WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature vibrational spectroscopy

  1. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Single Molecules at Sub-Kelvin Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface and revealed five new vibrational modes that were previously inaccessible to STM-IETS at 8K temperature. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% was demonstrated. Facilitated by the high energy resolution, we also revealed the a...

  2. Ab-initio molecular dynamics and vibrational Raman spectroscopy investigations of quartz polymorph at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediki, Hayet; Simon, Patrick; Hadjadj, Aomar; Krallafa, Abdelghani M.

    2017-09-01

    Quartz has found a wide range of applications over the past years. In the present work, the temperature dependence of microcrystalline quartz is investigated with Raman spectroscopy and DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. We aimed to determine the structure at short and medium range distances as a function of the increasing temperature. The dynamics and the structural changes are analysed in terms of time-dependent properties, and the vibrational analysis obtained from calculated dipole trajectory and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The computed data is compared to Raman and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The approach is of a particularly great interest when we focus on the structural behaviour, and the dynamical disorder observed and characterised through geometric and thermodynamic data. The calculations confirm that the infrared and Raman signature as a function of temperature provide a sensitive analysis of the structural behaviour of quartz.

  3. Time evolution of vibrational temperatures in a CO2 glow discharge measured with infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Engeln, R.; van den Bekerom, D. C. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.

    2017-11-01

    Vibrational temperatures of CO2 are studied in a pulsed glow discharge by means of time-resolved in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, with a 10 μs temporal resolution. A method to analyze the infrared transmittance through vibrationally excited CO2 is presented and validated on a previously published CO2 spectrum, showing good agreement between fit and data. The discharge under study is pulsed with a typical duty cycle of 5–10 ms on–off, at 50 mA and 6.7 mbar. A rapid increase of the temperature of the asymmetric stretch vibration (T 3) is observed at the start of the pulse, reaching 1050 K, which is an elevation of 550 K above the rotational temperature ({T}{{rot}}) of 500 K. After the plasma pulse, the characteristic relaxation time of T 3 to {T}{{rot}} strongly depends on the rotational temperature. By adjusting the duty cycle, the rotational temperature directly after the discharge is varied from 530 to 860 K, resulting in relaxation times between 0.4 and 0.1 ms. Equivalently, as the gas heats up during the plasma pulse, the elevation of T 3 above {T}{{rot}} decreases strongly.

  4. Accurate Lineshapes from Sub-1 cm-1 Resolution Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of α-Pinene at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mifflin, Amanda L.; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Ho, Junming; Psciuk, Brian; Negre, Christian; Ebben, Carlena J.; Upshur, Mary Alice; Lu, Zhou; Strick, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan; Batista, Victor; Wang, Hongfei; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-02-26

    Room temperature sub-wavenumber high-resolution broadband sum frequency generation (HR-BB-SFG) spectra of the common terpene (+)-α-pinene reveal ten peaks in the C–H stretching region. The spectral resolution exceeds that of Fourier transform infrared, femtosecond stimulated Raman, and traditional BB-SFG and scanning SFG spectroscopy of the same molecule. Experiment and simulation show the spectral lineshapes to be accurate. Homogeneous vibrational decoherence lifetimes of up to 1.7 psec are assigned to specific oscillators and compare favorably to lifetimes computed from density functional tight binding molecular dynamics calculations, while phase-resolved spectra yield orientation information for them. We propose the new spectroscopy as an attractive alternative to time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy or heterodyne-detection schemes for studying vibrational energy relaxation and vibrational coherences in molecules.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy of resveratrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans; Tyihák, Ernő

    2007-11-01

    In this article the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical interpretation of the vibrational spectra of trans-resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy- trans-stilbene) of diverse beneficial biological activity. Infrared and Raman spectra of the compound were recorded; density functional calculations were carried out resulting in the optimized geometry and several properties of the molecule. Based on the calculated force constants, a normal coordinate analysis yielded the character of the vibrational modes and the assignment of the measured spectral bands.

  6. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  7. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Dellby, Niklas; Aoki, Toshihiro; Carpenter, R W; Rez, Peter; Soignard, Emmanuel; Zhu, Jiangtao; Batson, Philip E; Lagos, Maureen J; Egerton, Ray F; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-10-09

    Vibrational spectroscopies using infrared radiation, Raman scattering, neutrons, low-energy electrons and inelastic electron tunnelling are powerful techniques that can analyse bonding arrangements, identify chemical compounds and probe many other important properties of materials. The spatial resolution of these spectroscopies is typically one micrometre or more, although it can reach a few tens of nanometres or even a few ångströms when enhanced by the presence of a sharp metallic tip. If vibrational spectroscopy could be combined with the spatial resolution and flexibility of the transmission electron microscope, it would open up the study of vibrational modes in many different types of nanostructures. Unfortunately, the energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in the electron microscope has until now been too poor to allow such a combination. Recent developments that have improved the attainable energy resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope to around ten millielectronvolts now allow vibrational spectroscopy to be carried out in the electron microscope. Here we describe the innovations responsible for the progress, and present examples of applications in inorganic and organic materials, including the detection of hydrogen. We also demonstrate that the vibrational signal has both high- and low-spatial-resolution components, that the first component can be used to map vibrational features at nanometre-level resolution, and that the second component can be used for analysis carried out with the beam positioned just outside the sample--that is, for 'aloof' spectroscopy that largely avoids radiation damage.

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  10. Vibrational Spectroscopy in Studies of Atmospheric Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Hosseinpour

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational spectroscopy has been successfully used for decades in studies of the atmospheric corrosion processes, mainly to identify the nature of corrosion products but also to quantify their amounts. In this review article, a summary of the main achievements is presented with focus on how the techniques infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy can be used in the field. Several different studies have been discussed where these instruments have been used to assess both the nature of corrosion products as well as the properties of corrosion inhibitors. Some of these techniques offer the valuable possibility to perform in-situ measurements in real time on ongoing corrosion processes, which allows the kinetics of formation of corrosion products to be studied, and also minimizes the risk of changing the surface properties which may occur during ex-situ experiments. Since corrosion processes often occur heterogeneously over a surface, it is of great importance to obtain a deeper knowledge about atmospheric corrosion phenomena on the nano scale, and this review also discusses novel vibrational microscopy techniques allowing spectra to be acquired with a spatial resolution of 20 nm.

  11. Characterization of pollen by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Boris

    2010-12-01

    Classification, discrimination, and biochemical assignment of vibrational spectra of pollen samples belonging to 43 different species of the order Pinales has been made using three different vibrational techniques. The comparative study of transmission (KBr pellet) and attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectroscopies was based on substantial variability of pollen grain size, shape, and relative biochemical composition. Depending on the penetration depth of the probe light, vibrational techniques acquire predominant information either on pollen grain walls (FT-Raman and ATR-FT-IR) or intracellular material (transmission FT-IR). Compared with the other two methods, transmission FT-IR obtains more comprehensive information and as a result achieves superior spectral identification and discrimination of pollen. The results strongly indicate that biochemical similarities of pollen grains belonging to the same plant genus or family lead to similar features in corresponding vibrational spectra. The exploitation of that property in aerobiological monitoring was demonstrated by simple and rapid pollen identification based on relatively small spectral libraries, with the same (or better) taxonomic resolution as that provided by optical microscopy. Therefore, the clear correlation between vibrational spectra and pollen grain morphology, biochemistry, and taxonomy is obtained, while successful pollen identification illustrates the practicability of such an approach in environmental studies.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy in diagnosis and screening

    CERN Document Server

    Severcan, F

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the use of vibrational spectroscopic methods for diagnosis and screening. These applications range from diagnosis of disease states in humans, such as cancer, to rapid identification and screening of microorganisms. The growth in such types of studies has been possible thanks to advances in instrumentation and associated computational and mathematical tools for data processing and analysis. This volume of Advances in Biomedical Spectroscopy contains chapters from leading experts who discuss the latest advances in the application of Fourier

  13. Water-carbon dioxide mixtures at high temperatures and pressures: Local order in the water rich phase investigated by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, R.; Tassaing, T.; Danten, Y.; Besnard, M.

    2005-12-01

    Raman scattering combined with near- and midinfrared absorption spectroscopies was used to investigate the evolution of the local order in the water rich phase of water-CO2 mixtures under isobaric heating (T=40-360°C,P=250bars). The quantitative analysis of the spectra shows that tetramers and larger oligomers are the main constituents of water at moderate temperatures below 80 °C. As the temperature increases, the dimer and trimer concentrations considerably increase at the expense of larger oligomers. Finally, water dimers are predominant at the highest temperature investigated close to the temperature of total miscibility of the mixture (T=366°C,P=250bars). This result is consistent with our previous investigation [R. Oparin T. Tassaing, Y. Danten, and M. Besnard, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 10691 (2004)] on water dissolved in the CO2 rich phase where we found that close to the temperature of total miscibility water also exists mainly under dimeric form. The current study combined with that mentioned above provides a model investigation of the evolution of the state of aggregation of water molecules in binary mixture involving a hydrophobic solvent in a wide range of temperature.

  14. Thymine Dimer Formation probed by Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Wolfgang J.; Schrader, Tobias E.; Roller, Florian O.; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Kohler, Bern

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are the major photoproducts formed when DNA is exposed to UV light. Femtosecond time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy reveals that thymine dimers are formed in thymidine oligonucleotides in an ultrafast photoreaction.

  15. Internal Temperature Control For Vibration Testers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Vibration test fixtures with internal thermal-transfer capabilities developed. Made of aluminum for rapid thermal transfer. Small size gives rapid response to changing temperatures, with better thermal control. Setup quicker and internal ducting facilitates access to parts being tested. In addition, internal flows smaller, so less energy consumed in maintaining desired temperature settings.

  16. Low Temperature Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Michael Dominic

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was designed and built to operate at liquid helium temperature and was used to measure highly localized electron tunneling spectroscopy. Several instruments were built, all capable of operating in many different environments: air, vacuum, liquid helium and in a transfer gas. An adaptation of one particular design was made into an atomic force microscope capable of operating at low temperatures. Using a low temperature STM, three adsorbed molecular species (liquid crystals, sorbic acid, and carbon monoxide), deposited on a graphite substrate, have been imaged at 4.2K. The inelastic tunneling spectra of these adsorbates show strong peaks in dI/dV vs V curves at energies that correspond to known vibrational modes. The increase in conductance at the onset of inelastic tunneling was measured to be as high as 100 times. The spatial variation of the spectra was measured and was seen to change dramatically on the scale of angstroms, suggesting that individual molecular bonds could be measured. A theoretical model is presented to explain the contrast seen in the STM images of adsorbed molecules, thereby explaining why adsorbed molecules appear to be more conductive than the background. The microscope proved very useful for measuring the energy gap of high temperature superconductors. These materials often have submicron grain sizes. For LaSrCuO, YBaCuO, and BiCaSrCuO, the conductance curves showed a large energy gap suggesting a strongly coupled superconductor. The conductance curves also indicated that intergrain tunneling may occur and that the background conductance varied linearly with the applied voltage. The crystalline structure of rm Bi_2 Sr_2 CaCu_2 O_ {8 + delta} was imaged by an STM operating in air and in ultra-high vacuum. From the STM images the bulk crystal structure model for this material was refined. Finally, the STM was used to make holes reproducibly on a graphite surface with diameters less than 40A. Because the

  17. Vibrational spectroscopy of Cm–C/Cb–Cb stretching vibrations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 1. Vibrational spectroscopy of –/ – stretching vibrations of copper tetramesityl porphyrin: An algebraic approach. Srinivasa Rao Karumuri Joydeep Choudhury Nirmal Kumar Sarkar Ramendu Bhattacharjee. Research Articles Volume 74 Issue 1 January 2010 pp ...

  18. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  19. Spectroscopy of Vibrational States in Diatomic Iodine Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Mary; Harrill, Charles H.; Smith, R. Seth

    2015-04-01

    This project is focused on understanding the vibrational structure of iodine, which is a homonuclear diatomic molecule. A 20 mW, 532 nm cw diode laser was used to selectively excite neutral iodine molecules to a higher energy electronic state. By performing spectroscopy on the transitions from this state to a lower energy electronic state, the data only showed those vibrational bands which connect the two electronic states. Since a number of vibrational levels are populated in the higher energy electronic state, the transitions to all of the allowed vibrational levels in the lower energy electronic state provided sufficient data to determine the vibrational structures of both states. Emission spectra were collected with an Ocean Optics USB4000 Compact CCD Spectrometer. The spectrometer had a range of 500 - 770 nm with a resolution of approximately 0.5 nm and was sensitive enough to resolve the vibrational states in diatomic iodine molecules. The results were compared to a simple harmonic oscillator model.

  20. Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ochkin, Vladimir N

    2009-01-01

    Providing an up-to-date overview on spectroscopical diagnostics of low temperature plasma Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasma covers the latest developments and techniques. Written by a distinguished scientist and experienced book author this text is applicable to many fields in materials and surface science as well as nanotechnology and contains numerous appendices with indispensable reference data.

  1. Liquid Space Lubricants Examined by Vibrational Micro-Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop liquid lubricants for satellites and space exploration vehicles. These lubricants must often perform under a range of harsh conditions such as vacuum, radiation, and temperature extremes while in orbit or in transit and in extremely dusty environments at destinations such as the Moon and Mars. Historically, oil development was guided by terrestrial application, which did not provide adequate space lubricants. Novel fluids such as the perfluorinated polyethers provided some relief but are far from ideal. With each new fluid proposed to solve one problem, other problems have arisen. Much of the work performed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in elucidating the mechanisms by which chemical degradation of space oils occur has been done by vibrational micro-spectroscopic techniques such as infrared and Raman, which this review details. Presented are fundamental lubrication studies as well as actual case studies in which vibrational spectroscopy has led to millions of dollars in savings and potentially prevented loss of mission.

  2. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy.

  3. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  4. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Wang, Lai S.

    2005-08-01

    We demonstrate vibrational cooling of anions via collisions with a background gas in an ion trap attached to a cryogenically controlled cold head (10 ? 400 K). Photoelectron spectra of vibrationally cold C60- anions, produced by electrospray ionization and cooled in the cold ion trap, have been obtained. Relative to spectra taken at room temperature, vibrational hot bands are completely eliminated, yielding well resolved vibrational structures and a more accurate electron affinity for neutral C60. The electron affinity of C60 is measured to be 2.683 ? 0.008 eV. The cold spectra reveal complicated vibrational structures for the transition to the C60 ground state due to the Jahn-Teller effect in the ground state of C60-. Vibrational excitations in the two Ag modes and eight Hg modes are observed, providing ideal data to assess the vibronic couplings in C60-.

  5. Spectroscopie de vibration infrarouge du silicium amorphe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ce travail porte sur l'étude des configurations des liaisons Si-H des couches minces du silicium amorphe hydrogéné évaporé (a-Si:H) préparées dans un bâti ultra-vide (UHV). L'hydrogène atomique est obtenu à l'aide d'un plasma dans un tube à décharge dirigé vers le porte-substrat. Les fréquences de vibrations et la ...

  6. Vibrational Action Spectroscopy of Solids: New Surface-Sensitive Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zongfang; Płucienik, Agata; Feiten, Felix E.; Naschitzki, Matthias; Wachsmann, Walter; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Staemmler, Volker; Kuhlenbeck, Helmut; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Vibrational action spectroscopy employing infrared radiation from a free-electron laser has been successfully used for many years to study the vibrational and structural properties of gas phase aggregates. Despite the high sensitivity of this method no relevant studies have yet been conducted for solid sample surfaces. We have set up an experiment for the application of this method to such targets, using infrared light from the free-electron laser of the Fritz Haber Institute. In this Letter, we present first results of this technique with adsorbed argon and neon atoms as messengers. We were able to detect surface-located vibrations of a thin V2O3(0 0 0 1 ) film on Au(111) as well as adsorbate vibrations, demonstrating that this method is highly surface sensitive. We consider that the dominant channel for desorption of the messenger atoms is direct inharmonic vibrational coupling, which is essentially insensitive to subsurface or bulk vibrations. Another channel is thermal desorption due to sample heating by absorption of infrared light. The high surface sensitivity of the nonthermal channel and its insensitivity to subsurface modes makes this technique an ideal tool for the study of surface-located vibrations.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging: applications for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querido, William; Falcon, Jessica M; Kandel, Shital; Pleshko, Nancy

    2017-10-23

    Tissue engineering (TE) approaches strive to regenerate or replace an organ or tissue. The successful development and subsequent integration of a TE construct is contingent on a series of in vitro and in vivo events that result in an optimal construct for implantation. Current widely used methods for evaluation of constructs are incapable of providing an accurate compositional assessment without destruction of the construct. In this review, we discuss the contributions of vibrational spectroscopic assessment for evaluation of tissue engineered construct composition, both during development and post-implantation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in the mid and near-infrared range, as well as Raman spectroscopy, are intrinsically label free, can be non-destructive, and provide specific information on the chemical composition of tissues. Overall, we examine the contribution that vibrational spectroscopy via fiber optics and imaging have to tissue engineering approaches.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy at high external pressures the diamond anvil cell

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1984-01-01

    Vibrational Spectroscopy at High External Pressures: The Diamond Anvil Cell presents the effects of high pressure on the vibrational properties of materials as accomplished in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The DAC serves the dual purpose of generating the pressures and being transparent to infrared radiation, allowing the observation of changes caused by pressure. The optical probes highlighted will deal principally with infrared and Raman scattering, although some observations in the visible region will also be presented. The book begins with a discussion of the effects of pressure and pres

  9. Low temperature vibrational spectroscopy. III. Structural aspects and detection of phase transitions in crystalline alkali metal and tetramethylammonium hexabromotellurates and platinates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    1979-01-01

    cases sharp, bands were observed at low temperatures. The spectra have been assigned, and in most cases a confirmation of previous results was obtained. The assignment ambiguity in the literature on the nu4 mode of [PtBr6]2− has been solved, placing it at ~ 130 cm−1. The majority of the new low...... of the tetramethylammonium compounds, methyl torsional IR bands were observed with increasing sharpness at lower temperatures. This behavior can be correlated with a gradual ordering of methyl torsional disorder. The potential energy barrier against methyl group rotation was found to be of the order 4–5 kcal/mol, showing...

  10. Drug–excipient interactions in ketoprofen: A vibrational spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, L. A. E. Batista de; Marques, M. Paula M.; Tomkinson, John

    2006-01-01

    Ketoprofen (3-benzoyl-alpha-methylbenzeneacetic acid) is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), always administered in the form of drug-excipient physical mixtures (PMs). The occurrence of possible interactions between ketoprofen and two commonly used excipients - lactose (LAC) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - was evaluated, through vibrational spectroscopy techniques [both Raman and Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS)]. Spectral evidence of drug:excipient close contacts, w...

  11. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study and DFT calculations of the sorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, G. D.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Freire, P. T. C.; de Sousa, F. F.; da Silva, J. H.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports a temperature-dependent vibrational spectroscopic study of the sorbic acid (C6H8O2), as well as the mode assignment at ambient conditions, based on the density functional theory. Temperature-dependent vibrational properties have been performed in polycrystalline sorbic acid through both Raman and infrared spectroscopy in the 20-300 K and 80-300 K temperature ranges, respectively. These studies present the occurrence of some modifications in the Raman spectra that could be interpreted as a low temperature phase transition undergone by sorbic acid from the monoclinic phase to an unknown phase with conformational change of the molecules in the unit cell.

  12. Enhanced Vibrational Spectroscopies as Tools for Small Molecule Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souhir Boujday

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short summary we summarize some of the latest developments in vibrational spectroscopic tools applied for the sensing of (small molecules and biomolecules in a label-free mode of operation. We first introduce various concepts for the enhancement of InfraRed spectroscopic techniques, including the principles of Attenuated Total Reflection InfraRed (ATR-IR, (phase-modulated InfraRed Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS/PM-IRRAS, and Surface Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIRAS. Particular attention is put on the use of novel nanostructured substrates that allow for the excitation of propagating and localized surface plasmon modes aimed at operating additional enhancement mechanisms. This is then be complemented by the description of the latest development in Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopies, again with an emphasis on the detection of small molecules or bioanalytes.

  13. Nanomechanical Infrared Spectroscopy with Vibrating Filters for Pharmaceutical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurek, Maksymilian; Carnoy, Matthias; Larsen, Peter Emil

    2017-01-01

    Standard infrared spectroscopy techniques are well-developed and widely used. However, they typically require milligrams of sample and can involve time-consuming sample preparation. A promising alternative is represented by nanomechanical infrared spectroscopy (NAM-IR) based on the photothermal r...... perform a chemical and morphological analysis on roughly 100 pg of sample. With an absolute estimated sensitivity of 109±15 fg, the presented method is suitable for ultrasensitive vibrational spectroscopy....... response of a nanomechanical resonator, which enables the chemical analysis of picograms of analyte directly from a liquid solution in only a few minutes. Herein, we present NAM-IR using perforated membranes (filters). The method was tested with the pharmaceutical compound indomethacin to successfully...

  14. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and vibrationally mediated photodissociation of V+(OCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citir, Murat; Altinay, Gokhan; Metz, Ricardo B

    2006-04-20

    Electronic spectra of gas-phase V+(OCO) are measured in the near-infrared from 6050 to 7420 cm(-1) and in the visible from 15,500 to 16,560 cm(-1), using photofragment spectroscopy. The near-IR band is complex, with a 107 cm(-1) progression in the metal-ligand stretch. The visible band shows clearly resolved vibrational progressions in the metal-ligand stretch and rock, and in the OCO bend, as observed by Brucat and co-workers. A vibrational hot band gives the metal-ligand stretch frequency in the ground electronic state nu3'' = 210 cm(-1). The OCO antisymmetric stretch frequency in the ground electronic state (nu1'') is measured by using vibrationally mediated photodissociation. An IR laser vibrationally excites ions to nu1'' = 1. Vibrationally excited ions selectively dissociate following absorption of a second, visible photon at the nu1' = 1 CO2, due to interaction with the metal. Larger blue shifts observed for complexes with fewer ligands agree with trends seen for larger V+(OCO)n clusters.

  15. Low temperature vibrational spectroscopy. I. Hexachlorotellurates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Bjerrum, Niels

    1977-01-01

    Far infrared and Raman spectra of six hexachlorotellurate (IV) salts have been obtained at ~100 K for the first time. In the rubidium, cesium, ammonium, and tetramethylammonium salts the Raman active T2g cation lattice translatory mode was found. In the monoclinic K2[TeCl6] a number of low freque...... pair of electrons present in hexachlorotellurates. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy of a molecular shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Danny J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Woutersen, Sander

    2012-02-14

    Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy is used to investigate the inter-component motion of an ultraviolet-triggered two-station molecular shuttle. The operation cycle of this molecular shuttle involves several intermediate species, which are observable in the amide I and amide II regions of the mid-IR spectrum. Using ab initio calculations on specific parts of the rotaxane, and by comparing the transient spectra of the normal rotaxane with that of the N-deuterated version, we can assign the observed vibrational modes of each species occurring during the shuttling cycle in an unambiguous way. The complete time- and frequency-dependent data set is analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). Using a kinetic model to describe the time-dependent concentrations of the transient species, we derive the absorption spectra associated with each stage in the operation cycle of the molecular shuttle, including the recombination of the charged species.

  17. Low temperature vibrational spectroscopy. II. Evidence for order–disorder phase transitions due to weak C–H···Cl hydrogen bonding in tetramethylammonium hexachloroplatinate (IV), -tellurate (IV), and -stannate (IV) and the related perdeuterated compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    1978-01-01

    and it is suggested that the phase transitions are caused by an ordering of rotationally disordered methyl groups via the formation of weak C–H···Cl hydrogen bonds at low temperatures. The transition temperatures and hence the interactions are shown to depend on both the kind of hydrogen isotope and metal present...... torsions and other noncubic features play a role, especially in spectra at low temperatures. Possible site symmetries of the [PtCl6]2− ion, which cannot have strictly Oh symmetry in either phase, have been deduced. The spectra of a mixed Pt : Te compound showed that the hexachlorometallate anions vibrate...

  18. Low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was designed and built to operate at liquid helium temperature and was used to measure highly localized electron tunneling spectroscopy. Several instruments were built, all capable of operating in many different environments: air, vacuum, liquid helium and in a transfer gas. An adaptation of one particular design was made into an atomic force microscope capable of operating at low temperatures. Using a low temperature STM, three adsorbed molecular species (liquid crystals, sorbic acid, and carbon monoxide), deposited on a graphite substrate, have been imaged at 4.2K. The inelastic tunneling spectra of these adsorbates show strong peaks in dI/dV vs V curves at energies that correspond to known vibrational modes. The increase in conductance at the onset of inelastic tunneling was measured to be as high as 100 times. The spatial variation of the spectra was measured and was seen to change dramatically on the scale of angstroms, suggesting that individual molecular bonds could be measured. A theoretical model is presented to explain the contrast seen in the STM images of adsorbed molecules, thereby explaining why adsorbed molecules appear to be more conductive than the background. The microscope proved very useful for measuring the energy gap of high temperature superconductors. These materials often have submicron grain sizes. For LaSrCuO, YBaCuO, and BiCaSrCuO, the conductance curves showed a large energy gap suggesting a strongly coupled superconductor. The conductance curves also indicated that intergrain tunneling may occur and that the background conductance varied linearly with the applied voltage. The crystalline structure of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} was imaged by an STM operating in air and in ultra-high vacuum.

  19. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  20. Terahertz mechanical vibrations in lysozyme: Raman spectroscopy vs modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Piana, Gianfranco; Bassani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of proteins is receiving an increasing attention from the scientific community. Recently it has been suggested that mechanical vibrations play a crucial role in controlling structural configuration changes (folding) which govern proteins biological function. The mechanism behind protein folding is still not completely understood, and many efforts are being made to investigate this phenomenon. Complex molecular dynamics simulations and sophisticated experimental measurements are conducted to investigate protein dynamics and to perform protein structure predictions; however, these are two related, although quite distinct, approaches. Here we investigate mechanical vibrations of lysozyme by Raman spectroscopy and linear normal mode calculations (modal analysis). The input mechanical parameters to the numerical computations are taken from the literature. We first give an estimate of the order of magnitude of protein vibration frequencies by considering both classical wave mechanics and structural dynamics formulas. Afterwards, we perform modal analyses of some relevant chemical groups and of the full lysozyme protein. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, obtained from both in-house and literature Raman measurements. In particular, the attention is focused on a large peak at 0.84 THz (29.3 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum obtained analyzing a lyophilized powder sample.

  1. Cryogenic Vibrational Spectroscopy Provides Unique Fingerprints for Glycan Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masellis, Chiara; Khanal, Neelam; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Clemmer, David E.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    The structural characterization of glycans by mass spectrometry is particularly challenging. This is because of the high degree of isomerism in which glycans of the same mass can differ in their stereochemistry, attachment points, and degree of branching. Here we show that the addition of cryogenic vibrational spectroscopy to mass and mobility measurements allows one to uniquely identify and characterize these complex biopolymers. We investigate six disaccharide isomers that differ in their stereochemistry, attachment point of the glycosidic bond, and monosaccharide content, and demonstrate that we can identify each one unambiguously. Even disaccharides that differ by a single stereogenic center or in the monosaccharide sequence order show distinct vibrational fingerprints that would clearly allow their identification in a mixture, which is not possible by ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry alone. Moreover, this technique can be applied to larger glycans, which we demonstrate by distinguishing isomeric branched and linear pentasaccharides. The creation of a database containing mass, collision cross section, and vibrational fingerprint measurements for glycan standards should allow unambiguous identification and characterization of these biopolymers in mixtures, providing an enabling technology for all fields of glycoscience. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Structural dynamics in complex liquids studied with multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The development of new sustainable energy sources is linked to our understanding of the molecular properties of water and aqueous solutions. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology, fuel cells, and batteries, make use of water for the purpose of moving energy in the form of charges and mediating the redox chemistry that allows this energy to be stored as and released from chemical bonds. To build our fundamental knowledge in this area, this project supports work in the Tokmakoff group to investigate the molecular dynamics of water’s hydrogen bond network, and how these dynamics influence its solutes and the mechanism of proton transport in water. To reach the goals of this grant, we developed experiments to observe molecular dynamics in water as directly as possible, using ultrafast multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy. We excite and probe broad vibrational resonances of water, molecular solutes, and protons in water. By correlating how molecules evolve from an initial excitation frequency to a final frequency, we can describe the underlying molecular dynamics. Theoretical modeling of the data with the help of computational spectroscopy coupled with molecular dynamics simulations provided the atomistic insight in these studies.

  3. Investigation of organometallic reaction mechanisms with one and two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahoon, James Francis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    One and two dimensional time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy has been used to investigate the elementary reactions of several prototypical organometallic complexes in room temperature solution. The electron transfer and ligand substitution reactions of photogenerated 17-electron organometallic radicals CpW(CO)3 and CpFe(CO)2 have been examined with one dimensional spectroscopy on the picosecond through microsecond time-scales, revealing the importance of caging effects and odd-electron intermediates in these reactions. Similarly, an investigation of the photophysics of the simple Fischer carbene complex Cr(CO)5[CMe(OMe)] showed that this class of molecule undergoes an unusual molecular rearrangement on the picosecond time-scale, briefly forming a metal-ketene complex. Although time-resolved spectroscopy has long been used for these types of photoinitiated reactions, the advent of two dimensional vibrational spectroscopy (2D-IR) opens the possibility to examine the ultrafast dynamics of molecules under thermal equilibrium conditions. Using this method, the picosecond fluxional rearrangements of the model metal carbonyl Fe(CO)5 have been examined, revealing the mechanism, time-scale, and transition state of the fluxional reaction. The success of this experiment demonstrates that 2D-IR is a powerful technique to examine the thermally-driven, ultrafast rearrangements of organometallic molecules in solution.

  4. Exciton-vibrational coupling in the dynamics and spectroscopy of Frenkel excitons in molecular aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Schulze, J.; Polyutov, S. P.; Yan, Y.; Pullerits, T.; Kühn, O.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of exciton-vibrational coupling on the optical and transport properties of molecular aggregates is an old problem that gained renewed interest in recent years. On the experimental side, various nonlinear spectroscopic techniques gave insight into the dynamics of systems as complex as photosynthetic antennae. Striking evidence was gathered that in these protein-pigment complexes quantum coherence is operative even at room temperature conditions. Investigations were triggered to understand the role of vibrational degrees of freedom, beyond that of a heat bath characterized by thermal fluctuations. This development was paralleled by theory, where efficient methods emerged, which could provide the proper frame to perform non-Markovian and non-perturbative simulations of exciton-vibrational dynamics and spectroscopy. This review summarizes the state of affairs of the theory of exciton-vibrational interaction in molecular aggregates and photosynthetic antenna complexes. The focus is put on the discussion of basic effects of exciton-vibrational interaction from the stationary and dynamics points of view. Here, the molecular dimer plays a prominent role as it permits a systematic investigation of absorption and emission spectra by numerical diagonalization of the exciton-vibrational Hamiltonian in a truncated Hilbert space. An extension to larger aggregates, having many coupled nuclear degrees of freedom, becomes possible with the Multi-Layer Multi-Configuration Time-Dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method for wave packet propagation. In fact it will be shown that this method allows one to approach the limit of almost continuous spectral densities, which is usually the realm of density matrix theory. Real system-bath situations are introduced for two models, which differ in the way strongly coupled nuclear coordinates are treated, as a part of the relevant system or the bath. A rather detailed exposition of the Hierarchy Equations Of Motion (HEOM) method will be

  5. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Blankenship, Steve [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence.

  6. Discovery of Cellulose Surface Layer Conformation by Nonlinear Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Libing; Fu, Li; Wang, Hong-fei; Yang, Bin

    2017-03-14

    Significant questions remain with respect to the structure and polymorphs of cellulose. These include the cellulose surface layers and the bulk crystalline core as well as the conformational differences. The Total Internal Reflection Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy (TIR-SFG-VS) combined with the conventional SFG-VS (non-TIR) can help to resolve these questions by selectively characterizing the molecular structures of surface layers and the crystalline core of cellulose. From the SFG spectra in the C-H and O-H regions, we found that the surface layers of Avicel are essentially amorphous; while the surface layers of Iβ cellulose are crystalline but with different structural and spectroscopic signatures than that of its crystalline core. This work demonstrates the capacity of TIR and Non-TIR SFG-VS tools in selectively studying the structures and polymorphs of cellulose. In addition, these results also suggest that the assignments of major vibrational peaks for cellulose need to be further determined.

  7. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  8. Application of fluorescent and vibration spectroscopy for septic serum human albumin structure deformation during pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyubin, A.; Konstantinova, E.; Slezhkin, V.; Matveeva, K.; Samusev, I.; Bryukhanov, V.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we perform results of conformational analysis of septic human serum albumin (HSA) carried out by Raman spectroscopy (RS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and fluorescent spectroscopy. The main vibrational groups were identified and analyzed for septic HSA and its health control. Comparison between Raman and IR results were done. Fluorescent spectral changes of Trp-214 group were analyzed. Application of Raman, IR spectroscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy for conformational changes study of HSA during pathology were shown.

  9. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  10. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transform infrared techniques. Electrical properties were studied using a.c. impedance spectroscopy technique in the temperature range of 50–650 °C and frequency range of 10 Hz–13 MHz. The complex impedance plots at temperature ≥ 300 °C show ...

  11. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Pyridine Hydrogenation on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-02-22

    Pyridine hydrogenation in the presence of a surface monolayer consisting of cubic Pt nanoparticles stabilized by tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide (TTAB) was investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy using total internal reflection (TIR) geometry. TIR-SFG spectra analysis revealed that a pyridinium cation (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}) forms during pyridine hydrogenation on the Pt nanoparticle surface, and the NH group in the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +} cation becomes more hydrogen bound with the increase of the temperature. In addition, the surface coverage of the cation decreases with the increase of the temperature. An important contribution of this study is the in situ identification of reaction intermediates adsorbed on the Pt nanoparticle monolayer during pyridine hydrogenation.

  12. Liicg - a New Method for Rotational and Ro-Vibrational Spectroscopy at 4K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Lars; Stoffels, Alexander; Bruenken, Sandra; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Since many years low temperature ion trapping techniques are successfully used in our laboratories in combination with sensitive action spectroscopy schemes (Laser Induced Reactions) to measure high resolution ro-vibrational and rotational spectra of gas-phase molecular ions. Here we present a further development of a LIR method first introduced for recording rotationally resolved electronic spectra of N2+. This new method, called LIICG (Light Induced Inhibition of Complex Growth), makes use of state specific He-attachment rates to stored cold molecular ions. We have recently demonstrated its applicability to rotational and ro-vibrational spectroscopy of C3H+ and CH5+. The measurements were performed in recently completed 4K 22-pole ion trap instruments. Ionic species are produced in a storage ion source and are mass selected before they enter the trap. For spectroscopy normally a few thousand ions are stored at 4K together with He at high number densities (around 1014 cm-3). Under these conditions He attaches to the ions via ternary collision processes. As we will show, this attachement process is hindered by exciting a rotational or ro-vibrational transition, likely because the attachment rates for He are slower for higher rotational or ro-vibrational levels. So by exciting the bare ion the number of ion- He complexes at equilibrium is reduced. In this way the spectrum of the bare ion can be recorded by counting the number of ion-He complexes as a function of frequency. To test the new method we chose well known rotational ground state transitions of CO+, HCO+ and CD+. In particular CD+ appeared to be a good candidate for understanding the new method in detail, due to its strong LIICG signal and its simple rotational spectrum. In this contribution we will explain the LIICG scheme and its underlying kinetics using the example of CD+. We will show effects of different experimental conditions on the signal (e.g. He number density, temperature, radiation power…) to

  13. Vibrational and thermodynamic properties of Ar, N2, O2, H2 and CO adsorbed and condensed into (H,Na)-Y zeolite cages as studied by variable temperature IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribov, Evgueni N; Cocina, Donato; Spoto, Giuseppe; Bordiga, Silvia; Ricchiardi, Gabriele; Zecchina, Adriano

    2006-03-14

    The adsorption of Ar, H2, O2, N2 and CO on (H,Na)-Y zeolite (Si/Al = 2.9, H+/Na+ approximately 5) has been studied at variable-temperature (90-20 K) and sub-atmospheric pressure (0-40 mbar) by FTIR spectroscopy. Unprecedented filling conditions of the zeolite cavities were attained, which allowed the investigation of very weakly adsorbed species and of condensed, liquid-like or solid-like, phases. Two pressure regimes were singled out, characterized by: (i) specific interaction at low pressure of the probe molecules (P) with the internal Brønsted and Lewis sites, and (ii) multilayer adsorption at higher pressure. In the case of CO the perturbation of the protonic sites located inside the sodalite cages was also observed. As the molecule is too large to penetrate the sodalite cage, the perturbation is thought to involve a proton jump tunneling mechanism. The adsorption energy for the (HF)OH...P (P = Ar, H2, O2, N2 and CO) specific interaction involving the high frequency Brønsted acid sites exposed in the supercages was derived following the VTIR (variable temperature infrared spectroscopy) method described by E. Garrone and C. Otero Areán (Chem. Soc. Rev., 2005, 34, 846).

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations of flavonoid derriobtusone A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. N. L.; Mendes Filho, J.; Freire, P. T. C.; Santos, H. S.; Albuquerque, M. R. J. R.; Bandeira, P. N.; Leite, R. V.; Braz-Filho, R.; Gusmão, G. O. M.; Nogueira, C. E. S.; Teixeira, A. M. R.

    2017-02-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants which perform various functions. One subclass of flavonoid is auronol that can present immunostimulating activity. In this work Fourier-Transform Infrared with Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and Fourier-Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of an auronol, derriobtusone A (C18H12O4), were obtained at room temperature. Theoretical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) were performed in order to assign the normal modes and to interpret the spectra of the derriobtusone A molecule. The FTIR-ATR and FT-Raman spectra of the crystal, were recorded at room temperature in the regions 600 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1 and 40 cm-1 to 4000 cm-1, respectively. The normal modes of vibrations were obtained using Density Functional Theory with B3LYP functional and 6-31G+ (d,p) basis set. The calculated frequencies are in good agreement with those obtained experimentally. Detailed assignments of the normal modes present in both the Fourier-Transform infrared and the Fourier-Transform Raman spectra of the crystal are given.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy of Cm–C/Cb–Cb stretching vibrations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    operator which conveniently describes stretching vibrations of biomolecules. For a copper tetramesityl porphyrin molecule, the higher excited vibrational levels are calculated by applying the U(2) algebraic approach. Keywords. Lie algebraic techniques; vibrational spectra; copper tetramesityl porphyrin. PACS Nos 31.65.

  16. Symmetry-broken effects on electron momentum spectroscopy caused by adiabatic vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yinghao; Ma, Xiaoguang; Lou, Wenhua; Wang, Meishan; Yang, Chuanlu

    2017-11-01

    The vibronic coupling effect is usually studied by invoking the breakdown of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The present study shows that the symmetry-broken effect induced by nuclei vibrations can also lead strong impact on the electronic states under the framework of Born-Oppenheimer approximation. This adiabatic-invoking vibrational effect on electron momentum spectroscopy of ethylene (C2H4), ethane (C2H6) and methanol (CH3OH) was studied with quantum mechanical method. The results show that electron momentum spectroscopy of localized electrons, especially core electrons in axial symmetric geometry molecules can be affected unusually and strongly by several asymmetric vibrational modes.

  17. Localized surface plasmon resonances in nanostructures to enhance nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies: towards an astonishing molecular sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational transitions contain some of the richest fingerprints of molecules and materials, providing considerable physicochemical information. Vibrational transitions can be characterized by different spectroscopies, and alternatively by several imaging techniques enabling to reach sub-microscopic spatial resolution. In a quest to always push forward the detection limit and to lower the number of needed vibrational oscillators to get a reliable signal or imaging contrast, surface plasmon resonances (SPR are extensively used to increase the local field close to the oscillators. Another approach is based on maximizing the collective response of the excited vibrational oscillators through molecular coherence. Both features are often naturally combined in vibrational nonlinear optical techniques. In this frame, this paper reviews the main achievements of the two most common vibrational nonlinear optical spectroscopies, namely surface-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SE-SFG and surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SE-CARS. They can be considered as the nonlinear counterpart and/or combination of the linear surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS techniques, respectively, which are themselves a branching of the conventional IR and spontaneous Raman spectroscopies. Compared to their linear equivalent, those nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies have proved to reach higher sensitivity down to the single molecule level, opening the way to astonishing perspectives for molecular analysis.

  18. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy studies of adsorbates on Pt(111): Studies of CO at high pressures and temperatures, coadsorbed with olefins and its role as a poison in ethylene hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Kyle Yi [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-12-01

    High pressure high temperature CO adsorption and coadsorption with ethylene and propylene on Pt(111) was monitored in situ with infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG). At high pressures and high temperatures, CO dissociates on a Pt(111) surface to form carbon. At 400 torr CO pressure and 673K, CO modifies the Pt(111) surface through a carbonyl intermediate, and dissociates to leave carbon on the surface. SFG was used to follow the CO peak evolution from monolayer adsorption in ultra high vacuum (UHV) to 400 torr CO pressure. At this high pressure, a temperature dependence study from room temperature to 823K was carried out. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to identify carbon on the surface CO coadsorption with ethylene and CO coadsorption with propylene studies were carried out with 2-IR 1-visible SFG. With this setup, two spectral ranges covering the C-H stretch range and the CO stretch range can be monitored simultaneously. The coadsorption study with ethylene reveals that after 5L ethylene exposure on a Pt(111) surface to form ethylidyne , CO at high pressures cannot completely displace the ethylidyne from the surface. Instead, CO first adsorbs on defect sites at low pressures and then competes with ethylidyne for terrace sites at high pressures. Propylene coadsorption with CO at similar conditions shows that propylidyne undergoes conformation changes with increased CO pressure and at 1 torr, is absent from the Pt(111) surface. Experiments on CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation was carried by 2-IR 1-visible SFG. At 1 torr CO,10 torr ethylene and 100 torr hydrogen, CO was found to block active sites necessary for ethylene hydrogenation, Above 425K, CO desorbs from the surface to allow ethylene hydrogenation to occur. The gas phase species were monitored by gas chromatography.

  19. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  20. 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Vibrational Spectroscopy - Formal Schedule and Speaker/Poster Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Franz [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  1. Localised vibrational mode spectroscopy studies of self-interstitial clusters in neutron irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Chroneos, A. [Materials Engineering, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-28

    The evolution of self-interstitial clusters in silicon (Si), produced by fast neutron irradiation of silicon crystals followed by anneals up to 750 °C, is investigated using localised vibrational mode spectroscopy. A band at 582 cm{sup −1} appears after irradiation and is stable up to 550 °C was attributed to small self-interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 4} structure. Two bands at 713 and 758 cm{sup −1} arising in the spectra upon annealing of the 582 cm{sup −1} band and surviving up to ∼750 °C were correlated with larger interstitial clusters (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8), with the most probable candidate the I{sub 8} structure or/and with chainlike defects which are precursors of the (311) extended defects. The results illustrate the presence of different interstitial clusters I{sub n}, at the various temperature intervals of the material, in the course of an isochronal anneal sequence. As the annealing temperature increases, they evolve from first-order structures with a small number of self-interstitials (I{sub n}, n ≤ 4) for the temperatures 50 < T < 550 °C, to second order structures (I{sub n}, 5 ≤ n ≤ 8) with a larger number of interstitials, for the temperatures 550 < T < 750 °C.

  2. Proton translocation in cytochrome c oxidase: insights from proton exchange kinetics and vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, Izumi; Hikita, Masahide; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme in the electron transfer chain. It reduces oxygen to water and harnesses the released energy to translocate protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mechanism by which the oxygen chemistry is coupled to proton translocation is not yet resolved owing to the difficulty of monitoring dynamic proton transfer events. Here we summarize several postulated mechanisms for proton translocation, which have been supported by a variety of vibrational spectroscopic studies. We recently proposed a proton translocation model involving proton accessibility to the regions near the propionate groups of the heme a and heme a3 redox centers of the enzyme based by hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange Raman scattering studies (Egawa et al., PLoS ONE 2013). To advance our understanding of this model and to refine the proton accessibility to the hemes, the H/D exchange dependence of the heme propionate group vibrational modes on temperature and pH was measured. The H/D exchange detected at the propionate groups of heme a3 takes place within a few seconds under all conditions. In contrast, that detected at the heme a propionates occurs in the oxidized but not the reduced enzyme and the H/D exchange is pH-dependent with a pKa of ~8.0 (faster at high pH). Analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that, as the pH is varied, entropy/enthalpy compensation held the free energy of activation in a narrow range. The redox dependence of the possible proton pathways to the heme groups is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vibrational spectroscopies and bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Photochromism of Composite Organometallic Nanostructures Based on Diarylethenes. II. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyuk, G. T.; Askirka, V. F.; Lavysh, A. V.; Kurguzenkov, S. A.; Yasinskii, V. M.; Kobeleva, O. I.; Valova, T. M.; Ayt, A. O.; Barachevsky, V. A.; Yarovenko, V. N.; Krayushkin, M. M.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure and photochromic transformations of nanostructured organometallic composites consisting of Ag nanoparticles with shells of photochromic diarylethenes (DAEs) deposited from various solutions onto the nanoparticles were studied using infrared absorption and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The studied nanostructures exhibited photochromic properties manifested as reversible photoinduced changes of the relative intensities of SERS bands related to vibrations of bonds participating in the reversible photoisomerization. Spectral manifestations of chemical interaction between metal nanoparticles and DAE molecules were detected.

  4. Theory of single molecule vibrational spectroscopy and microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, N; Persson, M

    2000-10-02

    We have carried out a density functional study of vibrationally inelastic tunneling in the scanning tunneling microscope of acetylene on copper. Our approach is based on a many-body generalization of the Tersoff-Hamann theory. We explain why only the carbon-hydrogen stretch modes are observed in terms of inelastic and elastic contributions to the tunneling conductance. The inelastic tunneling is found to be efficient and highly localized in space without any resonant interaction and to be governed by a vibration-induced change in tunneling amplitude.

  5. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates in methane-to-methanol conversion by CoO+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Gokhan; Kocak, Abdulkadir; Silva Daluz, Jennifer; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2011-08-01

    At room temperature, cobalt oxide cations directly convert methane to methanol with high selectivity but very low efficiency. Two potential intermediates of this reaction, the [HO-Co-CH3]+ insertion intermediate and [H2O-Co=CH2]+ aquo-carbene complex are produced in a laser ablation source and characterized by electronic and vibrational spectroscopy. Reaction of laser-ablated cobalt cations with different organic precursors seeded in a carrier gas produces the intermediates, which subsequently expand into vacuum and cool. Ions are extracted into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and spectra are measured via photofragment spectroscopy. Photodissociation of [HO-Co-CH3]+ in the visible and via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) makes only Co+ + CH3OH, while photodissociation of [H2O-Co=CH2]+ produces CoCH2+ + H2O. The electronic spectrum of [HO-Co-CH3]+ shows progressions in the excited state Co-C stretch (335 cm-1) and O-Co-C bend (90 cm-1); the IRMPD spectrum gives νOH = 3630 cm-1. The [HO-Co-CH3]+(Ar) complex has been synthesized and its vibrational spectrum measured in the O-H stretching region. The resulting spectrum is sharper than that obtained via IRMPD and gives νOH = 3642 cm-1. Also, an improved potential energy surface for the reaction of CoO+ with methane has been developed using single point energies calculated by the CBS-QB3 method for reactants, intermediates, transition states and products.

  6. Single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy of water molecules using an LT-STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Chikako; Kim, Yousoo; Motobayashi, Kenta; Kawai, Maki

    2006-03-01

    Single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy has attracted considerable attention as a powerful tool for nanoscale chemistry. The adsorption of water molecules on metal surfaces plays an important role in understanding many phenomena in nature, such as heterogeneous catalysis and corrosion, etc. The structure of water at low coverage has been investigated on a variety of transition-metal surfaces with various techniques. But the microscopic understanding of the adsorption feature of single water molecules is still unclear. We report molecular scale study of adsorption behaviors of water molecules on Pt (111) surface at 4.7 K by use of single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The Pt (111) surface was dosed with a small amount of water molecules (cherry blossom', which can be explained by one of the water molecules rotating around the other. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy using the STM was utilized to determine vibrational modes of individual water dimers.

  7. Hydrogen Bonding and Vibrational Spectroscopy: A Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of hydrogen bonding on vibrational spectra are studied for several hydrogen-bonded complexes, in which hydrogen bonding ranges from weak (25 kcal/mol). The systems studied include complexes of inorganic acids and salts with water and ammonia, as well as complexes of several organic molecules (nitriles and amino acids) with water. Since anharmonic effects are very strong in hydrogen-bonded systems, anharmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities are computed using the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method with ab initio potential surfaces at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels. The most common spectral effects induced by hydrogen bonding are red shifts of stretching vibrational frequencies ranging from approx.200/cm to over 2000/cm and significant increases of infrared intensities for those bonds that participate in hydrogen bonding. However, some systems (e.g. nitrile-water complexes) exhibit shifts in the opposite direction (to the blue) upon formation of hydrogen bonds.

  8. Prediction of Milk Quality Parameters Using Vibrational Spectroscopy and Chemometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Carl Emil Aae

    Vibrational spectroscopic techniques are widely used throughout all stages of food production. The analysis of raw materials, real-time process control, and end-product quality evaluation are all crucial steps in food production. In order to increase production throughput there is a need for speed...

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of the CCl[subscript 4] v[subscript 1] Mode: Theoretical Prediction of Isotopic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D.; Wetterer, Anna M.; Cochran, Rea M.; Valente, Edward J.; Mayer, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique, yet it is often missing from the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory curriculum. Tetrachloromethane (CCl[subscript 4]) is the ideal molecule for an introductory vibrational spectroscopy experiment and the symmetric stretch vibration contains fine structure due to isotopic variations…

  10. Vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy of a spin-triplet bis-(biuretato) cobaltate(III) coordination compound with low-lying electronic transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Thulstrup, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy was applied in the analysis of vibrational and low lying electronic transitions of a triplet ground state cobalt(III) coordination compound. The spectroscopic measurements were performed on the tetrabutylammonium salt...

  11. Adsorption-induced symmetry reduction of metal-phthalocyanines studied by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, J.; Bocquet, F. C.; Tautz, F. S.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the vibrational properties of Pt- and Pd-phthalocyanine (PtPc and PdPc) molecules on Ag(111) with high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). In the monolayer regime, both molecules exhibit long-range order. The vibrational spectra prove a flat adsorption geometry. The redshift of specific vibrational modes suggests a moderate interaction of the molecules with the substrate. The presence of asymmetric vibrational peaks indicates an interfacial dynamical charge transfer (IDCT). The molecular orbital that is involved in IDCT is the former Eg lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the molecules that becomes partially occupied upon adsorption. A group-theoretical analysis of the IDCT modes, based on calculated vibrational frequencies and line shape fits, provides proof for the reduction of the symmetry of the molecule-substrate complex from fourfold D4 h to C2 v(σv) , Cs(σv) , or C2 and the ensuing lifting of the degeneracy of the former LUMO of the molecule. The vibration-based analysis of orbital degeneracies, as carried out here for PtPc/Ag(111) and PdPc/Ag(111), is particularly useful whenever the presence of multiple molecular in-plane orientations at the interface makes the analysis of orbital degeneracies with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy difficult.

  12. Linking crystal structure with temperature-sensitive vibrational modes in calcium carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-09-07

    We demonstrate a correlation between how an IR-active vibrational mode responds to temperature changes and how it responds to crystallinity differences. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to track changes in carbonate-related vibrational modes in three different CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite) and CaMg(CO3)2 (dolomite) during heating. Of the three characteristic IR-active carbonate modes, the in-plane bending mode (ν4) shows the most pronounced changes with heating in polymorphs that have planar carbonate arrangements (calcite, aragonite, and dolomite). In contrast, this mode is virtually unchanged in vaterite, which has a canted arrangement of carbonate units. We correlate these trends with recent studies that identified the ν4 mode as most susceptible to changes related to crystallinity differences in calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate. Thus, our results suggest that studies of packing arrangements could provide a generalizable approach to identify the most diagnostic vibrational modes for tracking either temperature-dependent or crystallinity-related effects in IR-active solids.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of CO Ro-vibrational Absorption Lines toward the Obscured AGN IRAS 08572+3915

    OpenAIRE

    Shirahata, Mai; Nakagawa, Takao; Usuda, Tomonori; Goto, Miwa; Suto, Hiroshi; Geballe, T. R.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous CO absorption in the fundamental ro-vibrational band toward the heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) IRAS 08572+3915. We have detected absorption lines up to highly excited rotational levels (J 200 km s-1) of which is due to blueshifted (-160 km s-1) gas at a temperature of ~ 270 K absorbing at velocities as high as -400 km s-1. A much weaker but even warmer (~ 700 K) component, which is highly redshifted (+100 km s-1), is also dete...

  14. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Wolf, Sharon G; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an 'aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies <1 eV can be 'safely' investigated. To demonstrate the potential of aloof spectroscopy, we record electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  15. Vibrational spectroscopy modeling of a drug in molecular solvents and enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Christian J.; Fulfer, Kristen D.; Zhang, Xiaoliu; Kuroda, Daniel G.

    2017-09-01

    Modeling of drugs in enzymes is of immensurable value to many areas of science. We present a theoretical study on the vibrational spectroscopy of Rilpivirine, a HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor, in conventional solvents and in clinically relevant enzymes. The study is based on vibrational spectroscopy modeling of the drug using molecular dynamics simulations, DFT frequency maps, and theory. The modeling of the infrared lineshape shows good agreement with experimental data for the drug in molecular solvents where the local environment motions define the vibrational band lineshape. On the other hand, the theoretical description of the drug in the different enzymes does not match previous experimental findings indicating that the utilized methodology might not apply to heterogeneous environments. Our findings show that the lack of reproducibility might be associated with the development of the frequency map which does not contain all of the possible interactions observed in such systems.

  16. Communication: interfacial water structure revealed by ultrafast two-dimensional surface vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial water structure is essential for a basic understanding of the many environmental, technological, and biophysical systems in which aqueous interfaces appear. Using ultrafast two-dimensional surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy we show that the structure of heavy

  17. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy on protons and deuterons in proton conducting perovskites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, M.; Poulsen, F.W.; Berg, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    A short review of IR-spectroscopy on protons in perovskite structure oxides is given. The nature of possible proton sites, libration and combination tones and degree of hydrogen bonding is emphasised. Three new spectroscopic experiments and/or interpretations are presented. An IR-microscopy exper...

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in the Infrared and Near-Infrared Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Sidsel Dahl

    and 1,4-diaminobutane). Experimentally, the hydrogen bonds have been studied with vibrational spectroscopy in the infrared and near-infrared regions. The focus is primarily on spectra recorded in the near-infrared regions, which in these studies are dominated by O-H and N-H stretching overtones....... Overtone spectra have been recorded with intracavity laser photoacoustic laser spectroscopy and conventional long path absorption spectroscopy. Theoretically, a combination of electronic structure calculations and local mode models have been employed to guide the assignment of bands in the vibrational......, weak intramolecular hydrogen bonds in methyl lactate, allyl carbinol and methallyl carbinol have been identified and characterized. The effect of substitution of two hydrogen atoms on one of the methylene groups with either methyl groups or tri uoromethyl groups on the intramolecular...

