WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature sulfur tolerant

  1. 40 CFR 180.444 - Sulfur dioxide; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 180.444 Sulfur dioxide; tolerances for residues. A tolerance is established as follows for sulfite residues of the fungicide sulfur dioxide (determined as (SO2)) in or on the following raw agricultural... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfur dioxide; tolerances for...

  2. Sulfur tolerant zeolite supported platinum catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An experimental study of sulfur tolerant zeolite platinum catalysts for aormatics hydrogenation. Platinum catalysts supported on Y-zeolite have been prepared and characterized in various ways, including the hydrogenation of toluene in a high pressure...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfuric acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1019 Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) Residues of sulfuric acid are exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used in accordance with...

  4. Sulfur tolerant zeolite supported platinum catalysts for aromatics hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergem, Haakon

    1997-12-31

    The increased demand for transportation fuels at the expence of heavier fuel oil has forced the refinery industry to expand their conversion capacity with hydrotreating as one of the key processes. A shift towards more diesel powered vehicles along with tightening fuel regulations demanding cleaner fuels has lead to increasing interest in catalytic processes for the manufacturing of such environmentally acceptable fuels. This provides the motivation for this thesis. Its main objective was to study possible catalysts active for desulfurization, hydrogenation, and ring-opening of aromatics all in the presence of sulfur. A close examination of the physical properties and kinetical behaviour of the chosen catalysts has been performed. A high pressure reactor setup was designed and built for activity measurements. Zeolite supported platinum catalysts were prepared and both the metal and acid functions were characterized utilizing various experimental techniques. Hydrogenation of toluene was used as a model reaction and the effect of sulfur adsorption on the activity and kinetic behaviour of the catalysts was investigated. The catalyst samples showed hydrogenation activities comparable to a commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst. There were no clear differences in the effect of the various sulfur compounds studied. Platinum supported on zeolite Y gave considerably more sulfur tolerant catalysts compared to Al2O3 as support. 155 refs., 58 figs., 36 tabs.

  5. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, possessing different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at an operating temperature of 650°C. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  6. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Hagen, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Two metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (active area 16 cm2) with nanostructured Ni:GDC infiltrated anodes, but different anode and support microstructures were studied in respect to sulfur tolerance at the aimed operating temperature of 650ºC. The studied MS-SOFCs are based on ferretic...

  7. Solubility of HCL in sulfuric acid at stratospheric temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leah R.; Golden, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The solubility of HCl in sulfuric acid was measured using a Knudsen cell technique. Effective Henry's law constants are reported for sulfuric acid concentrations between 50 and 60 weight percent and for temperatures between 220 and 230 K. The measured values indicate that very little HCl will be dissolved in the stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles.

  8. Effects of Sulfurization Temperature on Properties of CZTS Films by Vacuum Evaporation and Sulfurization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper zinc tin sulfur (CZTS thin films have been extensively studied in recent years for their advantages of low cost, high absorption coefficient (≥104 cm−1, appropriate band gap (~1.5 eV, and nontoxicity. CZTS thin films are promising materials of solar cells like copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS. In this work, CZTS thin films were prepared on glass substrates by vacuum evaporation and sulfurization method. Sn/Cu/ZnS (CZT precursors were deposited by thermal evaporation and then sulfurized in N2 + H2S atmosphere at temperatures of 360–560°C to produce polycrystalline CZTS thin films. It is found that there are some impurity phases in the thin films with the sulfurization temperature less than 500°C, and the crystallite size of CZTS is quite small. With the further increase of the sulfurization temperature, the obtained thin films exhibit preferred (112 orientation with larger crystallite size and higher density. When the sulfurization temperature is 500°C, the band gap energy, resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of the CZTS thin films are 1.49 eV, 9.37 Ω · cm, 1.714×1017 cm−3, and 3.89 cm2/(V · s, respectively. Therefore, the prepared CZTS thin films are suitable for absorbers of solar cells.

  9. Strategies for Carbon and Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Materials, Incorporating Lessons from Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrin, Paul; Ruiz-Trejo, Enrique; Mermelstein, Joshua; Bermúdez Menéndez, José Miguel; Ramı Rez Reina, Tomás; Brandon, Nigel P

    2016-11-23

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels, and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review, we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur poisoning, before examining the strategies toward carbon and sulfur tolerance used so far in the SOFC literature. We then study the more extensive relevant heterogeneous catalysis literature for strategies and materials which could be incorporated into carbon and sulfur tolerant fuel cells.

