WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature wear applications

  1. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950 0 C (1562 to 1742 0 F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required

  2. Low Friction and Wear Surface for Application over a Wide Range of Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Rabi

    1997-01-01

    ...) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), both before and after exposure to high temperatures (up to 700 deg C) in air. Friction measurements were performed at temperatures in the range of room temperature to 700 deg C in air...

  3. Tribological properties of anti-wear PVD coatings for elevated temperatures application deposited onto X37CrMoV5-1 type hot work steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Polok, M.; Adamiak, M.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents results of tribological and adhesion investigations of anti-wear PVD coatings TiN, TiN/(Ti,Al)N and CrN types deposited in ion plating PVD process onto X37CrMoV5-1 type hot work tool steel. It was found that damage mechanism during scratch test in all investigated coatings begins with multiple spallings located on the scratch edges followed by cracking and tool coatings delamination. Regarding to the coating types it can be seen different location of such damages and loads typical for them. According to this observations it can be stated that highest adhesion among investigated coating present, CrN monolayer coating and the lowest one multilayers Ti/(Ti,Al)N coating. The wear resistance was investigated by pin-on-disc method performed in room and elevated to 500 o C temperatures. It was found that the lowest wear in to fixed investigation conditions in both room and elevated temperatures shows TiN monolayer coating. Additionally one can see that TiN coatings application improve wear resistance some five times. (author)

  4. Wirelessly Interrogated Wear or Temperature Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2010-01-01

    Sensors for monitoring surface wear and/or temperature without need for wire connections have been developed. Excitation and interrogation of these sensors are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. In a sensor of the present type as in the previously reported ones, the capacitance and, thus, the resonance frequency, varies as a known function of the quantity of interest that one seeks to determine. Hence, the resonance frequency is measured and used to calculate the quantity of interest.

  5. Abrasive wear of ceramic wear protection at ambient and high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, M.; Adam, K.; Tumma, M.; Alessio, K. O.

    2017-05-01

    Ceramic wear protection is often applied in abrasive conditions due to their excellent wear resistance. This is especially necessary in heavy industries conveying large amounts of raw materials, e.g. in steel industry. Some plants also require material transport at high temperatures and velocities, making the need of temperature stable and abrasion resistant wear protection necessary. Various types and wear behaviour of ceramic protection are known. Hence, the goal of this study is to identify the best suitable ceramic materials for abrasive conditions in harsh environments at temperatures up to 950°C and severe thermal gradients. Chamottes, known for their excellent thermal shock resistance are compared to high abrasion resistant ceramic wear tiles and a cost efficient cement-bounded hard compound. Testing was done under high-stress three-body abrasion regime with a modified ASTM G65 apparatus enabling for investigations up to ~950°C. Thereto heated abrasive is introduced into the wear track and also preheated ceramic samples were used and compared to ambient temperature experiments. Results indicate a significant temperature influence on chamottes and the hard compound. While the chamottes benefit from temperature increase, the cement-bounded hard compound showed its limitation at abrasive temperatures of 950°C. The high abrasion resistant wear tiles represented the materials with the best wear resistance and less temperature influence in the investigated range.

  6. Wear resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to low temperature plasma carburizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Barcelos

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the AISI 304 stainless steel has high corrosion/oxidation resistance, its tribological properties are poor, being one of the barriers for use in severe wear applications. Thus, there is a wide field for studying technologies that aim to increase the surface hardness and wear resistance of this material. In this work, hardness and wear resistance for AISI 304 stainless steel submitted to the thermochemical treatment by low temperature plasma carburizing (LTPC in a fixed gas mixture composition of 93% H2 and 7% CH4 are presented. Through the evaluation of the carburizing layers, it was possible to observe a substantial improvement in tribological properties after all temperature and time of treatment. This improvement is directly related to the increase of the process variables; among them temperature has a stronger influence on the wear resistance obtained using LTPC process.

  7. Applicability of out-of-pile fretting wear tests to in-reactor fretting wear-induced failure time prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-02-01

    In order to investigate whether or not the grid-to-rod fretting wear-induced fuel failure will occur for newly developed spacer grid spring designs for the fuel lifetime, out-of-pile fretting wear tests with one or two fuel assemblies are to be performed. In this study, the out-of-pile fretting wear tests were performed in order to compare the potential for wear-induced fuel failure in two newly-developed, Korean PWR spacer grid designs. Lasting 20 days, the tests simulated maximum grid-to-rod gap conditions and the worst flow induced vibration effects that might take place over the fuel life time. The fuel rod perforation times calculated from the out-of-pile tests are greater than 1933 days for 2 μm oxidized fuel rods with a 100 μm grid-to-rod gap, whereas those estimated from in-reactor fretting wear failure database may be about in the range of between 60 and 100 days. This large discrepancy in fuel rod perforation may occur due to irradiation-induced cladding oxide microstructure changes on the one hand and a temperature gradient-induced hydrogen content profile across the cladding metal region on the other hand, which may accelerate brittleness in the grid-contacting cladding oxide and metal regions during the reactor operation. A three-phase grid-to-rod fretting wear model is proposed to simulate in-reactor fretting wear progress into the cladding, considering the microstructure changes of the cladding oxide and the hydrogen content profile across the cladding metal region combined with the temperature gradient. The out-of-pile tests cannot be directly applicable to the prediction of in-reactor fretting wear-induced cladding perforations but they can be used only for evaluating a relative wear resistance of one grid design against the other grid design.

  8. Sliding friction and wear behavior of high entropy alloys at room and elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhim, Dheyaa

    Structure-tribological property relations have been studied for five high entropy alloys (HEAs). Microhardness, room and elevated (100°C and 300°C) temperature sliding friction coefficients and wear rates were determined for five HEAs: Co0.5 Cr Cu0.5 Fe Ni1.5 Al Ti0.4; Co Cr Fe Ni Al0.25 Ti0.75; Ti V Nb Cr Al; Al0.3CoCrFeNi; and Al0.3CuCrFeNi2. Wear surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy to determine the wear mechanisms and tribochemical phases, respectively. It was determined that the two HEAs Co0.5 Cr Cu0.5 Fe Ni1.5 Al Ti0.4 and Ti V Nb Cr Al exhibit an excellent balance of high hardness, low friction coefficients and wear rates compared to 440C stainless steel, a currently used bearing steel. This was attributed to their more ductile body centered cubic (BCC) solid solution phase along with the formation of tribochemical Cr oxide and Nb oxide phases, respectively, in the wear surfaces. This study provides guidelines for fabricating novel, low-friction, and wear-resistant HEAs for potential use at room and elevated temperatures, which will help reduce energy and material losses in friction and wear applications.

  9. Elevated temperature erosive wear of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Manish

    2006-01-01

    Solid particle erosion of metals and alloys at elevated temperature is governed by the nature of the interaction between erosion and oxidation, which, in turn, is determined by the thickness, pliability, morphology, adhesion characteristics and toughness of the oxide scale. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present state of understanding of the elevated temperature erosion behaviour of metals and alloys. First of all, the erosion testing at elevated temperature is reviewed. This is followed by discussion of the essential features of elevated temperature erosion with special emphasis on microscopic observation, giving details of the erosion-oxidation (E-O) interaction mechanisms. The E-O interaction has been elaborated in the subsequent section. The E-O interaction includes E-O maps, analysis of transition criteria from one erosion mechanism to another mechanism and quantification of enhanced oxidation kinetics during erosion. Finally, the relevant areas for future studies are indicated. (topical review)

  10. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  11. Thermodynamical Description of Running Discontinuities: Application to Friction and Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Stolz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The friction and wear phenomena appear due to contact and relative motion between two solids. The evolution of contact conditions depends on loading conditions and mechanical behaviours. The wear phenomena are essentially characterized by a matter loss. Wear and friction are in interaction due to the fact that particles are detached from the solids. A complex medium appears as an interface having a strong effect on the friction condition. The purpose of this paper is to describe such phenomena taking account of different scales of modelization in order to derive some macroscopic laws. A thermodynamical approach is proposed and models of wear are analysed in this framework where the separation between the dissipation due to friction and that due to wear is made. Applications on different cases are presented.

  12. High Temperature Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Performance of Laser Cladding WC/Ni Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jiao-xi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different types of agglomerate and angular WC/Ni matrix composite coatings were deposited by laser cladding. The high temperature wear resistance of these composite coatings was tested with a ring-on-disc MMG-10 apparatus. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS for elemental composition. The results show that the high temperature wear resistance of the laser clad WC/Ni-based composite coatings is improved significantly with WC mass fraction increasing. The 60% agglomerate WC/Ni composite coating has optimal high temperature wear resistance. High temperature wear mechanism of 60% WC/Ni composite coating is from abrasive wear of low temperature into composite function of the oxidation wear and abrasive wear.

  13. Application of charged particle activation for testing machine part wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosimova, M.; Tendera, P.

    1985-01-01

    The results of application of the charge particle activation method to investigate machine part wear are presented. Study of radionuclide activity and yield has been carried out at the U-120M isochronous cyclotron by means of the method of iron foil piles from 20 to 100 μm in thick. Protons and deuterons have been used. Wear measurement is based on determination of wear particle activity in a butyric medium. An example of the results of a bench test of activated piston rings and cylinder liner of the engine for trucks is given. The method of surface activation is shown to be acceptable for studying machine part wear under the regular service conditions, especially on the stage of the primary investigations and development, when sampling structural materials and estimating different lubricating oil applicability

  14. Effect of low temperature annealing on the wear properties of NITINOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukunda, Sriram; Nath S, Narendra; Herbert, Mervin A.; Mukunda, P. G.

    2016-01-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy is a wonder material that is a solution looking for problems. The material finds wide biomedical applications like endodontic files for root canal treatment and cardiovascular stents. This material has rendered the surgical procedure simple compared to that with the existing Stainless Steel (SS) or titanium ones. NiTi as an endodontic file would cause less discomfort to the patients in comparison to that with far stiffer SS or titanium ones. Here nearly equi-atomic 50:50 commercial NiTi rods were subjected to low temperature aging at 300 to 450°C. The wear resistance of the as-received and the heat-treated samples was studied using adhesive wear tests on hardened steel counter face. Abrasive wear tests were run against Alumina disc to simulate the working of endodontic drills and files against dental hard and soft tissues. The abrasive wear resistance is expected to be proportional to the Vickers Hardness of the material and is high for the 450°C heat-treated sample. A correlation between the mechanical properties and microstructures of this material is attempted (paper)

  15. Elevated temperature wear of Al6061 and Al6061-20%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.; Alpas, A.T. [Univ. of Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    Both current and potential applications of particulate reinforced aluminum alloys involve components which are required to operate under sliding contact conditions at elevated temperatures. Examples include brake rotors, piston and cylinder liners in automotive engines where operating temperatures can reach 0.5--0.8 of the melting temperature of the matrix alloy. For this reason, study of the high temperature wear resistance of aluminum alloys reinforced by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SiC particles is important. These studies are also of interest for the problem of die wear during hot extrusion of aluminum matrix composites and to rationalize the process of frictional welding involved in joining of the composites. Although the room temperature tribological and mechanical behaviors of aluminum matrix composites have received considerable attention, their high temperature properties have only recently started being considered. It has been shown that Al-Si-Mg (A356) alloys with or without SiC particles show a transition from mild to severe wear when a critical temperature (at about 0.4 T{sub m}, where T{sub m} is the melting temperature of aluminum) is reached as a result of frictional heating under dry sliding conditions. In this work, high temperature wear of A16061 and A16061-20%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied at temperatures between 25--500 C. The microstructural changes that occurred during wear have been delineated in order to understand the wear mechanisms that operate at high temperatures.

  16. Effect of design factors on surface temperature and wear in disk brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, J. J.; Kennedy, F. E.; Ling, F. F.

    1976-01-01

    The temperatures, friction, wear and contact conditions that occur in high energy disk brakes are studied. Surface and near surface temperatures were monitored at various locations in a caliper disk brake during drag type testing, with friction coefficient and wear rates also being determined. The recorded transient temperature distributions in the friction pads and infrared photographs of the rotor disk surface both showed that contact at the friction surface was not uniform, with contact areas constantly shifting due to nonuniform thermal expansion and wear. The effect of external cooling and of design modifications on friction, wear and temperatures was also investigated. It was found that significant decreases in surface temperature and in wear rate can be achieved without a reduction in friction either by slotting the contacting face of the brake pad or by modifying the design of the pad support to improve pad compliance. Both design changes result in more uniform contact conditions on the friction surface.

  17. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin; Yan, X.G.; Li, D.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  18. Effect of temperature and pressure on wear properties of ion nitrided AISI 316 and 409 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Heck, Stenio Cristaldo; Pereira, Ricardo Gomes; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos; Nascente, Pedro Augusto de Paula

    2010-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in chemical and other industries due to their corrosion resistance property. However, because of their low hardness and wear properties, their applications are limited. Many attempts have been made to increase the surface hardness of these materials by using plasma techniques. Plasma nitriding is distinguished by its effectiveness, and for presenting a relatively low cost and being a clean process, producing hard surface layers on stainless steels. Aiming to verify the influence of the temperature and pressure on the modified resultant layers, samples of AISI 316 and 409 stainless steels were plasma nitrided in two different temperatures (450 and 500°C) and pressures of 400, 500, and 600Pa for 5h. After the nitriding treatment, the layers were analyzed by means of optical microscopy and wear tests. Wear tests were conducted in a fixed-ball micro-wear machine without lubrication. After the plasma nitriding treatment on AISI 316 and 409 samples, homogeneous and continuous layers were produced and their thicknesses increased as the temperature increased, and as the pressure decreased. The nitriding treatment on the AISI 316 steel sample resulted on the formation of expanded austenite layers at 450°C, and chromium nitrides (CrN and Cr_2N) phases at 500°C. The nitriding treatment on AISI 409 sample yielded the formation of similar layers for both treatment temperatures; these layers constituted mainly by chromium (Cr_2N) and iron (Fe_2N, Fe3_N, and Fe_4N) nitrides. After the nitriding treatment, the AISI 316 steel sample presented higher wear resistance for lower temperature and pressure values. The increase on layer fragility, for higher temperature and pressure values can be responsible for this inverse tendency. The wear resistance of the nitrided AISI 409 sample followed a logic tendency: the harder the layer the better the performance, i.e. the performance was improved with the increase in both the temperature and pressure

  19. Reciprocating sliding wear of Inconel 600 tubing in room temperature air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hun; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Jun Ki; Hong, Hyun Seon; Kim, Seon Jin

    2003-01-01

    The sliding wear behavior of the material of a steam generator in a nuclear power station (Inconel 600) was investigated at room temperature. Effects of the wear parameters such as material combination, sliding distance and contact stress were examined with various mating materials including 304 austenitic stainless steel, Inconel 600 and Al-Cu alloy 2011. In the prediction of the wear volume by Archard's wear equation, the standard error range was calculated to be ±4.04x10 -9 m 3 and the reliability to be 71.9% for the combination of Inconel 600 and 304 stainless steel. The error range was considered to be relatively broad because the wear coefficient in Archard's equation was assumed to be a constant, regardless of the changes in the mechanical properties during the wear. In the present study, the sliding wear behavior turned out to be influenced by the material combination; the wear volume of 304 stainless steel did not linearly increase with the sliding distance, while that of other material combinations exhibited linear increases. Based on the experimental results, the wear coefficient was modified as a function of the sliding distance. The calculation with the modified wear equation showed that the error range narrowed down to ±2.60x10 -9 m 3 and the reliability increased to 75.3%, compared to Archard's original equation

  20. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  1. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  2. Wear-resistant ball bearings for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boving, H.; Hintermann, H. E.; Hanni, W.; Bondivenne, E.; Boeto, M.; Conde, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ball bearings consisting of steel parts of which the rings are coated with hard, wear resistant, chemical vapor deposited TiC are described. Experiments conducted in ultrahigh vacuum, using cages of various materials with self-lubricating properties, show that such bearings are suitable for space applications. The results of laboratory tests on the ESA Meteosat Radiometer Focalizing mechanism, which contains six coated bearings, are summarized.

  3. Wear Behavior of Selected Nuclear Grade Graphites at Room Temperature in Ambient Air Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eung-Seon; Park, Kwang-Seok; Kim, Yong-Wan

    2008-01-01

    In a very high temperature reactor (VHTR), graphite will be used not only for as a moderator and reflector but also as a major structural component due to its excellent neutronic, thermal and mechanical properties. In the VHTR, wear of graphite components is inevitable due to a neutron irradiation-induced dimensional change, thermal gradient, relative motions of graphite components and a shock load such as an earthquake. Large wear particles accumulated at the bottom of a reactor can influence the cooling of the lower part and small wear particles accumulated on the primary circuit and heat exchanger tube can make it difficult to inspect the equipment, and also decrease the heat exchange rate. In the present work, preliminary wear tests were performed at room temperature in ambient air environment to understand the basic wear characteristics of selected nuclear grade graphites for the VHTR

  4. Insulated skin temperature as a measure of core body temperature for individuals wearing CBRN protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, V L; Wilkinson, D M; Blacker, S D; Horner, F E; Carter, J; Rayson, M P; Havenith, G

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the validity of insulated skin temperature (T is ) to predict rectal temperature (T re ) for use as a non-invasive measurement of thermal strain to reduce the risk of heat illness for emergency service personnel. Volunteers from the Police, Fire and Rescue, and Ambulance Services performed role-related tasks in hot (30 °C) and neutral (18 °C) conditions, wearing service specific personal protective equipment. Insulated skin temperature and micro climate temperature (T mc ) predicted T re with an adjusted r 2 = 0.87 and standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 0.19 °C. A bootstrap validation of the equation resulted in an adjusted r 2 = 0.85 and SEE = 0.20 °C. Taking into account the 0.20 °C error, the prediction of T re resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 91%, respectively. Insulated skin temperature and T mc can be used in a model to predict T re in emergency service personnel wearing CBRN protective clothing with an SEE of 0.2 °C. However, the model is only valid for T is over 36.5 °C, above which thermal stability is reached between the core and the skin. (paper)

  5. Solutionizing temperature and abrasive wear behaviour of cast Al-Si-Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Rajesh; Anesh; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, the influence of solutionizing temperature during artificial age hardening treatment (T 6 ) of cast Al-(8, 12, 16%)Si-0.3%Mg on abrasive wear behaviour has been reported. Alloys were prepared by controlled melting and casting. Cast alloys were given artificial age hardening treatment having a sequence of solutionizing, quenching and artificial aging. All the alloys were solutionized at 450 deg. C, 480 deg. C, 510 deg. C, and 550 deg. C for 8 h followed by water quenching (30 deg. C) and aging hardening at 170 deg. C for 12 h. Abrasive wear tests were conducted against 320 grade SiC polishing papers at 5 N and 10 N normal loads. It was observed that the silicon content and solution temperature affected the wear resistance significantly. Increase in solution temperature improved the wear resistance. Hypereutectic alloy showed better wear resistance than the eutectic and hypoeutectic alloys under identical conditions. Optical microstructure study of alloys revealed that the increase in solutionizing temperature improved distribution of silicon grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wear surface was carried out to analyze the wear mechanism

  6. Study on microstructure and high temperature wear resistance of laser cladded nuclear valve clack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunliang; Chen Zichen

    2002-01-01

    Laser cladding of Co-base alloy on the nuclear valve-sealing surface are performed with a 5 kW CO 2 transverse flowing laser. The microstructure and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating and the plasma cladded coating are studied. The results show that the microstructure, the dilution rate and the high temperature impact-slide wear resistance of the laser cladded coating have obvious advantages over the spurt cladding processing

  7. HIGH TEMPERATURE EROSION WEAR OF CERMET PARTICLES REINFORCED SELF-FLUXING ALLOY MATRIX HVOF SPRAYED COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Surzhenkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the resistance of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF sprayed TiC-NiMo and Cr3C2-Ni cermet particles reinforced NiCrSiB self-fluxing alloy matrix coatings to high temperature erosion wear is studied. Microstructure of the coatings was examined by SEM, phase composition was determined by XRD. A four-channel centrifugal particle accelerator was applied to study the high temperature erosion wear of the coatings. The impact angles were 30 and 90 degrees, initial particle velocity was 50 m/s, temperature of the test - 650 degrees. Volume wear of the coatings was calculated and compared to the respective values of the reference materials. Wear mechanisms were studied by SEM.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7617

  8. The Applicability of Taylor’s Model to the Drilling of CFRP Using Uncoated WC-Co Tools: The Influence of Cutting Speed on Tool Wear

    OpenAIRE

    Merino Perez, J.L.; Merson, E.; Ayvar-Soberanis, S.; Hodzic, A.

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates the applicability of Taylor’s model on the drilling of CFRP using uncoated WC-Co tools, by assessing the influence of cutting speed (Vc) on tool wear. Two different resins, possessing low and high glass transition temperatures (Tg), and two different reinforcements, high strength and high modulus woven fabrics, were combined into three different systems. Flank wear rate gradient exhibited to be more reinforcement dependent, while the actual flank wear rate showed to be ...

  9. Evaluating the Properties of High-Temperature and Low-Temperature Wear of TiN Coatings Deposited at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Khorrami Mokhori

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research titanium nitride (TiN films were prepared by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition using TiCl4, H2, N2 and Ar on the AISI H13 tool steel. Coatings were deposited during different substrate temperatures (460°C, 480 ° C  and 510 °C. Wear tests were performed in order to study the acting wear mechanisms in the high(400 °C and low (25 °C temperatures by ball on disc method. Coating structure and chemical composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, microhardness and X-ray diffraction. Wear test result was described in ambient temprature according to wear rate. It was evidenced that the TiN coating deposited at 460 °C has the least weight loss with the highest hardness value. The best wear resistance was related to the coating with the highest hardness (1800 Vickers. Wear mechanisms were observed to change by changing wear temperatures. The result of wear track indicated that low-temprature wear has surface fatigue but high-temperature wear showed adhesive mechanism.

  10. EFFECT OF THE TEMPERATURE ON THE FRICTION AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF BULK AMORPHOUS ALLOY

    OpenAIRE

    DAWIT ZENEBE SEGU; PYUNG HWANG; SEOCK-SAM KIM

    2014-01-01

    The present paper report the results of an experimental investigation of the temperature effect on the sliding friction and wear properties of the bulk metallic glass (BMG). To improve the friction and wear properties of the BMG, the disk specimens were developed in the alloy system of Fe67.6C7.1Si3.3B5.5P8.7Cr2.3Mo2.6Al2Co1.0 using hot metal and industrial ferro-alloys. The friction and wear test was performed using flat-on-flat contact configuration of unidirectional tribometer and Si3N4 ce...

  11. Wear Response of Aluminium 6061 Composite Reinforced with Red Mud at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dabral

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is focused on the investigations on dry sliding wear behaviour of aluminium metal matrix composite at room and elevated temperature. Aluminium metal matrix composites reinforced with red mud are prepared by stir casting method. The experiments are planned using Taguchi technique. An orthogonal array, analysis of variance and signal to noise ratio are used to check the influence of wear parameters like temperature, percentage of reinforcement, mesh size, load, sliding distance and sliding speed on dry sliding wear of composites. The optimal testing parameters are found and their values are calculated which are then compared with predicted values. A reasonable agreement is found between predicted and actual values. The model prepared in the present work can be effectively used to predict the specific wear rate of the composites.

  12. State of art report for high temperature wear test of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Hu; Lee, Jae Seon; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Ji Ho; Kim, Jong In

    2000-03-01

    Wear resistance properties of machine elements has been more critical in view of its significant effect on life extension, economics and material saving because it has been recognized that nearly 80 percent of damages of mechanical elements in the friction pairs are due to the material loss by wear. And wear properties have direct influence on the life of a machine in a great extend under extremely severe operating condition. Therefore highly improved wear properties of machine elements operating in such circumstances is heavily required. The purpose of this report is to survey current technology for high temperature wear test in order to establish the test plan for the life evaluation of SMART MCP and CEDM bearing materials. Friction and wear test will be done under high pressure (170 MPa) and high temperature (350 degree C) with water as lubricant to simulate the operating condition of the nuclear power reactor. Because pump type for MCP is selected as the caned motor pump which needs no mechanical sealing, the rotating shaft on which bearing is fully submerged by main coolant with high temperature. So MCP bearing operates without additional lubricant. CEDM is adopted as the ball-screw type with fine controllability. So the driving part is designed as the immersed-in type by main coolant. Therefore the anti-wear and reliability of driving parts are much consequent to guarantee the lifetime and the safety of the whole system. Tribometer adapted to high temperature and pressure circumstance is needed to execute bearing material testing. Test parameters are material, sliding speed, sliding distance and applied load. In order to identify the wear mechanism, optical microscope and surface roughness testers are required. The result of this report will provide an elementary data to develop bearing materials and to estimate bearing lifetime for the bearings of MCP and CEDM in SMART. (author)

  13. Variations in erosive wear of metallic materials with temperature via the electron work function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Yu, Bin [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); Yan, X.G. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Li, D.Y., E-mail: dongyang.li@ualberta.ca [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2V4 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Science and Technology, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China)

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical properties of metals are intrinsically determined by their electron behavior, which is largely reflected by the electron work function (EWF or φ). Since the work function varies with temperature, the dependence of material properties on temperature could be predicted via variations in work function with temperature. Combining a hardness – φ relationship and the dependence of work function on temperature, a temperature-dependent model for predicting solid-particle erosion is proposed. Erosive wear losses of copper, nickel, and carbon steel as sample materials were measured at different temperatures. Results of the tests are consistent with the theoretical prediction. This study demonstrates a promising parameter, electron work function, for looking into fundamental aspects of wear phenomena, which would also help develop alternative methodologies for material design. - Highlights: • Metallic materials' wear resistance is influenced by temperature. • Electron work function (EWF) intrinsically determines materials' wear resistance. • An EWF-based temperature-dependent solid-particle erosion model is proposed.

  14. Elaboration of high-temperature friction polymer material and study of its wear aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gventsadze, L.

    2009-01-01

    High-temperature friction composite material is elaborated and its physical, mechanical and tribologic features are studied. It is shown, that addition to the friction material composition of filling material having nanopores -diatomite-and its modification with polyethilensilan leads to friction materials friction coefficient stability and wear resistance increase at high temperatures (400-600 ℃). (author)

  15. Obtention, machining and wear of sintered alloys for automotive applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Filho, Edson Souza de

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of materials for automotive applications, in particular, valve seat inserts for gasoline combustion engines. The development involved the following activities: processing by powder metallurgy techniques, heat treatment, mechanical and microstructural characterization, machining and wear of materials. This work was undertaken aiming cost reduction of this component by the use of cheaper and less pollutant elements, eliminating the presence of Co and Pb due to their high cost and toxicological effects, respectively. The accomplishment of a thorough research into patents revealed that the materials studied here present particular compositions and were not yet produced. The results of hardness measurements and the transverse radial strength of the studied materials, after heat treatment, revealed superior properties than the commercial alloys applied at the moment. The machining tests of the material without heat treatment indicated a similar behaviour in comparison to the commercial alloy, suggesting that the new alloy chemistry composition was not deleterious in this sense. After heat treatment, the obtained alloys presented a cutting force increase in relation to the commercial alloy. Wear tests results of heat treated materials presented smaller friction coefficient and mass loss than the commercial alloy, in ali cases. This was especially achieved due to the advantages offered by heat treatment allied to the addition of NbC and Ti/W carbides. The materials obtained here showed to be potential candidates to substitute with advantages, valve seat inserts made of Fe-Co alloys for gasoline combustion engines. (author)

  16. The rectal temperature estimation method based on tympanic temperature for workers wearing protective clothing in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    At nuclear facilities, workers wear impermeable protective clothing to prevent radioactive contamination during inspection and maintenance activities. The heat stroke risk of the workers wearing protective clothing gradually increases, because of retaining heat and humidity inside of protective clothing. Normally, the rectal temperature is used to manage the heat stroke risk. But the rectal temperature measurement is very difficult at the working place. We have already reported that the measurement of infrared tympanic temperature is more realistic than that of rectal temperature to manage the heat stroke risk. But tympanic temperature indicates high temperature compared to rectal temperature. So, the use of the tympanic temperature overestimates core temperature and decreases the work efficiency. Therefore, we attempted to make formulas to predict rectal temperature from measured tympanic temperature, and to use calculated rectal temperature for safer and more efficient management. The rectal temperature predicted with the formulas agreed with the actual measurement within the range of measurement error (±0.1degC). Combination of tympanic temperature measurement and heat rate evaluation enabled the safer management of the heat stroke risk with wearing protective clothing. (author)

  17. Skin sites to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment during periodical changes in air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Siyeon; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate stable and valid measurement sites of skin temperatures as a non-invasive variable to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment (PPE) during air temperature changes. Eight male firefighters participated in an experiment which consisted of 60-min exercise and 10-min recovery while wearing PPE without self-contained breathing apparatus (7.75 kg in total PPE mass). Air temperature was periodically fluctuated from 29.5 to 35.5 °C with an amplitude of 6 °C. Rectal temperature was chosen as a deep-body temperature, and 12 skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that the forehead and chest were identified as the most valid sites to predict rectal temperature (R(2) = 0.826 and 0.824, respectively) in an environment with periodically fluctuated air temperatures. This study suggests that particular skin temperatures are valid as a non-invasive variable when predicting rectal temperature of an individual wearing PPE in changing ambient temperatures. Practitioner Summary: This study should offer assistance for developing a more reliable indirect indicating system of individual heat strain for firefighters in real time, which can be used practically as a precaution of firefighters' heat-related illness and utilised along with physiological monitoring.

  18. Fretting wear of Inconel 625 at high temperature and in high vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the fretting properties of Inconel 625 at high temperature and in high vacuum. Experiments were carried out under constant conditions with a normal load of 14 N and a peak-to-peak slip amplitude of 110 μm and through 6x10 4 cycles. Several environmental conditions were used. Pressure was varied between 10 -3 and 10 5 Pa at temperatures of 20 and 500 0 C. Temperatures up to 500 0 C were also used at pressures of 10 -3 and 10 5 Pa. At 10 -3 Pa and 500 0 C wear loss was negligible but wear scars showed severe damage consisting of deep cracks and accretion of transferred debris. The coefficient of friction then maintained a high value of 1.7 throughout the fretting test. The critical pressure below which oxidation rate becomes reduced is 10 Pa, a value independent of temperature. At pressures below this critical value the coefficient of friction increases steeply and the fretting mechanism changes from one of oxidative wear to one of adhesive wear. A compacted so-called 'glaze' oxide was formed at temperatures above 300 0 C in air (10 5 Pa) and at pressures above 10 3 Pa at 500 0 C. A comparison of results for Inconel 625 with those for S45C and SUS304 steels and Inconel 600 is given. (orig.)

  19. Ocular Surface Temperature During Scleral Lens Wearing in Patients With Keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Gonzalo; Wang, Zicheng; Serramito-Blanco, Maria; Martin-Gil, Alba; Carballo-Alvarez, Jesús; Pintor, Jesús

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the ocular surface temperature using an infrared thermography camera before and after wearing scleral lens in patients with keratoconus and correlate these results with the tear production and stability. A pilot, experimental, short-term study has been performed. Twenty-six patients with keratoconus (36.95±8.95 years) participated voluntarily in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: patients with intrastromal corneal ring (KC-ICRS group) and patients without ICRS (KC group). Schirmer test, tear breakup time (TBUT), and ocular surface temperature in the conjunctiva, limbus, and cornea were evaluated before and after wearing a scleral lens. The patients wore the scleral lenses from 6 to 9 hours with average of 7.59±0.73 hours. No significant changes in Schirmer test and TBUT were found for both groups. No temperature differences were found between the KC-ICRS and the KC groups for all zones evaluated. There was a slight, but statistically significant, increase in the inferior cornea, temporal limbus, and nasal conjunctival temperature for KC-ICRS group and temporal limbus temperature decreasing for the KC group after wearing scleral lens (Ptemperature was statistically higher than the central cornea for both groups before and after scleral lenses wearing (Pperipheral cornea was found. No statistically significant differences in the central corneal temperature were found between the groups after scleral lens wearing (P>0.05). Scleral contact lens seems not to modify the ocular surface temperature despite the presence of the tear film stagnation under the lens.

  20. Microstructure and wear behaviors of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-WS2 high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mao-Sheng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Fan, Ji-Wei; He, Xiang-Ming; Shi, Shi-Hong; Fu, Ge-Yan; Wang, Ming-Di; Chen, Shu-Fa

    2012-02-01

    The high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 coating and wear-resistant NiCr/Cr3C2 coating were fabricated on 0Cr18Ni9 austenitic stainless steel by laser cladding. Phase constitutions and microstructures were investigated, and the tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc wear tester under dry sliding condition at room-temperature (17 °C), 300 °C and 600 °C, respectively. Results indicated that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2 coating consisted of Cr7C3 primary phase and γ-(Fe,Ni)/Cr7C3 eutectic colony, while the coating added with WS2 was mainly composed of Cr7C3 and (Cr,W)C carbides, with the lubricating WS2 and CrS sulfides as the minor phases. The wear tests showed that the friction coefficients of two coatings both decrease with the increasing temperature, while the both wear rates increase. The friction coefficient of laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 is lower than the coating without WS2 whatever at room-temperature, 300 °C, 600 °C, but its wear rate is only lower at 300 °C. It is considered that the laser clad NiCr/Cr3C2-30%WS2 composite coating has good combination of anti-wear and friction-reducing capabilities at room-temperature up to 300 °C.

  1. Internal Diameter HVAF Spraying for Wear and Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyphout, C.; Björklund, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) methods are still widely utilized in the printing, automotive and off-shore industries. Alternative methods to EHC have been widely developed in the past decade by conventional HVOF processes and more recently HVAF systems, which are processing at higher kinetic energy and more particularly at lower temperature, significantly increasing wear and corrosion resistance properties. A dedicated internal diameter HVAF system is here presented, and coatings characteristics are compared to the one obtained by standard HVAF coatings. Specially R&D designed fixtures with inside bore of 200 mm have been manufactured for this purpose, with a possibility to spray samples at increasing depth up to 400 mm while simulating closed bottom bore spraying. WC-based and Cr3C2-based powder feedstock materials have been deposited onto high-strength steel substrates. Respective coating microstructures, thermally induced stresses and corrosion resistance are discussed for further optimization of coating performances. The fact that the ID-HVAF system is utilized both for spraying and gritblasting procedures is also given a particular interest.

  2. Influence of the ion nitriding temperature in the wear resistance of AISI H13 tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, Stenio Cristaldo; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Pereira, Ricardo Gomes; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos; Totten, George Edward

    2010-01-01

    The AISI H13 tool steel for hot work is the most used in its category. This steel was developed for injection molds and extrusion of hot metals as well as for conformation in hot presses and hammers. Plasma nitriding can improve significantly the surface properties of these steels, but the treatments conditions, such as temperature, must be optimized. In this work the influence of nitriding treatment temperature on the wear behavior of this steel is investigated. Samples of AISI H13 steel were quenched and tempered and then ion nitrided in the temperatures of 450, 550 and 650 deg C, at 4mbar pressure, during 5 hours. Samples of the treated material were characterized by optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness, x-ray analysis and wear tests. Plasma nitriding formed hard diffusion zones in all the treated samples. White layers were formed in samples treated at 550 deg C and 650 deg C. The treatment temperature of 450 deg C produced the highest hardness. Treatment temperature showed great influence in the diffusion layer thickness. X-ray analysis indicated the formation of the Fe_3N, Fe_4N and CrN phases for all temperatures, but with different concentrations. Nitriding increased significantly the AISI H13 wear resistance. (author)

  3. Application of Influence Function Method to the Fretting Wear Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Yeol; Tian, Li Si; Bae, Joon Woo; Chai, Young Suck [Yeungnam University, Gyongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Numerical analysis by influence function method (IFM) is demonstrated in this study in order to investigate the fretting wear problems on the secondary side of the steam generator, caused by flow induced vibration. Two-dimensional numerical contact model in terms of Cauchy integral equation is developed. The distributions of normal pressures, shear stresses and displacement fields are derived between two contact bodies which have similar elastic properties. The work rate model is adopted to find the wear amounts between two materials. The results are compared with the solutions by finite element analyses, which show the utilization of the present method to the fretting wear problems.

  4. Application of Influence Function Method to the Fretting Wear Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Yeol; Tian, Li Si; Bae, Joon Woo; Chai, Young Suck

    2006-01-01

    Numerical analysis by influence function method (IFM) is demonstrated in this study in order to investigate the fretting wear problems on the secondary side of the steam generator, caused by flow induced vibration. Two-dimensional numerical contact model in terms of Cauchy integral equation is developed. The distributions of normal pressures, shear stresses and displacement fields are derived between two contact bodies which have similar elastic properties. The work rate model is adopted to find the wear amounts between two materials. The results are compared with the solutions by finite element analyses, which show the utilization of the present method to the fretting wear problems

  5. The unlubricated reciprocating sliding wear of 316 stainless steel in C02 in the temperature range 20 to 6000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1985-11-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of 316 stainless steel in C0 2 has been investigated in the load range 8 - 5ON from 20 to 600 0 C. Wear transitions occurred at all temperatures but were load dependent. At and below 300 0 C wear transitions only took place at low leads whereas above 300 0 C transitions were seen al all loads. The low temperature wear transition, giving an order of magnitude decrease in wear rate was associated with a change in friction behaviour. The friction force across the specimen was initially widely fluctuating and varied from cycle to cycle. After a time, which did not necessarily coincide with the wear transition the cyclic variation in the friction force become much less. This smoother sliding is thought to indicate a trend to oxide -oxide contacts. At higher temperatures wear transitions result in a two orders of magnitude reduction in wear. The corresponding friction transition was similar to the low temperature friction change but also included a marked temporary drop in the coefficient of friction. (author)

  6. Microstructure and High-temperature Wear Behavior of Hot-dipped Aluminized Coating on Different Substrate Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU De-qin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aluminized 45 and H13 steel were prepared via hot-dipped aluminizing and subsequently high-temperature diffusion treatment. The phase, morphology and composition of aluminized coating were characterized by XRD,SEM and EDS methods. Comparative study was performed on unlubricated sliding wear behavior of plating under different substrates on a pin-on-disc wear tester, and the wear mechanism was explored. The results show that the coating is composed of ductile phases FeAl and Fe3Al. Kikendall porosity parallel to the surface exists around the interface of the two phases; because of the carbide particles agglomeration, the bond between the coating and H13 steel is apparently inferior to that in the case of 45 steel; the aluminized 45 steel possesses an excellent wear resistance under 50-200N at 400℃, whereas mild-to-severe wear transition occurs when the temperature increases to 600℃. The wear rate of the aluminized H13 steel reaches the lowest at 400℃, then slightly increases at 600℃. The wear mechanisms of Fe-Al coating are mainly predominated by oxidative mild wear, whereas the extrusion wear prevails in the process for aluminized 45 steel at 600℃.

  7. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  8. A wear-resistant zirconia ceramic for low friction application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnubst, A.J.A.; Ran, S.; Wiratha, K.W.; Blank, D.H.A.; Pasaribu, H.R.; Sloetjes, J.W.; Schipper, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    A high wear-resistant ceramic/ceramic couple is described associated with low friction. By adding a small amount CuO to yttria-doped tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) the (dry) coefficient of friction against alumina is only 0.2 during a sliding distance of 3-5 km after which the coefficient drastically increases and a transition from mild to sever wear occurs. Pure Y-TZP exhibits a coefficient of friction of 0.7 under the same experimental conditions but wear remains mild during the test (upto 10 km of sliding distance). These small amounts of CuO also strongly influence the densification behaviour. Sintering of this system occurs in several steps where among other things dissolution of CuO in the Y-TZP matrix as well as liquid phase sintering takes place. Non-uniform shrinkage of the CuO-doped system resulting in relative large microcracks in the ceramic can explain its sudden drastic increase in coefficient of friction and wear rate after 3-5 km of operation. (orig.)

  9. Application of radioactive isotopes in the field of investigations of the means of transportation wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromann, Kh-D.

    1979-01-01

    The Station for governing of isotope technique ensures application of radioactive isotopes in the transport of the GDR. The main directions of the isotope application are investigations of wear and leaks. It is reported about the wear investigations performed on models and real structural elements at laboratory testing stands as well as on the real structural elements in the exploitation conditions. Special attention should be paid to the numerous measurements of wear of engines, rails and so on. Data and valuable results have been obtained about the problem of the short-term wear measurement. Measurements of leaks by means of radioactive isotopes application is used for investigations of the hermeticy of the refrigerator tronsport means, heating systems and clymatizing installations of the carriges as well as stationary installations. Then, measurements have been done of leaks in pipelines as well as determinations of their lacalization and intensity. General and specific advantages of separate methods are discussed [ru

  10. Hardness and wear analysis of Cu/Al2O3 composite for application in EDM electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, U.; Jangid, R.; Khan, S.

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic materials, like Aluminium Oxide (Al2O3), have high mechanical strength, high wear resistance, high temperature resistance and good chemical durability. Powder metallurgy processing is an adaptable method commonly used to fabricate composites because it is a simple method of composite preparation and has high efficiency in dispersing fine ceramic particles. In this research copper and novel material aluminium oxide/copper (Al2O3/Cu) composite has been fabricated for the application of electrode in Electro-Discharge Machine (EDM) using powder metallurgy technique. Al2O3 particles with different weight percentages (0, 1%, 3% and 5%) were reinforced into copper matrix using powder metallurgy technique. The powders were blended and compacted at a load of 100MPa to produce green compacts and sintered at a temperature of 574 °C. The effect of aluminium oxide content on mass density, Rockwell hardness and wear behaviour were investigated. Wear behaviour of the composites was investigated on Die-Sink EDM (Electro-Discharge Machine). It was found that wear rate is highly depending on hardness, mass density and green protective carbonate layer formation at the surface of the composite.

  11. Aging temperature and abrasive wear behaviour of cast Al-(4%, 12%, 20%)Si-0.3% Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, K.B.; Kumar, Sandeep; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, influence of aging temperature during artificial age hardening treatment (T 6 ) of cast Al-(4, 12, 20%)Si-0.3% Mg on abrasive wear behaviour has been reported. Alloys were prepared by controlled melting and casting. Cast alloys were given age hardening treatment having sequence of solutionizing, quenching and artificial aging. All the alloys were solutionized at 510 deg. C for 8 h followed by water quenching (30 deg. C) and aging hardening at 150, 170, 190, 210 and 230 deg. C for 12 h. Abrasive wear tests were conducted against of 320 grade SiC abrasive medium at 5 and 10 N normal loads. It was observed that the silicon content and aging temperature significantly affect the wear resistance. Increase in aging temperature improves the wear resistance. Hypereutectic alloy showed better wear resistance than the eutectic alloy under identical conditions. Optical microstructure study of alloys under investigation has shown that cast dendritic structure is destroyed besides the spheroidization of eutectic silicon crystals after the heat treatment. The extent of change in structure depends on aging temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of wear surface was carried to analyze the wear mechanism

  12. High Temperature Sliding Wear of NiAl-based Coatings Reinforced by Borides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr UMANSKYI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of composite materials (CM in the systems “metal-refractory compound” is one of the up-to-date trends in design of novel materials aimed at operating under the conditions of significant loads at high temperature. To design such material, NiAl, which is widely used for deposition of protective coatings on parts of gas-turbine engines, was selected for a matrix. To strengthen a NiAl under the conditions of intense wear and a broad temperature range (up to 1000 °C, it is reasonable to add refractory inclusions. Introduction of refractory borides into matrix leads to a marked increase in metal wear resistance. In order to research the behavior of the designed composites at high temperatures and to study the influence of oxides on the friction processes, the authors carried out high temperature oxidation of CM of the above systems at 1000 °С for 90 min. It was determined that all of the composites were oxidized selectively and that the thickness of oxide layers formed on the boride inclusions is 3 – 7 times that on the oxides formed on the NiAl matrix. The mechanism of wear of gas-thermal coatings of the NiAl – МеB2 systems was studied for conditions of high temperature tribotests using the «pin-on-disc» technique. The obtained results indicate that introduction of TiB2, CrB2 and ZrB2 leads to their more intense oxidation during high temperature tribotests as compared to the matrix. The oxides formed on refractory borides act as solid lubricants, which promote a decrease in wear of the contact friction pairs. For more detailed investigation of the effect of tribo-oxidation products on the friction processes, tribotests were conducted for prior oxidized (at 900 °С coatings NiAl – 15 wt.% CrB2 (TiB2, ZrB2.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.8093

  13. Effect of Volume Fraction of Particle on Wear Resistance of Al2O3/Steel Composites at Elevated Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Chong-gao; WANG En-ze; GAO Yi-min; XING Jian-dong

    2005-01-01

    Based on previous work,abrasive wear resistance of Al2 O3/steel composites with different Al2 O3 parti cle volume fraction (VOF) at 900 C was investigated.The experimental results showed that a suitable particle VOF is important to protect the metal matrix from wear at elevated temperature.Both too high and too low particle VOF lead to a poor abrasive wear because a bulk matrix is easily worn off by grits when it exceeds the suitable VOF and also because when VOF is low,the Al2O3 particles are easily dug out by grits during wearing as well.When the particle VOF is 39%,the wear resistance of tested composites is excellent.

  14. Effects of sintering temperature on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of WCp reinforced Ni-based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-hui; Bai, Yang; Ye, Xu-chu

    2014-12-01

    This article focuses on the microstructural evolution and wear behavior of 50wt%WC reinforced Ni-based composites prepared onto 304 stainless steel substrates by vacuum sintering at different sintering temperatures. The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The wear resistance of the coatings was tested by thrust washer testing. The mechanisms of the decomposition, dissolution, and precipitation of primary carbides, and their influences on the wear resistance have been discussed. The results indicate that the coating sintered at 1175°C is composed of fine WC particles, coarse M6C (M=Ni, Fe, Co, etc.) carbides, and discrete borides dispersed in solid solution. Upon increasing the sintering temperature to 1225°C, the microstructure reveals few incompletely dissolved WC particles trapped in larger M6C, Cr-rich lamellar M23C6, and M3C2 in the austenite matrix. M23C6 and M3C2 precipitates are formed in both the γ/M6C grain boundary and the matrix. These large-sized and lamellar brittle phases tend to weaken the wear resistance of the composite coatings. The wear behavior is controlled simultaneously by both abrasive wear and adhesive wear. Among them, abrasive wear plays a major role in the wear process of the coating sintered at 1175°C, while the effect of adhesive wear is predominant in the coating sintered at 1225°C.