  20. Reactivity, vibrational spectroscopy, internal rotation and thermochemical aspects of methylarsine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Rommel B.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to perform a characterization of the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of methylarsine (CH3AsH2). Post-Hartree-Fock, 29 DFT methods and eight different composite methodologies were employed in these analyses. A comparison between harmonic and anharmonic frequency accuracies in reproducing the observable frequencies was performed here. In addition, the CH3AsH2 → CH2AsH3 isomerization barrier energy was estimated in 100 kcal mol- 1, whereas the H2-release routes barrier heights were in the 45-107 kcal mol- 1 range. A rate constant of 10- 66 s- 1 was predicted regarding the isomerization route, while the CH2AsH3 hydrogen elimination mechanism is faster than the methylarsine one. The transition state structure of the CH3AsH2 internal rotational barrier energy varied between 1.0 and 1.4 kcal mol- 1. For the CH2AsH3 internal rotation the estimated barrier heights varied 0.6-2.5 kcal mol- 1. The adiabatic ionization energy and the heat of formation each structure was also calculated here. Table S2 Mean absolute error (MAE, in cm- 1) based in the harmonic frequencies calculated for each method in the prediction of the methylarsine experimental vibrational modes. Table S3 Calculated harmonic (ν, in cm- 1) and anharmonic (ω, in cm- 1) vibrational frequencies in reproducing the methylarsine observed frequencies using the cc-pVTZ basis sets. Table S4. Calculated harmonic (ZPVEHARM, in kcal mol- 1) and anharmonic (ZPVEANHARM, in kcal mol- 1) methylarsine zero-point vibrational energy values (ZPVE) and the difference (ΔZPVE) between both values. Table S5. Arsenic-Carbon bond order indexes for each molecule. Table S6 Properties at As-C bond critical points (BCPs) as electronic charge density [ρ(r)] and its Laplacian [∇2ρ(r)], total energy density [H(r)], ellipticity (ε) and the relationship between local potential energy and local energy density [V(r)/G(r)]. Table S7 Carbon [q(C)] and arsenic [q(As)] atomic charge distribution

  1. Theoretical methods for small-molecule ro-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson, Jonathan, E-mail: j.tennyson@ucl.ac.u [University College London, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-14

    The solution of the first principle equations of quantum mechanics provides an increasingly accurate and predictive approach for solving problems involving atoms and small molecules. A general introduction to the methods used for the ab initio calculation of rotational-vibrational spectra of small molecules is presented, with a strong focus on triatomic systems. The use of multi-reference electronic structure methods to compute molecular potential-energy and dipole-moment surfaces is discussed. Issues related to the construction of such surfaces and the inclusion of corrections due to relativistic and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects are reviewed. The derivation of exact, internal-coordinate nuclear-motion-effective Hamiltonians and their solution using a discrete-variable representation are discussed. Sample results for the water molecules are used throughout the tutorial to illustrate the theoretical and numerical issues in such calculations. (phd tutorial)

  2. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Paulo B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-14

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayer are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayer at Iiquidhapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the confirmational order of surfactant monolayers.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory study of ninhydrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Sui, Huimin; Liu, Peipie; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Jianbo; Zhao, Bing

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, ninhydrin was designed as a model molecule for theoretical and experimental studies of the molecule structure. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to predict the IR and Raman spectra for the molecule. In addition, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra of the compound have been obtained experimentally. Based on the modeling results obtained at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level, all FTIR and Raman bands of the compound obtained experimentally were assigned. Our calculated vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the experimental values. The molecular electrostatic potential surface calculation was performed and the result suggested that the ninhydrin had two potential hydrogen bond donors and four potential hydrogen bond acceptors. HOMO-LUMO gap was also obtained theoretically at B3LYP/6-311++G** level.

  4. Ultrafast vibrational population transfer dynamics in 2-acetylcyclopentanone studied by 2D IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungnam; Ji, Minbiao

    2011-03-14

    2-Acetylcyclopentanone (2-ACP), which is a β-dicarbonyl compound, undergoes keto-enol isomerization, and its enol tautomers are stabilized by a cyclic intramolecular hydrogen bond. 2-ACP (keto form) has symmetric and asymmetric vibrational modes of the two carbonyl groups at 1748 and 1715 cm(-1) , respectively, which are well separated from the carbonyl modes of its enol tautomers in the FTIR spectrum. We have investigated 2-ACP dissolved in carbon tetrachloride by 2D IR spectroscopy and IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Vibrational population transfer dynamics between the two carbonyl modes were observed by 2D IR spectroscopy. To extract the population exchange dynamics (i.e., the down- and uphill population transfer rate constants), we used the normalized volumes of the cross-peaks with respect to the diagonal peaks at the same emission frequency and the survival and conditional probability functions. As expected, the downhill population transfer time constant (3.2 ps) was measured to be smaller than the uphill population transfer time constant (3.8 ps). In addition, the vibrational population relaxation dynamics of the two carbonyl modes were observed to be the same within the experimental error and were found to be much slower than vibrational population transfer between two carbonyl modes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Correlating the motion of electrons and nuclei with two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Thomas A A; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Fleming, Graham R

    2014-07-15

    Multidimensional nonlinear spectroscopy, in the electronic and vibrational regimes, has reached maturity. To date, no experimental technique has combined the advantages of 2D electronic spectroscopy and 2D infrared spectroscopy, monitoring the evolution of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom simultaneously. The interplay and coupling between the electronic state and vibrational manifold is fundamental to understanding ensuing nonradiative pathways, especially those that involve conical intersections. We have developed a new experimental technique that is capable of correlating the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom: 2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy (2D-EV). We apply this new technique to the study of the 4-(di-cyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-4H-pyran (DCM) laser dye in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide and its excited state relaxation pathways. From 2D-EV spectra, we elucidate a ballistic mechanism on the excited state potential energy surface whereby molecules are almost instantaneously projected uphill in energy toward a transition state between locally excited and charge-transfer states, as evidenced by a rapid blue shift on the electronic axis of our 2D-EV spectra. The change in minimum energy structure in this excited state nonradiative crossing is evident as the central frequency of a specific vibrational mode changes on a many-picoseconds timescale. The underlying electronic dynamics, which occur on the hundreds of femtoseconds timescale, drive the far slower ensuing nuclear motions on the excited state potential surface, and serve as a excellent illustration for the unprecedented detail that 2D-EV will afford to photochemical reaction dynamics.

  6. Efficient Vibrational Energy Transfer through Covalent Bond in Indigo Carmine Revealed by Nonlinear IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Yu, Pengyun; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Jianping

    2017-10-12

    Ultrafast vibrational relaxation and structural dynamics of indigo carmine in dimethyl sulfoxide were examined using femtosecond pump-probe infrared and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopies. Using the intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded C═O and delocalized C═C stretching modes as infrared probes, local structural and dynamical variations of this blue dye molecule were observed. Energy relaxation of the vibrationally excited C═O stretching mode was found to occur through covalent bond to the delocalized aromatic vibrational modes on the time scale of a few picoseconds or less. Vibrational quantum beating was observed in magic-angle pump-probe, anisotropy, and 2D IR cross-peak dynamics, showing an oscillation period of ca. 1010 fs, which corresponds to the energy difference between the C═O and C═C transition frequency (33 cm-1). This confirms a resonant vibrational energy transfer happened between the two vibrators. However, a more efficient energy-accepting mode of the excited C═O stretching was believed to be a nearby combination and/or overtone mode that is more tightly connected to the C═O species. On the structural aspect, dynamical-time-dependent 2D IR spectra reveal an insignificant inhomogeneous contribution to time-correlation relaxation for both the C═O and C═C stretching modes, which is in agreement with the generally believed structural rigidity of such conjugated molecules.

  7. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 transitions have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region of its ν5-ν4 difference band and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The accuracy of these measurements is estimated to be ranging from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. The 12C2D2 molecules were generated under room temperature by passing 120-150 mTorr D2O vapor through calcium carbide (CaC2) powder. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν4 and ν5 of 12C2D2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2D2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set, which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. New frequency and intensity predictions have been made based on the obtained molecular parameters. The more precise measurements and new predictions reported here will support the analyses of astronomical observations by the future high-resolution spectroscopy telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA, which will work in the terahertz spectral region.

  8. The chemistry of ethylene and hydrogen on Pt(111) monitored with surface vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, P.; Shen, Y.R.; Somorjai, G.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of ethylene have been studied using infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG), a surface vibrational spectroscopy, on the Pt(111) single crystal surface in the v(CH) range. It was found that the dehydrogenation of ethylene to ethylidyne proceeds through an ethylidene (or ethyl) intermediate. The same intermediate was also found to be present in the conversion of both surface vinyl groups and acetylene to ethylidyne. The hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane was examined in situ using SFG over 10 orders of magnitude in pressure. It was found that di-sigma bonded ethylene was readily hydrogenated in UHV at low temperature. Further, di-sigma bonded ethylene was the only species beside ethylidyne found to be present on the Pt(111) surface under conditions of a few Torr of both ethylene and hydrogen at 300K. The surface concentration of di-sigma bonded ethylene on Pt(111) was about 5% of a monolayer under the high pressure conditions.

  9. Olive fruit growth and ripening as seen by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, Macarena; Ayora-Cañada, María José; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2010-01-13

    The aim of this work was to examine the potential of ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopies to evaluate changes happening during the development and maturation of olive fruit. To do this, the spectra of the different parts of the olive (skin, flesh and stone) have been measured at different stages of development. The evolution of different spectral bands has been related to the content of olive constituents like triglycerides, water, carotenoids and phenolic compounds. Oil accumulation can be followed using both FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The increase in bands at 1746 cm(-1) (ATR-FTIR) and 1440 cm(-1) (Raman) correlates well with the oil content in the fruit determined using the standard Soxhlet extraction method. In the case of overripe olives ATR-FTIR does not provide a representative spectrum of the olive flesh due to the accumulation of water on the surface of the ATR crystal. The increase of the content in carotenoids and phenolic compounds during olive growing and their decrease during the ripening phase can be successfully monitored by means of the Raman bands at 1525 and 1605 cm(-1), respectively.

  10. Electron-Induced Vibrational Spectroscopy. A New and Unique Tool To Unravel the Molecular Structure of Polymer Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pireaux, J.J.; Gregoire, Ch.; Caudano, R.; Rei Vilar, M.; Brinkhuis, R.; Schouten, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    Among the surface-sensitive spectroscopies used to characterize clean and surface-modified polymers, one technique has rather recently emerged as a very promising complementary tool. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy, or electron-induced vibrational spectroscopy, has potentially all

  11. Vibrational Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy of Single Acetylene Molecules Adsorbed on Copper (100) Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Chi-Lun

    2015-01-01

    With a 600mk homebuilt UHV STM system, we studied molecular vibration at the solid surface with inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of Acetylene single molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) surface. The identification of vibrational IETS features with normalized conductance change (Δσ/σ) as low as 0.24% in dI2/d2V spectra was demonstrated. Five vibrational modes with energy level at 117.70meV (Δσ/σ =0.42%), 84.07meV (Δσ/σ =0.24%), 58.46meV (Δσ/σ =1.18%), 34.80meV (Δσ/σ =0.65% ) and 22.1...

  12. Communication: Vibrational and vibronic coherences in the two dimensional spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Julian; Falge, Mirjam; Hildenbrand, Heiko; Engel, Volker [Universität Würzburg, Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Emil-Fischer-Str. 42, Campus Nord, Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Gomez, Sandra; Sola, Ignacio R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-28

    We theoretically investigate the photon-echo spectroscopy of coupled electron-nuclear quantum dynamics. Two situations are treated. In the first case, the Born-Oppenheimer (adiabatic) approximation holds. It is then possible to interpret the two-dimensional (2D) spectra in terms of vibrational motion taking place in different electronic states. In particular, pure vibrational coherences which are related to oscillations in the time-dependent third-order polarization can be identified. This concept fails in the second case, where strong non-adiabatic coupling leads to the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer-approximation. Then, the 2D-spectra reveal a complicated vibronic structure and vibrational coherences cannot be disentangled from the electronic motion.

  13. Vibrational Properties of a Monolayer Silicene Sheet Studied by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shaoxiang; Wu, Jiang-bin; Cong, Xin; Li, Wenbin; Gou, Jian; Zhong, Qing; Cheng, Peng; Tan, Ping-heng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2017-11-01

    Combining ultrahigh sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the capability to resolve chemical information, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool to study molecules or nanoscale objects. Here we show that TERS can also be a powerful tool in studying two-dimensional materials. We have achieved a 109 Raman signal enhancement and a 0.5 nm spatial resolution using monolayer silicene on Ag(111) as a prototypical 2D material system. Because of the selective enhancement on Raman modes with vertical vibrational components in TERS, our experiment provides direct evidence of the origination of Raman modes in silicene. Furthermore, the ultrahigh sensitivity of TERS allows us to identify different vibrational properties of silicene phases, which differ only in the bucking direction of the Si-Si bonds. Local vibrational features from defects and domain boundaries in silicene can also be identified.

  14. Process Analytical Techniques Based on In-Line Vibrational Spectroscopy and their Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jednačak, T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Process analytical techniques (PAT involve the monitoring and control of physical and chemical processes as well as the identification of important process parameters in order to obtain the products with desired properties. PAT have been applied in various industrial process phases to ensure better process understanding, quality by optimal design and determination of process disturbances in time. In-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques are one of the major process analytical techniques used today. The most frequently used in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques are near infrared spectroscopy (NIR, attenuated total reflectance middle infrared spectroscopy (ATR-MIR and Raman spectroscopy (Table 1, Figs. 1 and 2. They provide in situ real-time monitoring of the production processes by using different types of in-line probes (Figs. 3–5 which reduce exposure to hazardous materials and contamination, sample degradation or equilibrium perturbations in the reaction system. Due to the aforementioned advantages, in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques have been successfully applied for different industrial pur- poses. The analysis of characteristic vibrational bands in in-line infrared and Raman spectra enable the monitoring of different processes such as crystallization, dissolution, polimorphic transitions and chemical reactions (Scheme 1, Figs. 6 and 7. The obtained data are, due to their complexity, very often further processed by multivariate data analysis methods (Fig. 9, such as principal components analysis (PCA and partial least squares (PLS. The basic principles of PCA and PLS are shown in Fig. 8. A number of different in-line vibrational spectroscopic techniques as well as multivariate data analysis methods have been developed recently, but in this article only the most important and most frequently used techniques are described.   KUI – 7/2013 Received April 10, 2012 Accepted July 18, 2012

  15. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of rotaxane-based molecular machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Panman, Matthijs R; Bakker, Bert H; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio; Buma, Wybren Jan; Brouwer, Albert M; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-15

    It has recently become possible to synthesize mechanical devices the size of a single molecule. Although it is tempting to regard such molecular machines as nanoscale versions of their macroscopic analogs, many notions from macroscopic mechanics no longer apply at a molecular level. For instance, the concept of viscous friction is meaningless for a molecular machine because the size of the solvent molecules that cause the friction is comparable to that of the machine itself. Furthermore, in many cases, the interactions between a molecular machine and its surroundings are comparable to the force driving the machine. As a result, a certain amount of intrinsic randomness exists in the motion of molecular machines, and the details of their mechanics are largely unknown. For a detailed understanding of the mechanical behavior of molecular machines, experiments that probe their motion on an ultrafast time scale, such as two-dimensional (2D) vibrational spectroscopy, are essential. This method uses coupling between vibrational modes in a molecule to investigate the molecular conformation. The coupling shows up as off-diagonal peaks in a 2D graph of the vibrational response of the molecule, analogous to the spin coupling observed in multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Both spin coupling and vibrational coupling are sensitive probes of the molecular conformation, but 2D vibrational spectroscopy shows orders of magnitude better time resolution than NMR. In this Account, we use 2D vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular machines based on rotaxanes. These devices consist of a linear thread and a macrocycle that is noncovalently locked onto the thread. In the rotaxanes we study, the macrocycle and the thread both contain CO and NH groups. By determining the coupling between the stretching modes of these goups from the cross peaks in the 2D spectrum, we directly and quantitatively probe the relative position and orientation of the macrocycle and the thread for both a small

  16. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yisong [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); Brecht, Eric [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Aznavour, Kristen [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); George, Simon J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Bau, Robert [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W. [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States); Jenney, Francis E. Jr. [Georgia Campus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (United States); Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Yoda, Yoshitaka [JASRI (Japan); Cramer, Stephen P., E-mail: spcramer@lbl.gov [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We have applied {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  17. VSI@ESS: Case study for a vibrational spectroscopy instrument at the european spallation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoppi Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron Vibrational Spectroscopy is a well-established experimental technique where elementary excitations at relatively high frequency are detected via inelastic neutron scattering. This technique attracts a high interest in a large fraction of the scientific community in the fields of chemistry, materials science, physics, and biology, since one of its main applications exploits the large incoherent scattering cross section of the proton with respect to all the other elements, whose dynamics can be spectroscopically detected, even if dissolved in very low concentration in materials composed of much heavier atoms. We have proposed a feasibility study for a Vibrational Spectroscopy Instrument (VSI at the European Spallation Source ESS. Here, we will summarize the preliminary design calculations and the corresponding McStas simulation results for a possible ToF, Inverted Geometry, VSI beamline.

  18. Synthesis, conductivity, and vibrational spectroscopy of tetraphenylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Boumediene; Paolone, Annalisa; Villemin, Didier; Taqiyeddine, Moumene; Belarbi, El-habib; Bresson, Serge; Rahmouni, Mustapha; Dhumal, Nilesh R.; Kim, Hyung J.; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-10-01

    The reaction of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide with tetraphenylphosphonium bromide in water leads to the formation of tetraphenylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([PPh4+][(CF3SO2)2N-]). The obtained compound was identified by means of 1H, 13C, 19F and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Although it has a structure similar to ionic liquids, it exhibits a melting point above 100 °C. Besides describing the synthesis, a detailed characterization of its conductivity and vibrational spectroscopic properties is presented. For the latter, FT-Raman and FTIR/ATR spectroscopies are used in the wavenumber range from 150 to 3500 cm-1 and from 600 to 3500 cm-1, respectively. Density functional theory calculations reveal a minor influence of the interionic interactions on the vibrational structure. Consequently, the computational vibrational spectra of the isolated ions show a good agreement with the experimental data. A detailed vibrational assignment is presented. Furthermore, the conductivity data indicate a solid-solid phase transition about 130 K below the melting point.

  19. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  20. Vibrational spectroscopy studies of formalin-fixed cervix tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, C M; Sockalingum, G D; Vadhiraja, B M; Maheedhar, K; Rao, A C K; Rao, L; Venteo, L; Pluot, M; Fernandes, D J; Vidyasagar, M S; Kartha, V B; Manfait, M

    2007-02-15

    Optical histopathology is fast emerging as a potential tool in cancer diagnosis. Fresh tissues in saline are ideal samples for optical histopathology. However, evaluation of suitability of ex vivo handled tissues is necessitated because of severe constraints in sample procurement, handling, and other associated problems with fresh tissues. Among these methods, formalin-fixed samples are shown to be suitable for optical histopathology. However, it is necessary to further evaluate this method from the point of view discriminating tissues with minute biochemical variations. A pilot Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopic studies of formalin-fixed tissues normal, malignant, and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from the same malignant cervix subjects were carried out, with an aim to explore the feasibility of discriminating these tissues, especially the tissues after-2-fractions of radiotherapy from other two groups. Raman and FTIR spectra exhibit large differences for normal and malignant tissues and subtle differences are seen between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Spectral data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) and it provided good discrimination of normal and malignant tissues. PCA of data of three tissues, normal, malignant, and 2-fractions after radiotherapy, gave two clusters corresponding to normal and malignant + after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. A second step of PCA was required to achieve discrimination between malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy tissues. Hence, this study not only further supports the use of formalin-fixed tissues in optical histopathology, especially from Raman spectroscopy point of view, it also indicates feasibility of discriminating tissues with minute biochemical differences such as malignant and after-2-fractions of radiotherapy. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holinga IV, George Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  2. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Investigations of Benzoic Acid Desorption from Sodium and Calcium Montmorillonite Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Tara M; Ingram, Audrey L; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Processes involved in thermal desorption of benzoic acid from sodium and calcium montmorillonite clays are investigated by using variable temperature diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). By monitoring the temperature dependence of infrared absorbance bands while heating samples, subtle changes in molecular vibrations are detected and employed to characterize specific benzoic acid adsorption sites. Abrupt changes in benzoic acid adsorption site properties occur for both clay samples at about 125 °C. Difference spectra absorbance band frequency variations indicate that adsorbed benzoic acid interacts with interlayer cations through water bridges and that these interactions can be disrupted by the presence of organic anions, in particular, benzoate.

  3. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsälä, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-06-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν 1 + ν 2 + ν 3 + ν4 1 + ν5 - 1 in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm-1, the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm-1, and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10-6 cm-1, where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  4. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, J; Nauta, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-06-28

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, ν1+ν2+ν3+ν4 (1)+ν5 (-1) in the normal mode notation. Single-photon transitions to this state from the vibrational ground state are forbidden. Ten lines of the newly measured state are observed and fitted with the linear least-squares method to extract the band parameters. The vibrational term value was measured to be at 9775.0018(45) cm(-1), the rotational parameter B was 1.162 222(37) cm(-1), and the quartic centrifugal distortion parameter D was 3.998(62) × 10(-6) cm(-1), where the numbers in the parenthesis are one-standard errors in the least significant digits.

  5. Study of cancer cell lines with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)/vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uceda Otero, E. P.; Eliel, G. S. N.; Fonseca, E. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    absorption (VA) spectroscopy can be used as a useful tool in medical diagnostics that provides in principle additional information and detail to that which can be obtained/provided from conventional histological studies, and more conventional mass spectroscopic and NMR techniques. The use of high level......In this work we have used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) / vibrational absorption (VA) spectroscopy to study two cancer cell lines: the Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) human cervix carcinoma and 5637 human bladder carcinoma cell lines. Our goal is to experimentally investigate biochemical changes...... and differences in these cells lines utilizing FTIR spectroscopy. We have used the chemometrical and statistical method principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the spectral differences. We have been able to identify certain bands in the spectra which are so-called biomarkers for two types of cell lines...

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopy of He-O_2H^+ and O_2H^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Koichi MT; Jusko, Pavol; Schlemmer, Stephan; Asvany, Oskar

    2017-06-01

    The elusive protonated oxygen, O_2H^+, has been characterized by vibrational action spectroscopy in a cryogenic 22-pole ion trap. On the one hand, the vibrational bands of the tagged He-O_2H^+ have been investigated, using a table-top OPO system for the known OH-stretch^a, whereas the FELIX^b light source has been used to detect the hitherto unknown low-frequency O-O-H bend and O-O stretch. On the other hand, the untagged O_2H^+ has been detected for the first time by high-resolution rovibrational spectroscopy via its ν_1 OH-stretch motion. 38 ro-vibrational fine structure transitions with partly resolved hyperfine satellites were measured (56 resolved lines in total). Spectroscopic parameters were determined by a fit to an asymmetric rotor model with a ^3A'' electronic ground state. The band center is at 3016.73 \\wn, which is in good agreement with experimental^a and ab initio^{c,d} predictions. Based on the spectroscopic parameters, the rotational spectrum is predicted, but not detected yet. ^a S. A. Nizkorodov et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 278, 26, 1997 ^b D. Oepts et al., Infrared Phys. Technol., 36, 297, 1995 ^c S. L. W. Weaver et al., Astrophys. J., 697, 601, 2009 ^d X. Huang and T. J. Lee, J. Chem. Phys., 129, 044312, 2008

  7. An approach to compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy measurements using a commercial sum frequency generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng

    2011-06-21

    In this paper, we designed a compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy system that can be used for recording infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG) and infrared-infrared-visible three-pump-field four-wave-mixing (IIV-TPF-FWM) spectra using a commercial EKSPLA SFG system. This is the first time IIV-TPF-FWM signals were obtained using picosecond laser pulses. We have applied this compatible system to study the surface and vibrational structures of riboflavin molecules (also known as vitamin B2). The SFG spectra of eight polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The signals with incoming s-polarized IR are relatively weaker than the signals with incoming p-polarized IR. Under the double resonant conditions, the SFG signals of the conjugated tricyclic ring are greatly enhanced. For the IIV-TPF-FWM spectra with incoming p-polarized IR, only the sspp and pppp polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The IIV-TPF-FWM spectra show a very strong peak at 1585 cm(-1) that is mainly dominated by the N(5)-C(4a) stretch. The method developed in this study will be helpful for researchers, either using a home-built or commercial (EKSPLA) SFG system, to obtain independent and complementary measurements for SFG spectroscopy and more detailed structural information of interfacial molecules.

  8. Absolute Configuration of 3-METHYLCYCLOHEXANONE by Chiral Tag Rotational Spectroscopy and Vibrational Circular Dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Holdren, Martin S.; Mayer, Kevin J.; Smart, Taylor; West, Channing; Pate, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    The absolute configuration of 3-methylcyclohexanone was established by chiral tag rotational spectroscopy measurements using 3-butyn-2-ol as the tag partner. This molecule was chosen because it is a benchmark measurement for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). A comparison of the analysis approaches of chiral tag rotational spectroscopy and VCD will be presented. One important issue in chiral analysis by both methods is the conformational flexibility of the molecule being analyzed. The analysis of conformational composition of samples will be illustrated. In this case, the high spectral resolution of molecular rotational spectroscopy and potential for spectral simplification by conformational cooling in the pulsed jet expansion are advantages for chiral tag spectroscopy. The computational chemistry requirements for the two methods will also be discussed. In this case, the need to perform conformer searches for weakly bound complexes and to perform reasonably high level quantum chemistry geometry optimizations on these complexes makes the computational time requirements less favorable for chiral tag rotational spectroscopy. Finally, the issue of reliability of the determination of the absolute configuration will be considered. In this case, rotational spectroscopy offers a "gold standard" analysis method through the determination of the ^{13}C-subsitution structure of the complex between 3-methylcyclohexanone and an enantiopure sample of the 3-butyn-2-ol tag.

  9. New solid forms of efavirenz: Synthesis, vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Marcelo M.; Rezende, Carlos A.; Lima, Gabriel C.; Marques, Andressa C. S.; Prado, Lívia D.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Rocha, Helvécio V. A.; Ferreira, Gláucio B.; Resende, Jackson A. L. C.

    2017-06-01

    Efavirenz,(S)-6-chloro-4-(cyclopropylethynyl)-1,4-dihydro-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one, is an anti HIV agent from the class of the non-nucleoside inhibitors of the HIV-1 virus reverse transcriptase. This paper describes the synthesis of two new solvatomorphs of efavirenz (EFV). The results through XRPD and DSC/TG indicate that the new forms undergo a solvent loss over the days, and then return to the original polymorph. Structural and spectral characteristics of EFV were studied by vibrational spectroscopy and quantum chemical methods. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the potential energy curve, optimized geometries and vibrational spectra were carried out using 6-311 + G** basis sets and CAM-B3LYP functional, solid state calculations were also performed using DFT-XGGA (PBE-D3) exchange-correlation functional with the option of mixtures of Gaussian and plane waves method (GPW). Based on these results, the paper discussed the correlation between the vibrational modes and the crystalline structure of the most stable form of EFV. A complete analysis of the experimental infrared and Raman spectra was reported on the basis of the wavenumbers of the vibrational bands and the potential energy distribution.

  10. High Resolution Vibrational Spectroscopy at the Atomic Scale: CO on Au(110) and Cu(100), and C2H2 on Cu(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Jiang, Chilun; Zhang, Yanning; Wu, Ruqian; Ho, Wilson

    2012-11-01

    STM-IETS has been regarded as the ultimate tool to identify and characterize single molecules adsorbed on solid surfaces with atomic spatial resolution. With the improvement of the energy resolution obtained at ˜600 mK, STM-IETS is able to reveal subtle interactions between the molecule and its environment which was previously not possible at higher temperatures. Here we demonstrate the capability of sub-Kelvin STM on detecting the influence of the tip as well as the anisotropy of the reconstructed Au(110) surface on the low energy hindered vibrational motions of single adsorbed CO molecule. In the case of acetylene, more vibrational modes are resolved due to the enhanced spectral resolution. Single molecule vibrational spectroscopy with atomic scale spatial resolution opens new possibilities to probe molecular interactions with high spectral resolution.

  11. Vibration Suppression of Axial Drive High Temperature Superconducting Levitation Synchronous Motor with Magnetic Damper

    OpenAIRE

    村上, 岩範; 陸浦, 優輔; 小林, 祐介; 安藤, 嘉則; 山田, 功; Iwanori, MURAKAMI; Yusuke, MUTSUURA; Yusuke, KOBAYASHI; Yoshinori, ANDO; Kou, YAMADA; 群馬大学; 群馬大学; 群馬大学; 群馬大学; 群馬大学

    2010-01-01

    In this research, we propose the method of the vibration suppression by the magnetic damper system of the axial drive high temperature superconducting levitation synchronous motor. As for this motor, rotor eccentricity causes the vibration though the sway vibratory force by the drive is not generated. Then, we propose an easy magnetic damper system. It consists of four coils. When the rotor vibrates in the radial direction, current flows in the damper coil. It generates the magnetic force. Th...

  12. Temperature measurement in the convective and segregated vibrated bed of powder : A numerical study

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyono, Satoru; Taguchi, Y-h.

    2004-01-01

    In numerically simulated vibrated beds of powder, we measure temperature under convection by the generalized Einstein's relation. The spatial temperature distribution turns out to be quite uniform except for the boundary layers. In addition to this, temperature remains uniform even if segregation occurs. This suggests the possibility that there exists some "thermal equilibrium state" even in a vibrated bed of powder. This finding may lead to a unified view of the dynamic steady state of granu...

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  14. PREDICTION THE EVOLUTION OF TEMPERATURE AND VIBRATIONS ON SPINDLE USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS AND FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Petru GHENCEA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulation spindle behavior in terms of temperature and vibration at higher speeds is more economical and more secure (avoid undesirable mechanical events than testing practice. Testing practice has an important role in finalizing the product but throughout the course of prototype testing is more advantageous economic development simulation parameters based on data sets collected to dangerous speeds. In this paper we present an analysis mode hybrid (artificial neural networks - fuzzy logic on prediction the evolution of temperatures and vibrations at higher speeds for which no measurements were made. The main advantage of the method is the simultaneous prediction of the dynamics of temperature and vibration levels.

  15. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O-D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O-D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O-D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O-D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O-D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O-D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O-D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O-D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We anticipate that this

  16. Body temperature of the parasitic wasp Pimpla turionellae (Hymenoptera) during host location by vibrational sounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroder, Stefan; Samietz, Jörg; Stabentheiner, Anton; Dorn, Silvia

    2008-03-01

    The pupal parasitoid Pimpla turionellae (L.) uses self-produced vibrations transmitted on the plant substrate, so-called vibrational sounding, to locate immobile concealed pupal hosts. The wasps are able to use vibrational sounding reliably over a broad range of ambient temperatures and even show an increased signal frequency and intensity at low temperatures. The present study investigates how control of body temperature in the wasps by endothermic mechanisms may facilitate host location under changing thermal environments. Insect body temperature is measured with real-time IR thermography on plant-stem models at temperature treatments of 10, 18, 26 and 30 °C, whereas behaviour is recorded with respect to vibrational host location. The results reveal a low-level endothermy that likely interferes with vibrational sound production because it occurs only in nonsearching females. At the lowest temperature of 10 °C, the thoracic temperature is 1.15 °C warmer than the ambient surface temperature whereas, at the high temperatures of 26 and 30 ° C, the wasps cool down their thorax by 0.29 and 0.47 °C, respectively, and their head by 0.45 and 0.61 °C below ambient surface temperature. By contrast, regardless of ambient temperature, searching females always have a slightly elevated body temperature of at most 0.30 °C above the ambient surface temperature. Behavioural observations indicate that searching females interrupt host location more frequently at suboptimal temperatures, presumably due to the requirements of thermoregulation. It is assumed that both mechanisms, producing vibrations for host location and low-level endothermy, are located in the thorax. Endothermy by thoracic muscle work probably disturbs signal structure of vibrational sounding, so the processes cannot be used at the same time.

  17. A Summary Review of Correlations between Temperatures and Vibration Properties of Long-Span Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Dong Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The shift of modal parameters induced by temperature fluctuation may mask the changes of vibration properties caused by structural damage and result in false structural condition identification. Thoroughly understanding the temperature effects on vibration properties of long-span bridges becomes an especially important issue before vibration-based damage detection methodologies are applied in real bridges. This paper presents an overview of current research activities and developments in the field of correlations between temperatures and vibration properties of long-span bridges. The theoretical derivation methods using classical structural dynamics and closed-form formulations are first briefly introduced. Then the trend analysis methods that are intended to extract the degree of variability in vibration property under temperature variation for different bridges by numerical analysis, laboratory test, or field monitoring are reviewed in detail. Following that, the development of quantitative models to quantify the temperature influence on vibration properties is discussed including the linear model, nonlinear model, and learning model. Finally, some promising research efforts for promoting the study of correlations between temperatures and vibration properties of long-span bridges are suggested.

  18. Finite-temperature hydrogen adsorption and desorption thermodynamics driven by soft vibration modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Kim, Yong-Hyun

    2013-08-09

    It has been widely accepted that enhanced dihydrogen adsorption is required for room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured porous materials. Here we report, based on results of first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations, finite-temperature adsorption and desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules that are adsorbed on the metal center of metal-porphyrin-incorporated graphene. We have revealed that the room-temperature hydrogen storage is achievable not only with the enhanced adsorption enthalpy, but also with soft-mode driven vibrational entropy of the adsorbed dihydrogen molecule. The soft vibration modes mostly result from multiple orbital coupling between the hydrogen molecule and the buckled metal center, for example, in Ca-porphyrin-incorporated graphene. Our study suggests that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified with explicitly taking the finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  19. Gold micro- and nano-particles for surface enhanced vibrational spectroscopy of pyridostigmine bromide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolgov, Leonid; Fesenko, Olena; Kavelin, Vladyslav

    2017-01-01

    Triangular gold microprisms and spherical silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands were examined as an active nanostructures for the surface enhanced Raman and infrared spectroscopy. These particles were probed for the detection of pyridostigmine bromide as a safe analog of military...... compound sarin. Raman and infrared spectral bands of the pyridostigmine bromide were measured. Detailed correlation of obtained spectral bands with specific vibrations in pyridostigmine bromide was done. Silica nanoparticles with attached gold nano-islands showed more essential enhancement of the Raman...

  20. Vibrational frequencies of anti-diabetic drug studied by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S. Q.; Li, H.; Xie, L.; Chen, L.; Peng, Y.; Zhu, Y. M.; Li, H.; Dong, P.; Wang, J. T.

    2012-04-01

    By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the absorption spectra of seven anti-diabetic pills have been investigated. For gliquidone, glipizide, gliclazide, and glimepiride, an obvious resonance peak is found at 1.37 THz. Furthermore, to overcome the limit of density functional theory that can analyze the normal mode frequencies of the ground state of organic material, we also present a method that relies on pharmacophore recognition, from which we can obtain the resonance peak at 1.37 THz can be attributed to the vibration of sulfonylurea group. The results indicate that the veracity of density functional theory can be increased by combining pharmacophore recognition.

  1. First-Principles Vibrational Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy of β -Guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, G.; Taverna, D.; Lazzeri, M.; Balan, E.

    2017-07-01

    A general approach to model vibrational electron energy loss spectra obtained using an electron beam positioned away from the specimen is presented. The energy-loss probability of the fast electron is evaluated using first-principles quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) of the dielectric response of the specimen. The validity of the method is assessed using recently measured anhydrous β -guanine, an important molecular solid used by animals to produce structural colors. The good agreement between theory and experiments lays the basis for a quantitative interpretation of this spectroscopy in complex systems.

  2. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  3. Amplitude-temperature analysis of hard rubber by torsional vibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šulc, Petr; Pešek, Luděk; Bula, Vítězslav; Cibulka, Jan; Košina, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 821, č. 2016 (2016), s. 295-302 ISSN 1660-9336 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : hard rubber * torsion vibration * finite deformation * parameter identification Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  4. Variable Temperature Infrared Spectroscopy Studies of Aromatic Acid Adsorbate Effects on Montmorillonite Dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Audrey L; Nickels, Tara M; Maraoulaite, Dalia K; White, Robert L

    2017-02-01

    Molecular interactions between benzoic, salicylic, and acetylsalicylic acids and water contained within montmorillonite clay interlayer spaces are characterized by using variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS). By using sample perturbation and difference spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectral variations resulting from the removal of interlayer water are used to characterize aromatic acid local environment changes. Difference spectra features representing functional group perturbations are correlated with changes in IR absorptions associated with -O-H and -C = O stretching vibrations. Results suggest that adsorbate carboxylic acid functionalities participate in extensive hydrogen bonding and that the strengths of these interactions are diminished when clays are dehydrated. The nature of these interactions and their temperature-dependent properties are found to depend on adsorbate structure and concentration as well as the clay interlayer cation.

  5. Vibrational self-trapping in beta-sheet structures observed with femtosecond nonlinear infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Schwartz, Erik; Koepf, Matthieu; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M; Woutersen, Sander

    2009-09-28

    Self-trapping of NH-stretch vibrational excitations in synthetic beta-sheet helices is observed using femtosecond infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. In a dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, the transient-absorption change upon exciting the NH-stretch mode exhibits a negative absorption change at the fundamental frequency and two positive peaks at lower frequencies. These two induced-absorption peaks are characteristic for a state in which the vibrational excitation is self-trapped on essentially a single NH-group in the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, forming a small (Holstein) vibrational polaron. By engineering the structure of the polymer we can disrupt the hydrogen-bonded NH...OC chain, allowing us to eliminate the self-trapping, as is confirmed from the NH-stretch pump-probe response. We also investigate a trialanine-based beta-sheet helix, where each side chain participates in two NH...OC chains with different hydrogen-bond lengths. The chain with short hydrogen bonds shows the same self-trapping behavior as the dialanine-based beta-sheet helix, whereas in the chain with long hydrogen bonds the self-trapping is too weak to be observable.

  6. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  7. Solid-state transformation of the pseudopolymorphic forms of codeine phosphate hemihydrate and codeine phosphate sesquihydrate monitored by vibrational spectroscopy and thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruševski, Gjorgji; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Makreski, Petre

    2011-05-01

    The results from the first study on the pseudopolymorphism and solid-state transformations of codeine phosphate hemihydrate and codeine phosphate sesquihydrate are presented. The vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectra for both studied forms have revealed differences indicating that vibrational spectroscopy could discriminate between pseudopolymorphic forms of these compounds. Coupling the obtained spectroscopic data and the results from the thermoanalytical techniques (TGA/DSC) afforded interpretation of the undergoing solid-state transformations that occur when the compounds are being exposed at increased humidity and/or temperature. It was observed that, at room temperature, the hemihydrate and the sesquihydrate forms are the only sufficiently stable pseudopolymorphs of codeine phosphate explaining their intense pharmaceutical application.

  8. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Colloidal Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts: Disordering versus Removal of Organic Capping

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2012-08-23

    Recent work with nanoparticle catalysts shows that size and shape control on the nanometer scale influences reaction rate and selectivity. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying heterogeneous catalysis because it enables the observation of surface intermediates during catalytic reactions. To control the size and shape of catalytic nanoparticles, an organic ligand was used as a capping agent to stabilize nanoparticles during synthesis. However, the presence of an organic capping agent presents two major challenges in SFG and catalytic reaction studies: it blocks a significant fraction of active surface sites and produces a strong signal that prevents the detection of reaction intermediates with SFG. Two methods for cleaning Pt nanoparticles capped with poly (vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) are examined in this study: solvent cleaning and UV cleaning. Solvent cleaning leaves more PVP intact and relies on disordering with hydrogen gas to reduce the SFG signal of PVP. In contrast, UV cleaning depends on nearly complete removal of PVP to reduce SFG signal. Both UV and solvent cleaning enable the detection of reaction intermediates by SFG. However, solvent cleaning also yields nanoparticles that are stable under reaction conditions, whereas UV cleaning results in aggregation during reaction. The results of this study indicate that solvent cleaning is more advantageous for studying the effects of nanoparticle size and shape on catalytic selectivity by SFG vibrational spectroscopy. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chemical Species in Silicon and Silicon-Rich Nitride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill O. Bugaev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational properties of hydrogenated silicon-rich nitride (SiN:H of various stoichiometry (0.6≤≤1.3 and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H films were studied using Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furnace annealing during 5 hours in Ar ambient at 1130∘C and pulse laser annealing were applied to modify the structure of films. Surprisingly, after annealing with such high-thermal budget, according to the FTIR data, the nearly stoichiometric silicon nitride film contains hydrogen in the form of Si–H bonds. From analysis of the FTIR data of the Si–N bond vibrations, one can conclude that silicon nitride is partly crystallized. According to the Raman data a-Si:H films with hydrogen concentration 15% and lower contain mainly Si–H chemical species, and films with hydrogen concentration 30–35% contain mainly Si–H2 chemical species. Nanosecond pulse laser treatments lead to crystallization of the films and its dehydrogenization.

  10. Laser-Doppler vibrating tube densimeter for measurements at high temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Ai; Akutsu, Makoto; Ono, Takumi; Kanno, Akihiro; Hoshina, Taka-aki; Ota, Masaki; Watanabe, Masaru; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2007-11-01

    A laser-Doppler vibrometer was used to measure the vibration of a vibrating tube densimeter for measuring P-V-T data at high temperatures and pressures. The apparatus developed allowed the control of the residence time of the sample so that decomposition at high temperatures could be minimized. A function generator and piezoelectric crystal was used to excite the U-shaped tube in one of its normal modes of vibration. Densities of methanol-water mixtures are reported for at 673 K and 40 MPa with an uncertainty of 0.009 g/cm3.

  11. Conformational Heterogeneity in the Michaelis Complex of Lactate Dehydrogenase: An Analysis of Vibrational Spectroscopy Using Markov and Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoliang; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-14

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate. Recent isotope-edited IR spectroscopy suggests that conformational heterogeneity exists within the Michaelis complex of LDH, and this heterogeneity affects the propensity toward the on-enzyme chemical step for each Michaelis substate. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with Markov and hidden Markov models, we obtained a detailed kinetic network of the substates of the Michaelis complex of LDH. The ensemble-average electric fields exerted onto the vibrational probe were calculated to provide a direct comparison with the vibrational spectroscopy. Structural features of the Michaelis substates were also analyzed on atomistic scales. Our work not only clearly demonstrates the conformational heterogeneity in the Michaelis complex of LDH and its coupling to the reactivities of the substates, but it also suggests a methodology to simultaneously resolve kinetics and structures on atomistic scales, which can be directly compared with the vibrational spectroscopy.

  12. Determination of excitation temperature and vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2}(C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state in Ne-N{sub 2} RF discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, N U; Naveed, M A; Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, F U [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan)

    2008-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of neon mixing on the excitation and vibrational temperatures of the second positive system in nitrogen plasma generated by a 13.56 MHz RF generator. The excitation temperature is determined from Ne I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot. The overpopulation of the levels of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') states with neon mixing are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the second positive system of nitrogen molecules. The vibrational temperature is calculated for the sequence {delta}{nu} = -2, with the assumption that it follows Boltzmann's distribution. But due to overpopulation of levels, e.g. 1, 4, a linearization process was employed for such distributions allowing us to calculate the vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state. It is found that the excitation temperature as well as the vibrational temperature of the second positive system can be raised significantly by mixing neon with nitrogen plasma. It is also found that the vibrational temperature increases with power and pressure up to 0.5 mbar.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy-Infrared Spectroscopy of Individual Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Subdiffraction Limit Vibrational Spectroscopy and Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Amy L; Kirpes, Rachel M; Merzel, Rachel L; Pratt, Kerri A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-09-05

    Chemical analysis of atmospheric aerosols is an analytical challenge, as aerosol particles are complex chemical mixtures that can contain hundreds to thousands of species in attoliter volumes at the most abundant sizes in the atmosphere (∼100 nm). These particles have global impacts on climate and health, but there are few methods available that combine imaging and the detailed molecular information from vibrational spectroscopy for individual particles <500 nm. Herein, we show the first application of atomic force microscopy with infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) to detect trace organic and inorganic species and probe intraparticle chemical variation in individual particles down to 150 nm. By detecting photothermal expansion at frequencies where particle species absorb IR photons from a tunable laser, AFM-IR can study particles smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Combining strengths of AFM (ambient pressure, height, morphology, and phase measurements) with photothermal IR spectroscopy, the potential of AFM-IR is shown for a diverse set of single-component particles, liquid-liquid phase separated particles (core-shell morphology), and ambient atmospheric particles. The spectra from atmospheric model systems (ammonium sulfate, sodium nitrate, succinic acid, and sucrose) had clearly identifiable features that correlate with absorption frequencies for infrared-active modes. Additionally, molecular information was obtained with <100 nm spatial resolution for phase separated particles with a ∼150 nm shell and 300 nm core. The subdiffraction limit capability of AFM-IR has the potential to advance understanding of particle impacts on climate and health by improving analytical capabilities to study water uptake, heterogeneous reactivity, and viscosity.

  14. The Application of Vibrational Spectroscopy Techniques in the Qualitative Assessment of Material Traded as Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxleene Sandasi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The name “ginseng” is collectively used to describe several plant species, including Panax ginseng (Asian/Oriental ginseng, P. quinquefolius (American ginseng, P. pseudoginseng (Pseudoginseng and Eleutherococcus senticosus (Siberian ginseng, each with different applications in traditional medicine practices. The use of a generic name may lead to the interchangeable use or substitution of raw materials which poses quality control challenges. Quality control methods such as vibrational spectroscopy-based techniques are here proposed as fast, non-destructive methods for the distinction of four ginseng species and the identification of raw materials in commercial ginseng products. Certified ginseng reference material and commercial products were analysed using hyperspectral imaging (HSI, mid-infrared (MIR and near-infrared (NIR spectroscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA and (orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis models (OPLS-DA were developed using multivariate analysis software. UHPLC-MS was used to analyse methanol extracts of the reference raw materials and commercial products. The holistic analysis of ginseng raw materials revealed distinct chemical differences using HSI, MIR and NIR. For all methods, Eleutherococcus senticosus displayed the greatest variation from the three Panax species that displayed closer chemical similarity. Good discrimination models with high R2X and Q2 cum vales were developed. These models predicted that the majority of products contained either /P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius. Vibrational spectroscopy and HSI techniques in tandem with multivariate data analysis tools provide useful alternative methods in the authentication of ginseng raw materials and commercial products in a fast, easy, cost-effective and non-destructive manner.

  15. Structure of the ethylammonium nitrate surface: an X-ray reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niga, Petru; Wakeham, Deborah; Nelson, Andrew; Warr, Gregory G; Rutland, Mark; Atkin, Rob

    2010-06-01

    X-ray reflectivity and vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy are used to probe the structure of the ethylammonium nitrate (EAN)-air interface. X-ray reflectivity reveals that the EAN-air interface is structured and consists of alternating nonpolar and charged layers that extend 31 A into the bulk. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy reveals interfacial cations have their ethyl moieties oriented toward air, with the CH(3) C(3) axis positioned approximately 36.5 degrees from interface normal. This structure is invariant between 15 and 51 degrees C. On account of its molecular symmetry, the orientation of the nitrate anion cannot be determined with certainty.

  16. Intermolecular vibrational modes and H-bond interactions in crystalline urea investigated by terahertz spectroscopy and theoretical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yonghong; Li, Zhi; Liu, Jianjun; Hu, Cong; Zhang, Huo; Qin, Binyi; Wu, Yifang

    2018-01-01

    The characteristic absorption spectra of crystalline urea in 0.6-1.8 THz region have been measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy at room temperature experimentally. Five broad absorption peaks were observed at 0.69, 1.08, 1.27, 1.47 and 1.64 THz respectively. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed for the isolated urea molecule, and there is no infrared intensity in the region below 1.8 THz. This means that single molecule calculations are failure to predict the experimental spectra of urea crystals. To simulate these spectra, calculations on a cluster of seven urea molecules using M06-2X and B3LYP-D3 are performed, and we found that M06-2X perform better. The observed THz vibrational modes are assigned to bending and torsional modes related to the intermolecular H-bond interactions with the help of potential energy distribution (PED) method. Using the reduced-density-gradient (RDG) analysis, the positions and types of intermolecular H-bond interactions in urea crystals are visualized. Therefore, we can confirm that terahertz spectroscopy can be used as an effective means to detect intermolecular H-bond interactions in molecular crystals.

  17. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source...... and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A–X (0......, 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A–X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring...

  18. Sample presentation, sources of error and future perspectives on the application of vibrational spectroscopy in the wine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    Vibrational spectroscopy encompasses a number of techniques and methods including ultra-violet, visible, Fourier transform infrared or mid infrared, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The use and application of spectroscopy generates spectra containing hundreds of variables (absorbances at each wavenumbers or wavelengths), resulting in the production of large data sets representing the chemical and biochemical wine fingerprint. Multivariate data analysis techniques are then required to handle the large amount of data generated in order to interpret the spectra in a meaningful way in order to develop a specific application. This paper focuses on the developments of sample presentation and main sources of error when vibrational spectroscopy methods are applied in wine analysis. Recent and novel applications will be discussed as examples of these developments. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Polycrystalline powder of BaSnO3 was prepared at 1300 ◦C using a high-temperature solid-state reac- tion technique. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of a single-phase cubic structure with lattice parameter: a = (4·1158 ± 0·0003) Å. The synthesized powder was characterized using X-ray diffraction ...

  20. Hybrid Vibration Control under Broadband Excitation and Variable Temperature Using Viscoelastic Neutralizer and Adaptive Feedforward Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. O. Marra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibratory phenomena have always surrounded human life. The need for more knowledge and domain of such phenomena increases more and more, especially in the modern society where the human-machine integration becomes closer day after day. In that context, this work deals with the development and practical implementation of a hybrid (passive-active/adaptive vibration control system over a metallic beam excited by a broadband signal and under variable temperature, between 5 and 35°C. Since temperature variations affect directly and considerably the performance of the passive control system, composed of a viscoelastic dynamic vibration neutralizer (also called a viscoelastic dynamic vibration absorber, the associative strategy of using an active-adaptive vibration control system (based on a feedforward approach with the use of the FXLMS algorithm working together with the passive one has shown to be a good option to compensate the neutralizer loss of performance and generally maintain the extended overall level of vibration control. As an additional gain, the association of both vibration control systems (passive and active-adaptive has improved the attenuation of vibration levels. Some key steps matured over years of research on this experimental setup are presented in this paper.

  1. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong; Kong, Chengdong; Aldén, Marcus; Salewski, Mirko; Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Li, Zhongshan

    2017-08-21

    Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A-X (0, 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A-X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring the instantaneous length of the plasma column, the discharge voltage and the translational temperature, from which the electron temperature (Te) of the gliding arc discharge was estimated. The uncertainties of the translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures were analyzed. The relations of these four different temperatures (Te>Tv>Tr >Tt) suggest a high-degree non-equilibrium state of the gliding arc discharge.

  2. Extremely slow intramolecular vibrational redistribution: Direct observation by time-resolved raman spectroscopy in trifluoropropyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied the dynamics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) from the initially excited mode v1 ≈ 3330 cm-1 (acetylene-type H-C bond) in H-C≡C-CF3 molecules in the gaseous phase by means of anti-Stokes spontaneous Raman scattering. The time constant of this process is estimated as 2.3 ns—this is the slowest IVR time reported so far for the room-temperature gases. It is suggested that so long IVR time with respect to the other propyne derivatives can be explained by a larger defect, in this case, of the Fermi resonance of v1 with v2 + 2v7—the most probable doorway state leading to IVR from v1 to the bath of all vibrational-rotational states with the close energies. In addition, it is shown that the observed dynamics is in agreement with a theoretical model assuming strong vibrational-rotational mixing.

  3. Excitonic, vibrational, and van der Waals interactions in electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, T; Miyata, T; Olovsson, W

    2017-09-01

    The pioneer, Ondrej L. Krivanek, and his collaborators have opened up many frontiers for the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and they have demonstrated new potentials of the EELS method for investigating materials. Here, inspired by those achievements, we show further potentials of EELS based on the results of theoretical calculations, that is excitonic and van der Waals (vdW) interactions, as well as vibrational information of materials. Concerning the excitonic interactions, we highlight the importance of the two-particle calculation to reproduce the low energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), the Na-L 2,3 edge of NaI and the Li-K edge of LiCl and LiFePO 4 . Furthermore, an unusually strong excitonic interaction at the O-K edge of perovskite oxides, SrTiO 3 and LaAlO 3 , is shown. The effect of the vdW interaction in the ELNES is also investigated, and we observe that the magnitude of the vdW effect is approximately 0.1eV in the case of the ELNES from a solid and liquid, whereas its effect is almost negligible in the case of the ELNES from the gaseous phase owing to the long inter-molecular distance. In addition to the "static" information, the influence of the "dynamic" behavior of atoms in materials to EELS is also investigated. We show that measurements of the infrared spectrum are possible by using a modern monochromator system. Furthermore, an estimation of the atomic vibration in core-loss ELNES is also presented. We show the acquisition of vibrational information using the ELNES of liquid methanol and acetic acid, solid Al 2 O 3 , and oxygen gas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vibrational two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) study of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Isao

    2017-12-01

    A tutorial is provided for the generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS), which is applicable to the vibrational spectroscopic study of proteins and related systems. In 2DCOS, similarity or dissimilarity among variations of spectroscopic intensities, which are induced by applying an external perturbation to the sample, is examined by constructing correlation spectra defined by two independent spectral variable axes. By spreading congested or overlapped peaks along the second dimension, apparent spectral resolution is enhanced and interpretation of complex spectra becomes simplified. A set of simple rules for the intensities and signs of correlation peaks is used to extract insightful information. Simulated IR spectra for a model protein are used to demonstrate the specific utility of 2DCOS. Additional tools useful in the 2DCOS analysis of proteins, such as data segmentation assisted with moving-window analysis, 2D codistribution analysis, Pareto scaling, and null-space projection are also discussed.

  5. Exchanging conformations of a hydroformylation catalyst structurally characterized using two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Vos, Jannie; Bocokić, Vladica; Bellini, Rosalba; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost H N; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-12-16

    Catalytic transition-metal complexes often occur in several conformations that exchange rapidly (vibrational spectroscopy, a method that can be applied to any catalyst provided that the exchange between its conformers occurs on a time scale of a few picoseconds or slower. We find that, in one of the conformations, the OC-Rh-CO angle deviates significantly from the canonical value in a trigonal-bipyramidal structure. On the basis of complementary density functional calculations, we ascribe this effect to attractive van der Waals interaction between the CO and the xantphos ligand.