  10. Strategies for carbon and sulfur tolerant solid oxide fuel cell materials, incorporating lessons from heterogeneous catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, P; Ruiz Trejo, E; Mermelstein, J; Bermudez Menendez, J; Ramirez Reina, T; Brandon, N

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a rapidly emerging energy technology for a low carbon world, providing high efficiency, potential to use carbonaceous fuels and compatibility with carbon capture and storage. However, current state-of-the-art materials have low tolerance to sulfur, a common contaminant of many fuels, and are vulnerable to deactivation due to carbon deposition when using carbon-containing compounds. In this review we first study the theoretical basis behind carbon and sulfur ...

  11. High Permeability Ternary Palladium Alloy Membranes with Improved Sulfur and Halide Tolerances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Coulter

    2010-12-31

    The project team consisting of Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), TDA Research, and IdaTech LLC was focused on developing a robust, poison-tolerant, hydrogen selective free standing membrane to produce clean hydrogen. The project completed on schedule and on budget with SwRI, GT, CSM, TDA and IdaTech all operating independently and concurrently. GT has developed a robust platform for performing extensive DFT calculations for H in bulk palladium (Pd), binary alloys, and ternary alloys of Pd. Binary alloys investigated included Pd96M4 where M = Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi, Ce, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu. They have also performed a series of calculations on Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Ag{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Au{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Ni{sub 4}, Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Pt{sub 4}, and Pd{sub 70}Cu{sub 26}Y{sub 4}. SwRI deposited and released over 160 foils of binary and ternary Pd alloys. There was considerable work on characterizing and improving the durability of the deposited foils using new alloy compositions, post annealing and ion bombardment. The 10 and 25 {micro}m thick films were sent to CSM, TDA and IdaTech for characterization and permeation testing. CSM conducted over 60 pure gas permeation tests with SwRI binary and ternary alloy membranes. To date the PdAu and PdAuPt membranes have exhibited the best performance at temperatures in the range of 423-773 C and their performance correlates well with the predictions from GT. TDA completed testing under the Department of Energy (DOE) WGS conditions on over 16 membranes. Of particular interest are the PdAuPt alloys that exhibited only a 20% drop in flux when sulfur was added to the gas mixture and the flux was completely recovered when the sulfur flow was stopped. IdaTech tested binary

  12. High temperature damage of a re-sulfurized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinet, Hougo

    2002-01-01

    After having evoked the industrial problem raised by high-temperature damage in the 303 stainless steel, and outlined that the experimental study of high-temperature damage implies the study of the sane (or non damaged) material, the study of micro-voids germination, growth and coalescence, and the study of the material failure process, the author of this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on the behaviour of sane re-sulfurized stainless steel and different damage models. He presents experimental techniques (thermal-mechanical compression and tensile tests, image analysis in optical microscopy) which have been used in this work, and describes and comments results obtained on axisymmetric samples for micro-void germination, growth and coalescence in case of a damage under low and medium stress triaxiality. The last part addresses the study of the damage of strongly notched samples (stress triaxialities close to those existing at the crack bottom) [fr

  13. Cysteine Synthase Overexpression in Tobacco Confers Tolerance to Sulfur-Containing Environmental Pollutants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noji, Masaaki; Saito, Maiko; Nakamura, Michimi; Aono, Mitsuko; Saji, Hikaru; Saito, Kazuki

    2001-01-01

    Cysteine (Cys) synthase [O-acetyl-l-Ser(thiol)-lyase, EC 4.2.99.8; CSase] is responsible for the final step in biosynthesis of Cys. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; F1) plants with enhanced CSase activities in the cytosol and in the chloroplasts were generated by cross-fertilization of two transformants expressing cytosolic CSase or chloroplastic CSase. The F1 transgenic plants were highly tolerant to toxic sulfur dioxide and sulfite. Upon fumigation with 0.1 μL L−1 sulfur dioxide, the Cys and glutathione contents in leaves of F1 plants were increased significantly, but not in leaves of non-transformed control plants. Furthermore, the leaves of F1 plants exhibited the increased resistance to paraquat, a herbicide generating active oxygen species. PMID:11457948