  15. Bio-inspired polymeric patterns with enhanced wear durability for microsystem applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Siyuan, L.; Satyanarayana, N.; Kustandi, T.S.; Sinha, Sujeet K.

    2011-01-01

    At micro/nano-scale, friction force dominates at the interface between bodies moving in relative motion and severely affects their smooth operation. This effect limits the performance of microsystem devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). In addition, friction force also leads to material removal or wear and thereby reduces the durability i.e. the useful operating life of the devices. In this work, we fabricated bio-inspired polymeric patterns for tribological applications. Inspired by the surface features on lotus leaves namely, the protuberances and wax, SU-8 polymeric films spin-coated on silicon wafers were topographically and chemically modified. For topographical modification, micro-scale patterns were fabricated using nanoimprint lithography and for chemical modification, the micro-patterns were coated with perfluoropolyether nanolubricant. Tribological investigation of the bio-inspired patterns revealed that the friction coefficients reduced significantly and the wear durability increased by several orders. In order to enhance the wear durability much further, the micro-patterns were exposed to argon/oxygen plasma and were subsequently coated with the perfluoropolyether nanolubricant. Bio-inspired patterns with enhanced wear durability, such as the ones investigated in the current work, have potential tribological applications in MEMS/Bio-MEMS actuator-based devices. Highlights: →Bio-inspired polymeric patterns for tribological applications in microsystems. →Novel surface modification for the patterns to enhance tribological properties. →Patterns show low friction properties and extremely high wear durability.

  16. Application of RNB for high sensitive wear diagnostics in medicine technique and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehsenfeld, P.; Eifrig, C.; Kubat, R.

    2002-01-01

    The RTM--Radionuclide Technique in Mechanical engineering--is now extended to the solution of world wide problems in medicine technique (prosthetics), and in development of modern materials (synthetic materials, ceramics, hard coatings, etc.) and their industrial application. RNB--Radioactive Nuclear Beams of 7 Be or 22 Na--may enable the required extreme thin radioactive surface labeling (several micrometers) of synthetic materials for wear measurements without producing radiation damages of influence to the wear properties of the material. The function principle and special properties of the RTM on-line wear diagnostics and its components, the measurement methods, the radioactive surface labeling, and the measurement instruments are explained. The quality features of a 7 Be and 22 Na-beam for RTM application are specified

  17. The role of hardness and microstructure in high temperature pitting in the impact wear of 9Cr boiler material. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morri, J.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes impact wear experiments on 9Cr1Mo finned boiler tube specimens in 3 different heat treated forms. The objective of the tests was to establish whether a high temperature, high wear rate, pitting form of wear was dependent upon the residual microstructure and hardness. Although a x2 reduction in specific wear rate was achieved for the martensitic structure, the pitting characteristic remained. It is concluded that modifying the as-received 9Cr microstructure has not suppressed the high temperature severe form of wear. (author)

  18. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to examine the wear behavior of segments with boron carbide. Microstructure, surfaces of wear and fracture of segments were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. As a result, the wear rate decreased significantly in the 0-5 wt.% B4C contents, while it increased in the 5-10 wt.% B4C contents. With increase in sintering temperature, the wear rate decreased due to the hard matrix.

  19. The influence of elevated temperature transformation and mechanical properties of a precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel on its wear behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1989-11-01

    Self wear tests of a martensitic stainless steel in CO 2 in the temperature range 20-300degC showed transitional behaviour at 20 and 300degC. In the mid temperature range a severe wear rate of ∼ 2 x 10 -13 m 3 /Nm persisted for sliding distances up to 2000 m. A possible explanation was that while strain induced transformation of retained austenite at low temperatures provided a sufficiently hardened substrate that allowed inelastic rather than plastic interactions this did not occur at 200degC. Tests were carried out to determine the temperature above which strain no longer transformed austenite into martensite. Although a martensite start temperature of ∼ 150degC was found for the present steel the presence of only ∼ 10% retained austenite in the ''as heat treated'' material suggests that its transformation to martensite at 200degC would not materially affect the extent of subsurface hardening. It is proposed that a surface reaction plays a role in transition behaviour. At 300degC the reaction product is an oxide but at room temperature it is possibly a carbonate. The stability of the carbonate decreases with temperature thus giving an intermediate temperature range where metal/metal contacts prevail leading to the persistent high wear behaviour. (author)

  20. Micro-Structures and High-Temperature Friction-Wear Performances of Laser Cladded Cr–Ni Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiahong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cr–Ni coatings with the mass ratios of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni were fabricated on H13 hot work mould steel using a laser cladding (LC. The surface–interface morphologies, chemical elements, surface roughness and phase composition of the obtained Cr–Ni coatings were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS, atomic force microscope (AFM and X–ray diffractometer (XRD, respectively. The friction–wear properties and wear rates of Cr–Ni coatings with the different mass ratios of Cr and Ni at 600 °C were investigated, and the worn morphologies and wear mechanism of Cr–Ni coatings were analysed. The results show that the phases of Cr–Ni coatings with mass ratios of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni are composed of Cr + Ni single-phases and their compounds at the different stoichiometry, the porosities on the Cr–Ni coatings increase with the Cr content increasing. The average coefficient of friction (COF of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% coatings are 1.10, 0.33 and 0.87, respectively, in which the average COF of 20% Cr–80% Ni coating is the lowest, exhibiting the better anti-friction performance. The wear rate of 17% Cr–83% Ni, 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% Ni coatings is 4.533 × 10−6, 5.433 × 10−6, and 1.761 × 10−6 N−1·s−1, respectively, showing the wear resistance of Cr–Ni coatings at a high temperature increases with the Cr content, in which the wear rate is 24% Cr–76% Ni coating with the better reducing wear. The wear mechanism of 17% Cr–83% Ni and 20% Cr–80% Ni and 24% Cr–76% coatings at 600 °C is primarily adhesive wear, and that of 24% Cr–76% coating is also accompanied by oxidative wear.

  1. Influence of Sintering Temperature on Hardness and Wear Properties of TiN Nano Reinforced SAF 2205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, S. R.; Ige, O. O.; E Falodun, O.; Obadele, B. A.; Mphalele, M. R.; Olubambi, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Conventional duplex stainless steel degrade in wear and mechanical properties at high temperature. Attempts have been made by researchers to solve this problems leading to the dispersion of second phase particles into duplex matrix. Powder metallurgy methods have been used to fabricate dispersion strengthened steels with a challenge of obtaining fully dense composite and grain growth. This could be resolved by appropriate selection of sintering parameters especially temperature. In this research, spark plasma sintering was utilized to fabricate nanostructured duplex stainless steel grade SAF 2205 with 5 wt.% nano TiN addition at different temperatures ranging from 1000 °C to 1200 °C. The effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure, density, hardness and wear of the samples was investigated. The results showed that the densities and grain sizes of the sintered nanocomposites increased with increasing the sintering temperature. The microstructures reveal ferrite and austenite grains with fine precipitates within the ferrite grains. The study of the hardness and wear behaviors, of the samples indicated that the optimum properties were obtained for the sintering temperature of 1150 °C.

  2. A Low-wear Planar-contact Silicon Raceway for Microball Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    of friction between stainless steel microballs and silicon grooves (18–20). Both linear and rotary micromotors for sensor platforms were developed...mechanism, like a micromotor , will enable devices to reach higher speeds. Previously, the radial surface wear track depth was >15 m for a device...can lead to significant whirl and axial misalignment, which is critical for micromotor and micropump applications. Small changes in the alignment

  3. Development of in-situ ZrC reinforced iron based composites for wear resistance applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, T.K.; Das, K.

    2002-01-01

    A common objective behind the processing of iron-based composites is to improve the wear resistance of steels by incorporating some reinforcing phases, e.g., carbides and oxides. In the present investigation, iron-based zirconium carbide reinforced composite is produced by the aluminothermic reduction of zircon sand (ZrSiO 4 ) and blue dust (Fe 2 O 3 ) in the presence of carbon. Aluminothermic reduction of blue dust and zircon sand, being highly exothermic in nature, essentially leads to a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of the Fe-ZrC composite. The as-cast composite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties of the composite and the effect of heat treatment on the microstructure are evaluated. The composite possess sufficient hardness and promising abrasive wear resistance property. The abrasive wear resistance property of the Fe-ZrC composite is compared with that of a M2 grade tool material and it is found to be better than the tool material. The composite also possess good high temperature stability. (author)

  4. A Possible Link Between Macroscopic Wear and Temperature Dependent Friction Behaviors of MoS2 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    measured during operation without breaking the gas environment. For this study, coatings were deposited on 304 stainless steel spheres and rectangular...activated behavior in macroscopic tribology is reserved for systems with stable interfaces and ultra-low wear, and athermal behavior is characteristic to...efforts to measure and under- stand tribological behavior at cryogenic temperatures; to date, results of these efforts show either no trend or con- flicting

  5. Assessment of thermal spray coatings for wear and abrasion resistance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karode, Ishaan Nitin

    Thermal spray cermet and metallic coatings are extensively used for wear, abrasion and corrosion control in a variety of industries. The first part of the thesis focuses mainly on testing of sand erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings on carbon composites used in the manufacture of helicopter rotor blades. The test set-up employed is a sand blasting machine and is an effort to duplicate the in-flight conditions especially those encountered in hot arid conditions. The technique adopted follows the Department of Defence test method standard. Carbon Composites have excellent stiffness, strength and low weight/density. The strength to weight ratio is high. Hence, these are used in aerospace applications to a large extent. However, the biggest problem encountered with carbon composites is its low abrasion resistance as its surface is very weak. Hence, thermal spray coatings are used to improve the surface properties of CFRP. Zinc bond coats and WC-Co coatings were tested. However, high amount of thermal stresses were developed between the substrate and the coating due to large differences in the CTE's of the both, leading to high mass losses within two minutes and just 130 grams of sand sprayed on to the coatings with the sand blasting machine built; and hence the coatings with CC as a substrate could not qualify for the application. The second part of the thesis focuses on the assessment of different thermal spray coatings used for manufacture of mechanical seals in pumps and analyze the best coating material for the wear resistance application through detail quantification of material loss by block-on-ring test set-up. A machine based on Block-on-ring test set-up following ASTM G77 (Measurement of Adhesive wear resistance of thermal spray coatings) standards was built to duplicate the pump conditions. Thermally sprayed coated materials were tested in different conditions (Load, time, abrasive). WC-Co had the highest wear resistance (lower volume losses) and

  6. Patients presenting with miliaria while wearing flame resistant clothing in high ambient temperatures: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Anisa M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clothing can be a cause of occupational dermatitis. Frequent causes of clothing-related dermatological problems can be the fabric itself and/or chemical additives used in the laundering process, friction from certain fabrics excessively rubbing the skin, or heat retention from perspiration-soaked clothing in hot working environments. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of miliaria rubra associated with prolonged use of flame resistant clothing in the medical literature. Case presentation We report 18 cases (14 men and 4 women, with an age range of 19 to 37 years of moderate to severe skin irritation associated with wearing flame resistant clothing in hot arid environments (temperature range: 39 to 50°C, 5% to 25% relative humidity. We describe the medical history in detail of a 23-year-old Caucasian woman and a 31-year-old African-American man. A summary of the other 16 patients is also provided. Conclusions These cases illustrate the potential serious nature of miliaria with superimposed Staphylococcus infections. All 18 patients fully recovered with topical skin treatment and modifications to their dress ensemble. Clothing, in particular blend fabrics, must be thoroughly laundered to adequately remove detergent residue. While in hot environments, individuals with sensitive skin should take the necessary precautions such as regular changing of clothing and good personal hygiene to ensure that their skin remains as dry and clean as possible. It is also important that they report to their health care provider as soon as skin irritation or rash appears to initiate any necessary medical procedures. Miliaria rubra can take a week or longer to clear, so removal of exposure to certain fabric types may be necessary.

  7. Wear Resistance and Mechanical Behaviour of Epoxy/Mollusk Shell Biocomposites developed for Structural Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Oladele

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy resin is one of the strongest commercially exploitable thermosetting polymers in the polymer family; however its expensive nature in comparison with other thermosetting polymers such as vinylester and polyester limits its applications as a structural material. Inexpensive fillers on the other hand, especially those derived from agro-industrial wastes are very important in reducing the overall cost of polymer composites and furthermore influential in enhancing some of their engineering properties. In the present study, the wear resistance and mechanical behaviour of epoxy polymer matrix filled with <75 and 75 μm calcined particles of African land snail shells have been comparatively investigated. The wear resistance and the mechanical behaviour of the composites were studied via Taber Abraser and INSTRON universal testing machine. Also, the elemental constituents of the calcined snail shell and the epoxy biocomposites were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy. From the experimental results, it was observed that, at the highest filler loading, smaller particle size presented a biocomposite with significant enhancement in wear and mechanical properties. However, it was also observed that increase in particle size showed no significant enhancement in the mechanical properties of the biocomposites.

  8. Demonstration for the Applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG Tube Wear Defects Formed at the Tube Support Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo; Min, Kyong Mahn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 applied to the detection of tapered wear volumetric indications and depth sizing within the free span area, loose part not present was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation. The experiment to demonstrate the applicability of EPRI ETSS was performed by the employment of the newly prepared STD tube and resulted in ensuring the effectiveness and equivalency of the EPRI ETSS as well. The authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes. The testing results were reviewed with the influences of SG tube material and the support structure. The impact of the tube materials was insignificant and that of the tube support structure showed somewhat conservative results. The testing resulted in successful demonstration of applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG tube wear defects at the tube support. One of the major flaw mechanisms detected in the currently operating domestic OPR-1000 pressurized water reactors(PWR's) steam generator(SG) tubes is wear defect. In general, wear defect has been constantly detected in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration interaction between tube and its support structure, and the quantity of the affected tubes has also shown the tendency to increase as plant operation life is added. In order to take appropriate measures and maintain the structural integrity for the SG tubes, wear defect is currently categorized as active damage mechanism and the tubes containing 40% or greater wear depth of the nominal tube wall thickness shall be plugged per SGMP(SG Management Program) Recently, a fairly large amplitude of wear defects on the Batwing(BW), one of the upper tube support structures in the SG tubes

  9. Demonstration for the Applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG Tube Wear Defects Formed at the Tube Support Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ki Seok; Cheon, Keun Young; Nam, Min Woo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Kyong Mahn [Universal Monitoring and Inspection Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 applied to the detection of tapered wear volumetric indications and depth sizing within the free span area, loose part not present was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation. The experiment to demonstrate the applicability of EPRI ETSS was performed by the employment of the newly prepared STD tube and resulted in ensuring the effectiveness and equivalency of the EPRI ETSS as well. The authorized EPRI ETSS 27906.2 for getting the actual value of the wear depth and providing structural integrity interpretation based on engineering evaluation was reviewed and applied to the site SG tubes. The testing results were reviewed with the influences of SG tube material and the support structure. The impact of the tube materials was insignificant and that of the tube support structure showed somewhat conservative results. The testing resulted in successful demonstration of applicability of the EPRI ETSS on the SG tube wear defects at the tube support. One of the major flaw mechanisms detected in the currently operating domestic OPR-1000 pressurized water reactors(PWR's) steam generator(SG) tubes is wear defect. In general, wear defect has been constantly detected in the upper tube bundle imposed to the flow induced vibration interaction between tube and its support structure, and the quantity of the affected tubes has also shown the tendency to increase as plant operation life is added. In order to take appropriate measures and maintain the structural integrity for the SG tubes, wear defect is currently categorized as active damage mechanism and the tubes containing 40% or greater wear depth of the nominal tube wall thickness shall be plugged per SGMP(SG Management Program) Recently, a fairly large amplitude of wear defects on the Batwing(BW), one of the upper tube support structures in the SG

  10. A hybrid floating brush seal (HFBS) for improved sealing and wear performance in turbomachinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott Byran

    A conceptually new type of seal has been developed for gas turbine applications which dramatically reduces wear and leakage associated with current labyrinth and brush seal technologies. The Hybrid Floating Brush Seal (HFBS) combines brush seal and film riding face seal technologies to create a hybrid seal that allows both axial and radial excursions of the sealed shaft, while simultaneously eliminating interface surface speeds (friction and heat) between the rotor and the brush material that characterize standard brush seal technology. A simple test rig was designed to evaluate feasibility of the HFBS under relatively low pressures and rotational speeds (50psig, 5krpm). A second test stand was created to study the effects of centrifugal force on bristle deflection. A third test facility was constructed for prototype development and extensive room temperature testing at moderate pressures and fairly high rotational speeds (100psig, 40krpm). This test rig also allowed the evaluation of the HFBS during axial movement of a rotating shaft. An analytical model to predict the effects of centrifugal force on the bristles of a rotating brush seal was developed. Room temperature analysis of the HFBS proved successful for relatively high operating rotational velocities at moderate pressures with very acceptable leakage rates for gas turbine engines. Brush seals were able to track rotor speeds up to 24krpm while maintaining sealing integrity. The HFBS's ability to function under axial shaft displacement and synchronous dynamic radial loading was also proven successful. Hydrodynamic performance of the face seal was proven to provide adequate stiffness and load carrying capacity to keep the brush seal from contacting the face seal at pressure drops across the brush of up to 100psi. Leakage performance over standard brush seal and labyrinth technology was quite dramatic. The HFBS showed its sealing advantage using much higher radial interference between the rotor and the bristle

  11. A new reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-01-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis. (author)

  12. New reciprocating sliding wear testing apparatus for high temperature gaseous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.F.; Radford, T.J.; Mawson, D.; Kaye, P.

    1988-09-01

    A new reciprocating wear testing rig is described that has been designed, built and commissioned at the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The objectives of this work are to improve upon the range of parameters offered by the existing rigs and to provide additional facilities for data acquisition and analysis.

  13. Comparison of high temperature wear behaviour of plasma sprayed WC–Co coated and hard chromium plated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamurugan, G.M.; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan; Anandakrishnan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► WC–12wt.%Co powders were deposited to a thickness of 300 μm on to steel substrates. ► The micro hardness of the above coatings was lower than that of chromium plating. ► Wear resistance of chromium coating was increased up to five times of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel. ► Wear resistance of chromium coat higher than plasma coat at different temperatures. -- Abstract: The wear behaviour of plasma sprayed coating and hard chrome plating on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel substrate is experimentally investigated in unlubricated conditions. Experiments were conducted at different temperatures (room temp, 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C) with 50 N load and 1 m/s sliding velocity. Wear tests were carried out by dry sliding contact of EN-24 medium carbon steel pin as counterpart on a pin-on-disc wear testing machine. In both coatings, specimens were characterised by hardness, microstructure, coating density and sliding wear resistance. Wear studies showed that the hard chromium coating exhibited improved tribological performance than that of the plasma sprayed WC–Co coating. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) of the coatings showed that the better wear resistance at high temperature has been attributed to the formation of a protective oxide layer at the surface during sliding. The wear mechanisms were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. It was observed that the chromium coating provided higher hardness, good adhesion with the substrate and nearly five times the wear resistance than that obtained by uncoated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  14. Fretting wear of steam generator tubes: high-temperature tests on AECL rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, F.; Zbinden, M.

    1993-07-01

    The R and DD has undertaken the study of fretting-wear of Alloy 600 S.G. tubes which occurs by contact with migrating items. The test series was performed in Canada at AECL Research (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) as part of an exchange program. Four types of configuration were envisaged: a tube-to-drilled hole support contact which provides reference results and three types of tube-to-support contacts which simulate the tube fretting-wear induced by a welding rod, a threaded rod and a knife-edge rod support. This programme is completed by the study of the contact between a S.G. tube and a neighbouring S.G. tube which has been broken after plugging. (authors). 1 tab., 3 refs

  15. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumant, A.V.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A.F.; Adams, W.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R a ≥ 1 μm), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH 4 /Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R a = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  16. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  17. Effect of the low temperature ion nitriding on the wear and corrosion resistance of 316L austenitic stainless steel biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Bambang Siswanto; Wirjoadi; Lely Susita RM

    2012-01-01

    In the present study has been completed done the ion nitriding process and characterization of the 316L SS samples. The ion nitriding process has been conducted on the samples for nitriding temperature variation of 350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 °C, the optimum nitrogen gas pressure of 1.8 mbar and optimum nitriding time of 3 hours. The micro-structure, elemental composition and the phase structure of the nitride layer formed on the surface of samples were observed using the techniques of SEM-EDAX and XRD, respectively. It is known that a thin layer of iron nitrides has been formed on the surface of the samples. Iron nitride layer has a phase structure including ε-Fe_2_-_3N, γ'-Fe_4N, CrN, Cr_2N and expanded austenite γN. The characterization results of the wear resistance of the 316L SS samples showed an increasing of about 2.6 times the wear resistance of standard samples after nitriding temperature of 350 °C. From the corrosion test by using the Hanks solution was obtained 29.87 mpy corrosion rate or the increasing of corrosion resistance of about 137%. Thus it can be seen that by using ion nitriding technique the iron nitride layer has been formed on the surface of the 316L SS samples, and they have an excellent properties of wear resistance and corrosion resistance, which were caused especially due to the formation of an expanded austenite γN. Properties of the high hardness and has the good corrosion resistance, especially due to the formation of iron nitride and expanded austenite phases γN at low temperature nitriding process. (author)

  18. Development of wear resistant NFSS-HA novel biocomposites and study of their tribological properties for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesi, M; Bahrololoom, M E; Fooladfar, H

    2010-02-01

    Implants made of nickel free austenitic stainless steel can reduce the toxic effect of released nickel ion and compounds from the conventional stainless steels. On the other hand, hydroxyapatite is a ceramic which has been used in orthopaedic applications due to its good osteoconductivity, biocompatibility and bioactivity. However, there is no evidence in the literature up to now on producing composites based on nickel free stainless steel and hydroxyapatite and study of their tribology. The aim of this work was to produce novel biocomposites made up of nickel free stainless steel with hydroxyapatite (prepared by heat treating bone ash) and studying their tribology under various loads in air and in Ringer's physiological solution. Different amounts of hydroxyapatite powder (10, 20, 30 and 40% Vol.) were added to this nickel free stainless steel powder to get the biocomposites. Variation of their density, hardness, wear resistance and friction with the ceramic (hydroxyapatite) content and wear load were investigated in air and in Ringer's solution. The density of the composites was decreased by increasing the volume percentage of the hydroxyapatite, while wear resistance of the composites was increased. The wear mechanism of these composites was changed by increasing the wear load and consequently the volume loss was enhanced dramatically. Furthermore, by increasing the sliding distance, the rate of volume loss was decreased slightly. The friction coefficient of the composites was also decreased by increasing the weight percentage of hydroxyapatite. Effect of the physiological Ringer's solution on wear resistance and friction coefficient of the composites was nearly negligible. The wear mechanisms of the samples were identified by studying the SEM images of the worn surfaces of the tested samples in different wear loads and HA contents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A rolling-gliding wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denkena Berend

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-gliding movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure gliding motion only. Methods A rolling-gliding wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which simulates and reproduces the rolling-gliding movement and loading of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry. The technical concept was to run a base-plate, representing the tibia plateau, against a pivoted cylindrical counter-body, representing one femur condyle under an axial load. A rolling movement occurs as a result of the friction and pure gliding is induced by limiting the rotation of the cylindrical counter-body. The set up also enables simplified specimens handling and removal for gravimetrical wear measurements. Long-term wear tests and gravimetrical wear measurements were carried out on the well known material pairings: cobalt chrome-polyethylene, ceramic-polyethylene and ceramic-ceramic, over three million motion cycles to allow material comparisons to be made. Results The observed differences in wear rates between cobalt-chrome on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene pairings were similar to the differences of published data for existing material-pairings. Test results on ceramic-ceramic pairings of different frontal-plane geometry and surface roughness displayed low wear rates and no fracture failures. Conclusions The presented set up is able to simulate the rolling-gliding movement of the knee joint, is easy to use, and requires a minimum of user intervention or monitoring. It is suitable for long-term testing, and therefore a useful tool for the investigation of new and promising materials which are of interest for application in

  20. A rolling-gliding wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Berna I; Ostermeier, Sven; Turger, Anke; Denkena, Berend; Hurschler, Christof

    2010-06-15

    Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-gliding movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure gliding motion only. A rolling-gliding wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which simulates and reproduces the rolling-gliding movement and loading of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry. The technical concept was to run a base-plate, representing the tibia plateau, against a pivoted cylindrical counter-body, representing one femur condyle under an axial load. A rolling movement occurs as a result of the friction and pure gliding is induced by limiting the rotation of the cylindrical counter-body. The set up also enables simplified specimens handling and removal for gravimetrical wear measurements. Long-term wear tests and gravimetrical wear measurements were carried out on the well known material pairings: cobalt chrome-polyethylene, ceramic-polyethylene and ceramic-ceramic, over three million motion cycles to allow material comparisons to be made. The observed differences in wear rates between cobalt-chrome on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene pairings were similar to the differences of published data for existing material-pairings. Test results on ceramic-ceramic pairings of different frontal-plane geometry and surface roughness displayed low wear rates and no fracture failures. The presented set up is able to simulate the rolling-gliding movement of the knee joint, is easy to use, and requires a minimum of user intervention or monitoring. It is suitable for long-term testing, and therefore a useful tool for the investigation of new and promising materials which are of interest for application in knee joint replacement implants.

  1. A rolling-gliding wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-gliding movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure gliding motion only. Methods A rolling-gliding wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which simulates and reproduces the rolling-gliding movement and loading of the knee joint on specimens of simplified geometry. The technical concept was to run a base-plate, representing the tibia plateau, against a pivoted cylindrical counter-body, representing one femur condyle under an axial load. A rolling movement occurs as a result of the friction and pure gliding is induced by limiting the rotation of the cylindrical counter-body. The set up also enables simplified specimens handling and removal for gravimetrical wear measurements. Long-term wear tests and gravimetrical wear measurements were carried out on the well known material pairings: cobalt chrome-polyethylene, ceramic-polyethylene and ceramic-ceramic, over three million motion cycles to allow material comparisons to be made. Results The observed differences in wear rates between cobalt-chrome on polyethylene and ceramic on polyethylene pairings were similar to the differences of published data for existing material-pairings. Test results on ceramic-ceramic pairings of different frontal-plane geometry and surface roughness displayed low wear rates and no fracture failures. Conclusions The presented set up is able to simulate the rolling-gliding movement of the knee joint, is easy to use, and requires a minimum of user intervention or monitoring. It is suitable for long-term testing, and therefore a useful tool for the investigation of new and promising materials which are of interest for application in knee joint replacement

  2. Protection of 310l Stainless Steel from Wear at Elevated Temperatures using Conicraly Thermal Spray Coatings with and without Sic Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Kaiyang; Li, Dongyang

    2017-10-01

    Due to its high oxidation resistance, 310L stainless steel is often used for thermal facilities working at high-temperatures. However, the steel may fail prematurely at elevated temperatures when encounter surface mechanical attacks such as wear. Thermal spray coatings have been demonstrated to be effective in protecting the steel from wear at elevated temperatures. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of high velocity oxy-fuel(HVOF) spraying CoNiCrAlY/SiC coatings in resisting wear of 310L stainless steel at elevated temperature using a pin-on-disc wear tester. In order to further improve the performance of the coating, 5%SiC was added to the coating. It was demonstrated that the CoNiCrAlY/SiC coating after heat treatment markedly suppressed wear. However, the added SiC particles did not show benefits to the wear resistance of the coating. Microstructures of CoNiCrAlY coatings with and without the SiC addition were characterized in order to understand the mechanism responsible for the observed phenomena.

  3. Perspectives from the Wearable Electronics and Applications Research (WEAR) Lab, NASA, Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Haifa R.

    2017-01-01

    As NASA moves beyond exploring low earth orbit and into deep space exploration, increased communication delays between astronauts and earth drive a need for crew to become more autonomous (earth-independent). Currently crew on board the International Space Station (ISS) have limited insight into specific vehicle system performance because of the dependency on monitoring and real-time communication with Mission Control. Wearable technology provides a method to bridge the gap between the human (astronaut) and the system (spacecraft) by providing mutual monitoring between the two. For example, vehicle or environmental information can be delivered to astronauts through on-body devices and in return wearables provide data to the spacecraft regarding crew health, location, etc. The Wearable Electronics and Applications Research (WEAR) Lab at the NASA Johnson Space Center utilizes a collaborative approach between engineering and human factors to investigate the use of wearables for spaceflight. Zero and partial gravity environments present unique challenges to wearables that require collaborative, user-centered, and iterative approaches to the problems. Examples of the WEAR Lab's recent wearable projects for spaceflight will be discussed.

  4. The role of specimen temperature difference in the elevated temperature pitting/transfer of PE16 and 20/25/Nb SS during impact wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morri, J.

    1989-01-01

    A previous study of the impact fretting wear characteristics of PE16 + impacting 20/25 Nb SS (carried out on the BNL twin vibrator rig) identified a pitting-transfer form of wear at 480 0 C. This behaviour was thought to be dependent upon the temperature difference ΔT(ΔT = T 20/25 -T PE 16 ) between the two specimens. In that series of tests, however, no localised temperature control over the specimens was possible and specimen temperature effects could only be assessed by interchanging their positions in the rig. The introduction of locally positioned auxilliary heaters permitted a degree of control over the specimen temperature difference. The effect of ΔT upon pitting and transfer of the PE16 and 20/25 was then assessed and is reported in this paper. The study confirmed that the pitting transfer process was dependent on the temperature difference between the two surfaces. The direction and size of the transfer/pitting effect was independent of the material. Under the particular set of conditions employed in the test, pitting occurred only when the magnitude of ΔT exceeded 20 0 C. At high ΔT the initial period of high friction was extended and was associated with the tendency for gross transfer and pitting. (author)

  5. Practical applications of ion beam and plasma processing for improving corrosion and wear protection

    CERN Document Server

    Klingenberg, M L; Wei, R; Demaret, J; Hirvonen, J

    2002-01-01

    A multi-year project for the US Army has been investigating the use of various ion beam and plasma-based surface treatments to improve the corrosion and wear properties of military hardware. These processes are intended to be complementary to, rather than competing with, other promising macro scale coating processes such high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) deposition, particularly in non-line-of- sight and flash chrome replacement applications. It is believed that these processes can improve the tribological and corrosion behavior of parts without significantly altering the dimensions of the part, thereby eliminating the need for further machining operations and reducing overall production costs. The ion beam processes chosen are relatively mature, low-cost processes that can be scaled-up. The key methods that have been considered under this program include nitrogen ion implantation into electroplated hard chrome, ion beam assisted chromium and chromium nitride coatings, and plasma-deposited diamond- like carbon an...

  6. Fretting wear behaviour of TiC/Ti(C,N)/TiN multi-layer coatings at elevated temperature in gross slip regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanwei; Huang Kunpeng; Zhu Minhao; Zhou Zhongrong

    2005-01-01

    Tic/Ti(C,N)/TiN multi-layer coatings are prepared on the 1Cr13 stainless steel substrate by the technique of Chemical Vapour Deposition, and the fretting wear behaviour of 1Cr13 stainless steel and TiC/Ti(C,N)/TiN coatings are investigated and studied controversially from 25 degree C to 400 degree C in the gross slip regime. It shows that the temperature has great influence on the fretting wear in the gross slip regime for the 1Cr13 stainless steel but little for Ti/C/Ti(C,N)/TiN multi-layer coatings. With the temperature increasing, the friction coefficient and the wear volume of the 1Cr13 alloy decreases and the wear volume of TiC/Ti(C, N)/TiN multi-layer coatings is invariant. TiC/Ti(C,N)/TiN multi-layer coatings have better wear-resistant capability than the 1Cr13 stainless steel, but the wear volume of the substrate increases greatly because of the grain-abrasion resulted from hard debris when TiC/Ti(C,N)/TiN multi-layer coatings are ground off. (authors)

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Cutting Temperature and Tool Wear in 2 Dimensional Ultrasonic Vibrations Assisted Micro-Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Mohd Rasidi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional Ultrasonic vibration assisted milling (2D UVAM well knows process that involved in high tech system to generate ultra range of frequency applied to the milling process. More industries nowadays become aware taking this opportunity to improve their productivity without decreasing their product accuracies. This paper investigate a comparative machining between UVAM and conventional machining (CM in tool wear and cutting temperature in milling process. Micro amplitude and sine wave frequency will be generate into the workpiece jig by piezo-actuator. Thus, creating a micro gap that allow heat remove effectively with the chip produces. A more complex tool trajectory mechanics of 2D UVAM has been found during this research. The approaching the tool tip into the workpiece surfaces is affected by the amplitude displacement along the frequency applied. It is found that the tool wear was reduce and surface roughness improvement by applying the 2D UVAM compared to the CM when choosing the optimum amplitude and appropriate frequency.

  8. Tribaloy intermetallic alloy compositions: new materials or additives for wear resistant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, C.B.; Hoffman, R.A.; Poskitt, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Properties and uses of TRIBALOY alloys in powder metallurgy fabrication are discussed. Powders of TRIBALOY can be blended with essentially any powder processed by powder metallurgy. Green strength of the blended powder parts is reduced as the amount of TRIBALOY is increased. The concentration of TRIBALOY, however, is usually 15 to 20 volume percent, a compromise between green strength and effectiveness as a wear resistant part. Blended powders are sintered at the temperature normally used for the base metal with special consideration given to a low dew point in the atmosphere. The sintered parts can be coined, carburized, machined, or impregnated in any of the well-known ways. TRIBALOY as a powder blending agent has extended the useful life of P/M parts by factors of 5 and more. A variety of industries are presently using P/M parts at higher temperatures, heavier loads, in poorer or non-lubricated conditions or at higher speeds because of the addition of TRIBALOY. More important, however, is that TRIBALOY can be incorporated in parts to be made by powder metallurgy which until now had not been feasible. The overall effect has been considerable savings for the customer by switching to the powder metal method of manufacturing and increased activity for the fabricator

  9. Effect of pressing temperature on the wear resistance of a Co-based Cr-Mo powder alloy produced by hot pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somunkiran, Ilyas [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.; Balin, Ahmet [Siirt Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Vocational High School

    2016-02-01

    In this study, Co-based Cr-Mo powder alloy was produced at different pressing temperatures by using hot pressing technique and abrasive wear behaviors of the produced specimens were examined. Produced specimens were exposed to abrasive wear experiment using block on disc wear test device by applying a load of 50 N with 100-mesh SiC abrasive paper. Each specimen was investigated at 25, 50, 75 and 100 m. At the end of the experiment, abrasive wear results of the specimens were determined by calculating their mass losses. Microstructural properties of the specimens which were produced at different pressing temperatures were investigated by optical and SEM examinations and their wear resistances were examined by abrasive wear experiments. Consequently, it was observed that in Co-based Cr-Mo powder alloy produced by hot pressing technique; as sintering temperature increased, size of neck formations between the powder grains increased, porosity decreased and abrasive wear resistance increased. [German] In diesem Beitrag zugrunde liegenden Studie wurde eine Co-basierte Cr-Mo-Legierung mittels Heisspressens hergestellt und der Abrasivverschleisswiderstand dieser Proben untersucht. Die hergestellten Proben wurden dem Abrasivverschleissversuch durch einen Block-Scheibe-Versuchsaufbau unterzogen, wobei eine Kraft von 50 N mit einem SiC-Papier (100 mesh) verwendet wurde. Jede Probe wurde ueber eine Distanz von 25, 50, 75 und 100 m untersucht. Am Ende der jeweiligen Experimente wurden die Abrasivverschleissergebnisse ermittelt, indem die Massenverluste berechnet wurden. Die mikrostrukturellen Eigenschaften der Proben, die bei verschiedenen Presstemperaturen hergestellt wurden, wurden mittels optischer und Rasterelektronenmikroskopie bestimmt und ihr Verschleisswiderstand anhand der Verschleissversuche ermittelt. Schliesslich wurde beobachtet, dass bei steigender Sintertemperatur der heissgespressten Co-basierten Cr-Mo-Pulverlegierung die Groesse der Einschnuerungen zwischen den

  10. Experimental Investigation on Tool Wear Behavior and Cutting Temperature during Dry Machining of Carbon Steel SAE 1030 Using KC810 and KC910 Coated Inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tamerabet

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The removal of cutting fluids and lubrication in dry machining operations requires a good knowledge and full control of all the mechanisms that lead to tool damage. In order to optimize dry machining operations, it is necessary to clearly identify the wear patterns, determine the contact conditions and define the relationship between the contact parameters and the operating conditions. The idea is to choose optimal cutting conditions which lead to the best contact conditions limiting the triggering or aggravation of wear phenomena. The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact multilayer coatings and cutting parameters on tool wear and temperature at the tool-chip interface for two types of coated carbides (KC810 and KC910 Commercialized inserts during dry turning operation of carbon steel SAE 1030, in order to determine the ideal parameters and guarantee the best performances of the cutting tools. Cutting temperature, Crater and Flank wear have been systematically recorded in order to determine their influence on tool life time. To ensure the optimum choice of machining conditions; the TAGUCHI method associated to multi-factorial method were applied to plan the experiments. It has been noted that cutting speed was the most influential factor on temperature and wear evolution. We noted also that the KC810 insert was more suitable for machining of SAE 1030 Carbon Steel; where The best life time was registered (T=228 min. The KC810 inserts offer 30 min of additional machining time for the same work conditions.

  11. Application of wear resistant spraying for diesel engine; Diesel kikan eno taimamo yosha no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, Y. [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuliding Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-31

    Diesel engines used widely as propelling engines of ships have increasingly been provided with a high output and a high thermal efficiency; their structural members, particularly, the component parts for combustion chambers are therefore used under severe conditions, giving rise to the need of surface treatment and surface reforming of the members. Parts for marine diesel engines are huge, so that the technology applicable to the surface treatment and reforming are limited in point of facility and cost; therefore, most suitable is thermal spraying. This paper primarily discusses, among marine diesel engines, a 2-cycle low-speed engine with a 260-980mm bore used for the main engine of a merchant ship such as a container ship, bulk carrier or a tanker, and a 4-cycle medium-speed engine with a 300-420mm bore used for the main engine of a naval vessel; the paper explains the application status of a thermal spraying technology which is in progress to cope with the high output and high thermal efficiency of the diesel engines, explaining particularly the story of the development and the technological features of the wear resistant thermal spraying, which has been put to practical use, on the cylinder liner and the piston ring of the 4-cycle medium-speed engine. (NEDO)

  12. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D., E-mail: konba@ifm.liu.se; Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  13. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D.; Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN x ) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN x films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N 2 /Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V s , was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V s  ≥ 60 V, V s  ≥ 100 V, and V s  = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V s for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V s , while CN x films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant

  14. Effect of plasma spraying parameter on wear resistance of NiCrBSiCFe plasma coatings on austenitic stainless steel at elevated temperatures at various loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathi, N.L.; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan; Borah, Utpal

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Effect of plasma spraying parameters, especially the stand-off distance. ► Effect of microstructure and applied load on coating in sliding wear. ► The reason for maximum wear rate at 250 °C and the minimum wear at 350 °C were explained. ► The worn debris were characterised by SEM analysis and correlated with wear rate. -- Abstract: The dry sliding wear tests were carried out on AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) plasma coated with NiCrBSiCFe alloy powder under two set of plasma spraying parameters (PSP-1 and PSP-2). EN 8 medium carbon steel was used as a counterface material. The tests were carried out at loads of 20 N and 40 N with a constant sliding velocity of 1 m/s at room temperature (35°), 150 °C, 250 °C and 350 °C. Metallographic characterisation was carried out by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Between the two plasma parameters tested, stand-off distance of 125 mm was found to be more suitable for producing uniform lamellar microstructure with fewer amounts of pores which shows better wear resistance. The wear rate at 250 °C was comparatively more due to the material softening and adhesion by intermolecular bonding. The worn debris collected during sliding at 350 °C turn into oxides which further behaves like a protective and lubricative film eliminating the chances of severe material loss. SEM was used to characterise the worn track and debris to identity the wear mechanism.

  15. The validity of Actiwatch2 and SenseWear armband compared against polysomnography at different ambient temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirim Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There were no validation studies on portable sleep devices under different ambient temperature, thus this study evaluated the validity of wrist Actiwatch2 (AW2 or SenseWear armband (SWA against polysomnography (PSG in different ambient temperatures. Nine healthy young participants (6 males, aged 23.3±4.1 y underwent nine nights of study at ambient temperature of 17 °C, 22 °C and 29 °C in random order, after an adaptation night. They wore the AW2 and SWA while being monitored for PSG simultaneously. A linear mixed model indicated that AW2 is valid for sleep onset latency (SOL, total sleep time (TST and sleep efficiency (SE but significantly overestimated wake after sleep onset (WASO at 17 °C and 22 °C. SWA is valid for WASO, TST and SE at these temperatures, but severely underestimates SOL. However, at 29 °C, SWA significantly overestimated WASO and underestimated TST and SE. Bland–Altman plots showed small biases with acceptable limits of agreement (LoA for AW2 whereas, small biases and relatively wider LoA for most sleep variables were observed in SWA. The kappa statistic showed a moderate sleep–wake epoch agreement, with a high sensitivity but poor specificity; wake detection remains suboptimal. AW2 showed small biases for most of sleep variables at all temperature conditions, except for WASO. SWA is reliable for measures of TST, WASO and SE at 17–22 °C but not at 29 °C, and SOL approximates that of PSG only at 29 °C, thus caution is needed when monitoring sleep at different temperatures, especially in home sleep studies, in which temperature conditions are more variable.

  16. Laser surface melting of 10 wt% Mo alloyed hardfacing Stellite 12 plasma transferred arc deposits: Structural evolution and high temperature wear performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilawary, Shaikh Asad Ali; Motallebzadeh, Amir; Afzal, Muhammad; Atar, Erdem; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2018-05-01

    Laser surface melting (LSM) process has been applied on the plasma transferred arc (PTA) deposited Stellite 12 and 10 wt% Mo alloyed Stellite 12 in this study. Following the LSM process, structural and mechanical property comparison of the LSM'ed surfaces has been made. Hardness of the LSM'ed surfaces was measured as 549 HV and 623 HV for the Stellite 12 and Stellite 12 + 10 wt% Mo deposits, respectively. Despite their different hardness and structural features, the LSM'ed surfaces exhibited similar tribological performance at room temperature (RT), where fatigue wear mechanism operates. However, the wear at 500 °C promotes tribo-oxide layer formation whose composition depended on the alloying with Mo. Thus, addition of 10 wt% Mo into Stellite 12 PTA deposit has remarkably enhanced the high temperature wear performance of the LSM'ed surface as a result of participation of complex oxide (CoMoO4) in tribo-oxide layer.

  17. Core Temperature and Surface Heat Flux During Exercise in Heat While Wearing Body Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-26

    Adam W. Potter, MS, MBA Reed W. Hoyt, PhD Biophysics and Biomedical Modeling Division October 2015 U.S. Army Research Institute of...NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...A relatively recent innovation is to ingest a telemetry temperature pill. Local temperature is transmitted to a receiver as the pill migrates

  18. Temperature Changes on the Foot during Pregnancy Affected by Wearing Biomechanical Shoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zvonar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Everyone needs to walk; however, many people have problems with walking caused by non-standard condition or function of their feet, which in some cases can be easily recognized by thermography methods. The question is which internal actors can influence plantar temperature. 20 pregnant women from Czech and Slovak Republic in early stage of pregnancy, aged from 24 to 38 years old were included in the research. In this research, we followed the course of temperature-rested feet and feet after exercise for pregnant mothers in the different trimesters of pregnancy. Our task during the experimental research was to verify the functionality of special shoes. When we examined the temperatures of left and right sole in pregnant women, we noticed significant differences between right and left leg on 1 % level of statistical significance. Body weight gain is directly proportional with increased pressure on future mother’s sole. Increased body weight and pressure on the sole connected with it increases blood flow of the tissue. More blood flowing increases the friction and the temperature of the sole. Surprisingly, from second to third trimester we noticed decrease in temperature after walking.

  19. A Study on the Sliding/Impact Wear of a Nuclear Fuel Rod in Room Temperature Air: (I) Development of a Test Rig and Characteristic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2007-01-01

    A new type of a fretting wear tester has been designed and developed in order to simulate the actual vibration behavior of a nuclear fuel rod for springs/dimples in room temperature. When considering the actual contact condition between fuel rod and spring/dimple, if fretting wear progress due to the Flow-Induced Vibration (FIV) under a specific normal load exerted on the fuel rod by the elastic deformation of the spring, the contacting force between the fuel rod and dimple that were located in the opposite side should be decreased. Consequently, the evaluation of developed spacer grids against fretting wear damage should be performed with the results of a cell unit experiments because the contacting force is one of the most important variables that influence to the fretting wear mechanism. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new type of fretting test rig in order to simulate the actual contact condition. In this paper, the development procedure of a new fretting wear tester and its performance were discussed in detail

  20. Development and characterization of laser clad high temperature self-lubricating wear resistant composite coatings on Ti–6Al–4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiu-Bo; Meng, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Hai-Qing; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua; Sun, Cheng-Feng; Wang, Ming-Di; Qi, Long-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel high temperature self-lubricating anti-wear composite coating was fabricated. • Reinforced carbides as well as self-lubricating sulfides were in situ synthesized. • Microhardness of the Ti–6Al–4V substrate was significantly improved. • Friction coefficient and wear rate of the composite coating were greatly reduced. - Abstract: To enhance the wear resistance and friction-reducing capability of titanium alloy, a process of laser cladding γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC + TiWC 2 /CrS + Ti 2 CS coatings on Ti–6Al–4V alloy substrate with preplaced NiCr/Cr 3 C 2 –WS 2 mixed powders was studied. A novel coating without cracks and few pores was obtained in a proper laser processing. The composition and microstructure of the fabricated coating were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) techniques, and tribological properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry sliding wear test conditions at 20 °C (room-temperature), 300 °C, 600 °C, respectively. The results show that the coating has unique microstructure consisting of α-Ti, TiC, TiWC 2 , γ-NiCrAlTi, Ti 2 CS and CrS phases. Average microhardness of the composite coating is 1005 HV 0.2 , which is about 3-factor higher than that of Ti–6Al–4V substrate (360 HV 0.2 ). The friction coefficient and wear rate of the coating are greatly decreased due to the combined effects of the dominating anti-wear capabilities of reinforced TiC and TiWC 2 carbides and the CrS and Ti 2 CS sulfides which have excellent self-lubricating property

  1. Application of radionuclide techniques to study the wear behaviour of peripherally treated and coated components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, E.; Mayer, K.H.; Rodrian, U.; Scheidemantel, N.; Schweizer, R.