  6. Theoretical study of sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy on limonene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ren-Hui, E-mail: zrh@iccas.ac.cn; Liu, Hao; Jing, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Bo-Yang; Shi, Qiang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Structural Chemistry of Unstable and Stable Species, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Wen-Mei [Department of Chemistry, College of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China)

    2014-03-14

    By combining molecule dynamics (MD) simulation and quantum chemistry computation, we calculate the surface sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy (SFVS) of R-limonene molecules at the gas-liquid interface for SSP, PPP, and SPS polarization combinations. The distributions of the Euler angles are obtained using MD simulation, the ψ-distribution is between isotropic and Gaussian. Instead of the MD distributions, different analytical distributions such as the δ-function, Gaussian and isotropic distributions are applied to simulate surface SFVS. We find that different distributions significantly affect the absolute SFVS intensity and also influence on relative SFVS intensity, and the δ-function distribution should be used with caution when the orientation distribution is broad. Furthermore, the reason that the SPS signal is weak in reflected arrangement is discussed.

  7. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  8. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Frei, Heinz

    2017-05-01

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. Combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  9. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  10. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy using quantum cascade laser and laser Doppler vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Hu, Qi; Xie, Jiecheng; Fu, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a controllable laboratory environment. Hence, this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment in short and long standoff distances demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for chemical detection in an open environment.

  11. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of CO Ro-Vibrational Absorption Lines toward the Obscured AGN IRAS 08572+3915

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, Mai; Nakagawa, Takao; Usuda, Tomonori; Goto, Miwa; Suto, Hiroshi; Geballe, Thomas R.

    2013-02-01

    We present high-resolution spectroscopy of gaseous CO absorption in the fundamental ro-vibrational band toward the heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) IRAS 08572+3915. We have detected absorption lines up to highly excited rotational levels (J ≤ 17). The velocity profiles reveal three distinct components, the strongest and broadest (Δυ > 200 km s-1) of which is due to blueshifted (-160 km s-1) gas at a temperature of ˜270 K absorbing at velocities as high as -400 km s-1. A much weaker but even warmer (˜700 K) component, which is highly redshifted (+100 km s-1), is also detected, in addition to a cold (˜20 K) component centered at the systemic velocity of the galaxy. On the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium, the column density of CO in the 270 K component is NCO ˜4.5 × 1018 cm-2, which in fully molecular gas corresponds to an H2 column density of NH2 ˜ 2.5 × 1022 cm-2. The thermal excitation of CO up to the observed high rotational levels requires a density greater than nc (H2) > 2 × 107cm-3, implying that the thickness of the warm absorbing layer is extremely small (Δd warm components, as well as their temperatures, indicate that they originate in molecular clouds near the central engine of the AGN.

  13. Decoding Nucleation and Growth of Zeolitic Imidazolate Framework Thin Films with Atomic Force Microscopy and Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Zafer; Filez, Matthias; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2017-08-10

    The synthesis of metal-organic framework (MOF) thin films has garnered significant attention during the past decade. By better understanding the parameters governing the nucleation and growth of such thin films, their properties can be rationally tuned, empowering their application as (reactive) membranes. Here, a combined AFM-vibrational spectroscopy research strategy is employed to detail the chemistries governing the nucleation and growth of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) thin films, in particular isostructural Co-ZIF-67 and Zn-ZIF-8. First, a single step direct synthesis approach is used to investigate the influence of different synthesis parameters -metal/linker ratio, temperature, and metal type- on the thin film nucleation and growth behaviour. While the metal/linker ratio has a pronounced effect on the thin film nucleation rate, the temperature mainly influences the growth kinetics of nuclei forming the thin film. In addition, the nucleation and growth of ZIF thin films is shown to be highly dependent on the electronegativity of the metal type. Thin-film thickness control can be achieved by using a multistep synthesis strategy, implying repetitive applications of single step deposition under identical synthesis conditions, for which a growth mechanism is proposed. This study provides insight into the influence of synthesis parameters on the ZIF thin film properties, using tools at hand to rationally tune MOF thin film properties. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy and microscopic imaging: novel approaches for comparing barrier physical properties in native and human skin equivalents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guo; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging have been used to compare barrier properties in human skin, porcine skin, and two human skin equivalents, Epiderm 200X with an enhanced barrier and Epiderm 200 with a normal barrier. Three structural characterizations were performed. First, chain packing and conformational order were compared in isolated human stratum corneum (SC), isolated porcine SC, and in the Epiderm 200X surface layers. The infrared (IR) spectrum of isolated human SC revealed a large proportion of orthorhombically packed lipid chains at physiological temperatures along with a thermotropic phase transition to a state with hexagonally packed chains. In contrast, the lipid phase at physiological temperatures in both porcine SC and in Epiderm 200X, although dominated by conformationally ordered chains, lacked significant levels of orthorhombic subcell packing. Second, confocal Raman imaging of cholesterol bands showed extensive formation of cholesterol-enriched pockets within the human skin equivalents (HSEs). Finally, IR imaging tracked lipid barrier dimensions as well as the spatial disposition of ordered lipids in human SC and Epiderm 200X. These approaches provide a useful set of experiments for exploring structural differences between excised human skin and HSEs, which in turn may provide a rationale for the functional differences observed among these preparations.

  15. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Na-carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Federico; Carli, Cristian; De Angelis, Simone; Beck, Pierre; Brissaud, Olivier; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Piccioni, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The surfaces of the Galilean icy satellites Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, dominated by water ice, also show substantial amounts of non-water-ice compounds. These satellites will be the subject of close exploration by the ESA JUICE mission and the NASA Europa Multiple-Flyby Mission, which will focus on Ganymede and Europa, respectively. Among non-water-ice compounds thought to exist on the surfaces of the Jovian icy satellites, hydrated salt minerals have been proposed to exist as a by-product of endogenic processes. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on laboratory spectroscopic analysis of these materials carried out under appropriate environmental conditions. Here we report on laboratory measurements, carried out in the framework of a Europlanet Transnational Access (TA) 2020 proposal approved in 2016, on two hydrated sodium carbonates, namely sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3·1H2O) and sodium carbonate decahydrate (Na2CO3·10H2O). Spectral profiles of these compounds were obtained in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral domain, taking advantage of the Cold Surfaces spectroscopy facility at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG), where such compounds can be measured under cryogenic conditions indicative of real planetary surfaces. Carbonates were first sieved so as to separate them in three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm, and 125-150 μm. These grain sizes have been chosen to: (1) be indicative of typical regoliths known or expected to exist on the surface of the icy satellites, and (2) avoid overlapping between ranges, therefore minimizing particles contamination among the dimensional classes. Each grain size was then measured with the Spectro-Gonio-Radiometer facility in the overall 0.5-4.0 μm spectral range, with spectral sampling increasing with increasing wavelength. For each sample, the overall 93-279 K temperature ramp was acquired in 11 steps varying from 10 K to 25 K, imposed by time

  16. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  17. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  18. Combining surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy to study biological interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Jasensky, Joshua; Wu, Jing; Chen, Zhan

    2014-03-01

    A multimodal system combining surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and total-internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for surface and interface study was developed. Interfacial molecular structural information can be detected using SFG spectroscopy while interfacial fluorescence signal can be visualized using TIRF microscopy from the same sample. As a proof of concept experiment, SFG spectra of fluorescent polystyrene (PS) beads with different surface coverage were correlated with TIRF signal observed. Results showed that SFG signals from the ordered surfactant methyl groups were detected from the substrate surface, while signals from PS phenyl groups on the beads were not seen. Additionally, a lipid monolayer labeled using lipid-associated dye was deposited on a silica substrate and studied in different environments. The contact with water of this lipid monolayer caused SFG signal to disappear, indicating a possible lipid molecular disorder and the formation of lipid bilayers or liposomes in water. TIRF was able to visualize the presence of lipid molecules on the substrate, showing that the lipids were not removed from the substrate surface by water. The integration of the two surface sensitive techniques can simultaneously visualize interfacial molecular dynamics and characterize interfacial molecular structures in situ, which is important and is expected to find extensive applications in biological interface related research.

  19. Time-Resolved Kinetic Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy in a Room-Temperature Flow Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J; Ruscic, Branko; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-12-11

    Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy is a potentially powerful tool for studying chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics. Branching ratios of multiple reaction products and intermediates can be measured with unprecedented chemical specificity; molecular isomers, conformers, and vibrational states have distinct rotational spectra. Here we demonstrate chirped-pulse spectroscopy of vinyl cyanide photoproducts in a flow tube reactor at ambient temperature of 295 K and pressures of 1-10 μbar. This in situ and time-resolved experiment illustrates the utility of this novel approach to investigating chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics. Following 193 nm photodissociation of CH2CHCN, we observe rotational relaxation of energized HCN, HNC, and HCCCN photoproducts with 10 μs time resolution and sample the vibrational population distribution of HCCCN. The experimental branching ratio HCN/HCCCN is compared with a model based on RRKM theory using high-level ab initio calculations, which were in turn validated by comparisons to Active Thermochemical Tables enthalpies.

  20. Ultrafast dynamics in iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; Newton, Arthur C; Vos, Jannie; van den Bosch, Bart; Bocokić, Vladica; Reek, Joost N H; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-01-28

    The dynamics of iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes has been investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Cross peaks between all CO-stretching bands show that the CO-stretch modes are coupled, and from the cross-peak anisotropies we can confirm previous assignments of the absorption bands. From the pump-probe delay dependence of the diagonal peaks in the 2D-IR spectrum we obtain a correlation time of ∼3 ps for the spectral fluctuations of the CO-stretch modes. We observe a multi-exponential pump-probe delay dependence of the cross-peak intensities, with rate constants ranging from 0.1 ps(-1) to 0.6 ps(-1). To determine whether this delay dependence originates from fluxionality of the complex or from intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR), we modulate the free-energy barrier of fluxional rearrangement by varying the pi-backbonding capacities of the olefin ligand in two iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes: Fe(CO)(4)(cinnamic acid) and Fe(CO)(4)(dimethyl fumarate). Since the pi-backbonding strongly influences the rate of fluxionality, comparing the dynamics in the two complexes allows us to determine to what extent the observed dynamics is caused by fluxionality. We conclude that on the time scale of our experiments (up to 100 ps) the cross-peak dynamics in the iron complexes is determined by intramolecular vibrational energy relaxation. Hence, in contrast to previously investigated irontricarbonyl and ironpentacarbonyl complexes, iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes exhibit no fluxionality on the picosecond time scale.

  1. Vibrational Surface Electron-Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Probes Confined Surface-Phonon Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lourenço-Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, two reports [Krivanek et al. Nature (London 514, 209 (2014NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature13870, Lagos et al. Nature (London 543, 529 (2017NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature21699] have demonstrated the amazing possibility to probe vibrational excitations from nanoparticles with a spatial resolution much smaller than the corresponding free-space phonon wavelength using electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS. While Lagos et al. evidenced a strong spatial and spectral modulation of the EELS signal over a nanoparticle, Krivanek et al. did not. Here, we show that discrepancies among different EELS experiments as well as their relation to optical near- and far-field optical experiments [Dai et al. Science 343, 1125 (2014SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1246833] can be understood by introducing the concept of confined bright and dark surface phonon modes, whose density of states is probed by EELS. Such a concise formalism is the vibrational counterpart of the broadly used formalism for localized surface plasmons [Ouyang and Isaacson Philos. Mag. B 60, 481 (1989PMABDJ1364-281210.1080/13642818908205921, García de Abajo and Aizpurua Phys. Rev. B 56, 15873 (1997PRBMDO0163-182910.1103/PhysRevB.56.15873, García de Abajo and Kociak Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 106804 (2008PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.106804, Boudarham and Kociak Phys. Rev. B 85, 245447 (2012PRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.85.245447]; it makes it straightforward to predict or interpret phenomena already known for localized surface plasmons such as environment-related energy shifts or the possibility of 3D mapping of the related surface charge densities [Collins et al. ACS Photonics 2, 1628 (2015APCHD52330-402210.1021/acsphotonics.5b00421].

  2. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes.

  3. A study of the eigenvectors of the vibrational modes in crystalline cytidine via high-pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline cytidine at 295 K and high pressures by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency ω with respect to pressure P: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials have strong intramolecular bonds and weak intermolecular bonds. This hierarchy of bonding strengths causes the vibrational optical modes localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) to be relatively high in frequency while the modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes) have relatively low frequencies. The value of the logarithmic derivative is a useful diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes because stretching modes (which are predominantly internal to the molecule) have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. In crystalline cytidine, the modes at 85.8, 101.4, and 110.6 cm(-1) are external in which the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in either translational or librational motions (or some linear combination thereof). All of the modes above 320 cm(-1) are predominantly internal stretching modes. The remaining modes below 320 cm(-1) include external modes and internal modes, mostly involving either torsional or bending motions of groups of atoms within a molecule.

  4. Vinylphosphine-borane: synthesis, gas phase infrared spectroscopy, and quantum chemical vibrational calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Brahim; Guillemin, Jean-Claude; Benidar, Abdessamad; Bégué, Didier; Pouchan, Claude

    2008-12-14

    Both experimental and theoretical investigations are reported on the infrared spectrum of vinylphosphine-borane (CH(2)=CHPH(2) x BH(3)), a donor-acceptor complex. The gas phase infrared spectra (3500-600 cm(-1)) have been recorded at 0.5 cm(-1) resolution. This first primary alpha,beta-unsaturated phosphine-borane synthesized up to now is kinetically very unstable in the gas phase and decomposes rapidly into two fragments: the free vinylphosphine CH(2)=CHPH(2) and the monoborane BH(3) which dimerizes to form the more stable diborane B(2)H(6). Spectra of free CH(2)=CHPH(2) and B(2)H(6) compounds were also recorded to assign some vibration modes of the complex in very dense spectral regions. The analysis was completed by carrying out quantum mechanical calculations by density functional theory method at the B3LYP/6-31+G(**) level. Anharmonic frequencies and infrared intensities of the two predicted gauche and syn conformers of the vinylphosphine-borane complex were calculated in the 3500-100 cm(-1) region with the use of a variational approach, implemented in the P_ANHAR_V1.2 code. Because of the relatively weak interaction between the vinylphosphine and the monoborane, the vibrations of the complex can easily be subdivided into modes localized in the CH(2)=CHPH(2) and BH(3) moieties and into "intermolecular" modes. Localized modes are unambiguously correlated with the modes of the isolated monomers. Therefore, they are described in terms of the monomer vibrations, and the complexation shifts are defined as Delta nu = nu(complex) - nu(monomer) to make the effect of the complexation precise on each localized mode. In this objective, anharmonic frequencies and infrared intensities of the BH(3) monomer and the stable gauche and syn conformers of the free vinylphosphine were obtained at the same level of theory. In the gas phase, only the syn form of the complex was observed and assigned. All theoretically predicted frequencies and complexation shifts in magnitude and

  5. Pulsed differential holographic measurements of vibration modes of high temperature panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evensen, D. A.; Aprahamian, R.; Overoye, K. R.

    1972-01-01

    Holography is a lensless imaging technique which can be applied to measure static or dynamic displacements of structures. Conventional holography cannot be readily applied to measure vibration modes of high-temperature structures, due to difficulties caused by thermal convection currents. The present report discusses the use of pulsed differential holography, which is a technique for recording structural motions in the presence of random fluctuations such as turbulence. An analysis of the differential method is presented, and demonstration experiments were conducted using heated stainless steel plates. Vibration modes were successfully recorded for the heated plates at temperatures of 1000, 1600, and 2000 F. The technique appears promising for such future measurments as vibrations of the space shuttle TPS panels or recording flutter of aeroelastic models in a wind-tunnel.

  6. Ultrafast vibrational energy transfer at the water/air interface revealed by two-dimensional surface vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Piatkowski, L.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2011-01-01

    Water is very different from liquids of similar molecular weight, and one of its unique properties is the very efficient transfer of vibrational energy between molecules, which arises as a result of strong dipole-dipole interactions between the O-H oscillators. Although we have a sound understanding

  7. Structural characterization, vibrational spectroscopy accomplished with DFT calculation, thermal and dielectric behaviors in a new organic-inorganic tertrapropylammonium aquapentachlorostannate dihydrate compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajlaoui, Sondes, E-mail: hajlaouisondes@yahoo.fr [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia); Chaabane, Iskandar [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia); Lhoste, Jérôme; Bulou, Alain [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans, Cedex 9 (France); Guidara, Kamel [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-09-15

    In this work a novel compound tertrapropylammonium aquapentachlorostannate dihydrate was synthesized and characterized by; single crystal X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetric and dielectric measurement. The crystal structure refinement at room temperature reveled that this later belongs to the monoclinic compound with P121/c1 space group with the following unit cell parameters a = 8.2699(3) Å, b = 12.4665(4) Å, c = 22.3341(7) Å and β = 92.94(0)°. The crystal arrangement can be described by stacked organic-inorganic layers in the c direction with two independent water molecules placed between each two layers. The detailed interpretations of the vibrational properties of the studied compound were performed using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP/LanL2DZ basis set, and has enabled us to make the detailed assignments by comparative study of the experimental and calculated Raman and IR spectra. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement disclosed two anomalies in the temperature range 356–376 (T{sub 1}) K and at 393 K (T{sub 2}) characterized by the dehydration of the sample and probably a reconstruction of a new structure after T{sub 2} transition. The temperature dependences of dielectric permittivity show a relaxation process around T{sub 2} anomaly indicating the occurrence of the disorder at high temperature. The dependence of the exponent m(T) on temperature, extracted from the straight lines of log(ε″) with log (ω), suggests that the correlated barrier hopping is the appropriate model for the conduction mechanism. - Highlights: • The single-crystal X-ray diffraction has been performed. • The assignments of the vibration modes based on DFT were reported and discussed. • Differential scanning calorimetric reveals the presence of two endothermic peaks. • The electric permittivity was studied using the impedance measurements. • The CBH is the appropriate model for the conduction

  8. Detection of generator bearing inner race creep by means of vibration and temperature analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Dragiev, Ivaylo G.; Hilmisson, Reynir

    2015-01-01

    Vibration and temperature analysis are the two dominating condition monitoring techniques applied to fault detection of bearing failures in wind turbine generators. Relative movement between the bearing inner ring and generator axle is one of the most severe failure modes in terms of secondary...

  9. Quantum control spectroscopy of vibrational modes: Comparison of control scenarios for ground and excited states in {beta}-carotene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Juergen; Buckup, Tiago [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany); Motzkus, Marcus [Fachbereich Chemie, Physikalische Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Strasse, D-35043 Marburg (Germany)], E-mail: motzkus@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2008-06-23

    Quantum control spectroscopy (QCS) is used as a tool to study, address selectively and enhance vibrational wavepacket motion in large solvated molecules. By contrasting the application of Fourier-limited and phase-modulated excitation on different electronic states, the interplay between the controllability of vibrational coherence and electronic resonance is revealed. We contrast control on electronic ground and excited state by introducing an additional pump beam prior to a DFWM-sequence (Pump-DFWM). Via phase modulation of this initial pump pulse, coherent control is extended to structural evolution on the vibrationally hot ground state (hot-S{sub 0}) and lowest lying excited state (S{sub 1}) of {beta}-carotene. In an open loop setup, the control scenarios for these different electronic states are compared in their effectiveness and mechanism.

  10. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius [Department of Theoretical Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jankowiak, Ryszard [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 213 CBC Building Manhattan, Kansas 66506-0401 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  12. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements.

  13. Crystal growth, crystal structure, vibrational spectroscopy, linear and nonlinear optical properties of guanidinium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Němec, Ivan; Matulková, Irena; Held, Peter; Kroupa, Jan; Němec, Petr; Li, Dongxu; Bohatý, Ladislav; Becker, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Of the three guanidinium phosphates GuH2PO4 (space group P21/c), Gu2HPO4·H2O (space group P 4 bar 21 c) and Gu3PO4· 3/2 H2O (space group Cc) crystal structures and a vibrational spectroscopy study are presented. Large single crystals of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O are grown. Refractive indices and their dispersion in the wavelength range 365 nm - 1083 nm are determined and used for the analysis of phase matching conditions for collinear SHG in the case of the non-centrosymmetric crystals of Gu2HPO4·H2O. The crystals are not phase-matchable within their transmission range. Both independent components of the SHG tensor of Gu2HPO4·H2O, determined by the Maker fringe method, are given, with d14 = 0.23 pm/V and d36 = 0.22 pm/V. In addition, the thermal stability and the anisotropy of thermal expansion of GuH2PO4 and Gu2HPO4·H2O is reported.

  14. An experimental and theoretical study of the synthesis and vibrational spectroscopy of triacetone triperoxide (TATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Londono, Leonardo C.; Pena, Alvaro J.; Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen; Garcia, Rafael; Chamberlain, R. Thomas; Lareau, Richard T.

    2004-09-01

    Non nitrogen containing, organic peroxides explosives Triacetone triperoxide and diacetone diperoxide have been prepared in the laboratory in order to study various aspects of their synthesis and their experimental and theoretical spectroscopic characteristics. By using different proportions of acetone/hydrogen peroxide (Ac/H2O2), sulfuric, hydrochloric and methanosulfuric acids as catalyzers, it was possible to obtain both compounds in a rapid and simple form. Raman, IR spectroscopy, and GC-MS were used in order to determine the precursors, intermediates and final analytes. Experiments and theoretical studies using density functional theory (DFT) have been used in the elucidation step of the mechanism of the synthesis of the so called "transparent" explosives. The B3LYP functional with the 6-31G** basis set was used to carry out the electronic structure calculation of the intermediates and internal rotations and vibrations of TATP. Raman spectra of solid TATP and FTIR spectra of gas TATP, were recorded in order to assign the experimental spectra. Although full agreement with experiment was not obtained, spectral features of the main TATP bands were assigned.

  15. Structure and Dynamics of Urea/Water Mixtures Investigated by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. K.; Buchanan, L. E.; Schmidt, J. R.; Zanni, M. T.; Skinner, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Urea/water is an archetypical “biological” mixture, and is especially well known for its relevance to protein thermodynamics, as urea acts as a protein denaturant at high concentration. This behavior has given rise to an extended debate concerning urea’s influence on water structure. Based on a variety of methods and of definitions of water structure, urea has been variously described as a structure-breaker, a structure-maker, or as remarkably neutral towards water. Because of its sensitivity to microscopic structure and dynamics, vibrational spectroscopy can help resolve these debates. We report experimental and theoretical spectroscopic results for the OD stretch of HOD/H2O/urea mixtures (linear IR, 2DIR, and pump-probe anisotropy decay) and for the CO stretch of urea-D4/D2O mixtures (linear IR only). Theoretical results are obtained using existing approaches for water, and a modification of a frequency map developed for acetamide. All absorption spectra are remarkably insensitive to urea concentration, consistent with the idea that urea only very weakly perturbs water structure. Both this work and experiments by Rezus and Bakker, however, show that water’s rotational dynamics are slowed down by urea. Analysis of the simulations casts doubt on the suggestion that urea immobilizes particular doubly hydrogen bonded water molecules. PMID:23841646

  16. The effect of synthesis temperature on the formation of hydrotalcites in Bayer liquor: a vibrational spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sara J; Frost, Ray L

    2009-07-01

    The seawater neutralization process is currently used in the alumina industry to reduce the pH and dissolved metal concentrations in bauxite refinery residues through the precipitation of Mg, Al, and Ca hydroxide and carbonate minerals. This neutralization method is very similar to the co-precipitation method used to synthesize hydrotalcite (Mg6Al2(OH)16CO3.4H2O). This study looks at the effect of temperature on the type of precipitates that form from the seawater neutralization process of Bayer liquor. The Bayer precipitates have been characterized by a variety of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The mineralogical composition of Bayer precipitates largely includes hydrotalcite, hydromagnesite, and calcium carbonate species. Analysis with XRD determined that Bayer hydrotalcites that are synthesized at 55 degrees C have a larger interlayer distance, indicating that more anions are removed from Bayer liquor. Vibrational spectroscopic techniques have identified an increase in hydrogen bond strength for precipitates formed at 55 degrees C, suggesting the formation of a more stable Bayer hydrotalcite. Raman spectroscopy identified the intercalation of sulfate and carbonate anions into Bayer hydrotalcites using these synthesis conditions.

  17. Room temperature chiral discrimination in paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soncini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization $\\mathbf{P}$ rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. $\\mathbf{140}$, 011103 (2014)], is here generalized to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to $\\mathbf{P}$, varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy$^{3+}$ complexes, at 293K, show that in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules $\\mathbf{P}$ can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  18. Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy using an octave-spanning mid-IR probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, James D; Courtney, Trevor L; Balasubramanian, Madhumitha; Khalil, Munira

    2016-06-15

    The development of coherent Fourier transform two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2D EV) spectroscopy with acousto-optic pulse-shaper-generated near-UV pump pulses and an octave-spanning broadband mid-IR probe pulse is detailed. A 2D EV spectrum of a silicon wafer demonstrates the full experimental capability of this experiment, and a 2D EV spectrum of dissolved hexacyanoferrate establishes the viability of our 2D EV experiment for studying condensed phase molecular ensembles.

  19. Study of calcification formation and disease diagnostics utilising advanced vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, Marleen Maartje

    The accurate and safe diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant societal issue, with annual disease incidence of 48,000 women and around 370 men in the UK. Early diagnosis of the disease allows more conservative treatments and better patient outcomes. Microcalcifications in breast tissue are an important indicator for breast cancers, and often the only sign of their presence. Several studies have suggested that the type of calcification formed may act as a marker for malignancy and its presence may be of biological significance. In this work, breast calcifications are studied with FTIR, synchrotron FTIR, ATR FTIR, and Raman mapping to explore their disease specific composition. From a comparison between vibrational spectroscopy and routine staining procedures it becomes clear that calcium builds up prior to calcification formation. Raman and FTIR indicate the same size for calcifications and are in agreement with routine staining techniques. From the synchrotron FTIR measurements it can be proven that amide is present in the centre of the calcifications and the intensity of the bands depends on the pathology. Special attention is paid to the type of carbonate substitution in the calcifications relating to different pathology grades. In contrast to mammography, Raman spectroscopy has the capability to distinguish calcifications based on their chemical composition. The ultimate goal is to turn the acquired knowledge from the mapping studies into a clinical tool based on deep Raman spectroscopy. Deep Raman techniques have a considerable potential to reduce large numbers of normal biopsies, reduce the time delay between screening and diagnosis and therefore diminish patient anxiety. In order to achieve this, a deep Raman system is designed and after evaluation of its performance tested on buried calcification standards in porcine soft tissue and human mammary tissue. It is shown that, when the calcification is probed through tissue, the strong 960 cm-1 phosphate band

  20. Interpenetrating polymer network membranes for fuel cells: infrared vibrational spectroscopy; Membranes baseadas dm redes polimericas interpenetrantes para celulas a combustivel: estudo por espectroscopia vibracional no infravermelho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Felipe A.M.; Rocco, Ana Maria [Grupo de Materiais Condutores e Energia, Escola de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: amrocco@eq.ufrj.br; Pereira, Robson Pacheco [Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, proton conductive membranes based on IPN matrices doped with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were developed. The characterization by infrared vibrational spectroscopy evidenced the polymerization of DGEBA and the immobilization of PEI chains, originating a structure containing basic sites suitable for proton coordination and conduction. The FTIR characterization evidenced the polymerization of DGEBA in the presence of PEI thus forming Semi-IPN membranes which, after doped with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, exhibited conductivity values of 10{sup -4} W{sup -1}cm{sup -1} at room temperature and 10{sup -3} {omega}{sup -1}cm{sup -1} at 80 degree C, as well as a dependency of conductivity with temperature following the Arrhenius model. The activation energy values (14,33 and 12,96 kJ.mol{sup -1}) indicated a proton conduction mechanism predominantly vehicular in the matrices studied under 100% relative humidity. (author)

  1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Kinetic Study of 2-Methylfuran and 2,5-Dimethylfuran Hydrogenation over 7 nm Platinum Cubic Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Aliaga, Cesar

    2011-04-28

    Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements obtained from gas chromatography were used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (MF) and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) over cubic Pt nanoparticles of 7 nm average size, synthesized by colloidal methods and cleaned by ultraviolet light and ozone treatment. Reactions carried out at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range of 20-120 °C produced dihydro and tetrahydro species, as well as ring-opening products (alcohols) and ring-cracking products, showing high selectivity toward ring opening throughout the entire temperature range. The aromatic rings (MF and DMF) adsorbed parallel to the nanoparticle surface. Results yield insight into various surface reaction intermediates and the reason for the significantly lower selectivity for ring cracking in DMF hydrogenation compared to MF hydrogenation. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Parallelism between gradient temperature raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy (TDR) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur just prior to phase transitions. Herein we apply TDR and D...

  3. Catalyzed hydrogenation of nitrogen and ethylene on metal (Fe, Pt) single crystal surfaces and effects of coadsorption: A sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerberg, Staffan Per Gustav [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure catalytic reactions and associated processes, such as adsorption have been studied on a molecular level on single crystal surfaces. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy together with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Gas Chromatography (GC) were used to investigate the nature of species on catalytic surfaces and to measure the catalytic reaction rates. Special attention has been directed at studying high-pressure reactions and in particular, ammonia synthesis in order to identify reaction intermediates and the influence of adsorbates on the surface during reaction conditions. The adsorption of gases N2, H2, O2 and NH3 that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH2 (~3325 cm-1) and NH (~3235 cm-1) under high pressure of ammonia (200 Torr) on the clean Fe(111) surface. Addition of 0.5 Torr of oxygen to 200 Torr of ammonia does not significantly change the bonding of dissociation intermediates to the surface. However, it leads to a phase change of nearly 180° between the resonant and non-resonant second order non-linear susceptibility of the surface, demonstrated by the reversal of the SFG spectral features. Heating the surface in the presence of 200 Torr ammonia and 0.5 Torr oxygen reduces the oxygen coverage, which can be seen from the SFG spectra as another relative phase change of 180°. The reduction of the oxide is also supported by Auger electron spectroscopy. The result suggests that the phase change of the spectral features could serve as a sensitive indicator of the chemical environment of the adsorbates.

  4. Optical quasi-distributed simultaneous vibration and temperature sensing in stator bars of a 370-MVA electric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Uilian José; Vagner da Silva, Erlon; Martelli, Cicero; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new multiparametric optical fiber transducer applied to an electric generator of 370 MVA. The optical transducer has three multiplexed FBGs in the same optical fiber as the sensing element. The FBG sensors can simultaneously measure both the temperature and vibration independently of the other multiplexed FBGs. The installation in the power plant was performed using six transducers and it was obtained 23 hours of simultaneous vibration and temperature measurement. All the FBGs used to monitor generator vibration were able to monitor the frequency of mechanical and electromagnetic vibrations, which were measured at 2 Hz and 120 Hz, respectively. During the measurement, the machine was turned off due to a failure and all the FBGs sensed temperature changes, as well as frequency vibration changes. The largest temperature difference measured between the FBGs during the test is approximately 2°C.

  5. Temperature dependent equilibrium native to unfolded protein dynamics and properties observed with IR absorption and 2D IR vibrational echo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jean K; Thielges, Megan C; Bowman, Sarah E J; Bren, Kara L; Fayer, M D

    2011-05-04

    Dynamic and structural properties of carbonmonoxy (CO)-coordinated cytochrome c(552) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus (Ht-M61A) at different temperatures under thermal equilibrium conditions were studied with infrared absorption spectroscopy and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) vibrational echo experiments using the heme-bound CO as the vibrational probe. Depending on the temperature, the stretching mode of CO shows two distinct bands corresponding to the native and unfolded proteins. As the temperature is increased from low temperature, a new absorption band for the unfolded protein grows in and the native band decreases in amplitude. Both the temperature-dependent circular dichroism and the IR absorption area ratio R(A)(T), defined as the ratio of the area under the unfolded band to the sum of the areas of the native and unfolded bands, suggest a two-state transition from the native to the unfolded protein. However, it is found that the absorption spectrum of the unfolded protein increases its inhomogeneous line width and the center frequency shifts as the temperature is increased. The changes in line width and center frequency demonstrate that the unfolding does not follow simple two-state behavior. The temperature-dependent 2D IR vibrational echo experiments show that the fast dynamics of the native protein are virtually temperature independent. In contrast, the fast dynamics of the unfolded protein are slower than those of the native protein, and the unfolded protein fast dynamics and at least a portion of the slower dynamics of the unfolded protein change significantly, becoming faster as the temperature is raised. The temperature dependence of the absorption spectrum and the changes in dynamics measured with the 2D IR experiments confirm that the unfolded ensemble of conformers continuously changes its nature as unfolding proceeds, in contrast to the native state, which displays a temperature-independent distribution of structures. © 2011

  6. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy--a powerful tool for the rapid identification of microbial cells at the single-cell level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harz, M; Rösch, P; Popp, J

    2009-02-01

    Rapid microbial detection and identification with a high grade of sensitivity and selectivity is a great and challenging issue in many fields, primarily in clinical diagnosis, pharmaceutical, or food processing technology. The tedious and time-consuming processes of current microbiological approaches call for faster ideally on-line identification techniques. The vibrational spectroscopic techniques IR absorption and Raman spectroscopy are noninvasive methods yielding molecular fingerprint information; thus, allowing for a fast and reliable analysis of complex biological systems such as bacterial or yeast cells. In this short review, we discuss recent vibrational spectroscopic advances in microbial identification of yeast and bacterial cells for bulk environment and single-cell analysis. IR absorption spectroscopy enables a bulk analysis whereas micro-Raman-spectroscopy with excitation in the near infrared or visible range has the potential for the analysis of single bacterial and yeast cells. The inherently weak Raman signal can be increased up to several orders of magnitude by applying Raman signal enhancement methods such as UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation in the deep UV region, surface enhanced Raman scattering, or tip-enhanced Raman scattering. Copyright 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy of reduced ReI complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline and substituted analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Sarah L; Gordon, Keith C

    2006-04-13

    IR spectroscopy in concert with DFT calculations and resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry has been used to identify the molecular orbital nature of the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) in reduced [Re(CO)(3)Cl(L)] and [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(L)](+) complexes, where L = 1,10-phenanthroline and its 4,7-diphenyl- and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-substituted analogues. The SOMO of each reduced species considered was found to be of b(1) symmetry, rather than the close lying orbital of a(2) symmetry (within a C(2)(v)() symmetry description of the phenanthroline moiety). This was deduced in a number of ways. First, the average carbonyl band force constants (Deltak(av) = k(av){reduced complex} - k(av){parent complex}) range from -57 to -41 N m(-1) for the series of compounds studied. The value of Deltak(av) relates to the extent of orbital overlap between the ligand MO and the metal dpi MO. These values are consistent with population of a b(1) MO because the wave function amplitude at the chelating nitrogens for this MO is significantly greater than that for a(2) MO. Second, calculations on singly reduced [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(phen)](+) and [Re(CO)(3)(4-Mepy)(tem)](+) predict population of a b(2) SOMO. The spectra predicted for these species are in close agreement with the vibrational spectroscopic data; for the IR data the shifts in the CO bands are predicted to 6 cm(-1) and the mean absolute deviation between calculated and measured Raman bands was found to be 10 cm(-1).

  9. Crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis, vibrational, thermal behavior and UV spectroscopy of (2,6-diaminopyridinium) dihydrogen arsenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaziz, Emna; Ben Hassen, Chawki; Chniba-Boudjada, Nassira; Daoud, Abdelaziz; Mhiri, Tahar; Boujelbene, Mohamed

    2017-10-01

    A new organic dihydrogenomonoarsenate (C5H8N3)H2AsO4 was synthesized by slow evaporation method at room temperature and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the centro-symmetric space group P21/n. Unit cell parameters are a = 10.124 (5)Ǻ, b = 6.648 (5)Ǻ, c = 13.900 (5)Ǻ, β = 105.532° with Z = 4. The crystal structure was solved and refined to R = 0.038 with 2001 independent reflections. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis were used to visualize the fidelity of the crystal structure which has been determined by X-ray data collection on single crystals (C5H8N3)H2AsO4. Due the strong hydrogen Osbnd H⋯O bond network connecting the H2AsO4 groups, the anionic arrangement must be described as infinite (H2AsO4)nn-of dimers chains spreading, in a zig zag fashion, parallel to the b direction. The organic groups (C5H8N3)+ are anchored between adjacent polyanions through multiple hydrogen bonds Nsbnd H⋯O. The thermal decomposition of precursors studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), indicate the existence of two mass loss regions correspond to degradation of the title compound. The existence of vibrational modes correspond to the organic and inorganic groups are identified by the infrared and Raman spectroscopy in the frequency ranges 500-4000 and 25-4000 cm-1, respectively.

  10. Gas temperature measurements in a microwave plasma by optical emission spectroscopy under single-wall carbon nanotube growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, R K [Cummins Inc, 1900 McKinley Ave, MC 50180, Columbus, IN 47201 (United States); Anderson, T N; Lucht, R P; Fisher, T S; Gore, J P [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)], E-mail: rajesh.garg@cummins.com

    2008-05-07

    Plasma gas temperatures were measured via in situ optical emission spectroscopy in a microwave CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2} plasma under carbon nanotube (CNT) growth conditions. Gas temperature is an important parameter in controlling and optimizing CNT growth. The temperature has a significant impact on chemical kinetic rates, species concentrations and CNT growth rates on the substrate. H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were determined from the Q-branch spectrum of the d{sup 3}{pi}{sub u}(0){yields}a{sup 3}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}(0) transition. N{sub 2} rotational and vibrational temperatures were measured by fitting rovibrational bands from the N{sub 2} emission spectrum of the C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u} {yields} B {sup 3}{pi}{sub g} transition. The N{sub 2} rotational temperature, which is assumed to be approximately equal to the translational gas temperature, increases with an increase in input microwave plasma power and substrate temperature. The measured H{sub 2} rotational temperatures were not in agreement with the measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures under the CNT growth conditions in this study. The measured N{sub 2} rotational temperatures compared with the H{sub 2} rotational temperatures suggest the partial equilibration of upper excited state due to higher, 10 Torr, operating pressure. Methane addition in the hydrogen plasma increases the gas temperature slightly for methane concentrations higher than 10% in the feed gas.

  11. Effect of Temperature and Vibration on Electrical Connectors with Different Number of Contact Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song W. L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented the results from three related analysis performed by adopting the failure models, which provided an explanation of performance influencing factors caused by different number of contact cores, for the purpose of measuring the temperature change and deformation value, which were the factors causing contact failure. The failures were localized in contact parts of the connectors. Performed investigations included thermal analysis, modal analysis, harmonic response analysis and contact failure analysis. From the results of these simulations, related temperature and vibration analysis nephograms were got respectively. And the correctness of results of thermal analysis was verified by Fourier law. The research results of this paper provide a reference for thermal analysis and vibration analysis of electrical connectors, which is important for ensuring the reliability and safety of electrical connectors.

  12. Ro-vibrational coupling in high temperature thermochemistry of the BBr molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchowiecki, Marcin

    2018-01-01

    High temperature thermochemistry of the BBr molecule is investigated with the classical approach in the temperature range of 300-20,000 K. The role of ro-vibrational coupling is elucidated. The internal partition function, thermal energy, heat capacity, and entropy are calculated at three levels of approximation, i.e. taking into account bound states on the ground state (1 Σ), including also two excited states (3 Π and 1 Π), and finally adding the resonance and scattering states. The influence of these approximations on studied quantities is investigated. The entropy is found to be the least sensitive to approximations in the ro-vibrational coupling and the heat capacity the most sensitive.

  13. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karhu, J.; Nauta, J.; Vainio, M.; Metsala, M.; Hoekstra, S.; Halonen, L.

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to

  14. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  15. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  16. Infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical using tunable diode laser spectroscopy. [ozone destruction in stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Bair, C. H.; Wade, W. R.; Hoell, J. M.; Copeland, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tunable diode laser spectroscopy is used to measure the infrared vibration-rotation spectra of the ClO radical. The radical is generated in a flow system where a Cl2-He mixture passes through a microwave discharge to dissociate the Cl2. An O3-O2 mixture from an ozone generator is injected into the system downstream of the microwave discharge where O3 combines with Cl to form ClO. By adjusting the gas flow rates to yield an excess of Cl atoms, all the ozone is combined. ClO concentration is measured with UV absorption at 2577 and 2772 A and a deuterium lamp as a continuous source. Total cell pressure is 5.5 torr. The diode laser spectrometer is calibrated with ammonia lines as a reference where possible. The frequency of vibration-rotation lines is expressed as a function of rotational quantum number, fundamental vibrational frequency, and the rotational constants of the upper and lower vibrational states.

  17. Combined high-pressure and high-temperature vibrational studies of dolomite: phase diagram and evidence of a new distorted modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimiopoulos, I.; Jahn, S.; Kuras, A.; Schade, U.; Koch-Müller, M.

    2017-07-01

    A combined high-pressure mid-infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy study on a natural CaMg0.98Fe0.02(CO3)2 dolomite sample was performed both at ambient and high temperatures. A pressure-temperature phase diagram was constructed for all the reported dolomite ambient- and high-pressure polymorphs. In addition, a local distortion of the ambient-pressure dolomite structure was identified close to 11 GPa, just before the transition toward the first known high-pressure phase. All the Clausius-Clapeyron slopes are found to be positive with similar magnitudes. Complementary first-principles calculations suggest a metastable nature of the high-pressure dolomite polymorphs. Finally, theoretical spectroscopy is used to interpret and discuss the observed changes in the measured vibrational spectra.

  18. Enzyme-free cell detachment mediated by resonance vibration with temperature modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashina, Yuta; Hirano, Makoto; Imashiro, Chikahiro; Totani, Kiichiro; Komotori, Jun; Takemura, Kenjiro

    2017-10-01

    Cell detachment is an essential process in adherent cell culture. However, trypsinization, which is the most popular detachment technique used in culture, damages cellular membranes. Reducing cellular membrane damage during detachment should improve the quality of cell culture. In this article, we propose an enzyme-free cell detachment method based on resonance vibration with temperature modulation. We developed a culture device that can excite a resonance vibration and control temperature. We then evaluated the cell detachment ratio and the growth response, observed the morphology, and analyzed the cellular protein of the collected cells-mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12). With the temperature of 10°C and the maximum vibration amplitude of 2 μm, 77.9% of cells in number were successfully detached compared with traditional trypsinization. The 72-h proliferation ratio of the reseeded cells was similar to that with trypsinization, whereas the proliferation ratio of proposed method was 12.6% greater than that of trypsinization after freezing and thawing. Moreover, the cells can be collected relatively intact and both intracellular and cell surface proteins in the proposed method were less damaged than in trypsinization. These results show that this method has definite advantages over trypsinization, which indicates that it could be applied to subcultures of cells that are more susceptible to trypsin damage for mass culture of sustainable clinical use. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2279-2288. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Temperature dependence of X-ray absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra: probing quantum vibrations of light elements in oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemausat, Ruidy; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Trcera, Nicolas; Bordage, Amélie; Coelho-Diogo, Cristina; Florian, Pierre; Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Errea, Ion; Paulatto, Lorenzo; Lazzeri, Michele; Cabaret, Delphine

    2017-02-22

    A combined experimental-theoretical study on the temperature dependence of the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of periclase (MgO), spinel (MgAl2O4), corundum (α-Al2O3), berlinite (α-AlPO4), stishovite and α-quartz (SiO2) is reported. Predictive calculations are presented when experimental data are not available. For these light-element oxides, both experimental techniques detect systematic effects related to quantum thermal vibrations which are well reproduced by density-functional theory simulations. In calculations, thermal fluctuations of the nuclei are included by considering nonequilibrium configurations according to finite-temperature quantum statistics at the quasiharmonic level. The influence of nuclear quantum fluctuations on XANES and NMR spectroscopies is particularly sensitive to the coordination number of the probed cation. Furthermore, the relative importance of nuclear dynamics and thermal expansion is quantified over a large range of temperatures.

  20. Room temperature excitation spectroscopy of single quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Blum

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a single molecule detection scheme to investigate excitation spectra of single emitters at room temperature. We demonstrate the potential of single emitter photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy by recording excitation spectra of single CdSe nanocrystals over a wide spectral range of 100 nm. The spectra exhibit emission intermittency, characteristic of single emitters. We observe large variations in the spectra close to the band edge, which represent the individual heterogeneity of the observed quantum dots. We also find specific excitation wavelengths for which the single quantum dots analyzed show an increased propensity for a transition to a long-lived dark state. We expect that the additional capability of recording excitation spectra at room temperature from single emitters will enable insights into the photophysics of emitters that so far have remained inaccessible.

  1. Application of vibrational spectroscopy in the in vitro studies of carbon fiber-polylactic acid composite degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazewicz, Marta; Gajewska, Maria Chomyszyn; Paluszkiewicz, Czeslawa

    1999-05-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy was used for assessment of new material for stomatology, for guided tissue regeneration (GTR) techniqe.Implants applied in the healing of periodontal defects using GTR technique have to meet stringent requirements concerning their chemical as well physical properties.At present the implants prepared from two layers membranes differing in porosity in their outer and inner layers are studied clinically. Composite plates prepared by us consist of three layers: polylactic acid film, carbon fibres coated with polylactic acid and carbon fabric.Vibrational spectroscopic studies of the material; polylactic acid- carbon fiber have made it possible to analyse chemical reactions occurring between the polymer and carbon surface. Analysis of the IR spectra of samples treated in Ringer solution allowed to describe the phenomena resulting from the composite degradation. It was shown that material biostability is related to the presence of carbon fibers.

  2. Fructose-water-dimethylsulfoxide interactions by vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Mushrif, Samir H; Herbert, Bryon; Booksh, Karl S; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2012-09-13

    The solvation of fructose in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO-H(2)O (or DMSO-D(2)O) mixtures was investigated using vibrational spectroscopy (Raman, ATR/FTIR) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The analysis of the fructose hydroxyl hydrogen-DMSO oxygen radial distribution function showed that the coordination number of DMSO around the furanose form of fructose is ~3.5. This number is smaller than the number of hydroxyl groups of fructose because one DMSO molecule is shared between two hydroxyl groups and because intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed. In the case of fructose-DMSO mixtures, a red shift of the Raman S═O asymmetric stretch is observed, which indicates that fructose breaks the DMSO clusters through strong hydrogen bonding between the hydrogen atoms of its hydroxyl groups and the oxygen atom of DMSO. The Raman scattering cross sections of the DMSO S═O stretch when a DMSO molecule interacts with another DMSO molecule, a fructose molecule, or a water molecule were estimated from the spectra of the binary mixtures using the coordination numbers from MD simulations. It was also possible to use these values together with the MD-estimated coordination numbers to satisfactorily predict the effect of the water fraction on the Raman scattering intensity of the S═O stretching band in ternary mixtures. MD simulations also showed that, with increasing water content, the DMSO orientation around fructose changed, with the sulfur atom moving away from the carbohydrate. The deconvolution of the fructose IR OH stretching region revealed that the hydroxyls of fructose can be separated into two groups that participate in hydrogen bonds of different strengths. MD simulations showed that the three hydroxyls of the fructose ring form stronger hydrogen bonds with the solvent than the remaining hydroxyls, providing an explanation for the experimental observations. Finally, analysis of ATR/FTIR spectra revealed that, with increasing water content, the average

  3. Formation and function of chromate conversion coating on aircraft aluminum alloy probed by vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lin

    2000-10-01

    A Chromate Conversion Coating (CCC) is currently one of the most effective methods for protecting aluminum alloys from corrosion. Its unique "self-healing" property has been proved to be critical in corrosion prevention. During the formation process, CrVI, is "stored" in the CCC films. Under in-field conditions, most of the CrVI can leach out and diffuse to local defects, and stop corrosion. However, the involvement of highly toxic CrVI makes CCC system environmentally hazardous. In order to find less-toxic alternatives, the formation and protection mechanisms of CCC must be understood. Formation and function of CCC film are the focus of this study, and vibrational spectroscopy was chosen due to its superior structural sensitivity. First, the structure of CCC film was characterized. The structural similarity between CCC film and a synthetic Cr-mixed-oxide was found, and certain tests were conducted on the bulk synthetic powder which were not feasible on the thin film. All of the structural studies indicated that CCC film is mainly a CrIII-hydroxide gel layer, which adsorbs CrVI-oxy species through CrIII-O-Cr VI chemical bonds. Further analysis revealed the reversible Cr III-CrVI adsorption-desorption equilibrium, and a mathematical model ("Langmuir" model) was established to explain the Cr VI storage-release mechanism quantitatively. In addition, the function of Fe(CN)63-, an additive in the coating solution, was studied. The results indicate that Fe(CN)63- mediates the slow reaction between Al and CrVI, and the mediation mechanism can be illustrated as below: FeCN 3- 6+Al=FeCN 4-6+Al3+ ↑ FeCN 4- 6+CrVI=FeCN 3-6+CrIII In general, the formation of CCC is mediated by Fe(CN)63-, thus Al reduces CrVI quickly and generates CrIII-hydroxide on the alloy surface. The nascent CrIII-hydroxide is chemically active enough to form chemical bonds with CrVI from the solution, through Cr III-O-CrVI bonding. Such CrIII-O-Cr VI structure can form and break up reversibly according

  4. Structure and Absolute Configuration of Nyasol and Hinokiresinol via Synthesis and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Peter Rygaard

    2005-01-01

    The absolute configuration of the norlignan (+)-nyasol was determined to be S by comparison of the experimental vibrational circular dichroism data with first-principle calculations taking into account the eight lowest energy conformations. The established absolute configuration of (+)-nyasol...

  5. Analysis of solid-state transformations of pharmaceutical compounds using vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Strachan, Clare J; Gordon, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    pharmaceutical ingredient can significantly influence its processing behaviour, including powder flow and compressibility, and biopharmaceutical properties such as solubility, dissolution rate and bioavailability. KEY FINDINGS: Vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, near-infrared, Raman and, most...

  6. Influence of Temperature on Vibrational Frequency of Graphene Sheet Used as Nano-Scale Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Natsuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the vibrational properties of single- and double-layer graphene sheets (GSs with attached nanoparticles are analyzed based on the nonlocal elasticity theory. The potential applications of atomic-scale mass sensing are presented using GSs with simply supported boundary condition. The frequency equation for GSs with an attached nanoparticle is derived to investigate the vibration frequency of the GSs under thermal environment. Using the proposed model, the relationship between the frequency shifts of graphene-based mass sensor and the attached nanoparticles is obtained. The nonlocal effect and the temperature dependence on the variation of frequency shifts with the attached nanomass and the positions on the GS are investigated and discussed in detail. The obtained results show that the nanomass can be easily detected by using GS resonator which provides a highly sensitive nanomechanical element in sensor systems. The vibrational frequency shift of GS increases with increasing the temperature dependence. The double-layer GSs (DLGSs have higher sensitivity than the single-layer GSs (SLGSs due to high frequency shifts.

  7. Effects of cations and cholesterol with sphingomyelin membranes investigated by high-resolution broadband sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Feng, Rong-juan; Li, Yi-yi; Liu, Ming-hua; Guo, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Sphingomyelin(SM) is specifically enriched in the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. Its molecular structure is compose by N-acyl-Derythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine. The function of the SM related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking are relied on the interactions of the SM, cations, cholesterol and proteins. In this report, the interaction of three different nature SMs, cations and cholesterol at air/aqueous interfaces studied by high-resolution broadband sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy, respectively. Our results shed lights on understanding the relationship between SMs monolayer, cholesterol and Cations.

  8. Space and time analysis of the nanosecond scale discharges in atmospheric pressure air: I. Gas temperature and vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Boubert, P.; Vervisch, P.

    2014-03-01

    Reliable experimental data on nanosecond discharge plasmas in air become more and more crucial considering their interest in a wide field of applications. However, the investigations on such nonequilibrium plasmas are made difficult by the spatial non-homogeneities, in particular under atmospheric pressure, the wide range of time scales, and the complexity of multi-physics processes involved therein. In this study, we report spatiotemporal experimental analysis on the gas temperature and the vibrational excitation of N2 and O2 in their ground electronic state during the post-discharge of an overvoltage nanosecond-pulsed discharge generated in a pin-to-plane gap of air at atmospheric pressure. The gas temperature during the pulsed discharge is measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the rotational bands of the 0-0 vibrational transition N2(C 3 Πu, v = 0) → N2(B3 Πg, v = 0) of nitrogen. The results show a rapid gas heating up to 700 K in tens of nanoseconds after the current rise. This fast gas heating leads to a high gas temperature up to 1000 K measured at 150 ns in the first stages of the post-discharge using spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS). The spatiotemporal measurements of the gas temperature and the vibrational distribution function of N2 and O2, also obtained by SRS, over the post-discharge show the spatial expansion of the high vibrational excitation of N2, and the gas heating during the post-discharge. The present measurements, focused on thermal and energetic aspect of the discharge, provide a base for spatiotemporal analysis of gas number densities of N2, O2 and O atoms and hydrodynamic effects achieved during the post-discharge in part II of this investigation. All these results provide space and time database for the validation of plasma chemical models for nanosecond-pulsed discharges at atmospheric pressure air.

  9. Temperature- and pressure-dependent infrared spectroscopy of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate: A dipolar coupling theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, Christopher M; Chang, Hai-Chou

    2018-03-15

    Continued growth and development of ionic liquids requires a thorough understanding of how cation and anion molecular structure defines the liquid structure of the materials as well as the various properties that make them technologically useful. Infrared spectroscopy is frequently used to assess molecular-level interactions among the cations and anions of ionic liquids because the intramolecular vibrational modes of the ions are sensitive to the local potential energy environments in which they reside. Thus, different interaction modes among the ions may lead to different spectroscopic signatures in the vibrational spectra. Charge organization present in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([C 4 mim]CF 3 SO 3 ), is frequently modeled in terms of a quasicrystalline structure. Highly structured quasilattices enable the dynamic coupling of vibrationally-induced dipole moments to produce optical dispersion and transverse optical-longitudinal optical (TO-LO) splitting of vibrational modes of the ionic liquid. According to dipolar coupling theory, the degree of TO-LO splitting is predicted to have a linear dependence on the number density of the ionic liquid. Both temperature and pressure will affect the number density of the ionic liquid and, therefore, the amount of TO-LO splitting for this mode. Therefore, we test these relationships through temperature- and pressure-dependent FT-IR spectroscopic studies of [C 4 mim]CF 3 SO 3 , focusing on the totally symmetric SO stretching mode for the anion, ν s (SO 3 ). Increased temperature decreases the amount of TO-LO splitting for ν s (SO 3 ), whereas elevated pressure is found to increase the amount of band splitting. In both cases, the experimental observations follow the general predictions of dipolar coupling theory, thereby supporting the quasilattice model for this ionic liquid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration in a Langmuir monolayer with high-resolution spectra and ultrafast vibrational dynamics in sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2013-08-28

    Even though in principle the frequency-domain and time-domain spectroscopic measurement should generate identical information for a given molecular system, inhomogeneous character of surface vibrations in the sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) studies has only been studied with the time-domain SFGVS by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough line shape. Here with recently developed high-resolution broadband SFG-VS (HR-BB-SFG-VS) we show that the inhomogeneous line shape can be obtained in the frequency-domain, for the anchoring CN stretch of the 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) Langmuir monolayer at the air-water interface, and that an excellent agreement with the time-domain SFG free-induction-decay (FID) results can be established. We found that the 8CB CN stretch spectrum consists of a single peak centered at 2234.00 + * 0.01 cm-1 with a total line width of 10.9 + - 0.3 cm-1 at half maximum. The Lorentzian contribution accounts only for 4:7 + -0:4 cm-1 to this width and the Gaussian (inhomogeneous) broadening for as much as 8:1+*0:2 cm-1. Polarization analysis of the -CN spectra showed that the -CN group is tilted 57 + - 2 degrees from the surface normal. The large heterogeneity in the -CN spectrum is tentatively attributed to the -CN group interactions with the interfacial water molecules penetrated/accomodated into the 8CB monolayer, a unique phenomenon for the nCB Langmuir monolayers reported previously.