  14. Rational Design of a Water-Storable Hierarchical Architecture Decorated with Amorphous Barium Oxide and Nickel Nanoparticles as a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode with Excellent Sulfur Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yufei; Wang, Wei; Ge, Lei; Xu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhenbao; Julião, Paulo Sérgio Barros; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping

    2017-11-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), which can directly convert chemical energy stored in fuels into electric power, represent a useful technology for a more sustainable future. They are particularly attractive given that they can be easily integrated into the currently available fossil fuel infrastructure to realize an ideal clean energy system. However, the widespread use of the SOFC technology is hindered by sulfur poisoning at the anode caused by the sulfur impurities in fossil fuels. Therefore, improving the sulfur tolerance of the anode is critical for developing SOFCs for use with fossil fuels. Herein, a novel, highly active, sulfur-tolerant anode for intermediate-temperature SOFCs is prepared via a facile impregnation and limited reaction protocol. During synthesis, Ni nanoparticles, water-storable BaZr 0.4 Ce 0.4 Y 0.2 O 3- δ (BZCY) perovskite, and amorphous BaO are formed in situ and deposited on the surface of a Sm 0.2 Ce 0.8 O 1.9 (SDC) scaffold. More specifically, a porous SDC scaffold is impregnated with a well-designed proton-conducting perovskite oxide liquid precursor with the nominal composition of Ba(Zr 0.4 Ce 0.4 Y 0.2 ) 0.8 Ni 0.2 O 3- δ (BZCYN), calcined and reduced in hydrogen. The as-synthesized hierarchical architecture exhibits high H 2 electro-oxidation activity, excellent operational stability, superior sulfur tolerance, and good thermal cyclability. This work demonstrates the potential of combining nanocatalysts and water-storable materials in advanced electrocatalysts for SOFCs.

  15. Experimental research on sealing performance of sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment under low-temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. X.; Li, L.; Zhang, R.; Jiang, Z. Q.; Zhu, X. C.; Gao, Z. W.; Zhang, H. D.; Zhang, J.

    2018-01-01

    It is discovered that the sealing performance of the sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment worsens under low temperature, but research in the aspect is reported rarely when corresponding measures are adopted for improving the sealing performance of electrical equipment. Therefore, sealing and leakage test of sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment was implemented under low-temperature environment according to the analysis on gas sealing methods of sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment. Causes of gas leakage of sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment under low temperature environment were analyzed according to test results. Effective measures were proposed for improving the gas sealing performance of the equipment, thereby providing valuable reference for gas sealing design, installation, operation maintenance and failure analysis of sulfur hexafluoride electrical equipment under low - temperature environment.

  16. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2008-12-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  17. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided by Fundamental Atomistics Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a novel hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, Sn/Ni alloy as a potential carbon tolerant reforming catalyst. Sn/Ni alloy was synthesized and tested in steam reforming of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalyst is carbon-tolerant under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by a few characteristics: (a) Knowledge-based, bottom-up approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) The focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  19. Generating high temperature tolerant transgenic plants: Achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Anil; Mittal, Dheeraj; Negi, Manisha; Lavania, Dhruv

    2013-05-01

    Production of plants tolerant to high temperature stress is of immense significance in the light of global warming and climate change. Plant cells respond to high temperature stress by re-programming their genetic machinery for survival and reproduction. High temperature tolerance in transgenic plants has largely been achieved either by over-expressing heat shock protein genes or by altering levels of heat shock factors that regulate expression of heat shock and non-heat shock genes. Apart from heat shock factors, over-expression of other trans-acting factors like DREB2A, bZIP28 and WRKY proteins has proven useful in imparting high temperature tolerance. Besides these, elevating the genetic levels of proteins involved in osmotic adjustment, reactive oxygen species removal, saturation of membrane-associated lipids, photosynthetic reactions, production of polyamines and protein biosynthesis process have yielded positive results in equipping transgenic plants with high temperature tolerance. Cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel proteins that regulate calcium influxes across the cell membrane have recently been shown to be the key players in induction of high temperature tolerance. The involvement of calmodulins and kinases in activation of heat shock factors has been implicated as an important event in governing high temperature tolerance. Unfilled gaps limiting the production of high temperature tolerant transgenic plants for field level cultivation are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. First-principles study for the enhanced sulfur tolerance of Ni(1 1 1) surface alloyed with Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxing; Yang, Zongxian