    1990-07-01

    Technically and economically important machinery components (helical gear wheels, camshafts, rams, valve rockers) were to be optimized with regard to their wear behaviour under operation-oriented load conditions, and the process parameters required both for peripheral layer heating and surface coating were to be determined. Based on earlier experiments, the treatment parameters and the basic materials were varied. The layer structure was studied, characterized and correlated wi the wear behaviour. The wearing parts were activated in the reactor by thermal neutrons, or in the cyclotron by charged particles. By labelling various parts by means of different radioisotopes, up to three components may be measured at the same time in practice, provided that the circumstances are favourable. (BBR) [de

  2. Effects of feather wear and temperature on prediction of food intake and residual food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, M; Decuypere, E; Siau, O

    1989-03-01

    Heat production, which accounts for 0.6 of gross energy intake, is insufficiently represented in predictions of food intake. Especially when heat production is elevated (for example by lower temperature or poor feathering) the classical predictions based on body weight, body-weight change and egg mass are inadequate. Heat production was reliably estimated as [35.5-environmental temperature (degree C)] x [Defeathering (=%IBPW) + 21]. Including this term (PHP: predicted heat production) in equations predicting food intake significantly increased accuracy of prediction, especially under suboptimal conditions. Within the range of body weights tested (from 1.6 kg in brown layers to 2.8 kg in dwarf broiler breeders), body weight as an independent variable contributed little to the prediction of food intake; especially within strains its effect was better included in the intercept. Significantly reduced absolute values of residual food consumption were obtained over a wide range of conditions by using predictions of food intake based on body-weight change, egg mass, predicted heat production (PHP) and an intercept, instead of body weight, body-weight change, egg mass and an intercept.

  3. Aspects of fretting wear of sprayed cermet coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Two experimental fretting programmes which investigated aspects of fretting wear of sprayed cermet coatings are reviewed. These programmes were conducted in support of components used in the advanced gas-cooled reactor. It is speculated that the results from these programmes are compatible with a simple two-stage wear model. This model assumes that an initial wear process occurs which is dominated by an interlocking and removal of asperities. Such a phase will be dependent on the superficial contact areas and possibly the interfacial load, but the latter aspect is not considered. This initial wear is of very short duration and is followed by a mild, oxidative, wear mode. Coatings data are also compared with those for structural steels. In short-term low temperature tests it appears that structural steels have comparable performance with the cermet coatings but it is argued that this is an artefact of the wear process. However, at high temperatures (600 0 C) wear of stainless steel could not be determined, the specimens showing a net weight gain. It is concluded that for in-reactor fretting applications cermet coatings will have advantages over structural steels at low temperatures. Even in high temperature regions some operation at low temperatures is experienced and consequently cermet coatings may be useful here also. (orig.)

  4. Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

    2012-08-01

    Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

  5. Pin on flat wear volume prediction of UHMWPE against cp Ti for orthopedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoko, Suyitno, Dharmastiti, Rini; Magetsari, Rahadyan

    2018-04-01

    Tribological assessment of orthopedic biomaterials requires a lot of testing time. Researchers must test the biomaterials in millions of cycles at low frequency (1 Hz) to mimic the in vivo conditions. It is a problem because product designs and developments could not wait longer for wear data to predict the lifetime of their products. The problem can be solved with the use of computation techniques to model the wear phenomena and provide predicted data. The aim of this research is to predict the wear volume of the commonly used ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) sliding against commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) in the unidirectional pin on flat tests. The 9 mm diameter UHMWPE pin and cp Ti plate contact mechanics were modeled using Abaqus. Contact pressure was set at 3 MPa. Outputs of the computations (contact pressure and contact area) were used to calculate the wear volume with Archard law. A custom Python script was made to automate the process. The results were then compared with experimental data for validations. The predicted data were in a good trend with numerical errors from 0.3% up to 26%.

  6. Metal nitride coatings by physical vapor deposition (PVD) for a wear resistant aluminum extrusion die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Young; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the friction and wear behaviors of CrN, TiN, CrAlN, and TiAIN coated onto SKD61 for application to Al 7000 series extrusion dies. On the wear test, the experimental parameters are the load and the counter material's temperature. The results showed that the friction coefficient increased with load but decreased with the counter material's temperature, and the friction coefficients of CrN and CrAIN were lower than the friction coefficients of TiAIN and TIN, especially at a higher temperature. The wear track with different coatings identified different wear behaviors; the wear behavior of CrAIN was found to be abrasive, but the wear behavior of TiN, CrN, and TiAIN was adhesive. Therefore, CrAIN showed the least wear loss with a lower friction coefficient and less adhesion with counter materials at the highest range of wear load and temperature. This resulted in the easy formation of aluminum oxide in the wear track and less Al adhesion; moreover during the hard second phase, AIN dispersed in the film during deposition.

  7. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  8. Applications of high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malozemoff, A.P.; Gallagher, W.J.; Schwall, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The new high temperature superconductors open up possibilities for applications in magnets, power transmission, computer interconnections, Josephson devices and instrumentation, among many others. The success of these applications hinges on many interlocking factors, including critical current density, critical fields, allowable processing temperatures, mechanical properties and chemical stability. An analysis of some of these factors suggests which applications may be the easiest to realize and which may have the greatest potential

  9. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  10. Obtention, machining and wear of sintered alloys for automotive applications; Processamento, usinagem e desgaste de ligas sinterizadas para aplicacoes automotivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus Filho, Edson Souza de

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this work was the development of materials for automotive applications, in particular, valve seat inserts for gasoline combustion engines. The development involved the following activities: processing by powder metallurgy techniques, heat treatment, mechanical and microstructural characterization, machining and wear of materials. This work was undertaken aiming cost reduction of this component by the use of cheaper and less pollutant elements, eliminating the presence of Co and Pb due to their high cost and toxicological effects, respectively. The accomplishment of a thorough research into patents revealed that the materials studied here present particular compositions and were not yet produced. The results of hardness measurements and the transverse radial strength of the studied materials, after heat treatment, revealed superior properties than the commercial alloys applied at the moment. The machining tests of the material without heat treatment indicated a similar behaviour in comparison to the commercial alloy, suggesting that the new alloy chemistry composition was not deleterious in this sense. After heat treatment, the obtained alloys presented a cutting force increase in relation to the commercial alloy. Wear tests results of heat treated materials presented smaller friction coefficient and mass loss than the commercial alloy, in ali cases. This was especially achieved due to the advantages offered by heat treatment allied to the addition of NbC and Ti/W carbides. The materials obtained here showed to be potential candidates to substitute with advantages, valve seat inserts made of Fe-Co alloys for gasoline combustion engines. (author)

  11. Comparison study on resistance to wear and abrasion of high-temperature sliding strike of laser and plasma spray layer on the stainless steel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Zheng Qiguang; Fu Geyan; Wang Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of coatings, which are formed with laser cladding and plasma spray welding on 1Cr18Ni9Ti base metal of nuclear valve seats, on wear resistance is studied. A 5-kW transverse-flowing CO 2 laser is used for cladding Co base alloy powder pre-placed on the substrate. Comparing with the plasma spray coatings, the laser-cladding layer have lower rate of spoiled products and higher rate of finished products. Their microstructure is extremely fine. They have close texture and small-size grain. Their dilution diluted by the compositions of their base metal and hot-effect on base metal are less. The hardness, toughness, and strength of the laser-cladding layers are higher. The grain size is 11-12th grade in the laser-cladding layer and 9-10th in the plasma spray layer. The width of combination zone between laser-cladding layer and substrate is 10-45 μm but that between plasma spray layer and substrate is 120-160 μm. The wear test shows that the laser layers have higher property of anti-friction, anti-scour, and high-temperature sliding strike. The wear resistance of laser-cladding layer is about one time higher than that of plasma spray welding layer

  12. Applications of radioisotopes for studying refractory wear-out in Bhilai Steel Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, R.S.; Bose, U.P.; Shipstone, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    In Bhilai Steel Plant, investigations were carried out to study the refractory wear-out of (i) hearth bottom of blast furnaces, (ii) roof of open hearth furnaces, and (iii) hot metal mixer lining, by using radioisotope tracer techniques with a view to evaluate the life of the refractory lining at various locations and to help in planning its timely hot and cold repairs. The life of the refractory lining has the effective bearing on the overall production and hence on the economy of the plant. The two radiometric methods employed for studying the erosion of the refractory lining, by using isotope inserted bricks at various positions without damaging the lining are (i) based on recording the penetration of gamma rays emitting from the radioactive isotopes inserted at definite points of the brick lining and, (ii) by detecting the radioactivity of the pig iron or steel arising due to washing away of the respective radioactive isotopes previously inserted in the lining. In hot mixers also radioisotope sources were placed in the critical location of refractory lining and the washing out of radioisotope due to refractory brick wear out was detected by radiogauging at site. It has been found that radiotracer technique with periodic radiogauging is very useful method for tracing the radioisotope source if more than one refractory brick with isotope is placed, as in the case of open hearth furnaces. The results of radioanalysis revealed that radioactivity coming alongwith hot metal steel has been far below the permissible limit of concentration i.e. 20 micro-curie per ton of metal. Further, during dismantling of the residual refractory lining of open hearth furnaces or hot metal mixers, bricks containing radioisotopes have been successfully retrieved for safe disposal. (auth.)

  13. Application of High Temperature Superconductors to Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, a large effort has been made by the scientific community to investigate this field towards a possible application of the new oxide superconductors to different devices like SMES, magnetic bearings, flywheels energy storage, magnetic shielding, transmission cables, fault current limiters, etc. However, all present day large scale applications using superconductivity in accelerator technology are based on conventional materials operating at liquid helium temperatures. Poor mechanical properties, low critical current density and sensitivity to the magnetic field at high temperature are the key parameters whose improvement is essential for a large scale application of high temperature superconductors to such devices. Current leads, used for transferring currents from the power converters, working at room temperature, into the liquid helium environment, where the magnets are operating, represent an immediate application of the emerging technology of high t...

  14. Experimental evaluation of the wear of the PEC type fuel element base. Tribological experimental studies in Na at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agraives, B.C.; Volcan, A.; Bacchilega, A.

    1978-01-01

    Tribological studies in sodium, related to the PEC-type fuel element design are presented. They are aimed at the simulation of friction and wear phenomena which are expected to occur on the surface of fuel element components undergoing solid-solid contact situations with variable loads and/or variable motions. In this first paper, a description of the preparatory work is given. Then, results related to long-duration experiments are shown with respect to the contact between the centering spherical ring belonging to the lower extension of the subassembly, and the cylindrical sleeve of the grid in which it takes place. After 1000 hours under loaded and vibrated conditions, in sodium at 400 0 C, the wear effects suffered by both contacting samples, are observed and evaluated. The stellite surfaces of the samples are damaged to a not-negligible extent and material transfers from the cylindrical sleeve onto the spherical ring occur

  15. Friction and wear calculation methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kragelsky, I V; Kombalov, V S

    1981-01-01

    Friction and Wear: Calculation Methods provides an introduction to the main theories of a new branch of mechanics known as """"contact interaction of solids in relative motion."""" This branch is closely bound up with other sciences, especially physics and chemistry. The book analyzes the nature of friction and wear, and some theoretical relationships that link the characteristics of the processes and the properties of the contacting bodies essential for practical application of the theories in calculating friction forces and wear values. The effect of the environment on friction and wear is a

  16. Ceramics for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocellin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Problems related to materials, their fabrication, properties, handling, improvements are examined. Silicium nitride and silicium carbide are obtained by vacuum hot-pressing, reaction sintering and chemical vapour deposition. Micrographs are shown. Mechanical properties i.e. room and high temperature strength, creep resistance fracture mechanics and fatigue resistance. Recent developments of pressureless sintered Si C and the Si-Al-O-N quaternary system are mentioned

  17. Hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.

    2015-08-18

    The present disclosure relates generally to hardface coating systems and methods for metal alloys and other materials for wear and corrosion resistant applications. More specifically, the present disclosure relates to hardface coatings that include a network of titanium monoboride (TiB) needles or whiskers in a matrix, which are formed from titanium (Ti) and titanium diboride (TiB.sub.2) precursors by reactions enabled by the inherent energy provided by the process heat associated with coating deposition and, optionally, coating post-heat treatment. These hardface coatings are pyrophoric, thereby generating further reaction energy internally, and may be applied in a functionally graded manner. The hardface coatings may be deposited in the presence of a number of fluxing agents, beta stabilizers, densification aids, diffusional aids, and multimode particle size distributions to further enhance their performance characteristics.

  18. Nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation for surface treatment and wear protection of austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi1810

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blawert, C.; Mordike, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation is an effective surface treatment for stainless steels. The influence of treatment parameters (temperature, plasma density and pressure) on the sliding wear resistance are studied here. At moderate temperatures, nitrogen remains in solid solution without forming nitrides. This increases the surface hardness and the wear resistance without affecting the passivation of the steel. This may allow the use of such steels in applications where their poor wear resistance would normally prohibit their use. (orig.)

  19. A rolling-gliding wear simulator for the investigation of tribological material pairings for application in total knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Berna I; Ostermeier, Sven; Turger, Anke; Denkena, Berend; Hurschler, Christof

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Material wear testing is an important technique in the development and evaluation of materials for use in implant for total knee arthroplasty. Since a knee joint induces a complex rolling-gliding movement, standardised material wear testing devices such as Pin-on-Disc or Ring-on-Disc testers are suitable to only a limited extent because they generate pure gliding motion only. Methods A rolling-gliding wear simulator was thus designed, constructed and implemented, which sim...

  20. Preparation, characterization and wear behavior of carbon coated magnesium alloy with electroless plating nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Yan; Li, Zhuguo; Feng, Kai; Guo, Xingwu; Zhou, Zhifeng; Dong, Jie; Wu, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The carbon film with nickel interlayer (Ni + C coating) is deposited on GW83. • In Ni + C composite coating the carbon coating has good adhesion with the nickel interlayer. • The wear track of Ni + C coating is narrower compared to the bare one. • The wear resistance of GW83 is greatly improved by the Ni + C coating. - Abstract: Poor wear resistance of rare earth magnesium alloys has prevented them from wider application. In this study, composite coating (PVD carbon coating deposited on electroless plating nickel interlayer) is prepared to protect GW83 magnesium alloys against wear. The Ni + C composite coating has a dense microstructure, improved adhesion strength and hardness due to the effective support of Ni interlayer. The wear test result shows that the Ni + C composite coating can greatly prolong the wear life of the magnesium alloy. The wear track of the Ni + C coated magnesium alloy is obviously narrower and shows less abrasive particles as compared with the bare one. Abrasive wear is the wear mechanism of the coatings at the room temperature. In conclusion, the wear resistance of the GW83 magnesium alloy can be greatly improved by the Ni + C composite coating

  1. APPRAISAL OF APPLICATION OF WEAR-RESISTANT CHROMIC CAST IRONS FOR PRODUCTION OF MOULDED PIECES OF EQUIPMENT ON PRODUCTION OF BRICK OF CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. aranovkij

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The appraisal of application of wear-resistant chromic cast irons of different chemical compositions for production of moulded pieces of equipment on production of bricks of clay is carried out. It is determined that working resource of the details of test cast-irons is correlated with their hardness and not lower than of hardened steel.

  2. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  3. Potential applications of high temperature helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Kennedy, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses the DOE MHTGR-SC program's recent activity to improve the economics of the MHTGR without sacrificing safety performance and two potential applications of high temperature helium, the MHTGR gas turbine plant and a process heat application for methanol production from coal

  4. Tooth wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tušek Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction, which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to tooth abfraction and microfracture. Wear of tooth surfaces due to the presence of microscopic imperfections of tooth surfaces is clinically manifested as sanding veneers. Tribology, as an interdisciplinary study of the mechanisms of friction, wear and lubrication at the ultrastructural level, has defined a universal model according to which the etiopathogenesis of tooth wear is caused by the following factors: health and diseases of the digestive tract, oral hygiene, eating habits, poor oral habits, bruxism, temporomandibular disorders and iatrogenic factors. Attrition and dental erosion are much more common in children with special needs (Down syndrome. Erosion of teeth usually results from diseases of the digestive tract that lead to gastroesophageal reflux (GER of gastric juice (HCl. There are two basic approaches to the assessment of the degree of wear and dental erosion. Depending on the type of wear (erosion, attrition, abfraction, the amount of calcium that was realised during the erosive attack could be determined qualitatively and quantitatively, or changes in optical properties and hardness of enamel could be recorded, too. Abrasion of teeth (abrasio dentium is the loss of dental hard tissue caused by friction between the teeth and exogenous foreign substance. It is most commonly provoked by prosthetic dentures and bad habits, while its effect depends on the size of abrasive particles and their amount, abrasive particle hardness and hardness of tooth

  5. Wear protection in cutting tool applications by PACVD (Ti,Al)N and Al2O3 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathrein, M.; Heiss, M.; Rofner, R.; Schleinkofer, U.; Schintlmeister, W.; Schatte, J.; Mitterer, C.

    2001-01-01

    Various (Ti,Al)N-, Al 2 O 3 -, and (Ti,Al)N/Al 2 O 3 multilayer coatings were deposited onto cemented carbide cutting tool inserts by a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) technique. Al 2 O 3 coatings were deposited using the gaseous mixture AlCl 3 , Ar, H 2 , and O 2 . (Ti,Al)N intermediate layers were deposited in the same device using the process mentioned and the gases AICl 3 , Ar, H 2 , TiCl 4 and N 2 . The unique properties of (Ti,Al)N/Al 2 O 3 multilayer coatings result in superior wear protection for cutting inserts applied in severe multifunction cutting processes. The influence of different deposition temperatures an structure and properties of the coatings like crystallographic phases, chemical composition, mechanical and technological properties is shown. PACVD (Ti,Al)N/Al 2 O 3 coated cutting inserts with fine grained crystalline α/κ-Al 2 O 3 offer performance advantages which are superior with respect to coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) due to the low deposition temperature applied. (author)

  6. Tooth wear

    OpenAIRE

    Tušek Ivan; Tušek Jasmina

    2014-01-01

    Tooth wear is the loss of dental hard tissue that was not caused by decay and represents a common clinical problem of modern man. In the etiology of dental hard tissue lesions there are three dominant mechanisms that may act synergistically or separately:friction (friction), which is caused by abrasion of exogenous, or attrition of endogenous origin, chemical dissolution of dental hard tissues caused by erosion, occlusal stress created by compression and flexion and tension that leads to toot...

  7. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components: Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Certain internal components of Pressurized Water Reactors are damaged by wear when subjected to vibration induced by flow. In order to enable predictive calculation of such wear, one must have a model which takes account reliably of real damages. The modelling of wear represents a final link in a succession of numerical calculations which begins by the determination of hydraulic excitations induced by the flow. One proceeds, then, in the dynamic response calculation of the structure to finish up with an estimation of volumetric wear and of the depth of wear scars. A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which correspond to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work

  8. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  9. High temperature reactors for cogeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    There is a large potential for nuclear energy also in the non-electric heat market. Many industrial sectors have a high demand for process heat and steam at various levels of temperature and pressure to be provided for desalination of seawater, district heating, or chemical processes. The future generation of nuclear plants will be capable to enter the wide field of cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), to reduce waste heat and to increase efficiency. This requires an adjustment to multiple needs of the customers in terms of size and application. All Generation-IV concepts proposed are designed for coolant outlet temperatures above 500 C, which allow applications in the low and medium temperature range. A VHTR would even be able to cover the whole temperature range up to approx. 1 000 C.

  10. Ultra thin layer activation by recoil implantation of radioactive heavy ions. Applicability in wear and corrosion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, O.; Sauvage, T.; Blondiaux, G.; Guinard, L.

    1997-07-01

    A new calibration procedure is proposed for the application of recoil implantation of radioactive heavy ions (energies between a few hundred keV and a few MeV) into the near surface of materials as part of a research programme on sub-micrometric wear or corrosion phenomena. The depth profile of implanted radioelements is performed by using ultra thin deposited films obtained by cathode sputtering under argon plasma. Two curves for 56 Co ion in nickel have been determined for implantation depths of 110 and 200 nm, respectively, and stress the feasibility and reproducibility of this method for such activated depths. The achieved surface loss detection sensitivities are about 1 and 2 nm respectively. The on line detection mode is performed directly on the sample of interest. A general description of the method is presented. A study of the reaction kinematics followed by a general treatment on the irradiation parameters to be adopted are also developed with the intention of using the ultra thin layer activation method (UTLA) to further applications in research and industry. (author)

  11. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  12. Wear performance of laser processed tantalum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrick, Stanley; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu

    2011-12-01

    This first generation investigation evaluates the in vitro tribological performance of laser-processed Ta coatings on Ti for load-bearing implant applications. Linear reciprocating wear tests in simulated body fluid showed one order of magnitude less wear rate, of the order of 10{sup -4} mm{sup 3}(N.m){sup -1}, for Ta coatings compared to Ti. Our results demonstrate that Ta coatings can potentially minimize the early-stage bone-implant interface micro-motion induced wear debris generation due to their excellent bioactivity comparable to that of hydroxyapatite (HA), high wear resistance and toughness compared to popular HA coatings. Highlights: {yields} In vitro wear performance of laser processed Ta coatings on Ti was evaluated. {yields} Wear tests in SBF showed one order of magnitude less wear for Ta coatings than Ti. {yields} Ta coatings can minimize early-stage micro-motion induced wear debris generation.

  13. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components. Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbinden, M; Durbec, V

    1996-12-01

    A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which corresponds to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work. (author). 34 refs.

  14. A kinetic model for impact/sliding wear of pressurized water reactor internal components. Application to rod cluster control assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.; Durbec, V.

    1996-12-01

    A new concept of industrial wear model adapted to components of nuclear plants is proposed. Its originality is to be supported, on one hand, by experimental results obtained via wear machines of relatively short operational times, and, on the other hand, by the information obtained from the operating feedback over real wear kinetics of the reactors components. The proposed model is illustrated by an example which corresponds to a specific real situation. The determination of the coefficients permitting to cover all assembly of configurations and the validation of the model in these configurations have been the object of the most recent work. (author)

  15. High temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The meeting was organized to review industry/user needs designs, status of technology and the associated economics for high temperature applications. It was attended by approximately 100 participants from nine countries. The participants presented 17 papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Compensation systems for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, Balzej T

    2004-01-01

    The book is dedicated to the behaviour of ductile materials at cryogenic temperatures, structural stability issues and reliability oriented parametric optimisation of compensation systems containing the corrugated bellows. The problems of local and global stability of systems containing bellows, coupling between the low-cycle fatigue and stability as well as evolution of plastic strain fields, micro-damage and strain induced phase transformation in the corrugated shells at cryogenic temperatures are presented. As a special feature reliability oriented optimum design of compensation systems under strength, stability, fatigue and geometrical constraints is discussed. The relevant applications in the particle accelerators and cryogenic transfer lines are shown.

  17. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  18. Application of x-ray diffraction techniques to the understanding of the dry sliding wear behaviour of aluminium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoheir, N.; Ahmet, T.A.; Northwood, D.O.

    1996-01-01

    Dry sliding wear tests were performed on polycrystalline f.c.c. Al and h.c.p. Ti specimens using a block-on-ring type wear machine with a rotating ring made of 52100 bearing steel. The sliding speed was 0.13 m.s sup -l and the applied normal load was 10 N. The wear tests were performed on a single specimen in ambient conditions and the texture was evaluated during wear using an X-ray diffraction inverse pole figure technique at a range of sliding distances. Pole density distributions for the [0001] and [111) poles for of Ti and Al, respectively, were then determined from the inverse pole figures. The texture evolution during sliding wear was subsequently related to the friction and wear behaviour. For the aluminum sample, a (111) texture developed parallel to the worn surface with increasing sliding distance (a 6 fold increase in the (111) pole density as the sliding distance increases from 0 to 2714 m). The titanium sample (normal section) which had a preferred orientation with the basal poles, [0001), parallel to the contact surface prior to testing, an increase in wear, i.e. sliding distance, did not change the texture. However, for the transverse section of titanium, the basal pole, [0001), density parallel to the worn surface increased with increasing sliding distance. The shape of the coefficient of friction versus sliding distance curve is strongly influenced by crystallographic texturing. A drop in the coefficient of friction with the progressive development of the [111) and [0001) texture was observed for both Al and Ti (transverse section) specimens, respectively

  19. Millisecond bearing wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatchley, C.; Sioshansi, P.

    1987-01-01

    Radionuclides have been widely used for many purposes in medicine, metals, transportation, manufacturing and research. Approximately 200 artificially produced nuclides are commercially available from reactors or accelerator sources. Another 400 or so have properties which may make them useful if satisfactory methods of production can be developed. One of the most economically important industrial applications of radionuclides has been in wear measurement and condition monitoring in reciprocating engines. The general techniques developed for this purpose have also been applied in a number of other areas besides engine or lubrication studies. The wear of floor wax applied to linoleum, for example, has been measured by mixing shortlived radionuclides in the wax. In those applications where the material is tagged and then followed, the radionuclides are termed ''tracers,'' similar to the medical tracer materials used to measure uptake or metabolism of biologically active chemicals in the body. The alternate function for the radionuclides is to act as ''markers'' which indicate the amount of material which is remaining at the location of the original activation. Both approaches require that the debris removed from the surface must be carried away from the original site. The first application of radioactive tracers as a diagnostic tool in engines was in 1949. In this technique, an entire wearing part such as a piston ring or gear was first exposed to neutrons in a nuclear reactor. This caused the entire volume of the part to become radioactive. The part was next installed and exposed to wear in the operating engine. Detectors placed near the oil line, an oil filter or a sediment trap then determined the amount of debris from the part by counting the gamma rays escaping from the debris

  20. Fibre gratings for high temperature sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, J.; Sommer, K.; Englund, M.

    2001-07-01

    Phosphosilicate fibre gratings can be stabilized at temperatures in excess of 500 °C for sensor applications by optimizing thermal and UV presensitization recipes. Furthermore, the use of 193 nm presensitization prevents the formation of OH absorption bands, extending the use of fibre gratings across the entire wavelength spectrum. Gratings for operation at 700 °C retaining up to 70% reflectivity after 30 min are demonstrated.

  1. The synergy of corrosion and fretting wear process on Inconel 690 in the high temperature high pressure water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihao; Xu, Jian; Li, Jie; Xin, Long; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2018-04-01

    The synergistic effect of corrosion and fretting process of the steam generator (SG) tube was investigated by using a self-designed high temperature test rig in this paper. The experiments were performed at 100°C , 200°C and 288°C , respectively. The fretting corrosion damage was studied by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), Raman spectroscopy and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process in high temperature high pressure (HTHP) water environment had a distinct interaction with the fretting process of Inconel 690. With the increment of temperature, the damage mechanism changed from a simple mechanical process to a mechanochemical process.

  2. Resistance of superhydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces to varied temperature applications on 316L SS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Hamza; Basit, Kanza; Saleem, Sajid; Siddiqui, Bilal A.

    316L SS also called Marine Stainless Steel is an important material for structural and marine applications. When superhydrophobic and oleophobic coatings are applied on 316L SS it shows significant resistance to wear and corrosion. This paper aims to validate the coatings manufacturer's information on optimal temperature range and test the viability of coating against multiple oil based cleaning agents. 316L SS was coated with multiple superhydrophic and oleohobic coatings and observed under SEM for validity of adhesion and thickness and then scanned under FFM to validate the tribological information. The samples were then dipped into multiple cleaning agents maintained at the range of operating temperatures specified by the manufacturer. Coating was observed for deterioration over a fixed time intervals through SEM and FFM. A comparison was drawn to validate the most critical cleaning agent and the most critical temperature at which the coating fails to leave the base substrate exposed to the environment.

  3. Effect of tempering temperature on microstructure and sliding wear property of laser quenched 4Cr13 steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, J.H.; Pei, Y.T.; Li, X.D.; Lei, T.C.

    1994-01-01

    4Cr13 martensite stainless steel was quenched by a CO2 laser and tempered for 2 h at different temperatures in the range 200 °C to 550 °C. The microstructure of treated layer was observed by SEM, XRD and TEM. Tempering leads to the decomposition of a large number of retained austenites in laser

  4. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T c superconductors

  5. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F. [Prairie View A& M Univ., Texas (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  6. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  7. Investigation of laser cladding high temperature anti-wear composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy with the addition of self-lubricant CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Xiu-Bo; Ren, Jia; Luo, Jian; Shi, Shi-Hong; Chen, Yao; Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant coating was fabricated. • TiC carbides and self-lubricant CaF 2 were “in situ” synthesized in the coating. • The coating with the addition of CaF 2 possessed superior properties than without. - Abstract: To improve the high-temperature tribological properties of Ti–6Al–4V alloy, γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC and γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF 2 coatings were fabricated on Ti–6Al–4V alloy by laser cladding. The phase compositions and microstructure of the coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The tribological behaviors were evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer from ambient temperature to 600 °C under dry sliding wear conditions and the corresponding wear mechanisms were discussed. The results indicated that the γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF 2 coating consisted of α-Ti, the “in situ” synthesized TiC block particles and dendrite, γ-NiCrAlTi solid solution and spherical CaF 2 particles. The wear rates of γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF 2 coating were decreased greatly owing to the combined effects of the reinforced carbides and continuous lubricating films. Furthermore, the friction coefficients of γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF 2 coating presented minimum value of 0.21 at 600 °C, which was reduced by 43% and 50% compared to the substrate and γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC coating respectively. It was considered that the γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF 2 coating exhibited excellent friction-reducing and anti-wear properties at high temperature

  8. Investigation of laser cladding high temperature anti-wear composite coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy with the addition of self-lubricant CaF{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Zhan-Feng [School of Mechanical and Electric Engineering, Soochow University, 178 East Ganjiang Road, Suzhou 215006 (China); Liu, Xiu-Bo, E-mail: liuxiubo@suda.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Electric Engineering, Soochow University, 178 East Ganjiang Road, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ren, Jia; Luo, Jian; Shi, Shi-Hong; Chen, Yao [School of Mechanical and Electric Engineering, Soochow University, 178 East Ganjiang Road, Suzhou 215006 (China); Shi, Gao-Lian; Wu, Shao-Hua [Suzhou Institute of Industrial Technology, Suzhou 215104 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel high temperature self-lubricating wear-resistant coating was fabricated. • TiC carbides and self-lubricant CaF{sub 2} were “in situ” synthesized in the coating. • The coating with the addition of CaF{sub 2} possessed superior properties than without. - Abstract: To improve the high-temperature tribological properties of Ti–6Al–4V alloy, γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC and γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF{sub 2} coatings were fabricated on Ti–6Al–4V alloy by laser cladding. The phase compositions and microstructure of the coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The tribological behaviors were evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer from ambient temperature to 600 °C under dry sliding wear conditions and the corresponding wear mechanisms were discussed. The results indicated that the γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF{sub 2} coating consisted of α-Ti, the “in situ” synthesized TiC block particles and dendrite, γ-NiCrAlTi solid solution and spherical CaF{sub 2} particles. The wear rates of γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF{sub 2} coating were decreased greatly owing to the combined effects of the reinforced carbides and continuous lubricating films. Furthermore, the friction coefficients of γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF{sub 2} coating presented minimum value of 0.21 at 600 °C, which was reduced by 43% and 50% compared to the substrate and γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC coating respectively. It was considered that the γ-NiCrAlTi/TiC/CaF{sub 2} coating exhibited excellent friction-reducing and anti-wear properties at high temperature.

  9. A new methodology for predictive tool wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Sik

    An empirical approach to tool wear, which requires a series of machining tests for each combination of insert and work material, has been a standard practice for industries since early part of the twentieth century. With many varieties of inserts and work materials available for machining, the empirical approach is too experiment-intensive that the demand for the development of a model-based approach is increasing. With a model-based approach, the developed wear equation can be extended without additional machining experiments. The main idea is that the temperatures on the primary wear areas are increasing such that the physical properties of the tool material degrade substantially and consequently tool wear increases. Dissolution and abrasion are identified to be the main mechanisms for tool wear. Flank wear is predominantly a phenomenon of abrasion as evident by the presence of a scoring mark on the flank surface. Based on this statement, it is reasonable to expect that the flank-wear rate would increase with the content of hard inclusions. However, experimental flank wear results did not necessary correspond to the content of cementite phase present in the steels. Hence, other phenomena are believed to significantly affect wear behavior under certain conditions. When the cutting temperature in the flank interface is subjected to high enough temperatures, pearlitic structure austenizes. During the formation of a new austenitic phase, the existing carbon is dissolved into the ferrite matrix, which will reduce the abrasive action. To verify the austenitic transformation, turning tests were conducted with plain carbon steels. The machined surface areas are imaged using X-ray diffraction the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). On the other hand, crater wear occurs as a result of dissolution wear and abrasive wear. To verify the wear mechanisms of crater wear, various coating inserts as well as uncoated inserts were

  10. Tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A; He, L H; Lyons, K; Swain, M V

    2012-03-01

    Tooth wear has been recognised as a major problem in dentistry. Epidemiological studies have reported an increasing prevalence of tooth wear and general dental practitioners see a greater number of patients seeking treatment with worn dentition. Although the dental literature contains numerous publications related to management and rehabilitation of tooth wear of varying aetiologies, our understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of tooth wear is still limited. The wear behaviour of dental biomaterials has also been extensively researched to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for the development of restorative materials with good wear resistance. The complex nature of tooth wear indicates challenges for conducting in vitro and in vivo wear investigations and a clear correlation between in vitro and in vivo data has not been established. The objective was to critically review the peer reviewed English-language literature pertaining to prevalence and aetiology of tooth wear and wear investigations in dentistry identified through a Medline search engine combined with hand-searching of the relevant literature, covering the period between 1960 and 2011. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. 新型高效抗磨减阻剂在东海油气田的应用%Application of a New Highly Efficient Anti-wear Friction Reducer in Donghai Oil and Gas Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄召; 何福耀; 雷磊; 丁建平; 严维锋; 谢中成

    2017-01-01

    近年来,东海油气田大位移井、大斜度井和水平分支井钻井作业越来越多,钻进过程中的高扭矩、钻杆和套管的磨损已经严重地影响了作业的安全和效率.在这些高难度井中引入了一种新型高效抗磨减阻剂ARDR LUBE-100.ARDR LUBE-100属于有机负离子和有机金属化合物类产品,其主要是以醇、脂等抗磨材料在高温下,通过酯化合成及缩合反应得到的产物,在中间体合成过程中产生了有机金属离子及添加了抗磨惰性离子,通过有机负离子吸附在套管及钻杆表面,可以在管体表面形成滚动摩擦,起到了很好的抗磨减阻作用.室内评价和现场应用表明,该抗磨减阻剂与钻井液配伍性良好,在钻井液中加入1%左右即可将钻井液的润滑系数降低60%,钻具与套管之间的磨损速率降低99.64%以上,抗磨减阻效果明显.%In Donghai Oil and Gas Field, more and more extended reach wells, high angle deviated wells and multilateral horizontal wells have been drilled in recent years. During the drilling operations, high torque and wear-and-tear experienced by the drill pipes and the casing strings have impacted on the safety and the efficiency of the drilling operations. A highly efficient anti-wear friction reducer, ARDR LUBE-100 was found, after extensive investigation and experiments, to be effective in dealing with the problems aforementioned. ARDR LUBE-100 is a compound of organic anions and organic metals, and is a product of anti-wear materials such as alcohols and esters through esterification reaction or condensation reaction at high temperatures. Organic metal ions are generated in intermediate synthesis reaction, and anti-wear inert ions are added into the reactants. ARDR LUBE-100 can be adsorbed onto the surface of a pipe, where rolling friction takes place between the ARDR LUBE-100 particles and the surface of the pipe, thereby effectively reducing wear-and-tear and friction. Laboratory evaluation

  12. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  13. Application specific integrated circuit for high temperature oil well applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallet, T.; Gakkestad, J.; Forre, G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an integrated BiCMOS circuit for high temperature applications. The circuit contains Pierce oscillators with automatic gain control, and measurements show that it is operating up to 266{sup o}C. The relative frequency variation up to 200 {sup o}C is less than 60 ppm caused mainly by the crystal element itself. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Truck tyre wear assessment and prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.; Montanaro, F.; Donadio, D.; Gelosa, E.; Vis, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Tyre wear is a complex phenomenon. It depends non-linearly on numerous parameters, like tyre compound and design, vehicle type and usage, road conditions and road surface characteristics, environmental conditions (e.g., temperature) and many others. Yet, tyre wear has many economic and ecological

  15. Tribological Properties of a Pennzane(Registered Trademark)-Based Liquid Lubricant (Disubstituted Alkylated Cyclopentane) for Low Temperature Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, Clifford; Casserly, Edward W.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Marchetti, Mario; Jansen, Mark J.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2002-01-01

    The tribological properties of a disubstituted alkylated cyclopentane, Pennzane (registered) Synthesized Hydrocarbon Fluid X-1000, are presented. This compound is a lower molecular weight version of the commonly used multiply alkylated cyclopentane, Pennzane X-2000, currently used in many space mechanisms. New, lower temperature applications will require liquid lubricants with lower viscosities and pour points and acceptable vapor pressures. Properties reported include: friction and wear studies and lubricated lifetime in vacuum; additionally, typical physical properties (i.e., viscosity-temperature, pour point, flash and fire point, specific gravity, refractive index, thermal properties, volatility and vapor pressure) are reported.

  16. Testing of a Fiber Optic Wear, Erosion and Regression Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the physical processes and harsh environments associated with erosion and wear in propulsion environments makes their measurement and real-time rate quantification difficult. A fiber optic sensor capable of determining the wear (regression, erosion, ablation) associated with these environments has been developed and tested in a number of different applications to validate the technique. The sensor consists of two fiber optics that have differing attenuation coefficients and transmit light to detectors. The ratio of the two measured intensities can be correlated to the lengths of the fiber optic lines, and if the fibers and the host parent material in which they are embedded wear at the same rate the remaining length of fiber provides a real-time measure of the wear process. Testing in several disparate situations has been performed, with the data exhibiting excellent qualitative agreement with the theoretical description of the process and when a separate calibrated regression measurement is available good quantitative agreement is obtained as well. The light collected by the fibers can also be used to optically obtain the spectra and measure the internal temperature of the wear layer.

  17. Application and analysis of palladium vapor deposited on stainless steel for high temperature electrical contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodeh, S.

    2008-01-01

    Using electron beam evaporation. Pd thin films of 300 nm thickness have been deposited on 301 stainless steel for high temperature electrical contact studies. The structure and compost ion of the helms were studied in detail x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) with sputter depth profiling. The contact properties such as contact resistance, fretting wear resistance, and thermal stability have been measured.The contact resistance rem ins low after heat-aging in air for 168 h at 150 and 200 deg., but increases significantly after heat-aging at 340 deg.. This increase in contact resistance is caused by the formation of about a 27 nm (1 μin.) thick Pdo. In contrast, the thickness of the Pdo is too thin to cause measurable contact resistance increases after heat-aging at 150 and 200 deg.. The fretting wear resistance of Pd coated 301 stainless steel is better than that of electroplated Sn of ser veal thousand nm thickness. Thus, vapor deposited Pd coating on 301 stainless steel may replace electroplated Sn for electrical contact application at elevated temperatures.

  18. Radiation tagging measures wear at speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Jon.

    1994-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique for performing accelerated wear and corrosion analysis is particularly relevant to power transmission systems. Wear tests that would normally take days or weeks to complete can now be performed in hours. A tiny patch of the wearing component is made mildly radioactive and the drop in activity as material is worn away is monitored. Known as Thin Layer Activation (TLA), the technology was originally developed and pioneered in-house by the Atomic Energy Authority. Since then, the dominant partner has been the automotive sector where TLA has been used extensively for engine wear and lubrication performance analysis. However, TLA could be used in any wear or corrosion environment. Applications include wear analysis of machine tool cutting surfaces, pump impellers and brake linings to the corrosion monitoring of process plant and pipelines. (author)

  19. Biomedical applications using low temperature plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xiujuan; Jiang Nan

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature plasma technology and biomedicine are two different subjects, but the combination of the two may play a critical role in modern science and technology. The 21 st century is believed to be a biotechnology century. Plasma technology is becoming a widely used platform for the fabrication of biomaterials and biomedical devices. In this paper some of the technologies used for material surface modification are briefly introduced. Some biomedical applications using plasma technology are described, followed by suggestions as to how a bridge between plasma technology and biomedicine can be built. A pulsed plasma technique that is used for surface functionalization is discussed in detail as an example of this kind of bridge or combination. Finally, it is pointed out that the combination of biomedical and plasma technology will be an important development for revolutionary 21st century technologies that requires different experts from different fields to work together. (authors)

  20. Laser application in high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohse, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The scope and priorities of laser application in materials science and technology are attracting widespread interest. After a brief discussion of the unique capabilities of laser application in the various fields of materials science, main emphasis is given on the three areas of materials processing, surface modification and alloying, and property measurements at high temperatures. In materials processing the operational regimes for surface hardening, drilling, welding and laser glazing are discussed. Surface modifications by laser melting, quenching and surface alloying, the formation of solid solutions, metastable phases and amorphous solids on the basis of rapid solidification, ion implantation and ion beam mixing are considered. The influence of solidification rates and interface velocities on the surface properties are given. The extension of property measurements up to and beyond the melting point of refractory materials into their critical region by a transient-type dynamic laser pulse heating technique is given for the three examples of vapour pressure measurement, density and heat capacity determination in the solid and liquid phases. A new approach, the laser autoclave technique, applying laser heating and x-ray shadow technique under autoclave conditions to acoustically levitated spheres will be presented. (author)

  1. Predicting railway wheel wear under uncertainty of wear coefficient, using universal kriging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremona, Marzia A.; Liu, Binbin; Hu, Yang; Bruni, Stefano; Lewis, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Railway wheel wear prediction is essential for reliability and optimal maintenance strategies of railway systems. Indeed, an accurate wear prediction can have both economic and safety implications. In this paper we propose a novel methodology, based on Archard's equation and a local contact model, to forecast the volume of material worn and the corresponding wheel remaining useful life (RUL). A universal kriging estimate of the wear coefficient is embedded in our method. Exploiting the dependence of wear coefficient measurements with similar contact pressure and sliding speed, we construct a continuous wear coefficient map that proves to be more informative than the ones currently available in the literature. Moreover, this approach leads to an uncertainty analysis on the wear coefficient. As a consequence, we are able to construct wear prediction intervals that provide reasonable guidelines in practice. - Highlights: • Wear prediction is of outmost importance for reliability of railway systems. • Wear coefficient is essential in prediction through Archard's equation. • A novel methodology is developed to predict wear and RUL. • Universal kriging is used for wear coefficient and uncertainty estimation. • A simulation study and a real case application are provided.

  2. Wear resistance of polypropylene-SiC composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenojar, J.; Enciso, B.; Martínez, MA; Velasco, F.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the wear resistance of thermoplastic composites with a high amount of ceramic is evaluated. Composites made of polypropylene (PP) and silicon carbide (SiC) powder at 50 wt% were used with the final objective of manufacturing ablative materials. This is the first part of a project studying the wear resistance and the mechanical properties of those composites, to be used in applications like habitat industry. In theory, the exposure to high temperature of ablative materials involves the elimination of thermal energy by the sacrifice of surface polymer. In our case, PP will act as a heat sink, up to the reaction temperature (melting or sublimation), where endothermic chemical decomposition into charred material and gaseous products occurs. As the surface is eroded, it is formed a SiC like-foam with improved insulation performance. Composites were produced by extrusion and hot compression. The wear characterization was performed by pin-on-disk test. Wear test was carried out under standard ASTM G99. The parameters were 120 rpm speed, 15 N load, a alumina ball with 6 mm as pin and 1000 m sliding distance. The tracks were also observed by opto-digital microscope.

  3. Wear resistance of polypropylene-SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abenojar, J; Enciso, B; Martínez, MA; Velasco, F

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the wear resistance of thermoplastic composites with a high amount of ceramic is evaluated. Composites made of polypropylene (PP) and silicon carbide (SiC) powder at 50 wt% were used with the final objective of manufacturing ablative materials. This is the first part of a project studying the wear resistance and the mechanical properties of those composites, to be used in applications like habitat industry. In theory, the exposure to high temperature of ablative materials involves the elimination of thermal energy by the sacrifice of surface polymer. In our case, PP will act as a heat sink, up to the reaction temperature (melting or sublimation), where endothermic chemical decomposition into charred material and gaseous products occurs. As the surface is eroded, it is formed a SiC like-foam with improved insulation performance. Composites were produced by extrusion and hot compression. The wear characterization was performed by pin-on-disk test. Wear test was carried out under standard ASTM G99. The parameters were 120 rpm speed, 15 N load, a alumina ball with 6 mm as pin and 1000 m sliding distance. The tracks were also observed by opto-digital microscope. (paper)

  4. Tribopolymerization as an anti-wear mechanism. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furey, M.J.

    1996-04-01

    The primary objective of this activity is to obtain the necessary data which would enhance, promote, and encourage the introduction of advanced lubrication technology into the marketplace. This includes (a) defining specific but different applications, (b) establishing the limits or ranges of applied loads, speeds, and temperatures over which the concept of tribopolymerization would work in reducing wear and/or friction, (c) continuing in efforts to understand the film-forming process (this rates to (b) above), using this knowledge to develop new and even more effective additives, and (d) exploring possible connections with private and investment companies for the licensing and marketing of products which will reduce friction and wear in a variety of applications. Progress was made in several different but connected areas. These included (a) establishing of load/velocity limits of selected monomers for ceramic lubrication, (b) the discovery of new and effective monomers designed for higher temperature anti-wear applications, (c) improvements and modifications of the high load/high speed pin-on-disk machine, (d) the initiation of related or spin-off projects designed to get their advanced technology into the marketplace, (e) the filing of three new patent applications, and (f) collaborative research with Dr. Kajdas--the co-inventor with Dr. Furey--on tribopolymerization as a novel and effective approach to the boundary lubrication of ceramics and steel. These and other elements of progress made during the first Quarter of 1996 are discussed briefly.