  11. Final Technical Report: Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Combustion Intermediates Trapped in Helium Nanodroplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douberly, Gary Elliott [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2017-11-16

    The objective of our experimental research program is to isolate and stabilize transient intermediates and products of prototype combustion reactions. This will be accomplished by Helium Nanodroplet Isolation, a novel technique where liquid helium droplets freeze out high energy metastable configurations of a reacting system, permitting infrared spectroscopic characterizations of products and intermediates that result from hydrocarbon radical reactions with molecular oxygen and other small molecules relevant to combustion environments. The low temperature (0.4 K) and rapid cooling associated with He droplets provides a perfectly suited medium to isolate and probe a broad range of molecular radical and carbene systems important to combustion chemistry. The sequential addition of molecular species to He droplets often leads to the stabilization of high-energy, metastable cluster configurations that represent regions of the potential energy surface far from the global minimum. Single and double resonance IR laser spectroscopy techniques, along with Stark and Zeeman capabilities, are being used to probe the structural and dynamical properties of these systems.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of triacetone triperoxide (TATP): Anharmonic fundamentals, overtones and combination bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Brina; Dubnikova, Faina; Zeiri, Yehuda; Kosloff, Ronnie; Gerber, R. Benny

    2008-12-01

    The vibrational spectrum of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is studied by the correlation-corrected vibrational self-consistent field (CC-VSCF) method which incorporates anharmonic effects. Fundamental, overtone, and combination band frequencies are obtained by using a potential based on the PM3 method and yielding the same harmonic frequencies as DFT/cc-pVDZ calculations. Fundamentals and overtones are also studied with anharmonic single-mode (without coupling) DFT/cc-pVDZ calculations. Average deviations from experiment are similar for all methods: 2.1-2.5%. Groups of degenerate vibrations form regions of numerous combination bands with low intensity: the 5600-5800 cm -1 region contains ca. 70 overtones and combinations of CH stretches. Anharmonic interactions are analyzed.

  13. Orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes from combined experimental and theoretical sum frequency spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, Hilary M.; Chen, Shunli; Fu, Li; Upshur, Mary Alice; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; Thomson, Regan J.; Wang, Hong-Fei; Batista, Victor S.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2017-09-01

    Inferring molecular orientations from vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra is challenging in polarization combinations that result in low signal intensities, or when the local point group symmetry approximation fails. While combining experiments with density functional theory (DFT) could overcome this problem, the scope of the combined method has yet to be established. Here, we assess its feasibility of determining the distributions of molecular orientations for one monobasic ester, two epoxides and three alcohols at the vapor/fused silica interface. We find that molecular orientations of nonlocal vibrational modes cannot be determined using polarization-resolved SFG measurements alone.

  14. Vibrational cooling dynamics of a [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic probed by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplins, Benjamin W; Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2014-12-11

    Picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR) was performed for the first time on a dithiolate bridged binuclear iron(I) hexacarbonyl complex ([Fe₂(μ-bdt)(CO)₆], bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) which is a structural mimic of the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. As these model active sites are increasingly being studied for their potential in photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production, understanding their excited and ground state dynamics is critical. In n-heptane, absorption of 400 nm light causes carbonyl loss with low quantum yield (<10%), while the majority (ca. 90%) of the parent complex is regenerated with biexponential kinetics (τ₁ = 21 ps and τ₂ = 134 ps). In order to understand the mechanism of picosecond bleach recovery, a series of UV-pump TRIR experiments were performed in different solvents. The long time decay (τ₂) of the transient spectra is seen to change substantially as a function of solvent, from 95 ps in THF to 262 ps in CCl₄. Broadband IR-pump TRIR experiments were performed for comparison. The measured vibrational lifetimes (T₁(avg)) of the carbonyl stretches were found to be in excellent correspondence to the observed τ₂ decays in the UV-pump experiments, signifying that vibrationally excited carbonyl stretches are responsible for the observed longtime decays. The fast spectral evolution (τ₁) was determined to be due to vibrational cooling of low frequency modes anharmonically coupled to the carbonyl stretches that were excited after electronic internal conversion. The results show that cooling of both low and high frequency vibrational modes on the electronic ground state give rise to the observed picosecond TRIR transient spectra of this compound, without the need to invoke electronically excited states.

  15. A new, low temperature long-pass cell for mid-infrared to terahertz spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwabia Tchana, Fridolin; Willaert, Fabrice; Landsheere, Xavier; Flaud, Jean-Marie [LISA, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris-Est Créteil (UPEC) et Université Paris-Diderot (UPD), 61 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil Cedex (France); Lago, Leatitia; Chapuis, Mylène; Herbeaux, Christian; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent [High Vacuum Group and Beamline AILES, Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-09-15

    A new cell has been designed for accurate spectroscopic measurements in the 80–400 K temperature range with variable path lengths from 3 to more than 141 m. The spectral coverage at these temperatures ranges from the visible to less than 10 cm{sup −1}, thanks to the use of diamond windows. The design of the cryostat and vacuum setups allows vibration-free operation. The equipment provides temperature homogeneity and pressure control to better than 2% over the 100–400 K and the 0.1–1000 mbar ranges. Remote-controlled opto-mechanical systems enable in situ adjustments as well as changes of the optical path length within half an hour, in order to optimize measurement time in an open user facility. It allows then to meet the specific requirements of high resolution measurements on the Far-Infrared AILES beamline at SOLEIL as well at the LISA facility, in Créteil, in the mid-IR. This new instrument opens up the way for many experiments in the field of high-resolution gas-phase IR spectroscopy, in particular, in quantitative spectroscopy for atmospheric applications: measurements of absorption line parameters (absolute intensities, cross sections, and pressure-induced widths) using Fourier transform spectroscopy. The design and performance of the equipment are briefly presented and illustrated on spectroscopic examples.

  16. Room temperature triplet state spectroscopy of organic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Sebastian; Baldo, Marc A

    2014-01-21

    Organic light-emitting devices and solar cells are devices that create, manipulate, and convert excited states in organic semiconductors. It is crucial to characterize these excited states, or excitons, to optimize device performance in applications like displays and solar energy harvesting. This is complicated if the excited state is a triplet because the electronic transition is 'dark' with a vanishing oscillator strength. As a consequence, triplet state spectroscopy must usually be performed at cryogenic temperatures to reduce competition from non-radiative rates. Here, we control non-radiative rates by engineering a solid-state host matrix containing the target molecule, allowing the observation of phosphorescence at room temperature and alleviating constraints of cryogenic experiments. We test these techniques on a wide range of materials with functionalities spanning multi-exciton generation (singlet exciton fission), organic light emitting device host materials, and thermally activated delayed fluorescence type emitters. Control of non-radiative modes in the matrix surrounding a target molecule may also have broader applications in light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

  17. Evidence for cooperative vibrational relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids using infrared pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D J; Panman, M R; Woutersen, S

    2009-11-27

    Vibrational energy relaxation of the NH-, OH-, and OD-stretching modes in hydrogen-bonded liquids has been investigated by means of infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. The relaxation rates have been determined both in neat liquids and in isotopic mixtures with systematically varied isotope fractions. In all liquids, the vibrational relaxation rate increases as the isotope fraction is increased and reaches a maximum in the neat liquid. The dependence of the relaxation rate on the isotope fraction suggests a relaxation channel in which the vibrational energy is partitioned between accepting modes of two neighboring molecules.

  18. Vibrational spectroscopy of SnBr4 and CCl4 using Lie algebraic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U(4) algebra. The U(4) model takes the rotation and the vibration into account simultaneously but becomes complex when the number of atoms in the molecules becomes larger than four. After 1981, there is a rapid progress in this field. Iachello et al [3,4] have proposed U(4) algebra to calculate the stretching and bending vi ...

  19. N Vibrational Temperatures and OH Number Density Measurements in a NS Pulse Discharge Hydrogen-Air Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yichen; Winters, Caroline; Jans, Elijah R.; Frederickson, Kraig; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    This work presents time-resolved measurements of nitrogen vibrational temperature, translational-rotational temperature, and absolute OH number density in lean hydrogen-air mixtures excited in a diffuse filament nanosecond pulse discharge, at a pressure of 100 Torr and high specific energy loading. The main objective of these measurements is to study a possible effect of nitrogen vibrational excitation on low-temperature kinetics of HO2 and OH radicals. N2 vibrational temperature and gas temperature in the discharge and the afterglow are measured by ns broadband Coherent Anti-Stokes Scattering (CARS). Hydroxyl radical number density is measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) calibrated by Rayleigh scattering. The results show that the discharge generates strong vibrational nonequilibrium in air and H2-air mixtures for delay times after the discharge pulse of up to 1 ms, with peak vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K at T ≈ 500 K. Nitrogen vibrational temperature peaks ≈ 200 μs after the discharge pulse, before decreasing due to vibrational-translational relaxation by O atoms (on the time scale of a few hundred μs) and diffusion (on ms time scale). OH number density increases gradually after the discharge pulse, peaking at t 100-300 μs and decaying on a longer time scale, until t 1 ms. Both OH rise time and decay time decrease as H2 fraction in the mixture is increased from 1% to 5%. OH number density in a 1% H2-air mixture peaks at approximately the same time as vibrational temperature in air, suggesting that OH kinetics may be affected by N2 vibrational excitation. However, preliminary kinetic modeling calculations demonstrate that OH number density overshoot is controlled by known reactions of H and O radicals generated in the plasma, rather than by dissociation by HO2 radical in collisions with vibrationally excited N2 molecules, as has been suggested earlier. Additional measurements at higher specific energy loadings and kinetic modeling

  20. A Review of Hybrid Fiber-Optic Distributed Simultaneous Vibration and Temperature Sensing Technology and Its Geophysical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Miah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Distributed sensing systems can transform an optical fiber cable into an array of sensors, allowing users to detect and monitor multiple physical parameters such as temperature, vibration and strain with fine spatial and temporal resolution over a long distance. Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS and distributed temperature sensing (DTS systems have been developed for various applications with varied spatial resolution, and spectral and sensing range. Rayleigh scattering-based phase optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR for vibration and Raman/Brillouin scattering-based OTDR for temperature and strain measurements have been developed over the past two decades. The key challenge has been to find a methodology that would enable the physical parameters to be determined at any point along the sensing fiber with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, yet within acceptable frequency range for dynamic vibration, and temperature detection. There are many applications, especially in geophysical and mining engineering where simultaneous measurements of vibration and temperature are essential. In this article, recent developments of different hybrid systems for simultaneous vibration, temperature and strain measurements are analyzed based on their operation principles and performance. Then, challenges and limitations of the systems are highlighted for geophysical applications.

  1. Effects of high power ultrasonic vibration on temperature distribution of workpiece in dry creep feed up grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknejad, Masih; Abdullah, Amir; Azarhoushang, Bahman

    2017-11-01

    Temperature history and distribution of steel workpiece (X20Cr13) was measured by a high tech infrared camera under ultrasonic assisted dry creep feed up grinding. For this purpose, a special experimental setup was designed and fabricated to vibrate only workpiece along two directions by a high power ultrasonic transducer. In this study, ultrasonic effects with respect to grinding parameters including depth of cut (a e ), feed speed (v w ), and cutting speed (v s ) has been investigated. The results indicate that the ultrasonic vibration has considerable effect on reduction of temperature, depth of thermal damage of workpiece and width of temperature contours. Maximum temperature reduction of 25.91% was reported at condition of v s =15m/s, v w =500mm/min, a e =0.4mm in the presence of ultrasonic vibration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating vibrational anharmonic couplings in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slenkamp, Karla M.; Lynch, Michael S.; Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Brookes, Jennifer F.; Bannan, Caitlin C.; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Khalil, Munira, E-mail: mkhalil@chem.washington.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Box 351700, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Using polarization-selective two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy, we measure anharmonic couplings and angles between the transition dipole moments of the four cyanide stretching (ν{sub CN}) vibrations found in [(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Ru{sup III}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup −} (FeRu) dissolved in D{sub 2}O and formamide and [(NC){sub 5}Fe{sup II}CNPt{sup IV}(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}NCFe{sup II}(CN){sub 5}]{sup 4−} (FePtFe) dissolved in D{sub 2}O. These cyanide-bridged transition metal complexes serve as model systems for studying the role of high frequency vibrational modes in ultrafast photoinduced charge transfer reactions. Here, we focus on the spectroscopy of the ν{sub CN} modes in the electronic ground state. The FTIR spectra of the ν{sub CN} modes of the bimetallic and trimetallic systems are strikingly different in terms of frequencies, amplitudes, and lineshapes. The experimental 2D IR spectra of FeRu and FePtFe and their fits reveal a set of weakly coupled anharmonic ν{sub CN} modes. The vibrational mode anharmonicities of the individual ν{sub CN} modes range from 14 to 28 cm{sup −1}. The mixed-mode anharmonicities range from 2 to 14 cm{sup −1}. In general, the bridging ν{sub CN} mode is most weakly coupled to the radial ν{sub CN} mode, which involves the terminal CN ligands. Measurement of the relative transition dipole moments of the four ν{sub CN} modes reveal that the FeRu molecule is almost linear in solution when dissolved in formamide, but it assumes a bent geometry when dissolved in D{sub 2}O. The ν{sub CN} modes are modelled as bilinearly coupled anharmonic oscillators with an average coupling constant of 6 cm{sup −1}. This study elucidates the role of the solvent in modulating the molecular geometry and the anharmonic vibrational couplings between the ν{sub CN} modes in cyanide-bridged transition metal mixed valence complexes.

  3. Kinetic study of low-temperature CO2 plasmas under non-equilibrium conditions. I. Relaxation of vibrational energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T.; Grofulović, M.; Klarenaar, B. L. M.; Morillo-Candas, A. S.; Guaitella, O.; Engeln, R.; Pintassilgo, C. D.; Guerra, V.

    2018-01-01

    A kinetic model describing the time evolution of ∼70 individual CO2(X1Σ+) vibrational levels during the afterglow of a pulsed DC glow discharge is developed in order to contribute to the understanding of vibrational energy transfer in CO2 plasmas. The results of the simulations are compared against in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data obtained in a pulsed DC glow discharge and its afterglow at pressures of a few Torr and discharge currents of around 50 mA. The very good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results validates the kinetic scheme considered here and the corresponding vibration–vibration and vibration–translation rate coefficients. In this sense, it establishes a reaction mechanism for the vibrational kinetics of these CO2 energy levels and offers a firm basis to understand the vibrational relaxation in CO2 plasmas. It is shown that first-order perturbation theories, namely, the Schwartz–Slawsky–Herzfeld and Sharma–Brau methods, provide a good description of CO2 vibrations under low excitation regimes.

  4. Development of hardware system using temperature and vibration maintenance models integration concepts for conventional machines monitoring: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeri, Michael Kanisuru; Mpofu, Khumbulani; Kareem, Buliaminu

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the integration of temperature and vibration models for maintenance monitoring of conventional machinery parts in which their optimal and best functionalities are affected by abnormal changes in temperature and vibration values thereby resulting in machine failures, machines breakdown, poor quality of products, inability to meeting customers' demand, poor inventory control and just to mention a few. The work entails the use of temperature and vibration sensors as monitoring probes programmed in microcontroller using C language. The developed hardware consists of vibration sensor of ADXL345, temperature sensor of AD594/595 of type K thermocouple, microcontroller, graphic liquid crystal display, real time clock, etc. The hardware is divided into two: one is based at the workstation (majorly meant to monitor machines behaviour) and the other at the base station (meant to receive transmission of machines information sent from the workstation), working cooperatively for effective functionalities. The resulting hardware built was calibrated, tested using model verification and validated through principles pivoted on least square and regression analysis approach using data read from the gear boxes of extruding and cutting machines used for polyethylene bag production. The results got therein confirmed related correlation existing between time, vibration and temperature, which are reflections of effective formulation of the developed concept.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of Orthopyroxene and Clinopyroxene at Simultaneous High Pressures and Temperatures: Implications for the Upper Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopelas, A.; Kavner, A.

    2011-12-01

    The upper mantle has a complicated structure which is controlled by the subduction of crust and the upwelling of the hot mantle. The pyroxene (ortho and clino) minerals comprise 30% of the upper mantle. Previous studies of pyroxenes show them to have atypical elastic properties compared to other silicates and are complex in structure, transforming to several different structures in a narrow range of pressure and temperature. The goal of this study is to use Raman spectroscopy to monitor lattice vibrational properties of pyroxenes at temperatures and pressures corresponding to the Earth's crust and mantle. Specifically, we will determine the phase stability of a variety of different pyroxenes, and pressure- and temperature- dependence of the Raman-active spectral peaks. The former helps us to plot out the phase diagram of these complicated minerals; the latter provides information on the thermodynamic behavior of the pyroxenes as they are subjected to extreme conditions. Raman spectroscopy measurements versus temperatures to 470 K on a natural enstatite (Mg90) and diopside (deKalb) isobarically to 20 kbar have been performed in an externally heated membrane diamond cell. The figure shows typical results on enstatite at 11 kbar (1.1 GPa) to 468 K. The pressure derivatives the Raman modes at room temperature match those from our previous studies. For example, the 687 cm^(-1) line in enstatite has a (∂lnν/∂lnV)_T of 0.6±0.3 versus pressure while the temperature shift at 1.8 GPa (∂lnν/∂lnV)_p is 0.7±0.1 versus temperature. Similar results were found for the other modes in both enstatite and diopside. Thus, intrinsic anharmonicity was substantially reduced from high values at ambient temperatures as shown by the reduced volume dependence of the Raman modes versus temperature, meaning at mantle conditions, the vibrational properties scale with volume and are unaffected by temperatures. Higher pressures and temperatures are anticipated and will be further

  6. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) Characterization of Reformate-operated High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Simon Lennart; Simon Araya, Samuel; Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental characterization of a high temperature protonexchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) short stack carried out by means of impedance spectroscopy. Selected operating parameters; temperature, stoichiometry and reactant compositions were varied to investigate...

  7. From Vibrational Spectroscopy to Force Fields and Structures of Saccharides: New Computational Algorithms and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincu, Madeleine [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Gerber, Robert Benny [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-17

    vibrational bands involving the shared proton were strongly shifted to lower frequencies ( by about ~ 500 cm-1 for the symmetric mode, in this case). A similar motif was also observed recently by us in protonated cellobiose, indicating that this might be a common mechanism for interaction of a proton with sugars, perhaps similar to the proton wires observed in proteins. The simulations with protonated sugars also shed light on different mechanisms of interaction of a sugar with a proton, including formation of a carboxonium ion, mutarotation events, ring puckering and in the disaccharide cellobiose, the breaking of the glycosidic bond (in both forms of cis and trans). One final highlight to note in this summary, is the finding that in the monosaccharide beta-D-Galactose a hydroxyl ion abstracts a proton (forming water) in a barrierless process at room temperature, but the water remains bound to the sugar backbone, though it migrates around it; actual degradation occurs at ~500 K when water leaves the sugar. However, the study also shows that the water abstraction reaction can be reversed in the presence of 2 additional water molecules complexed with the sugar.

  8. Full characterization of vibrational coherence in a porphyrin chromophore by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Valduga de Almeida Camargo, Franco; Anderson, Harry; Meech, Steve; Heisler, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present experimental and calculated two-dimensional electronic spectra for a 5,15-bisalkynyl porphyrin chromophore. The lowest energy electronic Qy transition couples mainly to a single 380 cm–1 vibrational mode. The two-dimensional electronic spectra reveal diagonal and cross peaks which oscillate as a function of population time. We analyze both the amplitude and phase distribution of this main vibronic transition as a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Even t...

  9. The Fourteenth International Meeting on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Sponsored by Infrared Systems Development and Infrared Associates Sunday, May 10, 2009      7:30 AM Breakfast 8:50 AM Opening ...solutes 10:20 AM C Artem A Bakulin Wayne Liang Thomas la Cour Do hydrophobic groups stabilize the water structure?. , , Jansen Douwe A Wiersma Huib... opening of a beta turn thioxopeptide 13 Joshua Lessing, Jongjin Kim, Kevin Jones, Ziad Ganim, and Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT Two dimensional vibrational

  10. To Avoid Chasing Incorrect Chemical Structures of Chiral Compounds: Raman Optical Activity and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Prasad L; Covington, Cody L; Raghavan, Vijay

    2017-09-20

    A chemical structure (CS) identifies the connectivities between atoms, and the nature of those connections, for a given elemental composition. For chiral molecules, in addition to the identification of CS, the identification of the correct absolute configuration (AC) is also needed. Several chiral natural products are known whose CSs were initially misidentified and later corrected, and these errors were often discovered during the total synthesis of natural products. In this work, we present a new and convenient approach that can be used with Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, to distinguish between the correct and incorrect CSs of chiral compounds. This approach involves analyzing the spectral similarity overlap between experimental spectra and those predicted with advanced quantum chemical theories. Significant labor needed for establishing the correct CSs via chemical syntheses of chiral natural products can thus be avoided. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chlorophyll a and b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Div.; Kavli Energy Nanoscience Institute at Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleming, Graham R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Div.; Kavli Energy Nanoscience Institute at Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-03

    Presented are two-dimensional electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectra of isolated chlorophyll a and b in deuterated ethanol. We excite the Q-band electronic transitions and measure the effects on the carbonyl and C=C double-bond stretch region of the infrared spectrum. With the aid of density functional theory calculations, we provide assignments for the major features of the spectrum. We show how the 2DEV spectra can be used to readily distinguish different solvation states of the chlorophyll, with features corresponding to the minority pentacoordinate magnesium (Mg) species being resolved along each dimension of the 2DEV spectra from the dominant hexacoordinate Mg species. These assignments represent a crucial first step toward the application of 2DEV spectroscopy to chlorophyll-containing pigment-protein complexes.

  12. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of the retro-carotenoid rhodoxanthin in avian plumage, solid-state films, and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christopher J; LaFountain, Amy M; Prum, Richard O; Frank, Harry A; Tauber, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Rhodoxanthin is one of few retro-carotenoids in nature. These chromophores are defined by a pattern of single and double bond alternation that is reversed relative to most carotenoids. Rhodoxanthin is found in the plumage of several families of birds, including fruit doves (Ptilinopus, Columbidae) and the red cotingas (Phoenicircus, Cotingidae). The coloration associated with the rhodoxanthin-containing plumage of these fruit dove and cotinga species ranges from brilliant red to magenta or purple. In the present study, rhodoxanthin is characterized in situ by UV-Vis reflectance and resonance Raman spectroscopy to gain insights into the mechanisms of color-tuning. The spectra are compared with those of the isolated pigment in solution and in thin solid films. Key vibrational signatures are identified for three isomers of rhodoxanthin, primarily in the fingerprint region. Electronic structure (DFT) calculations are employed to describe the normal modes of vibration, and determine characteristic modes of retro-carotenoids. These results are discussed in the context of various mechanisms that change the electronic absorption, including structural distortion of the chromophore or enhanced delocalization of π-electrons in the ground-state. From the spectroscopic evidence, we suggest that the shift in absorption is likely a consequence of perturbations that primarily affect the excited state of the chromophore. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. N-H stretching modes around 3300 wavenumber from peptide backbones observed by chiral sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular origin of the chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) signals of proteins and peptides at interfaces in the N-H stretching vibrational region. The N-H stretching can be a probe for investigating structural and functional properties of proteins, but remains technically difficult to analyze due to the overlapping with the O-H stretching of water molecules. Chiral SFG spectroscopy offers unique tools to study the N-H stretching from proteins at interfaces without interference from the water background. However, the molecular origin of the N-H stretching signals of proteins is still unclear. This work provides a justification of the origin of chiral N-H signals by analyzing the vibrational frequencies, examining chiral SFG theory, studying proton (hydrogen/deuterium) exchange kinetics, and performing optical control experiments. The results demonstrate that the chiral N-H stretching signals at ~3300 cm(-1) originate from the amide group of the protein backbones. This chiral N-H stretching signal offers an in situ, real-time, and background-free probe for interrogating the protein structures and dynamics at interfaces at the molecular level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular gels in the gas phase? Gelator-gelator and gelator-solvent interactions probed by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada-Garcia, Rolando; Mu, Dan; Plazanet, Marie; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2016-08-10

    Benzylidene glucose (BzGlc) is a member of the benzylidene glycoside family. These molecules have the ability to form molecular physical gels. These materials are formed when gelator molecules create a non-covalently bound frame where solvent molecules are trapped. Since the gel formation process and its properties are determined by the subtle balance between non-covalent forces, it is difficult to anticipate them. Quantitative and qualitative understanding of the gelator-gelator and gelator-solvent interactions is needed to better control these materials for important potential applications. We have used gas phase vibrational spectroscopy and theoretical chemistry to study the conformational choices of BzGlc, its dimer and the complexes it forms with water or toluene. To interpret the vibrational spectra we have used the dispersion corrected functional B97D which we have calibrated for the calculation of OH stretching frequencies. Even at the most basic molecular level, it is possible to interrogate a large range of non-covalent interactions ranging from OH → OH hydrogen bonding, to OH → π, and CH → π, all being at the center of gel properties at the macroscopic level.

  15. Multimode Vibrational Wave Packet Dynamics of Strong-Field-Ionized Methyl Iodide Probed by Femtosecond XUV Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Zhi-Heng; Wei, Zhengrong; Li, Jialin

    2017-04-01

    Studies of vibrational wave packets (VWPs) created on the neutral electronic ground-state by intense laser fields have identified R -selective depletion (RSD) as the dominant mechanism for their generation. Another mechanism that is proposed to give rise to VWPs, bond softening (BS), remains hitherto unobserved. Here, we employ femtosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy to investigate the VWP dynamics of CH3 I induced by intense laser fields. Analysis of the first-moment time traces computed about the neutral depletion region reveals both the fundamental and the hot bands of the C-I stretch mode. The initial oscillation phases of these vibrations distinguishes the contributions of RSD and BS to the generation of the VWP in the neutral species. The relative oscillation amplitudes that are associated with the two phases suggest that the C-I VWP is generated predominantly by BS. In the case of the CH3 I+ X 2E3 / 2 ion state, VWP motion along the C-I stretch mode is dominant over the CH3 umbrella mode. Moreover, the amplitudes of the VWPs are only 1 pm (C-I distance) and 1° (H-C-I bond angle). The ability to resolve such VWP dynamics points to the exquisite sensitivity of femtosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy to structural changes. This work is supported by a NTU start-up Grant, the A*Star SERC PSF (122-PSF-0011), the Ministry of Education AcRF (MOE2014-T2-2-052), and the award of a Nanyang Assistant Professorship to Z.-H.L.

  16. Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study of corroded Magnox sludge from a legacy spent nuclear fuel storage pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Colin R., E-mail: colin.r.gregson@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Goddard, David T., E-mail: dave.t.goddard@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Sarsfield, Mark J., E-mail: mark.j.sarsfield@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Spent Magnox fuel corroding in-situ in storage ponds forms sludges comprised of brucite and other Mg based phases with uranium oxide particles. Display Omitted Research highlights: > Caracterization study of highly radioactive corroded Magnox sludges. > Unique data from samples of actual corroded nuclear fuel. > Combined electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy study. > Analysis of particles from legacy spent fuel storage pond at Sellafield. > Supports major UK decommissioning and nuclear clean up challenge. - Abstract: Samples of filtered particulates and sludges, formed from corroding magnesium alloy clad uranium metal ('Magnox') fuel elements, collected from one of the legacy nuclear fuel storage ponds located at Sellafield (UK) were investigated by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray analysis (ESEM/EDX), micro-Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). ESEM imaging confirmed the dominant morphology to be clusters of interlocking platelets typical of brucite (Mg(OH){sub 2}). EDX analysis was suggestive of some conversion to the related phase, hydrotalcite (Mg{sub 6}Al{sub 2}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 16}.4H{sub 2}O), due to elevated levels of Al associated with Mg. Other apparent morphologies were less commonly observed including flaky sheets, consistent with earlier stages of Magnox alloy corrosion. In a few specific cases, rods were also observed suggestive of some conversion to Mg-hydroxycarbonate phases. Discrete phases rich in U were also identified. Fluorescence in the Raman spectroscopy also indicated surface coatings of organic macromolecules and iron sulphide on hematite containing particles, attributed to microbial activity within the open air pond. Some specific differences in the solid phases between pond areas with differing conditions were apparent.

  17. Infrared spectroscopy of Mercury analogue materials under simulated Mercury surface temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitze, Maximilian; Morlok, Andreas; Hiesinger, Harald; Weber, Iris; Stojic, Aleksandra

    2017-04-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the exploration of planetary surfaces with remote sensing observations [e.g., 1]. The MERTIS (Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer) instrument onboard the BepiColombo spacecraft is designed to explore the surface mineralogy of Mercury in the wavelength region from 7 μ m to 14 μ m [2]. Mercury's surface reaches dayside temperatures of about 700 K [3]. It is well known that bondings between atoms change with temperature, resulting in infrared spectra changes with temperature [4]. In particular, rock-forming minerals like silicates show distinct absorption bands in the infrared due to molecular vibrations, for example, of Si-O bondings [4]. To accurately understand and correctly interpret returned MERTIS data, it is necessary to collect laboratory data of analogue materials under condition similar to Mercury [5]. It is known from previous investigations [5] that the Reststrahlenbands of olivine shift with temperature. In this work we report on temperature effects on Mercury analogue materials in ambient air. At the IRIS (Infrared & Raman for Interplanetary Spectroscopy) laboratory in Münster we used a Bruker VERTEX 70v IR spectrometer together with a Harrick heating stage in a Praying Mantis Diffuse Reflectance Accessory to measure mid-infrared reflectance of mineral powder samples with different grain sizes at increasing temperatures. We report on our spectral results for a natural olivine with Fo91 with a grain size range between 63 μ m and 125 μ m as well as a natural labradorite with a grain size range between 90 μ m and 125 μ m. Spectra were collected at 26, 75, 150, 200, 250, 300, and 350 degrees Celsius with a liquid nitrogen cooled MCT detector under normal ambient pressure. To ensure complete thermal equilibrium of our measured samples, we heated them to higher temperatures and subsequently cooled them to the temperatures at which the spectra were taken. For background calibration, we

  18. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  19. Free Transverse Vibration of Orthotropic Thin Trapezoidal Plate of Parabolically Varying Thickness Subjected to Linear Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the free transverse vibration of orthotropic thin trapezoidal plate of parabolically varying thickness in x-direction subjected to linear temperature distribution in x-direction through a numerical method. The deflection function is defined by the product of the equations of the prescribed continuous piecewise boundary shape. Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to evaluate the fundamental frequencies. The equations of motion, governing the free transverse vibrations of orthotropic thin trapezoidal plates, are derived with boundary condition CSCS. Frequency corresponding to the first two modes of vibration is calculated for the orthotropic thin trapezoidal plate having CSCS edges for different values of thermal gradient, taper constant, and aspect ratio. The proposed method is applied to solve orthotropic thin trapezoidal plate of variable thickness with C-S-C-S boundary conditions. Results are shown by figures for different values of thermal gradient, taper constant, and aspect ratio for the first two modes of vibrations.

  20. Probing the structure and nano-scale mechanical properties of polymer surfaces with scanning force microscopy and sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracias, David Hugo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) has been used to quantitatively measure the elastic modulus, friction and hardness of polymer surfaces with special emphasis on polyethylene and polypropylene. In the experiments, tips of different radii of curvature ranging from 20 nm to 1000 nm have been used and the high pressure applied by the SFM have been observed to affect the values obtained in the measurements. The contact of the SFM tip with the polymer surface is explained by fitting the experimental curves to theoretical predictions of contact mechanics. Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) Vibrational Spectroscopy has been used to measure vibrational spectra of polymer surfaces in the vibrational range of 2700 to 3100 cm-1. Strong correlations are established between surface chemistry and surface structure as probed by SFG and mechanical properties measured by SFM on the surfaces. In these studies segregation of low surface energy moieties, from the bulk of the polymer to the surface have been studied. It was found that surface segregation occurs in miscible polymer blends and a small concentration of surface active polymer can be used to totally modify the surface properties of the blend. A novel high vacuum SFM was built to do temperature dependent measurements of mechanical changes occurring at the surface of polypropylene during the glass transition of the polymer. Using this instrument the modulus and friction of polypropylene was measured in the range of room temperature to ˜-60°C. An increase in the ordering of the backbone of the polymer chains below the glass transition measured by SFG correlates well with the increase in modulus measured on the same surface with SFM. Friction measurements have been done on polyethylene with three different instruments by applying loads ranging from nN to sub newton i.e. over eight orders of magnitude. Pressure and contact area effects were observed to play a significant role in determining the frictional response of the polymer

  1. Molecular images and vibrational spectroscopy of sorbic acid with the scanning tunneling microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas P. E.; Kirk, Michael D.; Quate, Calvin F.

    1987-06-01

    Images of sorbic acid molecules absorbed onto graphite have been taken with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in liquid helium. Molecular clusters were clearly observed, as was the atomic structure of the graphite substrate. The molecules were seen to diffuse across the substrate at a rate of about 1 Å/min. When dI/dV vs V was measured with the STM probe directly over a sorbic acid molecule, a well-defined spectrum of peaks was obtained whose energies corresponded to the vibrational resonances of the molecule. Large changes in the spectra occurred if the tip was moved a lateral distance of 5 Å.

  2. Ultrafast dynamics in iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panman, M.R.; Newton, A.C.; Vos, J.; van den Bosch, B.; Bocokić, V.; Reek, J.N.H.; Woutersen, S.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of iron tetracarbonyl olefin complexes has been investigated using two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Cross peaks between all CO-stretching bands show that the CO-stretch modes are coupled, and from the cross-peak anisotropies we can confirm previous assignments of the

  3. Screening Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) families for physical and mechanical properties using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifty E. Acquah; Brian K. Via; Lori G. Eckhardt

    2016-01-01

    In a bid to control the loblolly pine decline complex, stakeholders are using the selection and deployment of genetically superior families that are disease tolerant. It is vital that we do not compromise other important properties while breeding for disease tolerance. In this preliminary study, near infrared spectroscopy was utilized in conjunction with data collected...

  4. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  5. Understanding and Manipulating Electrostatic Fields at the Protein-Protein Interface Using Vibrational Spectroscopy and Continuum Electrostatics Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Andrew W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-11-05

    Biological function emerges in large part from the interactions of biomacromolecules in the complex and dynamic environment of the living cell. For this reason, macromolecular interactions in biological systems are now a major focus of interest throughout the biochemical and biophysical communities. The affinity and specificity of macromolecular interactions are the result of both structural and electrostatic factors. Significant advances have been made in characterizing structural features of stable protein-protein interfaces through the techniques of modern structural biology, but much less is understood about how electrostatic factors promote and stabilize specific functional macromolecular interactions over all possible choices presented to a given molecule in a crowded environment. In this Feature Article, we describe how vibrational Stark effect (VSE) spectroscopy is being applied to measure electrostatic fields at protein-protein interfaces, focusing on measurements of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily binding with structurally related but functionally distinct downstream effector proteins. In VSE spectroscopy, spectral shifts of a probe oscillator's energy are related directly to that probe's local electrostatic environment. By performing this experiment repeatedly throughout a protein-protein interface, an experimental map of measured electrostatic fields generated at that interface is determined. These data can be used to rationalize selective binding of similarly structured proteins in both in vitro and in vivo environments. Furthermore, these data can be used to compare to computational predictions of electrostatic fields to explore the level of simulation detail that is necessary to accurately predict our experimental findings.

  6. Theoretical estimation of the vibrational temperatures of N2 molecules in the ionosphere and in the laboratory simulated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpuri, K. S.; Oyama, K.-I.

    1991-06-01

    The vibrational temperature of excited nitrogen molecules (N2) are estimated theoretically for the case of ionosphere as well as for the lab simulated plasma, considering the various chemical reactions leading to the production and loss of N2 molecules. It was found that even in the case when quenching of the excited molecules by O and CO2 is considered, the vibrational temperature, T sub v, is higher than the neutral temperature, T sub n, below about 105 km but the difference decreases and about 120 km, the value of T sub v is less than T sub n. However, for no quenching case, the vibrational temperature can be as high as 1600 K at 150 km. The vibrational temperature for the lab simulated plasma on the other hand was found to be high (1500 K or more), the absolute value being dependent upon the concentration of O2 in the gas mixture taken and the intensity of UV light used for excitation of nitrogen molecules.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy and analysis of pseudo-tetrahedral complexes with metal imido bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehn, Mark P; Brown, Steven D; Jenkins, David M; Peters, Jonas C; Que, Lawrence

    2006-09-04

    A number of assignments have been previously posited for the metal-nitrogen stretch (nu(M-NR)), the N-R stretch (nu(MN-R)), and possible ligand deformation modes associated with terminally bound imides. Here we examine mononuclear iron(III) and cobalt(III) imido complexes of the monoanionic tridentate ligand [PhBP3] ([PhBP3] = [PhB(CH2PPh2)3]-) to clarify the vibrational features for these trivalent metal imides. We report the structures of [PhBP3]FeNtBu and [PhBP3]CoNtBu. Pseudo-tetrahedral metal imides of these types exhibit short bond lengths (ca. 1.65 A) and nearly linear angles about the M-N-C linkages, indicative of multiple bond character. Furthermore, these compounds give rise to intense, low-energy visible absorptions. Both the position and the intensity of the optical bands in the [PhBP3]MNR complexes depend on whether the substituent is an alkyl or aryl group. Excitation into the low-energy bands of [PhBP3]FeNtBu gives rise to two Raman features at 1104 and 1233 cm(-1), both of which are sensitive to 15N and 2H labeling. The isotope labeling suggests the 1104 cm(-1) mode has the greatest Fe-N stretching character, while the 1233 cm(-1) mode is affected to a lesser extent by (15)N substitution. The spectra of the deuterium-labeled imides further support this assertion. The data demonstrate that the observed peaks are not simple diatomic stretching modes but are extensively coupled to the vibrations of the ancillary organic group. Therefore, describing these complexes as simple diatomic or even triatomic oscillators is an oversimplification. Analogous studies of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex lead to a similar set of isotopically sensitive resonances at 1103 and 1238 cm(-1), corroborating the assignments made in the iron imides. Very minimal changes in the vibrational frequencies are observed upon replacement of cobalt(III) for iron(III), suggesting similar force constants for the two compounds. This is consistent with the previously proposed

  8. X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Hendrik [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

  9. Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property Modulation and Vibration-Tolerant Interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2006-09-30

    The goals of the Year 2006 Continuation Phase 2 three months period (April 1 to Sept. 30) of this project were to (a) conduct a probe elements industrial environment feasibility study and (b) fabricate embedded optical phase or microstructured SiC chips for individual gas species sensing. Specifically, SiC chips for temperature and pressure probe industrial applications were batch fabricated. Next, these chips were subject to a quality test for use in the probe sensor. A batch of the best chips for probe design were selected and subject to further tests that included sensor performance based on corrosive chemical exposure, power plant soot exposure, light polarization variations, and extreme temperature soaking. Experimental data were investigated in detail to analyze these mentioned industrial parameters relevant to a power plant. Probe design was provided to overcome mechanical vibrations. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. The other main focus of the reported work is to modify the SiC chip by fabricating an embedded optical phase or microstructures within the chip to enable gas species sensing under high temperature and pressure. This has been done in the Kar UCF Lab. using a laser-based system whose design and operation is explained. Experimental data from the embedded optical phase-based chip for changing temperatures is provided and shown to be isolated from gas pressure and species. These design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed high temperature high pressure gas species detection optical sensor technology.

  10. Infrared vibrational spectroscopy of [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ in the excited triplet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Fukazawa, Naoto; Murata, Kei; Inagaki, Akiko; Akita, Munetaka; Tanaka, Sei'ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Onda, Ken

    2014-03-03

    This work involved a detailed investigation into the infrared vibrational spectra of ruthenium polypyridyl complexes, specifically heteroleptic [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and bpm = 2,2'-bipyrimidine) and homoleptic [Ru(bpy)3](2+), in the excited triplet state. Transient spectra were acquired 500 ps after photoexcitation, corresponding to the vibrational ground state of the excited triplet state, using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. We assigned the observed bands to specific ligands in [Ru(bpy)2(bpm)](2+) based on the results of deuterium substitution and identified the corresponding normal vibrational modes using quantum-chemical calculations. Through this process, the more complex vibrational bands of [Ru(bpy)3](2+) were assigned to normal vibrational modes. The results are in good agreement with the model in which excited electrons are localized on a single ligand. We also found that the vibrational bands of both complexes associated with the ligands on which electrons are little localized appear at approximately 1317 and 1608 cm(-1). These assignments should allow the study of the reaction dynamics of various photofunctional systems including ruthenium polypyridyl complexes.

  11. Dynamic Time-Resolved Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Cyanide Photoproducts in a Room Temperature Flow Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    Chirped-pulsed (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy invented by Brooks Pate and coworkers a decade ago is an attractive tool for gas phase chemical dynamics and kinetics studies. A good reactor for such a purpose would have well-defined (and variable) temperature and pressure conditions to be amenable to accurate kinetic modeling. Furthermore, in low pressure samples with large enough number of molecular emitters, reaction dynamics can be observable directly, rather than mediated by supersonic expansion. In the present work, we are evaluating feasibility of in situ time-resolved CP spectroscopy in a room temperature flow tube reactor. Vinyl cyanide (CH_2CHCN), neat or mixed with inert gasses, flows through the reactor at pressures 1-50 μbar (0.76-38 mTorr) where it is photodissociated by a 193 nm laser. Millimeter-wave beam of the CP spectrometer co-propagates with the laser beam along the reactor tube and interacts with nascent photoproducts. Rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCCCN are detected, with ≥10 μs time-steps for 500 ms following photolysis of CH_2CHCN. The post-photolysis evolution of the photoproducts' rotational line intensities is investigated for the effects of rotational and vibrational thermalization of energized photoproducts. Possible contributions from bimolecular and wall-mediated chemistry are evaluated as well.

  12. Vibrations and reorientations of NH3 molecules in [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 studied by infrared spectroscopy and theoretical (DFT) calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetmańczyk, Joanna; Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Migdał-Mikuli, Anna; Mikuli, Edward

    2015-02-05

    The vibrational and reorientational motions of NH3 ligands and ClO4(-) anions were investigated by Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in the high- and low-temperature phases of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2. The temperature dependencies of full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the infrared bands at: 591 and 3385cm(-1), associated with: ρr(NH3) and νas(N-H) modes, respectively, indicate that there exist fast (correlation times τR≈10(-12)-10(-13)s) reorientational motions of NH3 ligands, with a mean values of activation energies: 7.8 and 4.5kJmol(-1), in the phase I and II, respectively. These reorientational motions of NH3 ligands are only slightly disturbed in the phase transition region and do not significantly contribute to the phase transition mechanism. Fourier transform far-infrared and middle-infrared spectra with decreasing of temperature indicated characteristic changes at the vicinity of PT at TC(c)=137.6K (on cooling), which suggested lowering of the crystal structure symmetry. Infrared spectra of [Mn(NH3)6](ClO4)2 were recorded and interpreted by comparison with respective theoretical spectra calculated using DFT method (B3LYP functional, LANL2DZ ECP basis set (on Mn atom) and 6-311+G(d,p) basis set (on H, N, Cl, O atoms) for the isolated equilibrium two models (Model 1 - separate isolated [Mn(NH3)6](2+) cation and ClO4(-) anion and Model 2 - [Mn(NH3)6(ClO4)2] complex system). Calculated optical spectra show a good agreement with the experimental infrared spectra (FT-FIR and FT-MIR) for the both models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sodiated Sugar Structures: Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of Na^+(GLUCOSE) Adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jonathan; Kregel, Steven J.; Fischer, Kaitlyn C.; Garand, Etienne

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery that ionic liquids help facilitate the dissolution of cellulose has renewed interest in understanding how ionic species interact with carbohydrates. Here we present infrared spectra in the 2800 - 3800 \\wn range of gas-phase mass-selected Na^+(Glucose) adducts. These adducts are further probed with IR-dip spectroscopy to yield conformer specific spectra of at least seven unique species. The relative abundances of conformers show that gas-phase interconversion barriers are sufficiently high to preserve the solution-phase populations. Additionally, our results demonstrate that mM concentrations of NaCl do not strongly perturb the anomeric ratio of glucose in solution.

  14. Full characterization of vibrational coherence in a porphyrin chromophore by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Franco V A; Anderson, Harry L; Meech, Stephen R; Heisler, Ismael A

    2015-01-08

    In this work we present experimental and calculated two-dimensional electronic spectra for a 5,15-bisalkynyl porphyrin chromophore. The lowest energy electronic Qy transition couples mainly to a single 380 cm(-1) vibrational mode. The two-dimensional electronic spectra reveal diagonal and cross peaks which oscillate as a function of population time. We analyze both the amplitude and phase distribution of this main vibronic transition as a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Even though Feynman diagrams provide a good indication of where the amplitude of the oscillating components are located in the excitation-detection plane, other factors also affect this distribution. Specifically, the oscillation corresponding to each Feynman diagram is expected to have a phase that is a function of excitation and detection frequencies. Therefore, the overall phase of the experimentally observed oscillation will reflect this phase dependence. Another consequence is that the overall oscillation amplitude can show interference patterns resulting from overlapping contributions from neighboring Feynman diagrams. These observations are consistently reproduced through simulations based on third order perturbation theory coupled to a spectral density described by a Brownian oscillator model.

  15. Final Technical Report Structural Dynamics in Complex Liquids Studied with Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Fiechtner, Gregory J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    This grant supported work in the Tokmakoff lab at the University of Chicago aimed at understanding the fundamental properties of water at a molecular level, and how water participates in proton transport in aqueous media. The physical properties of water and aqueous solutions are inextricably linked with efforts to develop new sustainable energy sources. Energy conversion, storage, and transduction processes, particularly those that occur in biology and soft matter, make use of water for the purpose of storing and moving charge. Water’s unique physical and chemical properties depend on the ability of water molecules to participate in up to four hydrogen bonds, and the rapid fluctuations and ultrafast energy dissipation of its hydrogenbonded networks. Our work during the grant period led to advances in four areas: (1) the generation of short pulses of broadband infrared light (BBIR) for use in time-resolved twodimensional spectroscopy (2D IR), (2) the investigation of the spectroscopy and transport of excess protons in water, (3) the study of aqueous hydroxide to describe the interaction of the ion and water and the dynamics of proton transfer, and (4) the coupled motion of water and its hydrogen-bonding solutes.

  16. Detection of molecular changes induced by antibiotics in Escherichia coli using vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Nguyen, N. T.; Sarter, Samira; Hai Nguyen, N.; Daniel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to test Raman (400-1800 cm- 1) and Infra-red (1900-500 cm- 1) spectroscopies followed by statistical analysis (principal component analysis) to detect molecular changes induced by antibiotics (ampicillin, cefotaxime - cell wall synthesis inhibitors, tetracycline - protein synthesis inhibitor, ciprofloxacin - DNA synthesis inhibitor) against Escherichia coli TOP10. In case of ampicillin and cefotaxime, a decrease in protein bands in both Raman (1240, 1660 cm- 1), and IR spectra (1230, 1530, 1630 cm- 1), and an increase in carbohydrate bands (1150, 1020 cm- 1) in IR spectra were observed. Tetracycline addition caused an increase in nucleic acid bands (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1), a sharp decrease in phenylalanine (995 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and the amide I and amide II bands (1630, 1530 cm- 1) in IR spectra, an increase in DNA in both Raman (1083 cm- 1) and IR spectra (1080 cm- 1). Regarding ciprofloxacin, an increase in nucleic acids (775, 1478, 1578 cm- 1) in Raman spectra and in protein bands (1230, 1520, 1630 cm- 1), in DNA (1080 cm- 1) in IR spectra were detected. Clear discrimination of antibiotic-treated samples compared to the control was recorded, showing that Raman and IR spectroscopies, coupled to principal component analysis for data, could be used to detect molecular modifications in bacteria exposed to different classes of antibiotics. These findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of antibiotics in bacteria.

  17. Temperature and chain length dependence of ultrafast vibrational dynamics of thiocyanate in alkylimidazolium ionic liquids: A random walk on a rugged energy landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinzer, Thomas; Garrett-Roe, Sean

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of a thiocyanate vibrational probe (SCN-) was used to investigate local dynamics in alkylimidazolium bis-[trifluoromethylsulfonyl]imide ionic liquids ([Imn,1][Tf2N], n = 2, 4, 6) at temperatures from 5 to 80 °C. The rate of frequency fluctuations reported by SCN- increases with increasing temperature and decreasing alkyl chain length. Temperature-dependent correlation times scale proportionally to temperature-dependent bulk viscosities of each ionic liquid studied. A multimode Brownian oscillator model demonstrates that very low frequency (modes primarily drive the observed spectral diffusion and that these modes broaden and blue shift on average with increasing temperature. An Arrhenius analysis shows activation barriers for local motions around the probe between 5.5 and 6.5 kcal/mol that are very similar to those for translational diffusion of ions. [Im6,1][Tf2N] shows an unexpected decrease in activation energy compared to [Im4,1][Tf2N] that may be related to mesoscopically ordered polar and nonpolar domains. A model of dynamics on a rugged potential energy landscape provides a unifying description of the observed Arrhenius behavior and the Brownian oscillator model of the low frequency modes.

  18. In situ gas temperature measurements by UV-absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A(2)Sigma(+) situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path...

  19. Nanoscale chemical and mechanical characterization of thin films:sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy at buriedinterfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweskin, Sasha Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy was used to characterize interfaces pertinent to current surface engineering applications, such as thin film polymers and novel catalysts. An array of advanced surface science techniques like scanning probe microscopy (SPM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), gas chromatography (GC) and electron microscopy were used to obtain experimental measurements complementary to SFG data elucidating polymer and catalyst surface composition, surface structure, and surface mechanical behavior. Experiments reported in this dissertation concentrate on three fundamental questions: (1) How does the interfacial molecular structure differ from that of the bulk in real world applications? (2) How do differences in chemical environment affect interface composition or conformation? (3) How do these changes correlate to properties such as mechanical or catalytic performance? The density, surface energy and bonding at a solid interface dramatically alter the polymer configuration, physics and mechanical properties such as surface glass transition, adhesion and hardness. The enhanced sensitivity of SFG at the buried interface is applied to three systems: a series of acrylates under compression, the compositions and segregation behavior of binary polymer polyolefin blends, and the changes in surface structure of a hydrogel as a function of hydration. In addition, a catalytically active thin film of polymer coated nanoparticles is investigated to evaluate the efficacy of SFG to provide in situ information for catalytic reactions involving small mass adsorption and/or product development. Through the use of SFG, in situ total internal reflection (TIR) was used to increase the sensitivity of SFG and provide the necessary specificity to investigate interfaces of thin polymer films and nanostructures previously considered unfeasible. The dynamic nature of thin film surfaces is examined and it is found that the non

  20. Identification and Partial Structural Characterization of Mass Isolated Valsartan and Its Metabolite with Messenger Tagging Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlova, Olga; Colvin, Sean M.; Brathwaite, Antonio; Menges, Fabian S.; Craig, Stephanie M.; Miller, Scott J.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in the coupling of vibrational spectroscopy with mass spectrometry create new opportunities for the structural characterization of metabolites with great sensitivity. Previous studies have demonstrated this scheme on 300 K ions using very high power free electron lasers in the fingerprint region of the infrared. Here we extend the scope of this approach to a single investigator scale as well as extend the spectral range to include the OH stretching fundamentals. This is accomplished by detecting the IR absorptions in a linear action regime by photodissociation of weakly bound N2 molecules, which are attached to the target ions in a cryogenically cooled, rf ion trap. We consider the specific case of the widely used drug Valsartan and two isomeric forms of its metabolite. Advantages and challenges of the cold ion approach are discussed, including disentangling the role of conformers and the strategic choices involved in the selection of the charging mechanism that optimize spectral differentiation among candidate structural isomers. In this case, the Na+ complexes are observed to yield sharp resonances in the high frequency NH and OH stretching regions, which can be used to easily differentiate between two isomers of the metabolite. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. pH dependence of the conformation of small peptides investigated with two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Shaw, Daniel J; Woutersen, Sander

    2010-11-25

    We investigate how the conformation of small peptides is influenced by the presence or absence of charge on the C-terminus and on the side groups. To this purpose, the conformations of two tripeptides, with acidic and basic side groups, is determined at several pD values using two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. The investigated pD values are chosen relative to the C-terminal and side-chain pK(a) values in such a way that the C-terminus and side groups are in well-defined protonation states. The measurements are analyzed quantitatively using an excitonic model for the Amide I' mode. From the vibrational coupling and the angle between the Amide I' transition dipoles obtained in this way, the dihedral angles (φ,ψ) of the central C(α) atom are determined. Interestingly, our measurements show that the backbone structure of the peptides is remarkably stable against changing the charges of both the side groups and the C-terminal carboxylate groups. This is probably a consequence of effective screening of the Coulomb interactions between the charged groups by the water molecules between them. We also find that the (φ,ψ) confidence regions obtained from 2DIR measurements can have highly irregular shapes as a consequence of the nonlinear relation between the dihedral angles and the experimentally determined Amide I' coupling and transition-dipole angle.

  2. Alteration of biomacromolecule in corn by steam flaking in relation to biodegradation kinetics in ruminant, revealed with vibrational molecular spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ningning; Liu, Jianxin; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-10-12

    Large scale of steam flaked corn has been used in dairy ration to maintain high milk production level. This study aimed to determine effects of steam flaking on processing-induced intrinsic molecular structure changes that were associated with rumen degradation kinetics and nutrients supply. The advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to reveal the processing-induced intrinsic structure changes on a molecular basis. The rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient supply were determined using in situ approach in ruminant livestock system. Raw corn grain (RC) and steam flaked corn grain (SFC) were obtained from two different processing plants. The results showed that (1) Compared to RC, SFC had greater truly digestible non-fiber carbohydrate [tdNFC: 86.8 versus 78.0% dry matter (DM)], but lower truly digestible crude protein [tdCP: 7.7 versus 9.0% DM]. (2) The steam flaking increased (PMolecular absorbance intensities of most carbohydrate biopolymers were greater in SFC (Pmolecular spectral intensities were lower (Pmolecular structure and nutrient interactive study showed that carbohydrate spectral intensities were positively (Pmolecular structure changes had an interactive relationship with rumen degradation kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Yuxin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se; Gong, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Shumin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3}, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films.