    2018-04-01

    The adsorption of H2S, HS, S, H and the dissociation of H2S on the Ni2Pb/Ni (1 1 1) are systematically studied using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. It is found that H2S dissociation barriers are greatly increased by alloying with Pb atoms in the Ni(1 1 1) surface, while the barrier for H2S formation is greatly reduced. In addition, the adsorption of sulfur atom is weakened a lot. The results indicate that alloying with Pb may be a good way to increase the sulfur tolerance of Ni based anode catalysts of solid oxide fuel cells.

  1. PUMP DESIGN AND COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE SULFURIC ACID TRANSFER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNG-SIK CHOI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a newly designed sulfuric acid transfer system for the sulfur-iodine (SI thermochemical cycle. The proposed sulfuric acid transfer system was evaluated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD analysis for investigating thermodynamic/hydrodynamic characteristics and material properties. This analysis was conducted to obtain reliable continuous operation parameters; in particular, a thermal analysis was performed on the bellows box and bellows at amplitudes and various frequencies (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 Hz. However, the high temperatures and strongly corrosive operating conditions of the current sulfuric acid system present challenges with respect to the structural materials of the transfer system. To resolve this issue, we designed a novel transfer system using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon® as a bellows material for the transfer of sulfuric acid. We also carried out a CFD analysis of the design. The CFD results indicated that the maximum applicable temperature of PTFE is about 533 K (260 °C, even though its melting point is around 600 K. This result implies that the PTFE is a potential material for the sulfuric acid transfer system. The CFD simulations also confirmed that the sulfuric acid transfer system was designed properly for this particular investigation.

  2. Preparation of levoglucosenone through sulfuric acid promoted pyrolysis of bagasse at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xian-wei; Wang, Zhi; Liao, Bing; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Qing-xiang

    2012-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of bagasse pretreated by sulfuric acid was conducted in a fixed bed reactor to prepare levoglucosenone (LGO), a very important anhydrosugar for organic synthesis. The liquid yield and LGO yield were studied at temperatures from 240 to 350 °C and sulfuric acid loadings from 0.92 to 7.10 wt.%. An optimal LGO yield of 7.58 wt.% was obtained at 270 °C with a sulfuric acid pretreatment concentration of 0.05 M (corresponding to 4.28 wt.% sulfuric acid loading). For comparison, microcrystalline cellulose pretreated by 0.05 M sulfuric acid solution was pyrolyzed at temperature from 270 °C to 320 °C, and bagasse loaded with 3-5 wt.% phosphoric acid was pyrolyzed at temperature from 270 °C to 350 °C. The highest yield of LGO from bagasse was 30% higher than that from microcrystalline cellulose, and treatment with sulfuric acid allowed a 21% higher yield than treatment with phosphoric acid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Extreme low temperature tolerance in woody plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Paul G. Schaberg; Carl G. Fossdal; Wolfgang P. Schroder; Trygve D. Kjellsen

    2015-01-01

    Woody plants in boreal to arctic environments and high mountains survive prolonged exposure to temperatures below -40°C and minimum temperatures below -60°C, and laboratory tests show that many of these species can also survive immersion in liquid nitrogen at -196°C. Studies of biochemical changes that occur during acclimation, including recent proteomic and...

  4. Temperature and salinity tolerance of adult hermit crabs, Diogenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1987-11-04

    Nov 4, 1987 ... Estuarine populations are also exposed to wider temperature fluctuations than are marine populations. (Hill & Allanson 1971). There has been considerable work on the tolerance of estuarine animals to various temperature and salinity regimes, and speculations regarding the effect these factors have on ...

  5. Screening for pollen tolerance to high temperatures in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paupière, Marine J.; Haperen, van Pauline; Rieu, Ivo; Visser, Richard G.F.; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnaud G.