  5. Wear and Corrosion Resistance of Fe Based Coatings by HVOF Sprayed on Gray Cast-Iron for Automotive Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Priyan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, commercially available FeSiNiCr and FeBCr alloy powders were designed with suitable compositions, gas atomized and then coated on gray cast-iron substrate. The microstructures of the feed stock Fe based alloy powders and the coatings were investigated by means of optical microscopy (OM, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In the present study, both the coating materials experienced two-body wear mechanisms. The results showed that for loads of 0.05 N, 0.1 N and 0.2 N, the wear resistance of FeBCr coating was less than FeSiNiCr by 44 %, 40 % and 31 %, respectively. The results indicated that the coated substrates exhibited lower corrosion current densities and lower corrosion rates, when placed in 20 wt.% H2SO4 solutions. In addition, the use of optimal spraying parameters/conditions gave improvements to the corrosion resistance of the substrates that had been treated with the crystalline coating.

  6. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  7. Reconstruction mechanisms of tantalum oxide coatings with low concentrations of silver for high temperature tribological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, D. S.; Bischof, M.; Aouadi, S. M., E-mail: samir.aouadi@unt.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76207 (United States); Gao, H.; Martini, A. [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Chantharangsi, C.; Paksunchai, C. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-11-10

    Silver tantalate (AgTaO{sub 3}) coatings have been found to exhibit outstanding tribological properties at elevated temperatures. To understand the mechanisms involved in the tribological behavior of the Ag-Ta-O system, tantalum oxide coatings with a small content of silver were produced to investigate the metastable nature of this self-lubricating material. The coatings were produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, ball-on-disk wear tested at 750 °C, and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Auger Nanoprobe, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Complementary molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate changes in the chemical and structural properties at the interface due to sliding for films with varying silver content. Both the experimental characterization and the theoretical modeling showed that silver content affects friction and wear, through the role of silver in film reconstruction during sliding. The results suggest that the relative amount of silver may be used to tune film performance for a given application.

  8. Reconstruction mechanisms of tantalum oxide coatings with low concentrations of silver for high temperature tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, D. S.; Bischof, M.; Aouadi, S. M.; Gao, H.; Martini, A.; Chantharangsi, C.; Paksunchai, C.

    2014-01-01

    Silver tantalate (AgTaO 3 ) coatings have been found to exhibit outstanding tribological properties at elevated temperatures. To understand the mechanisms involved in the tribological behavior of the Ag-Ta-O system, tantalum oxide coatings with a small content of silver were produced to investigate the metastable nature of this self-lubricating material. The coatings were produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, ball-on-disk wear tested at 750 °C, and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Auger Nanoprobe, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Complementary molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate changes in the chemical and structural properties at the interface due to sliding for films with varying silver content. Both the experimental characterization and the theoretical modeling showed that silver content affects friction and wear, through the role of silver in film reconstruction during sliding. The results suggest that the relative amount of silver may be used to tune film performance for a given application

  9. NASA space applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Sokoloski, Martin M.; Aron, Paul R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1992-01-01

    The application of superconducting technology in space has been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. The only means of attaining these temperatures has been with cryogenic fluids which severely limits mission lifetime. The development of materials with superconducting transition temperatures (T sub c) above 77 K has made superconducting technology more attractive and feasible for employment in aerospace systems. Potential applications of high-temperature superconducting technology in cryocoolers and remote sensing, communications, and power systems are discussed.

  10. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO 2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  11. Investigation of Wear Coefficient of Manganese Phosphate Coated Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ilaiyavel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the properties of the coating in terms of wear resistance is of paramount importance in order to prevent the formation of severe damages. In this study, Wear coefficient of uncoated, Manganese Phosphate coated, Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated with oil lubricant on AISI D2 steels was investigated using Archard’s equation. The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The volumetric wear loss and wear coefficient were evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0 m/s under normal load of 40 N and controlled condition of temperature and humidity. Based on the results of the wear test, the Heat treated Manganese Phosphate with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average wear coefficient and the lowest wear loss under 40 N load.

  12. The Sliding Wear and Friction Behavior of M50-Graphene Self-Lubricating Composites Prepared by Laser Additive Manufacturing at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiyao; Shi, Xiaoliang; Huang, Yuchun; Deng, Xiaobin; Lu, Guanchen; Yan, Zhao; Zhou, Hongyan; Xue, Bing

    2018-03-01

    M50 steel is widely applied to manufacture aircraft bearings where service lives are mainly determined by the friction and wear behaviors. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the tribological behaviors and wear mechanisms of M50-1.5 wt.% graphene composites (MGC) prepared by laser additive manufacturing (LAM) (MGC-LAM) sliding against Si3N4 ball from 25 to 550 °C at 18 N-0.2 m/s. XRD, EPMA, FESEM, and EDS mapping were conducted to understand the major mechanisms leading to the improvement in the sliding behavior of MGC-LAM. The results indicated that MGC-LAM showed the excellent friction and wear performance at 25-550 °C for the lower friction coefficient of 0.16-0.52 and less wear rate of 6.1-9.5 × 10-7 mm3 N-1 m-1. Especially at 350 °C, MGC-LAM obtained the best tribological performance (0.16, 6.1 × 10-7mm3 N-1 m-1). It was attributed to the dense coral-like microstructure, as well as the formed surface lubricating structure which is composed of the upper uniform lubricating film with massive graphene and the underneath compacted layer.

  13. Friction and wear in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Droher, J.J.

    1973-01-01

    In the design of a safe and reliable sodium-cooled reactor one of the more important problem areas is that of friction and wear of components immersed in liquid sodium or exposed to sodium vapor. Sodium coolant at elevated temperatures may severely affect most oxide-bearing surface layers which provide corrosion resistance and, to some extent, lubrication and surface hardness. Consequently, accelerated deterioration may be experienced on engaged-motion contact surfaces, which could result in unexpected reactor shutdown from component malfunction or failure due to galling and seizure. An overall view of the friction and wear phenomena encountered during oscillatory rubbing of surfaces in high-temperature, liquid-sodium environments is presented. Specific data generated at the Liquid Metal Engineering Center (LMEC) on this subject is also presented. (U.S.)

  14. Polymer wear evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerbon, Mikkel; Sivebæk, Ion Marius

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wear plays an increasing role in manufacturing of machine parts for e.g. medical devices. Some of these have an expected lifetime of five to eight years during which very little wear of the components is acceptable. Too much wear compromises the dosage accuracy of the device and thereby...... the safety of the patients. Prediction of the wear of polymers is complicated by the low thermal conductivity of this kind of material. It implies that any acceleration of testing conditions by increased contact pressure and/or sliding velocity will make the polymer fail due to exaggerated heat buildup....... This is not the kind of wear observed in medical devices. In the present work a method was developed capable of evaluating the wear progression in polymer-polymer contacts. The configuration of the setup is injection moulded specimens consisting of an upper part having a toroid shape and a lower flat part. The sliding...

  15. Application of a TiAIN coating for the increase wear resistance of a passage floodgate manufactured in steel T9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes de Oca, J.; Gonzalez, H. J.; Solis, E.; Moreno, J.; Munoz S, J.

    2009-01-01

    The present work reports a study to increase wear resistance of a ball passage floodgate (steel type T9) trough the application of a thick film (coating). This study have included a material and process selection, synthesis of the coating on steel plates as substrates and spherical device, assembling of the coated floodgate on the ball valves, and finally an evaluation of the valves in the process of a thermoelectric power station. Taking into account the different requirements, a TiAIN coating prepared by cathodic arc evaporation was finally retained. The crystal structure, morphology and chemical composition of the coating were evaluated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). Finally, mechanical properties such as hardness and Young modulus were determined by nano indentation. (Author)

  16. Controlling LPG temperature for SI engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, Mehmet Akif; Kaleli, Alirıza; Güner, Erdoğan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the LPG temperature on the engine performance and the exhaust emission characteristics have been investigated experimentally on an SI engine. In conventional injection systems, the LPG temperature increases excessively during the phase change in pressure regulator, and reduces the engine volumetric efficiency. According to the test results, engine performance and NO emission characteristics can be improved by controlling the LPG temperature before injecting to the engine intake manifold. A new control system taking into account the results of the study has been developed and tested. In order to control the LPG temperature, the coolant flow rate in pressure regulator circuit was arranged by using a control valve activated by a PID controller unit. Results of the study showed that the engine brake power loss can be increased by about 1.85% and NO emissions can be decreased by about 2% as compared to the operation with the original LPG injection system. - Highlights: • Effects of the LPG temperature have been examined. • Engine performance characteristics and exhaust emissions have been studied. • Results reveal that the LPG temperature should be kept in a range. • A prototype LPG temperature control system has been successfully developed

  17. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment

  18. The Wear Characteristics of Heat Treated Manganese Phosphate Coating Applied to AlSi D2 Steel with Oil Lubricant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Alankaram

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, in the area of material design conversion coatings play an important role in the applications where temperature, corrosion, oxidation and wear come in to play. Wear of metals occurs when relative motion between counter-surfaces takes place, leading to physical or chemical destruction of the original top layers. In this study, the tribological behaviour of heat treated Manganese phosphate coatings on AISI D2 steel with oil lubricant was investigated. The Surface morphology of manganese phosphate coatings was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX .The wear tests were performed in a pin on disk apparatus as per ASTM G-99 Standard. The wear resistance of the coated steel was evaluated through pin on disc test using a sliding velocity of 3.0m/s under Constant loads of 40 N and 100 N with in controlled condition of temperature and humidity. The Coefficient of friction and wear rate were evaluated. Wear pattern of Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant, Heat treated Manganese phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant were captured using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. The results of the wear test established that the heat treated manganese phosphate coating with oil lubricant exhibited the lowest average coefficient of friction and the lowest wear loss up to 6583 m sliding distance under 40 N load and 3000 m sliding distance even under 100 N load respectively. The Wear volume and temperature rise in heat treated Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant is lesser than the Manganese Phosphate coated pins with oil lubricant

  19. Mechanical vapor compression refrigeration for low temperature industrial applications today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    If the super conductor industry settles out at a temperature of -100 0 F or above, mechanical refrigeration will be vying for the cooling business. Today there very definitely is a break point in the application of equipment at approximately -120 0 F or 189 0 K. Other technologies are generally utilized below this level. However, with market potential comes invention and breakthroughs in refrigeration can also occur. Today standard refrigeration systems are cost effective, reliable and produced in the millions for high temperature applications of +10 0 F to +40 0 F evaporator temperature. Lower temperatures require additional hardware, consume additional power and are produced today in limited quantities for special applications

  20. Wearable Android Android wear and Google Fit app development

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, Sanjay M

    2015-01-01

    Software Development/Mobile/Android/Wearable/Fitness Build ""Wearable"" Applications on the Android Wear and Google Fit Platforms This book covers wearable computing and wearable application development particularly for Android Wear (smartwatches) and Google Fit (fitness sensors). It provides relevant history, background and core concepts of wearable computing and ubiquitous computing, as a foundation for designing/developing applications for the Android Wear and Google Fit platforms. This book is intended for Android wearable enthusiasts, technologists and software developers. Gain ins

  1. Design for ASIC reliability for low-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Mojaradi, Mohammad; Westergard, Lynett; Billman, Curtis; Cozy, Scott; Burke, Gary; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to design for reliability for low temperature applications without requiring process improvement. The developed hot carrier aging lifetime projection model takes into account both the transistor substrate current profile and temperature profile to determine the minimum transistor size needed in order to meet reliability requirements. The methodology is applicable for automotive, military, and space applications, where there can be varying temperature ranges. A case study utilizing this methodology is given to design for reliability into a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a Mars exploration mission.

  2. Friction and wear behaviour of Ni-Cr-B hardface coating on 316LN stainless steel in liquid sodium at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Ramakrishnan, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Ray, K. K.

    2017-11-01

    The sliding friction and wear behaviour of Ni-Cr-B hardface coating made on 316LN stainless steel were evaluated in liquid sodium at 823 K by using a fabricated reciprocating-type tribometer. The test parameters have been selected based on operational conditions prevailing in the Indian sodium cooled fast breeder reactors (FBRs). Accordingly, the tests were carried out at sliding speeds of 2 and 16 mm/s under contact stresses of 10 and 40 MPa respectively using Ni-Cr-B coated pin and disc specimens. The static and dynamic friction coefficients are found to be in the ranges of 0.03-0.07 and 0.01-0.02 respectively under the imposed test conditions. The estimated wear rates (WR) are found to be in the range of 0.62 × 10-12 - 3.07 × 10-12 m3/m; the magnitude of WR increases with increase in the contact stress. The examination of the worn disc specimens by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated higher damage in specimens tested at 40 MPa compared to that in specimens tested at 10 MPa; the quantitative estimation of damage was made by the number of scars and their depth. These observations corroborate well with the morphological features of the worn surfaces of the pin specimens examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results unambiguously indicate superior friction coefficients and wear resistance of Ni-Cr-B coatings in liquid sodium compared to that in air under identical test conditions.

  3. Wear behaviour of nitrogen-implanted and nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinella, R.; Giovanardi, S.; Chevallard, G.; Villani, M.; Molinari, A.; Tosello, C.

    1985-01-01

    The comparison between the wear behaviour of nitrogen-implanted Ti-6Al-4V alloy and that of nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy is reported. Both treatments were carried out at temperatures from 573 to 973 K on lapped surfaces; in order to compare roughness effects, nitriding was also carried out on rougher samples. An improvement in wear resistance for lapped surfaces was noted after implantation at 573 K or higher temperatures and after nitriding at temperatures over 773 K only; however, at 873 K, nitriding was more effective than implantation. Rough nitrided surfaces showed better wear resistance than lapped nitrided surfaces or lapped implanted surfaces. Most probably the improvement in wear resistance on implanted samples is due to a reduction in friction induced by chemical modification of the surface as a result of oxide and TiN. Scanning electron microscopy observations which show subsurface voids and coalescence are in good agreement with a wear model previously reported. As implantation preserves the surface finish, a possible application is suggested. (Auth.)

  4. Wear Characteristics of Metallic Biomaterials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohamed A.; Mohammed, Abdul Samad; Al-Aqeeli, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Metals are extensively used in a variety of applications in the medical field for internal support and biological tissue replacements, such as joint replacements, dental roots, orthopedic fixation, and stents. The metals and alloys that are primarily used in biomedical applications are stainless steels, Co alloys, and Ti alloys. The service period of a metallic biomaterial is determined by its abrasion and wear resistance. A reduction in the wear resistance of the implant results in the release of incompatible metal ions into the body that loosen the implant. In addition, several reactions may occur because of the deposition of wear debris in tissue. Therefore, developing biomaterials with high wear resistance is critical to ensuring a long life for the biomaterial. The aim of this work is to review the current state of knowledge of the wear of metallic biomaterials and how wear is affected by the material properties and conditions in terms of the type of alloys developed and fabrication processes. We also present a brief evaluation of various experimental test techniques and wear characterization techniques that are used to determine the tribological performance of metallic biomaterials.

  5. A novel nonlinear nano-scale wear law for metallic brake pads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sandeep P; Chilakamarri, Sri Harsha; Markert, Bernd

    2018-05-03

    In the present work, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to investigate the temperature distribution as well as the fundamental friction characteristics such as the coefficient of friction and wear in a disc-pad braking system. A wide range of constant velocity loadings was applied on metallic brake pads made of aluminium, copper and iron with different rotating speeds of a diamond-like carbon brake disc. The average temperature of Newtonian atoms and the coefficient of friction of the brake pad were investigated. The resulting relationship of the average temperature with the speed of the disc as well as the applied loading velocity can be described by power laws. The quantitative description of the volume lost from the brake pads was investigated, and it was found that the volume lost increases linearly with the sliding distance. Our results show that Archard's linear wear law is not applicable to a wide range of normal loads, e.g., in cases of low normal load where the wear rate was increased considerably and in cases of high load where there was a possibility of severe wear. In this work, a new formula for the brake pad wear in a disc brake assembly is proposed, which displays a power law relationship between the lost volume of the metallic brake pads per unit sliding distance and the applied normal load with an exponent of 0.62 ± 0.02. This work provides new insights into the fundamental understanding of the wear mechanism at the nano-scale leading to a new bottom-up wear law for metallic brake pads.

  6. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Moises E. [Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

  7. Polymer temperature sensor for textronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielska, Sylwia; Sibinski, Maciej; Lukasik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present research work of designing prototype textile sensors dedicated to human body temperature measurements. The sensor construction was especially elaborated to be integrated into protective clothing as a practical realization of intelligent e-textile concept. These types of sensors should be easily incorporable in clothing structures without disturbance of fabric flexibility (Carpi and De Rossi). The construction of the new type functional sensor testing is presented and illustrated by its parameters and thermal characteristics.

  8. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  9. Application of high temperature superconductors for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.H.; Heller, R.; Schlachter, S.I.; Goldacker, W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) materials in future fusion machines can increase the efficiency drastically. For ITER, W7-X and JT-60SA the economic benefit of HTS current leads was recognized after a 70 kA HTS current lead demonstrator was designed, fabricated and successfully tested by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, which is a merge of former Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and University of Karlsruhe). For ITER, the Chinese Domestic Agency will provide the current leads as a part of the superconducting feeder system. KIT is in charge of design, construction and test of HTS current leads for W7-X and JT-60SA. For W7-X 14 current leads with a maximum current of 18.2 kA are required that are oriented with the room temperature end at the bottom. JT60-SA will need 26 current leads (20 leads - 20 kA and 6 leads - 25.7 kA) which are mounted in vertical, normal position. These current leads are based on BiSCCO HTS superconductors, demonstrating that HTS material is now state of the art for highly efficient current leads. With respect to future fusion reactors, it would be very promising to use HTS material not only in current leads but also in coils. This would allow a large increase of efficiency if the coils could be operated at temperatures ≥65 K. With such a high temperature it would be possible to omit the radiation shield of the coils, resulting in a less complex cryostat and a size reduction of the machine. In addition less refrigeration power is needed saving investment and operating costs. However, to come to an HTS fusion coil it is necessary to develop low ac loss HTS cables for currents well above 20 kA at high fields well above 10 T. The high field rules BiSCCO superconductors out at temperatures above 50 K, but RE-123 superconductors are promising. The development of a high current, high field RE-123 HTS fusion cable will not be targeted outside fusion community and has to be in the frame of a long term development programme for

  10. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  11. Analusis techniques for elevated temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.J.; Hellen, T.K.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the more generally used methods of analysis of stress and strain in structures at elevated temperatures, with particular emphasis on finite element methods. It is shown that where sufficiently large computers are available, and where cost is not a severe limitation, creep and plasticity behaviour can be computed for a wide range of components. Where these effects are encountered simultaneously, more knowledge of materials behaviour is required. Calculation of stress and strain is usually only a means to the designer's main aim, which is proving the life and integrity of his structure. The shortcomings of computational methods in this respect are discussed, and a brief review given of some of the 'short cut' methods of life assessment available to the designer. (author)

  12. Cutting tool wear monitoring with the use of impedance layers

    OpenAIRE

    Sadílek, Marek; Kratochvíl, Jiří; Petrů, Jana; Čep, Robert; Zlámal, Tomáš; Stančeková, Dana

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with problems of cutting process monitoring in real time. It is focused on tool wear by means of impedance layers applied on ceramic cutting inserts. In the experimental part the cutting process is monitored using electrical resistance measurement. The results are compared and verified using the monitored cutting temperature and tool wear. The testing of impedance layers is reasonable mainly for cutting edge diagnostics. The width of this layer determines the wear allowance ...

  13. Nitrogen implantation of steels: A treatment which can initiate sustained oxidative wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, E.B.; Reinbold, R.; Missouri Univ., Rolla; Kohser, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Falex wear tests on mild (SAE 3135) steel samples treated by either nitrogen implantation (2.5x10 17 N 2 + cm -2 at 180 keV) or low temperature (about 315 0 C) oxidation are reported. The results show that both treatments lead to about an order-of-magnitude reduction in the long-term wear rate of the steel. In addition to the wear rate measurements, the wear member asymmetry behavior, scanning electron microscopy studies, Auger spectra and sputter profiles all indicate that the wear modes induced by both treatments are the same and are oxidative wear. These results confirm the previously proposed initiator-sustainer wear model in which implanted nitrogen simply acts as an initiator of favorable oxidative wear but is not directly involved in maintaining the sustained wear resistance. Possible mechanisms for both the initiation process and the sustained wear process are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  14. High-temperature superconductors in application - fight for the top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    For the superconductor market two-digit growth rates are predicted until after the year 2000. The decrosslinking of the high temperature superconductors initiated a worldwide race for first applications. The report considers the situation of raw materials and the application potentials in the USA, Japan and Western Europe. (orig.) [de

  15. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid Analyses of Polyetheretherketone Wear Characteristics by Accelerated Wear Testing with Microfabricated Surfaces for Artificial Joint Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kuo, Chien-Wei; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Wear particle-induced biological responses are the major factors resulting in the loosening and then failure of total joint arthroplasties. It is feasible to improve the lubrication and reduce the wear of artificial joint system. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is considered as a potential bearing material due to its mechanical characteristics of resistance to fatigue strain. The PEEK wear particles have been indicated to be involved in biological responses in vitro, and further studies regarding the wear phenomena and wear particle generation are needed. In this study, we have established an accelerated wear testing system with microfabricated surfaces. Various contact pressures and lubricants have been utilized in the accelerated wear tests. Our results showed that increasing contact pressure resulted in an increase of wear particle sizes and wear rate, and the size of PEEK wear particles can be controlled by the feature size of microfabricated surfaces. These results provided the information rapidly about factors that affect the morphology and amount of PEEK wear particles and can be applied in the future for application of PEEK on the biological articulation system.

  17. Determination of a Wear Initiation Cycle by using a Contact Resistance Measurement in Nuclear Fuel Fretting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear fuel fretting, the improving of the contact condition with a modified spring shape is a useful method for increasing the wear resistance of the nuclear fuel rod. This is because the fretting wear resistance between the fuel rod and grid spring is mainly affected by the grid spring shape rather than the environment, the contact modes, etc. In addition, the wear resistance is affected by the wear debris behavior between contact surfaces. So, it is expected that the wear initiation of each spring shape should be determined in order to evaluate a wear resistance. However, it is almost impossible to measure the wear behavior in contact surfaces on a real time basis because the contact surfaces are always hidden. Besides, the results of the worn surface observation after the fretting wear tests are restricted to archive the information on the wear debris behavior and the formation mechanism of the wear scar. In order to evaluate the wear behavior during the fretting wear tests, it is proposed that the contact resistance measurement is a useful method for examining the wear initiation cycle and modes. Generally, fretting wear damages are rapidly progressed by a localized plastic deformation between the contact surfaces, crack initiation and fracture of the deformed surface with a strain hardening difference between a surface and a subsurface and finally a detachment of wear debris. After this, wear debris is easily oxidized by frictional heat, test environment, etc. At this time, a small amount of electric current applied between the contact surfaces will be influenced by the wear debris, which could be an obstacle to an electric current flow. So, it is possible to archive the information on the wear behavior by measuring the contact resistance. In order to determine the wear initiation cycle during the fretting wear tests, in this study, fretting wear tests have been performed by applying a constant electric current in room temperature air

  18. Application of response surface methodology on investigating flank wear in machining hardened steel using PVD TiN coated mixed ceramic insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Sahoo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the development of flank wear model in turning hardened EN 24 steel with PVD TiN coated mixed ceramic insert under dry environment. The paper also investigates the effect of process parameter on flank wear (VBc. The experiments have been conducted using three level full factorial design techniques. The machinability model has been developed in terms of cutting speed (v, feed (f and machining time (t as input variable using response surface methodology. The adequacy of model has been checked using correlation coefficients. As the determination coefficient, R2 (98% is higher for the model developed; the better is the response model fits the actual data. In addition, residuals of the normal probability plot lie reasonably close to a straight line showing that the terms mentioned in the model are statistically significant. The predicted flank wear has been found to lie close to the experimental value. This indicates that the developed model can be effectively used to predict the flank wear in the hard turning. Abrasion and diffusion has been found to be the dominant wear mechanism in machining hardened steel from SEM micrographs at highest parametric range. Machining time has been found to be the most significant parameter on flank wear followed by cutting speed and feed as observed from main effect plot and ANOVA study.

  19. Improvement of thermophysiological stress in participants wearing protective clothing for spraying pesticide, and its application in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, C; Tokura, H

    2000-04-01

    Thermoregulatory responses were compared under two experimental conditions, in the laboratory (Experiment I), and in the field (Experiment II), between two kinds of protective clothing for spraying pesticides. One was currently being used (Type A), and was composed of ready made Gore-Tex clothing, mask, polyurethane gloves and rubber boots. The other one was newly designed (Type B), and was composed of pesticide-proof clothing (100% cotton with water repellent finish), mask, Gore-Tex gloves, and special boots consisting of rubber for the feet and ankle and Gore-Tex around the legs. In addition, the head and chest were cooled by frozen gel strips fixed in the cap and undershirt. In Experiment I, five female adults took part, in a climate-chamber controlled at an ambient temperature of 28 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60%. In Experiment II, five farmers (one male and four female) were tested in an apple orchard in July, August and September. The main results are summarized as follows: (1) change of rectal temperature was inhibited more effectively in Type B in Experiment I, (2) change of heart rate tended to be lower in Type B than in Type A in both experiments, (3) salivary lactic acid concentration at the end of the first exercise was significantly higher in Type A than in Type B in Experiment I, (4) the number of contractions in the handgrip exercise which was performed immediately after the third exercise, was significantly smaller in Type A than in Type B in Experiment I, (5) subjective comfort sensation was significantly improved in Type B in Experiments I and II. Thus, it was concluded that the newly designed protective clothing could reduce thermal stress during the spraying of pesticides in an apple orchard in summer.

  20. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for high temperature decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Normally, chemical decontamination of coolant systems of nuclear power reactors is carried out at temperatures less than 90 °C. At these temperatures, though magnetite dissolves effectively, the rate of dissolution of chromium and nickel containing oxides formed over stainless steel and other non-carbon steel coolant system surfaces is not that appreciable. A high temperature dissolution process using 5 mM NTA at 160 °C developed earlier by us was very effective in dissolving the oxides such as ferrites and chromites. However, the corrosion of structural materials such as carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) also increased beyond the acceptable limits at elevated temperatures. Hence, the control of base metal corrosion during the high temperature decontamination process is very important. In view of this, it was felt essential to investigate and develop a suitable inhibitor to reduce the corrosion that can take place on coolant structural material surfaces during the high temperature decontamination applications with weak organic acids. Three commercial inhibitors viz., Philmplus 5K655, Prosel PC 2116 and Ferroqest were evaluated at ambient and at 160 °C temperature in NTA formulation. Preliminary evaluation of these corrosion inhibitors carried out using electrochemical techniques showed maximum corrosion inhibition efficiency for Philmplus. Hence, it was used for high temperature applications. A concentration of 500 ppm was found to be optimum at 160 °C and at this concentration it showed an inhibition efficiency of 62% for CS. High temperature dissolution of oxides such as Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 , which are relevant to nuclear reactors, was also carried out and the rate of dissolution observed was less in the presence of Philmplus. Studies were also carried out to evaluate hydrazine as a corrosion inhibitor for high temperature applications. The results revealed that for CS inhibition efficiency of hydrazine is comparable to that of Philmplus, while

  1. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  2. Creep behavior of materials for high-temperature reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.; Hartnagel, W.; Iischner, B.; Schepp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) application are selected according to their creep behavior. For two alloys--Incoloy-800 used for the live steam tubing of the thorium high-temperature reactor and Inconel-617 evaluated for tubings in advanced HTGRs--creep curves are measured and described by equations. A microstructural interpretation is given. An essential result is that nonstable microstructures determine the creep behavior

  3. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  4. Survey of high-temperature nuclear heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, N.; Schaefer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear heat application at high temperatures can be divided into two areas - use of high-temperature steam up to 550 deg. C and use of high-temperature helium up to about 950 deg. C. Techniques of high-temperature steam and heat production and application are being developed in several IAEA Member States. In all these countries the use of steam for other than electricity production is still in a project definition phase. Plans are being discussed about using steam in chemical industries, oil refineries and for new synfuel producing plants. The use of nuclear generated steam for oil recovery from sands and shale is also being considered. High-temperature nuclear process heat production gives new possibilities for the application of nuclear energy - hard coals, lignites, heavy oils, fuels with problems concerning transport, handling and pollution can be converted into gaseous or liquid energy carriers with no loss of their energy contents. The main methods for this conversion are hydrogasification with hydrogen generated by nuclear heated steam reformers and steam gasification. These techniques will allow countries with large coal resources to replace an important part of their natural gas and oil consumption. Even countries with no fossil fuels can benefit from high-temperature nuclear heat - hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting, nuclear steel making, ammonia production and the chemical heat-pipe system are examples in this direction. (author)

  5. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Wear of Spur Gears Having a Dithering Motion and Lubricated with a Perfluorinated Polyether Grease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Timothy; Oswald, Fred; Handschuh, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Gear contact surface wear is one of the important failure modes for gear systems. Dedicated experiments are required to enable precise evaluations of gear wear for a particular application. The application of interest for this study required evaluation of wear of gears lubricated with a grade 2 perfluorinated polyether grease and having a dithering (rotation reversal) motion. Experiments were conducted using spur gears made from AISI 9310 steel. Wear was measured using a profilometer at test intervals encompassing 10,000 to 80,000 cycles of dithering motion. The test load level was 1.1 GPa maximum Hertz contact stress at the pitch-line. The trend of total wear as a function of test cycles was linear, and the wear depth rate was approximately 1.2 nm maximum wear depth per gear dithering cycle. The observed wear rate was about 600 times greater than the wear rate for the same gears operated at high speed and lubricated with oil.

  7. Prediction Of Abrasive And Diffusive Tool Wear Mechanisms In Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, S.; Umbrello, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tool wear prediction is regarded as very important task in order to maximize tool performance, minimize cutting costs and improve the quality of workpiece in cutting. In this research work, an experimental campaign was carried out at the varying of cutting conditions with the aim to measure both crater and flank tool wear, during machining of an AISI 1045 with an uncoated carbide tool P40. Parallel a FEM-based analysis was developed in order to study the tool wear mechanisms, taking also into account the influence of the cutting conditions and the temperature reached on the tool surfaces. The results show that, when the temperature of the tool rake surface is lower than the activation temperature of the diffusive phenomenon, the wear rate can be estimated applying an abrasive model. In contrast, in the tool area where the temperature is higher than the diffusive activation temperature, the wear rate can be evaluated applying a diffusive model. Finally, for a temperature ranges within the above cited values an adopted abrasive-diffusive wear model furnished the possibility to correctly evaluate the tool wear phenomena.

  8. Common rectifier diodes in temperature measurement applications below 50 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervelae, J; Stenvall, A; Mikkonen, R

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we studied the use of common electronic semiconductor diodes in temperature measurements at cryogenic atmosphere. The motivation for this is the high price of calibrated cryogenic temperature sensors since there are some applications, like quench detection, in which a cheaper and a less accurate sensor would suffice. We measured the forward voltage as a function of temperature, V f (T), of several silicon rectifier diodes to determine the accuracy and interchangeability of the diodes. The experimental results confirmed that V f (T) of common rectifier diodes are similar to cryogenic sensor diodes, but the variability between two samples is much larger. The interchangeability of the diodes proved to be poor if absolute temperatures are to be measured. However for sensing changes in temperature they proved to be adequate and thus can be used to measure e.g. quench propagation or sense quench ignition at multiple locations with cheap price.

  9. Effects of Load and Speed on Wear Rate of Abrasive Wear for 2014 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabas, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of the normal load and sliding speed on wear rate of two-body abrasive wear for 2014 Al Alloy were investigated in detail. In order to understand the variation in wear behaviour with load and speed, wear tests were carried out at a sliding distance of 11 m, a speed of 0.36 m/s, a duration of 30 s and loads in the range 3-11 N using 220 grit abrasive paper, and at a speed range 0.09-0.90 m/s, a load of 5 N and an average sliding distance of 11 m using abrasive papers of 150 grit size under dry friction conditions. Before the wear tests, solution treatment of the 2014 Al alloy was carried out at temperatures of 505 and 520 °C for 1 h in a muffle furnace and then quenched in cold water at 15 °C. Later, the ageing treatment was carried out at 185 °C for 8 h in the furnace. Generally, wear rate due to time increased linearly and linear wear resistance decreased with increasing loads. However, the wear rate was directly proportional to the load up to a critical load of 7 N. After this load, the slope of the curves decreased because the excessive deformation of the worn surface and the instability of the abrasive grains began to increase. When the load on an abrasive grain reaches a critical value, the groove width is about 0.17 of the abrasive grain diameter, and the abrasive grains begin to fail. The wear rate due to time increased slightly as the sliding speed increased in the range 0.09-0.90 m/s. The reason for this is that changes arising from strain rate and friction heating are expected with increasing sliding speeds.

  10. Optical wear monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  11. Feasibility of wear compensation in micro EDM milling based on discharge counting and discharge population characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tristo, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of real time wear compensation in micro EDM milling based on discharge counting and discharge population characterization. Experiments were performed involving discharge counting and tool electrode wear measurement in a wide range of process parameters...

  12. Ceramic-like wear behaviour of human dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsecularatne, J A; Hoffman, M

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of subsurfaces of enamel specimens following in vitro reciprocating wear tests with an enamel cusp sliding on a flat enamel specimen under hydrated conditions. The obtained results show that crack formation occurred in the wear scar subsurface. The path followed by these cracks seems to be dictated either by the histological structure of enamel or by the contact stress field. Moreover, the analysis of a set of enamel wear results obtained from the literature and application of fracture-based models, originally developed for ceramics, correlate well, confirming the similar wear processes taking place in these materials. This analysis also reveals a marked influence of coefficient of friction on the enamel wear rate: for a higher coefficient of friction value, enamel wear can be severe even under forces generated during normal operation of teeth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation on wear characteristic of biopolymer gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Wafiuddin Bin Md; Daing Idris, Daing Mohamad Nafiz Bin; Sofian, Azizul Helmi Bin; Basrawi, Mohamad Firdaus bin; Khalil Ibrahim, Thamir

    2017-10-01

    Polymer is widely used in many mechanical components such as gear. With the world going to a more green and sustainable environment, polymers which are bio based are being recognized as a replacement for conventional polymers based on fossil fuel. The use of biopolymer in mechanical components especially gear have not been fully explored yet. This research focuses on biopolymer for spur gear and whether the conventional method to investigate wear characteristic is applicable. The spur gears are produced by injection moulding and tested on several speeds using a custom test equipment. The wear formation such as tooth fracture, tooth deformation, debris and weight loss was observed on the biopolymer spur gear. It was noted that the biopolymer gear wear mechanism was similar with other type of polymer spur gears. It also undergoes stages of wear which are; running in, linear and rapid. It can be said that the wear mechanism of biopolymer spur gear is comparable to fossil fuel based polymer spur gear, thus it can be considered to replace polymer gears in suitable applications.

  14. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...

  15. Online Vce measurement method for wear-out monitoring of high power IGBT modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beczkowski, Szymon; Ghimire, Pramod; de Vega, Angel Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    A simple Vce online monitoring circuit is presented in this paper. It allows an accurate wear out prediction of IGBT modules, in high-power applications, during normal converter operation. Bipolar measurement allows monitoring of both IGBT and antiparallel diode. The circuit uses two serial...... offset due to diodes' forward voltage temperature dependency. Using four diodes one can monitor voltages on all power devices in a converter leg....

  16. Proceedings, phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedell, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Phenomenology and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1991, was sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Materials Science, the Advanced Studies Program on High Temperature Superconductivity Theory (ASP) and the Exploratory Research and Development Center. This is the second symposium in the series. High Temperature Superconductivity, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1989, also published by Addison Wesley, focused on the cutting-edge theoretical and experimental issues in high temperature superconductors. This symposium, with its focus on the phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors, gives a complementary review of the aspects of the field closely related to the impact of high temperature superconductors on technology. The objective of ASP is to advance the field on a broad front with no specific point of view by bringing a team of leading academic theorists into a joint effort with the theoretical and experimental scientists of a major DOE national laboratory. The ASP consisted of fellows led by Robert Schrieffer (UCSB and now FSU) joined by David Pines (University of illinois), Elihu Abrahams (Rutgers), Sebastian Doniach (Stanford), and Maurice Rice (ETH, Zurich) and theoretical and experimental staff of Los Alamos National Laboratory. This synergism of academic, laboratory, theoretical and experimental research produced a level of interaction and excitement that would not be possible otherwise. This publication and the previous one in the series are just examples of how this approach to advancing science can achieve significant contributions

  17. Surface effects in adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckley, Donald H

    1981-01-01

    ... for carbon bodies to improve their wear resistance in high altitude aircraft generator applications. Basic researchers found that moisture in the carbon was critical t o its lubrication. Therefore, the presence of moisture o n the surface of the carbon was important. With it present, the carbon lubricated very effectively and very low wear was ...

  18. Effect of temperature on tribological properties of palm biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Sia, S.Y.; Fazal, M.A.; Masjuki, H.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-03-15

    Biodiesel, as an alternative fuel is steadily gaining attention to replace petroleum diesel partially or completely. The tribological performance of biodiesel is crucial for its application in automobiles. In the present study, effect of temperature on the tribological performance of palm biodiesel was investigated by using four ball wear machine. Tests were conducted at temperatures 30, 45, 60 and 75 C, under a normal load of 40 kg for 1 h at speed 1200 rpm. For each temperature, the tribological properties of petroleum diesel (B0) and three biodiesel blends like B10, B20, B50 were investigated and compared. During the wear test, frictional torque was recorded on line. Wear scars in tested ball were investigated by optical microscopy. Results show that friction and wear increase with increasing temperature. (author)

  19. Applications of high-temperature superconductors in power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, John R

    2003-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in the late 1980s, many materials and families of materials have been discovered that exhibit superconductivity at temperatures well above 20 K. Of these, several families of HTSs have been developed for use in electrical power applications. Demonstration of devices such as motors, generators, transmission lines, transformers, fault-current limiters, and flywheels in which HTSs and bulk HTSs have been used has proceeded to ever larger scales. First-generation wire, made from bismuth-based copper oxides, was used in many demonstrations. The rapid development of second-generation wire, made by depositing thin films of yttrium-based copper oxide on metallic substrates, is expected to further accelerate commercial applications. Bulk HTSs, in which large single-grain crystals are used as basic magnetic components, have also been developed and have potential for electrical power applications

  20. Application of zirconia membranes as high-temperature PH sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neidrach, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The zirconia pH sensor behaves much like the classical glass electrode, but it extends the range of measurement to much higher temperatures - about 300 0 vs 120 0 C. It also has virtues over the glass electrode at lower temperatures because of the absence of an ''alkaline error.'' Like the glass electrode, it is insensitive to changes in the redox potential of the environment and, in turn, it exerts no influence on the environment. Such sensors have been finding application in the direct measurement of the pH of geothermal brines, of water in nuclear reactors, and in high-temperature corrosion studies. The sensors can also be used as ''pseudoreference'' electrodes for the measurement of redox and corrosion potentials in high-temperature media

  1. Research on Oxidation Wear Behavior of a New Hot Forging Die Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yuanji; Wu, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Dry sliding tests for the hot forging die steel DM were performed in air under the test temperature at 400-700 °C and the time of 0.5-4 h by a UMT-3 high-temperature wear tester. The wear behavior and characteristics were studied systematically to explore the general characters in severe oxidation conditions. The results showed that a mild-to-severe oxidation wear transition occurred with an increase in the test temperature and duration. The reason was clarified as the unstable M6C carbides coarsening should be responsible for the severe delamination of tribo-oxide layer. More importantly, an intense oxidation wear with lower wear rates was found when the experimental temperature reaches 700 °C or after 4 h of test time at 600 °C, which was closely related to the degradation behavior during wear test. Furthermore, a new schematic diagram of oxidation wear of DM steel was proposed.

  2. Status and future perspective of applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    The material research on the high temperature superconductivity for the past ten years gave us sufficient information on the new phenomena of these new materials. It seems that new applications in a very wide range of industries are increasing rapidly. In this report three main topics of the applications are given ; [a] progress of the superconducting bulk materials and their applications to the flywheel electricity storage system and others, [b] progress in the development of superconducting tapes and their applications to power cables, the high field superconducting magnet for the SMES and for the pulling system of large silicon single crystal, and [c] development of new superconducting electronic devices (SFQ) and the possiblity of the application to next generation supercomputers. These examples show the great capability of the superconductivity technology and it is expected that the real superconductivity industry will take off around the year of 2005.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict

  4. Multilayer ceramic capacitors for pulsed power, high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, S.; McLarney, J.; Prymak, J.; Bohn, P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of the multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLC) in high frequency power applications has improved significantly over the last years. One of the possible applications of MLC capacitors is the automotive industry where repetitive discharging of capacitors is required. A 0.25-μF capacitor using NPO dielectric subjected to repetitive discharging with the rate of 700 pulses per second, magnitude of 600-V and 195-A peak currents showed no degradation in performance at 298 K or 398 K even after 1 billion discharge cycles. Less than a 5-K temperature rise was observed under these conditions. The most exciting, newly emerging utilization for MLC capacitors, however, might be the high temperature application (up to 473 K for underhood utilization), where ceramic capacitors with higher volumetric efficiency as compared to glass or polymer type capacitors prove very superior. Moreover ceramic capacitors, which next to glass capacitors exhibit the greatest radiation resistance among all insulating materials (Hanks and Hamman 1971), might also be best suited in the future for high temperature operation in space environment. The pulsed power performance of the 0.25-μF NPO capacitor was evaluated under repetitive discharge conditions (200 V, 700 pps) at high temperature, 473 K, and the results are presented in this paper

  5. Wear determination in braking systems by radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, W.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear behaviour of friction couples has been tested applying loads and sliding speeds. The determination was carried out by direct measurements of the lining material and by surface activation of the opposite material with protons. The application limits of several braking materials could be determined and compared

  6. Prediction of the wear and evolution of cutting tools in a carbide / titanium-aluminum-vanadium machining tribosystem by volumetric tool wear characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttolamadom, Mathew Abraham

    The objective of this research work is to create a comprehensive microstructural wear mechanism-based predictive model of tool wear in the tungsten carbide / Ti-6Al-4V machining tribosystem, and to develop a new topology characterization method for worn cutting tools in order to validate the model predictions. This is accomplished by blending first principle wear mechanism models using a weighting scheme derived from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of tools worn under different operational conditions. In addition, the topology of worn tools is characterized through scanning by white light interferometry (WLI), and then application of an algorithm to stitch and solidify data sets to calculate the volume of the tool worn away. The methodology was to first combine and weight dominant microstructural wear mechanism models, to be able to effectively predict the tool volume worn away. Then, by developing a new metrology method for accurately quantifying the bulk-3D wear, the model-predicted wear was validated against worn tool volumes obtained from corresponding machining experiments. On analyzing worn crater faces using SEM/EDS, adhesion was found dominant at lower surface speeds, while dissolution wear dominated with increasing speeds -- this is in conformance with the lower relative surface speed requirement for micro welds to form and rupture, essentially defining the mechanical load limit of the tool material. It also conforms to the known dominance of high temperature-controlled wear mechanisms with increasing surface speed, which is known to exponentially increase temperatures especially when machining Ti-6Al-4V due to its low thermal conductivity. Thus, straight tungsten carbide wear when machining Ti-6Al-4V is mechanically-driven at low surface speeds and thermally-driven at high surface speeds. Further, at high surface speeds, craters were formed due to carbon diffusing to the tool surface and

  7. Surface engineering for enhanced performance against wear

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Surface Engineering constitutes a variety of processes and sub processes. Each chapter of this work covers specific processes by experts working in the area. Included for each topic are tribological performances for each process as well as results of recent research. The reader also will benefit from in-depth studies of diffusion coatings, nanocomposite films for wear resistance, surfaces for biotribological applications, thin-film wear, tribology of thermal sprayed coatings, hardfacing, plating for tribology and high energy beam surface modifications. Material scientists as well as engineers working with surface engineering for tribology will be particularly interested in this work.

  8. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  9. Wear Analysis of Top Piston Ring to Reduce Top Ring Reversal Bore Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ilanthirayan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The piston rings are the most important part in engine which controls the lubricating oil consumption and blowby of the gases. The lubricating film of oil is provided to seal of gases towards crankcase and also to give smooth friction free translatory motion between rings and liner. Of the three rings present top ring is more crucial as it does the main work of restricting gases downwards the crankcase. Boundary lubrication is present at the Top dead centre (TDC and Bottom dead centre (BDC of the liner surface. In addition to this, top ring is exposed to high temperature gases which makes the oil present near the top ring to get evaporated and decreasing its viscosity, making metal-metal contact most of the time. Due to this at TDC, excess wear happens on the liner which is termed as Top ring reversal bore wear. The wear rate depends upon many parameters such as lubrication condition, viscosity index, contact type, normal forces acting on ring, geometry of ring face, surface roughness, material property. The present work explores the wear depth for different geometries of barrel ring using Finite Element model with the help of Archard wear law and the same is validated through experimentation. The study reveals that Asymmetric barrel rings have less contact pressure which in turn reduces the wear at Top dead centre.