  4. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  5. Analysis of functional organic molecules at noble metal surfaces by means of vibrational spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyssner, Felix

    2011-10-24

    The goal of this work is to optimize the efficiency of photoinduced molecular switching processes on surfaces via controlled variations of the adsorption and electronic properties of the switch. We investigated the influence of external stimuli, i.e. photons and thermal activation, on surface bound molecular switches undergoing trans/cis-isomerizations and ring-opening/closing-reactions, respectively. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy have been used as the main tools to investigate the adsorption behavior and the molecular switching properties. Two basic concepts of coupling the molecular switch to the surface have been studied: (i) physisorbed or weakly chemisorbed systems deposited on noble metal surfaces under UHV conditions and (ii) molecular switches bound covalently via anchor groups. In the HREELS study following concept (i), we investigated the adsorption geometry and isomerization behavior of various molecular switches on metal substrates which are able to undergo a photoinduced trans/cis-isomerization in solution. We investigated three isoelectronic molecules on Au where we systematically changed the photochemically active group from the diazo-group in an azobenzene-derivative (on Cu(111)) to the imine-group, and the vinylene-group, respectively. Finding the photoisomerization quenched for all systems we observed considerable differences in their thermal isomerization behavior. Comparable we find the photoinduced ring-opening/closing-reaction of spiropyran quenched on Au(111) but a thermally induced ring-opening reaction resulting in the open form being strongly stabilized by the metal. SFG spectroscopy is employed to investigate the reversible, photoinduced trans/cis-isomerization of an azobenzene-functionalized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold using a tripodal linker system. In consequence of the decoupling provided by the tripodal linker, the switching behavior of the

  6. Dual-resolution Raman spectroscopy for measurements of temperature and twelve species in hydrocarbon–air flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Barlow, Robert S.

    2016-07-12

    This study introduces dual-resolution Raman spectroscopy as a novel diagnostics approach for measurements of temperature and species in flames where multiple hydrocarbons are present. Simultaneous measurement of multiple hydrocarbons is challenging because their vibrational Raman spectra in the C–H stretch region are closely overlapped and are not well known over the range of temperature encountered in flames. Overlap between the hydrocarbon spectra is mitigated by adding a second spectrometer, with a higher dispersion grating, to collect the Raman spectra in the C–H stretch region. A dual-resolution Raman spectroscopy instrument has been developed and optimized for measurements of major species (N2, O2, H2O, CO2, CO, H2, DME) and major combustion intermediates (CH4, CH2O, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6) in DME–air flames. The temperature dependences of the hydrocarbon Raman spectra over fixed spectral regions have been determined through a series of measurements in laminar Bunsen-burner flames, and have been used to extend a library of previously acquired Raman spectra up to flame temperature. The paper presents the first Raman measurements of up to twelve species in hydrocarbon flames, and the first quantitative Raman measurements of formaldehyde in flames. Lastly, the accuracy and precision of the instrument are determined from measurements in laminar flames and the applicability of the instrument to turbulent DME–air flames is discussed.

  7. The vibrational structure of (E,E’)-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene. Linear dichroism FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Møller, Søren; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The title compound (DPB) was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in liquid solutions and by FTIR linear dichroism (LD) measurements on samples aligned in stretched polyethylene. The LD data provided experimental assignments of molecular transition moment directions and vibrational symmetries for more...... of a nearly complete assignment of the IR active fundamentals of DPB, involving reassignment of a number of transitions. In addition, previously published Raman spectra of DPB were well predicted by the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations....

  8. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy studies at solid/liquid interfaces : Influence of the experimental geometry in the spectral shape and enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Liljeblad, Jonathan F.D.; Tyrode, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the experimental geometry, specifically the angles of incidence (AOI) of the exciting beams, on the enhancement of the vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) spectra has been systematically investigated, particularly when approaching total internal reflection (TIR) conditions. Theoretical simulations of the spectral intensity as a function of the AOI and infrared wavelength at three different polarization combinations were critically compared to experimental data obtai...

  9. Transient two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of an operating molecular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; van Dijk, Chris N; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Sanders, Hans J; Bakker, Bert H; Leigh, David A; Brouwer, Albert M; Buma, Wybren Jan; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-12-20

    Synthetic molecular machines are promising building blocks for future nanoscopic devices. However, the details of their mechanical behaviour are in many cases still largely unknown. A deeper understanding of mechanics at the molecular level is essential for the design and construction of complex nanodevices. Here, we show that transient two-dimensional infrared (T2DIR) spectroscopy makes it possible to monitor the conformational changes of a translational molecular machine during its operation. Translation of a macrocyclic ring from one station to another on a molecular thread is initiated by a UV pulse. The arrival of the shuttling macrocycle at the final station is visible from a newly appearing cross peak between these two moieties. To eliminate spectral congestion in the T2DIR spectra, we use a subtraction method applicable to many other complex molecular systems. The T2DIR spectra indicate that the macrocycle adopts a boat-like conformation at the final station, which contrasts with the chair-like conformation at the initial station.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy via the Caldeira-Leggett model with anharmonic system potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Ivanov, Sergei D; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-04-28

    The Caldeira-Leggett (CL) model, which describes a system bi-linearly coupled to a harmonic bath, has enjoyed popularity in condensed phase spectroscopy owing to its utmost simplicity. However, the applicability of the model to cases with anharmonic system potentials, as it is required for the description of realistic systems in solution, is questionable due to the presence of the invertibility problem [F. Gottwald et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 2722 (2015)] unless the system itself resembles the CL model form. This might well be the case at surfaces or in the solid regime, which we here confirm for a particular example of an iodine molecule in the atomic argon environment under high pressure. For this purpose we extend the recently proposed Fourier method for parameterizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics [F. Gottwald et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 244110 (2015)] to the non-linear case based on the CL model and perform an extensive error analysis. In order to judge on the applicability of this model in advance, we give practical empirical criteria and discuss the effect of the potential renormalization term. The obtained results provide evidence that the CL model can be used for describing a potentially broad class of systems.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy via the Caldeira-Leggett model with anharmonic system potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gottwald, Fabian; Kühn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    The Caldeira-Leggett (CL) model, which describes a system bi-linearly coupled to a harmonic bath, has enjoyed popularity in condensed phase spectroscopy owing to its utmost simplicity. However, the applicability of the model to cases with anharmonic system potentials, as it is required for the description of realistic systems in solution, is questionable due to the presence of the invertibility problem [J. Phys. Chem. Lett., \\textbf{6}, 2722 (2015)] unless the system itself resembles the CL model form. This might well be the case at surfaces or in the solid regime, which we here confirm for a particular example of an iodine molecule in the atomic argon environment under high pressure. For this purpose we extend the recently proposed Fourier method for parameterizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics[J. Chem. Phys., \\textbf{142}, 244110 (2015)] to the non-linear case based on the CL model and perform an extensive error analysis. In order to judge on the applicability of this model in advance, we give handy ...

  12. Temperature-dependent Raman and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies on phase transition behavior of VO{sub 2} films with M1 and M2 phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okimura, Kunio, E-mail: okifn@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Hanis Azhan, Nurul [Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, Hiratsuka 259-1292 (Japan); Hajiri, Tetsuya [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kimura, Shin-ichi [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Zaghrioui, Mustapha; Sakai, Joe [GREMAN, UMR 7347 CNRS, Université François Rabelais de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2014-04-21

    Structural and electronic phase transitions behavior of two polycrystalline VO{sub 2} films, one with pure M1 phase and the other with pure M2 phase at room temperature, were investigated by temperature-controlled Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). We observed characteristic transient dynamics in which the Raman modes at 195 cm{sup −1} (V-V vibration) and 616 cm{sup −1} (V-O vibration) showed remarkable hardening along the temperature in M1 phase film, indicating the rearrangements of V-V pairs and VO{sub 6} octahedra. It was also shown that the M1 Raman mode frequency approached those of invariant M2 peaks before entering rutile phase. In UPS spectra with high energy resolution of 0.03 eV for the M2 phase film, narrower V{sub 3d} band was observed together with smaller gap compared to those of M1 phase film, supporting the nature of Mott insulator of M2 phase even in the polycrystalline film. Cooperative behavior of lattice rearrangements and electronic phase transition was suggested for M1 phase film.

  13. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  14. Complementary Vibrational Spectroscopy Investigations of Iron and Iron-Bearing Minerals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C. A.; Antonangeli, D.; Fiquet, G.; Fei, Y.; Alatas, A.; Dera, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The high-pressure elastic and thermodynamic properties of iron have been extensively studied because iron is thought to be the main constituent in Earth's core, along with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements. In particular, nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) is an isotope-selective technique that has been used to investigate the vibrational properties of 57Fe at high-pressure via its measured phonon density of states (DOS) [e.g., 1]. For example, the low-energy region of a material's phonon DOS is proportional to its Debye sound velocity (vD), which reflects an average of its compressional (vP) and shear (vS) sound velocities, weighted more heavily towards vS [2]. In order to separate the compressional and shear components of vD, one often relies on established equations of state (EOS) which, in the case of iron, diverge above 100 GPa [e.g., 3; 4]. In turn, such uncertainties are propagated into iron's sound velocities--particularly vP--at pressures approaching those of Earth's core. Here we demonstrate how the combination of NRIXS and high-energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HERIX) data allows for the determination of both vP and vS, independent of an EOS. In particular, we used NRIXS and HERIX to probe the total phonon DOS and points along the longitudinal acoustic phonon branch, respectively, of pure iron loaded into similarly prepared diamond anvil cells, up to a pressure of 171 GPa at 300 K [1; 5]. Experiments were performed at the Advanced Photon Source and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, where sample volumes (densities) were also measured with in-situ x-ray diffraction. Using established NRIXS and HERIX fitting procedures, we determined iron's density-dependent vD and vP, respectively, accounting for mass effects in the former parameter using a harmonic oscillator model. The combination of these datasets [1; 5] provides a new tight constraint on the density-dependent compressional and shear sound velocities of iron

  15. Syntheses, crystal structures, NMR spectroscopy, and vibrational spectroscopy of Sr(PO{sub 3}F).H{sub 2}O and Sr(PO{sub 3}F)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantz, Stephan G.; Hoeppe, Henning A. [Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperchemie, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Wuellen, Leo van; Fischer, Andreas [Lehrstuhl fuer Chemische Physik und Materialwissenschaften, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Libowitzky, Eugen [Institute for Mineralogy and Crystallography, Faculty of Geosciences, Geography and Astronomy, University of Vienna (Austria); Baran, Enrique J. [Centro de Quimica Inorganica (CEQUINOR/CONICET, UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Weil, Matthias [Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Division Structural Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    Single crystals of Sr(PO{sub 3}F).H{sub 2}O {P2_1/c, Z = 4, a = 7.4844(2) Aa, b = 7.0793(2) Aa, c = 8.4265(2) Aa, β = 108.696(1) , V = 422.91(2) Aa"3, 2391 F_o"2, 70 parameters, R_1[F"2 > 2σ(F"2)] = 0.036; wR_2(F"2 all) = 0.049, S = 1.054} were grown from an aqueous solution by a metathesis reaction. The structure comprises [SrO{sub 8}] polyhedra and PO{sub 3}F tetrahedra that form a layered arrangement parallel to (100). The topotactic dehydration of this phase proceeds between 80 and 140 C to afford Sr(PO{sub 3}F). The monazite-type crystal structure of Sr(PO{sub 3}F) was elucidated from the X-ray powder data by simulated annealing [P2{sub 1}/c, Z = 4, a = 6.71689(9) Aa, b = 7.11774(11) Aa, c = 8.66997(13) Aa, β = 128.0063(7) , V = 326.605(8) Aa{sup 3}, R{sub p} = 0.010, R{sub wp} = 0.015, R{sub F} = 0.030]. During dehydration, the structure of Sr(PO{sub 3}F) .H{sub 2}O collapses along [100] from a layered arrangement into a framework structure, accompanied by a change of the coordination number of the Sr{sup 2+} ions from eight to nine. The magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and vibrational spectroscopy data of both phases are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Time, Temperature, and Cationic Dependence of Alkali Activation of Slag: Insights from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Spectral Deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakhane, Akash; Madavarapu, Sateesh Babu; Marzke, Robert; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2017-08-01

    The use of waste/by-product materials, such as slag or fly ash, activated using alkaline agents to create binding materials for construction applications (in lieu of portland cement) is on the rise. The influence of activation parameters (SiO 2 to Na 2 O ratio or M s of the activator, Na 2 O to slag ratio or n, cation type K + or Na + ) on the process and extent of alkali activation of slag under ambient and elevated temperature curing, evaluated through spectroscopic techniques, is reported in this paper. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy along with a Fourier self-deconvolution method is used. The major spectral band of interest lies in the wavenumber range of ∼950 cm -1 , corresponding to the antisymmetric stretching vibration of Si-O-T (T = Si or Al) bonds. The variation in the spectra with time from 6 h to 28 days is attributed to the incorporation of Al in the gel structure and the enhancement in degree of polymerization of the gel. 29 Si nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to quantify the Al incorporation with time, which is found to be higher when Na silicate is used as the activator. The Si-O-T bond wavenumbers are also generally lower for the Na silicate activated systems.

  17. Vibrational energy relaxation of a diatomic molecule in a room-temperature ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Youngseon; Kim, Hyung J

    2006-07-14

    Vibrational energy relaxation (VER) dynamics of a diatomic solute in ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (EMI(+)PF(6) (-)) are studied via equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The time scale for VER is found to decrease markedly with the increasing solute dipole moment, consonant with many previous studies in polar solvents. A detailed analysis of nonequilibrium results shows that for a dipolar solute, dissipation of an excess solute vibrational energy occurs almost exclusively via the Lennard-Jones interactions between the solute and solvent, while an oscillatory energy exchange between the two is mainly controlled by their electrostatic interactions. Regardless of the anharmonicity of the solute vibrational potential, VER becomes accelerated as the initial vibrational energy increases. This is attributed primarily to the enhancement in variations of the solvent force on the solute bond, induced by large-amplitude solute vibrations. One interesting finding is that if a time variable scaled with the initial excitation energy is employed, dissipation dynamics of the excess vibrational energy of the dipolar solute tend to show a universal behavior irrespective of its initial vibrational state. Comparison with water and acetonitrile shows that overall characteristics of VER in EMI(+)PF(6) (-) are similar to those in acetonitrile, while relaxation in water is much faster than the two. It is also found that the Landau-Teller theory predictions for VER time scale obtained via equilibrium simulations of the solvent force autocorrelation function are in reasonable agreement with the nonequilibrium results.

  18. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), at low vibrational excitation: From high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, David; Miller, Anthony; AMYAY, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), with up to 8,600 cm-1 of vibrational energy This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision (B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thievin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 114301-11431...

  19. Temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins probed by NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational...... ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. NMR spectroscopy allows analysis...... of temperature-induced structural changes at residue resolution using secondary chemical shift analysis, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, and residual dipolar couplings. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins....

  20. Semiclassical treatments for small-molecule dynamics in low-temperature crystals using fixed and adiabatic vibrational bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Craig T.; Cina, Jeffrey A.

    2007-09-01

    Time-resolved coherent nonlinear optical experiments on small molecules in low-temperature host crystals are exposing valuable information on quantum mechanical dynamics in condensed media. We make use of generic features of these systems to frame two simple, comprehensive theories that will enable the efficient calculations of their ultrafast spectroscopic signals and support their interpretation in terms of the underlying chemical dynamics. Without resorting to a simple harmonic analysis, both treatments rely on the identification of normal coordinates to unambiguously partition the well-structured guest-host complex into a system and a bath. Both approaches expand the overall wave function as a sum of product states between fully anharmonic vibrational basis states for the system and approximate Gaussian wave packets for the bath degrees of freedom. The theories exploit the fact that ultrafast experiments typically drive large-amplitude motion in a few intermolecular degrees of freedom of higher frequency than the crystal phonons, while these intramolecular vibrations indirectly induce smaller-amplitude—but still perhaps coherent—motion among the lattice modes. The equations of motion for the time-dependent parameters of the bath wave packets are fairly compact in a fixed vibrational basis/Gaussian bath (FVB/GB) approach. An alternative adiabatic vibrational basis/Gaussian bath (AVB/GB) treatment leads to more complicated equations of motion involving adiabatic and nonadiabatic vector potentials. Computational demands for propagation of the parameter equations of motion appear quite manageable for tens or hundreds of atoms and scale similarly with system size in the two cases. Because of the time-scale separation between intermolecular and lattice vibrations, the AVB/GB theory may in some instances require fewer vibrational basis states than the FVB/GB approach. Either framework should enable practical first-principles calculations of nonlinear optical

  1. High-Temperature Spectroscopy of Organometallics: The Gol'danskii-Karyagin Effect in Ferrocene Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herber, Rolfe H.; Nowik, Israel [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2002-06-15

    The temperature dependence of the mean-square-amplitude of vibration and the motional anisotropy of the metal atom in a number of structurally related organometallics has been examined in detail and can be related to the molecular level architecture of these solids. In particular, it is noted that in octamethylferrocenylmethanol, there is a competition between the 'gear-wheel effect' observed in related octamethylferrocenyl complexes and hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules in the solid below the melting point.

  2. Vibration-rotation alchemy in acetylene (12C2H2), ? at low vibrational excitation: from high resolution spectroscopy to fast intramolecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, Badr; Fayt, André; Herman, Michel

    2010-04-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), ? with up to 8600 cm-1 of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive and reliable knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision [B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 114301 (2009)]. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities in intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the v 4 + v 5 and v 3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φ d, the IVR lifetime τ IVR , and the recurrence time τ rec. For the two bright states v 3 + 2v 4 and 7v 4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7v 4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states.

  3. Alteration of biomacromolecule in corn by steam flaking in relation to biodegradation kinetics in ruminant, revealed with vibrational molecular spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ningning; Liu, Jianxin; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-02-01

    Large scale of steam flaked corn has been used in dairy ration to maintain high milk production level. This study aimed to determine effects of steam flaking on processing-induced intrinsic molecular structure changes that were associated with rumen degradation kinetics and nutrients supply. The advanced vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to reveal the processing-induced intrinsic structure changes on a molecular basis. The rumen degradation kinetics and nutrient supply were determined using in situ approach in ruminant livestock system. Raw corn grain (RC) and steam flaked corn grain (SFC) were obtained from two different processing plants. The results showed that (1) Compared to RC, SFC had greater truly digestible non-fiber carbohydrate [tdNFC: 86.8 versus 78.0% dry matter (DM)], but lower truly digestible crude protein [tdCP: 7.7 versus 9.0% DM]. (2) The steam flaking increased (P < 0.01) rumen degradable DM (RDDM) and starch (RDSt), but decreased (P < 0.01) rumen degradable protein (RDP). (3) Molecular absorbance intensities of most carbohydrate biopolymers were greater in SFC (P < 0.01), but protein amides associated molecular spectral intensities were lower (P < 0.01) in SFC. (4). The molecular structure and nutrient interactive study showed that carbohydrate spectral intensities were positively (P < 0.10) associated with RDDM and RDSt and protein amide spectral intensities were positively (P < 0.10) associated with RDP. This results indicated that the steam flaking induced molecular structure changes had an interactive relationship with rumen degradation kinetics.

  4. Surface and buried interfacial structures of epoxy resins used as underfills studied by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Anne V; Holden, Brad; Kristalyn, Cornelius; Fuller, Mike; Wilkerson, Brett; Chen, Zhan

    2011-05-01

    Flip chip technology has greatly improved the performance of semiconductor devices, but relies heavily on the performance of epoxy underfill adhesives. Because epoxy underfills are cured in situ in flip chip semiconductor devices, understanding their surface and interfacial structures is critical for understanding their adhesion to various substrates. Here, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to study surface and buried interfacial structures of two model epoxy resins used as underfills in flip chip devices, bisphenol A digylcidyl ether (BADGE) and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE). The surface structures of these epoxies were compared before and after cure, and the orientations of their surface functional groups were deduced to understand how surface structural changes during cure may affect adhesion properties. Further, the effect of moisture exposure, a known cause of adhesion failure, on surface structures was studied. It was found that the BADGE surface significantly restructured upon moisture exposure while the BDDGE surface did not, showing that BADGE adhesives may be more prone to moisture-induced delamination. Lastly, although surface structure can give some insight into adhesion, buried interfacial structures more directly correspond to adhesion properties of polymers. SFG was used to study buried interfaces between deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) and the epoxies before and after moisture exposure. It was shown that moisture exposure acted to disorder the buried interfaces, most likely due to swelling. These results correlated with lap shear adhesion testing showing a decrease in adhesion strength after moisture exposure. The presented work showed that surface and interfacial structures can be correlated to adhesive strength and may be helpful in understanding and designing optimized epoxy underfill adhesives.

  5. Spectroscopy for Industrial Applications: High-Temperature Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Grosch, Helge; Clausen, Sønnik

    The continuous development of the spectroscopic databases brings new perspectives in the environmental and industrial on-line process control, monitoring and stimulates further optical sensor developments. This is because no calibration gases are needed and, in general, temperature-dependent spec...

  6. High sensitive translational temperature measurement using characteristic curve of second harmonic signal in wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamada, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    A high sensitive measurement system of translational temperature of plasma was developed. In this system, which is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy, a peak value of second harmonic signal was measured as a function of modulation depth. The translational temperature was estimated by fitting the theoretically calculated curve to the measured characteristic curve. The performance of this system was examined using microwave discharge plasma. As a result of comparison with conventional laser absorption spectroscopy, both results show good agreement in the measurable region of the laser absorption spectroscopy. Next, the measurable limit of this system was investigated by decreasing the target number density. The detectable fractional absorption was as low as 3.7 × 10-5 in which condition the signal to noise ratio was the order of single digit at the averaging number of 40. This value is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the laser absorption spectroscopy.

  7. Spectroscopie moléculaire : calcul de spectres, mesures des températures de rotation et de vibration dans les plasmas thermiques

    OpenAIRE

    Faure, Géraldine

    1997-01-01

    This work deals with vibrational and rotational temperatures of molecules in thermal plasmas.This thesis had two main parts : the first is devoted to the molecular spectra calculation and the second part is devoted to the spectra comparison in four different experimental conditions.A code of calculation has been created to simulate spectra of diatomic molecules. It has been essentially applied on the radicals C2, CN, the molecule N2 and the molecular ion N2+ for variable parameter vibration a...

  8. Application of high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy: Vibrational resolved C 1s and O 1s spectra of CO adsorbed on Ni(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foehlisch, A.; Nilsson, A.; Martensson, N. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    There are various effects which determine the line shape of a core-level electron spectrum. These are due to the finite life-time of the core hole, inelastic scattering of the outgoing photoelectron, electronic shake-up and shake-off processes and vibrational excitations. For free atoms and molecules the different contributions to the observed line shapes can often be well separated. For solids, surfaces and adsorbates the line shapes are in general much broader and it has in the past been assumed that no separation of the various contributions can be made. In the present report the authors will show that this is indeed not the case. Surprisingly, the vibrational fine structure of CO adsorbed on Ni(100) can be resolved in the C 1s and O 1s electron spectra. This was achieved by the combination of highly monochromatized soft X-rays from B18.0 with a high resolution Scienta 200 mm photoelectron spectrometer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with tunable excitation energy yields as a core level spectroscopy atomic and site-specific information. The presented measurements allow for a determination of internuclear distances and potential energy curves in corehole ionized adsorbed molecules. The authors analysis of the c(2x2) phase CO/Ni(100) on {open_quotes}top{close_quotes} yielded a vibrational splitting of 217 +/- 2 meV for C 1s ionization. For O 1s ionization a splitting of 173 +/- 8 meV was found.

  9. Pyrrole Hydrogenation over Rh(111) and Pt(111) Single-Crystal Surfaces and Hydrogenation Promotion Mediated by 1-Methylpyrrole: A Kinetic and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J.; Bieri, Marco; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-03-04

    Sum-frequency generation (SFG) surface vibrational spectroscopy and kinetic measurements using gas chromatography have been used to study the adsorption and hydrogenation of pyrrole over both Pt(111) and Rh(111) single-crystal surfaces at Torr pressures (3 Torr pyrrole, 30 Torr H{sub 2}) to form pyrrolidine and the minor product butylamine. Over Pt(111) at 298 K it was found that pyrrole adsorbs in an upright geometry cleaving the N-H bond to bind through the nitrogen evidenced by SFG data. Over Rh(111) at 298 K pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry relative to the surface through the p-aromatic system. A pyrroline surface reaction intermediate, which was not detected in the gas phase, was seen by SFG during the hydrogenation over both surfaces. Significant enhancement of the reaction rate was achieved over both metal surfaces by adsorbing 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. SFG vibrational spectroscopic results indicate that reaction promotion is achieved by weakening the bonding between the N-containing products and the metal surface because of lateral interactions on the surface between 1-methylpyrrole and the reaction species, reducing the desorption energy of the products. It was found that the ring-opening product butylamine was a reaction poison over both surfaces, but this effect can be minimized by treating the catalyst surfaces with 1-methylpyrrole before reaction. The reaction rate was not enhanced with elevated temperatures, and SFG suggests desorption of pyrrole at elevated temperatures.

  10. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    on the nanopillars within the high electromagnetic field areas. The adsorption behaviour of folic acid and the band assignment of the main vibrations together with the optimized geometry of folic acid and folic acid in the presence of a cluster of 10 gold atoms were assessed using the density functional theory (B3......This paper presents a study of adsorption and vibrational features of folic acid, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A gold-capped silicon nanopillar (Au NP) with a height of 600 nm and a width of 120 nm was utilized to study the vibrational features of FA molecules adsorbed......LYP(6-31G(d))) and the scalar relativistic effective core potential with a double-zeta basis set (LANL2DZ). The vibrations obtained from the solid-state folic acid and the folic acid on a gold cluster were in accordance with those observed experimentally. The analysis of the main vibrations indicated...

  11. Theoretical Investigation of C-H Vibrational Spectroscopy. 1. Modeling of Methyl and Methylene Groups of Ethanol with Different Conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2017-09-14

    A flexible and polarizable molecular model of ethanol is developed to extend our investigation of thermodynamic, structural, and vibrational properties of the liquid and interface. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the present model confirmed that this model well reproduces a number of properties of liquid ethanol, including density, heat of vaporization, surface tension, molecular dipole moment, and trans/gauche ratio. In particular, the present model can describe vibrational IR, Raman, and sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of ethanol and partially deuterated analogues with reliable accuracy. The improved accuracy is largely attributed to proper modeling of the conformational dependence and the intramolecular couplings including Fermi resonance in C-H vibrations. Precise dependence of torsional motions is found to be critical in representing vibrational spectra of the C-H bending. This model allows for further vibrational analysis of complicated alkyl groups widely observed in various organic molecules with MD simulation.

  12. Folding dynamics of the Trp-cage miniprotein: evidence for a native-like intermediate from combined time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Marino, Kristen A; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Panman, Matthijs R; Smeenk, Linde E J; Kettelarij, Albert J; van Maarseveen, Jan H; Timmerman, Peter; Bolhuis, Peter G; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-10-03

    Trp-cage is a synthetic 20-residue miniprotein which folds rapidly and spontaneously to a well-defined globular structure more typical of larger proteins. Due to its small size and fast folding, it is an ideal model system for experimental and theoretical investigations of protein folding mechanisms. However, Trp-cage's exact folding mechanism is still a matter of debate. Here we investigate Trp-cage's relaxation dynamics in the amide I' spectral region (1530-1700 cm(-1)) using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Residue-specific information was obtained by incorporating an isotopic label ((13)C═(18)O) into the amide carbonyl group of residue Gly11, thereby spectrally isolating an individual 310-helical residue. The folding-unfolding equilibrium is perturbed using a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump), and the subsequent re-equilibration is probed by observing the time-dependent vibrational response in the amide I' region. We observe bimodal relaxation kinetics with time constants of 100 ± 10 and 770 ± 40 ns at 322 K, suggesting that the folding involves an intermediate state, the character of which can be determined from the time- and frequency-resolved data. We find that the relaxation dynamics close to the melting temperature involve fast fluctuations in the polyproline II region, whereas the slower process can be attributed to conformational rearrangements due to the global (un)folding transition of the protein. Combined analysis of our T-jump data and molecular dynamics simulations indicates that the formation of a well-defined α-helix precedes the rapid formation of the hydrophobic cage structure, implying a native-like folding intermediate, that mainly differs from the folded conformation in the orientation of the C-terminal polyproline II helix relative to the N-terminal part of the backbone. We find that the main free-energy barrier is positioned between the folding intermediate and the unfolded state ensemble, and that it involves the formation of

  13. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy investigation using ab initio and DFT vibrational analysis of 7-chloro-2-methylamino-5-phenyl-3H-1,4-benzodiazepine-4-oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, M.; Muthu, S.; Arun Balaji, R.

    2013-09-01

    The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum of 7-chloro-2-methylamino-5-phenyl-3H-1, 4-benzodiazepine-4-oxide (7CMP4BO) has been recorded in the region 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1 respectively. The optimized geometry, Thermodynamic properties, NBO, Molecular Electrostatic Potentials, PES, frequency and intensity of the vibrational bands of 7CMP4BO were obtained by the ab initio HF and density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) basis set. The molecule orbital contributions were studied by using the total (TDOS), partial (PDOS), and overlap population (OPDOS) density of states. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra of this compound has been made on the basis of the calculated potential energy distribution (PED). The linear polarizability (α) and the first order hyperpolarizability (β) values of the investigated molecule have been computed using DFT quantum mechanical calculations. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically calculated values.

  15. Chirped-pulse Fourier transform millimeter-wave spectroscopy of ten vibrationally excited states of i-propyl cyanide: exploring the far-infrared region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Benjamin E; Gruet, Sébastien; Steber, Amanda L; Giuliano, Barbara M; Schnell, Melanie

    2017-01-18

    We report here further spectroscopic investigation of the astrochemically relevant molecule i-propyl cyanide. We observed and analysed the rotational spectra of the ground state of the molecule and ten vibrationally excited states with energies between 180-500 cm(-1). For this, we used a segmented W-band spectrometer (75-110 GHz) and performed the experiments under room temperature conditions. This approach thus provides access to high-resolution, pure rotational data of vibrational modes that occur in the far-infrared fingerprint region, and that can be difficult to access with other techniques. The obtained, extensive data set will support further astronomical searches and identifications, such as in warmer regions of the interstellar space where contributions from vibrationally excited states become increasingly relevant.

  16. Room-temperature vibrational properties of potassium gadolinium double tungstate under compression up to 32 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada – ICMUV, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Pellicer-Porres, J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada – ICMUV, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Pujol, M.C.; Carvajal, J.J.; Aguiló, M. [Física i Cristal lografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FICNA) – EMAS, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), C/Marcel lí Domingo 1, 43005 Tarragona (Spain)

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • Two phase transitions are pressure-induced in KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} at 7.2, and 14.2 GPa. • Raman-active modes and their pressure dependences are reported and discussed. • Several modes showing a weak softening are found and related with structural changes. - Abstract: KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} has been studied by high-pressure Raman spectroscopy at room temperature up to 32.2 GPa. Evidences of two pressure-driven phase transitions have been detected. The low-pressure monoclinic phase undergoes a phase transition at 7.2(±0.9) GPa. The second transition is found at 14.2(±1.6) GPa. Both transitions are reversible. No evidence of pressure-induced amorphization is found up to 32 GPa. The pressure dependence of the Raman active modes of the low- and high-pressure phases is reported. A Raman mode is detected to exhibit a weak softening in the low-pressure phase. Three Raman modes are also observed to have a similar behavior in the second high-pressure phase. The reported results are discussed comparing with the studies available in related tungstates. Emphasis is placed on the physical implications of the results.

  17. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations of transition state spectroscopy of I + HI and I + DI reactions: the existence of long life vibrational bonding resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki

    2017-11-08

    We present the results of nonadiabatic quantum wave packet calculations to analyze the experimental transition state spectra for the I(2P3/2,1/2) + XI (X = H and D) hydrogen exchange reactions based on photodetachment of the IXI- anion. We developed (3 × 3) diabatic potential energy surfaces that can reasonably describe the nonadiabatic transitions induced by spin-orbit interactions. A good agreement was obtained between theory and experiment and it was found that nonadiabatic transitions play a role in the reaction dynamics. We also found that the calculated spectra showed very sharp resonance states with a vibrational bonding character, where the resonance wavefunctions are highly localized around the transition state region. Our calculated results suggest that one may experimentally detect these vibrational bonding resonances using time-domain transition state spectroscopy techniques since those states have picosecond-order lifetimes.

  18. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.

    2003-01-01

    in the underlying Te layer. The Be-rich surface exhibits a (4 X 1) periodicity with alternating Te dimers and Te-Be-Te trimers. A vibration eigenfrequency of 165 cm(-1) is observed for the Te-rich surface, while eigenmodes at 157 and 188 cm(-1) are found for the Be-rich surface. The experimentally derived atomic......The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...... geometry and the vibration modes are in very good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations....

  19. An experimental study of the structural and vibrational properties of sesquiterpene lactone cnicin using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-visible and NMR spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chain, Fernando; Romano, Elida; Leyton, Patricio; Paipa, Carolina; Catalán, César Atilio Nazareno; Fortuna, Mario Antonio; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2014-05-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of cnicin is presented, combining the use of infrared, Raman, NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies with density functional theory (DFT) that employs hybrid B3LYP exchange correlation functional and a 6-31G∗ basis set. The molecular electrostatic potentials, atomic charges, bond orders, stabilization energies, topological properties and energy gap are presented by performing NBO, AIM and HOMO-LUMO calculations at the same level of theory as cnicin. A complete vibrational compound assignment was performed by employing internal coordinate analysis and a scaled quantum mechanical force field (SQMFF) methodology. Comparisons between the theoretical and experimental vibrational and ultraviolet-visible spectra show a strong concordance. The geometrical parameters and NBO studies suggest a probable negative Cotton effect for cnicin, which can be attributed to the π → π∗ transition for an α,β-unsaturated γ-lactone, as reported in the literature.

  20. Dynamics of an [Fe4S4(SPh)4]2- cluster explored via IR, Raman, and nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)-analysis using 36S substitution, DFT calculations, and empirical force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuming; Koutmos, Markos; Case, David A; Coucouvanis, Dimitri; Wang, Hongxin; Cramer, Stephen P

    2006-05-14

    We have used four vibrational spectroscopies--FT-IR, FT-Raman, resonance Raman, and 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS)--to study the normal modes of the Fe-S cluster in [(n-Bu)4N]2[Fe4S4(SPh)4]. This [Fe4S4(SR)4]2- complex serves as a model for the clusters in 4Fe ferredoxins and high-potential iron proteins (HiPIPs). The IR spectra exhibited differences above and below the 243 K phase transition. Significant shifts with 36S substitution into the bridging S positions were also observed. The NRVS results were in good agreement with the low temperature data from the conventional spectroscopies. The NRVS spectra were interpreted by normal mode analysis using optimized Urey-Bradley force fields (UBFF) as well as from DFT theory. For the UBFF calculations, the parameters were refined by comparing calculated and observed NRVS frequencies and intensities. The frequency shifts after 36S substitution were used as an additional constraint. A D 2d symmetry Fe4S4S'4 model could explain most of the observed frequencies, but a better match to the observed intensities was obtained when the ligand aromatic rings were included for a D 2d Fe4S4(SPh)4 model. The best results were obtained using the low temperature structure without symmetry constraints. In addition to stretching and bending vibrations, low frequency modes between approximately 50 and 100 cm(-1) were observed. These modes, which have not been seen before, are interpreted as twisting motions with opposing sides of the cube rotating in opposite directions. In contrast with a recent paper on a related Fe4S4 cluster, we find no need to assign a large fraction of the low frequency NRVS intensity to 'rotational lattice modes'. We also reassign the 430 cm(-1) band as primarily an elongation of the thiophenolate ring, with approximately 10% terminal Fe-S stretch character. This study illustrates the benefits of combining NRVS with conventional Raman and IR analysis for characterization of Fe-S centers. DFT

  1. Support Effects in Catalysis Studied by in-situ Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and in-situ X-Ray Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Griffin John

    Kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst. In order to establish a paradigm for metal-support interactions using colloidally synthesized Pt nanoparticles the ability of the organic capping agent to inhibit reactivity and interaction with the support must first be assessed. Pt nanoparticles capped by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and those from which the PVP is removed by UV light exposure, are investigated for two reactions, the hydrogenation of ethylene and the oxidation of methanol. It is shown that prior to PVP removal the particles are moderately active for both reactions. Following removal, the activity for the two reactions diverges, the ethylene hydrogenation rate increases 10-fold, while the methanol oxidation rate decreases 3-fold. To better understand this effect the capping agent prior to, and the residual carbon remaining after UV treatment are probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Prior to removal no major differences are observed when the particles are exposed to alternating H2 and O2 environments. When the PVP is removed, carbonaceous fragments remain on the surface that dynamically restructure in H2 and O2. These fragments create a tightly bound shell in an oxygen environment and a porous coating of hydrogenated carbon in the hydrogen environment. Reaction rate measurements of thermally cleaned PVP and oleic acid capped particles show this effect to be independent of cleaning method or capping agent. In all this demonstrates the ability of the capping agent to mediate nanoparticle catalysis

  2. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dong, Hui [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Oliver, Thomas A. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  3. A method for the direct measurement of electronic site populations in a molecular aggregate using two-dimensional electronic-vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nicholas H. C.; Dong, Hui; Oliver, Thomas A. A.; Fleming, Graham R., E-mail: grfleming@lbl.gov [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Two dimensional electronic spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable experimental technique to reveal electronic excitation dynamics in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, nanoscale semiconductors, organic photovoltaic materials, and many other types of systems. It does not, however, provide direct information concerning the spatial structure and dynamics of excitons. 2D infrared spectroscopy has become a widely used tool for studying structural dynamics but is incapable of directly providing information concerning electronic excited states. 2D electronic-vibrational (2DEV) spectroscopy provides a link between these domains, directly connecting the electronic excitation with the vibrational structure of the system under study. In this work, we derive response functions for the 2DEV spectrum of a molecular dimer and propose a method by which 2DEV spectra could be used to directly measure the electronic site populations as a function of time following the initial electronic excitation. We present results from the response function simulations which show that our proposed approach is substantially valid. This method provides, to our knowledge, the first direct experimental method for measuring the electronic excited state dynamics in the spatial domain, on the molecular scale.

  4. Interfacial Infrared Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-30

    aqueous sulphuric acid has been used as the electrolyte, bands in the 900 to 1250 cmŕ region are often observed, and these can be assigned to...high angles of incidence. Fig. 2 shows that Ep is maximized for angles of incidence near 80. For aqueous acid solutions the largest angle of incidence...from a change in dielectric function of the electrode producing a difference in reflectivity of the electrode at the two potentials defining the

  5. Vibrational relaxation in simulated two-dimensional infrared spectra of two amide modes in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arend G.; Jansen, Thomas la Cour; Bloem, Robbert; Knoester, Jasper

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy is capable of following the transfer of vibrational energy between modes in real time. We develop a method to include vibrational relaxation in simulations of two-dimensional infrared spectra at finite temperature. The method takes into account the correlated

  6. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  7. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewell, Craig Richmond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl4 and a Al(Et)3 co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl2 and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl4 in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl2 by TiCl4 resulting in a thin film of MgCl2/TiClx, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl2/TiClx on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to ~1 Torr of Al(Et)3.

  8. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature ...... of the MEA's is 160-180oC, depending on the purity of the hydrogen used, the load pattern and the desired lifetime. The advantages of the HTPEM fuel cell technology include fast response to load changes and high tolerance to CO (1-3%)......This work presents the development of an equivalent circuit model of a 65 cell high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The HTPEM fuel cell membranes used are PBI-based and uses phosphoric acid as proton conductor. The operating temperature...

  9. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, K. J.; Jürgensen, V. Würtz; Claussen, A.; Rahim, A.; Jensen, G. M.; Wade, R. C.; Nardi, F.; Jung, C.; Degtyarenko, I. M.; Nieminen, R. M.; Herrmann, F.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.; Niehaus, T. A.; Frimand, K.; Suhai, S.

    We report on our work with vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman scattering, Raman optical activity, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and the binding of ligands, drugs, pesticides, or herbicides via a combined theoretical and experimental approach. The systems we have studied systematically are the amino acids (L-alanine, L-tryptophan, and L-histidine), peptides (N-4271 acetyl L-alanine N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-tryptophan N?-methyl amide, N-acetyl L-histidine N?-methyl amide, L-alanyl L-alanine, tri-L-serine, N-acetyl L-alanine L-proline L-tyrosine N?-methyl amide, Leu-enkephalin, cyclo-(gly-L-pro)3, N-acetyl (L-alanine)n N?-methyl amide), 3-methyl indole, and a variety of small molecules (dichlobenil and 2,6-dochlorobenzamide) of relevance to the protein systems under study. We have used molecular mechanics, the SCC-DFTB, SCC-DFTB+disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties of these molecules in their various environments. The application of these spectroscopies to biophysical and environmental assays is expanding, and therefore a thorough understanding of the phenomenon from a rigorous theoretical basis is required. In addition, we give some exciting and new preliminary results which allow us to extend our methods to even larger and more complex systems. The work presented here is the current state of the art to this ever and fast changing field of theoretical spectroscopic interpretation and use of VA, VCD, Raman, ROA, EA, and ECD spectroscopies.

  10. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  11. High-resolution synchrotron infrared spectroscopy of acrolein: The vibrational levels between 850 and 1020 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, A. R. W.; Billinghurst, B. E.; Xu, Li-Hong; Lees, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Using spectra obtained at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron radiation facility, a previously unobserved out-of-plane vibration of trans-acrolein (propenal) is reliably assigned for the first time. Its origin is at 1002.01 cm-1, which is about 20 cm-1 higher than usually quoted in the past. This mode is thus labelled as v14, leaving the label v15 for the known vibration at 992.66 cm-1. Weak combination bands 171182 ← 182, 171131 ← 131, 121182 ← 181, and 171182 ← 181 are studied for the first time, and assignments in the known v11, v16, and v15 fundamental bands are also extended. The seven excited vibrations involved in these bands are analyzed, together with five more unobserved vibrations in the same region (850-1020 cm-1), in a large 12-state simultaneous fit which accounts for most of the many observed perturbations in the spectra.

  12. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-07

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  13. Heterogeneous Dynamics of Coupled Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cringus, Dan; Jansen, Thomas I. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Schoenlein, RW; Corkum, P; DeSilvestri, S; Nelson, KA; Riedle, E

    2009-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamics of coupled stretch vibrations of a water molecule are revealed by 2D IR correlation spectroscopy. These are caused by non-Gaussian fluctuations of the environment around the individual OH stretch vibrations.

  14. Broad-temperature range spectroscopy of the two-centre modular redox metalloprotein Desulfovibrio desulfuricans desulfoferrodoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Harnung, S.E.; Trabjerg, I.

    2003-01-01

    /VIS, MCD, CD, and EPR spectroscopy. The UV/VIS spectra of grey DFx at room temperature is characterised by broad charge transfer (CT) transitions associated with oxidised centre 1 (495 and 368 nm) and II (335 and 635 nm). The transitions are resolved at 78 K, substantiated by VT-MCD and -CD. The data offer...

  15. Measurement of He neutral temperature in detached plasmas using laser absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aramaki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the heat load onto plasma-facing components by plasma detachment is an inevitable scheme in future nuclear fusion reactors. Since the control of the plasma and neutral temperatures is a key issue to the detached plasma generation, we have developed a laser absorption spectroscopy system for the metastable helium temperature measurements and used together with a previously developed laser Thomson scattering system for the electron temperature and density measurements. The thermal relaxation process between the neutral and the electron in the detached plasma generated in the linear plasma device, NAGDIS-II was studied. It is shown that the electron temperature gets close to the neutral temperature by increasing the electron density. On the other hand, the pressure dependence of electron and neutral temperatures shows the cooling effect by the neutrals. The possibility of the plasma fluctuation measurement using the fluctuation in the absorption signal is also shown.

  16. Imaging spectroscopy of the missing REMPI bands of methyl radicals: Final touches on all vibrational frequencies of the 3p Rydberg states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huilin; Liu, Kopin

    2018-01-07

    (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection of methyl radicals, in particular that via the intermediate 3p Rydberg states, has shown to be a powerful method and thus enjoyed a wide range of applications. Methyl has six vibrational modes. Among them-including partially and fully deuterated isotopologs-four out of twenty vibrational frequencies in the intermediate 3p states have so far eluded direct spectroscopic determination. Here, by exploiting the imaging spectroscopy approach to a few judiciously selected chemical reactions, the four long-sought REMPI bands-CHD2(611), CH2D(311), CH2D(511), and CH2D(611)-are discovered, which complete the REMPI identification for probing any vibrational mode of excitation of methyl radical and its isotopologs. These results, in conjunction with those previously reported yet scattered in the literature, are summarized here for ready reference, which should provide all necessary information for further spectral assignments and future studies of chemical dynamics using this versatile REMPI scheme.

  17. Intrinsic Chirality and Prochirality at Air/R-(+)- and S-(-)-Limonene Interfaces: Spectral Signatures with Interference Chiral Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Zhehao; Wang, Hongfei

    2014-06-04

    We report in this work detailed measurements on the chiral and achiral sum-frequency vibrational spectra in the C-H stretching vibration region (2800-3050cm-1) of the air/liquid interfaces of R-limonene and S-limonene, using the recently developed high-resolution broadband sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (HR-BB-SFG-VS). The achiral SFG spectra of R-limonene and S-limonene, as well as the equal amount (50/50) racemic mixture show that the enantiomers are with the same interfacial orientations. The interference chiral SFG spectra of the limonene enantiomers exhibit spectral signature from chiral response of the Cα-H stretching mode, and spectral signature from prochiral response of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode, respectively. The chiral spectral feature of the Cα-H stretching mode changes sign from R-limonene to S-limonene, and disappears for the 50/50 racemic mixture. While the prochiral spectral feature of the CH2 asymmetric stretching mode is the same for R-limonene and S-limonene, and also surprisingly remains the same for the 50/50 racemic mixture. These results provided detail information in understanding the structure and chirality of molecular interfaces, and demonstrated the sensitivity and potential of SFG-VS as unique spectroscopic tool for chirality characterization and chiral recognition at the molecular interface.

  18. Evaluation and differentiation of the Betulaceae birch bark species and their bioactive triterpene content using analytical FT-vibrational spectroscopy and GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîntă-Pînzaru Simona

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aiming to obtain the highest triterpene content in the extraction products, nine bark samples from the forest abundant flora of Apuseni Mountains, Romania were Raman spectroscopically evaluated. Three different natural extracts from Betula pendula Roth birch bark have been obtained and characterized using Fourier transform vibrational spectra. Results This study shows that principal components of the birch tree extract can be rapidly recognized and differentiated based on their vibrational fingerprint band shape and intensity. The vibrational spectroscopy results are supported by the GC-MS data. Based on IR and Raman analysis, one can conclude that all the extracts, independent on the solvent(s used, revealed dominant betulin species, followed by lupeol. Conclusions Since Raman measurements could also be performed on fresh plant material, we demonstrated the possibility to apply the present results for the prediction of the highest triterpene content in bark species, for the selection of harvesting time or individual genotypes directly in the field, with appropriate portable Raman equipment.

  19. Vibrational Spectrum of an Excited State and Huang-Rhys Factors by Coherent Wave Packets in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyeongjin; Kim, Junwoo; Kim, So Young; Kim, Dong Eon; Joo, Taiha

    2017-03-17

    Coherent nuclear wave packet motions in an electronic excited state of a molecule are measured directly by time-resolved spontaneous fluorescence spectroscopy with an unprecedented time resolution by using two-photon absorption excitation and fluorescence upconversion by noncollinear sum frequency generation. With an estimated time resolution of approximately 25 fs, wave packet motions of vibrational modes up to 1600 cm(-1) are recorded for coumarin 153 in ethanol. Two-color transient absorption at 13 fs time resolution are measured to confirm the result. Vibrational displacements between the ground and excited states and Huang-Rhys factors (HRFs) are calculated by quantum mechanical methods and are compared with the experimental results. HRFs calculated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT reproduce the experiment adequately. This fluorescence-based method provides a unique and direct way to obtain the vibrational spectrum of a molecule in an electronic excited state and the HRFs, as well as the dynamics of excited states, and it might provide information on the structure of an excited state through the HRFs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. High-resolution mirror temperature mapping in GaN-based diode lasers by thermoreflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierścińska, Dorota; Marona, Łucja; Pierściński, Kamil; Wiśniewski, Przemysław; Perlin, Piotr; Bugajski, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    In this paper accurate measurements of temperature distribution on the facet of GaN-based diode lasers are presented as well as development of the instrumentation for high-resolution thermal imaging based on thermoreflectance. It is shown that thermoreflectance can be successfully applied to provide information on heat dissipation in these devices. We demonstrate the quantitative measurements of the temperature profiles and high-resolution temperature maps on the front facet of nitride lasers and prove that thermoreflectance spectroscopy can be considered as the accurate and fast nondestructive tool for investigation of thermally induced degradation modes of GaN lasers.

  1. Studies of Heterogeneously Catalyzed Liquid-Phase Alcohol Oxidation on Platinum bySum-frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and Reaction Rate Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Christopher [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Compared to many branches of chemistry, the molecular level study of catalytically active surfaces is young. Only with the invention of ultrahigh vacuum technology in the past half century has it been possible to carry out experiments that yield useful molecular information about the reactive occurrences at a surface. The reason is two-fold: low pressure is necessary to keep a surface clean for an amount of time long enough to perform an experiment, and most atomic scale techniques that are surface speci c (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, etc.) cannot be used at ambient pressures, because electrons, which act as chemical probes in these techniques, are easily scattered by molecules. Sum-frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is one technique that can provide molecular level information from the surface without the necessity for high vacuum. Since the advent of SFG as a surface spectroscopic tool it has proved its worth in the studies of surface catalyzed reactions in the gas phase, with numerous reactions in the gas phase having been investigated on a multitude of surfaces. However, in situ SFG characterization of catalysis at the solid-liquid interface has yet to be thoroughly pursued despite the broad interest in the use of heterogeneous catalysts in the liquid phase as replacements for homogeneous counterparts. This work describes an attempt to move in that direction, applying SFG to study the solid-liquid interface under conditions of catalytic alcohol oxidation on platinum.

  2. Measuring Temperature Induced Phase Change Kinetics in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues Using Near Infrared Spectroscopy, MR Imaging and Spectroscopy and OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Amir Y; Manstein, Dieter; Carp, Stefan A

    2017-12-19

    Monitoring phase transition in adipose tissue and formation of lipid crystals is important in Cryo-procedures such as Selective Cryolipolysis (SC). We exploited a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) method to monitor the onset of fat phase transition (freezing/melting) in human abdominal adipose tissue. The changes in optical scattering were compared to Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) measurements as the gold standard method for measuring phase transition. For some samples, concurrent in vitro measurements of optical scattering using NIRS and the MR signal parameters (T2*) as well as spectral parameters using MR Spectroscopy were performed in a 3 T MR scanner during a cooling/heating cycle. To further investigate phase-transition in adipose tissue in microscopic level, an identical cooling/heating procedure was replicated on a small piece of fat harvested from the same tissue while being imaged under Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For all methods, their relationship with temperature shows inflexions in a narrow range, characteristic of lipid phase transition. In particular, the good agreement between DSC and Optical measurements suggests that such NIRS methods can be used to improve dosimetry and to minimize variations of clinical outcome for cryo-procedures.