    2017-01-01

    Among the abiotic stresses affecting plant reproduction, high temperature is one of the most prominent ones because it directly affects fruit set. So far, little attention has been paid to the investigation of the variation in high temperature tolerance among wild tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

  6. Extreme low temperature tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Richard Strimbeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Woody plants in boreal to arctic environments and high mountains survive prolonged exposure to temperatures below -40˚C and minimum temperatures below -60˚C, and laboratory tests show that many of these species can also survive immersion in liquid nitrogen at -196˚C. Studies of biochemical changes that occur during acclimation, including recent proteomic and metabolomic studies, have identified changes in carbohydrate and compatible solute concentrations, membrane lipid composition, and proteins, notably dehydrins, that may have important roles in survival at extreme low temperature. Consideration of the biophysical mechanisms of membrane stress and strain lead to the following hypotheses for cellular and molecular mechanisms of survival at extreme low temperature: 1. Changes in lipid composition stabilize membranes at temperatures above the lipid phase transition temperature (-20 to 30˚C, preventing phase changes that result in irreversible injury. 2. High concentrations of oligosaccharides promote vitrification or high viscosity in the cytoplasm in freeze-dehydrated cells, which would prevent deleterious interactions between membranes. 3. Dehydrins bind membranes and further promote vitrification or act stearically to prevent membrane-membrane interactions.

  7. Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Coal Syngas Application: Experimental Study on Diverse Impurity Effects and Fundamental Modeling of Electrode Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mingyang

    With demand over green energy economy, fuel cells have been developed as a promising energy conversion technology with higher efficiency and less emission. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can utilize various fuels in addition to hydrogen including coal derived sygas, and thus are favored for future power generation due to dependence on coal in electrical industry. However impurities such as sulfur and phosphorous present in coal syngas in parts per million (p.p.m.) levels can severely poison SOFC anode typically made of Ni/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (Ni-YSZ) and limit SOFC applicability in economically derivable fuels. The focus of the research is to develop strategy for application of high performance SOFC in coal syngas with tolerance against trace impurities such as H2S and PH3. To realize the research goal, the experimental study on sulfur tolerant anode materials and examination of various fuel impurity effects on SOFC anode are combined with electrochemical modeling of SOFC cathode kinetics in order to benefit design of direct-coal-syngas SOFC. Tolerant strategy for SOFC anode against sulfur is studied by using alternative materials which can both mitigate sulfur poisoning and function as active anode components. The Ni-YSZ anode was modified by incorporation of lanthanum doped ceria (LDC) nano-coatings via impregnation. Cell test in coal syngas containing 20 ppm H2S indicated the impregnated LDC coatings inhibited on-set of sulfur poisoning by over 10hrs. Cell analysis via X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemistry revealed LDC coatings reacted with H2S via chemisorptions, resulting in less sulfur blocking triple--phase-boundary and minimized performance loss. Meanwhile the effects of PH3 impurity on SOFC anode is examined by using Ni-YSZ anode supported SOFC. Degradation of cell is found to be irreversible due to adsorption of PH3 on TPB and further reaction with Ni to form secondary phases with low melting point. The

  8. Unravelling chemical priming machinery in plants: the role of reactive oxygen-nitrogen-sulfur species in abiotic stress tolerance enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Chrystalla; Savvides, Andreas; Christou, Anastasis; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-10-01

    Abiotic stresses severely limit crop yield and their detrimental effects are aggravated by climate change. Chemical priming is an emerging field in crop stress management. The exogenous application of specific chemical agents before stress events results in tolerance enhancement and reduction of stress impacts on plant physiology and growth. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the remarkable effects of chemical priming on plant physiology remain to be elucidated. Reactive oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur species (RONSS) are molecules playing a vital role in the stress acclimation of plants. When applied as priming agents, RONSS improve stress tolerance. This review summarizes the recent knowledge on the role of RONSS in cell signalling and gene regulation contributing to abiotic stress tolerance enhancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Performance Factors and Sulfur Tolerance of Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells with Nanostructured Ni:GDC Infiltrated Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2015-01-01

    cells (active area 16 cm2) have initial area specific resistances (ASR) at 650ºC of 0.35 Ωcm2 and 0.7 Ωcm2 respectively. It was found that the porosity of the support and the AFL seems to have a pronounced effect on the resulting performance. The MS-SOFCs were subjected to technologically relevant H2S......In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing metal supported solid oxide fuel cells (MS-SOFCs). MS-SOFCs are interesting as they potentially offer some advantages compared to conventional electrode and electrolyte supported SOFCs, such as low materials cost, better thermal......’s commercially available and relevant SOFC fuels such as natural gas and diesel etc. contain trace amounts of sulfur. Thus, tolerance towards sulfur poisoning is desirable. Ceria and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) have been reported in the literature to have a beneficial effect on the tolerance towards sulfur...