  10. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  11. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  12. Overview of PVD wear resistant coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The combined functionality of wear-resistant and low-friction multilayer coatings has widened application possibilities for a new generation of coated tools. For the first time tool wear mechanisms are comprehensively addressed both at the cutting edge and contact areas away from the edge where chip evacuation is facilitated. Since its recent market introduction a combined TiA1N and WC/C PVD coating has been proven to increase cutting performance in various metal cutting operations, notably drilling and tapping of steels and aluminum alloys. Significant improvements have been obtained under dry as well as with coolant conditions. The results of laboratory metal cutting tests and field trials to date will be described. Correlations between chip formation / wear mechanisms and coating properties are given to explain the effectiveness of this coating. (author)

  13. Microstructure Characterization and Wear-Resistant Properties Evaluation of an Intermetallic Composite in Ni–Mo–Si System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic compounds have been studied for their potential application as structural wear materials or coatings on engineering steels. In the present work, a newly designed intermetallic composite in a Ni–Mo–Si system was fabricated by arc-melting process with commercially pure metal powders as starting materials. The chemical composition of this intermetallic composite is 45Ni–40Mo–15Si (at %, selected according to the ternary alloy diagram. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and the wear-resistant properties at room temperature were evaluated under different wear test conditions. Microstructure characterization showed that the composite has a dense and uniform microstructure. XRD results showed that the intermetallic composite is constituted by a binary intermetallic compound NiMo and a ternary Mo2Ni3Si metal silicide phase. Wear test results indicated that the intermetallic composite has an excellent wear-resistance at room-temperature, which is attributed to the high hardness and strong atomic bonding of constituent phases NiMo and Mo2Ni3Si.

  14. Reciprocating wear in a steam environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.J.; Gee, M.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Tests to simulate the wear between sliding components in steam power plant have been performed using a low frequency wear apparatus at elevated temperatures under static load, at ambient pressure, in a steam environment. The apparatus was modified to accept a novel method of steam delivery. The materials tested were pre-exposed in a flowing steam furnace at temperature for either 500 or 3000 hours to provide some simulation of long term ageing. The duration of each wear test was 50 hours and tests were also performed on as-received material for comparison purposes. Data has been compared with results of tests performed on non-oxidised material for longer durations and also on tests without steam to examine the effect of different environments. Data collected from each test consists of mass change, stub height measurement and friction coefficient as well as visual inspection of the wear track. Within this paper, it is reported that both pre-ageing and the addition of steam during testing clearly influence the friction between material surfaces. (orig.)

  15. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  16. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  17. High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plakida, Nikolay Maksimilianovich

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their...

  18. High-temperature cuprate superconductors. Experiment, theory, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their knowledge of this remarkable class of materials. (orig.)

  19. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  20. Technological improvements to high temperature thermocouples for nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, R.; Leveque, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    The specific operating conditions of thermocouples in nuclear reactors have provided an incentive for further advances in high temperature thermocouple applications and performance. This work covers the manufacture and improvement of existing alloys, the technology of clad thermocouples, calibration drift during heat treatment, resistance to thermal shock and the compatibility of insulating materials with thermo-electric alloys. The results lead to specifying improved operating conditions for thermocouples in nuclear reactor media (pressurized water, sodium, uranium oxide) [fr

  1. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  2. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  3. Thermal sensor based zinc oxide diode for low temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaya, R.O. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (South Africa); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Farooq, W.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yakuphanoglu, F., E-mail: fyhan@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Firat University, Elazig, 23169 (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    The device parameters of Al/p-Si/Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O-NiO/Al Schottky diode for x = 0.005 were investigated over the 50 K–400 K temperature range using direct current–voltage (I–V) and impedance spectroscopy. The films were prepared using the sol–gel method followed by spin-coating on p-Si substrate. The ideality factor, barrier height, resistance and capacitance of the diode were found to depend on temperature. The calculated barrier height has a mean. Capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements show that the capacitance decreases with increasing frequency, suggesting a continuous distribution of interface states over the surveyed 100 kHz to 1 MHz frequency range. The interface state densities, N{sub ss}, of the diode were calculated and found to peak as functions of bias and temperature in two temperature regions of 50 K–300 K and 300 K–400 K. A peak value of approximately 10{sup 12}/eV cm{sup 2} was observed around 0.7 V bias for 350 K and at 3 × 10{sup 12}/eVcm{sup 2} around 2.2 V bias for 300 K. The relaxation time was found to average 4.7 μs over all the temperatures, but showing its lowest value of 1.58 μs at 300 K. It is seen that the interface states of the diode is controlled by the temperature. This suggests that Al/p-Si/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al diode can be used as a thermal sensors for low temperature applications. - Highlights: • Al/pSi/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al Schottky diode was fabricated by sol gel method. • The interface state density of the diode is controlled by the temperature. • Zinc oxide based diode can be used as a thermal sensor for low temperature applications.

  4. Impact fretting wear in CO2-based environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.; Morri, J.

    1985-01-01

    An impact wear model, based on the load-sliding distance proportionality of wear and the mechanical response of the impacting bodies, was derived and tested against experiment. The experimental work was carried out on a twin vibrator rig capable of repetitive impact of a moving specimen against a stationary target material. The impact wear characteristics of three materials (mild steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and austenitic 316 steel) against 310 stainless steel were examined over a range of temperatures (18-600 0 C). Additionally the effects of variations in the mechanical parameters (incident energy, ξ i , number N of impacts and angle of incidence φ) as a function of temperature were evaluated for mild steel only. The model was verified for impacting within a stable wear regime at 100 0 C for 9Cr-1Mo steel. The emergence of a severe-to-mild wear transition at elevated temperatures (200-400 0 C), however, introduced an energy and a 'numbers of cycles' effect that caused apparent deviations from theory. It was concluded that for stable single-mechanism wear regimes (metallic, oxidative etc.) oblique elastic impacts with a gross slip component were accurately described by the proposed impact wear model. (orig.)

  5. Ultra light weight refractory material for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finke, V.; Kern, H. [Rath GmbH, Meissen (Germany); Springer, M. [Aug. Rath jun. GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The requirements on companies running high temperature processes, i.e. at temperatures about 1000 C and above, have increased dramatically within the last few years. For technological, economical and ecological purposes each application has to be checked carefully. As well the political discussion regarding environmental pollution, greenhouse effect and emission trading and the guidelines for climate and environmental protection exert massive influence on thermal process technology and pose an appropriate challenge for the companies. Next to costs of labour and raw materials the costs for energy and environmental costs play a decisive role more and more. The pressure on the management thereby incurred may have a lasting effect on innovations regarding increase of energy efficiency, decrease of CO{sub 2}-emission and often on non negligible increase of productivity. Mainly against the background of the highly scheduled European aims for emission reduction and also in consideration of the still proceeding globalisation the usage of state-of-the-art refractory technics in thermal process technology is of particular importance for business success, for reducing of environmental impact and last but not least for conservation and safeguarding of jobs in Europe and Germany. The applications for products made from high-temperature insulation wool in high temperature applications have strongly increased during the last five years. Especially the production capacities of polycrystalline wool (aluminium oxide wool e.g. Altra B72) have been doubled within the last three years. Primarily ultra light weight products made from HTIW are used in industrial furnaces with application temperatures above 1000 C and / or with high thermo-mechanical (thermal shock) and chemical exposure. The outstanding and essential advantages of these materials are obviously: Ultra light weight material with high resilience and flexibility, Optimised energy consumption (energy saving up to 50% compared

  6. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  7. Correlation between the wear behaviour and the mechanical properties of several surface treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelait, L.; Lina, A.; Rezakhanlou, R.; Duysen, J.C. van; Stebut, J. von

    1993-01-01

    Surface mechanical strength of chromium base (electrolytic and plasma sprayed) coatings is studied for friction and wear applications in nuclear environment. Indentation, scratch, and wear testing results are compared. In particular intrinsic coating brittleness is investigated as a mechanism responsible for impact wear. Electrolytic, hard chromium plate has a wear resistance well below that of the spray coated specimens studied. Acoustic emission level and brittle damage features are shown to be correlated. (orig.)

  8. A comparative study on the fretting wear properties of advanced zirconium fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu; Park, Jeong Yong; Kim, Jun Hwan

    2005-06-01

    Fretting wear tests were carried out in room and high temperature water in order to evaluate the wear properties of new zirconium nuclear fuel claddings (K2∼K6) and the commercial claddings (M5, zirlo and zircaloy-4). The objective is to compare the wear resistance of K2∼K6 claddings with that of the commercial ones at the same test condition. After the wear tests, the average wear volume and the maximum wear depth were evaluated and compared at each test condition. As a result, it is difficult to select the most wear-resistant cladding between the K2∼K6 claddings and the commercial ones. This is because the average wear volume and maximum depth of each cladding included between the scattering range of measured results. However, wear resistance of the tested claddings based on the average wear volume and maximum wear depth could be summarized as follows: K5 > zircaloy-4 > (K2,K3) > (K4,M5) > K6 > zirlo at room temperature, zircaloy-4 > K5 > (K3,K4,zirlo) > (K2,K6) > M5 at high temperature and pressure. Therefore, it is concluded that K5 cladding among the tested new zirconium alloys has relatively higher wear-resistance in room and high temperature condition. In order to examine the wear mechanism, it is necessary to systematically study with the consideration of the alloying element effect and test environment. In this report, the wear test procedure and the wear evaluation method are described in detail

  9. Pyroelectric Ceramics as Temperature Sensors for Energy System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge Luis

    Temperature is continuously monitored in energy systems to ensure safe operation temperatures, increase efficiency and avoid high emissions. Most of energy systems operate at high temperature and harsh environments to achieve higher efficiencies, therefore temperature sensing devices that can operate under these conditions are highly desired. The interest has increased in temperature sensors capable to operate and in harsh environments and temperature sensors capable to transmit thermal information wirelessly. One of the solutions for developing harsh environment sensors is to use ceramic materials, especially functional ceramics such as pyroelectrics. Pyroelectric ceramics could be used to develop active sensors for both temperature and pressure due to their capabilities in coupling energy among mechanical, thermal, and electrical domains. In this study, two different pyroelectric materials were used to develop two different temperature sensors systems. First, a high temperature sensor was developed using a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric ceramic. With its Curie temperature of 1210 °C, lithium niobate is capable to maintain its pyroelectric properties at high temperature making it ideal for temperature sensing at high temperature applications. Lithium niobate has been studied previously in the attempt to use its pyroelectric current as the sensing mechanism to measure temperatures up to 500 °C. Pyroelectric coefficient of lithium niobate is a function of temperature as reported in a previous study, therefore a dynamic technique is utilized to measure the pyroelectric coefficient of the lithium niobate used in this study. The pyroelectric coefficient was successfully measured up to 500 °C with coefficients ranging from -8.5 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at room temperature to -23.70 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at 500 °C. The lithium niobate sensor was then tested at higher temperatures: 220 °C, 280 °C, 410 °C and 500 °C with 4.31 %, 2.1 %, 0.4 % and 0.6 % deviation

  10. Microhardness, Friction and Wear of SiC and Si3N4 Materials as a Function of Load, Temperature and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    hardness tester described below. Hot-hardness experiments were carried out in a Wilberforce Scientific Developments (Coventry, U.K.) high-temperature micro...private comunication . 22. G.D. Quinn, -1980, Technical Report to U.S. Department of Energy by AZ4MRC, Interagency Agreement EC-76-A-1017. 46 23. 0.0...1981, priyate comunication . 38. T.F. Page, G.R. Sawyer, O.O.Adewoye and J.J. Wert, 1978, Proc. Brit. Ceram. Soc. 26, 193. 39. K. Niihara, R. Morenaand

  11. Application of high temperature superconductivity to electric motor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, J.S.; Sharma, D.K.; Jordan, H.E.; Edick, J.D.; Schiferl, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on progress made in a joint project conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute and Reliance Electric Company to study the possible application of High Temperature Super Conductors (HTSC), materials to electric motors. Specific applications are identified which can be beneficially served by motors constructed with HTSC materials. A summary is presented of the components and design issues related to HTSC motors designed for these applications. During the course of this development program, a three tier HTSC wire performance specification has evolved. The three specifications and the rationale behind these three levels of performance are explained. A description of a test motor that has been constructed to verify the electromagnetic analytical techniques of HTSC motor design is given. Finally, a DC motor with an HTSC field coil is described. Measured data with the motor running is presented showing that the motor is operating with the field winding in the superconducting state

  12. Experimental Research on the Determination of the Coefficient of Sliding Wear under Iron Ore Handling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The handling of iron ore bulk solids maintains an increasing trend due to economic development. Because iron ore particles have hard composites and irregular shapes, the bulk solids handling equipment surface can suffer from severe sliding wear. Prediction of equipment surface wear volume is beneficial to the efficient maintenance of worn areas. Archard’s equation provides a theoretical solution to predict wear volume. To use Archard’s equation, the coefficient of sliding wear must be determined. To our best knowledge, the coefficient of sliding wear for iron ore handling conditions has not yet been determined. In this research, using a pin-on-disk tribometer, the coefficients of sliding wear for both Sishen particles and mild steel are determined with regard to iron ore handling conditions. Both naturally irregular and spherical shapes of particles are used to estimate average values of wear rate. Moreover, the hardness and inner structures of Sishen particles are examined, which adds the evidence of the interpretation of wear results. It is concluded that the coefficients of sliding wear can vary largely for both Sishen particle and mild steel. The wear rate decreases from transient- to steady-state. The average coefficient of sliding wear is capable of predicting wear with respect to long distances at the steady-state. Two types of sliding friction are distinguished. In addition, it is found that the temperature rise of the friction pairs has negligible influence on wear rate.

  13. Wear of human enamel: a quantitative in vitro assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidonis, J A; Richards, L C; Townsend, G C; Tansley, G D

    1998-12-01

    Many factors influence the extent and rate at which enamel wears. Clinical studies in humans are limited by difficulties in the accurate quantification of intra-oral wear and by a lack of control over the oral environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the wear characteristics of human dental enamel under controlled experimental conditions. An electro-mechanical tooth wear machine, in which opposing enamel surfaces of sectioned, extracted teeth were worn under various conditions, was used to simulate tooth grinding or bruxism. Enamel surface wear was quantified by weight to an accuracy of 0.1 mg, with water uptake and loss controlled. The variables considered included the structure and hardness of enamel, facet area, duration of tooth contact, relative speed of opposing surfaces, temperature, load, pH, and the nature of the lubricant. Enamel wear under non-lubricated conditions increased with increasing load over the range of 1.7 to 16.2 kg. The addition of a liquid lubricant (pH = 7) reduced enamel wear up to 6.7 kg, but when the load increased above this threshold, the rate of wear increased dramatically. With the viscosity of the lubricant constant and pH = 3, the rate of wear was further reduced to less than 10% of the non-lubricated rate at 9.95 kg, after which the rate again increased substantially. Under more extreme conditions (pH = 1.2, simulating gastric acids), the wear was excessive under all experimental loads. When saliva was used as a lubricant, the amount of wear was relatively low at 9.95 kg, but rapid wear occurred at 14.2 kg and above. These results indicate that under non-lubricated conditions, enamel wear remains low at high loads due to the dry-lubricating capabilities of fine enamel powder. Under lubricated conditions, low loads with an acidic lubricant lead to little enamel wear, whereas very low pH results in a high rate of wear under all loads.

  14. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  15. Wear monitoring of single point cutting tool using acoustic emission ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    feeds are used, the coating remains intact throughout the duration of testing. Wear ... present global industrial scenario is to produce quality products at competitive price. .... Coated carbide tool was selected based on its wider application.

  16. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  17. Consideration of wear rates at high velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Chad S.

    The development of the research presented here is one in which high velocity relative sliding motion between two bodies in contact has been considered. Overall, the wear environment is truly three-dimensional. The attempt to characterize three-dimensional wear was not economically feasible because it must be analyzed at the micro-mechanical level to get results. Thus, an engineering approximation was carried out. This approximation was based on a metallographic study identifying the need to include viscoplasticity constitutive material models, coefficient of friction, relationships between the normal load and velocity, and the need to understand wave propagation. A sled test run at the Holloman High Speed Test Track (HHSTT) was considered for the determination of high velocity wear rates. In order to adequately characterize high velocity wear, it was necessary to formulate a numerical model that contained all of the physical events present. The experimental results of a VascoMax 300 maraging steel slipper sliding on an AISI 1080 steel rail during a January 2008 sled test mission were analyzed. During this rocket sled test, the slipper traveled 5,816 meters in 8.14 seconds and reached a maximum velocity of 1,530 m/s. This type of environment was never considered previously in terms of wear evaluation. Each of the features of the metallography were obtained through micro-mechanical experimental techniques. The byproduct of this analysis is that it is now possible to formulate a model that contains viscoplasticity, asperity collisions, temperature and frictional features. Based on the observations of the metallographic analysis, these necessary features have been included in the numerical model, which makes use of a time-dynamic program which follows the movement of a slipper during its experimental test run. The resulting velocity and pressure functions of time have been implemented in the explicit finite element code, ABAQUS. Two-dimensional, plane strain models

  18. Tribology of selected ceramics at temperatures to 900 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Deadmore, D.; Miyoshi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Results of fundamental and focused research on the tribological properties of ceramics are discussed. The basic friction and wear characteristics are given for ceramics of interest for use in gas turbine, adiabatic diesel, and Stirling engine applications. The importance of metal oxides in ceramic/metal sliding combinations is illustrated. The formulation and tribological additives are described. Friction and wear data are given for carbide and oxide-based composite coatings for temperatures to at least 900 C.

  19. Assessment of very high temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Spiewak, I.; Gambill, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    In April 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) authorized General Atomic Company, General Electric Company, and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory to assess the available technology for producing process heat utilizing a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The VHTR is defined as a gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactor. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been given a lead role in evaluating the VHTR reactor studies and potential applications of the VHTR. Process temperatures up to the 760 to 871 0 C range appear to be achievable with near-term technology. The major development considerations are high temperature materials, the safety questions (especially regarding the need for an intermediate heat exchanger) and the process heat exchanger. The potential advantages of the VHTR over competing fossil energy sources are conservation of fossil fuels and reduced atmospheric impacts. Costs are developed for nuclear process heat supplied from a 3000-MW(th) VHTR. The range of cost in process applications is competitive with current fossil fuel alternatives

  20. Design and application consideration of high temperature superconducting current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    As a potential major source of heat leak and the resultant cryogen boiloff, cryogenic current leads can significantly affect the refrigeration power requirement of cryogenic power equipment. Reduction of the heat leak associated with current leads can therefore contribute to the development and application of this equipment. Recent studies and tests have demonstrated that, due to their superconducting and low thermal conductivity properties, ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTSC) can be employed in current leads to significantly reduce the heat leak. However, realization of this benefit requires special design considerations pertaining to the properties and the fabrication technology of the relatively new ceramic superconductor materials. Since processing and fabrication technology are continuously being developed in the laboratories, data on material properties unrelated to critical states are quite limited. Therefore, design analysis and experiments have to be conducted in tandem to achieve a successful development. Due to the rather unique combination of superconducting and thermal conductivities which are orders of magnitude lower than copper, ceramic superconductors allow expansion of the operating scenarios of current leads. In addition to the conventional vapor-cooled lead type application, low heat leak conduction-cooled type current leads may be practical and are being developed. Furthermore, a current lead with an intermediate heat leak intercept has been successfully demonstrated in a multiple current lead assembly employing HTSC. These design and application considerations of high temperature superconducting current leads are addressed here

  1. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  2. Spectroscopy for Industrial Applications: High-Temperature Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Grosch, Helge; Clausen, Sønnik

    -dependent spectral absorption features gases of interest fora specic instrument can in principle be calculated by knowing only the gas temperature and pressure in the process under investigation/monitoring. The latest HITRAN-2012 database contains IR/UV spectral data for 47 molecules and it is still growing. However...... use of HITRAN is limited to low-temperature processes (available. Only a few molecules CO2, H2O, CO and NO are those of interest for e.......g. various combustion and astronomical applications are included. In the recent few years, several efforts towards a developmentof hot line lists have been made; those have been implemented in the latest HITRAN-2012 database. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 (IR, 0.1 cm-1) and phenol (UV,0...

  3. Multi technical analysis of wear mechanisms in axial piston pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhler, G.; Jourani, A.; Bouvier, S.; Perrochat, J.-M.

    2017-05-01

    Axial piston pumps convert a motor rotation motion into hydraulic or pneumatic power. Their compactness and efficiency of approximately 0.9 make them suitable for actuation applications especially in aeronautics. However, they suffer a limited life due to the wear of their components. In the literature, studies of axial piston pumps deal with contact between its different elements under lubrication conditions. Nevertheless, they are more focused on analytic or numerical approaches. This study consists in an experimental analysis of worn pump components to highlight and understand wear mechanisms. Piston shoes are central components in the axial piston pump since they are involved in three tribological contacts. These three contacts are thereby studied: piston shoes/swashplate, piston shoes/pistons and piston shoes/shoes hold down plate (SHDP). To perform this analysis, helicopter hydraulic pumps after different operating times have been studied. The wear damage mechanisms and wear debris are analysed using SEM observations. 3D surface roughness measurements are then used to characterize worn surfaces. The observations reveal that in the contact between shoes and swashplate, the main wear mechanism is three-body abrasive wear due to coarse carbides removal. Between shoes and pistons, wear occurs in a less severe way and is mainly due to the debris generated in the first contact and conveyed by the lubricating fluid. In the third contact, the debris are also the prime cause of the abrasive wear and the generation of deep craters in the piston shoes.

  4. MOCEAN SURF WEAR -MALLISTO

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtovaara, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Surffi on urheilulaji, jossa kuljetaan aallon päällä surffilaudalla. Surffaus on lähtöisin Polynesiasta, mutta nykypäivänä surffausta harrastetaan ympäri maailmaa. Opinnäytetyö käsittelee surf wear -malliston suunnittelua ja toteuttamista omalle toi-minimelle Mocean. Työn tavoitteena oli suunnitella toimiva, mutta myös trendikäs mallisto naissurffareille. Mallisto sisältää bikineitä, surffipaitoja legginsejä ja shortseja. Mallisto on suunniteltu naissurffareille, jotka surffaavat lämpimis...

  5. Wear Particle Atlas. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-28

    Superintendent NOTICE Reproduction of this document in any form by other than naval activities is/Jotbvlhorized except isys^iedcil approval of the SecretarWof...constant. •.■, -1 "if -w \\ SÄNPLlWi V» IVf Figure 3.1.1.1 Simplified Oil Path Ref 21 Scott. D, McCullagh. PJ and Campbell GW Condition Monitoring...Wear Particles in Human Synovial Fluid Arthritis and Rheumatism, 24 (1981) 912-918 30 Evans. C H .andTew W P isolationof Biological Materials

  6. Aspects of nuclear process heat application of very high temperature reactors (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansing, W.T.; Kugeler, K.

    2014-01-01

    been tested successfully. The test time in totally was longer than 10 000 h. A hot steam generator with a power of 10 MW (T He =950°C, p He =40 bar) for application in different processes has been tested over a long time with good success too. For the steam gasification of coal or other C-containing substances a special gasifier has undergone long time testing with great success. This component (T He =950°C, p=40 bar) for application in different processes has been tested over a time of more than 10 000 h. This component (P≈ 3MW,T He =1000°C, p He =40 bar, T gasif =800°C) represented a characteristic part of a large fluidized bed gasifier. The development work additionally contained a broad material program for alloys applied at helium temperatures of around 950°C. All mechanical relevant data till 30000 hours, data of corrosion, Tritium- and hydrogen permeation have been measured for some promising candidates. Special experiments related to reaction kinetics, heat transfer, pressure drops, vibration, friction and wear, behavior on special components in helium have been carried out and delivered a broad know how on helium technologies. During the planning work for different reactor concepts all questions of coupling nuclear reactors and processes have been analyzed in detail and partly have undergone steps of a nuclear licensing process. It was shown, that extreme safety requirements of the nuclear heat source and the total plant could be fulfilled. (author)

  7. Assessment of potential solder candidates for high temperature applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    pressure to eliminate lead containing materials despite the fact that materials for high Pb containing alloys are currently not affected by any legislations. A tentative assessment was carried out to determine the potential solder candidates for high temperature applications based on the solidification...... criterion, phases predicted in the bulk solder and the thermodynamic stability of chlorides. These promising solder candidates were precisely produced using the hot stage microscope and its respective anodic and cathodic polarization curves were investigated using a micro-electrochemical set up...

  8. Elevated temperature erosion studies on some materials for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianren.

    1991-01-01

    The surface degradation of materials due to high temperature erosion or combined erosion corrosion is a serious problem in many industrial and aeronautical applications. As such, it has become an important design consideration in many situations. The materials investigated in the present studies are stainless steels, Ti-6Al-4V, alumina ceramics, with and without silicate glassy phase, and zirconia. These are some of the potential materials for use in the high temperature erosive-corrosive environments. The erosion or erosion-corrosion experiments were performed in a high temperature sand-blast type of test rig. The variables studied included the temperature, material composition, heat treatment condition, impingement velocity and angle, erodent concentration, etc. The morphological features of the eroded or eroded-corroded surfaces, substrate deformation, and oxide characteristics were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The scratch test, single ball impact, and indentation tests were used to understand the behavior of oxide film in particle impacts. Based on these studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical or combined mechanical and chemical actions in erosion was developed

  9. Low-Temperature Solution Processable Electrodes for Piezoelectric Sensors Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Julin, Tuomas; Rantanen, Ville; Zakrzewski, Mari; Moilanen, Pasi; Lupo, Donald

    2013-05-01

    Piezoelectric thin-film sensors are suitable for a wide range of applications from physiological measurements to industrial monitoring systems. The use of flexible materials in combination with high-throughput printing technologies enables cost-effective manufacturing of custom-designed, highly integratable piezoelectric sensors. This type of sensor can, for instance, improve industrial process control or enable the embedding of ubiquitous sensors in our living environment to improve quality of life. Here, we discuss the benefits, challenges and potential applications of piezoelectric thin-film sensors. The piezoelectric sensor elements are fabricated by printing electrodes on both sides of unmetallized poly(vinylidene fluoride) film. We show that materials which are solution processable in low temperatures, biocompatible and environmental friendly are suitable for use as electrode materials in piezoelectric sensors.

  10. Small reactors for low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    In accordance with the Member States' calls for information exchange in the field of nuclear heat application (NHA) two IAEA meetings were organized already in 1976 and 1977. After this ''promising period'', the development of relevant programmes in IAEA Member States was slowed down and therefore only after several years interruption a new Technical Committee Meeting with a Workshop was organized in late 1983, to review the status of NHA, after a few new specific plans appeared in some IAEA Member States in the early 1980's for the use of heat from existing or constructed NPPs and for developing nuclear heating plants (NHP). In June 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting was convened in Winnipeg, Canada, to discuss and formulate a state-of-the-art review on ''Small Reactors for Low Temperature Nuclear Heat Application''. Information on this subject gained up to 1987 in the Member States whose experts attended this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Report. Figs and tabs

  11. New alloys for high temperature applications in incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinz, H.P.; Koeck, W.

    1993-01-01

    The hot components of incineration plants exposed to temperatures between 800 and 1,200 C like boilers, grates, thermocouple sheaths and nozzles suffer from severe joint slag and hot gas attack. Considering corrosion resistance only, ceramic materials show excellent performance under these conditions. But because of the ceramics' brittleness metallic materials exhibit an overall advantage although being corroded faster. Within the class of suitable metals PM-ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened)-superalloys based on iron or nickel and PM-Cr-base-alloys are among the most promising ones. This can be derived from various laboratory and field tests which were performed up to now. Laboratory oxidation tests indicate that these new alloys can be used at temperatures up to 1,300 C in hot air. High temperature erosion tests with quartz particles show that PM 2,000 (Fe 19,5Cr5,5Al0,5Ti0,5Y 2 O 3 ) and Ducropur (99.7% Cr) have almost the same resistance against particle impact as alumina or zirconia at 900 C. The corresponding laboratory and field tests under typical joint slag and hot gas conditions at temperatures up to 1,200 C show good results for PM 2,000 and already lead to the actual application of boiler components. Extensive testing has been performed in the field of municipal waste incineration. Depending on temperature, slag and hot gas composition selected grades of the PM-ODS and Cr-base-alloy-group give satisfactory results in the field tests. In the pulp industry black liquor, an alkaline solution with high concentrations of organic waste, is incinerated for the recovery of caustic soda. Flame sprayed coatings of Ducrolloy Cr50Ni give a sixfold increase of the lifetime of the burner nozzles compared to unprotected stainless steel

  12. The synergism of impact wear and oxidation in carbon dioxide environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morri, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The impact fretting wear characteristics in Co 2 of a 9%Cr steel against a 310SS counterface have been studied between 100 0 and 500 0 C. An energy effect was identified in which high energy impacts suppressed a severe-to-mild wear transition for low energy impacts between 250 0 and 350 0 C. In addition a severe form of high temperature wear (above 400 0 C) was observed in which pitting of the 9Cr steel and transfer to the 310SS occurred. Subsequent wear scar examination revealed a wear mechanism dominated by the interaction of the oxidation characteristics and the changing mechanical behaviour of the 9Cr. (author)

  13. Wear of polymers and composites

    CERN Document Server

    Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    In the field of tribology, the wear behaviour of polymers and composite materials is considered a highly non-linear phenomenon. Wear of Polymers and Composites introduces fundamentals of polymers and composites tribology. The book suggests a new approach to explore the effect of applied load and surface defects on the fatigue wear behaviour of polymers, using a new tribometer and thorough experiments. It discusses effects of surface cracks, under different static and cyclic loading parameters on wear, and presents an intelligent algorithm, in the form of a neural network, to map the relations

  14. Wear mechanisms of toughened zirconias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, P.C.; Libsch, T.A.; Rhee, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    The dry friction and wear behavior of toughened zirconias against hardened steel was studied using the falex ring and block technique. Three experimental ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 ceramics and two commerical ZrO 2 -MgO ceramics were investigated. Each ceramic was tested at 500 and 2000 rpm at normal loads in the range 2.3 to 40.8 kg. Significant trends in the friction and wear data were found correlating composition, test speeds, and loads. Microstructural examination of the ring, ceramic block, and wear debris has shown that the wear process is very complex and incorporates a number of mechanisms

  15. Arc-Sprayed Fe-Based Coatings from Cored Wires for Wear and Corrosion Protection in Power Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobov Yury

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High wear and corrosion of parts lead to an increase in operating costs at thermal power plants. The present paper shows a possible solution to this problem through the arc spraying of protective coatings. Cored wires of the base alloying system Fe-Cr-C were used as a feedstock. Rise of wear- and heat-resistance of the coatings was achieved by additional alloying with Al, B, Ti, and Y. The wear and heat resistance of the coatings were tested via a two-body wear test accompanied by microhardness measurement and the gravimetric method, respectively. A high-temperature corrosion test was performed at 550 °C under KCl salt deposition. The porosity and adhesion strengths of the coatings were also evaluated. The microstructure was investigated with a scanning electron microscope (SEM unit equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX microanalyzer, and the phase composition was assessed by X-ray diffractometry. The test results showed the positive influence of additional alloying with Y on the coating properties. A comparison with commercial boiler materials showed that the coatings have the same level of heat resistance as austenite steels and are an order of magnitude higher than that of pearlite and martensite-ferrite steels. The coatings can be applied to wear- and heat-resistant applications at 20–700 °C.

  16. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  17. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor: reformer application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This Application Study evaluates the HTGR-R with a core outlet temperature of 850 0 C as a near-term Lead Project and as a vehicle to long-term HTGR Program objectives. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-R technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-R markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-R plants, and the evaluation of the program scope and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-R technology through the completion of the Lead Project. In order to properly assess the potential of the HTGR-R and the suitability of the HTGR-R as a Lead Project, additional work must be performed before a final judgment is rendered. Design trade-off studies and alternative applications must be investigated to determine if a commercial potential exists for the HTGR-R at 850 0 C. If commercial incentives are only identified for the HTGR-R with core outlet temperatures greater than 850 0 C, the design and development program duration and cost and the demonstration path for the HTGR-R must be reassessed

  18. Potential of low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    At present, more than one third of the fossil fuel currently used is being consumed to produce space heating and to meet industrial needs in many countries of the world. Imported oil still represents a large portion of this fossil fuel and despite its present relatively low price future market evolutions with consequent upward cost revisions cannot be excluded. Thus the displacement of the fossil fuel by cheaper low-temperature heat produced in nuclear power plants is a matter which deserves careful consideration. Technico-economic studies in many countries have shown that the use of nuclear heat is fully competitive with most of fossil-fuelled plants, the higher investment costs being offset by lower production cost. Another point in favour of heat generation by nuclear source is its indisputable advantage in terms of benefits to the environment. The IAEA activity plans for 1985-86 concentrate on information exchange with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications of heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and existing power plants backfitted for additional heat applications. The information gained up to 1985 was discussed during the Advisory Group Meeting on the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Applications held in the Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland in September 1985 and, is included in the present Technical Document

  19. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  20. Magnetic refrigeration--towards room-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, E.; Tegus, O.; Li, X.W.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Modern society relies very much on readily available cooling. Magnetic refrigeration based on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has become a promising competitive technology for the conventional gas-compression/expansion technique in use today. Recently, there have been two breakthroughs in magnetic-refrigeration research: one is that American scientists demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator; the other one is that we discovered a new class of magnetic refrigerant materials for room-temperature applications. The new materials are manganese-iron-phosphorus-arsenic (MnFe(P,As)) compounds. This new material has important advantages over existing magnetic coolants: it exhibits a huge MCE, which is larger than that of Gd metal; and its operating temperature can be tuned from about 150 to about 335 K by adjusting the P/As ratio. Here we report on further improvement of the materials by increasing the Mn content. The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. Addition of Mn reduces the thermal hysteresis, which is intrinsic to the first-order transition. This implies that already moderate applied magnetic fields of below 2 T may suffice

  1. Assessment of wear facets produced by the ACTA wear machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana R; Larsen, Liselotte; Dowling, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    . The mean wear depth was measured using the traditionally employed 2D and compared with the 3D profilometric (digital) techniques. Data were submitted to analyses of variance, Tukey's post hoc tests and Independent Samples Student's t-tests (where appropriate) at p...OBJECTIVE: To investigate the use of a three-dimensional (3D) digital scanning method in determining the accuracy of the wear performance parameters of resin-based composites (RBCs) determined using a two-dimensional (2D) analogue methodology following in-vitro testing in an Academisch Centrum...... for Tandheelkunde Amsterdam (ACTA) wear machine. METHODS: Specimens compatible with the compartments of the ACTA wear machine specimen wheel (n=10) were prepared from one commercial and four experimental RBCs. The RBC specimens were rotated against an antagonist wheel in a food-like slurry for 220,000 wear cycles...

  2. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Friction and wear behavior of steam-oxidized ferrous PM compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, P. Philomen-D-Anaand; GopalaKrishna, A. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kakinada (India); Palaniradja, K [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pondicherry Engineering College, Pondicherry (India)

    2016-10-15

    This study determines density effect by assessing sintering temperature and graphite content on the dry sliding wear characteristics of steam-treated iron materials using a pin-on-disk wear test. The specimens were prepared from atomized premixed iron base powders and contained 0.1 to 1.0 wt.% carbon compacted at different densities (5.9 g/cc to 6.8 g/cc). The specimens were sintered for 1 h at different sintering temperatures (1090°C to 1130°C), and then subjected to continuous steam treatment at 540°C for 95 min through in situ Powder metallurgy (PM) technique. Steam treatment was proposed to improve the wear performances of the components of PM. Wear tests were conducted using a pin-on-disk-type machine. Load ranged from 20 N to 60 N. Sliding distance and sliding velocity of 312 m and 0.26 m/s, respectively, were adopted for all tests. Scanning electron microscope was used to analyze wear surface. Increased density and graphite content reduced the wear rate of steam-treated materials. Hardness increased with increasing graphite content. Wear mechanism, wear rate map, and wear maps were drawn for the test result data. Wear transition map identified mild, severe, and ultra-severe wear regimes as functions of applied load.

  4. Tribological and Wear Performance of Carbide Tools with TiB2 PVD Coating under Varying Machining Conditions of TiAl6V4 Aerospace Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Mario Paiva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tribological phenomena and tool wear mechanisms during machining of hard-to-cut TiAl6V4 aerospace alloy have been investigated in detail. Since cutting tool wear is directly affected by tribological phenomena occurring between the surfaces of the workpiece and the cutting tool, the performance of the cutting tool is strongly associated with the conditions of the machining process. The present work shows the effect of different machining conditions on the tribological and wear performance of TiB2-coated cutting tools compared to uncoated carbide tools. FEM modeling of the temperature profile on the friction surface was performed for wet machining conditions under varying cutting parameters. Comprehensive characterization of the TiB2 coated vs. uncoated cutting tool wear performance was made using optical 3D imaging, SEM/EDX and XPS methods respectively. The results obtained were linked to the FEM modeling. The studies carried out show that during machining of the TiAl6V4 alloy, the efficiency of the TiB2 coating application for carbide cutting tools strongly depends on cutting conditions. The TiB2 coating is very efficient under roughing at low speeds (with strong buildup edge formation. In contrast, it shows similar wear performance to the uncoated tool under finishing operations at higher cutting speeds when cratering wear predominates.

  5. Properties of arc-sprayed coatings from Fe-based cored wires for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobov, Yu. S.; Nevezhin, S. V.; Filiрpov, M. A.; Makarov, A. V.; Malygina, I. Yu.; Fantozzi, D.; Milanti, A.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2017-12-01

    Equipment of a thermal power plant is subjected to high temperature oxidation and wear. This raises operating costs through frequent repair of worn parts and high metal consumption. The paper proposes a possible solution to this problem through arc spraying of protective coatings. Cored wires of the Fe-Cr-C basic alloying system are used as a feedstock. Additional alloying by Al, B, Si, Ti and Y allows one to create wear- and heat-resistant coatings, which are an attractive substitute of more expensive Co- and Ni-based materials.

  6. Tyre and road wear prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupker, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Both tyre wear and road polishing are complex phenomenon, which are obviously strongly related; the energy that polishes the road is the energy that wears the tyre. The both depend non-linearly on numerous parameters, like materials used, vehicle and road usage, environmental conditions (i.e.

  7. Friction and wear methodologies for design and control

    CERN Document Server

    Straffelini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the basic concepts of contact mechanics, friction, lubrication, and wear mechanisms, providing simplified analytical relationships that are useful for quantitative assessments. Subsequently, an overview on the main wear processes is provided, and guidelines on the most suitable design solutions for each specific application are outlined. The final part of the text is devoted to a description of the main materials and surface treatments specifically developed for tribological applications and to the presentation of tribological systems of particular engineering relevance. The text is up to date with the latest developments in the field of tribology and provides a theoretical framework to explain friction and wear problems, together with practical tools for their resolution. The text is intended for students on Engineering courses (both bachelor and master degrees) who must develop a sound understanding of friction, wear, lubrication, and surface engineering, and for technicians or professi...

  8. Material irradiation techniques used in corrosion and wear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenreiro, Claudio

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear physics methods, applied to material analysis are discussed and some application examples are given. Experiments have been performed to study corrosion du to the presence of humidity and sulfur compounds. The use of resonant reactors allows the determination of depth profiles of H and S from structures located in particularly contaminated areas. The method provides a non destructive and quick way of estimating the effect of such elements in different types of structures, such as the ones used in high voltage transmission lines. Also the wear out rates in mechanical engine components having a difficult direct access, have been evaluated by proton activation analysis. The evaluation of the advantages of this method is being done. The effect of irradiation damage on superconducting high temperature ceramics was analyzed by the interaction of energetic alpha particles with high T c YBaCuO samples

  9. CrN-based wear resistant hard coatings for machining and forming tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S; Cooke, K E; Teer, D G [Teer Coatings Ltd, West Stone House, Berry Hill Industrial Estate, Droitwich, Worcestershire WR9 9AS (United Kingdom); Li, X [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); McIntosh, F [Rolls-Royce plc, Inchinnan, Renfrewshire PA4 9AF, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-21

    Highly wear resistant multicomponent or multilayer hard coatings, based on CrN but incorporating other metals, have been developed using closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating technology. They are exploited in coated machining and forming tools cutting and forming of a wide range of materials in various application environments. These coatings are characterized by desirable properties including good adhesion, high hardness, high toughness, high wear resistance, high thermal stability and high machining capability for steel. The coatings appear to show almost universal working characteristics under operating conditions of low and high temperature, low and high machining speed, machining of ordinary materials and difficult to machine materials, and machining under lubricated and under minimum lubricant quantity or even dry conditions. These coatings can be used for cutting and for forming tools, for conventional (macro-) machining tools as well as for micromachining tools, either as a single coating or in combination with an advanced, self-lubricating topcoat.

  10. Wear Behavior of Uncoated and Coated Tools under Complex Loading Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wieland

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In automotive industry crash relevant structures of the body in white are manufactured using the direct hot stamping process. Due to the high temperature difference between the hot blank and the cold tool surfaces and the relative movement between the blank and the tool surfaces during the forming operation, high thermal and mechanical loads are applied on the tool leading to excessive wear in terms of adhesion on the tool surfaces. One possibility to reduce wear of hot stamping tools is the application of tool coating systems. In the scope of this work uncoated and coated tools are characterized under complex loading conditions with respect to adhesive layer build-up.

  11. Characteristics of fracture during the approach process and wear mechanism of a silicon AFM tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Ha; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2005-01-01

    The wear of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip is one of the crucial issues in AFM as well as in other probe-based applications. In this work, wear tests under extremely low normal load using an AFM were conducted. Also, in order to understand the nature of silicon tip wear, the wear characteristics of crystal silicon and amorphous silicon oxide layer were investigated by a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). It was found that fracture of the tip readily occurred due to impact during the approach process. Experimental results showed that the impact should be below 0.1 nN s to avoid significant fracture of the tip. Also, it was observed that wear of the amorphous layer, formed at the end of the tip, occurred at the initial stage of the silicon tip damage process. Based on Archard's wear law, the wear coefficient of the amorphous layer was in the range of 0.009-0.014. As for the wear characteristics of the silicon tip, it was shown that wear occurred gradually under light normal load and the wear rate decreased with increase in the sliding distance. As for the wear mechanism of the silicon tip, oxidation wear was identified to be the most significant. It was shown that the degree of oxidation was higher under high normal load and in a nitrogen environment, oxidation of the silicon tip was reduced

  12. Wear-Induced Changes in FSW Tool Pin Profile: Effect of Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlot, Pankaj; Jha, Kaushal; Dey, G. K.; Arora, Amit

    2018-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of high melting point metallic (HMPM) materials has limited application due to tool wear and relatively short tool life. Tool wear changes the profile of the tool pin and adversely affects weld properties. A quantitative understanding of tool wear and tool pin profile is crucial to develop the process for joining of HMPM materials. Here we present a quantitative wear study of H13 steel tool pin profile for FSW of CuCrZr alloy. The tool pin profile is analyzed at multiple traverse distances for welding with various tool rotational and traverse speeds. The results indicate that measured wear depth is small near the pin root and significantly increases towards the tip. Near the pin tip, wear depth increases with increase in tool rotational speed. However, change in wear depth near the pin root is minimal. Wear depth also increases with decrease in tool traverse speeds. Tool pin wear from the bottom results in pin length reduction, which is greater for higher tool rotational speeds, and longer traverse distances. The pin profile changes due to wear and result in root defect for long traverse distance. This quantitative understanding of tool wear would be helpful to estimate tool wear, optimize process parameters, and tool pin shape during FSW of HMPM materials.

  13. Steam generator fretting-wear damage: A summary of recent findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerout, F.M.; Fisher, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration of steam generator (SG) tubes may sometimes result in fretting-wear damage at the tube-to-support locations. Fretting-wear damage predictions are largely based on experimental data obtained at representative test conditions. Fretting-wear of SG materials has been studied at the Chalk River Laboratories for two decades. Tests are conducted in fretting-wear test machines that simulate SG environmental conditions and tube-to-support dynamic interactions. A new high-temperature force and displacement measuring system was developed to monitor tube-to-support interaction (i.e., work-rate) at operating conditions. This improvement in experimental fretting-wear technology was used to perform a comprehensive study of the effect of various environment and design parameters on SG tube wear damage. This paper summarizes the results of tests performed over the past 4 yr to study the effect of temperature, water chemistry, support geometry, and tube material on fretting-wear. The results show a significant effect of temperature on tube wear damage. Therefore, fretting-wear tests must be performed at operating temperatures in order to be relevant. No significant effect of the type of water treatment on tube wear damage was observed. For predominantly impacting motion, the wear of SG tubes in contact with 410 stainless steel is similar regardless of whether Alloy 690 or Alloy 800 is used as tubing material or whether lattice bars or broached hole supports are used. Based on results presented in this paper, an average wear coefficient value is recommended that is used for the prediction of SG tube wear depth versus time

  14. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-01-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant. (paper)

  15. High-temperature process heat applications with an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    An 842-MW(t) HTGR-process heat (HTGR-PH) design and several synfuels and energy transport processes to which it could be coupled are described. As in other HTGR designs, the HTGR-PH has its entire primary coolant system contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) which provides the necessary biological shielding and pressure containment. The high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. With a capability to produce hot helium in the secondary loop at 800 0 C (1472 0 F) with current designs and 900 0 C (1652 0 F) with advanced designs, a large number of process heat applications are potentially available. Studies have been performed for coal liquefaction and gasification using nuclear heat

  16. A 15-pole high temperature superconductor filter for radar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Xi, Weibin; Wu, Songtao

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a compact and high first harmonic frequency resonator. The characteristics of this resonator are theoretically analyzed. A highly selective 15-pole Chebyshev high temperature superconducting ultra-high frequency narrowband filter for radar applications was fabricated by using this resonator. The filter has a center frequency of 495 MHz and a fractional bandwidth of 1%. The first harmonic frequency is more than 3.3 times the fundamental frequency. The measured filter shows excellent selectivity, better than 85 dB/1 MHz skirt slopes, and more than 85 dB of rejection at 497.5 MHz from the band edge. The filter was fabricated on a 2 inch YBCO thin film with a 0.5 mm thick MgO substrate. The experimental results are consistent with the simulations.

  17. Thermochemical heat storage for high temperature applications. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felderhoff, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Urbanczyk, Robert; Peil, Stefan [Institut fuer Energie- und Umwelttechnik e.V. (IUTA), Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Heat storage for high temperature applications can be performed by several heat storage techniques. Very promising heat storage methods are based on thermochemical gas solid reactions. Most known systems are metal oxide/steam (metal hydroxides), carbon dioxide (metal carbonates), and metal/hydrogen (metal hydrides) systems. These heat storage materials posses high gravimetric and volumetric heat storage densities and because of separation of the reaction products and their storage in different locations heat losses can be avoided. The reported volumetric heat storage densities are 615, 1340 and 1513 [ kWh m{sup -3}] for calcium hydroxide Ca(OH){sub 2}, calcium carbonate CaCO{sub 3} and magnesium iron hydride Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 6} respectively. Additional demands for gas storage decrease the heat storage density, but metal hydride systems can use available hydrogen storage possibilities for example caverns, pipelines and chemical plants. (orig.)