  3. Engineering and Characterization of Peptides and Proteins at Surfaces and Interfaces: A Case Study in Surface-Sensitive Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Li, Yaoxin; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-21

    Understanding molecular structures of interfacial peptides and proteins impacts many research fields by guiding the advancement of biocompatible materials, new and improved marine antifouling coatings, ultrasensitive and highly specific biosensors and biochips, therapies for diseases related to protein amyloid formation, and knowledge on mechanisms for various membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands. Developing methods for measuring such unique systems, as well as elucidating the structure and function relationship of such biomolecules, has been the goal of our lab at the University of Michigan. We have made substantial progress to develop sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy into a powerful technique to study interfacial peptides and proteins, which lays a foundation to obtain unique and valuable insights when using SFG to probe various biologically relevant systems at the solid/liquid interface in situ in real time. One highlighting feature of this Account is the demonstration of the power of combining SFG with other techniques and methods such as ATR-FTIR, surface engineering, MD simulation, liquid crystal sensing, and isotope labeling in order to study peptides and proteins at interfaces. It is necessary to emphasize that SFG plays a major role in these studies, while other techniques and methods are supplemental. The central role of SFG is to provide critical information on interfacial peptide and protein structure (e.g., conformation and orientation) in order to elucidate how surface engineering (e.g., to vary the structure) can ultimately affect surface function (e.g., to optimize the activity). This Account focuses on the most significant recent progress in research on interfacial peptides and proteins carried out by our group including (1) the development of SFG analysis methods to determine orientations of regular as well as disrupted secondary structures, and the successful demonstration and application of an isotope

  4. Structure Sensitivity in Pt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene: In Situ Study of Reaction Intermediates Using SFG Vibrational Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2013-01-31

    The product selectivity during 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation on monodisperse, colloidally synthesized, Pt nanoparticles was studied under reaction conditions with kinetic measurements and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG was performed with the capping ligands intact in order to maintain nanoparticle size by reduced sintering. Four products are formed at 75 C: 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and n-butane. Ensembles of Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 0.9 and 1.8 nm exhibit a ∼30% and ∼20% increase in the full hydrogenation products, respectively, as compared to Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.6 and 6.7 nm. Methyl and methylene vibrational stretches of reaction intermediates observed under working conditions using SFG were used to correlate the stable reaction intermediates with the product distribution. Kinetic and SFG results correlate with previous DFT predictions for two parallel reaction pathways of 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene can initiate with H-addition at internal or terminal carbons leading to the formation of 1-buten-4-yl radical (metallocycle) and 2-buten-1-yl radical intermediates, respectively. Small (0.9 and 1.8 nm) nanoparticles exhibited vibrational resonances originating from both intermediates, while the large (4.6 and 6.7 nm) particles exhibited vibrational resonances originating predominately from the 2-buten-1-yl radical. This suggests each reaction pathway competes for partial and full hydrogenation and the nanoparticle size affects the kinetic preference for the two pathways. The reaction pathway through the metallocycle intermediate on the small nanoparticles is likely due to the presence of low-coordinated sites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Oriented single-crystal nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)]: quantitative assessment of the trans effect of NO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Sage, J Timothy; Silvernail, Nathan; Scheidt, W Robert; Alp, E Ercan; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-08-02

    This paper presents oriented single-crystal Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data for the six-coordinate (6C) ferrous heme-nitrosyl model complex [(57)Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] (1; TPP(2-) = tetraphenylporphyrin dianion; MI = 1-methylimidazole). The availability of these data enables for the first time the detailed simulation of the complete NRVS data, including the porphyrin-based vibrations, of a 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyl, using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Importantly, the Fe-NO stretch is split by interaction with a porphyrin-based vibration into two features, observed at 437 and 472 cm(-1). The 437 cm(-1) feature is strongly out-of-plane (oop) polarized and shows a (15)N(18)O isotope shift of 8 cm(-1) and is therefore assigned to nu(Fe-NO). The admixture of Fe-N-O bending character is small. Main contributions to the Fe-N-O bend are observed in the 520-580 cm(-1) region, distributed over a number of in-plane (ip) polarized porphyrin-based vibrations. The main component, assigned to delta(ip)(Fe-N-O), is identified with the feature at 563 cm(-1). The Fe-N-O bend also shows strong mixing with the Fe-NO stretching internal coordinate, as evidenced by the oop NRVS intensity in the 520-580 cm(-1) region. Very accurate normal mode descriptions of nu(Fe-NO) and delta(ip)(Fe-N-O) have been obtained in this study. These results contradict previous interpretations of the vibrational spectra of 6C ferrous heme-nitrosyls where the higher energy feature at approximately 550 cm(-1) had usually been associated with nu(Fe-NO). Furthermore, these results provide key insight into NO binding to ferrous heme active sites in globins and other heme proteins, in particular with respect to (a) the effect of hydrogen bonding to the coordinated NO and (b) changes in heme dynamics upon NO coordination. [Fe(TPP)(MI)(NO)] constitutes an excellent model system for ferrous NO adducts of myoglobin (Mb) mutants where the distal histidine (His64

  6. Simulation of vibrational energy transfer in two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of amide I and amide II modes in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, Robbert; Dijkstra, Arend G.; Jansen, Thomas La Cour; Knoester, Jasper

    2008-01-01

    Population transfer between vibrational eigenstates is important for many phenomena in chemistry. In solution, this transfer is induced by fluctuations in molecular conformation as well as in the surrounding solvent. We develop a joint electrostatic density functional theory map that allows us to

  7. Terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory calculation of anthracene: Effect of dispersion force on the vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng; Tominaga, Keisuke, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-0013 (Japan); Hayashi, Michitoshi, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp; Wang, Houng-Wei [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Sec. 4, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Kambara, Ohki; Sasaki, Tetsuo [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Jyohoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8561 (Japan); Nishizawa, Jun-ichi, E-mail: atmyh@ntu.edu.tw, E-mail: tominaga@kobe-u.ca.jp, E-mail: junichi.nishizawa@hanken.jp [Jun-ichi Nishizawa Memorial Research Center, Tohoku University, 519-1176 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The phonon modes of molecular crystals in the terahertz frequency region often feature delicately coupled inter- and intra-molecular vibrations. Recent advances in density functional theory such as DFT-D{sup *} have enabled accurate frequency calculation. However, the nature of normal modes has not been quantitatively discussed against experimental criteria such as isotope shift (IS) and correlation field splitting (CFS). Here, we report an analytical mode-decoupling method that allows for the decomposition of a normal mode of interest into intermolecular translation, libration, and intramolecular vibrational motions. We show an application of this method using the crystalline anthracene system as an example. The relationship between the experimentally obtained IS and the IS obtained by PBE-D{sup *} simulation indicates that two distinctive regions exist. Region I is associated with a pure intermolecular translation, whereas region II features coupled intramolecular vibrations that are further coupled by a weak intermolecular translation. We find that the PBE-D{sup *} data show excellent agreement with the experimental data in terms of IS and CFS in region II; however, PBE-D{sup *} produces significant deviations in IS in region I where strong coupling between inter- and intra-molecular vibrations contributes to normal modes. The result of this analysis is expected to facilitate future improvement of DFT-D{sup *}.

  8. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  9. Vibrational energy flow in substituted benzenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pein, Brandt C.

    Using ultrafast infrared (IR) Raman spectroscopy, vibrational energy flow was monitored in several liquid-state substituted benzenes at ambient temperature. In a series of mono-halogenated benzenes, X-C6H 5 (X = F, Cl, Br, I), a similar CH-stretch at 3068 cm-1 was excited using picosecond IR pulses and the resulting vibrational relaxation and overall vibrational cooling processes were monitored with anti-Stokes spectroscopy. In the molecules with a heavier halide substituent the CH-stretch decayed slower while midrange vibrations decayed faster. This result was logical if the density of states (DOS) in the first few tiers, which is the DOS composed of vibrations with smaller quantum number, is what primarily determines energy flow. For tiers 1-4, the DOS was nearly identical in the CH-stretch region while it increased in the midrange region for heavier halide mass. Excitation spectroscopy, an extension of 3D IR-Raman spectroscopy, was developed and used to selectively pump vibrations localized to the substituent or the phenyl group in nitrobenzene (NB), o-fluoronitrobenzene (OFNB) and o-nitrotoluene (ONT) and in the alkylbenzene series toluene, isopropylbenzene (IPB), and t-butylbenzene (TBB). Using quantum chemical calculations, each Raman active vibration was sorted, according to their atomic displacements, into three classifications: substituent, phenyl, or global. Using IR pump wavenumbers that initially excited substituent or phenyl vibrations, IR-Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor energy flowing from the substituent to phenyl vibrations and vice versa. In NB nitro-to-phenyl and nitro-to-global energy flow was almost nonexistent while phenyl-to-nitro and phenyl-to-global was weak. When ortho substituents (-CH3, -F) were introduced, energy flow from nitro-to-phenyl and nitro-to-global was activated. In ONT, phenyl-to-nitro energy flow ceased possibly due to the added methyl group diverting energy from entering the nitro vibrations. Energy flow is therefore

  10. Rotational Dependence of Intramolecular Dynamics in Acetylene at Low Vibrational Excitation as Deduced from High Resolution Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, David S.; Miller, Anthony; Amyay, B.; Fayt, A.; Herman, M.

    2010-06-01

    The link between energy-resolved spectra and time-resolved dynamics is explored quantitatively for acetylene (12C2H2), X1Σg+ with up to 8,600 wn of vibrational energy. This comparison is based on the extensive knowledge of the vibration-rotation energy levels and on the model Hamiltonian used to fit them to high precision. Simulated intensity borrowing features in high resolution absorption spectra and predicted survival probabilities for intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) are first investigated for the ν4+ν5 and ν3 bright states, for J = 2, 30 and 100. The dependence of the results on the rotational quantum number and on the choice of vibrational bright state reflects the interplay of three kinds of off-diagonal resonances: anharmonic, rotational l-type, and Coriolis. The dynamical quantities used to characterize the calculated time-dependent dynamics are the dilution factor φd, the IVR lifetime τIVR, and the recurrence time τrec. For the two bright states ν3+2ν4 and 7ν4, the collisionless dynamics for thermally averaged rotational distributions at T = 27, 270 and 500 K were calculated from the available spectroscopic data. For the 7ν4 bright state, an apparent irreversible decay of is found. In all cases, the model Hamiltonian allows a detailed calculation of the energy flow among all of the coupled zeroth-order vibration-rotation states. B. Amyay, S. Robert, M. Herman, A. Fayt, B. Raghavendra, A. Moudens, J. Thiévin, B. Rowe, and R. Georges, J. Chem. Phys., 131, 114301 (2009).

  11. Off-axis parabolic mirror optics for polarized Raman spectroscopy at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelwani, N.; Hoch, D.; Jost, D.; Botka, B.; Scholz, J.-R.; Richter, R.; Theodoridou, M.; Kretzschmar, F.; Böhm, T.; Kamarás, K.; Hackl, R.

    2017-05-01

    We report the development of a detection optics for the integration of Raman scattering and scanning probe microscopy at low temperature based on a parabolic mirror. In our set-up, half of the paraboloid mirror covers a solid angle of π corresponding to a numerical aperture of N.A. ≈ 0.85. The optical system can be used for far- and near-field spectroscopy. In the far field, the polarizations can be maintained to within 80%-90%. In combination with a scanning microscope (AFM/STM), tunneling or near-field experiments are possible with less than 10% loss of aperture. Our set-up provides ideal conditions for the future development of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy at low temperature.

  12. Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    In designing and controlling fuel cell sys-tems it is advantageous having models predicting the behavior of the fuel cells in steady-state as well as in dynamic ope-ration. This work examines the use of electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for characterizing and developing a model for a ...... for a high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual interface has been developed to perform the signal generation and acquisition which is needed to perform EIS....

  13. Effect of vibrating electrode on temperature profiles, fluid flow, and pool shape in ESR system based on a comprehensive coupled model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vibrating electrode method was proposed in the electro-slag remelting (ESR process in this paper, and the effect of vibrating electrode on the solidification structure of ingot was studied. A transient three-dimensional (3D coupled mathematical model was established to simulate the electromagnetic phenomenon, fluid flow as well as pool shape in the ESR process with the vibrating electrode. The finite element volume method is developed to solve the electromagnetic field using ANSYS mechanical APDL software. Moreover, the electromagnetic force and Joule heating are interpolated as the source term of the momentum and energy equations. The multi-physical fields have been investigated and compared between the traditional electrode and the vibrating electrode in the ESR process. The results show that the drop process of metal droplets with the traditional electrode is scattered randomly. However, the drop process of metal droplets with the vibrating electrode is periodic. The highest temperature of slag layer with the vibrating electrode is higher than that with the traditional electrode, which can increase the melting rate due to the enhanced heat transfer in the vicinity of the electrode tip. The results also show that when the amplitude and frequency of the vibrating electrode increase, the cycle of drop process of metal droplets decreases significantly.

  14. Monitoring brain temperature by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2014-05-01

    Mild hypothermia (HT) is an effective neuroprotective strategy for a variety of acute brain injuries. However, the wide clinical adaptation of HT has been hampered by the lack of a reliable noninvasive method for measuring brain temperature, since core measurements have been shown to not always reflect brain temperature. The goal of this work was to develop a noninvasive optical technique for measuring brain temperature that exploits both the temperature dependency of water absorption and the high concentration of water in brain (80%-90%). Specifically, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS) to measure temperature in tissue-mimicking phantoms (in vitro) and deep brain tissue (in vivo) during heating and cooling, respectively. For deep brain tissue temperature monitoring, experiments were conducted on newborn piglets wherein hypothermia was induced by gradual whole body cooling. Brain temperature was concomitantly measured by TR-NIRS and a thermocouple probe implanted in the brain. Our proposed TR-NIRS method was able to measure the temperature of tissue-mimicking phantoms and brain tissues with a correlation of 0.82 and 0.66 to temperature measured with a thermometer, respectively. The mean difference between the TR-NIRS and thermometer measurements was 0.15°C±1.1°C for the in vitro experiments and 0.5°C±1.6°C for the in vivo measurements.

  15. The three dimensional laser induced temperature distribution in photo-thermal displacement spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanolkotabi, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed theoretical treatment of 3-D temperature distribution induced by laser beam in photothermal displacement spectroscopy. We assume that a solid sample, which is deposited on a substrate and is in contact with a fluid, is irradiated by an intensity modulated cw laser source. By using a technique based on Green's function and integral transformations we find the explicit expression for temperature distribution function. This function which depends on the properties of the laser beam and optical and thermal properties of the sample, the substrate and the fluid, exhibits the characteristics of a damped thermal wave. Numerical analysis of the temperature distribution for a certain sample (GaAs) reveals that the behavior of thermal wave is not so sensitive with respect to the variation of the modulation frequency. On the other hand, we find that the temperature of the sample surface decreases with increasing modulation frequency because of the thermal inter tia of the sample. Furth...

  16. Remote temperature measurements in femto-liter volumes using dual-focus-Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claus B; Weiss, Kerstin; Loman, Anastasia; Enderlein, Jörg; Richtering, Walter

    2009-05-07

    Remote temperature measurements in microfluidic devices with micrometer spatial resolution are important for many applications in biology, biochemistry and chemistry. The most popular methods use the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of Rhodamine B, or the temperature-dependent size of thermosensitive materials such as microgel particles. Here, we use the recently developed method of dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (2fFCS) for measuring the absolute diffusion coefficient of small fluorescent molecules at nanomolar concentrations and show how these data can be used for remote temperature measurements on a micrometer scale. We perform comparative temperature measurements using all three methods and show that the accuracy of 2fFCS is comparable or even better than that achievable with Rhodamine B fluorescence lifetime measurements. The temperature dependent microgel swelling leads to an enhanced accuracy within a narrow temperature range around the volume phase transition temperature, but requires the availability of specific microgels, whereas 2fFCS is applicable under very general conditions.

  17. Finite-temperature IR spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules: a theoretical assessment of scaling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basire, M; Parneix, P; Calvo, F

    2010-03-11

    With a recently developed simulation method (Basire, M.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 6947), the infrared vibrational spectra of several polyatomic molecules are calculated over a broad range of temperature, taking into account quantum, anharmonic, and couplings effects. Anharmonic force fields, generated from static first-principle calculations, are sampled in the microcanonical ensemble to provide energy-resolved absorption intensities and their finite temperature analogues after Laplace transformation. Effective anharmonic frequencies are characterized as a continuous function of temperature for vinyl fluoride, the N-acetyl-Phe-NH(2) peptide, and protonated naphthalene. These frequencies generally deviate increasingly from the harmonic value with increasing temperature, although the overestimation due to the harmonic approximation is particularly salient for high-frequency modes. Anharmonicities may also be sufficient to alter structural assignment of experimental spectra with respect to empirically scaled harmonic bands. These results emphasize some possible limitations and inaccuracies inherent to using such static scaling factors for correcting harmonic IR spectra.

  18. Temperature Drift of Conformational Equilibria of Butyl Alcohols Studied by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy and Fully Anharmonic DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabska, Justyna; Beć, Krzysztof B; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Huck, Christian W

    2017-03-09

    Conformational isomerism of aliphatic alcohols with respect to the internal rotation of C-O(H) group and its impact on near-infrared (NIR) spectra has been known in the literature. However, no attempt has ever been made to investigate systematically whether and how the conformational flexibility of the aliphatic chain determines the observed NIR data of aliphatic alcohols. In the present study NIR spectra of four kinds of butyl alcohols, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, isobutanol, and tert-butyl alcohol, were investigated in diluted (0.1 M) CCl4 solutions. The experimental NIR spectra of butyl alcohols were accurately reproduced and explained in a fully anharmonic DFT study by means of generalized second-order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2). Entire conformational populations were taken into account in each case. On the basis of the theoretical study, influences of conformational flexibility with respect to internal rotations not only about the C-O bond, but also about the C-C bonds have been well evidenced in the experimental spectra. The conformational isomerism affects significantly the shape of NIR spectra. The temperature-dependent NIR spectra of butyl alcohols show changes in the band shape and a blue-shift of the overtone band due to the stretching mode of free OH group, and its intensity decreases with increasing temperature. These effects can be closely monitored by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS). In this work, the experimental 2D-COS patterns have been successfully reproduced, based on DFT calculated NIR spectra of conformational isomers of the studied molecules and their Boltzmann coefficients over the corresponding temperature range. Thus, the experimentally observed effects are fully reflected in the DFT study, which leads to the conclusion that the main factor in the temperature-dependent spectral changes of 2νOH band of aliphatic alcohols in the diluted phase, where no self-association occurs, is played by the changes in the

  19. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M.; Prates, Luciana L.; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions.

  1. Amine Chemistry at Aqueous Interfaces: The Study of Organic Amines in Neutralizing Acidic Gases at an Air/Water Surface Using Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, L.; Wren, S. N.; Valley, N. A.; Richmond, G.

    2014-12-01

    Small organic bases have been measured in atmospheric samples, with their sources ranging from industrial processing to animal husbandry. These small organic amines are often highly soluble, being found in atmospheric condensed phases such as fogwater and rainwater. Additionally, they display acid-neutralization ability often greater than ammonia, yet little is known regarding their kinetic and thermodynamic properties. This presentation will describe the molecular level details of a model amine system at the vapor/liquid interface in the presence of acidic gas. We find that this amine system shows very unique properties in terms of its bonding, structure, and orientation at aqueous surfaces. The results of our studies using a combination of computation, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy, and surface tension will report the properties inherent to these atmospherically relevant species at aqueous surfaces.

  2. Bio-functions and molecular carbohydrate structure association study in forage with different source origins revealed using non-destructive vibrational molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yan, Xiaogang; Mostafizar Rahman, M; Prates, Luciana L; Yu, Peiqiang

    2017-08-05

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate forage carbohydrate molecular structure profiles; 2) bio-functions in terms of CHO rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio of N to OM (HEDN/OM), and 3) quantify interactive association between molecular structures, bio-functions and nutrient availability. The vibrational molecular spectroscopy was applied to investigate the structure feature on a molecular basis. Two sourced-origin alfalfa forages were used as modeled forages. The results showed that the carbohydrate molecular structure profiles were highly linked to the bio-functions in terms of rumen degradation characteristics and hourly effective degradation ratio. The molecular spectroscopic technique can be used to detect forage carbohydrate structure features on a molecular basis and can be used to study interactive association between forage molecular structure and bio-functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) for complex molecular surfaces and interfaces: Spectral lineshape measurement and analysis plus some controversial issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Fei

    2016-12-01

    Sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) was first developed in the 1980s and it has been proven a uniquely sensitive and surface/interface selective spectroscopic probe for characterization of the structure, conformation and dynamics of molecular surfaces and interfaces. In recent years, there has been significant progress in the development of methodology and instrumentation in the SFG-VS toolbox that has significantly broadened the application to complex molecular surfaces and interfaces. In this review, after presenting a unified view on the theory and methodology focusing on the SFG-VS spectral lineshape, as well as the new opportunities in SFG-VS applications with such developments, some of the controversial issues that have been puzzling the community are to be discussed. The aim of this review is to present to the researchers and students interested in molecular surfaces and interfacial sciences up-to-date perspectives complementary to the existing textbooks and reviews on SFG-VS.

  4. Proton conducting system (ImH2)2SeO4·2H2O investigated with vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zięba, Sylwia; Mizera, Adam; Pogorzelec-Glaser, Katarzyna; Łapiński, Andrzej

    2017-06-01

    Imidazolium selenate dihydrate (ImH2)2SeO4·2H2O crystals have been investigated using Raman and IR spectroscopy. Experimental data were supported by the quantum-chemical calculations (DFT), Hirshfield surfaces and fingerprint plots analysis, and Bader theory calculations. The imidazolium selenate dihydrate crystal exhibits high proton conductivity of the order of 10- 1 S/m at T = 333 K. The spectra of this compound are dominated by bands related to the lattice modes, the internal vibrations of the protonated imidazole cation, selenate anion, water molecules, and hydrogen bonds network. For the imidazolium selenate dihydrate crystal, the formal classification of the fundamental modes has been carried out.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom); Edwards, Howell G.M. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.G.M.Edwards@bradford.ac.uk; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J.; Telford, Richard J. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-14

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting {beta}-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control.

  6. Probing electron density of H-bonding between cation-anion of imidazolium-based ionic liquids with different anions by vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yong; Li, Haoran

    2010-03-04

    Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory calculation have been employed to study the spectral properties of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) with different anions. ILs based on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation with different anions, OH(-), CF(3)CO(2)(-), HSO(4)(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Cl(-), PF(6)(-), and BF(4)(-), are investigated in the present work. It has been shown that the C(2)-H stretching vibration of the imidazolium ring is closely related to the electron density of H-bonding between the two closest cations and anions for pure ILs. The electron density of H-bonding between cation and anion with different anions decreases in the order [OH](-) > [H(2)PO(4)](-) > [HSO(4)](-) > [CF(3)CO(2)](-) > [Cl](-) > [BF(4)](-) > [PF(6)](-). For aqueous ILs, with increasing water content, the aromatic C-H stretching vibration of the imidazolium cation showed systematic blue-shifts. Especially for BmimOH, the nu(C(2))(-H) undergoes a drastic blue-shift by 58 cm(-1), suggesting that the formation of the strong hydrogen bonds O-H...O may greatly weaken the electron density of H-bonding between the cation and anion of ILs.

  7. Temperature dependent structural, vibrational and magnetic properties of K3Gd5(PO4)6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevara, Samatha; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Mishra, Karuna Kara; Ravindran, T R; Sinha, Anil K; Sastry, P U; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2017-02-22

    Herein we report the evolution of the crystal structure of K3Gd5(PO4)6 in the temperature range from 20 K to 1073 K, as observed from variable temperature X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies. K3Gd5(PO4)6 has an open tunnel containing a three dimensional structure built by [Gd5(PO4)6]3- ions which in turn are formed of PO4 tetrahedra and GdOn (n = 8 and 9) polyhedra. The empty tunnels in the structure are occupied by K+ ions and maintain charge neutrality in the lattice. Evolution of unit cell parameters with temperature shows a systematic increase with temperature. The average axial thermal expansion coefficients between 20 K and 1073 K are: αa = 10.6 × 10-6 K-1, αb = 5.5 × 10-6 K-1 and αc = 16.4 × 10-6 K-1. The evolution of distortion indices of the various coordination polyhedra with temperature indicates a gradual decrease with increasing temperature, while those of Gd2O9 and K2O8 polyhedra show opposite trends. The overall anisotropy of the lattice thermal expansion is found to be controlled largely by the effect of temperature on GdOn polyhedra and their linkages. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopic studies indicated that the intensities and wavenumbers of most of the Raman modes decrease continuously with increasing temperature. Anharmonic analyses of Raman modes indicated that the lattice, rigid translation and librational modes have larger contributions towards thermal expansion of K3Gd5(PO4)6 compared to high frequency internal modes. The temperature and field dependent magnetic measurements indicated no long range ordering down to 2 K and the observed effective magnetic moment per Gd3+ ion and the Weiss constant are 7.91 μB and 0.38 K, respectively.

  8. New Insight into the Local Structure of Hydrous Ferric Arsenate Using Full-Potential Multiple Scattering Analysis, Density Functional Theory Calculations, and Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaofeng; Ma, Xu; Zhang, Guoqing; Jia, Yongfeng; Hatada, Keisuke

    2016-11-15

    Hydrous ferric arsenate (HFA) is an important arsenic-bearing precipitate in the mining-impacted environment and hydrometallurgical tailings. However, there is no agreement on its local atomic structure. The local structure of HFA was reprobed by employing a full-potential multiple scattering (FPMS) analysis, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and vibrational spectroscopy. The FPMS simulations indicated that the coordination number of the As-Fe, Fe-As, or both in HFA was approximately two. The DFT calculations constructed a structure of HFA with the formula of Fe(HAsO4)x(H2AsO4)1-x(OH)y·zH2O. The presence of protonated arsenate in HFA was also evidenced by vibrational spectroscopy. The As and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra of HFA were accurately reproduced by FPMS simulations using the chain structure, which was also a reasonable model for extended X-Ray absorption fine structure fitting. The FPMS refinements indicated that the interatomic Fe-Fe distance was approximately 5.2 Å, consistent with that obtained by Mikutta et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47 (7), 3122-3131) using wavelet analysis. All of the results suggested that HFA was more likely to occur as a chain with AsO4 tetrahedra and FeO6 octahedra connecting alternately in an isolated bidentate-type fashion. This finding is of significance for understanding the fate of arsenic and the formation of ferric arsenate minerals in an acidic environment.

  9. Characterisation of iron oxide nanoparticles by Mössbauer spectroscopy at ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joos, Alexander; Rümenapp, Christine [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 11, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wagner, Friedrich E. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard, E-mail: gleich@tum.de [Zentralinstitut für Medizintechnik (IMETUM), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles are important as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging or for magnetic drug targeting. Such particles can be made by different ways of synthesis, but depending on their size they tend to oxidise to maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which is often less desirable because of its lower magnetisation. Mössbauer spectroscopy is well suited for determining the relative amounts of the two iron oxides in a sample. When measured at 4.2 K the nanoparticles typically exhibit well-defined but complicated hyperfine spectra that may present some problems of evaluation, but eventually yield reliable results for the degree of oxdation. At room temperature, however, particles smaller than about 15 nm are affected by superparamagnetic relaxation, which renders Mössbauer spectroscopy useless for their characterisation. To characterise magnetic nanoparticles even at room temperature, we designed an arrangement of permanent magnets to apply an external magnetic field of about 0.7 T to the Mössbauer absorbers. This has been found to be sufficient to give rise to magnetically split Mössbauer spectra that allow a distinction between magnetite and maghemite and to determine their relative amounts in a sample. - Highlights: • Mössbauer spectroscopy can be used to characterise magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). • Interpretation of room temperature spectra of MNP smaller than 15 nm is impossible. • We built a permanent magnet construction to apply a homogeneous field of 725 mT. • This field is enough to generate useful spectra of the MNP even at room temperature. • The magnetite content of small MNP can thus be determined.

  10. The interplay between the paracetamol polymorphism and its molecular structures dissolved in supercritical CO2 in contact with the solid phase: In situ vibration spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparin, Roman D; Moreau, Myriam; De Walle, Isabelle; Paolantoni, Marco; Idrissi, Abdenacer; Kiselev, Michael G

    2015-09-18

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the distribution of paracetamol conformers which are dissolved in a supercritical CO2 phase being in equilibrium with their corresponding crystalline form. The quantum calculations and molecular dynamics simulations were used in order to characterize the structure and analyze the vibration spectra of the paracetamol conformers in vacuum and in a mixture with CO2 at various thermodynamic state parameters (p,T). The metadynamics approach was applied to efficiently sample the various conformers of paracetamol. Furthermore, using in situ IR spectroscopy, the conformers that are dissolved in supercritical CO2 were identified and the evolution of the probability of their presence as a functions of thermodynamic condition was quantified while the change in the crystalline form of paracetamol have been monitored by DSC, micro IR and Raman techniques. The DSC analysis as well as micro IR and Raman spectroscopic studies of the crystalline paracetamol show that the subsequent heating up above the melting temperature of the polymorph I of paracetamol and the cooling down to room temperature in the presence of supercritical CO2 induces the formation of polymorph II. The in situ IR investigation shows that two conformers (Conf. 1 and Conf. 2) are present in the phase of CO2 while conformer 3 (Conf. 3) has a high probability to be present after re-crystallization. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  12. The two-dimensional vibrating reed technique. A study of anisotropic pinning in high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karelina, Anna

    2004-02-18

    In this work the anisotropy of the pinning forces of vortices in a-b plane of high temperature-supraconductors was examined. For this purpose vibrating reed with two degrees of freedom of the oscillation was constructed. The pinning forces were examined in single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. The experiments with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} show that at temperatures lower than 78 K the vortices are in a nonequilibrium state. This leads to a flux creep and to a drift of the resonance frequency with time. This prevents the comparison of resonance curves in different directions of oscillations. In Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} single crystals the vortices are in more stable state, but the measurements of the resonance curves in different directions show no indication of the four-fold symmetry. At temperatures below 60 K a strong hysteresis of the resonance frequency and the resonance-oscillation amplitude was found in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} crystals as a function of the magnetic field. (orig.)

  13. Monitoring metal contamination of silicon by multiwavelength room temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ko Jang Jian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin thermal oxide film (∼36 nm was grown on p--Si (100 wafers in a vertical furnace at 950 °C for 90 min in 1 atm dry O2 as a vehicle for monitoring metal contamination. They are annealed in separate vertical furnaces at 1100°C for 120 min in N2 and tested for metal contamination using multiwavelength room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS. Significant RTPL intensity and spectral variations, corresponding to the degree of metal contamination, were observed. Nondestructive wafer mapping and virtual depth profiling capabilities of RTPL is a very attractive metal contamination monitoring technique.

  14. High Temperature, Through the Case Eddy Current Sensor for Blade Vibration Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Preliminary results have shown that low temperature eddy current sensors can provide excellent resolution for blade tip timing, and have the ability to see ?through...

  15. Low-temperature Spectroscopy of the 12C2H2 (υ1 + υ3) Band in a Helium Buffer Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, L.; Di Sarno, V.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Mosca, S.; Santambrogio, G.; Maddaloni, P.; De Natale, P.

    2015-03-01

    Buffer gas cooling with a 4He gas is used to perform laser-absorption spectroscopy of the 12C2H2 (υ1 + υ3) band at cryogenic temperatures. Doppler thermometry is first carried out to extract translational temperatures from the recorded spectra. Then, rotational temperatures down to 20 K are retrieved by fitting the Boltzmann distribution to the relative intensities of several ro-vibrational lines. The potential of our setup to tune the thermal equilibrium between translational and rotational degrees of freedom is also demonstrated. This can be used to reproduce in a controlled way the regime of non-local thermal equilibrium typically encountered in the interstellar medium. The underlying helium-acetylene collisional physics, relevant for modeling planetary atmospheres, is also addressed. In particular, the diffusion time of 12C2H2 in the buffer cell is measured against the 4He flux at two separate translational temperatures; the observed behavior is then compared with that predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation, thus providing an estimate for the respective total elastic cross sections: σel(100 K) = (4 ± 1) × 10-20 m2 and σel(25 K) = (7 ± 2) × 10-20 m2.

  16. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Global Analysis of the Bending Vibrations of ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian J.; Pearson, John C.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Lattanzi, Valerio; Walters, Adam

    2009-06-01

    Symmetric molecules have no permanent dipole moment and are undetectable by rotational spectroscopy. Their interstellar observations have previously been limited to mid-infrared vibration-rotation spectroscopy. Although relatively weak, vibrational difference bands provide a means for detection of non polar molecules by terahertz techniques with microwave precision. Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of difference bands of light symmetric species, e.g., C_2H_2, CH_4 and C_3. This paper reports the results of the laboratory study on ^{12}C_2H_2 and ^{12}C_2D_2. The symmetric isotopomers of acetylene have two bending modes, the trans bending ν_4 (^1{π}_g), and the cis bending ν_5 (^1{π}_u). For ^{12}C_2H_2, the two bending modes occur at 612 and 729 cm^{-1}, respectively. For ^{12}C_2D_2, the two bending modes occur at 511 and 538 cm^{-1}. The ν_5-ν_4 difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 117 cm^{-1} (3500 GHz) for ^{12}C_2H_2 and 27 cm^{-1} (900 GHz) for ^{12}C_2D_2. Two hundred and fifty-one ^{12}C_2D_2 transitions, which are from ν_5-ν_4, (ν_5+ν_4)-2ν_4 and 2ν_5-(ν_5+ν_4) bands, have been measured in the 0.2-1.6 THz region, and 202 of them were observed for the first time. The precision of these measurements is estimated to be from 50 kHz to 100 kHz. A multistate analysis was carried out for the bending vibrational modes ν_4 and ν_5 of ^{12}C_2D_2, which includes the lines observed in this work and prior microwave, far-infrared and infrared data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for ^{12}C_2D_2 by adding the new measurements to the old data set which had only 10 lines with microwave measurement precision. The experiments on ^{12}C_2H_2 are in progress and ten P branch lines have been observed. We will present the ^{12}C_2H_2 results to date.

  17. Determining the defect density of states by temperature derivative admittance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian V.; Levi, Dean H.

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate that the temperature derivative admittance spectroscopy method can be used to directly determine the defect density of states. The density of defect states is proportional to the temperature derivative of the capacitance. This method is equivalent to the existing frequency derivative method in principle but possesses certain key advantages for detection of deep levels. To illustrate these advantages, we define the activation energy of a fictitious defect the Arrhenius plot of which extends diagonally across the measurable temperature-frequency range. Below this level (that is, shallower defects), the frequency derivative method is advantageous, and above this level (that is, deeper defects), the temperature derivative method is advantageous. The temperature derivative method allows a wider observation window of defect energy that avoids possible detection failure and facilitates simultaneous observation of multiple defects. For deep defects, it also yields more Arrhenius plot data points and therefore enables more accurate extraction of defect energy and capture cross-sections. In general, the temperature derivative method can avoid system noise at low frequency and is relatively immune to baseline effects due to parasitic circuit effects.

  18. Temperature and high pressure effects on the structural features of catalytic nanocomposites oxides by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Antonio N.; Pinto, Raffael C. F.; Freire, Paulo T. C.; Junior, Jose Alves L.; Oliveira, Alcineia C.; Filho, Josué M.

    2015-03-01

    Structural characterizations of nanostructured oxides were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The oxides catalysts namely, SnO2, ZrO2, CeO2, MnOx, Al2O3 and TiO2 were prepared by a nanocasting route and the effect of the temperature and pressure on the stability of the solids was evaluated. Raman spectra showed that ZrO2 and TiO2 exhibited phase transitions at moderate temperatures whereas CeO2, SnO2 and MnOx had an effective creation of defects in their structures upon annealing at elevated temperatures. The results suggested also that the effect of the temperature on the particles growth is related to the type of oxide. In this regard, phase transition by up to 600 °C accelerated the sintering of ZrO2 and CeO2 grains compared to TiO2, SnO2 and MnOx counterparts. Under hydrostatic pressures lower than 10 GPa, rutile TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 exhibited pressure induced phase transition whereas CeO2 and SnO2 were stable at pressures close to 15 GPa. The experiments revealed that the nanostructured SnO2 oxide exhibited stable performance at relatively high temperatures without phase transition or sintering, being suitable to be used as catalysts in the range of temperature and pressure studied.

  19. Temperature-independent band structure of WTe2 as observed from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirupathaiah, S.; Jha, Rajveer; Pal, Banabir; Matias, J. S.; Das, P. Kumar; Vobornik, I.; Ribeiro, R. A.; Sarma, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    Extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR), observed in transition-metal dichalcogenides, WTe2, has attracted recently a great deal of research interest as it shows no sign of saturation up to a magnetic field as high as 60 T, in addition to the presence of type-II Weyl fermions. Currently, there is a great deal of discussion on the role of band structure changes in the temperature-dependent XMR in this compound. In this contribution, we study the band structure of WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that the temperature-dependent band structure has no substantial effect on the temperature-dependent XMR, as our measurements do not show band structure changes upon increasing the sample temperature between 20 and 130 K. We further observe an electronlike surface state, dispersing in such a way that it connects the top of bulk holelike band to the bottom of bulk electronlike band. Interestingly, similarly to bulk states, the surface state is also mostly intact with the sample temperature. Our results provide valuable information in shaping the mechanism of temperature-dependent XMR in WTe2.

  20. Microelemental and mineral compositions of pathogenic biomineral concrements: SRXFA, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, T.N. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: moroz@uiggm.nsc.ru; Palchik, N.A.; Dar' in, A.V. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-11

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF), X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy had been applied for determination of microelemental and mineral composition of the kidney stones, gallstones and salivalities from natives of Novosibirsk and Novosibirsk region, Russia. The relationship between mineral, organic and microelemental composition of pathogenic calcilus was shown.

  1. Experimental and numerical characterization of a mid-infrared plasmonic perfect absorber for dual-band enhanced vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Erdem; Aslan, Ekin; Turkmen, Mustafa; Saracoglu, Omer Galip

    2017-11-01

    Plasmonic perfect absorbers (PPAs) have promising properties to be utilized in molecular sensing and spectroscopy applications such as surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In order to employ these properties and demonstrate the great potential of PPAs, investigation and demonstration of PPA designs and their sensing applications are highly needed. In this context, we present the design, optical characterization, experimental realization and dual-band sensing application of a subwavelength PPA array for infrared detection and surface enhanced spectroscopy applications. We analyze the PPA to investigate the absorption spectra and the fine-tuning mechanism through the parameter sweep simulations and experiments. In order to understand the absorption mechanism, we investigate the charge and current density distribution maps with electric and magnetic field enhancement effects. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential usage and reliability of the proposed PPA by presenting the experimental results of the dual-band detection of a conformal polymethyl methacrylate layer with nanometer-scale thickness atop the PPA. According to the experimental and simulation results of this study, the proposed PPA can be utilized in multiband molecular detection and high sensitive spectroscopy applications.

  2. ULTRA-HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSORS BASED ON OPTICAL PROPERTY MODULATION AND VIBRATION-TOLERANT INTERFEROMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel A. Riza

    2004-11-10

    The goals of the first six months of this project were to lay the foundations for both the SiC front-end optical chip fabrication as well as the free-space laser beam interferometer designs and preliminary tests. In addition, a Phase I goal was to design and experimentally build the high temperature and pressure infrastructure and test systems that will be used in the next 6 months for proposed sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. Both design process and diagrams for the mechanical elements as well as the optical systems are provided. In addition, photographs of the fabricated SiC optical chips, the high temperature & pressure test chamber instrument, the optical interferometer, the SiC sample chip holder, and signal processing data are provided. The design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed novel high temperature optical sensor technology. The goals of the second six months of this project were to conduct high temperature sensing tests using the test chamber and optical sensing instrument designs developed in the first part of the project. In addition, a Phase I goal was to develop the basic processing theory and physics for the proposed first sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail. Both optical experimental design process and sensed temperature are provided. In addition, photographs of the fabricated SiC optical chips after deployment in the high temperature test chamber are shown from a material study point-of-view.

  3. Water Orientation at Ceramide/Water Interfaces Studied by Heterodyne-Detected Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Adhikari, Aniruddha

    2016-10-10

    Lipid/water interaction is essential for many biological processes. The water structure at the nonionic lipid interface remains little known, and there is no scope of a priori prediction of water orientation at nonionic interfaces, either. Here, we report our study combining advanced nonlinear spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation on the water orientation at the ceramide/water interface. We measured χ spectrum in the OH stretch region of ceramide/isotopically diluted water interface using heterodyne-detected vibrational sum-frequency generation spectroscopy and found that the interfacial water prefers an overall hydrogen-up orientation. Molecular dynamics simulation indicates that this preferred hydrogen-up orientation of water is determined by a delicate balance between hydrogen-up and hydrogen-down orientation induced by lipid-water and intralipid hydrogen bonds. This mechanism also suggests that water orientation at neutral lipid interfaces depends highly on the chemical structure of the lipid headgroup, in contrast to the charged lipid interfaces where the net water orientation is determined solely by the charge of the lipid headgroup.

  4. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffer, Saskia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  5. Study of acetylene diluted in xenon by diode-laser spectroscopy: I. Temperature dependence of the broadening coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyne, Miguël; Joubert, Pierre; Populaire, Jean-Claude; Blanquet, Ghislain; Lepère, Muriel

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the Xe-broadening coefficients of 18 rovibrational lines in the ν4+ν5 band of C212H2 (near 1330 cm-1) determined at five temperatures, ranging from 173.2 K to 298.2 K. The measurement of these coefficients was realized with a tunable diode-laser spectrometer. A low temperature cell was coupled with the spectrometer in order to determine their temperature dependence. The line parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental profiles by the Voigt lineshape and the Rautian and the Galatry models, which take into account the collisional narrowing. The results were compared with previous experimental data reporting for other vibrational bands and agree with them. This indicates that they are insensitive to vibrational excitation.

  6. Continuous gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry of N-3DPA and DHA from -100 to 10°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, C Leigh; Schmidt, Walter F; Nguyen, Julie K; Qin, Jianwei; Chao, Kuanglin; Aubuchon, Steven R; Kim, Moon S

    2017-04-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) is exclusively utilized in fast signal processing tissues such as retinal, neural and cardiac. N-3 docosapentaenoic acid (n-3DPA, 22:5n-3), with just one less double bond, is also found in the marine food chain yet cannot substitute for DHA. Gradient temperature Raman spectroscopy (GTRS) applies the temperature gradients utilized in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to Raman spectroscopy, providing a straightforward technique to identify molecular rearrangements that occur near and at phase transitions. Herein we apply GTRS and both conventional and modulated DSC to n-3DPA and DHA from -100 to 20°C. Three-dimensional data arrays with 0.2°C increments and first derivatives allowed complete assignment of solid, liquid and transition state vibrational modes. Melting temperatures n-3DPA (-45°C) and DHA (-46°C) are similar and show evidence for solid-state phase transitions not seen in n-6DPA (-27°C melt). The C6H2 site is an elastic marker for temperature perturbation of all three lipids, each of which has a distinct three dimensional structure. N-3 DPA shows the spectroscopic signature of saturated fatty acids from C1 to C6. DHA does not have three aliphatic carbons in sequence; n-6DPA does but they occur at the methyl end, and do not yield the characteristic signal. DHA appears to have uniform twisting from C6H2 to C12H2 to C18H2 whereas n-6DPA bends from C12 to C18, centered at C15H2. For n-3DPA, twisting is centered at C6H2 adjacent to the C2-C3-C4-C5 aliphatic moiety. These molecular sites are the most elastic in the solid phase and during premelting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  8. Influence of ambient temperature on whole body and segmental bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, G.; Bausch, R.; Ismail, A. H.; Cordes, A.; Pikkemaat, R.; Leonhardt, S.

    2010-04-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurements are easy to implement and could be used for continuous monitoring. However, several factors (e.g. environment temperature) influence the measurements limiting the accuracy of the technology. Changes in skin temperature produced by changes in ambient temperature are related with changes in skin blood flow and skin impedance. It is assumed that skin impedance change is responsible for the error observed in whole body and segmental measurements. Measurements including body parts more distant from the torso seem to be more affected. In the present article skin and segment impedance have been performed on healthy subjects under extreme changes in environment temperature (13-39 °C). A commercial BIS device with a range between 5 kHz and 1 MHz has been used for the measurements. The results indicate that not only skin impedance, but also impedance of deeper tissue (e.g. muscle) may be responsible for the influence of environment temperature on BIS measurements. Segmental (knee-to-knee) BIS measurements show a relative change of only 2 %, while forearm and whole body impedance changed 14 % and 8 % respectively.

  9. Terahertz Spectroscopy of the Bending Vibrations of Acetylene 12C2H2 and 12C2D2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, B.; Pearson, J.

    2009-12-01

    Several fundamental interstellar molecules, e.g., C2H2, CH4 and C3, are completely symmetric molecules and feature no permanent dipole moment and no pure rotation spectrum. As a result they have only previously been observed in the infrared. However, directly observing them with the rest of the molecular column especially when the source is spatially resolved would be very valuable in understanding chemical evolution. Vibrational difference bands provide a means to detect symmetric molecules with microwave precision using terahertz techniques. Herschel, SOFIA and ALMA have the potential to identify a number of vibrational difference bands of light symmetric species. This paper reports laboratory results on 12C2H2 and 12C2D2. Symmetric acetylene isotopologues have two bending modes, the trans bending and the cis bending. Their difference bands are allowed and occur in the microwave, terahertz, and far-infrared wavelengths, with band origins at 3500 GHz for 12C2H2 and 900 GHz for 12C2D2. Twenty 12C2H2 P branch high-J transitions and two hundred and fifty-one 12C2D2 P Q and R branch transitions have been measured in the 0.2 - 1.6 THz region with precision of 50 to 100 kHz. These lines were modeled together with prior data on the pure bending levels. Significantly improved molecular parameters were obtained for 12C2H2 and 12C2D2 with the combined data set, and new frequency and intensity predictions were made to support astrophysics applications. The research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. S. Y. was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program, administrated by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  10. Conformational analysis and vibrational study of daidzein by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Daidzein (C15H10O4) is a type of isoflavone. It was isolated from Butea monosperma that belongs to the Fabaceae family. Soybeans and soy products are the abundant source of daidzein. It is the subject of investigation for many reasons, as it has got wide applications, such as anti-tumor, anti-estrogen, weak pro-estrogen and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, a complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR and Raman spectra of daidzein. Electronic properties have been analyzed using TD-DFT method for both gaseous and solvent phase. The optimized geometry, total energy, potential energy surface and vibrational wavenumbers of daidzein have been determined using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and a good correlation was found between observed and calculated values. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about three bonds, has been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Global reactivity descriptors have been calculated for predicting the chemical reactivity and the stability of chemical systems. Electrostatic potential surface has been plotted for predicting the structure activity relationship. NBO analysis has also been performed to study the stability of the molecule. NLO study reveals the nonlinear properties of the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been studied. Finally, the calculated results were used to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which showed a good agreement with the observed spectra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of conformational stability, structural, electronic and charge transfer properties of cladrin using vibrational spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swapnil; Singh, Harshita; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Kumar, Padam; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-11-11

    In the present work, a detailed conformational study of cladrin (3-(3,4-dimethoxy phenyl)-7-hydroxychromen-4-one) has been done by using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR/FT-Raman/UV-Vis/NMR) and quantum chemical calculations. The optimized geometry, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of the cladrin in ground state were calculated by density functional theory (DFT) employing 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The study has been focused on the two most stable conformers that are selected after the full geometry optimization of the molecule. A detailed assignment of the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra has been done for both the conformers along with potential energy distribution for each vibrational mode. The observed and scaled wavenumber of most of the bands has been found to be in good agreement. The UV-Vis spectrum has been recorded and compared with calculated spectrum. In addition, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra have been also recorded and compared with the calculated data that shows the inter or intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The electronic properties such as HOMO-LUMO energies were calculated by using time-dependent density functional theory. Molecular electrostatic potential has been plotted to elucidate the reactive part of the molecule. Natural bond orbital analysis was performed to investigate the molecular stability. Non linear optical property of the molecule have been studied by calculating the electric dipole moment (μ) and the first hyperpolarizability (β) that results in the nonlinearity of the molecule. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vibrational mid-infrared photothermal spectroscopy using a fiber laser probe: asymptotic limit in signal-to-baseline contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totachawattana, Atcha; Liu, Hui; Mertiri, Alket; Hong, Mi K; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Sander, Michelle Y

    2016-01-01

    We report on a mid-infrared photothermal spectroscopy system with a near-infrared fiber probe laser and a tunable quantum cascade pump laser. Photothermal spectra of a 6 μm-thick 4-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl liquid crystal sample are measured with a signal-to-baseline contrast above 103. As both the peak photothermal signal and the corresponding baseline increase linearly with probe power, the signal-to-baseline contrast converges to an asymptotic limit for a given pump power. This limit is independent of the probe power and characterizes the best contrast achievable for the system. This enables sensitive quantitative spectral characterization of linear infrared absorption features directly from photothermal spectroscopy measurements.

  13. Electron Temperature Measurement of Buried Layer Targets Using Time Resolved K-shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Edward; Foord, M. E.; Shepherd, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Scott, H.; London, R.; Martin, M.; Wilson, B.; Iglesias, C.; Mauche, C.; Whitley, H.; Nilsen, J.; Hoarty, D.; James, S.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M.; Allan, P.; Hobbs, L.

    2016-10-01

    Short pulse laser-heated buried layer experiments have been performed with the goal of creating plasmas with mass densities >= 1 g/cm3 and electron temperatures >= 500 eV. The buried layer geometry has the advantage of rapid energy deposition before significant hydrodynamic expansion occurs. For brief periods (< 40 ps) this provides a low gradient, high density platform for studying emission characteristics under extreme plasma conditions. A study of plasma conditions achievable using the Orion laser facility has been performed. Time resolved K-shell spectroscopy was used to determine the temperature evolution of buried layer aluminum foil targets. The measured evolution is compared to a 2-D PIC simulation done using LSP, which shows late time heating from the non-thermal electron population. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of excitons in two-dimensional-semiconductors as a function of temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Tizei, Luiz H. G.

    2016-04-21

    We have explored the benefits of performing monochromated Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy(EELS) in samples at cryogenic temperatures. As an example, we have observed the excitonic absorption peaks in single layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides. These peaks appear separated by small energies due to spin orbit coupling. We have been able to distinguish the split for MoS2 below 300 K and for MoSe2 below 220 K. However, the distinction between peaks is only clear at 150 K. We have measured the change in absorption threshold between 150 K and 770 K for MoS2 and MoSe2. We discuss the effect of carbon and ice contamination in EELSspectra. The increased spectral resolution available made possible with modern monochromators in electron microscopes will require the development of stable sample holders which reaches temperatures far below that of liquid nitrogen.

  15. Room temperature oxidation kinetics of Si nanoparticles in air, determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Gillet, Jean-Numa; Meunier, M.; Sacher, E.

    2005-01-01

    The air oxidation kinetics of low coverages of ˜5nm Si nanoparticles, deposited by pulsed excimer laser ablation (KrF, 248 nm) in He, have been characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A simple model, based on the evolution of the Si 2p spectral components during oxidation, has been developed to determine the nanoparticle oxide thickness. It is found that the short-term oxide thickness is greater, and the long-term room-temperature air oxidization rate of these nanoparticles is less, than those reported for bulk a-Si and c-Si. The results are also consistent with an earlier transmission electron microscope observation of the oxidation of larger Si particles at higher temperatures. The greater short-term oxide thickness may be attributed to surface defects on the prepared Si nanoparticles, and lower long-term oxidation rate is due to the nonlinear decrease of oxygen diffusion in spherical systems.

  16. Infrared absorption spectroscopy of carbon monoxide on nickel films: a low temperature thermal detection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, R.B.

    1978-11-01

    Sensitive vibrational spectra of carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed on evaporated nickel films have been measured by attaching a thermometer to the sample, cooling the assembly to liquid helium temperatures, and recording the temperature changes which occur when infrared radiation is absorbed. The measurements are made in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber in which the sample surface can be cleaned, heated, exposed to gas molecules and cooled to 1.6 K for the infrared measurements. The spectra of chemisorbed CO molecules are interpreted in terms of the linear and bridge adsorption sites on the nickel surface, and they show how the distribution of molecules among these sites changes when the CO coverage increases and intermolecular forces become important. The spectra of physically adsorbed molecules in both monolayer and multilayer films are also reported. Absorptions as small as five parts in 10/sup 5/ of the incident radiation can presently be detected in spectra covering broad bands of infrared frequencies with a resolution of 2 cm/sup -1/. This high sensitivity is attributable to the low noise and reduced background signal of the thermal detection scheme, to the stability of the rapid scan Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, and to the automated computerized data acquisition electronics. Better performance is expected in future experiments on single crystal samples as well as evaporated films. This will make it possible to study molecules with weaker absorptions than CO and to look for evidence of chemical reactions between different adsorbed molecules.

  17. Cut-off nonlinearities in the low-temperature vibrations of glasses and crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Sperl, Matthias; Mossa, Stefano; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    We present a computer simulation study of glassy and crystalline states using the standard Lennard-Jones interaction potential that is truncated at a finite cut-off distance, as is typical of many computer simulations. We demonstrate that the discontinuity at the cut-off distance in the first derivative of the potential (corresponding to the interparticle force) leads to the appearance of cut-off nonlinearities. These cut-off nonlinearities persist into the very-low-temperature regime thereby...

  18. Vibrational Excitation of H2 Scattering from Cu(111): Effects of Surface Temperature and of Allowing Energy Exchange with the Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Juaristi, J I; Alducin, M

    2017-06-29

    In scattering of H2 from Cu(111), vibrational excitation has so far defied an accurate theoretical description. To expose the causes of the large discrepancies with experiment, we investigate how the feature due to vibrational excitation (the "gain peak") in the simulated time-of-flight spectrum of (v = 1, j = 3) H2 scattering from Cu(111) depends on the surface temperature (Ts) and the possibility of energy exchange with surface phonons and electron-hole pairs (ehp's). Quasi-classical dynamics calculations are performed on the basis of accurate semiempirical density functionals for the interaction with H2 + Cu(111). The methods used include the quasi-classical trajectory method within the Born-Oppenheimer static surface model, the generalized Langevin oscillator (GLO) method incorporating energy transfer to surface phonons, the GLO + friction (GLO+F) method also incorporating energy exchange with ehp's, and ab initio molecular dynamics with electronic friction (AIMDEF). Of the quasi-classical methods tested, comparison with AIMDEF suggests that the GLO+F method is accurate enough to describe vibrational excitation as measured in the experiments. The GLO+F calculations also suggest that the promoting effect of raising Ts on the measured vibrational excitation is due to an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. However, by itself, enabling energy exchange with the surface by modeling surface phonons and ehp's leads to reduced vibrational excitation, further decreasing the agreement with experiment. The simulated gain peak is quite sensitive to energy shifts in calculated vibrational excitation probabilities and to shifts in a specific experimental parameter (the chopper opening time). While the GLO+F calculations allow important qualitative conclusions, comparison to quantum dynamics results suggests that, with the quasi-classical way of describing nuclear motion and the present box quantization method for assigning the final vibrational state, the gain peak is not

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Investigations of the Rotor Vibration Amplitude of the Turbocharger and Bearings Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zadorozhnaya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most urgent issues of the modern world and domestic automobile and tractor production is the problem of the production of efficient and reliable turbochargers. The rotor bearings largely determine the reliable operation of the turbocharger. By increasing the degree of the forcing of the engine the turbocharger rotor speed and the load increases significantly. Working conditions of bearings also complicated because of the temperature rise. In this case the bearing of the turbine and the compressor bearing works in different thermal conditions. The definition of the thermal state of the bearings can be performed experimentally. However, to perform these studies the sophisticated experimental equipment must be used. Researchers can't perform experiments for each type of turbocharger. Therefore, the applying of the theoretical approaches becomes more relevant. The peculiarity of the considered problem is the design of the bearings, which are made in the form of multilayer bearings with floating rings. Such designs increase the number of the parameters that affect the behaviour of the rotor. For the calculation of the multilayer bearings and turbocharger rotor dynamics a method and calculation algorithm was developed. A plan of the experiment based on the orthogonal central composite plan was drawn up. The regression equations for rotor amplitude and bearing temperature were obtained. As variable parameters the clearances (external and internal, rotor speed, pressure and lubricant temperature were used. The results of the calculation were compared with experimental results obtained at the plant. Non-Newtonian properties of the lubricants were taken into account in the calculations. Comparative results showed good agreement. In this way the resulting function can be applied to studies of the similarly multilayer bearings without complicated experimental studies.

  20. Preparation and measurement of FBG-based length, temperature, and vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel, Bretislav; Helan, Radek; Buchta, Zdenek; Jelinek, Michal; Cip, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    We present system of structure health measurement by optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings. Our system is focused to additionally install to existing buildings. We prepared first set-up of the system to monitoring of the nuclear power plant containment shape deformation. The presented system can measure up to several tens of sensors simultaneously. Each sensor contains optical fiber grating to measurement of change of length and the other independed fiber grating to monitor the temperature and the other ineligible effects.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Charge Localization in High-Mobility, Solution-Crystallized Small Molecule Semiconductors Studied by Charge Modulation Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meneau, Aurélie Y. B.; Olivier, Yoann; Backlund, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    In solution-processable small molecule semiconductors, the extent of charge carrier wavefunction localization induced by dynamic disorder can be probed spectroscopically as a function of temperature using charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS). Here, it is shown based on combined fi eld-effect......, in principle, be observed at low temperatures if other transport bottlenecks associated with grain boundaries or contacts could be removed....