  10. An Ipomoea batatas iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, is involved in salt tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Degao; Wang, Lianjun; Liu, Chenglong; Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Zhai, Hong; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis involving the nitrogen fixation (Nif) proteins has been proposed as a general mechanism acting in various organisms. NifU-like protein may play an important role in protecting plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. An iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line LM79 in our previous study, but its role in sweetpotato stress tolerance was not investigated. In the present study, the IbNFU1 gene was introduced into a salt-sensitive sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang to characterize its function in salt tolerance. The IbNFU1-overexpressing sweetpotato plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline and reduced ascorbate content were significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbNFU1 up-regulated pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) genes under salt stress. The systemic up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging genes was found in the transgenic plants under salt stress. These findings suggest that IbNFU1gene is involved in sweetpotato salt tolerance and enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and activating ROS scavenging system.

  11. An Ipomoea batatas Iron-Sulfur Cluster Scaffold Protein Gene, IbNFU1, Is Involved in Salt Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuejin; He, Shaozhen; Zhai, Hong; Liu, Qingchang

    2014-01-01

    Iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis involving the nitrogen fixation (Nif) proteins has been proposed as a general mechanism acting in various organisms. NifU-like protein may play an important role in protecting plants against abiotic and biotic stresses. An iron-sulfur cluster scaffold protein gene, IbNFU1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) line LM79 in our previous study, but its role in sweetpotato stress tolerance was not investigated. In the present study, the IbNFU1 gene was introduced into a salt-sensitive sweetpotato cv. Lizixiang to characterize its function in salt tolerance. The IbNFU1-overexpressing sweetpotato plants exhibited significantly higher salt tolerance compared with the wild-type. Proline and reduced ascorbate content were significantly increased, whereas malonaldehyde (MDA) content was significantly decreased in the transgenic plants. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthesis were significantly enhanced in the transgenic plants. H2O2 was also found to be significantly less accumulated in the transgenic plants than in the wild-type. Overexpression of IbNFU1 up-regulated pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS) and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase (P5CR) genes under salt stress. The systemic up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging genes was found in the transgenic plants under salt stress. These findings suggest that IbNFU1gene is involved in sweetpotato salt tolerance and enhances salt tolerance of the transgenic sweetpotato plants by regulating osmotic balance, protecting membrane integrity and photosynthesis and activating ROS scavenging system. PMID:24695556

  12. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  13. Adsorptive removal of sulfur compounds using IRMOF-3 at ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Fan, Hui-Ling, E-mail: fanhuiling@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Tian, Zhen [Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, Shanghai 201209 (China); He, En-Yun; Li, Ye; Shangguan, Ju [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology, Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Zinc-based metal–organic framework (IRMOF-3) was used as adsorbent for removal of dimethyl sulfide, ethyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide in fixed bed reactor at ambient temperature. These samples before and after exposure to sulfur compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo gravimetric (TG), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that IRMOF-3 exhibit the best performance for hydrogen sulfide removal with the highest breakthrough sulfur capacity, followed by ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide. This is in consistent with the interaction strength between IRMOF-3 and sulfur compounds. In the case of dimethyl sulfide and ethyl mercaptan, the interaction comes from the weak interaction between the amino group in the MOFs and the sulfur atom of the adsorbate. This can also be considered as a hydrogen bond complex in which the amino group in the MOFs and the S atom of the sulfur compounds play the role of H-donor and H-acceptor, respectively. In the case of hydrogen sulfide, the interaction with sulfur atom originates from the amino group and zinc site in the MOFs. The former is more like an acid–base interaction, whereas the latter results in new products of ZnS and H{sub 2}O and serious destruction of the MOFs.