  18. A complex autoregressive model and application to monthly temperature forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Gu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex autoregressive model was established based on the mathematic derivation of the least squares for the complex number domain which is referred to as the complex least squares. The model is different from the conventional way that the real number and the imaginary number are separately calculated. An application of this new model shows a better forecast than forecasts from other conventional statistical models, in predicting monthly temperature anomalies in July at 160 meteorological stations in mainland China. The conventional statistical models include an autoregressive model, where the real number and the imaginary number are separately disposed, an autoregressive model in the real number domain, and a persistence-forecast model.

  19. High temperature reactor and application to nuclear process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulten, R; Kugeler, K [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-01-01

    The principle of high temperature nuclear process heat is explained and the main applications (hydrogasification of coal, nuclear chemical heat pipe, direct reduction of iron ore, coal gasification by steam and water splitting) are described in more detail. The motivation for the introduction of nuclear process heat to the market, questions of cost, of raw material resources and environmental aspects are the next point of discussion. The new technological questions of the nuclear reactor and the status of development are described, especially information about the fuel elements, the hot gas ducts, the contamination and some design considerations are added. Furthermore the status of development of helium heated steam reformers, the main results of the work until now and the further activities in this field are explained.

  20. Sliding wear and friction behavior of zirconium alloy with heat-treated Inconel718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H., E-mail: kimjhoon@cnu.ac.kr [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.M. [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.K.; Jeon, K.L. [Nuclear Fuel Technology Department, Korea Nuclear Fuel, 1047 Daedukdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    In water-cooled nuclear reactors, the sliding of fuel rod can lead to severe wear and it is an important issue to sustain the structural integrity of nuclear reactor. In the present study, sliding wear behavior of zirconium alloy in dry and water environment using Pin-On-Disk sliding wear tester was investigated. Wear resistance of zirconium alloy against heat-treated Inconel718 pin was examined at room temperature. Sliding wear tests were carried out at different sliding distance, axial load and sliding speed based on ASTM (G99-05). The results of these experiments were verified with specific wear rate and coefficient of friction. The micro-mechanisms responsible for wear in zirconium alloy were identified to be microcutting and microcracking in dry environment. Moreover, micropitting and delamination were observed in water environment.

  1. Type T reference function suitability for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, D.

    2013-09-01

    Type T thermocouples are commonly used in industrial measurement applications due to their accuracy relative to other thermocouple types, low cost, and the ready availability of measurement equipment. Type T thermocouples are very effective when used in differential measurements, as there is no cold junction compensation necessary for the connections to the measurement equipment. Type T's published accuracy specifications result in its frequent use in low temperature applications. An examination of over 328 samples from a number of manufacturers has been completed for this investigation. Samples were compared to a Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometer (SPRT) at the LN2 boiling point along with four other standardized measurement points using a characterized ice point reference, low-thermal EMF scanner and an 8.5 digit multimeter, and the data compiled and analyzed. The test points were approximately -196 °C, -75 °C, 0 °C, +100 °C, and +200 °C. These data show an anomaly in the conformance to the reference functions where the reference functions meet at 0 °C. Additionally, in the temperature region between -100 °C to -200 °C, a positive offset of up to 5.4 °C exists between the reference function equations published in the ASTM E230-06 for the nitrogen point and the measured response of the actual wire. This paper will examine the historical and technological reasons for this anomaly in the both the ASTM and IEC reference functions. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained several figures with missing information/characters—caused by processes used to generate the PDF file. All figures were affected by this error. The article has been replaced and these figures now display correctly. The corrected article was published on 7 November 2013.

  2. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  3. The application of microwave techniques to temperature measurement in biotelemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a microwave dielectric resonator for temperature measurement in Biotelemetry offers the advantage that a passive temperature telemeter can be used. The telemeter is powered by a source remote from the host creature, thus permitting greater miniaturisation of the implant than is possible with conventional techniques. This is essential, especially for application to small animals where the telemeter size and weight become critical. The design of the telemeter which is based upon a novel microwave technique, and the associated practical considerations are discussed. Included in this work is a criticism of initially promising ideas which after an in-depth investigation had to be disregarded. Although the transponder could not be built in its final form due to the unavailability of certain key materials, the transponder operation was tested and found to be successful. A specification of the transponder and transmitter requirements for a working system are included. A theoretical and experimental appraisal of dielectric resonators as miniature microwave filters, also forms a large part of this work. Dielectric resonators offer a significant volume reduction compared to air-filled metallic cavities, and simple coupling to microstrip combined with ease of tuning permits incorporation into Microwave Integrated Circuits. A computer program which can form the basis for a dielectric resonator filter design is provided, and some unusual results of tests on dielectric resonators are presented. It is believed that this will help to popularise and increase understanding of the dielectric resonator - which is an exciting, yet still emerging technology

  4. PWR control rods wear by vibrations induced by coolant fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynier, R.

    1997-01-01

    Flow induced vibrations in pressurised water reactors generate the wear of control rods against their guidance systems. Alternate sliding (at 320 deg. C in water) and impact-sliding tests (at room temperature in air) were carried out on 304 L austenitic stainless steel control rods' claddings. Microstructural analysis were made on the wear scars of the tube specimen using Scanning ELectron Microscopy, microhardness measurements and X-ray diffractometry. The alternate sliding leads to an important mass loss, a strong plastic deformation due to the strain hardening of the surface layers and generates strong compressive residual stresses. These results are specific to a severe wear case. Therefore, the impact-sliding mode induces martensitic phase, a cracked oxide layer and a compressive residual stresses weaker than those created in the alternate sliding case. This type of motion leads to a milder wear of the control rods

  5. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoz, Erman

    used in applications such as adsorption, storage, and separation of small gas molecules. The maximum excess H2 storage capacity was 1.5 wt% at 77 K and at pressures below 2 MPa. The notable H2 adsorption of PCFF below 1 MPa can be justified by the abundance of microporosity and the nanopores available for H2 penetration. In the second step of the pyrolysis the protein matrix went through a series of transformations including cyclization and aromatization reactions above the melting point. A partially cyclic carbon-nitrogen framework (carbon/nitrogen ratio=2.38) supported by double and triple bonds and oxygen functionalities is the suggested structural model for the PCFF. The useful fibers and adsorbents produced from CFF in this dissertation can encourage researchers to use high temperature heat treatments on keratin-based fibers. Also, the identified pyrolysis mechanisms can serve as a guide for producing materials with desired properties from protein-based materials, particularly in textile, high performance composite and catalyst industries.

  6. Adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayali, Yusuf; Yalcin, Yilmaz; Taktak, Suekrue

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, the wear and adhesion properties of BDI were investigated. → Boro-tempering process under several heat treatment conditions was examined. → Optical microscope, SEM and XRD analysis were carried out to investigate the microstructure. → It was observed that boro-tempering process improves micro-hardness and wear properties of ductile irons. -- Abstract: In this study, adhesion and wear properties of boro-tempered ductile iron (BDI) were investigated. Boro-tempering was carried out on two stage processes i.e. boronizing and tempering. At the first stage, ductile iron samples were boronized by using pack process at 900 o C for 1, 3, and 5 h and then, secondly tempered at 250, 300, 350, and 400 o C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of boro-tempered samples showed that FeB and Fe 2 B phases were found on the surface of the samples. The Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test was used to assess the adhesion of boride layer. Test result showed that adhesion decreased with increasing boriding time and increased with increasing tempering temperature. Dry sliding wear tests of these samples were performed against Al 2 O 3 ball at a constant sliding speed and loads of 5 and 10 N. Wear tests indicated that boro-tempering heat treatment increased wear resistance of ductile iron. In addition, it was found that while wear rate of boro-tempered samples decreased with increasing boriding time, there is no significant affect of tempering temperature on wear rate.

  7. Dry sliding wear of Ni alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akbarzadeh Chiniforush

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of dry sliding wear are presented for ductile irons with composition Fe-3.56C-2.67Si-0.25Mo-0.5Cu and Ni contents of 0.8 and 1.5 in wt.% with applied loads of 50, 100 and 150 N for austempering temperatures of 270, 320, and 370 °C after austenitizing at 870 °C for 120 min. The mechanical property measurements show that the grades of the ASTM 897M: 1990 Standard can be satisfied for the selected austempering conditions. The results show that wear resistance is independent of austempering temperature with an applied load of 50 N, but there is a strong dependence at higher austempering temperatures with applied loads of 100 and 150 N. Observations indicate that wear is due to subsurface fatigue with cracks nucleated at deformed graphite nodules.

  8. Wear behavior of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plant operating condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Sup; Hong, Jin-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Nam; Jang, Ki-Sang

    2003-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding wear tests were performed on steam generator tubes materials at steam generator operating temperature. The material surfaces react with oxygen to form oxides. The oxide properties such as formation rate and mechanical properties are varied with the test temperature and alloy composition. So, it is important to investigate the wear properties of each steam generator tube materials in steam generator operating condition. The tests results indicated that the wear coefficient in work rate model of alloy 690 was faster than that of alloy 800. From the scanning electron microscopy observation, the wear scars were similar each other and worn surfaces were covered with oxide layers. It seemed that the oxide layers were formed by wear debris sintering or cold welding and these layer properties affected the wear rate of steam generator tube materials. (author)

  9. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Modelling and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    DSC. Some shortcomings of TMDSC have been noticed in both modelling and application work. Firstly, any experiments for purpose of either understanding or the quantitative measurements of TMDSC output quantities should be performed under carefully selected conditions which can satisfy the linear response assumption. Secondly, some signals in particular those associated with kinetic processes may not be fully sampled by TMDSC due to the limit of the observing window of a modulation. Thirdly, the TMDSC evaluation procedure introduces mathematical artefacts into the output signals. As a consequence, it is preferable to include as many temperature modulations as possible within any transition being studied in order obtain good quality experimental signals by eliminating or minimising these artefacts. (author)

  10. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1995-07-01

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author)

  11. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author.) 2 refs. 3 figs. 1 tabs.

  12. Rubber glove wearing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tatsuo; Takada, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    Rubber groves are attached each to an upper end of a glove putting vessel having an air-sucking hole on the bottom by enlarging an opening end of the rubber glove and turning back the inside to the outside. When the sucking device is operated, air in the glove putting device is sucked and the rubber glove is expanded by an atmospheric pressure. After expansion of the rubber glove to some extent, the sucking device is stopped, and presence or absence of failures of the rubber glove is confirmed by shrinkage of the rubber glove and by an indication value of a pressure gauge for detecting the pressure change in the vessel. Then, a hand is inserted to the expanded rubber glove, and a detaching switch in the vessel is pushed by a finger tip. A detaching piece at the upper end of the vessel is protruded outwardly to enlarge the turned-back portion of the rubber glove to easily release the rubber glove from the putting vessel, and the rubber glove is put on. This enables to wear the rubber glove and conduct failure test simultaneously. Further, a user can put on the rubber glove without touching the outside of the rubber glove. (I.N.)

  13. Study of wear performance of deep drawing tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranje, Vishal G.; Karthikeyan, Ram; Nair, Vipin

    2017-09-01

    One of the most common challenges for many of the mechanical engineers and also in the field of materials science is the issue of occurrences of wear of the material parts which is used in certain applications that involves such surface interactions. In this paper, wear behaviour of particular grade High Carbon High Chromium Steel and many most famously D2, H13, O1 known as the Viking steel has been studied, evaluated and analyzed under certain processing parameters such as speed, load, track diameter and time required for deep drawing process to know it’s the wear rate and coefficient of friction. Also, the significance of the processing parameters which is used for wear testing analysis is also examined.

  14. Japanese HTTR program for demonstration of high temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, T.; Hada, K.; Shiozawa, S.

    1997-01-01

    Construction works of the HTTR started in March 1991 in order to establish and upgrade the HTGR technology basis, to carry out innovative basic researches on high temperature engineering and to demonstrate high temperature heat utilization and application of nuclear heat. This report describes the demonstration program of high temperature heat utilization and application. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Erosive tooth wear in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; Lussi, A.; Jaeggi, T.; Gambon, D.L.; Lussi, A.; Ganss, C.

    2014-01-01

    Erosive tooth wear in children is a common condition. Besides the anatomical differences between deciduous and permanent teeth, additional histological differences may influence their susceptibility to dissolution. Considering laboratory studies alone, it is not clear whether deciduous teeth are

  16. Effect of cold compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Towle-Millard, Heather A; Rankin, David C; Roush, James K

    2013-03-01

    To measure the effect of cold compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs. 10 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 (superficial), 1.0 (middle), and 1.5 (deep) cm into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Cold (-16.8°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no cold compress. Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of application at the superficial depth was significantly decreased, compared with control temperatures. Application for 10 and 20 minutes significantly reduced the temperature at all depths, compared with controls and 5 minutes of application. Twenty minutes of application significantly decreased temperature at only the middle depth, compared with 10 minutes of application. With this method of cold treatment, increasing application time from 10 to 20 minutes caused a further significant temperature change at only the middle tissue depth; however, for maximal cooling, the minimum time of application should be 20 minutes. Possible changes in tissue temperature and adverse effects of application > 20 minutes require further evaluation.

  17. Wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, V.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper several aspects of the wear mechanisms of coated hardmetals, ceramics and super-hard materials (CBN) in machining cast iron are discussed, with particular attention being given to high-speed machining of different cast iron grades. The influence of machining parameters, microstructure, composition and mechanical and chemical properties of the cutting tool and the work-piece material on wear are considered. (author)

  18. Applications of a high temperature sessile drop device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, B; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C [Vienna University of Technology, Insitute of Solid State Physics E-138, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Worbs, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Materialforschung, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernhard.schwarz@ifp.tuwien.ac.at

    2008-03-01

    The wettability of a liquid metal on a solid surface is of great technological interest for the industry (soldering, brazing, infiltration) as well as for fundamental research (diffusion, chemical reaction, intermetallic phases). The characterization of wetting is done by measuring the contact angle at the triple line of the liquid on the solid. A High Temperature Sessile Drop Device (HTSDD) was constructed and several applications were tested: (i) a wettability study of a copper-based brazing alloy (Cu-ABA) on TiN{sub x} coatings with different stoichiometries. The data derived from the HTSDD show that the reduction of the nitrogen content in the TiN coating reduces the time for reaching the final contact angle. Also for substoichiometric TiC a similar behaviour is predicted in literature. (ii) The liquid surface energy of molten metals can be estimated from the curvature of flattened droplets due to the influence of gravity. Two models were used for the calculation of the liquid surface energy of different liquid metals. (iii) From the droplet radius vs. time curves it is possible to distinguish between two different reactive wetting regimes - the diffusion and the reaction controlled reactive wetting. The beginning of this research topic will be discussed.

  19. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbations to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development

  20. Study of the compression and wear-resistance properties of freeze-cast Ti and Ti‒5W alloy foams for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyelim; Shil'ko, Serge; Gubicza, Jenő; Choe, Heeman

    2017-08-01

    Ti and Ti‒5wt% W alloy foams were produced by freeze-casting process and their mechanical behaviors were compared. The Ti‒5W alloy foam showed a typical acicular Widmanstätten α/β structure with most of the W dissolved in the β phase. An electron-probe microanalysis revealed that approximately 2wt% W was uniformly dissolved in the Ti matrix of Ti‒5W alloy foam with few partially dissolved W particles. The compressive-yield strength of Ti‒5W alloy foam (~323MPa) was approximately 20% higher than that of the Ti foam (~256MPa) owing to the solid-solution-strengthening effect of W in the Ti matrix, which also resulted in a dramatic improvement in the wear resistance of Ti‒5W alloy foam. The compressive behaviors of the Ti and Ti‒5W alloy foams were predicted by analytical models and compared with the experimental values. Compared with the Gibson-Ashby and cellular-lattice-structure-in-square-orientation models of porous materials, the orientation-averaging method provided prediction results that are much more accurate in terms of both the Young's modulus and the yield strength of the Ti and Ti‒5W alloy foams. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gear Tooth Wear Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Irebert R.

    2015-01-01

    Vibration-based condition indicators continue to be developed for Health Usage Monitoring of rotorcraft gearboxes. Testing performed at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown correlations between specific condition indicators and specific types of gear wear. To speed up the detection and analysis of gear teeth, an image detection program based on the Viola-Jones algorithm was trained to automatically detect spiral bevel gear wear pitting. The detector was tested using a training set of gear wear pictures and a blind set of gear wear pictures. The detector accuracy for the training set was 75 percent while the accuracy for the blind set was 15 percent. Further improvements on the accuracy of the detector are required but preliminary results have shown its ability to automatically detect gear tooth wear. The trained detector would be used to quickly evaluate a set of gear or pinion pictures for pits, spalls, or abrasive wear. The results could then be used to correlate with vibration or oil debris data. In general, the program could be retrained to detect features of interest from pictures of a component taken over a period of time.

  2. High Temperature Electrical Insulation Materials for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art high temperature insulation materials of which higher working temperature, high...

  3. Critical component wear in heavy duty engines

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, P A

    2011-01-01

    The critical parts of a heavy duty engine are theoretically designed for infinite life without mechanical fatigue failure. Yet the life of an engine is in reality determined by wear of the critical parts. Even if an engine is designed and built to have normal wear life, abnormal wear takes place either due to special working conditions or increased loading.  Understanding abnormal and normal wear enables the engineer to control the external conditions leading to premature wear, or to design the critical parts that have longer wear life and hence lower costs. The literature on wear phenomenon r

  4. Onset wear in self-assembled monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Acunto, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are very useful for the systematic modification of the physical, chemical and structural properties of a surface by varying the chain length, tail group and composition. Many of these properties can be studied making use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the interaction between the AFM probe tip and the SAMs can also be considered an excellent reference to study the fundamental properties of dissipation phenomena and onset wear for viscoelastic materials on the nanoscale. We have performed a numerical study showing that the fundamental mechanism for the onset wear is a process of nucleation of domains starting from initial defects. An SAM surface repeatedly sheared by an AFM probe tip with enough applied loads shows the formation of progressive damages nucleating in domains. The AFM induced surface damages involve primarily the formation of radicals from the carbon chain backbones, but the deformations of the chains resulting in changes of period lattice also have to be taken into consideration. The nucleation of the wear domains generally starts at the initial surface defects where the energy cohesion between chains is lower. Moreover, the presence of surface defects is consistent with the changes in lateral force increasing the probability of the activation for the removal of carbon debris from the chain backbone. The quantification of the progressive worn area is performed making use of the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) theory for phase transition kinetic processes. The advantage of knowing the general conditions for onset wear on the SAM surfaces can help in studying the fundamental mechanisms for the tribological properties of viscoelastic materials, in solid lubrication applications and biopolymer mechanics

  5. Wear Characterization of Aluminium/Basalt Fiber Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites - A Novel Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amuthakkannan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy based metal matrix composite participate have a wider applications in wear resistance applications. Attempt made in current study is that, basalt fiber reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite have been prepared using stir casting method. Different weight percentage of basalt fiber reinforced with Al (6061 metal matrix composites are used to study the wear resistance of the composites. For wear study, percentage of reinforcement, normal load and sliding velocity are the considered as important parameters. To study the effect of basalt fiber reinforcement on the dry sliding wear of Al6061 alloy composites the Pin On wear tester is used. Initially hardness of the composites was tested, it was found that increasing reinforcement in the composite hardness value of the composites also increased. Based on the Grey relation analysis (GRA the effects of wear resistance of the composites were studied.

  6. A novel SOI pressure sensor for high temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sainan; Liang Ting; Wang Wei; Hong Yingping; Zheng Tingli; Xiong Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The silicon on insulator (SOI) high temperature pressure sensor is a novel pressure sensor with high-performance and high-quality. A structure of a SOI high-temperature pressure sensor is presented in this paper. The key factors including doping concentration and power are analyzed. The process of the sensor is designed with the critical process parameters set appropriately. The test result at room temperature and high temperature shows that nonlinear error below is 0.1%, and hysteresis is less than 0.5%. High temperature measuring results show that the sensor can be used for from room temperature to 350 °C in harsh environments. It offers a reference for the development of high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. (semiconductor devices)

  7. A probabilistic-based approach to monitoring tool wear state and assessing its effect on workpiece quality in nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Niaki, Farbod

    The objective of this research is first to investigate the applicability and advantage of statistical state estimation methods for predicting tool wear in machining nickel-based superalloys over deterministic methods, and second to study the effects of cutting tool wear on the quality of the part. Nickel-based superalloys are among those classes of materials that are known as hard-to-machine alloys. These materials exhibit a unique combination of maintaining their strength at high temperature and have high resistance to corrosion and creep. These unique characteristics make them an ideal candidate for harsh environments like combustion chambers of gas turbines. However, the same characteristics that make nickel-based alloys suitable for aggressive conditions introduce difficulties when machining them. High strength and low thermal conductivity accelerate the cutting tool wear and increase the possibility of the in-process tool breakage. A blunt tool nominally deteriorates the surface integrity and damages quality of the machined part by inducing high tensile residual stresses, generating micro-cracks, altering the microstructure or leaving a poor roughness profile behind. As a consequence in this case, the expensive superalloy would have to be scrapped. The current dominant solution for industry is to sacrifice the productivity rate by replacing the tool in the early stages of its life or to choose conservative cutting conditions in order to lower the wear rate and preserve workpiece quality. Thus, monitoring the state of the cutting tool and estimating its effects on part quality is a critical task for increasing productivity and profitability in machining superalloys. This work aims to first introduce a probabilistic-based framework for estimating tool wear in milling and turning of superalloys and second to study the detrimental effects of functional state of the cutting tool in terms of wear and wear rate on part quality. In the milling operation, the

  8. Standard guide for measuring the wear volumes of piston ring segments run against flat coupons in reciprocating wear tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers and describes a profiling method for use accurately measuring the wear loss of compound-curved (crowned) piston ring specimens that run against flat counterfaces. It does not assume that the wear scars are ideally flat, as do some alternative measurement methods. Laboratory-scale wear tests have been used to evaluate the wear of materials, coatings, and surface treatments that are candidates for piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel engines or spark ignition engines. Various loads, temperatures, speeds, lubricants, and durations are used for such tests, but some of them use a curved piston ring segment as one sliding partner and a flat or curved specimen (simulating the cylinder liner) as its counterface. The goal of this guide is to provide more accurate wear measurements than alternative approaches involving weight loss or simply measuring the length and width of the wear marks. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its ...

  9. Characterization of wear mechanism by tribo-corrosion of nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Some components of nuclear power plants, as steam generator tubes are made from Ni base alloys. These components are exposed to severe environment of high temperature and high pressure and submitted to contact mechanical stresses. These Ni - based alloys properties are determined by their ability to form on their surface an inner protective barrier film mainly composed of Cr 2 O 3 . The steam generator tubes are among the most difficult components to maintain, on the hand, because of their safety importance and secondly, the exchange tubes are subject to various degradation mechanisms, because of the harsh conditions of work. Wear by tribo-corrosion is a physicochemical aging mechanism which occurs in the management of the nuclear power plants life time. Tribo-corrosion is an irreversible process which involves mechanical and chemical / electrochemical interactions between surfaces in relative motion, in the presence of a corrosive environment. The goal of this study was to quantify in terms of quantity and quality the wear generated by tribo-corrosion process on Ni - Cr model alloys. Two model alloys: Ni -15Cr and Ni -30Cr were used to highlight, evaluate and compare the influence of the chromium content on the formation of the protective oxide layer and the role played by the latter one on the kinetics and mechanisms of wear by tribo-corrosion. The tribo-corrosion experiments were performed by using a pin-on-disc tribometer under controlled electrochemical conditions in LiOH - H 3 BO 3 solution. The corrosion - wear degradation of the protective layer during continuous and intermittent unidirectional sliding tests was investigated by a three-stage tribo-corrosion protocol. In the first stage, electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential measurements and electrochemical impedance measurements) were used without applying unidirectional sliding to monitor and evaluate the characteristics of protective oxide layer formed on the surface of the two model alloys

  10. Wearing the Playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Pagliarini, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we describe and define the range of possible applications and the technical contours of a robotic system to be worn on the body for playful interactions. Earlier work on Modular Robotic Wearable, MRW, described how, by using modular robotics for creating wearable...... possible application in the electronic games domain. Indeed, the Modular Robotic Wearable is an example of modular playware, which can create playful interactions for many application domains, including electronic games....

  11. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantsker, E.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO 3 -YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room

  12. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  13. Standard test method for ranking resistance of plastics to sliding wear using block-on-ring wear test—cumulative wear method

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of plastics to sliding wear. The test utilizes a block-on-ring friction and wear testing machine to rank plastics according to their sliding wear characteristics against metals or other solids. 1.2 An important attribute of this test is that it is very flexible. Any material that can be fabricated into, or applied to, blocks and rings can be tested. Thus, the potential materials combinations are endless. In addition, the test can be run with different gaseous atmospheres and elevated temperatures, as desired, to simulate service conditions. 1.3 Wear test results are reported as the volume loss in cubic millimetres for the block and ring. Materials of higher wear resistance will have lower volume loss. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with it...

  14. Hydrogen ion induced ultralow wear of PEEK under extreme load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuai; Wang, Anying; Fei, Jixiong; Wang, Zhenyang; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Lin, Bin

    2018-03-01

    As a high-performance engineering polymer, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is a perfect candidate material for applications under extreme working conditions. However, its high wear rate greatly shortens its service life. In this study, ultralow friction and wear between PEEK and silicon nitride (Si3N4) under extreme-load conditions (with a mean contact pressure above 100 MPa) are found in acid lubricating solutions. Both friction and wear decrease sharply with decreasing pH. At pH = 1, the friction coefficient decreases by an order of magnitude and the wear rate of the PEEK decreases by two orders of magnitude compared to the results with water lubrication. These reductions in friction and wear occur for different speed, load, and surface roughness conditions. The underlying mechanism can be attributed to the formation of hydrogen-ion-induced electrical double layers on the surfaces of PEEK and Si3N4. The combined effect of the resulting repulsive force, electro-viscosity, and low shear strength of the water layer dramatically reduces both friction and wear.

  15. Fretting wear characteristic tests of X2-GEN midgrid for SMART under a FIV rod trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ho; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Jae Yong; Kim, Hyung Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co. requested the fretting wear characteristic tests of a X2-GEN midgrid under a FIV rod trace at room temperature air. The following results were obtained for the fretting wear test. {center_dot} Fretting wear tests under a FIV rod trace Based on the result of the fretting wear tests of the X2-GEN and 17ACE7 1x1 mid-grid under a FIV rod trace, X2-GEN mid-grid showed a slightly severe wear volume rather than 17ACE7 spring. But, maximum wear depth shows an opposite behavior. This is due to spring shape effect. The fretting wear mechanisms at each mid-grid were influenced by each spring shape, that are depended on the different impacting behavior under a FIV rod motion. Up to 5x105 cycles, wear characteristics of each mid-grid shows a relatively similar wear rate. Consequently, it is necessary to further study for examining exact fretting wear behavior under a FIV rod tra

  16. Fretting wear damage of steam generator tubes and its prediction modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Honglong; Lei Mingkai

    2013-01-01

    The steam generator is the key equipment used for the energy transition in nuclear power plant. Since the high-temperature and high-pressure fluid flows with high speed, the steam generator tubes will be excited and vibrate, leading to the tremendous fretting wear problem on the tubes, sometimes even leading to tube cracking. This paper introduces typical fretting wear cases, the result of corresponding simulation wear experiment and damage mechanism which combining mechanical wear and erosion-corrosion. Work rate model could give a reasonable life prediction about the steam generator tube, and this predictive model has been used in nuclear power plant safety assessment. (authors)

  17. Isotopic study of the wear of sliding bearings with plastic friction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandur, J.; Varkonyi, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new complex device has been elaborated for the investigation of the duration of bearings in the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. The simultaneous determination of wear by an isotopic method the coefficient of friction by means of a Wheatstone bridge and the bearing temperature by means of a thermoresistor is described. Dynamic loading and variable revolution per minute are applied to produce a forced wear of the bearings. The isotopically labelled wear products are removed by oil and the collected sample is measured by a scintillation detector. Wear of a steel axle in plastic housing and plastic coated axle in cast iron housing was determined. (V.N.)

  18. Application of high precision temperature control technology in infrared testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haiyuan; Cheng, Yong; Zhu, Mengzhen; Chu, Hua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    In allusion to the demand of infrared system test, the principle of Infrared target simulator and the function of the temperature control are presented. The key technology of High precision temperature control is discussed, which include temperature gathering, PID control and power drive. The design scheme of temperature gathering is put forward. In order to reduce the measure error, discontinuously current and four-wire connection for the platinum thermal resistance are adopted. A 24-bits AD chip is used to improve the acquisition precision. Fuzzy PID controller is designed because of the large time constant and continuous disturbance of the environment temperature, which result in little overshoot, rapid response, high steady-state accuracy. Double power operational amplifiers are used to drive the TEC. Experiments show that the key performances such as temperature control precision and response speed meet the requirements.

  19. Application of piezoceramic materials in low temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, A.P.; Panich, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the voltage-to-movement conversion coefficients for piezoceramic domestic materials PKR and TsTS-19 are measured using a capacitance dilatometer in the 0.4< T<300K temperature range. Anisotropy of thermal expansion of materials determined by the polarization vector is observed. Some recommendations concerning the use of the given materials in low-temperature scanning tunnel microscopes are given

  20. Metal-coated optical fibers for high temperature sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Wysokiński, Karol; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Kołakowska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowski, Piotr; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    An novel low-temperature method was used to enhance the corrosion resistance of copper or gold-coated optical fibers. A characterization of the elaborated materials and reports on selected studies such as cyclic temperature tests together with tensile tests is presented. Gold-coated optical fibers are proposed as a component of optical fiber sensors working in oxidizing atmospheres under temperatures exceeding 900 °C.

  1. Abrasive Wear Resistance of the Iron- and WC-based Hardfaced Coatings Evaluated with Scratch Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abrasive wear is one of the most common types of wear, which makesabrasive wear resistance very important in many industries. Thehard facing is considered as useful and economical way to improve theperformance of components submitted to severe abrasive wear conditions, with wide range of applicable filler materials. The abrasive wear resistance of the three different hardfaced coatings (two iron‐based and one WC‐based, which were intended to be used for reparation of the impact plates of the ventilation mill, was investigated and compared. Abrasive wear tests were carried‐out by using the scratch tester under the dry conditions. Three normal loads of 10, 50 and 100 N and the constant sliding speed of 4 mm/s were used. Scratch test was chosen as a relatively easy and quick test method. Wear mechanism analysis showed significant influence of the hardfaced coatings structure, which, along with hardness, has determined coatings abrasive wear resistance.

  2. Application of phosphor thermometry to a Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andrews, W.H.; Beshears, D.L.; Cates, M.R.; Childs, R.M.; Grann, E.B.; Manges, W.W.; McIntyre, T.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Simpson, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System (GTMS) was developed for the American Iron and Steel Institute by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through a partnership with the National Steel Midwest Division in Portage, Indiana. The GTMS provides crucial on-line thermal process control information during the manufacturing of galvanneal steel. The system has been used with the induction furnaces to measure temperatures ranging from 450 to 700 degrees C with an accuracy of better than +/-5 Degrees C. The GTMS provides accurate, reliable temperature information thus ensuring a high quality product, reducing waste, and saving energy. The production of uniform, high-quality galvanneal steel is only possible through strict temperature control

  3. Effect of Phenomena Accompanying Wear in Dry Corundum Abrasive on the Properties and Microstructure of Austempered Ductile Iron with Different Chemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myszka D.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research described in this article is a fragment in the series of published works trying to determine the applicability of new materials for parts of the mining machinery. Tests were performed on two groups of austempered ductile iron - one of which contained 1.5% Ni and 0.5% Mo, while the other contained 1.9% Ni and 0.9% Cu. Each group has been heat treated according to the three different heat treatment variants and then the material was subjected to detailed testing of mechanical properties and abrasion wear resistance, measuring also hardness and magnetic properties, and conducting microstructural examinations. The results indicated that each of the tested materials was senstive to the surface hardening effect, which resulted in high wear resistance. It has been found that high temperature of austempering, i.e. 370°C, favours high wear resistance of ductile iron containing nickel and molybdenum. Low temperature of austempering, i.e. 270°C, develops high wear resistance in ductile iron containing nickel and copper. Both these materials offer completely different mechanical properties and as such can be used for different and specific applications.

  4. Wear behavior of A356/M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and A356/SiC particulate metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turhan, H. [Univ. of Firat, Dept. of Metallurgy, Elazig (Turkey); Yilmaz, O. [Univ. of Firat, Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, Elazig (Turkey)

    2002-06-01

    The stability of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides as reinforcement for A356 materials for tribological applications has been investigated. For this purpose, A356/M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, A356/SiC and A356/M{sub 7}C{sub 3}/SiC composites were prepared by powder metallurgy and tested at room temperature against SAE 4620 steel ring and AISI 304 stainless steel counterfaces under loads of 10 - 150 N. For comparison, also unreinforced A356 specimens were processed and tested under the same conditions. The tribological behavior was evaluated by microstructural examination of the wear-effected zones and by weight loss measurements of the specimens and counterfaces. The wear behavior of A356/M{sub 7}C{sub 3} composite gave an excellent result as function of the applied load because the M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particles act as load-bearing elements due to their excellent bonding to the Al matrix, and their interfaces withtood the wear stresses even at the highest applied load. Moreover, the M{sub 7}C{sub 3} particles limited the incorporation of wear debris into the Al matrix and reduced the wear damage occasioned to the steel counterfaces compared to that of A356 Al alloy. (orig.)

  5. Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.; Miller, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel

  6. Chamber for uniaxial pressure application at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, M.L.N.; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Picon, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    A chamber for alignment of low temperature ferroelastic domains in crystals by the use of uniaxial stress was built. The system allows the use of EPR and optical techniques, as well as X-ray irradiation at temperatures as low as 77K. (Author) [pt

  7. Effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Towle-Millard, Heather A; Rankin, David C; Roush, James K

    2013-03-01

    To measure the effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs. 10 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 cm (superficial), 1.0 cm (middle), and 1.5 cm (deep) into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Warm (47°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no warm compress. Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of heat application at the superficial, middle, and deep depths was significantly increased, compared with the control temperature. Application for 10 minutes significantly increased the temperature at all depths, compared with 5 minutes of application. Mean temperature associated with 20 minutes of application was not different at the superficial or middle depths, compared with 10 minutes of application. Temperature at the deep depth associated with 10 minutes of application was significantly higher, compared with 20 minutes of application, but all temperature increases at this depth were minimal. Results suggested that application of a warm compress should be performed for 10 minutes. Changes in temperature at a tissue depth of 1.5 cm were minimal or not detected. The optimal compress temperature to achieve therapeutic benefits was not determined.

  8. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  9. Application of subsurface temperature measurements in geothermal prospecting in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flóvenz, Ólafur G.

    1985-12-01

    In geothermal areas in Iceland aquifers are in most cases found to occur in highly permeable near-vertical fractures in the low permeability basaltic crust. Therefore heat transfer in the rocks surrounding the aquifers is mainly conductive. Temperature profiles in shallow non-flowing boreholes are used to construct a two dimensional model of the temperature distribution in the vicinity of near vertical aquifers. This is done by finite element solution of the equation of heat transfer which requires knowledge of the regional temperature gradient outside the area of geothermal activity and some constraints on the temperature within the aquifers. The model is helpful in estimating dip and location of near-vertical water bearing fractures and thus in siting production wells. An example of successful use to the method and of soil temperature measurements from a geothermal field in North-Iceland is demonstrated.

  10. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  11. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  12. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro; Ruggeri, Fabrizio; Tempone, Raul; Vilanova, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  13. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-07

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  14. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2014-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Wear Degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2016-01-06

    Cylinder liners of diesel engines used for marine propulsion are naturally subjected to a wear process, and may fail when their wear exceeds a specified limit. Since failures often represent high economical costs, it is utterly important to predict and avoid them. In this work [4], we model the wear process using a pure jump process. Therefore, the inference goal here is to estimate: the number of possible jumps, its sizes, the coefficients and the shapes of the jump intensities. We propose a multiscale approach for the inference problem that can be seen as an indirect inference scheme. We found that using a Gaussian approximation based on moment expansions, it is possible to accurately estimate the jump intensities and the jump amplitudes. We obtained results equivalent to the state of the art but using a simpler and less expensive approach.

  16. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of pulsed DC PACVD deposition temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear rate and durability of DLC films was studied. • Results show that wear rate of the DLC films, reduced from 14×E-4 mm3/Nm to 1×E-6 mm3/Nm with increasing the duty cycle from 50% to 80%. • In low duty cycle (around 50%), wear rate increases with increasing in Argon/CH4 flow ratio. • Oxidation, fatigue, abrasion and graphitization are main wear mechanisms in the DLC film. - Abstract: The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH_4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH_4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH_4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  17. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboubi, Farzad, E-mail: mahboubi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 1875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza [Research Laboratory of Green Organic Synthesis and Polymers, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 16846, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of pulsed DC PACVD deposition temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear rate and durability of DLC films was studied. • Results show that wear rate of the DLC films, reduced from 14×E-4 mm3/Nm to 1×E-6 mm3/Nm with increasing the duty cycle from 50% to 80%. • In low duty cycle (around 50%), wear rate increases with increasing in Argon/CH4 flow ratio. • Oxidation, fatigue, abrasion and graphitization are main wear mechanisms in the DLC film. - Abstract: The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH{sub 4} ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH{sub 4} flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  18. Use of nuclear techniques for measuring thin wears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanneau, B.

    1989-01-01

    Wear measurements with apparatus of classical metrology like profilography or tridimensional analysis, need a certain number of conditions, in particular, dismantling of the machine into parts, which give less of time and money. Radioactive methods permit to avoid such a dismantling, isn't sensitive to the temperature of the part... and according to their sensitivity, reduce the test duration

  19. Controlled wear of vitrified abrasive materials for precision grinding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    2Machining Research Group, Department of Engineering, University of ... ods are applied to analyse the cutting mechanism in grinding. .... (d) Chemical reaction between abrasive and workpiece material at elevated temperatures ... most common method used for measuring wear flat area employs an optical, or an electron.

  20. Applicability and performance of an imaging plate at subzero temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawabe, Atsushi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2010-01-01

    The performance of imaging plates (IPs) has not been studied at temperatures lower than 0 o C. In the present study, an IP was irradiated with gamma rays emitted from the mineral monazite at temperatures between -80 and 30 o C to determine its fundamental properties. The IP response as a function of irradiation time was found to be linear, suggesting that the IP works properly at low temperatures. Fading, an effect which should be considered at temperatures of more than 0 o C, was not observed at -30 and -80 o C. Furthermore, the fading-corrected PSL value of the IP irradiated at -80 o C was lower than at other temperatures (30, 5 and -30 o C). This can be explained by thermostimulated luminescence (TSL). Since the only intensive TSL peak in the temperature range from -80 to 30 o C is present at about -43 o C, some of the electrons trapped at F centers recombine with holes through the process of TSL before the stored radiation image is read out at room temperature. This finding suggests that the apparent sensitivity of the IP is lower at -80 o C although it is similar to sensitivities between -30 and 30 o C. This low sensitivity should be corrected to perform quantitative measurements.

  1. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  2. High Temperature Electro-Mechanical Devices For Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require a number of electro-mechanical devices, for example, Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDM's) to control the raising and lowering of control rods and Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) to circulate the primary coolant. There are potential benefits in locating electro-mechanical components in areas of the plant with high ambient temperatures. One such benefit is the reduced need to make penetrations in pressure vessels leading to simplified plant design and improved inherent safety. The feature that limits the ambient temperature at which most electrical machines may operate is the material used for the electrical insulation of the machine windings. Conventional electrical machines generally use polymer-based insulation that limits the ambient temperature they can operate in to below 200 degrees Celsius. This means that when a conventional electrical machine is required to operate in a hot area it must be actively cooled necessitating additional systems. This paper presents data gathered during investigations undertaken by Rolls-Royce into the design of high temperature electrical machines. The research was undertaken at Rolls-Royce's University Technology Centre in Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives at Sheffield University. Rolls- Royce has also been investigating high temperature wire and encapsulants and latterly techniques to provide high temperature insulation to terminations. Rolls-Royce used the experience gained from these tests to produce a high temperature electrical linear actuator at sizes representative of those used in reactor systems. This machine was tested successfully at temperatures equivalent to those found inside the reactor vessel of a pressurised water reactor through a full series of operations that replicated in service duty. The paper will conclude by discussing the impact of the findings and potential electro-mechanical designs that may utilise such high temperature technologies. (authors)

  3. Wear of micro end mills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the important issue of wear on micro end mills considering relevant metrological tools for its characterization and quantification. Investigation of wear on micro end mills is particularly difficult and no data are available in the literature. Small worn volumes cause large...... part. For this investigation 200 microns end mills are considered. Visual inspection of the micro tools requires high magnification and depth of focus. 3D reconstruction based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and stereo-pair technique is foreseen as a possible method for quantification...

  4. Application of Wireless Sensor Networks for Indoor Temperature Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojkoska, Biljana Risteska; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Chatzimisios, Periklis

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks take a major part in our everyday lives by enhancing systems for home automation, healthcare, temperature control, energy consumption monitoring, and so forth. In this paper we focus on a system used for temperature regulation for residential, educational, industrial...... energy savings by reducing the amount of data transmissions through the network. Furthermore, the framework explores techniques for localization, such that the location of the nodes can be used by algorithms that regulate temperature settings......., and commercial premises, and so forth. We propose a framework for indoor temperature regulation and optimization using wireless sensor networks based on ZigBee platform. This paper considers architectural design of the system, as well as implementation guidelines. The proposed system favors methods that provide...

  5. Towards the effective tool wear control in micro-EDM milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Valentincic, J.; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2010-01-01

    The electrode wear in micro-electrical discharge milling (micro-EDM milling) is one of the main problems to be solved in order to improve machining accuracy. This paper presents an investigation on wear and material removal in micro-EDM milling for selected process parameter combinations typical...... of the accuracy of volume measurements on the electrode wear per discharge and on the material removal per discharge are discussed, and the issues limiting the applicability of real time wear sensing in micro-EDM milling are presented....

  6. Calculation of wear (f.i. wear modulus) in the plastic cup of a hip joint prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    The wear equation is applied to the wear process in a hip joint prosthesis and a wear modulus is defined. The sliding distance, wear modulus, wear volume, wear area, contact angle and the maximum normal stress were calculated and the theoretical calculations applied to test results. During the wear

  7. New Challenges in Tribology: Wear Assessment Using 3D Optical Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valigi, Maria Cristina; Logozzo, Silvia; Affatato, Saverio

    2017-05-18

    Wear is a significant mechanical and clinical problem. To acquire further knowledge on the tribological phenomena that involve freeform mechanical components or medical prostheses, wear tests are performed on biomedical and industrial materials in order to solve or reduce failures or malfunctions due to material loss. Scientific and technological advances in the field of optical scanning allow the application of innovative devices for wear measurements, leading to improvements that were unimaginable until a few years ago. It is therefore important to develop techniques, based on new instrumentations, for more accurate and reproducible measurements of wear. The aim of this work is to discuss the use of innovative 3D optical scanners and an experimental procedure to detect and evaluate wear, comparing this technique with other wear evaluation methods for industrial components and biomedical devices.

  8. Wear of resin composites: Current insights into underlying mechanisms, evaluation methods and influential factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akimasa Tsujimoto

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The application of resin composites in dentistry has become increasingly widespread due to the increased aesthetic demands of patients, improvements in the formulation of resin composites, and the ability of these materials to bond to tooth structures, together with concerns about dental amalgam fillings. As resistance to wear is an important factor in determining the clinical success of resin composite restoratives, this review article defines what constitutes wear and describes the major underlying phenomena involved in this process. Insights are further included on both in vivo and in vitro tests used to determine the wear resistance of resin composite and the relationships between these tests. The discussion focuses on factors that contribute to the wear of resin composite. Finally, future perspectives are included on both clinical and laboratory tests and on the development of resin composite restorations. Keywords: Resin composites, Wear resistance, Wear testing

  9. Couple of biomimetic surfaces with different morphologies for remanufacturing nonuniform wear rail surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qi; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Haifeng; Feng, Li; Zhang, Peng

    2018-02-01

    In this work, biomimetic laser treatment was performed on repairing and remanufacturing the nonuniform worn rail surface. The wearing depth distribution of three work regions of a failure rail surface was discussed, and different thickness hardening layers with different microstructure, microhardness and wear resistances were detected from the worm surfaces. Varying wear resistances of the surfaces with different biomimetic morphologies were obtained by biomimetic laser treatments, and the corresponding effect on the lubrication sliding wear of treated and untreated surfaces were studied for comparative study. In addition, the relationship between wear resistance and the spacing of units was also provided, which can lay the important theoretical foundation for avoiding the wear resistance of the serious worn surface is less than that of the slight worn surface in the future practical applications.

  10. High temperature superconductivity: Concept, preparation and testing of high Tc superconductor compounds, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, Wafik

    1992-06-01

    Many studies have been carried out on high temperature superconductors with transition temperature above that of the liquid nitrogen. In this scientific study the concept and the mechanism of this phenomena are discussed, in addition the examples of preparation and testing of high temperature superconductors compounds are shown. Also the most important applications in industry are explained. (author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  11. Nodal wear model: corrosion in carbon blast furnace hearths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdeja, L. F.; Gonzalez, R.; Alfonso, A.; Barbes, M. F.