  2. High-Temperature Raman Spectroscopy of Nano-Crystalline Carbon in Silicon Oxycarbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rosenburg

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of segregated carbon in silicon oxycarbide (SiOC, hot-pressed at T = 1600 °C and p = 50 MPa, has been investigated by VIS Raman spectroscopy (λ = 514 nm within the temperature range 25–1000 °C in air. The occurrence of the G, D’ and D bands at 1590, 1620 and 1350 cm−1, together with a lateral crystal size La < 10 nm and an average distance between lattice defects LD ≈ 8 nm, provides evidence that carbon exists as nano-crystalline phase in SiOC containing 11 and 17 vol % carbon. Both samples show a linear red shift of the G band up to the highest temperature applied, which is in agreement with the description of the anharmonic contribution to the lattice potential by the modified Tersoff potential. The temperature coefficient χG = −0.024 ± 0.001 cm−1/°C is close to that of disordered carbon, e.g., carbon nanowalls or commercial activated graphite. The line width of the G band is independent of temperature with FWHM-values of 35 cm−1 (C-11 and 45 cm−1 (C-17, suggesting that scattering with defects and impurities outweighs the phonon-phonon and phonon-electron interactions. Analysis of the Raman line intensities indicates vacancies as dominating defects.

  3. Helium temperature measurements in a hot filament magnetic mirror plasma using high resolution Doppler spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, S.; McCarthy, P. J.; Ruth, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Langmuir probe and spectroscopic diagnostics are used to routinely measure electron temperature and density over a wide operating range in a reconfigured Double Plasma device at University College Cork, Ireland. The helium plasma, generated through thermionic emission from a negatively biased tungsten filament, is confined by an axisymmetric magnetic mirror configuration using two stacks of NdFeB permanent magnets, each of length 20 cm and diameter 3 cm placed just outside the 15 mm water cooling jacket enclosing a cylindrical vacuum vessel of internal diameter 25 cm. Plasma light is analysed using a Fourier Transform-type Bruker spectrometer with a highest achievable resolution of 0.08 cm-1 . In the present work, the conventional assumption of room temperature ions in the analysis of Langmuir probe data from low temperature plasmas is examined critically using Doppler spectroscopy of the 468.6 nm He II line. Results for ion temperatures obtained from spectroscopic data for a variety of engineering parameters (discharge voltage, gas pressure and plasma current) will be presented.

  4. Folding of a Zinc-Finger ββα-Motif Investigated Using Two-Dimensional and Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuzelaar, Heleen; Panman, Matthijs R; van Dijk, Chris N; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-11-03

    Small proteins provide good model systems for studying the fundamental forces that control protein folding. Here, we investigate the folding dynamics of the 28-residue zinc-finger mutant FSD-1, which is designed to form a metal-independent folded ββα-motif, and which provides a testing ground for proteins containing a mixed α/β fold. Although the folding of FSD-1 has been actively studied, the folding mechanism remains largely unclear. In particular, it is unclear in what stage of folding the α-helix is formed. To address this issue we investigate the folding mechanism of FSD-1 using a combination of temperature-dependent UV circular dichroism (UV-CD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy, and temperature-jump (T-jump) transient-IR spectroscopy. Our UV-CD and FTIR data show different thermal melting transitions, indicating multistate folding behavior. Temperature-dependent 2D-IR spectra indicate that the α-helix is the most stable structural element of FSD-1. To investigate the folding/unfolding re-equilibration dynamics of FSD-1, the conformational changes induced by a nanosecond T-jump are probed with transient-IR and transient dispersed-pump-probe (DPP) IR spectroscopy. We observe biexponential T-jump relaxation kinetics (with time constants of 80 ± 13 ns and 1300 ± 100 ns at 322 K), confirming that the folding involves an intermediate state. The IR and dispersed-pump-probe IR spectra associated with the two kinetic components suggest that the folding of FSD-1 involves early formation of the α-helix, followed by the formation of the β-hairpin and hydrophobic contacts.

  5. Temperature and high pressure effects on the structural features of catalytic nanocomposites oxides by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Antonio N; Pinto, Raffael C F; Freire, Paulo T C; Junior, Jose Alves L; Oliveira, Alcineia C; Filho, Josué M

    2015-03-05

    Structural characterizations of nanostructured oxides were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The oxides catalysts namely, SnO2, ZrO2, CeO2, MnOx, Al2O3 and TiO2 were prepared by a nanocasting route and the effect of the temperature and pressure on the stability of the solids was evaluated. Raman spectra showed that ZrO2 and TiO2 exhibited phase transitions at moderate temperatures whereas CeO2, SnO2 and MnOx had an effective creation of defects in their structures upon annealing at elevated temperatures. The results suggested also that the effect of the temperature on the particles growth is related to the type of oxide. In this regard, phase transition by up to 600°C accelerated the sintering of ZrO2 and CeO2 grains compared to TiO2, SnO2 and MnOx counterparts. Under hydrostatic pressures lower than 10GPa, rutile TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 exhibited pressure induced phase transition whereas CeO2 and SnO2 were stable at pressures close to 15GPa. The experiments revealed that the nanostructured SnO2 oxide exhibited stable performance at relatively high temperatures without phase transition or sintering, being suitable to be used as catalysts in the range of temperature and pressure studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vibrational spectroscopy characterization of low level laser therapy on mammary culture cells: a micro-FTIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Taciana D.; Villa dos Santos, Nathalia; Pecora Milazzotto, Marcella; Cerchiaro, Giselle; da Silva Martinho, Herculano

    2011-03-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is an emerging therapeutic approach for several clinical conditions. The clinical effects induced by LLLT presumably go from the photobiostimulation/photobioinibition at cellular level to the molecular level. The detailed mechanism underlying this effect is still obscure. This work is dedicated to quantify some relevant aspects of LLLT related to molecular and cellular variations. This goal was attached by exposing malignant breast cells (MCF7) to spatially filtered light of a He-Ne laser (633 nm) with 28.8 mJ/cm2 of fluency. The cell viability was evaluated by microscopic observation using Trypan Blue viability test. The vibrational spectra of each experimental group (micro- FTIR technique) were used to identify the relevant biochemical alterations occurred due the process. The red light had influence over RNA, phosphate and serine/threonine/tyrosine bands. Light effects on cell number or viability were not detected. However, the irradiation had direct influence on metabolic activity of cells.

  7. DFT approach to (benzylthio)acetic acid: Conformational search, molecular (monomer and dimer) structure, vibrational spectroscopy and some electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz-Gromiuk, Justyna

    2018-01-01

    The DFT studies were carried out with the B3LYP method utilizing the 6-31G and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets depending on whether the aim of calculations was to gain the geometry at equilibrium, or to calculate the optimized molecular structure of (benzylthio)acetic acid (Hbta) in the forms of monomer and dimer. The minimum conformational energy search was followed by the potential energy surface (PES) scan of all rotary bonds existing in the acid molecule. The optimized geometrical monomeric and dimeric structures of the title compound were compared with the experimental structural data in the solid state. The detailed vibrational interpretation of experimental infrared and Raman bands was performed on the basis of theoretically simulated ESFF-scaled wavenumbers calculated for the monomer and dimer structures of Hbta. The electronic characteristics of Hbta is also presented in terms of Mulliken atomic charges, frontier molecular orbitals and global reactivity descriptors. Additionally, the MEP and ESP surfaces were computed to predict coordination sites for potential metal complex formation.

  8. Conformational analysis and vibrational spectroscopy of a paracetamol analogous: 2-Bromo-N-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-2-methylpropanamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Rommel B.; Quintero, David E.; Viana, Anderson B.; Moreno-Fuquen, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    We conducted an experimental and quantum chemical investigation of the electronic properties and vibrational mode couplings of a structure analogous to a paracetamol (acetaminophen): 2-Bromo-N-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)-2-methylpropanamide. The spectroscopic and electronic properties were carried out with the PBE1PBE functional, and G3MP2 was used to predict the heat of formation. Among the E/Z stereoisomers, we showed that the energy gap ranged from 3 to 10 kcal mol-1; the relative stability among the regioisomers (involving the different positions of the methyl and hydroxyl groups) exhibited energy differences lower than 5 kcal mol-1. A topological analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) was performed to determine the intramolecular hydrogen bonds that govern the configuration changes, and the Natural Bond Orbital method was used to estimate the interplay between the steric and electrostatic interactions that stabilized each isomer. It was also estimated the influence of the population methodology in to predict the atomic charge distribution for the title compound.

  9. Measurement of Internal Friction for Tungsten by the Curve Vibrating Method with Variation of Voltage and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Yusibani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Application of a curved vibrating wire method (CVM to measure gas viscosity has been widely used. A fine Tungsten wire with 50 mm of diameter is bent into a semi-circular shape and arranged symmetrically in a magnetic field of about 0.2 T. The frequency domain is used for calculating the viscosity as a response for forced oscillation of the wire. Internal friction is one of the parameter in the CVM which is has to be measured beforeahead. Internal friction coefficien for the wire material which is the inverse of the quality factor has to be measured in a vacuum condition. The term involving internal friction actually represents the effective resistance of motion due to all non-viscous damping phenomena including internal friction and magnetic damping. The testing of internal friction measurement shows that at different induced voltage and elevated temperature at a vacuum condition, it gives the value of internal friction for Tungsten is around 1 to 4 10-4.

  10. Sub-nano tesla magnetic imaging based on room-temperature magnetic flux sensors with vibrating sample magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshiaki; Oyama, Daisuke

    2017-05-01

    We developed a two-dimensional imaging method for weak magnetic charge distribution using a commercially available magnetic impedance sensor whose magnetic field resolution is 10 pT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz. When we applied the vibrating sample magnetometry, giving a minute mechanical vibration to the sample and detecting magnetic signals modulated by the vibration frequency, the effects of 1/f noise and the environmental low-frequency band noise were suppressed, and a weak magnetic charge distribution was obtained without magnetic shielding. Furthermore, improvement in the spatial resolution was also expected when the signals were demodulated at the second harmonic frequency of the vibration. In this paper, a preliminary magnetic charge imaging using the vibrating sample magnetometry and its results are demonstrated.

  11. Structure and vibrations of 2-fluoro-N-methylaniline in the S0, S1 and D0 states: REMPI and MATI spectroscopy and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Dai, Wenshuai; Zhang, Lijuan; Cheng, Min; Du, Yikui; Zhu, Qihe

    2017-10-01

    Theoretical calculations predicted that there are only two stable conformers, trans and cis, for 2-fluoro-N-methylaniline (2FNMA) in the S0, S1 and D0 states. Compared to the cis conformer, the trans one is more stable, and has a population more than 99% at room temperature. The optimized molecular skeleton of trans and cis 2FNMA are both non-planar in the S0 state, but planar in the S1 and D0 states. The one-dimensional potential energy surface of 2FNMA in the S0 state is obtained. The Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (R2PI) and Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectra of trans 2FNMA are obtained. The first electronic excitation energy (E1) and the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of trans 2FNMA are determined. The substitution effect on the molecular structures, transition energies and vibrations of 2FNMA are discussed.

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy and electrophoresis as a "golden means" in monitoring of polysaccharides in medical plant and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, A.

    In recent years, some bioactive polysaccharides isolated from natural sources have attracted much attention in the field of biochemistry and pharmacology. Of them, polysaccharides or their glycoconjugates were shown to exhibit multiple biological activities including anticarcinogenic, anticoagulant, immunostimulating, antioxidant, etc. Pharmacotherapy using plant-derived substances can be currently regarded as a very promising future alternative to conventional therapy. The advanced biotechnologies available today enable chemical investigation of well-defined bioactive plant components as sources of novel drugs. The need for safer drugs without side effects has led to the use of natural ingredients with proven safety. Special interest is focused on plant polysaccharides. This article attempts to review the current structural and conformational characterization of some importantly bioactive monosaccharides isolated from following plant cell-wall: Symphytum officinale (comfrey), Thymus pulegioides (thyme), Trigonella foenum-graecum L. (fenugreek), Tussilago farfara L. (coltsfoot), Hyssopus officinalis (hyssop), Althaea officinalis L. (marshmallow) and Equisetum arvense L. (horsetail). The chemical structures of monosaccharides were analysed using FTIR and Raman spectroscopies as well as cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis (CAE). The dried plant samples were gently hydrolysed with sulphuric acid. The presence of glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, alginic acid, glucose, mannose and xylose in the hydrolysates of reference substances and non-defatted plant films was proved. The possibility of a taxonomic classification of plant cell walls based on infrared and Raman spectroscopies and the use of spectral fingerprinting for authentication and detection of adulteration of products rich in cell-wall materials are discussed. Individual bands were selected to monitor the sugar content in medical plant cell walls and to confirm the identity of the analysed plants.

  13. Temperature dependence of diffusion in model and live cell membranes characterized by imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Yap, Darilyn Hui Xin; Wohland, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    The organization of the plasma membrane is regulated by the dynamic equilibrium between the liquid ordered(Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) phases. The abundance of the Lo phase is assumed to be a consequence of the interaction between cholesterol and the other lipids, which are otherwise in either the Ld or gel (So) phase.The characteristic lipid packing in these phases results in significant differences in their respective lateral dynamics.In this study, imaging total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (ITIR-FCS) is applied to monitor the diffusion within supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) as functions of temperature and composition. We show that the temperature dependence of membrane lateral diffusion,which is parameterized by the Arrhenius activation energy (EArr), can resolve the sub-resolution phase behavior of lipid mixtures. The FCS diffusion law, a novel membrane heterogeneity ruler implemented in ITIR-FCS, is applied to show that the domains in the So–Ldphase are static and large while they are small and dynamic in the Lo–Ld phase. Diffusion measurements and the subsequent FCS diffusion law analyses at different temperatures show that the modulation in membrane dynamics at high temperature (313 K) is a cumulative effect of domain melting and rigidity relaxation. Finally, we extend these studies to the plasma membranes of commonly used neuroblastoma, HeLa and fibroblast cells.The temperature dependence of membrane dynamics for neuroblastoma cells is significantly different from that of HeLa or fibroblast cells as the different cell types exhibit a high level of compositional heterogeneity.

  14. Defining the temperature range for cooking with extra virgin olive oil using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naveed; Saleem, M.; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-09-01

    Using the potential of Raman spectroscopy, new findings regarding the effects of heating on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) during frying/cooking are presented. A temperature range from 140 to 150 °C has been defined within which EVOO can be used for cooking/frying without much loss of its natural molecular composition. Raman spectra from the EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation laser at 785 nm in the range from 540 to 1800 cm-1. Due to heating, prominent variations in intensity are observed at Raman bands from 540 to 770 cm-1, 790 to 1170 cm-1 and 1267 and 1302 cm-1. The Raman bands at 1267 and 1302 cm-1 represent cis unsaturated fats and their ratio is used to investigate the effects of temperature on the molecular composition of EVOO. In addition, principal component analysis has been applied on all the groups of data to classify the heated EVOO samples at different temperatures and for different times. In addition, it has been found that use of EVOO for frying twice does not have any prominent effect on its molecular composition.

  15. Non-invasive product temperature determination during primary drying using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneid, Stefan C; Gieseler, Henning; Kessler, William J; Pikal, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this work was to demonstrate the application of Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) as a non-invasive method to determine the average product temperature of the batch during primary drying. The TDLAS sensor continuously measures the water vapor concentration and the vapor flow velocity in the spool connecting the freeze-dryer chamber and condenser. Vapor concentration and velocity data were then used to determine the average sublimation rate (g/s) which was subsequently integrated to evaluate the amount of water removed from the product. Position dependent vial heat transfer coefficients (K(v)) were evaluated using the TDLAS sensor data for 20 mL vials during sublimation tests with pure water. TDLAS K(v) data showed good agreement to K(v) data obtained by the traditional gravimetric procedure. K(v) for edge vials was found to be about 20-30% higher than that of center vials. A weighted K(v) was then used to predict a representative average product temperature from TDLAS data in partial and full load freeze drying runs with 5%, 7.5%, or 10% (w/w) sucrose, mannitol, and glycine solutions. TDLAS product temperatures for all freeze-drying runs were within 1-2 degrees C of "center vial" steady state thermocouple data.

  16. Development of Laser-induced Grating Spectroscopy for Underwater Temperature Measurement in Shock Wave Focusing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gasdynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results may be used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cells which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  17. Low-temperature hydrogen absorption in metallic nanocontacts studied by point-contact spectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, H.; Islam, M. S.; Ienaga, K.; Inagaki, Y.; Hashizume, K.; Kawae, T.

    2017-09-01

    We report on hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms absorption below T = 20 K in metallic palladium (Pd) via quantum tunnelling (QT). When a small bias voltage is applied between Pd nanocontacts that are immersed in liquid H2 (D2), the differential conductance spectra measured by point-contact spectroscopy change enormously. The results indicate H (D) absorption in Pd nanocontacts at the temperature where H (D) absorption due to thermal hopping process is not expected, and can be explained by QT. The QT occurs when the energy level of the potential well trapping the H (D) atom coincides with those not trapping the H (D) atom, and is assisted by phonons induced by ballistic electrons.

  18. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  19. Temperature dependence of the photodissociation of CO2 from high vibrational levels: 205-230 nm imaging studies of CO(X1Σ+) and O(3P, 1D) products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Samanta, B. R.; Samanta, A. K.; Reisler, H.

    2017-07-01

    The 205-230 nm photodissociation of vibrationally excited CO2 at temperatures up to 1800 K was studied using Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and time-sliced Velocity Map Imaging (VMI). CO2 molecules seeded in He were heated in an SiC tube attached to a pulsed valve and supersonically expanded to create a molecular beam of rotationally cooled but vibrationally hot CO2. Photodissociation was observed from vibrationally excited CO2 with internal energies up to about 20 000 cm-1, and CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were detected by REMPI. The large enhancement in the absorption cross section with increasing CO2 vibrational excitation made this investigation feasible. The internal energies of heated CO2 molecules that absorbed 230 nm radiation were estimated from the kinetic energy release (KER) distributions of CO(X1Σ+) products in v″ = 0. At 230 nm, CO2 needs to have at least 4000 cm-1 of rovibrational energy to absorb the UV radiation and produce CO(X1Σ+) + O(3P). CO2 internal energies in excess of 16 000 cm-1 were confirmed by observing O(1D) products. It is likely that initial absorption from levels with high bending excitation accesses both the A1B2 and B1A2 states, explaining the nearly isotropic angular distributions of the products. CO(X1Σ+) product internal energies were estimated from REMPI spectroscopy, and the KER distributions of the CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were obtained by VMI. The CO product internal energy distributions change with increasing CO2 temperature, suggesting that more than one dynamical pathway is involved when the internal energy of CO2 (and the corresponding available energy) increases. The KER distributions of O(1D) and O(3P) show broad internal energy distributions in the CO(X1Σ+) cofragment, extending up to the maximum allowed by energy but peaking at low KER values. Although not all the observations can be explained at this time, with the aid of available theoretical studies of CO2 VUV

  20. Using vibrational infrared biomolecular spectroscopy to detect heat-induced changes of molecular structure in relation to nutrient availability of prairie whole oat grains on a molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M D Mostafizar; Theodoridou, Katerina; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    To our knowledge, there is little study on the interaction between nutrient availability and molecular structure changes induced by different processing methods in dairy cattle. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of heat processing methods on interaction between nutrient availability and molecular structure in terms of functional groups that are related to protein and starch inherent structure of oat grains with two continued years and three replication of each year. The oat grains were kept as raw (control) or heated in an air-draft oven (dry roasting: DO) at 120 °C for 60 min and under microwave irradiation (MIO) for 6 min. The molecular structure features were revealed by vibrational infrared molecular spectroscopy. The results showed that rumen degradability of dry matter, protein and starch was significantly lower (P grains are more sensitive to microwave irradiation than dry heating in terms of protein and starch molecular profile and nutrient availability in ruminants.

  1. Surface structures of an amphiphilic tri-block copolymer in air and in water probed using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristalyn, Cornelius B; Lu, Xiaolin; Weinman, Craig J; Ober, Christopher K; Kramer, Edward J; Chen, Zhan

    2010-07-06

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy has been applied to investigate surface structures of an amphiphilic surface-active block copolymer (SABC) film deposited on a CaF(2) substrate, in air and in water in situ. Developed as a surface-active component of an antifouling coating for marine applications, this amphiphilic triblock copolymer contains both hydrophobic fluorinated alkyl groups as well as hydrophilic ethoxy groups. It was found that surface structures of the copolymer film in air and in water cannot be probed directly using the SFG experimental geometry we adopted because SFG signals can be contributed from the polymer/air (or polymer/water) interface as well as the buried polymer/CaF(2) substrate interface. Using polymer films with varied thicknesses, structural information about the polymer surfaces in air and in water can be deduced from the detected SFG signals. With SFG, surface restructuring of this polymer has been observed in water, especially the methyl and methylene groups change orientations upon contact with water. However, the hydrophobic fluoroalkyl group was present on the surface in both air and water, and we believe that it was held near the surface in water by its neighboring ethoxy groups.

  2. In-Situ Studies of Structure Transformation and Al Coordination of KAl(MoO42 during Heating by High Temperature Raman and 27Al NMR Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in optimizing composition and synthesis conditions of functional crystals, and the further exploration of new possible candidates for tunable solid-state lasers, has led to significant research on compounds in this family MIMIII(MVIO42 (MI = alkali metal, MIII = Al, In, Sc, Fe, Bi, lanthanide; MVI = Mo, W. The vibrational modes, structure transformation, and Al coordination of crystalline, glassy, and molten states of KAl(MoO42 have been investigated by in-situ high temperature Raman scattering and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR spectroscopy, together with first principles density functional simulation of room temperature Raman spectrum. The results showed that, under the present fast quenching conditions, Al is present predominantly in [AlO6] octahedra in both KAl(MoO42 glass and melt, with the tetrahedrally coordinated Al being minor at approximately 2.7%. The effect of K+, from ordered arrangement in the crystal to random distribution in the melt, on the local chemical environment of Al, was also revealed. The distribution and quantitative analysis of different Al coordination subspecies are final discussed and found to be dependent on the thermal history of the glass samples.

  3. Experimentally validated structural vibration frequencies’ prediction from frictional temperature signatures using numerical simulation: A case of laced cantilever beam-like structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Talai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article pertains to the prediction of structural vibration frequencies from frictional temperature evolution through numerical simulation. To achieve this, a finite element analysis was carried on AISI 304 steel cantilever beam-like structures coupled with a lacing wire using the commercial software ABAQUS/CAE. The coupled temperature–displacement transient analysis simulated the frictional thermal generation. Furthermore, an experimental analysis was carried out with infrared cameras capturing the interfacial thermal images while the beams were subjected to forced excitation, thus validating the finite element analysis results. The analysed vibration frequencies using a MATLAB fast Fourier transform algorithm confirmed the validity of its prediction from the frictional temperature time domain waveform. This finding has a great significance to the mechanical and aerospace engineering communities for the effective structural health monitoring of dynamic structures online using infrared thermography, thus reducing the downtime and maintenance cost, leading to increased efficiency.

  4. Infrared spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory of crystalline β-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaaziosowurtzitane (β CL-20) in the region of its C-H stretching vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behler, K. D.; Pesce-Rodriguez, R.; Cabalo, J.; Sausa, R.

    2013-10-01

    Molecular vibrational spectroscopy provides a useful tool for material characterization and model verification. We examine the CH stretching fundamental and overtones of energetic material β-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaaziosowurtzitane (β-CL-20) by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Laser Photoacoustic Overtone Spectroscopy, and utilize Density Functional Theory to calculate the C-H bond energy of β-CL-20 in a crystal. The spectra reveal four intense and distinct features, whose analysis yields C-H stretching fundamental frequencies and anharmonicity values that range from 3137 to 3170 cm-1 and 53.8 to 58.8 cm-1, respectively. From these data, we estimate an average value of 42,700 cm-1 (5.29 eV) for the C-H bond energy, a value that agrees with our quantum mechanical calculations.

  5. Vibrational spectroscopy and analytical electron microscopy studies of Fe-V-O and In-V-O thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Vuk, A S; Drazic, G; Colomban, P

    2002-01-01

    Orthovanadate (M sup 3 sup + VO sub 4; M= Fe, In) and vanadate (Fe sub 2 V sub 4 O sub 1 sub 3) thin films were prepared using sol-gel synthesis and dip coating deposition. Using analytical electron microscopy (AEM), the chemical composition and the degree of crystallization of the phases present in the thin Fe-V-O films were investigated. TEM samples were prepared in both orientations: parallel (plan view) and perpendicular (cross section) to the substrate. In the first stages of crystallization, when the particle sizes were in the nanometer range, the classical identification of phases using electron diffraction was not possible. Instead of measuring d values, experimentally selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns were compared to calculated (simulated) patterns in order to determine the phase composition. The problems of evaluating the ratio of amorphous and crystalline phases in thin films are reported. Results of TEM and XRD as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy showed that the films made at lo...

  6. Direct probing of photoinduced electron transfer in a self-assembled biomimetic [2Fe2S]-hydrogenase complex using ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Hartl, František; Lutz, Martin; de Bruin, Bas; Becker, René; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-05-19

    A pyridyl-functionalized diiron dithiolate complex, [μ-(4-pyCH2-NMI-S2)Fe2(CO)6] (3, py = pyridine (ligand), NMI = naphthalene monoimide) was synthesized and fully characterized. In the presence of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP), a self-assembled 3·ZnTPP complex was readily formed in CH2Cl2 by the coordination of the pyridyl nitrogen to the porphyrin zinc center. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from excited ZnTPP to complex 3 in the supramolecular assembly was observed in real time by monitoring the ν(C≡O) and ν(C═O)NMI spectral changes with femtosecond time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy. We have confirmed that photoinduced charge separation produced the monoreduced species by comparing the time-resolved IR spectra with the conventional IR spectra of 3(•-) generated by reversible electrochemical reduction. The lifetimes for the charge separation and charge recombination processes were found to be τCS = 40 ± 3 ps and τCR = 205 ± 14 ps, respectively. The charge recombination is much slower than that in an analogous covalent complex, demonstrating the potential of a supramolecular approach to extend the lifetime of the charge-separated state in photocatalytic complexes. The observed vibrational frequency shifts provide a very sensitive probe of the delocalization of the electron-spin density over the different parts of the Fe2S2 complex. The TR and spectro-electrochemical IR spectra, electron paramagnetic resonance spectra, and density functional theory calculations all show that the spin density in 3(•-) is delocalized over the diiron core and the NMI bridge. This delocalization explains why the complex exhibits low catalytic dihydrogen production even though it features a very efficient photoinduced electron transfer. The ultrafast porphyrin-to-NMI-S2-Fe2(CO)6 photoinduced electron transfer is the first reported example of a supramolecular Fe2S2-hydrogenase model studied by femtosecond TRIR spectroscopy. Our results show that TRIR

  7. Photocatalytic Graphene-TiO2 Thin Films Fabricated by Low-Temperature Ultrasonic Vibration-Assisted Spin and Spray Coating in a Sol-Gel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zabihi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we communicate a facile and low temperature synthesis process for the fabrication of graphene-TiO2 photocatalytic composite thin films. A sol-gel chemical route is used to synthesize TiO2 from the precursor solutions and spin and spray coating are used to deposit the films. Excitation of the wet films during the casting process by ultrasonic vibration favorably influences both the sol-gel route and the deposition process, through the following mechanisms. The ultrasound energy imparted to the wet film breaks down the physical bonds of the gel phase. As a result, only a low-temperature post annealing process is required to eliminate the residues to complete the conversion of precursors to TiO2. In addition, ultrasonic vibration creates a nanoscale agitating motion or microstreaming in the liquid film that facilitates mixing of TiO2 and graphene nanosheets. The films made based on the above-mentioned ultrasonic vibration-assisted method and annealed at 150 °C contain both rutile and anatase phases of TiO2, which is the most favorable configuration for photocatalytic applications. The photoinduced and photocatalytic experiments demonstrate effective photocurrent generation and elimination of pollutants by graphene-TiO2 composite thin films fabricated via scalable spray coating and mild temperature processing, the results of which are comparable with those made using lab-scale and energy-intensive processes.

  8. Femtosecond nonlinear spectroscopy at surfaces: Second-harmonic probing of hole burning at the Si(111)7x7 surface and fourier-transform sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, John Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-11-24

    The high temporal resolution and broad bandwidth of a femtosecond laser system are exploited in a pair of nonlinear optical studies of surfaces. The dephasing dynamics of resonances associated with the adatom dangling bonds of the Si(111)7 x 7 surface are explored by transient second-harmonic hole burning, a process that can be described as a fourth-order nonlinear optical process. Spectral holes produced by a 100 fs pump pulse at about 800 nm are probed by the second harmonic signal of a 100 fs pulse tunable around 800 nm. The measured spectral holes yield homogeneous dephasing times of a few tens of femtoseconds. Fits with a Lorentzian spectral hole centered at zero probe detuning show a linear dependence of the hole width on pump fluence, which suggests that charge carrier-carrier scattering dominates the dephasing dynamics at the measured excitation densities. Extrapolation of the deduced homogeneous dephasing times to zero excitation density yields an intrinsic dephasing time of {approx} 70 fs. The presence of a secondary spectral hole indicates that scattering of the surface electrons with surface optical phonons at 570 cm-1 occurs within the first 200 fs after excitation. The broad bandwidth of femtosecond IR pulses is used to perform IR-visible sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy. By implementing a Fourier-transform technique, we demonstrate the ability to obtain sub-laser-bandwidth spectral resolution. FT-SFG yields a greater signal when implemented with a stretched visible pulse than with a femtosecond visible pulse. However, when compared with multichannel spectroscopy using a femtosecond IR pulse but a narrowband visible pulse, Fourier-transform SFG is found to have an inferior signal-to-noise ratio. A mathematical analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio illustrates the constraints on the Fourier-transform approach.

  9. Characterization of extracellular vesicles by IR spectroscopy: Fast and simple classification based on amide and CH stretching vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihály, Judith; Deák, Róbert; Szigyártó, Imola Csilla; Bóta, Attila; Beke-Somfai, Tamás; Varga, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles isolated by differential centrifugation from Jurkat T-cell line were investigated by attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Amide and CH stretching band intensity ratios calculated from IR bands, characteristic of protein and lipid components, proved to be distinctive for the different extracellular vesicle subpopulations. This proposed 'spectroscopic protein-to-lipid ratio', combined with the outlined spectrum-analysis protocol is valid also for low sample concentrations (0.15-0.05mg/ml total protein content) and can carry information about the presence of other non-vesicular formations such as aggregated proteins, lipoproteins and immune complexes. Detailed analysis of IR data reveals compositional changes of extracellular vesicles subpopulations: second derivative spectra suggest changes in protein composition from parent cell towards exosomes favoring proteins with β-turns and unordered motifs at the expense of intermolecular β-sheet structures. The IR-based protein-to-lipid assessment protocol was tested also for red blood cell derived microvesicles for which similar values were obtained. The potential applicability of this technique for fast and efficient characterization of vesicular components is high as the investigated samples require no further preparations and all the different molecular species can be determined in the same sample. The results indicate that ATR-FTIR measurements provide a simple and reproducible method for the screening of extracellular vesicle preparations. It is hoped that this sophisticated technique will have further impact in extracellular vesicle research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Noninvasive Vibrational Mode Spectroscopy of Ion Coulomb Crystals through Resonant Collective Coupling to an Optical Cavity Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan; Albert, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    We report on a novel noninvasive method to determine the normal mode frequencies of ion Coulomb crystals in traps based on the resonance enhanced collective coupling between the electronic states of the ions and an optical cavity field at the single photon level. Excitations of the normal modes...... are observed through a Doppler broadening of the resonance. An excellent agreement with the predictions of a zero-temperature uniformly charged liquid plasma model is found. The technique opens up for investigations of the heating and damping of cold plasma modes, as well as the coupling between them....

  11. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band ν2 of H2O trapped in an argon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsevich, G.; Doroshenko, I.; Malevich, A..; Shalamberidze, E.; Sapeshko, V.; Pogorelov, V.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J″ = 0 - 2; and J‧ = 0 - 3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrödinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  12. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  13. Investigating temperature effects on extra virgin olive oil using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Ahmad, Naveed; Ali, H.; Bilal, M.; Khan, Saranjam; Ullah, Rahat; Ahmed, M.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-12-01

    The potential of fluorescence spectroscopy has been utilized to study the heating effects on extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Through a series of experiments, a temperature range from 140 °C  ‑  150 °C has been found where cooking with EVOO is possible without destroying its natural ingredients. Fluorescence emission spectra from all heated and non-heated EVOO samples were recorded using an excitation source at 350 nm, where emission bands in non-heated EVOO at 380, 440, 455, and 525 nm are labelled for vitamin E and a band at 673 nm is assigned for chlorophyll a. The emission band at 525 nm is also responsible for beta carotenoids (vitamin A). As a result of heating, prominent intensity variations have been observed in all spectral bands, but it is particularly affected at 525 nm, indicating the deterioration of vitamin E and beta carotenoids. However, if the temperature of oil can be maintained in the above defined range, then frying food with EVOO is possible by preserving its natural ingredients. The spectral variations resulting from the heating effects have been further highlighted by using principal component analysis for classification purposes.

  14. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of single molecules at room temperature and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Taekjip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    We performed fluorescence spectroscopy of single and pairs of dye molecules on a surface at room temperature. Near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and far field scanning optical microscope with multi-color excitation/detection capability were built. The instrument is capable of optical imaging with 100nm resolution and has the sensitivity necessary for single molecule detection. A variety of dynamic events which cannot be observed from an ensemble of molecules is revealed when the molecules are probed one at a time. They include (1) spectral jumps correlated with dark states, (2) individually resolved quantum jumps to and from the meta-stable triplet state, (3) rotational jumps due to desorption/readsorption events of single molecules on the surface. For these studies, a computer controlled optical system which automatically and rapidly locates and performs spectroscopic measurements on single molecules was developed. We also studied the interaction between closely spaced pairs of molecules. In particular, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a single resonant pair of donor and acceptor molecules was measured. Photodestruction dynamics of the donor or acceptor were used to determine the presence and efficiency of energy transfer Dual molecule spectroscopy was extended to a non-resonant pair of molecules to obtain high resolution differential distance information. By combining NSOM and dual color scheme, we studied the co-localization of parasite proteins and host proteins on a human red blood cell membrane infected with malaria. These dual-molecule techniques can be used to measure distances, relative orientations, and changes in distances/orientations of biological macromolecules with very good spatial, angular and temporal resolutions, hence opening new capabilities in the study of such systems.

  16. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  17. Long-Term Vibration Monitoring of the Effects of Temperature and Humidity on PC Girders with and without Fly Ash considering ASR Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Ha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural responses have been used as inputs in the evaluation procedures of civil structures for years. Apart from the degradation of a structure itself, changes in the environmental conditions affect its characteristics. For adequate maintenance, it is necessary to quantify the environment-induced changes and discriminate them from the effects due to damage. This study investigates the variation in the vibration responses of prestressed concrete (PC girders, which were deteriorated because of the alkali–silica reaction (ASR, concerning ambient temperature and humidity. Three PC girders were exposed to outdoor weather conditions outside the laboratory, one of which had a selected amount of fly ash in its mixture to mitigate the ASR. The girders were periodically vibration tested for one and a half years. It was found that when the temperature and humidity increased, the frequencies and damping ratios decreased in proportion. No apparent variation in the mode shapes could be identified. A finite element model was proposed for numerical verification, the results of which were in good agreement with the measured changes in the natural frequencies. Moreover, the different dynamic performances of the three specimens indicated that the fly ash significantly affected the vibrations of the PC girders under ASR deterioration.

  18. New Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Systems for High-Temperature Studies in the Diamond Anvil Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, S.; Lamm, R.; Rekhi, S.; Catalli, K.; Santillan, J.; Lundin, S.

    2005-12-01

    In order to measure high-quality Raman spectra at high temperature and pressure in either the resistance- or laser-heated diamond-anvil cell, we have developed two Raman systems at MIT, a dispersive and a nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy systems. The excitation source of the dispersive Raman system is an Ar/Kr mixed ion laser which has nine available laser lines with wavelengths between 457 and 752 nm. Near UV laser lines allow us to measure Raman spectra up to 1200 K by shifting the spectral range of Raman modes away from intense thermal radiation. Near IR lines can be used for highly fluorescent materials. Three 500 mm spectrometers (Trivista spectrometer, Acton Research) are configured to operate in either single, triple subtractive, or triple additive mode combined with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD detector. Holographic notch filters allow for high throughput in the single mode, which is ideal for weak Raman scattering. The subtractive triple mode allows detection of phonon modes to 5 cm-1 from the Raleigh line. The nanosecond time-resolved Raman system is designed for measurements above 1000 K. Previous studies at ambient pressure have shown that time-resolved Raman spectroscopy is the most effective technique to reject strong thermal radiation above 1000 K. We achieve nanosecond time resolution by synchronizing a frequency-doubled pulse Nd:YLF laser (527 nm, 0.1-10 kHz rep rate, 10-100 ns pulse width) with an intensified gated CCD detector (>5 ns gate width). This system is combined with a laser heating system (Nd:YLF laser, 1053 nm, TEM00, 45 W). Temperature is measured using both spectroradiometry and Raman thermometry methods. Our systems are designed to study phase relations and thermodynamic properties of mantle minerals at high P-T. Using these systems, we have measured the phase transition in (Mg0.9Fe0.1)SiO3 pyroxene at 300-1700 K and 0 GPa, and the dehydration of serpentine at 2-8 GPa and 300-900 K. We also have found that the time

  19. Vibrational lineshapes of adsorbates on solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, H.

    A review is presented of the current activity in vibrational spectroscopy of adsorbates on metal surfaces. A brief introduction of the representative spectroscopies is given to demonstrate the rich information contained in vibrational spectra, which are characterized by their intensity, peak position and width. Analysis of vibrational spectra enables us to gain the deep insight into not only the local character of adsorption site or geometry, but also the dynamical interaction between the adsorbates or between the adsorbate and the substrate. Some recent instructive experimental results, mostly of a CO molecule adsorbed on various metal surfaces, are accompanied by the corresponding theoretical recipe for vibrational excitation mechanisms. Wide spread experimental results of the C-O stretching frequency of CO adsorbed on metal surfaces are discussed in terms of the chemical effect involving the static and dynamic charge transfers between the chemisorbed CO and metal, and also of the electrostatic dipole-dipole interaction between the molecules. The central subject of this review is directed to the linshapes characterized by the vibrational relaxation processes of adsorbates. A simple and transparent model is introduced to show that the characteristic decay time of the correlation function for the vibrational coordinates is the key quantity to determine the spectral lineshapes. Recent experimental results focused on a search for an intrinsic broadening mechanism are reviewed in the light of the so-called T1 (energy) and T2 (phase) relaxation processesof the vibrational excited states of adsorbates. Those are the vibrational energy dissipation into the elementary excitation, such as phonons or electron-hole pairs in the metal substrate, and pure dephasing due to the energy exchange with the sorroundings. The change of width and frequency by varying the experimental variables, such as temperature or isotope effect, provides indispensable knowledge for the dynamical

  20. On Ultrafast Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy in the Condensed Phase: Linear Spectroscopic Measurements of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics of Astrochemical Ice Analogs and Nonlinear TeraHertz Kerr Effect Measurements of Vibrational Quantum Beats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Marco A.

    . We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 wavenumbers (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectra features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice. To advance the study of liquids with THz spectroscopy, we developed a new ultrafast nonlinear THz spectroscopic technique: heterodyne-detected, ultrafast THz Kerr effect (TKE) spectroscopy. We implemented a heterodyne-detection scheme into a TKE spectrometer that uses a stilbazoium-based THz emitter, 4-N,N-dimethylamino-4-N-methyl-stilbazolium 2,4,6-trimethylbenzenesulfonate (DSTMS), and high numerical aperture optics which generates THz electric field in excess of 300 kV/cm, in the sample. This allows us to report the first measurement of quantum beats at terahertz (THz) frequencies that result from vibrational coherences initiated by the nonlinear, dipolar interaction of a broadband, high-energy, (sub)picosecond THz pulse with the sample. Our instrument improves on both the frequency coverage, and sensitivity previously reported; it also ensures a backgroundless measurement of the THz Kerr effect in pure liquids. For liquid diiodomethane, we observe a quantum beat at 3.66 THz (122 wavenumbers), in exact agreement with the fundamental transition frequency of the lowest energy vibration of the molecule. This result provides new insight into dipolar vs. Raman selection rules at terahertz frequencies. To conclude we discuss future directions for the nonlinear THz spectroscopy in the Blake lab

  1. Low-Temperature Single Carbon Nanotube Spectroscopy of sp3 Quantum Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Jeffrey L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ihly, Rachelle R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); He, Xiaowei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gifford, Brendan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hartmann, Nicolai F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ma, Xuedan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kilina, Svetlana V. [North Dakota State University; Luo, Yue [Stevens Institute of Technology; Shayan, Kamran [Stevens Institute of Technology; Strauf, Stefan [Stevens Institute of Technology; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Htoon, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-09-28

    Aiming to unravel the relationship between chemical configuration and electronic structure of sp3 defects of aryl-functionalized (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we perform low-temperature single nanotube photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies and correlate our observations with quantum chemistry simulations. We observe sharp emission peaks from individual defect sites that are spread over an extremely broad, 1000-1350 nm, spectral range. Our simulations allow us to attribute this spectral diversity to the occurrence of six chemically and energetically distinct defect states resulting from topological variation in the chemical binding configuration of the monovalent aryl groups. Both PL emission efficiency and spectral line width of the defect states are strongly influenced by the local dielectric environment. Wrapping the SWCNT with a polyfluorene polymer provides the best isolation from the environment and yields the brightest emission with near-resolution limited spectral line width of 270 ueV, as well as spectrally resolved emission wings associated with localized acoustic phonons. Pump-dependent studies further revealed that the defect states are capable of emitting single, sharp, isolated PL peaks over 3 orders of magnitude increase in pump power, a key characteristic of two-level systems and an important prerequisite for single-photon emission with high purity. These findings point to the tremendous potential of sp3 defects in development of room temperature quantum light sources capable of operating at telecommunication wavelengths as the emission of the defect states can readily be extended to this range via use of larger diameter SWCNTs.

  2. Vibrational modes of the Cu(100)-c(2x2)-Pd surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoltze, Per; Hannon, J.B.; Ibach, H.

    1996-01-01

    The vibrational modes of the surface have been measured using electron-energy loss spectroscopy. The measured mode energies are compared to dynamical models with parameters taken from effective medium theory. Strong Pd-Cu interplanar bonding gives rise to nearly degenerate Pd and Cu vibrations (95...... cm(-1)) at the (X) over bar point, despite the large mass difference of the ions. Upon low-temperature annealing of the surface, overlayer islands of pure Cu coalesce and order. These overlayer islands are characterized by a high-energy vibrational mode near 128 cm(-1) which grows in intensity upon...

  3. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin (eds.)

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  4. [Measurements of CO2 concentration at high temperature and pressure environments using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ting-Dong; Gao, Guang-Zhen; Wang, Min-Rui; Wang, Gui-Shi; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-07-01

    The present research was planned to develop a method for species concentration measurements under high temperature and pressure environments. The characteristics of CO2 spectrum at high temperature and pressure were studied at first. Based on the research above, tunable diode-laser absorption of CO2 near 2.0 microm incorporating fixed-wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection was used to provide a method for sensitive and accurate measurements of gas temperature and CO2 concentration at high temperature and pressure. Measurements were performed in a well-controlled high temperature and pressure static cell. The results show that the average error of the CO2 concentration measurements at 5 atm, 500 K and 10 atm, 1000 K is 4. 49%. All measurements show the accuracy and potential utility of the method for high temperature and pressure diagnostics.

  5. The temperature-dependent single-crystal Raman spectroscopy of a model dipeptide: L-Alanyl-L-alanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. G.; Arruda, L. M.; Pinheiro, G. S.; Lima, C. L.; Melo, F. E. A.; Ayala, A. P.; Filho, J. Mendes; Freire, P. T. C.

    2015-09-01

    A single-crystal of peptide L-alanyl-L-alanine (C6H12N2O3) was studied by Raman spectroscopy at low-temperature, and a tentative assignment of the normal modes was given. Evidence of a second order structural phase transition was found through Raman spectroscopy between the temperatures of 80 K and 60 K. Group theory considerations suggest that the transition leads the sample from the tetragonal to a monoclinic structure. Additionally, our study suggests that the mechanism for the structural phase transition is governed by the occupation of non-equivalent C1 local symmetry sites by the CH3 molecular groups. Analysis based on group theory suggests L-alanyl-L-alanine presents C2 symmetry at low temperatures.

  6. Deduction of structural information of interfacial proteins by combined vibrational spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Paszti, Zoltan; Clarke, Matthew L; Chen, Xiaoyun; Chen, Zhan

    2007-05-31

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the combination of vibrational spectroscopic techniques on samples can be used to deduce more detailed structural information of interfacial proteins and peptides. Such an approach can be used to elucidate structures of proteins or peptides at interfaces, such as at the solid/liquid interface or in cell membranes. We also discuss that the controlled perturbations may provide more measured parameters for structural studies on such proteins and peptides. In this paper, we will demonstrate that optical spectroscopic techniques such as polarized Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and higher order nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies can be used to deduce different and complementary structural information of molecules at interfaces (e.g., orientation information of certain functional groups and secondary structures of interfacial proteins). Also, we believe that controlled perturbations on samples, such as variation of sample temperature, application of electrical fields, and alternation of substrate roughness, can provide more detailed information regarding the interfacial structures of proteins and peptides. The development of nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies, such as SFG and four-wave mixing vibrational spectroscopy, to examine interfacial protein and peptide structures, and introduction of external perturbations on samples should be able to substantially advance our knowledge in understanding structures and thus functions of proteins and peptides at interfaces.

  7. Dual time-resolved temperature-jump fluorescence and infrared spectroscopy for the study of fast protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Caitlin M; Reddish, Michael J; Dyer, R Brian

    2017-05-05

    Time-resolved temperature-jump (T-jump) coupled with fluorescence and infrared (IR) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for monitoring protein dynamics. Although IR spectroscopy of the polypeptide amide I mode is more technically challenging, it offers complementary information because it directly probes changes in the protein backbone, whereas, fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive to the environment of specific side chains. With the advent of widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) it is possible to efficiently probe multiple IR frequencies with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here we describe a dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectrometer and its application to study protein folding dynamics. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser provides the T-jump source for both time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectroscopy, which are probed by a QCL and Ti:Sapphire laser, respectively. The Ho:YAG laser simultaneously pumps the time-resolved IR and fluorescence spectrometers. The instrument has high sensitivity, with an IR absorbance detection limit of jump induced difference spectrum from 50ns to 0.5ms. This study demonstrates the power of the dual time-resolved T-jump fluorescence and IR spectroscopy to resolve complex folding mechanisms by complementary IR absorbance and fluorescence measurements of protein dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Low Temperature Photoluminescence Spectroscopy to Investigate CH3NH3PbI3 Hybrid Perovskite Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Jemli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the stability and evaluating the quality of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite structures is quite critical both to the design and fabrication of high-performance perovskite devices and to fundamental studies of the photophysics of the excitons. In particular, it is known that, under ambient conditions, CH3NH3PbI3 degrades producing some PbI2. We show here that low temperature Photoluminescence (PL spectroscopy is a powerful tool to detect PbI2 traces in hybrid perovskite layers and single crystals. Because PL spectroscopy is a signal detection method on a black background, small PbI2 traces can be detected, when other methods currently used at room temperature fail. Our study highlights the extremely high stability of the single crystals compared to the thin layers and defects and grain boundaries are thought to play an important role in the degradation mechanism.

  9. In-situ Studies of the Reactions of Bifunctional and Heterocyclic Molecules over Noble Metal Single Crystal and Nanoparticle Catalysts Studied with Kinetics and Sum-Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliewer, Christopher J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-06-30

    Sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy (SFG-VS) in combination with gas chromatography (GC) was used in-situ to monitor surface bound reaction intermediates and reaction selectivities for the hydrogenation reactions of pyrrole, furan, pyridine, acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and prenal over Pt(111), Pt(100), Rh(111), and platinum nanoparticles under Torr reactant pressures and temperatures of 300K to 450K. The focus of this work is the correlation between the SFG-VS observed surface bound reaction intermediates and adsorption modes with the reaction selectivity, and how this is affected by catalyst structure and temperature. Pyrrole hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Rh(111) single crystals at Torr pressures. It was found that pyrrole adsorbs to Pt(111) perpendicularly by cleaving the N-H bond and binding through the nitrogen. However, over Rh(111) pyrrole adsorbs in a tilted geometry binding through the {pi}-aromatic orbitals. A surface-bound pyrroline reaction intermediate was detected over both surfaces with SFG-VS. It was found that the ring-cracking product butylamine is a reaction poison over both surfaces studied. Furan hydrogenation was studied over Pt(111), Pt(100), 10 nm cubic platinum nanoparticles and 1 nm platinum nanoparticles. The product distribution was observed to be highly structure sensitive and the acquired SFG-VS spectra reflected this sensitivity. Pt(100) exhibited more ring-cracking to form butanol than Pt(111), while the nanoparticles yielded higher selectivities for the partially saturated ring dihydrofuran. Pyridine hydrogenation was investigated over Pt(111) and Pt(100). The α-pyridyl surface adsorption mode was observed with SFG-VS over both surfaces. 1,4-dihydropyridine was seen as a surface intermediate over Pt(100) but not Pt(111). Upon heating the surfaces to 350K, the adsorbed pyridine changes to a flat-lying adsorption mode. No evidence was found for the pyridinium cation. The hydrogenation of the

  10. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L. [Molecular Physics Department, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Cernicharo, J. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB. INTA-CSIC. Crta Torrejón-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M., E-mail: jl.domenech@csic.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London. Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  11. Temperature dependent of IVR investigated by steady-state and time-frequency resolved CARS for liquid nitrobenzene and nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanqiang; Zhu, Gangbei; Yan, Lin; Liu, Xiaosong; Yang's Ultrafast Spectroscopy Group Team

    2017-06-01

    Intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution (IVR) is important process in thermal decomposition, shock chemistry and photochemistry. Anti-Stokes Raman scattering is sensitive to the vibrational population in excited states because only vibrational excited states are responsible to the anti-Stokes Raman scattering, does not vibrational ground states. In this report, steady-state anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy and broad band ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are performed. The steady-state anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy shows temperature dependent of vibrational energy redistribution in vibrational excited-state molecule, and reveal that, in liquid nitrobenzene, with temperature increasing, vibrational energy is mainly redistributed in NO2 symmetric stretching mode, and phenyl ring stretching mode of νCC. For liquid nitromethane, it is found that, with temperature increasing, vibrational energy concentrate in CN stretching mode and methyl umbrella vibrational mode. In the broad band ultrafast CARS experiment, multiple vibrational modes are coherently excited to vibrational excited states, and the time-frequency resolved CARS spectra show the coincident IVR processes. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Numbers 21673211 and 11372053), and the Science Challenging Program (Grant Number JCKY2016212A501).

  12. Monitoring the temperature-dependent elastic and anelastic properties in isotropic polycrystalline ice using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Vaughan

    2016-11-01

    calibration of active and passive seismic data gathered in the field. The elastic properties and anelastic quality factor Q in laboratory-manufactured polycrystalline isotropic ice cores decrease (reversibly with increasing temperature, but compressional-wave speed and attenuation prove most sensitive to temperature, indicative of pre-melting of the ice. This method of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy can be deployed in the field, for those situations where shipping samples is difficult (e.g. remote locations, or where the properties of ice change rapidly after extraction (e.g. in the case of sea ice.

  13. Sol-gel transition of organogels observed by terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ozaki, Atsumi; Itagaki, Yusuke; Yajima, Setsuko; Suzuki, Hal; Ishii, Shinya; Ishida, Misaki; Uchiyama, Tetsuji; Kimura, Keiichi; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    Terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of organogels consisting of (1R,2R)-1,2-bis(dodecanoylamino)cyclohexane/2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (RR-BDC/NPOE) and RR-BDC/n-dodecane were measured by Fourier-transform far-infrared (FT-FIR) spectroscopy. The vibrational peaks of the gels were observed at the same frequencies as those of the pure gelator, suggesting that the intermolecular structure around the Nsbnd H⋯Odbnd C hydrogen bond is maintained in the gel phase. Temperature-dependent spectroscopy showed a drastic spectral change at the sol-gel transition temperature, in which the vibrational peak at 3.5 THz disappears and a new peak appears at 2.9 THz. The change in THz vibrational frequency is indicative of the structural collapse of the hydrogen-bonded fibrous architecture in the sol phase.

  14. Impedance spectroscopy of heterojunction solar cell a-SiC/c-Si with ITO antireflection film investigated at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šály, V.; Perný, M.; Janíček, F.; Huran, J.; Mikolášek, M.; Packa, J.

    2017-04-01

    Progressive smart photovoltaic technologies including heterostructures a-SiC/c-Si with ITO antireflection film are one of the prospective replacements of conventional photovoltaic silicon technology. Our paper is focused on the investigation of heterostructures a-SiC/c-Si provided with a layer of ITO (indium oxide/tin oxide 90/10 wt.%) which acts as a passivating and antireflection coating. Prepared photovoltaic cell structure was investigated at various temperatures and the influence of temperature on its operation was searched. The investigation of the dynamic properties of heterojunction PV cells was carried out using impedance spectroscopy. The equivalent AC circuit which approximates the measured impedance data was proposed. Assessment of the influence of the temperature on the operation of prepared heterostructure was carried out by analysis of the temperature dependence of AC equivalent circuit elements.

  15. [Study on temperature & EMF co-effects on insulin conformation and biological functions by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhe; Chen, Shu-de; Qiao, Deng-jiang

    2008-06-01

    Our previous studies had suggested that the intercellular signal molecule might be an important target of electromagnetic fields. Insulin, an intercellule signal molecule, plays a critical role in transferring life information. The studies on effects of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on insulin molecule are meaningful for explaining the mechanism of biological effects of electromagnetic fields. The PEF, which we used, with its highest electric field (2 x 10(6) V x m(-1)) coupled into the insulin buffer, was about 1 V x cm(-1) cm, with a repeating frequency of 50 Hz. In the present study, the changes of insulin conformation induced by PEF were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. Insulin solution was exposed to 50 Hz PEF with different electric field intensities for 5-35 min, which caused a time-and dose-dependent decrease in fluorescence intensities of insulin. Further, insulin solution was exposed to PEF at different temperatures to investigate the effects of PEF co-operated with temperature on insulin. The results indicated that the difference in temperature (about 5 degrees C) could induce conflict results, which is due to the effects of PEF co-operated with temperature rather than only to the effect of temperature. The authors calculated that the increase in temperature induced by PEF was 0.07 degrees C (less than 0.1 degrees C). So the effects of PEF were scarcely explained by thermal effects, it belongs to "non-thermal effects" of electric fields. So it was concluded that temperature is a considerably important factor in "non-thermal effects" of electric fields, and the ignorance of variety of temperature probably result in the contrary conclusion. Further, Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the details of structure of insulin treated by PEF co-operated with temperature. The results of Raman spectroscopy verified the effects of PEF co-operated with temperature on insulin. And the reductions of the S-S band intensity at 510 cm(-1), the skeletal C

  16. Supramolecular organization of perfluorinated 1H-indazoles in the solid state using X-ray crystallography, SSNMR and sensitive (VCD) and non sensitive (MIR, FIR and Raman) to chirality vibrational spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Moreno, María M; Avilés-Moreno, Juan Ramón; López-González, Juan Jesús; Jacob, Kane; Vendier, Laure; Etienne, Michel; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Claramunt, Rosa M

    2017-01-04

    1H-Indazole derivatives exhibit a remarkable property since some of them form chiral supramolecular structures starting from achiral monomers. The present work deals with the study of three perfluorinated 1H-indazoles that resolve spontaneously as conglomerates. These conglomerates can contain either a pure enantiomer (one helix) or a mixture of both enantiomers (both helices) with an enantiomeric excess (e.e.) of one of them. The difficulty of the structural analysis of these types of compounds is thus clear. We outline a complete strategy to determine the structures and configurations (M or P helices) of the enantiomers (helices) forming the conglomerates of these perfluorinated 1H-indazoles based on X-ray crystallography, solid state NMR spectroscopy and different solid state vibrational spectroscopies that are either sensitive (VCD) or not (FarIR, IR and Raman) to chirality, together with quantum chemical calculations (DFT).