  14. Adsorptive removal of sulfur compounds using IRMOF-3 at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Fan, Hui-Ling; Tian, Zhen; He, En-Yun; Li, Ye; Shangguan, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-based metal-organic framework (IRMOF-3) was used as adsorbent for removal of dimethyl sulfide, ethyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide in fixed bed reactor at ambient temperature. These samples before and after exposure to sulfur compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermo gravimetric (TG), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that IRMOF-3 exhibit the best performance for hydrogen sulfide removal with the highest breakthrough sulfur capacity, followed by ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide. This is in consistent with the interaction strength between IRMOF-3 and sulfur compounds. In the case of dimethyl sulfide and ethyl mercaptan, the interaction comes from the weak interaction between the amino group in the MOFs and the sulfur atom of the adsorbate. This can also be considered as a hydrogen bond complex in which the amino group in the MOFs and the S atom of the sulfur compounds play the role of H-donor and H-acceptor, respectively. In the case of hydrogen sulfide, the interaction with sulfur atom originates from the amino group and zinc site in the MOFs. The former is more like an acid-base interaction, whereas the latter results in new products of ZnS and H2O and serious destruction of the MOFs.

  15. Iron and zinc partitioning between coexisting stannite and sphalerite: a possible indicator of temperature and sulfur fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M.; Shikazono, N.

    1985-10-01

    Stannite and sphalerite coexisting with iron sulfides (pyrite and/or pyrrhotite) from Japanese ore deposits associated with tin mineralization were analyzed. Based on the iron and zinc partitioning between stannite and sphalerite, the formation temperature and sulfur fugacity for this mineral assemblage were estimated. A good correlation between stannite-sphalerite temperatures and filling temperatures of fluid inclusions and sulfur isotope temperatures was obtained. This good correlation suggests that the stannite-sphalerite pair is a useful indicator of temperature and sulfur fugacity. It is deduced that the formation temperatures are not different for skarn-type, polymetallic vein-type and Sn-W vein-type deposits, whereas the sulfur fugacities are different; sulfur fugacities increase from the skarn-type through the Sn-W vein-type to the polymetallic vein-type deposits.

  16. High-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyhev, V.P.; Andreeva, N.N.; Kim, E.M.; Kovaleva, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to determine the possibility of conducting high-temperature extraction of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with trialkylamines (TAA) using higher hydrocarbon-paraffin mixtures as the diluent of the extraction system. Substitution of kerosene by paraffin in the extraction system would permit decreasing the danger of fire and explosions during he extraction process. In extracting rhenium from industrial solutions with a melt of higher paraffins containing TAA and alcohols, the extraction system can be continously heated in heat exchangers through which washing sulfuric acid passes and then goes to the extractor. This permits utilizing the heat and decreases the temperature of the solutions for extraction to the optimum temperatures. Extraction of rhenium with a melt of trioctylamine in paraffin obeys the same mechanisms as high-temperature extraction of ruthenium (IV) by amines in kerosene and aromatic hydrocarbons

  17. Modeling of a Large-Scale High Temperature Regenerative Sulfur Removal Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konttinen, Jukka T.; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    1999-01-01

    model that does not account for bed hydrodynamics. The pilot-scale test run results, obtained in the test runs of the sulfur removal process with real coal gasifier gas, have been used for parameter estimation. The validity of the reactor model for commercial-scale design applications is discussed.......Regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbents are prime candidates for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from hot gasifier gas in the simplified integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process. As part of the regenerative sulfur removal process development, reactor models are needed for scale......-up. Steady-state kinetic reactor models are needed for reactor sizing, and dynamic models can be used for process control design and operator training. The regenerative sulfur removal process to be studied in this paper consists of two side-by-side fluidized bed reactors operating at temperatures of 400...

  18. Sulfur Tolerant Pd/Cu and Pd/Au Alloy Membranes for H2 Separation with High Pressure CO2 for Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Hua Ma; Natalie Pomerantz; Chao-Huang Chen