    2003-01-01

    Criteria developed for the Nodal Wear Model (NWM) were applied to estimate the shape of the corrosion profiles that a blast furnace hearth may acquire during its campaign. Taking into account design of the hearth, the boundary conditions, the characteristics of the refractory materials used and the operation conditions of the blast furnace, simulation of wear profiles with central well, mushroom and elephant foot shape were accomplished. The foundations of the NWM are constructed considering that the corrosion of the refractory is a function of the temperature present at each point (node) of the liquid metal-refractory interface and the corresponding physical and chemical characteristics of the corrosive fluid. (Author) 31 refs

  12. Ignition of a Combustible Atmosphere by Incandescent Carbon Wear Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Swikert, Max A.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether carbon wear particles from carbon elements in sliding contact with a metal surface were sufficiently hot to cause ignition of a combustible atmosphere. In some machinery, electric potential differences and currents may appear at the carbon-metal interface. For this reason the effect of these voltages and currents on the ability of carbon wear particles to cause ignition was evaluated. The test specimens used in the investigation were carbon vanes taken from a fuel pump and flat 21-inch-diameter 2 metal disks (440-C stainless steel) representing the pump housing. During each experiment a vane was loaded against a disk with a 0.5-pound force, and the disk was rotated to give a surface speed of 3140 feet per minute. The chamber of the apparatus that housed the vane and the disk was filled with a combustible mixture of air and propane. Various voltages and amperages were applied across the vane-disk interface. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 75, 350, 400, and 450 F. Fires were produced by incandescent carbon wear particles obtained at conditions of electric potential as low as 106 volts and 0.3 ampere at 400 F. Ignitions were obtained only with carbon wear particles produced with an electric potential across the carbon-vane-disk interface. No ignitions were obtained with carbon wear particles produced in the absence of this potential; also, the potential difference produced no ignitions in the absence of carbon wear particles. A film supplement showing ignition by incandescent wear particles is available.

  13. Fissure sealant materials: Wear resistance of flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Sohrab; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Hamidiaval, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Wear resistance of pit and fissure sealant materials can influence their retention. Wear characteristics of sealant materials may determine scheduling of check-up visits. The aim of this study was to compare wear resistance of two flowable composite resins with that of posterior composite resin materials. Methods. Thirty-five disk-shaped specimens were prepared in 5 groups, including two flowable composite resins (Estelite Flow Quick and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow), Filtek P90 and Filtek P60 and Tetric N-Ceram. The disk-shaped samples were prepared in 25-mm diameter by packing them into a two-piece aluminum mold and then light-cured. All the specimens were polished for 1minute using 600-grit sand paper. The samples were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 1 week and then worn by two-body abrasion test using "pin-on-disk" method (with distilled water under a 15-Nload at 0.05 m/s, for a distance of 100 meter with Steatite ceramic balls antagonists). A Profilometer was used for evaluating the surface wear. Data were analyzed with the one-way ANOVA. Results. Estelite Flow Quick exhibited 2708.9 ± 578.1 μm(2) and Estelite Flow Quick High Flow exhibited 3206 ± 2445.1 μm(2)of wear but there were no significant differences between the groups. They demonstrated similar wear properties. Conclusion. Estelite flowable composite resins have wear resistance similar to nano- and micro-filled and micro-hybrid composite resins. Therefore, they can be recommended as pit and fissure sealant materials in the posterior region with appropriate mechanical characteristics.

  14. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  15. Study on the friction and wear properties of glass fabric composites filled with nano- and micro-particles under different conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Fenghua; Zhang Zhaozhu; Liu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    wear behaviors of the unfilled glass fabric and the composites. In a practical viewpoint, 10% PTFE-filled glass fabric composite could be suitable to tribological applications at moderately elevated temperature

  16. A study on die wear model of warm and hot forgings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J. H.; Park, I. W.; Jae, J. S.; Kang, S. S.

    1998-05-01

    Factors influencing service lives of tools in warm and hot forging processes are wear, mechanical fatigue, plastic deformation and thermal fatigue, etc. Wear is the predominant factor for tool failure among these. To predict tool life by wear, Archard's model where hardness is considered as constant or function of temperature is generally applied. Usually hardness of die is a function of not only temperature but operating time of die. To consider softening of die by repeated operation it is necessary to express hardness of die by a function of temperature and time. In this study wear coefficients were measured for various temperatures and heat treatment for H13 tool steel. Also by experiment of reheating of die, die softening curves were obtained. From experimental results, relationships between tempering parameters and hardness were established to investigate effects of hardness decrease by the effect of temperatures and time. Finally modified Archard's wear model in which hardness is considered to be a function of main tempering curve was proposed. And finite element analyses were conducted by adopting suggested wear model. By comparisons of simulations and real profiles of worn die, proposed wear model was verified.

  17. 自蔓延高温合成Ti3AlC2材料及其摩擦磨损性能%Fabrication of Ti3AlC2 by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and its friction and wear behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      以TiC,Ti,Al,C粉末为反应物原料,采用自蔓延高温反应按照质量分数为15% TiC,50% Ti,28% Al,7% C的配比合成了纯度为96.76%、气孔率为9.45%的高纯Ti3AlC2块体材料。研究添加TiC对合成产物Ti3AlC2材料纯度的影响,并对其摩擦磨损性能进行分析。结果表明:当添加 TiC 的质量分数小于15%,Ti3AlC2含量随 TiC 含量的增加而增加;当添加TiC质量分数大于15%,Ti3AlC2含量随TiC含量的增加而降低。当载荷较小,Ti3AlC2材料以磨粒磨损为主;而载荷较大,其以磨粒磨损为主并伴随有轻微黏着磨损。%High purity Ti3AlC2 was synthesized by self⁃propagating high⁃temperature synthesis method using TiC,Ti,Al and C powders as raw materials. Ti3AlC2 material with high density was successfully fabricated when the mass fraction of TiC/Ti/Al/C is equal to 15%/50%/28%/7%. The content of Ti3AlC2 in the material reaches as high as 96.76%,and the porosity is only 9.45%. The effects of TiC on the purity of sintered Ti3AlC2 were studied. When the addition content of TiC is less than 15%,Ti3AlC2 percentage content firstly increases with the increase of TiC content,but when the addition content of TiC is greater than 15%,it will decrease with continuously increasing amount of TiC. When the load is low,the main wear mechanism is abrasive wear. Under a higher load,the wear mechanism transforms to abrasive wear and light adhesive wear.

  18. The friction and wear of γ-irradiated polytetrafluoroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briscoe, B.J.; Ni, Z.

    1984-01-01

    The exposure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to γ radiation significantly reduces the molecular weight but below the gross softening temperature suppresses the overall molecular domain mobility. The shear modulus and creep resistance increase but the toughness is reduced. Data are presented to substantiate these trends and to interpret their influence on the friction and wear of γ-damaged PTFE. The sliding friction on smooth rigid counterfaces increases but the wear in this configuration is decreased. The rate of abrasion on rough rigid counterfaces is increased. There is also an improvement in the ultimate load-bearing capacity. All the changes produced are a function of the exposure but most of the effects are fully manifested by 20 Mrad. The general conclusion is that the extent of the molecular mobility or migration induced by mechanical stresses, imposed in both the interface and the bulk of the polymer, has a critical effect on the friction and wear processes. (Auth.)

  19. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Gambill, W.R.; Fox, E.C.

    1976-11-01

    An overview is presented of the technical and economic feasibility for the development of a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) and associated processes. A critical evaluation of VHTR technology for process temperatures of 1400 and 2000 0 F is made. Additionally, an assessment of potential market impact is made to determine the commercial viability of the reactor system. It is concluded that VHTR process heat in the range of 1400 to 1500 0 F is attainable with near-term technology. However, process heat in excess of 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. The potential for the VHTR could include a major contribution to synthetic fuel, hydrogen, steel, and fertilizer production and to systems for transport and storage of high-temperature heat. A recommended development program including projected costs is presented

  20. Experimental fretting-wear studies of steam generator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, N.J.; Chow, A.B.; Weckwerth, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration of steam generator tubes results in fretting-wear damage due to impacting and rubbing of the tubes against their supports. This damage can be predicted by computing tube response to flow-induced excitation forces using analytical techniques, and then relating this response to resultant wear damage using experimentally-derived wear coefficients. Fretting-wear of steam generator materials has been studied experimentally at Chalk River Laboratories for two decades. Tests are conducted in machines that simulate steam generator environmental conditions and tube-to-support dynamic interactions. Different tube and support materials, tube-to-support clearances and tube support geometries have been studied. As well, the effect of environmental conditions, such as temperature, oxygen content, pH and chemistry control additive, have been investigated. Early studies showed that damage was related to contact force as long as other parameters, such as geometry and motion were held constant. Later studies have shown that damage is related to a parameter called work-rate, which combines both contact force and sliding distance. Results of short- and long-term fretting-wear tests for CANDU steam generator materials at realistic environmental conditions are presented. These results demonstrate that work-rate is appropriate correlating parameter for impact-sliding interaction

  1. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  2. Wear resistance of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper investigations of abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of different cast iron grades have been presented. Examinations showed, that the most advantageous pair of materials is the cast iron – the hardened steel with low-tempered martensite. It was found, that martensitic nodular cast iron with carbides is the most resistant material.

  3. Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselkorn, M.H. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

  4. Application of 'SPICE' to predict temperature distribution in heat pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H M; Liu, Y; Damodaran, M [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (SG). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    1991-11-01

    This article presents a new alternative approach to predict temperature distribution in heat pipes. In this method, temperature distribution in a heat pipe, modelled as an analogous electrical circuit, is predicted by applying SPICE, a general-purpose circuit simulation program. SPICE is used to simulate electrical circuit designs before the prototype is assembled. Useful predictions are obtained for heat pipes with and without adiabatic sections and for heat pipes with various evaporator and condenser lengths. Comparison of the predicted results with experiments demonstrates fairly good agreement. It is also shown how interdisciplinary developments could be used appropriately. (author).

  5. Is applicable thermodynamics of negative temperature for living organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2017-11-01

    During organismal development the moment of sexual maturity can be characterizes by nearly maximum basal metabolic rate and body mass. Once the living organism reaches extreme values of the mass and the basal metabolic rate, it reaches near equilibrium thermodynamic steady state physiological level with maximum organismal complexity. Such thermodynamic systems that reach equilibrium steady state level at maximum mass-energy characteristics can be regarded from the prospective of thermodynamics of negative temperature. In these systems the increase of the internal and free energy is accompanied with decrease of the entropy. In our study we show the possibility the living organisms to regard as thermodynamic system with negative temperature

  6. Temperature control of power semiconductor devices in traction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugachev, A. A.; Strekalov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    The peculiarity of thermal management of traction frequency converters of a railway rolling stock is highlighted. The topology and the operation principle of the automatic temperature control system of power semiconductor modules of the traction frequency converter are designed and discussed. The features of semiconductors as an object of temperature control are considered; the equivalent circuit of thermal processes in the semiconductors is suggested, the power losses in the two-level voltage source inverters are evaluated and analyzed. The dynamic properties and characteristics of the cooling fan induction motor electric drive with the scalar control are presented. The results of simulation in Matlab are shown for the steady state of thermal processes.

  7. High-temperature spectroscopy for nuclear waste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Robouch, P.; Torres, R.A.; Silva, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Instrumentation has been developed to perform uv-vis-nir absorbance measurements remotely and at elevated temperatures and pressures. Fiber-optic spectroscopy permits the interrogation of radioactive species within a glovebox enclosure at temperatures ranging from ambient to >100 degree C. Spectral shifts as a function of metal- ligand coordination are used to compute thermodynamic free energies of reaction by matrix regression analysis. Pr 3+ serves as a convenient analog for trivalent actinides without attendant radioactivity hazards, and recent results obtained from 20 degree--95 degree C with the Pr-acetate complexation system are presented. Preliminary experimentation on Am(3) hydrolysis is also described. 16 refs., 1 tab

  8. Thin film system with integrated load and temperature sensors for the technical application in deep drawing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, Saskia; Paetsch, Nancy; Meyer-Kornblum, Eike

    2017-05-01

    In these days industry 4.0 resounded throughout the land and means the fourth industrial revolution. The industry has to tackle the task of a flexible and customer-oriented production. Therefor the need of sensor systems for the measurement of temperature and load, the two most important categories in production, is rising. For getting the real specification during the production process the integration of sensor elements in high load regions of machinery is very important. Thus wear resistant thin film sensor systems directly applied onto the surface of plant components are in development. These multilayer systems combine excellent wear resistance with sensory behaviour. The sensor data will lead to a deeper process understanding, to optimization of simulation tools, to reduction of rejects and to an improvement of flexibility in production.

  9. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  10. Wear of Polished Steel Surfaces in Dry Friction Linear Contact on Polimer Composites with Glass Fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that the friction and wear between polymers and polished steel surfaces has a special character, the behaviour to friction and wear of a certain polymer might not be valid for a different polymer, moreover in dry friction conditions. In this paper, we study the reaction to wear of certain polymers with short glass fibres on different steel surfaces, considering the linear friction contact, observing the friction influence over the metallic surfaces wear. The paper includes also its analysis over the steel’s wear from different points of view: the reinforcement content influence and tribological parameters (load, contact pressure, sliding speed, contact temperature, etc.. Thus, we present our findings related to the fact that the abrasive component of the friction force is more significant than the adhesive component, which generally is specific to the polymers’ friction. Our detections also state that, in the case of the polyamide with 30% glass fibres, the steel surface linear wear rate order are of 10-4 mm/h, respectively the order of volumetric wear rate is of 10-6 cm3 /h. The resulting volumetric wear coefficients are of the order (10-11 – 10-12 cm3/cm and respectively linear wear coefficients of 10-9 mm/cm.

  11. Effect of thermal treatments on the wear behaviour of duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargas, G; Mestra, A; Anglada, M; Mateo, A

    2009-01-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a family of steels characterized by two-phase microstructure with similar percentages of ferrite (α) and austenite (γ).Their attractive combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance has increased its use in last decades in the marine and petrochemical industries. Nevertheless, an inappropriate heat treatment can induce the precipitation of secondary phases which affect directly their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. There are few works dealing with the influence of heat treatments on wear behaviour of these steels in the literature. For instances, this paper aims to determine wear kinetic and sliding wear volume developed as a function of heat treatment conditions. Therefore, the samples were heat treated from 850 deg. C to 975 deg.C before sliding wear tests. These wear tests were carried out using ball on disk technique at constant sliding velocity and different sliding distances. Two methodologies were used to calculate the wear volume: weight loss and area measurement using a simplified contact model. Microstructural observations showed the presence of sigma phase for all studied conditions. The formation kinetics of this phase is faster at 875 deg. C and decrease at higher temperatures. Results related to wear showed that the hardness introduced due to the presence of sigma phase plays an important role on wear behaviour for this steel. It was observed also that wear rates decreased when increasing the percentage of sigma phase on the microstructure.

  12. A comparative wear study on Al-Li and Al-Li/SiC composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumus, S. Cem, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr; Karslioglu, Ramazan, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr; Akbulut, Hatem, E-mail: cokumus@sakarya.edu.tr [Sakarya University Engineering Faculty, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Esentepe Campus, 54187, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2013-12-16

    Aluminum-lithium based unreinforced (Al-8090) alloy and Al-8090/SiCp/17 vol.% metal matrix composite produced by extrusion after spray co-deposition. A dry ball-on disk wear test was carried out for both alloy and composite. The tests were performed against an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ball, 10 mm in diameter, at room temperature and in laboratory air conditions with a relative humidity of 40-60%. Sliding speed was chosen as 1.0 ms{sup −1} and normal loads of 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 N were employed at a constant sliding distance of 1000 m. The wear damage on the specimens was evaluated via measurement of wear depth and diameter. Microstructural and wear characterization was carried out via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that wear loss of the Al-8090/SiC composite was less than that of the Al-8090 matrix alloy. Plastic deformation observed on the wear surface of the composite and the matrix alloy, and the higher the applied load the greater the plastic deformation. Scanning electron microscopy examinations of wear tracks also reveal that delamination fracture was the dominant wear mechanism during the wear progression. Friction coefficient was maximum at the low applied load in the case of the Al-8090/SiC composite while a gradual increase was observed with applied load for the matrix alloy.

  13. A study on mechanism of wear on body seat in nozzle of diesel fuel injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeonggee, Son; Yamashita, Toru; Sato, Susumu; Kosaka, Hidenori; Masuko, Masabumi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Wear of nozzle's body seat of diesel fuel injector, which is caused by the collision of needle on the body seat in a nozzle, affects fuel spray behaviors and injection characteristics. Recently, to reduce the wear of body seat, DLC nozzles are widely used. The DLC on the needle which is called diamond-like carbon has a certain effect in reducing wear of body seat. However, disallowable wear is reported at limited engine operating conditions. Moreover, the wear mechanism of body seat with DLC coated needle has not been made clear yet. In this study, the influence of temperature of the body seat and fuel property on the wear of DLC nozzle was investigated with a newly developed wear testing device which was constructed based on common-rail injection system. Worn surfaces of body seat were observed by FE-SEM, laser scanning microscope and EPMA. The obtained results from the measurements show that DLC nozzle has much less wear amount than non-DLC nozzle on the body seat and the corrosive wear effect is suppressed with DLC nozzle. (orig.)

  14. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Super Duplex Stainless Steel AISI 2507: a Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davanageri M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dry sliding wear behavior of heat-treated super duplex stainless steel AISI 2507 was examined by taking pin-on-disc type of wear-test rig. Independent parameters, namely applied load, sliding distance, and sliding speed, influence mainly the wear rate of super duplex stainless steel. The said material was heat treated to a temperature of 850°C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The heat treatment was carried out to precipitate the secondary sigma phase formation. Experiments were conducted to study the influence of independent parameters set at three factor levels using the L27 orthogonal array of the Taguchi experimental design on the wear rate. Statistical significance of both individual and combined factor effects was determined for specific wear rate. Surface plots were drawn to explain the behavior of independent variables on the measured wear rate. Statistically, the models were validated using the analysis of variance test. Multiple non-linear regression equations were derived for wear rate expressed as non-linear functions of independent variables. Further, the prediction accuracy of the developed regression equation was tested with the actual experiments. The independent parameters responsible for the desired minimum wear rate were determined by using the desirability function approach. The worn-out surface characteristics obtained for the minimum wear rate was examined using the scanning electron microscope. The desired smooth surface was obtained for the determined optimal condition by desirability function approach.

  15. Synthesis and Study on Effect of Parameters on Dry Sliding Wear Characteristics of AL-SI Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Uchenna OZIOKO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of parameters on dry sliding wear characteristics of Al-Si alloys was studied. Aluminium-silicon alloys containing 7%, 12% and 14% weight of silicon were synthesized using casting method. Dry sliding wear characteristics of sample were studied against a hardened carbon steel (Fe-2.3%Cr-0.9%C using a pin-on-disc. Observations were recorded keeping two parameters (sliding distance, sliding speed and load constant against wear at room temperature. Microstructural characterization was done using optical microscope (OM and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Hardness and wear characteristics of different samples have shown near uniform behaviour. The wear rate decreased when the percentage of silicon increases. Wear was observed to increase at higher applied load, higher sliding speed and higher sliding distance. The wear characteristics of Al-14%Si was observed superior to those of Al-7%Si and Al-12%Si due to the degree of refinement of their eutectic silicon.

  16. Microstructural and wear characteristics of cobalt free, nickel base intermetallic alloy deposited by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, Reena; Kumar, Santosh; Viswanadham, C.S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Limaye, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the microstructural and wear characteristics of Ni base intermetallic hardfacing alloy (Tribaloy-700) deposited on stainless steel-316 L substrate by laser cladding technique. Cobalt base hardfacing alloys have been most commonly used hardfacing alloys for application involving wear, corrosion and high temperature resistance. However, the high cost and scarcity of cobalt led to the development of cobalt free hardfacing alloys. Further, in the nuclear industry, the use of cobalt base alloys is limited due to the induced activity of long lived radioisotope 60 Co formed. These difficulties led to the development of various nickel and iron base alloys to replace cobalt base hardfacing alloys. In the present study Ni base intermetallic alloy, free of Cobalt was deposited on stainless steel- 316 L substrate by laser cladding technique. Traditionally, welding and thermal spraying are the most commonly employed hardfacing techniques. Laser cladding has been explored for the deposition of less diluted and fusion-bonded Nickel base clad layer on stainless steel substrate with a low heat input. The laser cladding parameters (Laser power density: 200 W/mm 2 , scanning speed: 430 mm/min, and powder feed rate: 14 gm/min) resulted in defect free clad with minimal dilution of the substrate. The microstructure of the clad layer was examined by Optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffraction technique. The clad layer exhibited sharp substrate/clad interface in the order of planar, cellular, and dendritic from the interface upwards. Dilution of clad with Fe from substrate was very low passing from ∼ 15% at the interface (∼ 40 μm) to ∼ 6% in the clad layer. The clad layer was characterized by the presence of hexagonal closed packed (hcp, MgZn 2 type) intermetallic Laves phase dispersed in the eutectic of Laves and face centered cubic (fcc) gamma solid solution. The

  17. A Silicon Carbide Wireless Temperature Sensing System for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  18. Abrasive Wear Resistance of Tool Steels Evaluated by the Pin-on-Disc Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, José Divo; Schopf, Roberto Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Present work examines tool steels abrasion wear resistance and the abrasion mechanisms which are one main contributor to failure of tooling in metal forming industry. Tooling used in cutting and metal forming processes without lubrication fails due to this type of wear. In the workshop and engineering practice, it is common to relate wear resistance as function of material hardness only. However, there are others parameters which influences wear such as: fracture toughness, type of crystalline structure and the occurrence of hard precipitate in the metallic matrix and also its nature. In the present investigation, the wear mechanisms acting in tool steels were analyzed and, by normalized tests, wear resistance performance of nine different types of tool steels were evaluated by pin-on-disc testing. Conventional tool steels commonly used in tooling such as AISI H13 and AISI A2 were compared in relation to tool steels fabricated by sintering process such as Crucible CPM 3V, CPM 9V and M4 steels. Friction and wear testing were carried out in a pin-on-disc automated equipment which pin was tool steel and the counter-face was a abrasive disc of silicon carbide. Normal load of 5 N, sliding velocity of 0.45 m/s, total sliding distance of 3000 m and room temperature were employed. The wear rate was calculated by the Archard's equation and from the plotted graphs of pin cumulated volume loss versus sliding distance. Specimens were appropriately heat treated by quenching and three tempering cycles. Percentage of alloying elements, metallographic analyses of microstructure and Vickers microhardness of specimens were performed, analyzed and correlated with wear rate. The work is concluded by the presentation of a rank of tool steel wear rate, comparing the different tool steel abrasion wear resistance: the best tool steel wear resistance evaluated was the Crucible CPM 9V steel.

  19. Inkjet printing and low temperature sintering for organic electronic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wünscher, S.; Teichler, A.; Perelaer, J.; Abbel, R.J.; Schubert, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, inkjet printing is increasingly used as a flexible and digital patterning technique in order to deposit functional materials for the manufacturing of microelectronic applications, including radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic light

  20. A new temperature threshold detector - Application to missile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coston, C. J.; Higgins, E. V.

    Comprehensive thermal surveys within the case of solid propellant ballistic missile flight motors are highly desirable. For example, a problem involving motor failures due to insulator cracking at motor ignition, which took several years to solve, could have been identified immediately on the basis of a suitable thermal survey. Using conventional point measurements, such as those utilizing typical thermocouples, for such a survey on a full scale motor is not feasible because of the great number of sensors and measurements required. An alternate approach recognizes that temperatures below a threshold (which depends on the material being monitored) are acceptable, but higher temperatures exceed design margins. In this case hot spots can be located by a grid of wire-like sensors which are sensitive to temperature above the threshold anywhere along the sensor. A new type of temperature threshold detector is being developed for flight missile use. The considered device consists of KNO3 separating copper and Constantan metals. Above the KNO3 MP, galvanic action provides a voltage output of a few tenths of a volt.

  1. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain carbon steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel, and carbon-silicon steel may convert to graphite. (b) (Reproduces 124.2.B.) Upon prolonged exposure to...

  2. Mechanical Properties of Ceramics for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    meets another aim of gas turbine ceramics. Temperature measuring by optical pyrometer gives here a reproducibility of approximately 150 C. The...with a similar acoustic impedence to the host material (e.g., certain inclusions, large grains) will be minimal, signal averaging instrumentation

  3. CMOS bandgap references and temperature sensors and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.

    2005-01-01

    Two main parts have been presented in this thesis: device characterization and circuit. In integrated bandgap references and temperature sensors, the IC(VBE, characteristics of bipolar transistors are used to generate the basic signals with high accuracy. To investigate the possibilities to

  4. Friction and wear behavior of laser cladding Ni/hBN self-lubricating composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shitang; Zhou Jiansong; Guo Baogang; Zhou Huidi; Pu Yuping; Chen Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    Ni/hBN coating was successfully prepared on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate by means of laser cladding. The microhardness profile of the composite coating along the depth direction was measured, while its cross-sectional microstructures and phase compositions were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si 3 N 4 from ambient to 800 deg. C was evaluated using a ball-on-disc friction and wear tester, and the worn surface morphologies of the composite coatings and counterpart ceramic balls were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At the same time, the worn surfaces of the ceramic balls were also analyzed using a 3D non-contact surface mapping profiler as well. It was found that the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating on the stainless steel substrate had high microhardness and good friction-reducing and antiwear abilities at elevated temperatures up to 800 deg. C. The composite coating registered slightly increased friction coefficient and wear rate as the temperature rose from ambient to 100 deg. C; then the friction coefficient and wear rate decreased with increasing temperature up to 800 deg. C (with the slight increase in the wear rate at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C to be an exception). The laser cladding Ni/hBN coating was dominated by mixed adhesion and abrasive wear as it slid against the ceramic ball below 300 deg. C. With further increase in the test temperature up to 400 deg. C and above, it was characterized by mild adhesion wear and plastic deformation. Since the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating registered an increased wear rate at temperatures of 600 deg. C and above, it was not suggested to be used for wear prevention and protection of the stainless steel at elevated temperature above 800 deg. C

  5. Friction and wear behavior of laser cladding Ni/hBN self-lubricating composite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Shitang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Jiansong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo Baogang [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Huidi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Pu Yuping [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Chen Jianmin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)], E-mail: chenjm@lzb.ac.cn

    2008-09-15

    Ni/hBN coating was successfully prepared on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel substrate by means of laser cladding. The microhardness profile of the composite coating along the depth direction was measured, while its cross-sectional microstructures and phase compositions were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} from ambient to 800 deg. C was evaluated using a ball-on-disc friction and wear tester, and the worn surface morphologies of the composite coatings and counterpart ceramic balls were observed using a scanning electron microscope. At the same time, the worn surfaces of the ceramic balls were also analyzed using a 3D non-contact surface mapping profiler as well. It was found that the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating on the stainless steel substrate had high microhardness and good friction-reducing and antiwear abilities at elevated temperatures up to 800 deg. C. The composite coating registered slightly increased friction coefficient and wear rate as the temperature rose from ambient to 100 deg. C; then the friction coefficient and wear rate decreased with increasing temperature up to 800 deg. C (with the slight increase in the wear rate at 700 deg. C and 800 deg. C to be an exception). The laser cladding Ni/hBN coating was dominated by mixed adhesion and abrasive wear as it slid against the ceramic ball below 300 deg. C. With further increase in the test temperature up to 400 deg. C and above, it was characterized by mild adhesion wear and plastic deformation. Since the laser cladding Ni/hBN coating registered an increased wear rate at temperatures of 600 deg. C and above, it was not suggested to be used for wear prevention and protection of the stainless steel at elevated temperature above 800 deg. C.

  6. Wearing the playware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagliarini, Luigi; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we describe and defi ne the range of possible applications, and the technical contours, of a robotic system to be worn on the body for playful interactions. Earlier work on a modular robotic wearable (MRW) described how, by using modular robotics to create a wearable......, it is possible to obtain a fl exible wearable processing system where freely interchangeable input/output modules can be positioned on a body suit in accordance with the task at hand. Here, we guide attention toward early prototypes to show the potentialities of such an approach, and focus on depicting possible...

  7. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  8. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  9. Combined Corrosion and Wear of Aluminium Alloy 7075-T6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Mol, J.M.C.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 7075-T6 is widely used in engineering. In some applications, like slurry transport, corrosion and abrasion occur simultaneously, resulting in early material failure. In the present work, we investigated the combined effect of corrosion and wear on the aluminium alloy 7075-T6. We

  10. Measurement of Wear in Radial Journal Bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, D.J.; Ligterink, D.J.; de Gee, A.W.J.

    1996-01-01

    this article, the measurement of wear in radial journal bearings is discussed, where a distinction is made between stationary and non-stationary contact conditions. Starting with Holm/Archard's wear law, equations are derived for the calculation of the specific wear rate k of the bearing material as

  11. Backside wear in modern total knee designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Furman, Bridgette D; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-02-01

    Although modularity affords various options to the orthopedic surgeon, these benefits come at a price. The unintended bearing surface between the back surface of the tibial insert and the metallic tray results in micromotion leading to polyethylene wear debris. The objective of this study was to examine the backside wear of tibial inserts from three modern total knee designs with very different locking mechanisms: Insall-Burstein II (IB II), Optetrak, and Advance. A random sample of 71 inserts were obtained from our institution's retrieval collection and examined to assess the extent of wear, depth of wear, and wear damage modes. Patient records were also obtained to determine patient age, body mass index, length of implantation, and reason for revision. Modes of wear damage (abrasion, burnishing, scratching, delamination, third body debris, surface deformation, and pitting) were then scored in each zone from 0 to 3 (0 = 0%, 1 = 0-10%, 2 = 10-50%, and 3 = >50%). The depth of wear was subjectively identified as removal of manufacturing identification markings stamped onto the inferior surface of the polyethylene. Both Advance and IB II polyethylene inserts showed significantly higher scores for backside wear than the Optetrak inserts. All IB II and Advance implants showed evidence of backside wear, whereas 17% (5 out of 30) of the retrieved Optetrak implants had no observable wear. There were no significant differences when comparing the depth of wear score between designs. The locking mechanism greatly affects the propensity for wear and should be considered when choosing a knee implant system.

  12. A Multiple Model Prediction Algorithm for CNC Machine Wear PHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2010 PHM data challenge focuses on the remaining useful life (RUL estimation for cutters of a high speed CNC milling machine using measurements from dynamometer, accelerometer, and acoustic emission sensors. We present a multiple model approach for wear depth estimation of milling machine cutters using the provided data. The feature selection, initial wear estimation and multiple model fusion components of the proposed algorithm are explained in details and compared with several alternative methods using the training data. The final submission ranked #2 among professional and student participants and the method is applicable to other data driven PHM problems.

  13. Decontamination of radioactive contaminated protective wear using dry cleaning solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthiah, Pushpa; Chitra, S.; Paul, Biplob

    2013-01-01

    Liquid waste generated by conventional decontamination of radioactive contaminated cotton protective wear using detergent affects the chemical treatment of the plant. To reduce the generation of aqueous detergent waste, dry cleaning of cotton protective wear, highly soiled with oil and grease towards decontamination was tried with organic solvents. Mineral turpentine oil (MTO) among various other organic solvents was identified as a suitable organic solvent. As MTO leaves characteristic odour on the cloth, various commercial fragrances for the removal of the odour were tried. Application of the optimised dry cleaning solvent and commercial fragrance was adopted in plant scale operation. (author)

  14. Study on influence of Surface roughness of Ni-Al2O3 nano composite coating and evaluation of wear characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, C. R.; Basavarajappa, S.; Sogalad, Irappa

    2018-02-01

    Electrodeposition is one of the most technologically feasible and economically superior techniques for producing metallic coating. The advancement in the application of nano particles has grabbed the attention in all fields of engineering. In this present study an attempt has been made on the Ni-Al2O3nano particle composite coating on aluminium substrate by electrodeposition process. The aluminium surface requires a specific pre-treatment for better adherence of coating. In light of this a thin zinc layer is coated on the aluminium substrate by electroless process. In addition to this surface roughness is an important parameter for any coating method and material. In this work Ni-Al2O3 composite coating were successfully coated by varying the process parameters such as bath temperature, current density and particle loading. The experimentation was performed using central composite design based 20 trials of experiments. The effect of process parameters and surface roughness before and after coating is analyzed on wear rate and coating thickness. The results shown a better wear resistance of Ni-Al2O3 composite electrodeposited coating compared to Ni coating. The particle loading and interaction effect of current density with temperature has greater significant effect on wear rate. The surface roughness is significantly affected the wear behaviour and thickness of coating.

  15. Abrasive wear mechanisms and surface layer structure of refractory materials after mechanical working

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milman, Y.V.; Lotsko, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms of abrasive wear and surface layer structure formation after different kinds of mechanical working are considered in terms of fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms for various refractory materials. The principles for classification of abrasive wear mechanisms are proposed, the four types of wear mechanisms are distinguished for various combinations of fractures and plastic deformation types. The concept of characteristic deformation temperature t * (knee temperature) is used. Detailed examples are given of investigating the surface layer structures in grinded crystals of sapphire and molybdenum. The amorphisation tendency of the thinnest surface layer while mechanical polishing is discussed separately. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs. (Author)

  16. Assessment of wear dependence parameters in complex model of cutting tool wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antsev, A. V.; Pasko, N. I.; Antseva, N. V.

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses wear dependence of the generic efficient life period of cutting tools taken as an aggregate of the law of tool wear rate distribution and dependence of parameters of this law's on the cutting mode, factoring in the random factor as exemplified by the complex model of wear. The complex model of wear takes into account the variance of cutting properties within one batch of tools, variance in machinability within one batch of workpieces, and the stochastic nature of the wear process itself. A technique of assessment of wear dependence parameters in a complex model of cutting tool wear is provided. The technique is supported by a numerical example.

  17. Predicting wear of hydrotransport pipelines in oil sand slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, J.; Lu, B.; Wolodko, J. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kiel, D. [Coanda Research and Development Corp., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    An overview of erosion and corrosion methods and techniques was presented. Wear to pipelines is influenced by slurry flow and chemistry; solids loading; and electrochemical interactions. While several experimental techniques have been developed to rank the performance of different pipeline materials, experiments do not currently provide accurate quantitative prediction of pipeline wear in the field. Rotating cylinder electrodes (RCE) and jet impingement methods are used to study the effect of flow velocity on corrosion rate. Slurry pot erosion-corrosion testers are used to rank materials for use in more dilute, less turbulent slurries. Coriolois slurry erosion testers are used to rank the erosion resistance of different pipeline materials. A pilot-scale flow loop is now being constructed by the Alberta Research Council (ARC) in order to replicate wet erosion phenomena in oil sands applications. The flow loop will be used to simulate the field conditions of oil sands pipelines and develop predictive wear data and models. Coulombic shear stress and characteristic wall velocities have been determined using a 2-layer model designed to represent flow as 2 distinct layers. To date, the flow loop pilot study has demonstrated that wear rates in smaller diameter flow loops are not significantly different than larger diameter field installations. Preliminary calculations have demonstrated that the flow loop can be used to accurately simulate the hydrodynamics and wear typically experienced in field slurry flows. 67 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  18. Wear reduction through piezoelectrically-assisted ultrasonic lubrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Sheng; J Dapino, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Traditional lubricants are undesirable in harsh aerospace environments and certain automotive applications. Ultrasonic vibrations can be used to reduce and modulate the effective friction coefficient between two sliding surfaces. This paper investigates the relationship between friction force reduction and wear reduction in ultrasonically lubricated surfaces. A pin-on-disc tribometer is modified through the addition of a piezoelectric transducer which vibrates the pin at 22 kHz in the direction perpendicular to the rotating disc surface. Friction and wear metrics including volume loss, surface roughness, friction forces and apparent stick-slip effects are measured without and with ultrasonic vibrations at three different sliding velocities. SEM imaging and 3D profilometry are used to characterize the wear surfaces and guide model development. Over the range of speeds considered, ultrasonic vibrations reduce the effective friction force up to 62% along with a wear reduction of up to 49%. A simple cube model previously developed to quantify friction force reduction is implemented which describes wear reduction within 15% of the experimental data. (paper)

  19. Aspects of the application of low temperatures in electrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-01

    After a short assessment of superconductors and high field coils as well as normal conductors at low temperature, refrigerating units and thermal insulation are discussed. In the case of superconductor direct current cables for 2 by 400 kV, a comparison is made with hvdc overhead lines and it was found that the cost of erection, as well as the annual operating costs, are equivalent for a transmitted load of 2 to 3 GW.

  20. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Dooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    A class of devices known as integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 0 C is described. The evolution of the ITC concept is discussed. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Recent experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits have successfully operated in 500 0 C environments for extended periods of time

  1. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc [SBT, UMR-E CEA / UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, Grenoble, F-38054 (France); Daniel, Christophe [CNES, 18, avenue Edouard Belin, Toulouse, F-31401 (France)

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  2. LVDT Development for High Temperature Irradiation Test and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Ban, Chae Min; Choo, Kee Nam; Jun, Byung Hyuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is used to measure the elongation and pressure of a nuclear fuel rod, or the creep and fatigue of the material during a reactor irradiation test. This device must be a radiation-resistant LVDT for use in a research reactor. Norway Halden has LVDTs for an irradiation test by the own development and commercialized. But Halden's LVDTs have limited the temperature of the use until to 350 .deg. C. So, KAERI has been developing a new LVDT for high temperature irradiation test. This paper describes the design of a LVDT, the fabrication process of a LVDT, and the result of the performance test. The designed LVDT uses thermocouple cable for coil wire material and one MI cable as signal cable. This LVDT for a high temperature irradiation test can be used until a maximum of 900 .deg. C. Welding is a very important factor for the fabrication of an LVDT. We are using a 150W fiber laser welding system that consists of a welding head, monitoring vision system and rotary index.

  3. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  4. Effect of soot on oil properties and wear of engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D A; Lewis, R

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the work outlined in this paper was to increase the understanding of the wear mechanisms that occur within a soot contaminated contact zone, to help in future development of a predictive wear model to assist in the automotive engine valve train design process. The paper builds on previous work by the author, through testing of different lubricants and increased levels of soot contamination. Wear testing has been carried out using specimens operating under realistic engine conditions, using a reciprocating test-rig specifically designed for this application, where a steel disc is held in a heated bath of oil and a steel ball is attached to a reciprocating arm (replicating a sliding elephant's foot valve train contact). Detailed analysis of the test specimens has been performed using scanning electron microscopy to identify wear features relating to the proposed wear mechanisms. Analysis of worn engine components from durability engine tests has also been carried out for a comparison between specimen tests and engine testing. To assist the understanding of the wear test results obtained, the physical properties of contaminated lubricants were investigated, through viscosity, traction and friction measurements. The results have revealed how varying lubrication conditions change the wear rate of engine components and determine the wear mechanism that dominates in specific situations. Testing has also shown the positive effects of advanced engine lubricants to reduce the amount of wear produced with soot present

  5. Applications of American design codes for elevated temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    A brief summary of the ASME Code rules of Case N-47 is presented. An overview of the typical procedure used to demonstrate Code compliance is provided. Application experience and some examples of detailed inelastic analysis and simplified-approximate methods are given. Recent developments and future trends in design criteria and ASME Code rules are also presented

  6. Influence of nitrogen ion implantation on wear studied by a new laboratory wear test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E.; Paszti, F.; Vertessy, Z. (Central Research Inst. for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary))

    1991-05-01

    A new laboratory wear test is developed in which the wear trace is measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The advantage of the new test is that the wear rate is directly determinable. The new test setup has been used to study the effects of nitrogen implantation on the wear processes on 115CrV3 steel. The wear rate decreases by a factor of 2 at 4x10{sup 17} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2} implanted dose. (orig.).

  7. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R"2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. - Highlights: • The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. • Distinct diurnal and temporal Brightness Temperature behavior divide the city into four segments. • We assess air temperature from satellite surface temperature (R"2 = 0.81). - The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. Distinct diurnal and temporal Surface Temperature behavior divide the city into four different segments.

  8. 500 C Electronic Packaging and Dielectric Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for exploring the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by these high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed. High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for probing the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and eventual applications of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high electronics and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed.

  9. Microstructure and wear behavior of austempered high carbon high silicon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya Palaksha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, the influence of austempering temperature and time on the microstructure and dry sliding wear behavior of high silicon steel was studied. The test specimens were initially austenitised at 900°C for 30 minutes, thereafter austempered at various temperatures 280°C, 360°C and 400°C, for varying duration from 30 to 120 minutes. These samples after austempering heat treatment were subsequently air cooled to room temperature, to generate typical ausferritic microstructures and then correlated with the wear property. The test outcomes demonstrate the slight increase in specific wear rate with increase in both austempering temperature and time. Specific wear rate was found to be minimum at an austempering temperature of 280°C, that exhibits lower bainite microstructure with high hardness, on the other hand specific wear rate was found to be slightly high at increased austempering temperatures at 360°C and 400°C, due to the upper bainite structure that offered lower hardness to the matrix. The sample austempered at 280°C for 30 minutes offered superior wear resistance when compared to other austempering conditions, mainly due to the presence of fine acicular bainitic ferrite along with stabilized retained austenite and also some martensite in the microstructure.

  10. Progress in DOE high temperature superconductivity electric power applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, J.G.; Sheahn, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) leads national R and D effort to develop US industry's capability to produce a wide range of advanced energy-efficient electric power products. The immediate need is to make high temperature superconductivity (HTS) wire. Wire developers at the DOE National laboratories are working wit industrial partners toward this objective. In this paper, the authors describe the progress to date, citing both the difficulties associated with making wire from these ceramic materials, and achievements at several organizations. Results for progress over the next five years are stated

  11. Characterization of commercial supercapacitors for low temperature applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iwama, Etsuro; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Azais, Philippe; Brégeon, Laurent; Simon, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Electrochemical characterizations at low temperature and floating tests have been performed on 600F commercial supercapacitor (SC) for acetonitrile (AN)-based and AN + methyl acetate (MA) mixed electrolytes. From −40 to +20 °C, AN electrolyte showed slightly higher capacitance than those of AN + MA mixed electrolytes (25 and 33 vol.% of MA). At −55 °C, however, AN electrolyte did not cycle at all, while MA mixed electrolyte normally cycled with a slight decrease in the...

  12. High emissivity coatings for high temperature application: Progress and prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaodong; Li Yibin; Wang Lidong; Sun Yue; Zhang, Sam

    2009-01-01

    High emissivity coatings are widely used in many cases where heat transfers through electromagnetic radiation that arises due to the temperature of a body. Extensive theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to synthesize and investigate high emissivity coatings. The emissivity can be improved through various or combined mechanisms. The characterization of the emissivity is still a fully open problem. In this paper, we review the various mechanisms associated with the emissivity enhancement and emissivity characterization techniques. Based on these literature reviews, the prospect will be presented in the concluding remarks.

  13. Porosity and wear resistance of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed coatings offer practical and economical solutions for corrosion and wear protection of components or tools. To improve the coating properties, heat treatment such as preheat is applied. The selection of coating and substrate materials is a key factor in improving the quality of the coating morphology after the heat treatment. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of preheat temperatures, i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C, on porosity and wear resistance of tungsten carbide (WC) coating sprayed by flame thermal coating. The powders and coatings morphology were analyzed by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDS), whereas the phase identification was performed by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD). In order to evaluate the quality of the flame spray obtained coatings, the porosity, micro-hardness and wear rate of the specimens was determined. The results showed that WC coating gives a higher surface hardness from 1391 HVN up to 1541 HVN compared to that of the non-coating. Moreover, the wear rate increased from 0.072 mm3/min. to 0.082 mm3/min. when preheat temperature was increased. Preheat on H13 steel substrate can reduce the percentage of porosity level from 10.24 % to 3.94% on the thermal spray coatings.

  14. Current high-temperature superconducting coils and applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, four projects for the application of Bi-based superconducting magnets to practical apparatus are currently underway. These projects involve the development of an insert magnet for a 1 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a magnet for a silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus, a magnet for a magnetic separation system, and a 1 T pulse magnet for a superconducting magnet energy storage system. For example, the magnet for the silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus is of the class with stored energy of 1 MJ to be operated at around 20 K. This review focuses on the present status of the development of these magnets, followed by a discussion of the problems of the present superconducting tapes that need to be overcome for future applications. (author)

  15. Low-temperature tar and oil: properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, R

    1942-01-01

    In Germany the value of low-temperature tar is largely dependent on its fuel fractions; these vary with the coal and the method of carbonization (external heating or recirculated gases). Brown-coal tars can be processed by distillation, cracking under pressure, hydrogenation under pressure (largest volume of tar is processed by this method) and by solvent extraction, with EtOH, SO/sub 2/, or phenol. Each of these processes is discussed in detail. In the pressure-hydrogenation process, 1.25 kilogram of brown-coal tar yields approximately 1 kilogram of gasoline with an octane number of 60 to 70. Low-temperature tars from bituminous coals can be hydrogenated readily but are not well adapted to solvent extraction. Attempts should be made to produce tar approximating the desired characteristics for fuel directly from the carbonizing apparatus. For laboratory carbonization tests, an approximation to results secured by externally heated retorts is secured by using an insert consisting of a series of perforated trays in the 200-gram Fischer aluminum retort; this reduces the capacity to 100 gram. Fractional condensation is used to separate heavy oil, middle oil, and liquor; low-boiling products are condensed at -20/sup 0/ by solid CO/sub 2/.

  16. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  17. Wear rate optimization of Al/SiCnp/e-glass fibre hybrid metal matrix composites using Taguchi method and genetic algorithm and development of wear model using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongale, Arunkumar M.; Kumar, Satish; Sachit, T. S.; Jadhav, Priya

    2018-03-01

    Studies on wear properties of Aluminium based hybrid nano composite materials, processed through powder metallurgy technique, are reported in the present study. Silicon Carbide nano particles and E-glass fibre are reinforced in pure aluminium matrix to fabricate hybrid nano composite material samples. Pin-on-Disc wear testing equipment is used to evaluate dry sliding wear properties of the composite samples. The tests were conducted following the Taguchi’s Design of Experiments method. Signal-to-Noise ratio analysis and Analysis of Variance are carried out on the test data to find out the influence of test parameters on the wear rate. Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis and Energy Dispersive x-ray analysis are conducted on the worn surfaces to find out the wear mechanisms responsible for wear of the composites. Multiple linear regression analysis and Genetic Algorithm techniques are employed for optimization of wear test parameters to yield minimum wear of the composite samples. Finally, a wear model is built by the application of Artificial Neural Networks to predict the wear rate of the composite material, under different testing conditions. The predicted values of wear rate are found to be very close to the experimental values with a deviation in the range of 0.15% to 8.09%.