  17. Comment on “Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene” [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susi, T., E-mail: toma.susi@univie.ac.at; Kotakoski, J. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-02-14

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  18. Comment on "Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene" [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, T.; Kotakoski, J.

    2016-02-01

    In an interesting recent study [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 074302 (2015)] (see also their Erratum [Allen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 118, 159902 (2015)]), Allen and co-workers measured the mean square amplitudes of graphene lattice vibrations between 100 and 1300 K and used a simplified theoretical approximation for the acoustic phonon modes to evaluate the maximum phonon wavelengths supported by the lattice. By fitting their data using the smallest wave-vector as the fitting parameter, they found this to be significantly smaller than the physical size of the graphene crystallites.

  19. Changing Hydrogen-Bond Structure during an Aqueous Liquid-Liquid Transition Investigated with Time-Resolved and Two-Dimensional Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijn, Jeroen R; van der Loop, Tibert H; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-03-03

    We investigate the putative liquid-liquid phase transition in aqueous glycerol solution, using the OD-stretch mode in dilute OD/OH isotopic mixtures to probe the hydrogen-bond structure. The conversion exhibits Avrami kinetics with an exponent of n = 2.9 ± 0.1 (as opposed to n = 1.7 observed upon inducing ice nucleation and growth in the same sample), which indicates a transition from one liquid phase to another. Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy shows that the initial and final phases have different hydrogen-bond structures: the former has a single Gaussian distribution of hydrogen-bond lengths, whereas the latter has a bimodal distribution consisting of a broad distribution and a narrower, ice-like distribution. The 2D-IR spectrum of the final phase is identical to that of ice/glycerol at the same temperature. Combined with the kinetic data this suggests that the liquid-liquid transformation is immediately followed by a rapid formation of small (probably nanometer-sized) ice crystals.

  20. Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of Trifluoperazine by FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P; Gunasekaran, S; Gnanasambandan, T; Seshadri, S

    2015-02-25

    The complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental vibrational modes of Trifluoperazine (TFZ) was carried out using the experimental FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis data and quantum chemical studies. The observed vibrational data were compared with the wavenumbers derived theoretically for the optimized geometry of the compound from the DFT-B3LYP gradient calculations employing 6-31G (d,p) basis set. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and enthalpy have been calculated for the molecule. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis. Important non-linear properties such as first hyperpolarizability of TFZ have been computed using B3LYP quantum chemical calculation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Note: Temperature effects in the modified Howland current source for electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Santos, S.; Bertemes-Filho, P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to show how the modified Howland current source (MHCS) is affected by temperature changes. The source has been tested in a temperature range from 20 to 70 °C and frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz. Parameters like output current, output impedance, total harmonic distortion, and oscillation have been measured. The measurements were made inside a temperature controlled environment. It was showed that the MHCS is stable at temperatures below 70 °C. Operational amplifiers with a low temperature drift and matching resistor should be carefully considered in order to prevent oscillations at high temperatures.

  2. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on metallic samples at very low temperature in different ambient gas pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saeid, R. H.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of metals at very low temperature adopting laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is greatly beneficial in space exploration expeditions and in some important industrial applications. In the present work, the effect of very low sample temperature on the spectral emission intensity of laser-induced plasma under both atmospheric pressure and vacuum has been studied for different bronze alloy samples. The sample was cooled down to liquid nitrogen (LN) temperature 77 K in a special vacuum chamber. Laser-induced plasma has been produced onto the sample surface using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser. The optical emission from the plasma is collected by an optical fiber and analyzed by an echelle spectrometer combined with an intensified CCD camera. The integrated intensities of certain spectral emission lines of Cu, Pb, Sn, and Zn have been estimated from the obtained LIBS spectra and compared with that measured at room temperature. The laser-induced plasma parameters (electron number density Ne and electron temperature Te) were investigated at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures for both atmospheric pressure and vacuum ambient conditions. The results suggest that reducing the sample temperature leads to decrease in the emission line intensities under both environments. Plasma parameters were found to decrease at atmospheric pressure but increased under vacuum conditions.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy study of oxidation of a PdCr alloy used for high-temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Darwin L.; Zeller, Mary V.; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1993-01-01

    A Pd-13 wt. percent Cr solid solution is a promising high-temperature strain gage alloy. In bulk form it has a number of properties that are desirable in a resistance strain gage material, such as a linear electrical resistance versus temperature curve to 1000 C and stable electrical resistance in air at 1000 C. However, unprotected fine wire gages fabricated from this alloy perform well only to 600 C. At higher temperatures severe oxidation degrades their electrical performance. In this work Auger electron spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation chemistry of the alloy wires and ribbons. Results indicate that the oxidation is caused by a complex mechanism that is not yet fully understood. As expected, during oxidation, a layer of chromium oxide is formed. This layer, however, forms beneath a layer of metallic palladium. The results of this study have increased the understanding of the oxidation mechanism of Pd-13 wt. percent Cr.

  4. Temperature Measurements in Reacting Flows Using Time-Resolved Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (fs-CARS) Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J; Lucht, Robert P; Gord, James R

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames...

  5. High temperature microplasticity of fine-grained Y-TZP zirconia studied by mechanical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donzel, L.; Schaller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique

    1997-12-31

    Mechanical spectroscopy has been used to study the early stage of the plastic deformation, i.e. the microplasticity of Y-TZP ceramics. Measurements on samples with different grain sizes have shown that the mechanical loss is proportional to the inverse of the square root of the grain size. The existence of a threshold stress has been observed. (orig.) 4 refs.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of temperature, stress, and electric field in GaN HEMTs with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnall, Kevin R.; Moore, Elizabeth A.; Badescu, Stefan C.; Zhang, Lenan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-11-01

    As semiconductor devices based on silicon reach their intrinsic material limits, compound semiconductors, such as gallium nitride (GaN), are gaining increasing interest for high performance, solid-state transistor applications. Unfortunately, higher voltage, current, and/or power levels in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) often result in elevated device temperatures, degraded performance, and shorter lifetimes. Although micro-Raman spectroscopy has become one of the most popular techniques for measuring localized temperature rise in GaN HEMTs for reliability assessment, decoupling the effects of temperature, mechanical stress, and electric field on the optical phonon frequencies measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy is challenging. In this work, we demonstrate the simultaneous measurement of temperature rise, inverse piezoelectric stress, thermoelastic stress, and vertical electric field via micro-Raman spectroscopy from the shifts of the E2 (high), A1 longitudinal optical (LO), and E2 (low) optical phonon frequencies in wurtzite GaN. We also validate experimentally that the pinched OFF state as the unpowered reference accurately measures the temperature rise by removing the effect of the vertical electric field on the Raman spectrum and that the vertical electric field is approximately the same whether the channel is open or closed. Our experimental results are in good quantitative agreement with a 3D electro-thermo-mechanical model of the HEMT we tested and indicate that the GaN buffer acts as a semi-insulating, p-type material due to the presence of deep acceptors in the lower half of the bandgap. This implementation of micro-Raman spectroscopy offers an exciting opportunity to simultaneously probe thermal, mechanical, and electrical phenomena in semiconductor devices under bias, providing unique insight into the complex physics that describes device behavior and reliability. Although GaN HEMTs have been specifically used in this study to

  7. LOW-TEMPERATURE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (υ{sub 1} + υ{sub 3}) BAND IN A HELIUM BUFFER GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria, L.; Sarno, V. Di; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Mosca, S.; Maddaloni, P. [CNR-INO, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Via Campi Flegrei 34, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Santambrogio, G. [CNR-INO, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Via N. Carrara 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); De Natale, P. [INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Buffer gas cooling with a {sup 4}He gas is used to perform laser-absorption spectroscopy of the {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (υ{sub 1} + υ{sub 3}) band at cryogenic temperatures. Doppler thermometry is first carried out to extract translational temperatures from the recorded spectra. Then, rotational temperatures down to 20 K are retrieved by fitting the Boltzmann distribution to the relative intensities of several ro-vibrational lines. The potential of our setup to tune the thermal equilibrium between translational and rotational degrees of freedom is also demonstrated. This can be used to reproduce in a controlled way the regime of non-local thermal equilibrium typically encountered in the interstellar medium. The underlying helium-acetylene collisional physics, relevant for modeling planetary atmospheres, is also addressed. In particular, the diffusion time of {sup 12}C{sub 2}H{sub 2} in the buffer cell is measured against the {sup 4}He flux at two separate translational temperatures; the observed behavior is then compared with that predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation, thus providing an estimate for the respective total elastic cross sections: σ{sub el}(100 K) = (4 ± 1) × 10{sup –20} m{sup 2} and σ{sub el}(25 K) = (7 ± 2) × 10{sup –20} m{sup 2}.

  8. Temperature-dependent vibration analysis of a FG viscoelastic cylindrical microshell under various thermal distribution via modified length scale parameter: a numerical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour, Hamed; Mohammadi, Kianoosh; Ghadiri, Majid

    2017-04-01

    In this article, the vibrational analysis of temperature-dependent cylindrical functionally graded (FG) microshells surrounded by viscoelastic a foundation is investigated by means of the modified couple stress theory (MCST). MCST is applied to this model to be productive in design and analysis of micro actuators and micro sensors. The modeled cylindrical FG microshell, its equations of motion and boundary conditions are derived by Hamilton's principle and the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). For the first time, in the present study, functionally graded length scale parameter which changes along the thickness has been considered in the temperature-dependent cylindrical FG microshell. The accuracy of the present model is verified with previous studies and also with those obtained by analytical Navier method. The novelty of the current study is consideration of viscoelastic foundation, various thermal loadings and size effect as well as satisfying various boundary conditions implemented on the temperature-dependent cylindrical FG microshell using MCST. Generalized differential quadrature method (GDQM) is applied to discretize the equations of motion. Then, some factors are investigated such as the influence of length to radius ratio, damping, Winkler and Pasternak foundations, different temperature changes, circumferential wave numbers, and boundary conditions on natural frequency of the cylindrical FG microshell. The results have many applications such as modeling of microrobots and biomedical microsystems.

  9. Renormalized Phonon Microstructures at High Temperatures from First-Principles Calculations: Methodologies and Applications in Studying Strong Anharmonic Vibrations of Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Lan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While the vibrational thermodynamics of materials with small anharmonicity at low temperatures has been understood well based on the harmonic phonons approximation, at high temperatures, this understanding must accommodate how phonons interact with other phonons or with other excitations. To date the anharmonic lattice dynamics is poorly understood despite its great importance, and most studies still rely on the quasiharmonic approximations. We shall see that the phonon-phonon interactions give rise to interesting coupling problems and essentially modify the equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of materials, for example, thermal expansion, thermodynamic stability, heat capacity, optical properties, thermal transport, and other nonlinear properties of materials. The review aims to introduce some recent developements of computational methodologies that are able to efficiently model the strong phonon anharmonicity based on quantum perturbation theory of many-body interactions and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. The effective potential energy surface of renormalized phonons and structures of the phonon-phonon interaction channels can be derived from these interdependent methods, which provide both macroscopic and microscopic perspectives in analyzing the strong anharmonic phenomena while the traditional harmonic models fail dramatically. These models have been successfully performed in the studies on the temperature-dependent broadenings of Raman and neutron scattering spectra, high temperature phase stability, and negative thermal expansion of rutile and cuprite structures, for example.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy of the G...C base pair: Experiment, harmonic and anharmonic calculations, and the nature of the anharmonic couplings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brauer, B.; Gerber, R. B.; Kabeláč, Martin; Hobza, Pavel; Bakker, J. M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Vries de, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 109, - (2005), s. 6974-6984 ISSN 1089-5639 Grant - others:NSF(US) CHE-0244341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nucleic acids bases * vibrational spectrum * frequencies anharmonicity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.898, year: 2005

  11. Use of vibrational spectroscopy to study protein and DNA structure, hydration, and binding of biomolecules: A combined theoretical and experimental approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Claussen, Anetta

    2006-01-01

    +disp, RHF, MP2, and DFT methodologies for the modeling studies with the goal of interpreting the experimentally measured vibrational spectra for these molecules to the greatest extent possible and to use this combined approach to understand the structure, function, and electronic properties...

  12. Full Article: Stoichiometry, Vibrational Modes and Structure of Molten Nb2O5-K2S2O7 Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boghosian, S.; Borup, F.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1998-01-01

    The dissolution reaction of Nb205 in pure molten K2S207 has been studied and high temperature Raman spectroscopy has been used for determining the vibrational and structural properties of the Nb(V) complex(es) formed according to the reaction Nb205 + n S207(2-) -> complex. By means of a recently ...

  13. Characterization of the quasi-one-dimensional compounds δ-(EDT-TTF-CONMe{sub 2}){sub 2}X, X=AsF{sub 6} and Br by vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterseim, Tobias; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Antal, Ágnes [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Batail, Patrick [Laboratoire MOLTECH, UMR 6200 CNRS-Université d' Angers, Bt. K, UFR Sciences, 2 Boulevard Lavoisier, F-49045 Angers (France); Drichko, Natalia [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-02-14

    We have investigated the infrared spectra of the quarter-filled charge-ordered insulators δ-(EDT-TTF-CONMe{sub 2}){sub 2}X (X= AsF{sub 6}, Br) along all three crystallographic directions in the temperature range from 300 to 10 K. DFT-assisted normal mode analysis of the neutral and ionic EDT-TTF-CONMe{sub 2} molecule allows us to assign the experimentally observed intramolecular modes and to obtain relevant information on the charge ordering and intramolecular interactions. From frequencies of charge-sensitive vibrations we deduce that the charge-ordered state is already present at room temperature and does not change on cooling, in agreement with previous NMR measurements. The spectra taken along the stacking direction clearly show features of vibrational overtones excited due to the anharmonic electronic molecule potential caused by the large charge disproportionation between the molecular sites. The shift of certain vibrational modes indicates the onset of the structural transition below 200 K.

  14. Determining the Concentrations and Temperatures of Products in a CF_4/CHF_3/N_2 Plasma via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2017-06-01

    Plasmas used for the manufacturing of semiconductor devices are similar in pressure and temperature to those used in the laboratory for the study of astrophysical species in the submillimeter (SMM) spectral region. The methods and technology developed in the SMM for these laboratory studies are directly applicable for diagnostic measurements in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Many of the molecular neutrals, radicals, and ions present in processing plasmas have been studied and their spectra have been cataloged or are in the literature. In this work, a continuous wave, intensity calibrated SMM absorption spectrometer was developed as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. A major advantage of intensity calibrated rotational absorption spectroscopy is its ability to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species from first principles without altering the plasma environment. An important part of this work was the design of the optical components which couple 500-750 GHz radiation through a commercial inductively coupled plasma chamber. The measurement of transmission spectra was simultaneously fit for background and absorption signal. The measured absorption was used to calculate absolute densities and temperatures of polar species. Measurements for CHF_3, CF_2, FCN, HCN, and CN made in a CF_4/CHF_3/N_2 plasma will be presented. Temperature equilibrium among species will be shown and the common temperature is leveraged to obtain accurate density measurements for simultaneously observed species. The densities and temperatures of plasma species are studied as a function of plasma parameters, including flow rate, pressure, and discharge power.

  15. In Situ Adsorption Studies at the Solid/Liquid Interface:Characterization of Biological Surfaces and Interfaces Using SumFrequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy,and Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Diana Christine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) have been used to study the molecular surface structure, surface topography and mechanical properties, and quantitative adsorbed amount of biological molecules at the solid-liquid interface. The molecular-level behavior of designed peptides adsorbed on hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica substrates has been examined as a model of protein adsorption on polymeric biomaterial surfaces. Proteins are such large and complex molecules that it is difficult to identify the features in their structure that lead to adsorption and interaction with solid surfaces. Designed peptides which possess secondary structure provide simple model systems for understanding protein adsorption. Depending on the amino acid sequence of a peptide, different secondary structures (α-helix and β-sheet) can be induced at apolar (air/liquid or air/solid) interfaces. Having a well-defined secondary structure allows experiments to be carried out under controlled conditions, where it is possible to investigate the affects of peptide amino acid sequence and chain length, concentration, buffering effects, etc. on adsorbed peptide structure. The experiments presented in this dissertation demonstrate that SFG vibrational spectroscopy can be used to directly probe the interaction of adsorbing biomolecules with a surface or interface. The use of well designed model systems aided in isolation of the SFG signal of the adsorbing species, and showed that surface functional groups of the substrate are sensitive to surface adsorbates. The complementary techniques of AFM and QCM allowed for deconvolution of the effects of surface topography and coverage from the observed SFG spectra. Initial studies of biologically relevant surfaces are also presented: SFG spectroscopy was used to study the surface composition of common soil bacteria for use in bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  16. Temperature jump/Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: A novel method for investigating the chemistry of a burning surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brush, P.J.

    1993-12-31

    The early, highly exothermic reactions which take place at the surface of a burning propellant play an important role in htheburn-rate, flame stability, and ignition sensitivity of energetic materials. However, direct study of this region is prohibited by the complexity of the chemical and physical details of a burning propellant. A novel experimental technique, Temperature Jump/Fourier Transform Infrared (T-Jump/FT-IR) spectroscopy, is described which approximates the conditions of the surface reaction zone of a burning propellant while spectroscopically probing its chemistry. T-Jump/FT-Ir spectroscopy uses a rapidly heated thin film of material as an instantaneous simulation of the surface reaction zone. The thin film of material is placed on a Pt ribbon filament and is housed inside a gas-tight IR cell. The filament is then heated by the pyrolysis control unit at 2000{degrees}C/s to a constant temperature in the 200-600{degrees}C range depending on the sample. Control of the heating rate and final temperature is achieved by rapidly sensing the resistance of the Pt filament. Endothermic or exothermic events of the sample are detected by monitoring the control voltage required to maintain constant resistance. The evolved gaseous decomposition products aaresimultaneously detected by a rapid scanning FT-IR spectrometer whose IR beam is focused 3 mm above the sample. The sequential thermal decomposition chemistry of energetic materials under conditions relevant to combustion is determined for the first time. The application of T-Jump/FT-IR spectroscopy is illustrated with rapid, isothermal thermolysis data from several classes of energetic materials. The materials studied are: the organoazide polymers azidomethylmethyloxetane, bis(azidomethyl)oxetane, and glycidylazide; the cyclic nitramines octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazacine and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine; and the salts ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate.

  17. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  18. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectra and structure of liquid water from classical and quantum simulations with the MB-pol potential energy function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep K; Moberg, Daniel R; Straight, Shelby C; Paesani, Francesco

    2017-12-28

    The structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is investigated through the modeling of infrared and Raman spectra along with structural order parameters calculated from classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations with the MB-pol many-body potential energy function. The magnitude of nuclear quantum effects is also monitored by comparing the vibrational spectra obtained from classical and centroid molecular dynamics, both in intensities and peak positions. The observed changes in spectral activities are shown to reflect changes in the underlying structure of the hydrogen-bond network and are found to be particularly sensitive to many-body effects in the representation of the electrostatic interactions. Overall, good agreement is found with the experimental spectra, which provides further evidence for the accuracy of MB-pol in predicting the properties of water.

  19. Temperature-dependent vibrational spectra and structure of liquid water from classical and quantum simulations with the MB-pol potential energy function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep K.; Moberg, Daniel R.; Straight, Shelby C.; Paesani, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    The structure of liquid water as a function of temperature is investigated through the modeling of infrared and Raman spectra along with structural order parameters calculated from classical and quantum molecular dynamics simulations with the MB-pol many-body potential energy function. The magnitude of nuclear quantum effects is also monitored by comparing the vibrational spectra obtained from classical and centroid molecular dynamics, both in intensities and peak positions. The observed changes in spectral activities are shown to reflect changes in the underlying structure of the hydrogen-bond network and are found to be particularly sensitive to many-body effects in the representation of the electrostatic interactions. Overall, good agreement is found with the experimental spectra, which provides further evidence for the accuracy of MB-pol in predicting the properties of water.

  20. Temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond films studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of residual stress and its components with increasing temperature in chemical vapor deposited (CVD diamond films has a crucial impact on their high temperature applications. In this work we investigated temperature dependence of stress in CVD diamond film deposited on Si(100 substrate in the temperature range of 30 °C to 480 °C by Raman mapping measurement. Raman shift of the characteristic diamond band peaked at 1332 cm-1 was studied to evaluate the residual stress distribution at the diamond surface. A new approach was applied to calculate thermal stress evolution with increasing tempera­ture by using two commonly known equations. Comparison of the residts obtained from the two methods was presented. The intrinsic stress component was calculated from the difference between average values of residual and thermal stress and then its temperature dependence was discussed.

  1. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  2. The high-temperature modification of ScRuSi - Structure, 29Si and 45Sc solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Haverkamp, Sandra; Benndorf, Christopher; Eckert, Hellmut; Heying, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2017-10-01

    A polycrystalline sample of the TiNiSi type low-temperature (LT) modification of ScRuSi was synthesized by arc-melting. Longer annealing in a sealed silica tube (6 weeks at 1270 K) followed by quenching led to the high-temperature (HT) phase. HT-ScRuSi adopts the ZrNiAl structure type: P 6 bar 2 m , a = 688.27(9), c = 336.72(5) pm, wR2 = 0.0861, 260 F2 values, 14 variables. The striking structural building units are regular, tricapped trigonal prisms Si1@Ru3Sc6 and Si2@Ru6Sc3. Both polymorphs have been characterized by 29Si and 45Sc MAS-NMR spectroscopy. The local scandium environments in the two polymorphs are easily distinguished by their electric field gradient tensor values, in agreement with theoretically calculated values.

  3. Simultaneous Determination of Monoatomic Ions via Infrared Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy in Aqueous Solution at Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-07-01

    In this study, monoatomic and thus IR-inactive ions were determined via infrared attenuated total reflection (IR-ATR) spectroscopy including Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+) and Br(-), next to the IR-active ion [Formula: see text] The determination of IR-inactive ions is enabled, as each ion influences the infrared spectrum of bulk water by organizing the water molecules within the solvation shell around the ionic species in a unique way. Furthermore, the influence of temperature was taken into account for the potential application of this analytical technique in real-world scenarios. Using chemometric data analysis, seven ions could be discriminated at temperatures ranging between 3 ℃ and 45 ℃. Finally, within a sample of seawater, Cl(-), Na(+), Mg(2+) and [Formula: see text] could be simultaneously quantified, while the concentrations of Ca(2+), K(+) and Br(-) remained below the achievable limits of detection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Room temperature air oxidation of nanostructured Si thin films with varying porosities as studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.-Q.; Meunier, M.; Sacher, E.

    2006-04-01

    The room temperature air oxidation of nanostructured Si thin films, with varying porosities, has been followed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), using films deposited by KrF excimer (248 nm) laser ablation in He gas ambients. The overall oxidation, determined from the Si2p XPS spectrum, was shown to be amenable to time-porosity superposition, with the extracted shift factors indicating that oxidation is controlled by the permeability of air in the pores. A model has been developed to describe the room temperature air oxidation process as a function of time and porosity, in accord with the experimental findings. Efforts to determine O:Si atomic ratios from O1s:Si2p spectral ratios have revealed the effect of porosity on both the photoelectron attenuation lengths and the size-dependent photoemission intensities of the nanoparticles that compose the samples.

  5. Compositional dependencies in the vibrational properties of amorphous Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenide alloys studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shportko, K.; Revutska, L.; Paiuk, O.; Baran, J.; Stronski, A.; Gubanova, A.; Venger, E.

    2017-11-01

    This work is focused on the compositional dependencies in the Raman spectra of amorphous Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenides with the systematic increase of the Ge-content. Studied Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenides are promising for applications in the photonics, optical, and electronic data storages. Gaussians used to fit the obtained Raman spectra were attributed to the vibrations of the structural units in Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se samples. Systematic compositional dependencies of the intensities of the characteristic Raman bands correlate with evolution of concentration of the different structural units in Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se alloys along the studied compositional lines. Obtained compositional trends in the intensities of Raman bands may enable one to predict vibrational properties of other amorphous Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se chalcogenides.

  6. Vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodis, Pavol; Larsen, Olaf F A; Woutersen, Sander

    2005-06-23

    The vibrational relaxation of the bending mode of HDO in liquid D2O has been studied using time-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. At short delays, the transient spectrum clearly shows the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption and v = 1 --> 0 bleaching and stimulated emission, whereas at long delays, the transient spectrum is dominated by the spectral changes caused by the temperature increase in the sample after vibrational relaxation. From the decay of the v = 1 --> 2 induced absorption, we obtain an estimate of 390 +/- 50 fs for the vibrational lifetime, in surprisingly good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. In the v = 0 --> 1 frequency region, the decay of the absorption change involves a second, slower component, which suggests that after vibrational relaxation the system is not yet in thermal equilibrium.

  7. Observation of Ortho-Para Dependence of Pressure Broadening Coefficient in Acetylene νb{1}+νb{3} Vibration Band Using Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Okubo, Sho; Inaba, Hajime; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei; Sasada, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Koichi MT

    2016-06-01

    We observe that the pressure-broadening coefficients depend on the ortho-para levels. The spectrum is taken with a dual-comb spectrometer which has the resolution of 48 MHz and the frequency accuracy of 8 digit when the signal-to-noise ratio is more than 20. In this study, about 4.4-Tz wide spectra of the P(31) to R(31) transitions in the νb{1}+νb{3} vibration band of 12C_2H_2 are observed at the pressure of 25, 60, 396, 1047, 1962 and 2654 Pa. Each rotation-vibration absorption line is fitted to Voight function and we determined pressure-broadening coefficients for each rotation-vibration transition. The Figure shows pressure broadening coefficient as a function of m. Here m is J"+1 for R and -J" for P-branch. The graph shows obvious dependence on ortho and para. We fit it to Pade function considering the population ratio of three-to-one for the ortho and para levels. This would lead to detailed understanding of the pressure boarding mechanism. S. Okubo et al., Applied Physics Express 8, 082402 (2015)

  8. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  9. Low-temperature single-molecule spectroscopy on photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes from purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oellerich, Silke; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    The primary reactions of purple bacterial photosynthesis take place within two well characterized pigment-protein complexes, the core Reaction Center-Light Harvesting 1 (RC-LH1) complex and the more peripheral Light Harvesting 2 (LH2) complex. These antenna complexes serve to absorb incident solar radiation and to transfer it to the reaction-centers, where it is used to 'power' the photosynthetic redox reaction. This review provides an overview of how the character of the electronically excited states of these pigment-protein complexes are determined by quantum mechanics and how the respective spectral signatures can be observed by single-molecule spectroscopy.

  10. Low temperature vibrational spectra, lattice dynamics, and phase transitions in some potassium hexahalometallates: K2[XY6] with X=Sn or Te and Y=Cl or Br

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chodos, Steven L.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1979-01-01

    This paper deals with the observation and identification of phonon frequencies resulting from the low temperature phase transitions in K2XY6 crystals. By means of a simple lattice dynamical model, the vibrational Raman and IR data available in the literature and obtained here have been analyzed. ...

  11. Rapid, broadband spectroscopic temperature measurement of CO2 using VIPA spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Klose, Andrew; Cruz, Flavio C; Maser, Daniel L; Diddams, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopic temperature measurements of a sealed carbon dioxide sample cell were realized with an optical frequency comb combined with a two-dimensional dispersive spectrometer. A supercontinuum laser source based on an erbium fiber mode-locked laser was employed to generate coherent light around 2000 nm (5000 cm-1). The laser was passed through a 12-cm long cell containing CO2, and the transmitted light was analyzed in a virtually imaged phased array- (VIPA-) based spectrometer. Broadband spectra spanning more than 100 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of roughly 0.075 cm-1 (2.2 GHz) were acquired with an integration period of 2 ms. The temperature of the CO2 sample was deduced from fitting a modeled spectrum to the line intensities of the experimentally acquired spectrum. Temperature dynamics on the time scale of milliseconds were observed with a temperature resolution of 2.6 K. The spectroscopically-deduced temperatures agreed with temperatures of the sample cell measured with a thermistor. P...

  12. Temperature Dependence of Near-Infrared CO_2 Line Shapes Measured by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, Mélanie; Fleisher, Adam J.; Liu, Qingnan; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2017-06-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio, mode-by-mode cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) line shape measurements of air-broadened transitions in the 30013 → 0001 band of ^{12}C^{16}O_2 located near λ = 1.6 μm. Absorption spectra were acquired from (230-290) K with a variable-temperature spectrometer developed in the framework of the NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 Mission to improve our understanding of carbon dioxide and oxygen line shape parameters. This system comprises a monolithic, thermally stabilized two-mirror, optical resonator exhibiting a mode stability of 200 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 10^{-11} cm^{-1}. Observed spectra were modeled the using the recently recommended Hartmann-Tran line profile (HTP) (and several of its limiting cases) which includes the effects of Dicke narrowing, speed dependent broadening, correlation between velocity- and phase-changing collisions and first-order line mixing effects. At fixed temperature, line shape parameters were determined by constrained multispectrum fitting of spectra acquired over the pressure range (30 - 300) Torr. For each transition considered, analysis of the temperature dependence of the fitted line shape parameters yielded the pressure-broadening temperature exponent and speed dependence parameter, where the latter quantity was found to be in good agreement with theoretical values consistent with the HTP model. Tennyson, et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 86, (2014) 1931

  13. Temperature and water mole fraction measurements by time-domain-based supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy in a flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werblinski, Thomas; Mittmann, Frank; Altenhoff, Michael; Seeger, Thomas; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the first quantitative multi-scalar measurements by time-domain-based supercontinuum absorption spectroscopy in a flame. Temperature and mole fraction are determined simultaneously from broadband spectra ranging from 1,340 to 1,485 nm by a multi-peak least square fit between experiments and simulated spectra. To this end, a combination of the most comprehensive databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012, is used. Line strength values listed in BT2 are combined with averaged broadening coefficients and temperature exponents based on the upper rotational quantum number J from the latest HITRAN database to precisely model the line shape function for each transition. The height-dependent temperature and mole fraction profiles of a premixed one-dimensional flame of a McKenna type burner are reconstructed by direct comparison of experimental spectra with theory. For verification, the temperature data obtained are compared with a profile determined by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

  14. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of 1,3-Butadiene Hydrogenation on 4 nm Pt@SiO 2 , Pd@SiO 2 , and Rh@SiO 2 Core–Shell Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Krier, James M.

    2015-01-14

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. 1,3-Butadiene (1,3-BD) hydrogenation was performed on 4 nm Pt, Pd, and Rh nanoparticles (NPs) encapsulated in SiO2 shells at 20, 60, and 100 °C. The core-shells were grown around polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated NPs (Stöber encapsulation) prepared by colloidal synthesis. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was performed to correlate surface intermediates observed in situ with reaction selectivity. It is shown that calcination is effective in removing PVP, and the SFG signal can be generated from the metal surface. Using SFG, it is possible to compare the surface vibrational spectrum of Pt@SiO2 (1,3-BD is hydrogenated through multiple paths and produces butane, 1-butene, and cis/trans-2-butene) to Pd@SiO2 (1,3-BD favors one path and produces 1-butene and cis/trans-2-butene). In contrast to Pt@SiO2 and Pd@SiO2, SFG and kinetic experiments of Rh@SiO2 show a permanent accumulation of organic material.

  15. Anisole fluorescence spectroscopy for temperature measurements with a Hg (Xe) arc lamp excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, P.; Kanumuri, S. S.; Bonnety, J.; Tran, K.-H.; Serio, B.; Bonnet, D.; Luc, J.; Lavayssiere, M.

    2017-04-01

    The main contribution of this study is to propose time-resolved measurements to determine temperature with a novel source of continuous excitation for an induced fluorescence technique with laser diagnosis based on tracer-induced fluorescence, which has become a major tool for experimental studies of fluid dynamics in reaction flows. We use a Hg (Xe) arc lamp as a continuous light source that has a wide range of emissions in wavelength. With this setup, one can reach high spatial and temporal resolution (temperature, pressure, species concentration, and velocity) to acquire quantitative data for the control of fluid thermal systems, such as engines, combustion chambers, furnaces, and reactors. A fluorescence study was performed on various tracers and their configurations. We focus on an anisole tracer using a broad wavelength of excitations. We propose a calibration to achieve temperature measurements in the range of 493-773 K and from 0.2 to 3.5 MPa of pressure. The temperature-dependent fluorescence is based on a two-line technique. The results give a better understanding of the influence of temperature and pressure in a nitrogen bath gas on the fluorescence photophysics in the UV domain. High temporal resolution was acquired using a high-speed intensified camera setup. The application of the photomultipliers manages the time-scale evolution of the flow in continuous emission and this eliminates the signal-to-noise ratio impact.

  16. Ion and electron temperatures in the SUMMA mirror device by emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, R. W.; Voss, D. E.; Reinmann, J. J.; Snyder, A.

    1974-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained in the SUMMA mirror device by observing the Doppler-broadened charge-exchange component of the 667.8and 587.6-nm He lines in He plasma and the H alpha and H beta lines in H2 plasma. The second moment of the line profiles was used as the parameter to determine ion temperature. Corrections for magnetic splitting, fine structure, monochromator slit function, and variation in charge-exchange cross section with energy are derived and included. Even for constant cross section, no magnetic splitting or fine structure, and infinitely narrow slit function, the line profile is not Gaussian, because the excitation results from a change-exchange process. Comparison is made with temperatures from a neutral particle analyzer.-

  17. Versatile setup for optical spectroscopy under high pressure and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Michaël K.; Levallois, Julien; Akrap, Ana; Teyssier, Jérémie; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Lévy-Bertrand, Florence; Tediosi, Riccardo; Brandt, Mehdi; Lerch, Philippe; van der Marel, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    We present an optical setup for spectroscopic measurements in the infrared and of Raman shift under high pressure and at low temperature. Using a membrane-driven diamond anvil cell, the pressure can be tuned in situ up to 20 GPa and the temperatures ranges from room temperature down to 18 K in transmission mode and 13 K in reflection mode. In transmission, the setup is entirely working under vacuum to reduce the water absorption features and obtain a higher spectral stability. Since the infrared throughput obtained with a thermal source is limited, the use of a synchrotron source allowed to enhance the performance, as illustrated with results obtained with various materials. The analysis of the reflectivity is adapted so that it benefits from ambient pressure data and produces quantitative optical conductivity curves that can be easily compared to the results at ambient pressure.

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy of gases at elevated temperatures for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In situ simultaneous fast measurements of gas temperature and gas composition are of great interest in combustion/gasification research and power plant engineering and give useful information about conditions, chemical reactions and gas mixing in various industrial processes. Usually gas...... development of existing and developing new databases. Measurements should be performed at well-controlled conditions in a highly temperature uniform heated gas cell with a high-resolution spectrometer. In this work some high-temperature, high-resolution IR absorption/transmission measurements gases relevant...... measurements have to be done in a very aggressive and unstable in time hot gas environment which is realized, for example, in boilers, gasifires and engines. An optically based technique is beneficial because it is non-intrusive, accurate, fast and can be performed in situ for various extremely hard conditions...

  19. High temperature radiance spectroscopy measurements of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manara, D., E-mail: dario.manara@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); De Bruycker, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); CNRS - CEMHTI Site Haute Temperature, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Boboridis, K. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tougait, O. [Universite de Rennes 1, Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR CNRS 6226, 263, Av. du General Leclerc, F-35042 Rennes cedex (France); Eloirdi, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Malki, M. [CNRS - CEMHTI Site Haute Temperature, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France)

    2012-07-15

    In this work, an experimental study of the radiance of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at wavelengths 550 nm Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To {lambda} Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 920 nm is reported. A fast multi-channel spectro-pyrometer has been employed for the radiance measurements of samples heated up to and beyond their melting point by laser irradiation. The melting temperature of uranium monocarbide, soundly established at 2780 K, has been taken as a radiance reference. Based on it, a wavelength-dependence has been obtained for the high-temperature spectral emissivity of some uranium carbides (1 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To C/U Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 2). Similarly, the peritectic temperature of plutonium monocarbide (1900 K) has been used as a reference for plutonium monocarbide and sesquicarbide. The present spectral emissivities of solid uranium and plutonium carbides are close to 0.5 at 650 nm, in agreement with previous literature values. However, their high temperature behaviour, values in the liquid, and carbon-content and wavelength dependencies in the visible-near infrared range have been determined here for the first time. Liquid uranium carbide seems to interact with electromagnetic radiation in a more metallic way than does the solid, whereas a similar effect has not been observed for plutonium carbides. The current emissivity values have also been used to convert the measured radiance spectra into real temperature, and thus perform a thermal analysis of the laser heated samples. Some high-temperature phase boundaries in the systems U-C and Pu-C are shortly discussed on the basis of the current results.

  20. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  1. Conformational Analysis of (+)-Germacrene A by Variable Temperature NMR and NOE Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Faraldos, Juan A.; Wu, Shuiqin; Chappell, Joe; Coates, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    (+)-Germacrene A, an important intermediate in sesquiterpene biosynthesis, was isolated in pure form from a genetically engineered yeast and was characterized by chromatographic properties (TLC, GC), MS, optical rotation, UV, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR data. Variable-temperature 500 MHz 1H NMR spectra in CDCl3 showed that this flexible cyclodecadiene ring exists as three NMR-distinguishable conformational isomers in a ratio of about 5:3:2 at or below ordinary probe temperature (25° C). The confor...

  2. Monitoring vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryaki, B. [Hacettepe University (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-12-01

    The paper examines the prediction and optimisation of machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Underground studies were carried out at the Middle Anatolian Lignite Mine, between 1993 and 1997. Several shearer drums with different pick lacing arrangements were designed and tested on double-ended ranging longwall shearers employed at the mine. A computer program called the Vibration Analysis Program (VAP) was developed for analysing machine vibrations in longwall shearers. Shearer drums that were tested underground, as well as some provided by leading manufacturers, were analyzed using these programs. The results of the experiments and computer analyses are given in the article. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Effect of shelf aging on vibration transmissibility of anti-vibration gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-05

    Anti-vibration gloves have been used in real workplaces to reduce vibration transmitted through hand-held power tools to the hand. Generally materials used for vibration attenuation in gloves are resilient materials composed of certain synthetic and/or composite polymers. The mechanical characteristics of the resilient materials used in anti-vibration gloves are prone to be influenced by environmental conditions such as temperature, humidity, and photo-irradiation, which cause material degradation and aging. This study focused on the influence of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of air-packaged anti-vibration gloves following 2 years of shelf aging. Effects of shelf aging on the vibration attenuation performance of anti-vibration gloves were examined according to the Japan industrial standard JIS T8114 test protocol. The findings indicate that shelf aging induces the reduction of vibration attenuation performance in air-packaged anti-vibration gloves.

  4. Low temperature-induced lycopene degradaton in red ripe tomato evaluated by remittance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farneti, B.; Schouten, R.E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Tomatoes are mostly harvested at the orange and red-ripe stages. A survey among consumers indicated that tomatoes are most often stored in the refrigerator well below 10 °C, a temperature considered harmful for chilling sensitive products such as tomato. Also during distribution, tomatoes may be

  5. Temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy of melamine and structural analogs in milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral Raman imaging has the potential for rapid screening of solid-phase samples for potential adulterants. We found that the Raman spectra of melamine analogs changed dramatically and uniquely as a function of elevated temperature. Raman spectra were acquired for urea, biuret, cyanuric acid...

  6. Characterisation and Modelling of a High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Stack using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Jespersen, Jesper Lebæk; Schaltz, Erik

    2009-01-01

    temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cell stack. A Labview virtual instrument has been developed to perform the signal generation and data acquisition which is needed to perform EIS. The typical output of an EIS measurement on a fuel cell, is a Nyquist plot, which shows the imaginary and real part of the impedance...

  7. Structural changes in cartilage and collagen studied by high temperature Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Mark; Spencer, Nicholas; Dudhia, Jayesh; McMillan, Paul F

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the high temperature behavior of collagen and collagenous tissue is important for surgical procedures and biomaterials processing for the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. One primary event for proteins is thermal denaturation that involves unfolding the polypeptide chains while maintaining the primary structure intact. Collagen in the extracellular matrix of cartilage and other connective tissue is a hierarchical material containing bundles of triple-helical fibers associated with water and proteoglycan components. Thermal analysis of dehydrated collagen indicates irreversible denaturation at high temperature between 135°C and 200°C, with another reversible event at ∼60-80°C for hydrated samples. We report high temperature Raman spectra for freeze-dried cartilage samples that show an increase in laser-excited fluorescence interpreted as conformational changes associated with denaturation above 140°C. Spectra for separated collagen and proteoglycan fractions extracted from cartilage indicate the changes are associated with collagen. The Raman data also show appearance of new features indicating peptide bond hydrolysis at high temperature implying that molecular H2 O is retained within the freeze-dried tissue. This is confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis that show 5-7 wt% H2 O remaining within freeze-dried cartilage that is released progressively upon heating up to 200°C. Spectra obtained after exposure to high temperature and re-hydration following recovery indicate that the capacity of the denatured collagen to re-absorb water is reduced. Our results are important for revealing the presence of bound H2 O within the collagen component of connective tissue even after freeze-drying and its role in denaturation that is accompanied by or perhaps preceded by breakdown of the primary polypeptide structure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Synthesis, characterization and study on vibration spectra of potassium triborate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Sun, Yong; Yang, Gang; Li, Zuo-Hu

    2007-07-01

    Potassium triborate was synthesized with potassium carbonate and boric acid by controlling suitable feed mixture ratio, reaction temperature and dehydration temperature in the self-designed boiling reactor. According to chemical analysis, the formula of the synthetics was monohydrate potassium triborate (KB3O5 x H2O). It's structure was characterized by XRD, FTIR, Raman and TG, and it was found by XRD analysis that the synthetics was amorphous solid. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy anal-ysis show that three coordination B(3) -O bond, four coordination B(4) -O bond, and hydroxy and triborate anions existed in the formula of the synthetics. Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis show that the groups which can lose mono-water existed in the formula of the synthetics, and structural formula of the synthetics was deduced as K[B3O4 (OH)2]. Vibration spectra of the synthetics were studied, including FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Vibration absorption peaks of some main groups of the synthetics were investigated, including three coordination B(3) -O bond and four coordination B(4) -O bond that are the main existing forms of boron atoms in the synthetics as well as other groups, and each vibration absorption peak was assigned.

  9. High Temperature Superconducting Levitation Energy Storage Flywheel having Stable Levitation without Control and Its Vibration Control Electromagnetic Damper

    OpenAIRE

    福室, 允央; 大関, 健一郎; 斎藤, 正人; 葛, 徳梁; 村上, 岩範; 長屋, 幸助

    2004-01-01

    A simple and stable energy-storage flywheel system with high temperature superconducting levitation is presented. In order to have stable levitation, a superconductor and a permanent magnet are used, and 3 permanent magnets support the top of the shaft. In the part of drive system, 8-poles permanent magnet and 8 coils are used to cancel electromagnetic forces in the radial direction. An electromagnetic damper consisting of permanent magnet for levitation and 4 coils is presented which lies at...

  10. Polyglutamine- and Temperature-Dependent Conformational Rigidity in Mutant Huntingtin Revealed by Immunoassays and Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodale, Valentina; Kegulian, Natalie C.; Verani, Margherita; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Petricca, Lara; Daldin, Manuel; Boggio, Roberto; Padova, Alessandro; Kuhn, Rainer; Pacifici, Robert; Macdonald, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Ryan C.; Park, Hyunsun; Isas, J. Mario; Langen, Ralf; Weiss, Andreas; Caricasole, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Huntington's disease, expansion of a CAG triplet repeat occurs in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT), resulting in a protein bearing>35 polyglutamine residues whose N-terminal fragments display a high propensity to misfold and aggregate. Recent data demonstrate that polyglutamine expansion results in conformational changes in the huntingtin protein (HTT), which likely influence its biological and biophysical properties. Developing assays to characterize and measure these conformational changes in isolated proteins and biological samples would advance the testing of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at correcting mutant HTT misfolding. Time-resolved Förster energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based assays represent high-throughput, homogeneous, sensitive immunoassays widely employed for the quantification of proteins of interest. TR-FRET is extremely sensitive to small distances and can therefore provide conformational information based on detection of exposure and relative position of epitopes present on the target protein as recognized by selective antibodies. We have previously reported TR-FRET assays to quantify HTT proteins based on the use of antibodies specific for different amino-terminal HTT epitopes. Here, we investigate the possibility of interrogating HTT protein conformation using these assays. Methodology/Principal Findings By performing TR-FRET measurements on the same samples (purified recombinant proteins or lysates from cells expressing HTT fragments or full length protein) at different temperatures, we have discovered a temperature-dependent, reversible, polyglutamine-dependent conformational change of wild type and expanded mutant HTT proteins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirms the temperature and polyglutamine-dependent change in HTT structure, revealing an effect of polyglutamine length and of temperature on the alpha-helical content of the protein. Conclusions/Significance The temperature- and polyglutamine-dependent effects

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of the mass-selected tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol monomers and its dimers in gas phase using IR depletion and VUV single photon ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengchao; Hu, Yongjun; Zhan, Huaqi; Chen, Jiaxin; Jin, Shan; Song, Wentao; Li, Yujian

    2017-10-01

    Tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA, C5H10O2) is a close chemical analog of the sugar rings present in the phosphate-deoxyribose backbone structure of the nucleic acids. In present report, the infrared (IR) spectra of the size-selected THFA monomer and its dimer have been investigated in a pulsed supersonic jet using infrared-vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization. Herein, the laser light at 118 nm wavelength served as the source of ;soft; ionization in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The IR features for the monomers located at 3622 cm- 1 can be assigned to the intramolecular hydrogen bonding stretch vibrations mainly referring to A and C conformers. Compared with the monomer, however, characteristic peaks for the dimer centered at 3415 and 3453 cm- 1, red shifted 207 and 169 cm- 1, respectively, were associated with the intermolecular hydrogen bonding stretch vibrations. Combined with the quantum-chemical calculations, the dimer in the gas phase preferred cyclic AC conformer stabled by forming two strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which shown the high hydrogen bond selectivity in the cluster. The conclusions drawn from the role played in the conformational flexibility by the hydroxyl and ether groups may be extended to other biomolecules.

  12. Interfacial Water Structure and Cation Binding with the Dppc Phosphate at Air /aqueous Interfaces Studied by Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular-level knowledge of water structure and cation binding specificity to lipid headgroups at lipid/water interfaces plays a key role in many relevant chemical, biological, and environmental processes. To obtain information on the molecular organization at aqueous interfaces, vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) has been applied extensively as an interface-specific technique. Dipalmitoylphosphocholine (DPPC) is a major component of cell membranes and has been used as a proxy for the organic coating on fat-coated aerosols. In the present work, in addition to conventional VSFG studies on cation interaction with the phosphate headgroup moiety of DPPC, we employ phase-sensitive vibrational sum frequency generation (PS-VSFG) to investigate the average direction of the transition dipole moment of interfacial water molecules. The average orientation of water structure at DPPC/water interfaces is inferred. DPPC orients interfacial water molecules on average with their net transition dipole moment pointing towards the surface. The influence of Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ is identified in regard to interfacial water structure and DPPC headgroup organization. Ca2+ is observed to have greater impact on the water structure and a unique binding affinity to the phosphate headgroup relative to other cations tested. In highly concentrated Ca2+ regimes the already disturbed interfacial hydrogen-bonding network reorganizes to resemble that of the neat salt solution interface.

  13. Development, implementation, and characterization of a standalone embedded viscosity measurement system based on the impedance spectroscopy of a vibrating wire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Janeiro, Fernando M.; Ramos, Pedro M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an embedded liquid viscosity measurement system based on a vibrating wire sensor. Although multiple viscometers based on different working principles are commercially available, there is still a market demand for a dedicated measurement system capable of performing accurate, fast measurements and requiring little or no operator training for simple systems and solution monitoring. The developed embedded system is based on a vibrating wire sensor that works by measuring the impedance response of the sensor, which depends on the viscosity and density of the liquid in which the sensor is immersed. The core of the embedded system is a digital signal processor (DSP) which controls the waveform generation and acquisitions for the measurement of the impedance frequency response. The DSP also processes the acquired waveforms and estimates the liquid viscosity. The user can interact with the measurement system through a keypad and an LCD or through a computer with a USB connection for data logging and processing. The presented system is tested on a set of viscosity standards and the estimated values are compared with the standard manufacturer specified viscosity values. A stability study of the measurement system is also performed.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  15. Single-photon cesium Rydberg excitation spectroscopy using 3186-nm UV laser and room-temperature vapor cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieying; Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a single-photon Rydberg excitation spectroscopy of cesium (Cs) atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell. Cs atoms are excited directly from 6S1/2 ground state to nP3/2 (n = 70 - 100) Rydberg states with a 318.6 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser,and Rydberg excitation spectra are obtained by transmission enhancement of a probe beam resonant to Cs 6S1/2, F = 4 - 6P3/2, F' = 5 transition as partial population on F = 4 ground state are transferred to Rydberg state .Analysis reveals that the observed spectra are velocity-selective spectroscopy of Rydberg state, from which the amplitude and linewidth influenced by lasers'Rabi frequency have been investigated. Fitting to energies of Cs nP3/2 (n = 70 -100) states, the determined quantum defect is 3.56671(42). The demodulated spectra can also be employed as frequency references to stabilize the UV laser frequency to specific Cs Rydberg transition.

  16. Estimating Percent Crystallinity of Polyethylene as a Function of Temperature by Raman Spectroscopy Multivariate Curve Resolution by Alternating Least Squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Ashok Zachariah; Lai, Bo-Han; Lan, Shih-Ting; Ando, Masahiro; Wang, Chien-Lung; Hamaguchi, Hiro-O

    2017-03-07

    We have recently demonstrated a methodology to estimate the percent crystallinity (PC) of polymers directly with Raman spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) by alternating least-squares (ALS). In the MCR-ALS methodology, the Raman spectrum of a semicrystalline polymer is separated into two constituent components (crystalline and molten/amorphous) and their corresponding concentrations. The methodology necessitates that the Raman spectrum at any temperature be a linear combination of two MCR spectral components (one molten and one crystalline). This is true in the case of simple systems such as crystalline pendant alkyl domains in polymers (Samuel et al. Anal. Chem. 2016, 88, 4644). However, in the case of main chain polymer crystals (e.g., polyethylene), the situation can be complicated owing to several molecular changes in the lattice in addition to conformational reorganizations during melting. Under this circumstance, a simple two-state model may not be adequate and we describe the modifications required to treat such systems, keeping the basic principles of the proposed methodology unchanged. A comparative study with wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and Raman spectroscopy is also performed to substantiate our findings. In addition to estimating percent crystallinity (PC), our methodology is capable of revealing additional information, such as interchain interactions in crystal lattice, that in principle will help distinguishing polymorphic transformations, subtle changes in lamellar lattice dimensions, and other phase changes in polymers.

  17. Measurements of density, temperature, and their fluctuations in turbulent supersonic flow using UV laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, and their turbulent fluctuation levels were obtained in the boundary layer of an unseeded, Mach 2 wind tunnel flow. The spectroscopic technique that was used to make the measurements is based on the combination of laser-induced oxygen fluorescence and Raman scattering by oxygen and nitrogen from the same laser pulse. Results from this demonstration experiment are compared with previous measurements obtained in the same facility using conventional probes and an earlier spectroscopic technique. Densities and temperatures measured with the current technique agree with the previous surveys to within 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The fluctuation amplitudes for both variables agree with the measurements obtained using the earlier spectroscopic technique and show evidence of an unsteady, weak shock wave that perturbs the boundary layer.

  18. Conformational Analysis of (+)-Germacrene A by Variable Temperature NMR and NOE Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraldos, Juan A; Wu, Shuiqin; Chappell, Joe; Coates, Robert M

    2007-09-06

    (+)-Germacrene A, an important intermediate in sesquiterpene biosynthesis, was isolated in pure form from a genetically engineered yeast and was characterized by chromatographic properties (TLC, GC), MS, optical rotation, UV, IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data. Variable-temperature 500 MHz (1)H NMR spectra in CDCl(3) showed that this flexible cyclodecadiene ring exists as three NMR-distinguishable conformational isomers in a ratio of about 5:3:2 at or below ordinary probe temperature (25° C). The conformer structures were assigned by (1)H NMR data comparisons, NOE experiments, and vicinal couplings as follows: 1a (52%, UU), 1b (29% UD), and 1c (19%, DU).

  19. Gamma spectroscopy for analysis of high temperature reactor fuel element KueFA tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, O.; Laurie, M.; Bottomley, P.D.W.; Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU); Allelein, H.J. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik

    2013-07-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is characterized by an advanced design with passive safety features. Fuel elements are constituted by a graphite matrix containing sub-mm-sized fuel particles with TRISO (TRi-ISOtropic) coating designed to provide high fission product retention. During a loss of coolant accident scenario in a HTR the maximum temperature is foreseen to be in the range of 1600-1650 C, remaining well below the melting point of the fuel. An experimental assessment of the fuel behaviour under accident conditions is necessary to investigate the quality of fission product retention of TRISO coated particles in a given fuel element and to validate relevant computer codes. The device used to perform these studies is the cold finger apparatus KueFA (KuehlFinger-Apparatur). (orig.)

  20. Photodynamics of quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride revealed by low-temperature spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontheimer, Bernd; Braun, Merle; Nikolay, Niko; Sadzak, Nikola; Aharonovich, Igor; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Quantum emitters in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have recently emerged as promising bright single photon sources. In this Rapid Communication we investigate in detail their optical properties at cryogenic temperatures. In particular, we perform temperature-resolved photoluminescence studies and measure photon coherence times from the hBN emitters. The obtained value of 81 (1 )ps translates to a width of ˜6.5 GHz which is higher than the Fourier transform limited value of ˜32 MHz . To account for the photodynamics of the emitter, we perform ultrafast spectral diffusion measurements that partially account for the coherence times. Our results provide important insight into the relaxation processes in quantum emitters in hBN which is mandatory to evaluate their applicability for quantum information processing.