  18. Wear of rolling element bearings in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Rolling element bearings and related mechanisms are attractive for service in liquid sodium but it is not clear what minimum wear rate can be anticipated. For axially loaded angular contact bearings rotation is incompatible with pure rolling on both races and wear arises from the resulting ball spin. The initial pressure distributions and sizes of the contact ellipses can be calculated but will change with bearing wear. However, the most effective distribution for producing wear would be for the full loads to be borne on the tips of the contact areas, whose maximum length is given by examination of the race wear tracks. A calculation on such a basis should set a lower limit for the wear coefficient. Both the torque and instantaneous wear rate of a bearing will be similar functions of the integral over the contact areas of the product of contact pressure and radius from the ball spin axis. A better estimate of wear coefficient should be obtained by relating the average torque, the average wear, the initial torque and the initial wear where the conditions are known. Analysis of tests in sodium at 400 0 C of high speed steel and Stellite bearings by these methods indicates specific wear rates of the order of 10 -15 m 3 /N-m, not unduly out of line with the range of values found in conventional sliding tests

  19. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  20. Novel, Functionally Graded Coating System for Reusable, Very High Temperature Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses some of the most challenging materials issues with respect to multi-mission, very high temperature, up to 4000°F, applications. The very...

  1. A Mechanistic Design Approach for Graphite Nanoplatelet (GNP) Reinforced Asphalt Mixtures for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores the application of a discrete computational model for predicting the fracture behavior of asphalt mixtures at low temperatures based on the results of simple laboratory experiments. In this discrete element model, coarse aggregat...

  2. Microstructural evolution during dry wear test in magnesium and Mg-Y alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somekawa, Hidetoshi, E-mail: SOMEKAWA.Hidetoshi@nims.go.jp [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Maeda, Shunsuke; Hirayama, Tomoko; Matsuoka, Takashi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Doshisha University, 1-3 Miyakodani, Tatara, Kyotanabe 610-0321 (Japan); Inoue, Tadanobu [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Mukai, Toshiji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Kobe, 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-01-20

    The friction and wear properties of pure magnesium and the Mg-Y alloy were investigated using the pin-on-disk configuration. The friction and wear resistance of the Mg-Y alloy was superior to those of pure magnesium. The wear mechanism was abrasion under all the conditions. The deformed microstructural evolutions near the surface region were observed by transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The stress and strain states were also evaluated by finite element analysis (FEA). The deformed microstructures of both alloys consisted of the {l_brace}10-12{r_brace} twinning formation and the FEA results showed the occurrence of plastic deformation even at the beginning of the test. The formation of low angle grain boundaries was also confirmed with an increase in the applied load in the Mg-Y alloy. On the other hand, grain refinement due to dynamic recrystallization was observed in pure magnesium as the wear test progressed. The different microstructures resulted from difference in the surface temperature during the wear test, which was estimated to be around 393 K and 363 K for pure magnesium and the Mg-Y alloy, respectively. The high increment temperature in the fine-grained alloys brought about the occurrence of grain boundary sliding, i.e., material softening, which led to a decrease in the friction and wear properties. The present results indicated that one of the methods for enhancing the friction and wear properties is to increase the dynamic recrystallization temperature.

  3. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  4. Application of flexible micro temperature sensor in oxidative steam reforming by a methanol micro reformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Shen, Chia-Chieh; Yeh, Chuin-Tih; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM), with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  5. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Man Lo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM, with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  6. Investigation of friction and wear characteristics of cast iron material under various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chang Lae; Oh, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dae Eun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nemati, Narguess [School of Materials and Metallurgy, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Cast iron is widely used in fields such as the transport and heavy industries. For parts where contact damage is expected to occur, it is necessary to understand the friction and wear characteristics of cast iron. In this study, we use cast iron plates as the specimens to investigate their friction and wear characteristics. We perform various experiments using a reciprocating type tribotester. We assess the frictional characteristics by analyzing the friction coefficient values that were obtained during the sliding tests. We observe the wear surfaces of cast iron and steel balls using a scanning electron microscope, confocal microscope, and 3D profiler. We investigate the friction and wear characteristics of cast iron by injecting sand and alumina particles having various sizes. Furthermore, we estimate the effect of temperature on the friction and wear characteristics. The results obtained are expected to aid in the understanding of the tribological characteristics of cast iron in industry.

  7. Friction and wear properties of Cu and Fe-based P/M bearing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufekci, Kenan; Kurbanoglu, Cahit; Durak, Ertugrul; Tunay, R. Fatih

    2006-01-01

    The performances of porous bearings under different operating conditions were experimentally investigated in this study. Material groups studied are 90%Cu + 10%Sn bronze and 1%C + % balance Fe iron-based self-lubricating P/M bearings at constant (85%) density. In the experiments, the variation of the coefficient of friction and wear ratio of those two different group materials for different sliding speeds, loads, and temperatures were investigated. As a result, the variation of the friction coefficient - temperature for both constant load, and constant sliding speed, friction coefficient - average bearing pressure, PV - wear loss and temperature-wear loss curves were plotted and compared with each other for two materials, separately. The test results showed that Cu-based bearings have better friction and wear properties than Fe-based bearings

  8. Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Russel, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by an Ames-led project team under a 4-year DOE-ITP sponsored project titled, 'Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency.' The Report serves as the project deliverable for the CPS agreement number 15015. The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a family of lightweight, bulk composite materials that are highly resistant to degradation by erosive and abrasive wear. These materials, based on AlMgB{sub 14}, are projected to save over 30 TBtu of energy per year when fully implemented in industrial applications, with the associated environmental benefits of eliminating the burning of 1.5 M tons/yr of coal and averting the release of 4.2 M tons/yr of CO{sub 2} into the air. This program targeted applications in the mining, drilling, machining, and dry erosion applications as key platforms for initial commercialization, which includes some of the most severe wear conditions in industry. Production-scale manufacturing of this technology has begun through a start-up company, NewTech Ceramics (NTC). This project included providing technical support to NTC in order to facilitate cost-effective mass production of the wear-resistant boride components. Resolution of issues related to processing scale-up, reduction in energy intensity during processing, and improving the quality and performance of the composites, without adding to the cost of processing were among the primary technical focus areas of this program. Compositional refinements were also investigated in order to achieve the maximum wear resistance. In addition, synthesis of large-scale, single-phase AlMgB{sub 14} powder was conducted for use as PVD sputtering targets for nanocoating applications.

  9. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J

    1997-12-31

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au). 111 refs.

  10. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au). 111 refs.

  11. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au)

  12. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-12

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha -1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha -1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results

  13. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-01

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha-1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha-1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results suggest

  14. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium; Mesure des constantes elastiques a haute temperature application au plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu{sub {delta}} and Pu{sub {epsilon}}. E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (author) [French] Nous decrivons un appareil qui permet de mesurer les constantes elastiques (module de Young et module de Poisson) jusqu'a 700 deg. C a partir des frequences de resonance de barreaux cylindriques. Nous avons plus specialement etudie le plutonium et determine pour la premiere fois a notre connaissance le module de Young des phases {delta} et {epsilon}: E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Nos mesures nous ont permis de calculer la compressibilite, la temperature de Debye, la constante de Gruneisen et la chaleur specifique electronique de Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (auteur)

  15. The effects of various reinforcements on dry sliding wear behaviour of AA 6061 nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyasimman, D.; Narayanasamy, R.; Ponalagusamy, R.; Anandakrishnan, V.; Kamaraj, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Wear and friction coefficient of nanocomposites were investigated. • The worn surface morphologies of nanocomposites were analysed. • The wear rate was increased with increasing load and sliding velocity. • The friction coefficient was decreased with increasing load and sliding velocity. - Abstract: The present work aims to investigate the dry sliding wear behaviour of AA 6061 nanocomposites reinforced with various nanolevel reinforcements, such as titanium carbide (TiC), gamma phase alumina (γ-Al 2 O 3 ) and hybrid (TiC + Al 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles with two weight percentages (wt.%) prepared by 30 h of mechanical alloying (MA). The tests were performed using a pin-on-disk wear tester by sliding these pin specimens at sliding speeds of 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m/s against an oil-hardened non-shrinking (OHNS) steel disk at room temperature. Wear tests were conducted for normal loads of 5, 7 and 10 N at different sliding speeds at room temperature. The variations of the friction coefficient and the wear rate with the sliding distances (500 m, 1000 m and 1600 m) for different normal loads and sliding velocities were plotted and investigated. To observe the wear characteristics and to investigate the wear mechanism, the morphologies of the worn surfaces were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The formation of an oxide layer on the worn surface was examined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The wear rate was found to increase with the load and sliding velocity for all prepared nanocomposites. Hybrid (TiC + Al 2 O 3 ) reinforced AA 6061 nanocomposites had lower wear rates and friction coefficients compared with TiC and Al 2 O 3 reinforced AA 6061 nanocomposites

  16. The Application of High Temperature Superconducting Materials to Power Switches

    CERN Document Server

    March, S A; Ballarino, A

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting switches may find application in superconducting magnet systems that require energy extraction. Such superconducting switches could be bypass-switches that are operated in conjunction with a parallel resistor or dump-switches where all of the energy is dissipated in the switch itself. Bypass-switches are more suited to higher energy circuits as a portion of the energy can be dissipated in the external dump resistor. Dump- switches require less material and triggering energy as a lower switch resistance is needed to achieve the required total dump resistance. Both superconducting bypass-switches and superconducting dump-switches can be ther- mally activated. Switching times that are comparable to those obtained with mechanical bypass-switch systems can be achieved using a co-wound heater that is powered by a ca- pacitor discharge. Switches that have fast thermal diffusion times through the insulation can be modelled as a lumped system whereas those with slow thermal diffusion times were modelle...

  17. Characterization of commercial supercapacitors for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, E.; Taberna, P. L.; Azais, P.; Brégeon, L.; Simon, P.

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical characterizations at low temperature and floating tests have been performed on 600F commercial supercapacitor (SC) for acetonitrile (AN)-based and AN + methyl acetate (MA) mixed electrolytes. From -40 to +20 °C, AN electrolyte showed slightly higher capacitance than those of AN + MA mixed electrolytes (25 and 33 vol.% of MA). At -55 °C, however, AN electrolyte did not cycle at all, while MA mixed electrolyte normally cycled with a slight decrease in their capacitance. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, the whole resistance for AN-based cells at -55 °C was found to be about 10,000 times higher than that of +20 °C, while a 40-fold increase in the cell resistance was obtained for the MA mixture between 20 and -55 °C. From the results of floating tests at 2.7 V and 60 °C for 1 month, the 25 vol.% MA mixture showed no change and slight decreased but stable capacitance.

  18. A State of the Art Report on Wear Damage of Steam Generator Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Jung, Man Kyo

    2004-10-01

    The recent status on wear damage of steam generator tubes caused by flow-induced vibration was investigated, and the criteria for structural integrity evaluation of the wear-damaged tubes were reviewed. It was surveyed how the wear damage of tubes could be affected by main parameters, such as, materials properties and their combination, impact load and vibration amplitude/frequency, contact areas and diametral clearance between the tube and tube support plate, wear test duration, and test temperature. Finally, corrosive wear, which means the combined action of corrosion and wear simultaneously, was also surveyed in this report. There has been only a few works concerned on the wear damage of steam generator tubes in Korea, compared with the leading foreign research institutes. Especially, the experience related to the wear characteristics of Alloy 690, which has become a replacement material for Alloy 600 as steam generator tubes, is far from satisfactory. Systematic studies, therefore, concerned with structural integrity of tubes as well as improvement of were resistance of Alloy 690 in the PWR environment are needed

  19. Study of robust thin film PT-1000 temperature sensors for cryogenic process control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, R.; Boguhn, D.; Fillinger, H.; Schlachter, S. I.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    In some cryogenic process measurement applications, for example, in hydrogen technology and in high temperature superconductor based generators, there is a need of robust temperature sensors. These sensors should be able to measure the large temperature range of 20 - 500 K with reasonable resolution and accuracy. Thin film PT 1000 sensors could be a choice to cover this large temperature range. Twenty one sensors selected from the same production batch were tested for their temperature sensitivity which was then compared with different batch sensors. Furthermore, the sensor's stability was studied by subjecting the sensors to repeated temperature cycles of 78-525 K. Deviations in the resistance were investigated using ice point calibration and water triple point calibration methods. Also the study of directional oriented intense static magnetic field effects up to 8 Oersted (Oe) were conducted to understand its magneto resistance behaviour in the cryogenic temperature range from 77 K - 15 K. This paper reports all investigation results in detail.

  20. A review on the electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids in nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    A mini review on the electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) in nuclear fuel cycle is presented. It is shown that how the fascinating properties of RTIL can be tuned to deliver desirable application in aqueous and non-aqueous reprocessing and in nuclear waste management. (author)

  1. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas

  2. Standard Terminology Relating to Wear and Erosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The terms and their definitions given herein represent terminology relating to wear and erosion of solid bodies due to mechanical interactions such as occur with cavitation, impingement by liquid jets or drops or by solid particles, or relative motion against contacting solid surfaces or fluids. This scope interfaces with but generally excludes those processes where material loss is wholly or principally due to chemical action and other related technical fields as, for instance, lubrication. 1.2 This terminology is not exhaustive; the absence of any particular term from this collection does not necessarily imply that its use within this scope is discouraged. However, the terms given herein are the recommended terms for the concepts they represent unless otherwise noted. 1.3 Certain general terms and definitions may be restricted and interpreted, if necessary, to make them particularly applicable to the scope as defined herein. 1.4 The purpose of this terminology is to encourage uniformity and accuracy ...

  3. A critical view on temperature modelling for application in weather derivatives markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Benth, Fred Espen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a stochastic model for daily average temperature. The model contains seasonality, a low-order autoregressive component and a variance describing the heteroskedastic residuals. The model is estimated on daily average temperature records from Stockholm (Sweden). By comparing the proposed model with the popular model of Campbell and Diebold (2005), we point out some important issues to be addressed when modelling the temperature for application in weather derivatives market. - Highlights: ► We present a stochastic model for daily average temperature, containing seasonality, a low-order autoregressive component and a variance describing the heteroskedastic residuals. ► We compare the proposed model with the popular model of Campbell and Diebold (2005). ► Some important issues to be addressed when modelling the temperature for application in weather derivatives market are pointed out.

  4. TiAu based shape memory alloys for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadood, Abdul; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko; Hosoda, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    TiAu (equiatomic) exhibits phase transformaion from B2 (ordered bcc) to thermo-elastic orthorhombic B19 martensite at about 875K and thus TiAu is categorized as high temperature shape memory alloy. In this study, recent research and developments related to TiAu based high temperature shape memory alloys will be discussed in the Introduction part. Then some results of our research group related to strengthening of TiAu based high temperature shape memory alloys will be presented. Potential of TiAu based shape memory alloys for high temperature shape memory materials applications will also be discussed

  5. High temperature polymer film dielectrics for aerospace power conditioning capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Narayanan, E-mail: venkats3@gmail.co [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Dang, Thuy D. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Nanostructured and Biological Materials Branch (AFRL/RXBN) (United States); Bai Zongwu; McNier, Victor K. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); DeCerbo, Jennifer N. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Tsao, B.-H. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Stricker, Jeffery T. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Polymer dielectrics are the preferred materials of choice for capacitive energy-storage applications because of their potential for high dielectric breakdown strengths, low dissipation factors and good dielectric stability over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures, despite having inherently lower dielectric constants relative to ceramic dielectrics. They are also amenable to large area processing into films at a relatively lower cost. Air Force currently has a strong need for the development of compact capacitors which are thermally robust for operation in a variety of aerospace power conditioning applications. While such applications typically use polycarbonate (PC) dielectric films in wound capacitors for operation from -55 deg. C to 125 deg. C, future power electronic systems would require the use of polymer dielectrics that can reliably operate up to elevated temperatures in the range of 250-350 deg. C. The focus of this research is the generation and dielectric evaluation of metallized, thin free-standing films derived from high temperature polymer structures such as fluorinated polybenzoxazoles, post-functionalized fluorinated polyimides and fluorenyl polyesters incorporating diamond-like hydrocarbon units. The discussion is centered mainly on variable temperature dielectric measurements of film capacitance and dissipation factor and the effects of thermal cycling, up to a maximum temperature of 350 deg. C, on film dielectric performance. Initial studies clearly point to the dielectric stability of these films for high temperature power conditioning applications, as indicated by their relatively low temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) (approx2%) over the entire range of temperatures. Some of the films were also found to exhibit good dielectric breakdown strengths (up to 470 V/mum) and a film dissipation factor of the order of <0.003 (0.3%) at the frequency of interest (10 kHz) for the intended applications. The measured relative dielectric

  6. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of high-temperature superconductor wires are summarized and detailed discussion is provided on developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future, include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines

  7. Nano- and Macro-wear of Bio-carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 Steel Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Emmanuel Kwesi; Ampaw, Edward; Zebaze Kana, M. G.; Adetunji, A. R.; Olusunle, S. O. O.; Adewoye, O. O.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of nano- and macro-scale wear in a carbo-nitrided AISI 8620 steel. Carbo-nitriding is carried out using a novel method that involves the use of dried, cyanide-containing cassava leaves, as sources of carbon and nitrogen. These are used in a pack cementation that is used to diffuse carbon and nitrogen into case layers at intermediate temperatures [673.15 K, 723.15 K, 773.15 K, and 823.15 K (400 °C, 450 °C, 500 °C, and 550 °C)]. Nano- and macro-scale wear properties are studied in the case-hardened surfaces, using a combination of nano-scratch and pin-on-disk experiments. The measured wear volumes (at both nano- and macro-length scales) are shown to increase with decreasing pack cyaniding temperature. The nano- and macro-wear resistances are also shown to be enhanced by the in situ diffusion of carbon and nitrogen from cyanide-containing bio-processed waste. The underlying wear mechanisms are also elucidated via atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations of the wear tracks. The implications of the results are discussed for the design of hardened carbo-nitrided steel surfaces with improved wear resistance.

  8. An in vitro study of dental enamel wear by restorative materials using radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Lena Katekawa

    2000-01-01

    There is an increasing demand and interest to study the dental materials wear as well as about the abrasion effect on antagonistic teeth. Due to the fact that the existent restorative materials have no specifications about their abrasiveness, it is necessary the establishment of degrees of comparison among them to support clinical application. In this work, the radiometric method was applied to study the enamel wear caused by another enamel and by restorative materials (Ceramco II, Noritake and Finesse porcelains, Artglass and Targis). The dental enamel made radioactive by irradiation at the IEA-R1m nuclear research reactor under a thermal neutron flux was submitted to wear in a machine which allows sliding motion of an antagonistic surface in contact with this radioactive enamel. The enamel wear was evaluated by measuring beta activity of 32 P transferred to water from this irradiated tooth. Results obtained indicated that dental porcelains cause pronounced enamel wear when compared with that provoked by another enamel or by resin materials. Resin materials caused less enamel wear than another enamel. Vickers microhardness data obtained for antagonistic materials showed a correlation with the wear caused to the enamel. This study allowed to conclude that the radiometric method proposed can be used satisfactorily in the evaluation of enamel wear by restorative materials. This method presents advantages due to quick responses and ease of analyses There is (author)

  9. Wear mechanisms in ceramic hip implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonaker, Matthew; Goswami, Tarun

    2004-01-01

    The wear in hip implants is one of the main causes for premature hip replacements. The wear affects the potential life of the prosthesis and subsequent removals of in vivo implants. Therefore, the objective of this article is to review various joints that show lower wear rates and consequently higher life. Ceramics are used in hip implants and have been found to produce lower wear rates. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of ceramics compared to other implant materials. Different types of ceramics that are being used are reviewed in terms of the wear characteristics, debris released, and their size together with other biological factors. In general, the wear rates in ceramics were lower than that of metal-on-metal and metal-on-polyethylene combinations.

  10. Application of Combined Sustained and Cyclic Loading Test Results to Alloy 617 Elevated Temperature Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I [Global Egineering and Technology, LLC, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of 900-950°C . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200°F (650°C). The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, 1200 °F, is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures.

  11. Research on calibration method of downhole optical fiber temperature measurement and its application in SAGD well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Han, Li; Hu, Chengjun; Pan, Yong; Duan, Shengnan; Wang, Ningbo; Li, Shijian; Nuer, Maimaiti

    2017-10-01

    With the development of oil and gas fields, the accuracy and quantity requirements of real-time dynamic monitoring data needed for well dynamic analysis and regulation are increasing. Permanent, distributed downhole optical fiber temperature and pressure monitoring and other online real-time continuous data monitoring has become an important data acquisition and transmission technology in digital oil field and intelligent oil field construction. Considering the requirement of dynamic analysis of steam chamber developing state in SAGD horizontal wells in F oil reservoir in Xinjiang oilfield, it is necessary to carry out real-time and continuous temperature monitoring in horizontal section. Based on the study of the principle of optical fiber temperature measurement, the factors that cause the deviation of optical fiber temperature sensing are analyzed, and the method of fiber temperature calibration is proposed to solve the problem of temperature deviation. Field application in three wells showed that it could attain accurate measurement of downhole temperature by temperature correction. The real-time and continuous downhole distributed fiber temperature sensing technology has higher application value in the reservoir management of SAGD horizontal wells. It also has a reference for similar dynamic monitoring in reservoir production.

  12. Friction and wear studies of graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air and in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Sheehan, J.E.

    1980-10-01

    Sliding friction and wear tests were conducted on a commercial isotropic graphite and a carbon-carbon composite in air, purified helium, and a helium environment containing controlled amounts of impurities simulating the primary coolant chemistry of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The friction and wear characteristics of the materials investigated were stable and were found to be very sensitive to the testing temperature. In general, friction and wear decreased with increasing temperature in the range from ambient to 950 0 C. This temperature dependence is concluded to be due to chemisorption of impurities to form lubricating films and oxidation at higher temperatures, which reduce friction and wear. Graphite and carbon-carbon composites are concluded to be favorable candidate materials for high-temperature sliding service in helium-cooled reactors

  13. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989-2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R(2) = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The spatial and temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwarts, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model’s results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. PMID:26499933

  15. The production of wear protection coatings reinforced with tungsten carbide by temperature-controlled welding with the CO{sub 2} laser; Herstellung wolframkarbidverstaerkter Verschleissschutzschichten durch temperaturgeregeltes Auftragschweissen mit dem CO{sub 2}-Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, S.; Boddin, G.C.; Luft, A.; Techel, A. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Uelze, A. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Dresden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Protective coatings can be produced by laser coating with metal alloys reinforced by carbide, whose resistance to abrasive wear with a content of 40 to 50% by volume of hard material is comparable to sintered TC-Co hard metal. Due to the remaining ductile material behaviour and the metallurgical binding to the substrate, the coatings have high impact, fatigue and adhesion strengths. The use of process control leads to a stable coating process and to increased safety and reproduceability when working in narrow parameter areas. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Durch das Laserbeschichten mit karbidverstaerkten Metallegierungen koennen Schutzschichten erzeugt werden, deren Widerstand gegen Abrasivverschleiss bereits bei einem Hartstoff-Volumengehalt von 40 bis 50% gesintertem WC-Co-Hartmetall vergleichbar ist. Aufgrund des verbleibenden duktilen Werkstoffverhaltens und der metallurgischen Bindung zum Substrat verfuegen die Schichten ueber hohe Schlag-, Ermuedungs- und Haftfestigkeiten. Der Einsatz der Prozessregelung fuehrt zu einem stabilen Beschichtungsvorgang und zu einer erhoehten Sicherheit und Reproduzierbarkeit beim Arbeiten in eng begrenzten Parameterbereichen. (orig./RHM)

  16. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  17. A thermal, thermoelastic, and wear analysis of high-energy disk brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, F. E., Jr.; Wu, J. J.; Ling, F. F.

    1974-01-01

    A thermomechanical investigation of the sliding contact problem encountered in high-energy disk brakes is described. The analysis includes a modelling, using the finite element method of the thermoelastic instabilities that cause transient changes in contact area to occur on the friction surface. In order to include the effect of wear at the contact surface, a wear criterion is proposed that results in the prediction of wear rates for disk brakes that are quite close to experimentally determined wear rates. The thermal analysis shows that the transient temperature distribution in a disk brake assembly can be determined more accurately by use of this thermomechanical analysis than by a more conventional analysis that assumes constant contact conditions. It also shows that lower, more desirable, temperatures in disk brakes can be attained by increasing the volume, the thermal conductivity, and, especially, the heat capacity of the brake components.

  18. Wear of liquid nitrogen-cooled 440C bearing steels in an oxygen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Dilip K.; Verma, Ravi

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents up-to-date findings of the research being conducted to understand the mechanism of sliding wear in unlubricated 440C bearing steels under oxidative conditions. A sliding wear test rig has been designed and built with a cylinder-on-flat geometry. The equipment is capable of testing specimens under high axial loads and sliding speeds in a simulated LOX environment. Samples of 440C steel, quenched and tempered to a hardness of Rc 56, were tested under a load of 890 N and a sliding speed of 2.05 m/sec for total sliding distances of up to 5.54 km. Flash temperatures during these tests were measured with an IR camera and a fast digital recorder. Microstructural and microanalytical data from the worn surfaces and the debris particles are analyzed extensively, along with wear rates, flash temperatures, surface profiles, hardnesses, and residual stresses, in the context of oxidation and wear theories.

  19. Development and industrial application of catalyzer for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis of Claus tail gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honggang Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of more strict national environmental protection laws, energy conservation, emission reduction and clean production will present higher requirements for sulfur recovery tail gas processing techniques and catalyzers. As for Claus tail gas, conventional hydrogenation catalyzers are gradually being replaced by low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers. This paper concentrates on the development of technologies for low-temperature hydrogenation hydrolysis catalyzers, preparation of such catalyzers and their industrial application. In view of the specific features of SO2 hydrogenation and organic sulfur hydrolysis during low-temperature hydrogenation, a new technical process involving joint application of hydrogenation catalyzers and hydrolysis catalyzers was proposed. In addition, low-temperature hydrogenation catalyzers and low-temperature hydrolysis catalyzers suitable for low-temperature conditions were developed. Joint application of these two kinds of catalyzers may reduce the inlet temperatures in the conventional hydrogenation reactors from 280 °C to 220 °C, at the same time, hydrogenation conversion rates of SO2 can be enhanced to over 99%. To further accelerate the hydrolysis rate of organic sulfur, the catalyzers for hydrolysis of low-temperature organic sulfur were developed. In lab tests, the volume ratio of the total sulfur content in tail gas can be as low as 131 × 10−6 when these two kinds of catalyzers were used in a proportion of 5:5 in volumes. Industrial application of these catalyzers was implemented in 17 sulfur recovery tail gas processing facilities of 15 companies. As a result, Sinopec Jinling Petrochemical Company had outstanding application performances with a tail gas discharging rate lower than 77.9 mg/m3 and a total sulfur recovery of 99.97%.

  20. Determination of rail wear and short-time wear measurements of rails applying radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohmann, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    An energetic model has been developed for calculating rail wear. Short-time wear tests on rails after surface activation and following activity measurements showed a good agreement with the calculated values

  1. Friction & Wear Under Very High Electromagnetic Stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowan, Richard S; Danyluk, Steven; Moon, Francis; Ford, J. C; Brenner, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    This document summarizes initial progress toward advancing the fundamental understanding of the friction, wear and mechanics of interfaces subjected to extreme electromagnetic stress, high relative...

  2. Daily Water Requirements when Wearing Body Armor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montain, Scott

    2000-01-01

    .... This report presents the results of model simulations predicting the individual daily water requirements under a broad range of energy expenditures and weather conditions when wearing battle dress...

  3. Dense nanostructured t-ZrO2 coatings at low temperatures via modified emulsion precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, F.C.M.; Sager, W.F.C.; Sibelt, N.G.M.; Verweij, H.

    2001-01-01

    Nanostructured coatings on metals, plastics, and textiles have numerous applications, for example, as antifogging and self-cleaning coatings as well as protective coatings against corrosion, heat, or wear. Here the preparation at low temperature of dense nanostructured tetragonal ZrO2 coatings via a

  4. Dry sliding wear behaviour of Al-12Si-4Mg alloy with cerium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anasyida, A.S.; Daud, A.R.; Ghazali, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to understand the effect of cerium addition on wear resistance behaviour of as-cast alloys. Al-12Si-4 Mg alloys with 1-5 wt% cerium addition were prepared using the casting technique. A sliding wear test was carried out under applied loads of 10 N, 30 N and 50 N at a fixed sliding speed of 1 m/s using a pin-on-disc configuration. The wear test was conducted in dry conditions at room temperature of ∼25 o C. Detailed analysis of the microstructure, worn surface, collected debris and microhardness was undertaken in order to investigate the differences between the as-cast alloys with different levels of cerium addition. The addition of 1-5 wt% cerium was found to lead to the precipitation of intermetallic phases (Al-Ce), resulting a needle-like structures. Increasing cerium content up to 2 wt% improved both wear resistance and microhardness of as-cast alloys. Addition of more than 2 wt% cerium, however, led to a decrease in microhardness, resulting in lower wear resistance of the alloys. Moderate wear was observed at all loads, with specific wear rates (K') ranging from 6.82 x 10 -5 with 2 wt% Ce at applied load of 50 N to 21.48 x 10 -5 mm 3 /N m without added Ce at an applied load of 10 N. Based on K' ranges, the as-cast alloys exhibited moderate wear regimes, and the mechanism of wear is a combination of abrasion and adhesion. Alloy containing 2 wt% Ce, with the highest hardness and lowest K' value, showed the greatest wear resistance.

  5. New methodology for fast prediction of wheel wear evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apezetxea, I. S.; Perez, X.; Casanueva, C.; Alonso, A.

    2017-07-01

    In railway applications wear prediction in the wheel-rail interface is a fundamental matter in order to study problems such as wheel lifespan and the evolution of vehicle dynamic characteristic with time. However, one of the principal drawbacks of the existing methodologies for calculating the wear evolution is the computational cost. This paper proposes a new wear prediction methodology with a reduced computational cost. This methodology is based on two main steps: the first one is the substitution of the calculations over the whole network by the calculation of the contact conditions in certain characteristic point from whose result the wheel wear evolution can be inferred. The second one is the substitution of the dynamic calculation (time integration calculations) by the quasi-static calculation (the solution of the quasi-static situation of a vehicle at a certain point which is the same that neglecting the acceleration terms in the dynamic equations). These simplifications allow a significant reduction of computational cost to be obtained while maintaining an acceptable level of accuracy (error order of 5-10%). Several case studies are analysed along the paper with the objective of assessing the proposed methodology. The results obtained in the case studies allow concluding that the proposed methodology is valid for an arbitrary vehicle running through an arbitrary track layout.

  6. Friction and wear behavior of Colmonoy and Stellite alloys in sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoh, S.; Mizobuchi, S.; Atsumo, H.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of a series of experiments in sodium environment for the research and development of friction and wear resistant material used for the sliding components of sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. The study relates to the friction and wear characteristics of nickel-base alloy, Colmonoy, and cobalt-base alloy, Stellite, with respect to temperature, load, sliding velocity, sliding mode, and sodium flushing. The friction behavior of these alloys in sodium is compared with that in argon

  7. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike L. Fulcher; Kenneth L. Knittel

    2004-06-08

    The work performed on this program was to develop wear resistant, tough FM composite materials with efforts focused on WC-Co based FM systems. The materials were developed for use in mining industry wear applications. Components of interest were drill bit inserts for drilling blast holes. Other component applications investigated included wear plates for a variety of equipment such as pit shovels, wear surfaces for conveyors, milling media for ball milling operations, hydrocyclone cones, grader blades and dozer teeth. Cross-cutting technologies investigated included hot metal extrusion dies, drill bits for circuit board fabrication, cutting tools for cast iron and aluminum machining. An important part of the work was identification of the standard materials used in drilling applications. A materials trade study to determine those metals and ceramics used for mining applications provided guidance for the most important materials to be investigated. WC-Co and diamond combinations were shown to have the most desirable properties. Other considerations such as fabrication technique and the ability to consolidate shifted the focus away from diamond materials and toward WC-Co. Cooperating partners such as Kennametal and Kyocera assisted with supplies, evaluations of material systems, fabricated parts and suggestions for cross-cutting technology applications for FM architectures. Kennametal provided the raw materials (WC-Co and Al-TiCN powders) for the extent of the material evaluations. Kyocera shared their research into various FM systems and provided laboratory testing of fabricated materials. Field testing provided by partners Superior Rock Bit and Brady Mining and Construction provided insight into the performance of the fabricated materials under actual operational conditions. Additional field testing of cross-cutting technology, the extrusion of hot metals, at Extruded Metals showed the potential for additional market development.

  8. Characterization of piezoelectric materials for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing for ultra-low frequency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Mohammad Nouroz; Seethaler, Rudolf; Alam, M Shahria

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are used extensively in a number of sensing applications ranging from aerospace industries to medical diagnostics. Piezoelectric materials generate charge when they are subjected to strain. However, since measuring charge is difficult at low frequencies, traditional piezoelectric sensors are limited to dynamic applications. In this research an alternative technique is proposed to determine static strain that relies upon the measurement of piezoelectric capacitance and resistance using piezoelectric sensors. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the capacitance and resistance of a piezoelectric patch sensor was characterized for a wide range of strain and temperature. The study shows that the piezoelectric capacitance is sensitive to both strain and temperature while the resistance is mostly dependent on the temperature variation. The findings can be implemented to obtain thermally compensated static strain from piezoelectric sensors, which does not require an additional temperature sensor. (paper)

  9. High-temperature measurement techniques for the application in photometry, radiometry and thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Well characterised sources of thermal radiation are essential for photometry, radiometry, and thermometry. They serve as reference radiators for the calibration of detectors and radiance sources. Thermal radiation sources are advantageous for this purpose compared to other radiance sources such as lamps or LEDs because they possess a continuous spectrum of the emitted spectral radiance, which, for blackbody sources, can be calculated analytically using Planck's law of radiation. For application in thermometry, blackbody sources starting from temperatures near absolute zero to temperatures up to 3000 deg. C are needed for the calibration of radiation thermometers. For application in photometry and radiometry high intensity sources of radiation in the visible and UV region of the optical spectrum were required. This latter requirement is met by blackbody sources at temperatures well above 2000 deg. C. An ideal reference source should always emit the same amount of radiation at any time of use. This is realised by fixed-point radiators. Such radiators are based on a phase transition of a substance, at high temperatures the melting and freezing points of metals. However, current metal fixed-points are limited to relatively low temperatures. In the present work innovative techniques necessary for research into high-temperature thermal radiation sources are developed and thoroughly described. Starting with variable temperature blackbody sources the techniques required are: Precise apertures determination and detailed characterisation of the applied optical detectors. The described techniques are then used to undertake research into the development of high-temperature fixed-points above the copper fixed-point for application in photometry, radiometry, and thermometry. Applying these sophisticated techniques it was shown that these new high-temperature fixed-points are reproducible and repeatable to better than 100 mK at temperatures up to nearly 3200 K. Finally, a forward

  10. Wear behaviour and morphology of stir cast aluminium/SiC nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanwir Alam, Md; Arif, Sajjad; Husain Ansari, Akhter

    2018-04-01

    Wear and friction play a vital role in the service life of components. Aluminium matrix nanocomposites possess tremendous potential for a number of applications in addition to their present uses. It is valuable to the field of newer materials for better performance in tribological applications. In this work, dry sliding wear, friction coefficient and morphology of aluminium alloy (A356) reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiCn) were investigated. A356/SiCn nanocomposites (AMNCs) containing 1–5 weight percentage of SiCn were prepared through two-step stir casting process via mechanical ball milling. The wear test was conducted on pin-on-disc test apparatus. Regression analysis was performed to develop mathematical functions to fit the experimental data points. Morphological studies of Al and SiCn as-received, wear debris and worn surfaces were further analysed by SEM along with EDS. The occurrence of oxide layers was observed on worn surfaces. Iron trace was identified by wear debris. It was found that the wear loss and friction coefficient were strongly influenced by mechanical milling and SiCn content. The results exhibited that the friction coefficient reduces with the addition of SiCn as well as with the increase in load. However, wear resistance increases as the reinforcement content increases because of the embedding and wettability effects.

  11. Microstructure and wear resistance of spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zepon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the early 90's the oil industry has been encouraging the development of corrosion and wear resistant alloys for onshore and offshore pipeline applications. In this context supermartensitic stainless steel was introduced to replace the more expensive duplex stainless steel for tubing applications. Despite the outstanding corrosion resistance of stainless steels, their wear resistance is of concern. Some authors reported obtaining material processed by spray forming, such as ferritic stainless steel, superduplex stainless steel modified with boron, and iron-based amorphous alloys, which presented high wear resistance while maintaining the corrosion performance1,2. The addition of boron to iron-based alloys promotes the formation of hard boride particles (M2B type which improve their wear resistances3-9. This work aimed to study the microstructure and wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel modified with 0.3 wt. (% and 0.7 wt. (% processed by spray forming (SF-SMSS 0.3%B and SF-SMSS 0.7%B, respectively. These boron contents were selected in order to improve the wear resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel through the formation of uniformly distributed borides maintaining the characteristics of the corrosion resistant matrix. SF-SMSS 0.7%B presents an abrasive wear resistance considerably higher than spray-formed supermartensitic stainless steel without boron addition (SF-SMSS.

  12. Fabry-Perot Interferometer Performance as Temperature Sensor for Use in Electrical Power System Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Mandal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transfer function model of the loss less Fabry-Perot cavity (FPI, developed in Z-domain is presented in this paper. Frequency response analysis of the model was carried out in MATLAB environment to explain the behavior of the interferometer and its potential as temperature sensor was studied. Analysis reveals a highly sensitive temperature sensor that can be used in electrical engineering power system applications.

  13. The influence of reciprocating sliding wear on the oxidation behaviour of Fe-12Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    Medium-chromium ferritic alloys are used extensively in advanced gas cooled reactors (AGRs). Under certain conditions these alloys can undergo breakaway oxidation in which the rate-limiting step is located at the oxide/metal interface rather than the more usual gas/oxide interface; this results in linear oxidation kinetics. Repeated removal of oxide layers can expose chromium-depleted metal to the oxidizing gas and promote nucleation of breakaway oxidation. The question has been addressed as to whether high temperature sliding wear processes can also disrupt the surface so as to make the material potentially susceptible to breakaway oxidation. High temperature reciprocating wear tests of Fe-12Cr material in both low and high pressure reactor gas have been carried out. As expected, compact adhesive load-bearing oxide and mixed oxide/metal beds form in wear regions. These contacting features wear at very low rates of less than 10 -16 m 3 (Nm) -1 . Preformed oxides wear at sufficiently low rates at high temperature as to preclude the possibility of exposure of the underlying metal to the reactor gas. It is thus unlikely that sliding wear processes will accelerate the tendency for initiation of breakaway oxidation. (author)

  14. Surface and sliding wear behaviour of different coatings and steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera-Cardenas, E.E. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico)]. E-mail: evera@upp.edu.mx; Vite-Torres, M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: drmanulvite9@hotmail.com; Lewis, R. [University of Sheffield (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: roger.lewis@sheffield.ac.uk

    2012-01-15

    In this work, the sliding wear behaviour of the coatings TiN, CrN and WC/C applied on steel substrates was studied using a reciprocating wear test machine. All tests were carried out in dry conditions, at room temperature (20-23 degrees Celsius and 45% - 50% relative humidity). The average sliding velocity was 0.08 m/s and an amplitude of 2 mm was used. The applied loads were 11.76 N (Po = 1.74 GPa) and 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Optical microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of wear scars and spalls and possible causes of their formation. The variation of the friction coefficient against the number of cycles was obtained. This was used to determine more precisely the time (number of cycles) where the coating presented the first signs of wear, in addition Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) was performed, as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and hardness tests on the wear traces, which reinforced the previous observations. Thus it was possible to know the wear life of different coatings and possible causes of variation. Increasing the load was an important factor in the variation of wear life results. But it is also important to consider other factors such as surface roughness and thickness of coatings. [Spanish] En este trabajo se estudio el comportamiento en desgaste por deslizamiento de los recubrimientos de TiN, CrN y WC/C aplicados sobre sustratos de acero. Las pruebas se realizaron con una maquina reciprocante en condiciones secas a temperatura ambiente (20-23 grados centigrados y 45% - 50% de humedad relativa). Se empleo una velocidad promedio de 0.08 m/s y una amplitud de 2 mm. Las cargas aplicadas fueron de 11.76N (Po = 1.74 GPa) y de 7.84 N (Po = 1.52 GPa). Se realizo microscopia optica para observar las caracteristicas de las zonas de desgaste y sus posibles causas de formacion. Se obtuvo graficamente la variacion del coeficiente de friccion con el numero de ciclos. Estos datos se emplearon para determinar con mayor precision el

  15. Electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids in nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have invaded all branches of science. They are also receiving an upsurge, in recent years, for possible applications in various stages of nuclear fuel cycle. Ionic liquids are compounds composed entirely of ions existing in liquid state and RTILs are ionic liquids molten at temperatures lower than 373 K. RTILs are generally made up of an organic cation and an inorganic or an organic anion. Room temperature ionic liquids have several fascinating properties, which are unique to a particular combination of cation and anion. The properties such as insignificant vapor pressure, amazing ability to dissolve organic and inorganic compounds, wide electrochemical window are the specific advantages when dealing with application of RTILs for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The ionic liquids are regarded as designer or tailor-made solvents as their properties can be tuned for desired application by appropriate cation-anion combinations. An excellent review by Wilkes describes about the historical perspectives of room temperature ionic liquids, pioneers in that area, events and the products delivered till 2001. Furthermore, several comprehensive reviews have been made on room temperature ionic liquids by various authors

  16. The response of rice (Oryza sativa L. to elevated night temperature with application of Pyraclostobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Y. Wahjanto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rice productivity is having a problem related with climate change phenomenon, mainly the global warming. The rising of temperature in some country threat the rice production. The increasing of temperature is a major limiting factor that affects yield through the growth and development of rice plant. This study was aimed to examine the response of rice (Oryza sativa L. to elevated night temperature with the application of Pyraclostobin. A glasshouse experiment that was conducted from March to August 2015 at Brawijaya University Research Station of Jatikerto – Malang, used nested plot design with three replications and two treatments. The first treatments were the night temperature level (normal temperature, increased 2oC, and increased 4oC. The second treatments were the concentration of Pyraclostrobin (0 ppm, 400 ppm and 800 ppm. Results of the study showed that the increase of temperature at night for about 2oC and 4oC, as well as application of Pyraclostrobin, affected growth and yield of rice. Application of Pyraclostrobin by concentrations of 400 ppm and 800 ppm effectively reduced yield loss by increasing night temperature of 2oC, which resulted in 20.20% and 24.93%, respectively, in comparison with the control; while the increase of night temperature by 4oC have resulted 26.86% and 33.33% in comparison with the control. Pyraclostrobin was effective in maintaining percentage of the filled spikelets by the increase of temperature at night for about 2oC and 4oC.

  17. Thick sputtered tantalum coatings for high-temperature energy conversion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelmakh, Veronika, E-mail: stelmakh@mit.edu; Peykov, Daniel; Chan, Walker R.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin; Celanovic, Ivan [Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Castillo, Robert; Coulter, Kent; Wei, Ronghua [Materials Engineering Department, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Thick sputtered tantalum (Ta) coatings on polished Inconel were investigated as a potential replacement for bulk refractory metal substrates used for high-temperature emitters and absorbers in thermophotovoltaic energy conversion applications. In these applications, high-temperature stability and high reflectance of the surface in the infrared wavelength range are critical in order to sustain operational temperatures and reduce losses due to waste heat. The reflectance of the coatings (8 and 30 μm) was characterized with a conformal protective hafnia layer as-deposited and after one hour anneals at 700, 900, and 1100 °C. To further understand the high-temperature performance of the coatings, the microstructural evolution was investigated as a function of annealing temperature. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze the texture and residual stress in the coatings at four reflections (220, 310, 222, and 321), as-deposited and after anneal. No significant changes in roughness, reflectance, or stress were observed. No delamination or cracking occurred, even after annealing the coatings at 1100 °C. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the thick Ta coatings are a promising alternative to bulk substrates and pave the way for a relatively low-cost and easily integrated platform for nanostructured devices in high-temperature energy conversion applications.

  18. The development of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, N.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2004-01-01

    There are several applications and fundamental research areas which require the detection of VUV light at cryogenic temperatures. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested special designs of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes able to operate at low temperatures: sealed gaseous detectors with MgF2 windows and windowless detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated, that both primary and secondary (due to the avalanche multiplication inside liquids) scintillation lights could be recorded by photosensitive gaseous detectors. The results of this work may allow one to significantly improve the operation of some noble liquid gas TPCs.

  19. Temperature change of various ferrite particles with alternating magnetic field for hyperthermic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Se-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Shim, In-Bo; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2005-01-01

    Various ferrites (Fe-, Li-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Co-, Co/Ni, Ba- and Sr-ferrites) were investigated with respect to their application for hyperthermia. Temperature changes under an alternating magnetic field were observed. The area of hysteresis loop was much larger in the Ba- and Sr-ferrites than for that of the Fe-, Ni/Zn/Cu-, Li-, Co- and Co/Ni-ferrites. Co-ferrite exhibited the most applicable temperature change ΔT=19.25K (29.62W/gs), in distilled water when the field was 110A/m

  20. Design of the steam reformer for the HTR-10 high temperature process heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Huaiming; Xu Yuanhui; Jia Haijun

    2000-01-01

    The 10 MW High Temperature Reactor Test Module (HTR-10) is being constructed now and planned to be operational in 2000. One of the objectives is to develop the high temperature process heat application. The methane steam reformer is one of the key-facilities for the nuclear process heat application system. The paper describes the conceptual design of the HTR-10 Steam Reformer with He heating, and the design optimization computer code. It can be used to perform sensitivity analysis for parameters, and to improve the design. Principal parameters and construction features of the HTR-10 reformer heated by He are introduced. (author)