    2008-09-30

    The effect of H{sub 2}S poisoning on Pd, Pd/Cu, and Pd/Au alloy composite membranes prepared by the electroless deposition method on porous Inconel supports was investigated to provide a fundamental understanding of the durability and preparation of sulfur tolerant membranes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies showed that the exposure of pure Pd to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures caused bulk sulfide formation at lower temperatures and surface sulfide formation at higher temperatures. Lower temperatures, longer exposure times, and higher H{sub 2}S concentrations resulted in a higher degree of sulfidation. In a Pd membrane, the bulk sulfide formation caused a drastic irrecoverable H{sub 2} permeance decline and an irreparable loss in selectivity. Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes exhibited permeance declines due to surface sulfide formation upon exposure to 50 ppm H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} gas mixtures. However in contrast to the pure Pd membrane, the permeances of the Pd/Cu and Pd/Au alloy membranes were mostly recovered in pure H{sub 2} and the selectivity of the Pd alloy layers remained essentially intact throughout the characterization in H{sub 2}, He and H{sub 2}S/H{sub 2} mixtures which lasted several thousand hours. The amount of irreversible sulfur poisoning decreased with increasing temperature due to the exothermicity of H{sub 2}S adsorption. Longer exposure times increased the amount of irreversible poisoning of the Pd/Cu membrane but not the Pd/Au membrane. Pd/Au coupon studies of the galvanic displacement method showed that higher Au{sup 3+} concentrations, lower pH values, higher bath temperatures and stirring the bath at a rate of 200 rpm yielded faster displacement rates, more uniform depositions, and a higher Au content within the layers. While 400 C was found to be sufficient to form a Pd/Au alloy on the surface, high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) studies showed that even after annealing between 500-600 C, the Pd/Cu alloys could have

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and tolerance of temperature stress in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiancan; Song, Fengbin; Liu, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    to improve tolerance to temperature stress in plants. This chapter addresses the effect of AM symbiosis on plant growth and biomass production, water relations (water potential, stomatal conductance, and aquaporins), photosynthesis (photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll, and chlorophyll fluorescence), plasma...... membrane permeability (malondialdehyde and ATPase), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, osmotic adjustment, carbohydrate metabolism, nutrient acquisition, and secondary metabolism under low or high temperature stress. The possible mechanisms of AM symbiosis improving temperature stress......Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors that determine the growth and productivity of plants across the globe. Many physiological and biochemical processes and functions are affected by low and high temperature stresses. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been shown...

  20. Systems and Methods for Implementing High-Temperature Tolerant Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement high-temperature tolerant supercapacitors. In one embodiment, a high-temperature tolerant super capacitor includes a first electrode that is thermally stable between at least approximately 80C and approximately 300C; a second electrode that is thermally stable between at least approximately 80C and approximately 300C; an ionically conductive separator that is thermally stable between at least approximately 80C and 300C; an electrolyte that is thermally stable between approximately at least 80C and approximately 300C; where the first electrode and second electrode are separated by the separator such that the first electrode and second electrode are not in physical contact; and where each of the first electrode and second electrode is at least partially immersed in the electrolyte solution.

  1. Origin of the critical temperature discontinuity in superconducting sulfur under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monni, M.; Bernardini, F.; Sanna, A.; Profeta, G.; Massidda, S.

    2017-02-01

    Elemental sulfur shows a superconducting phase at high pressure (above 100 GPa), with critical temperatures that rise up to 20 K [Phys. Rev. B 65, 064504 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.064504; Nature (London) 525, 73 (2015), 10.1038/nature14964] and presenting a jump at about 160 GPa, close to a structural phase transition to the β -Po phase. In this work we present a theoretical and fully ab initio characterization of sulfur based on superconducting density functional theory (SCDFT), focusing in the pressure range from 100 to 200 GPa. Calculations result in very good agreement with available experiments and point out that the origin of the critical temperature discontinuity is not related to the structural phase transition but induced by an electronic Lifshitz transition. This brings a strongly (interband) coupled electron pocket available for the superconducting condensation.

  2. Temperature shifts for extraction and purification of zygomycetes chitosan with dilute sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Akram; Edebo, Lars; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2010-08-13

    The temperature-dependent hydrolysis and solubility of chitosan in sulfuric acid solutions offer the possibility for chitosan extraction from zygomycetes mycelia and separation from other cellular ingredients with high purity and high recovery. In this study, Rhizomucor pusillus biomass was initially extracted with 0.5 M NaOH at 120 °C for 20 min, leaving an alkali insoluble material (AIM) rich in chitosan. Then, the AIM was subjected to two steps treatment with 72 mM sulfuric acid at (i) room temperature for 10 min followed by (ii) 120 °C for 45 min. During the first step, phosphate of the AIM was released into the acid solution and separated from the chitosan-rich residue by centrifugation. In the second step, the residual AIM was re-suspended in fresh 72 mM sulfuric acid, heated at 120 °C and hot filtered, whereby chitosan was extracted and separated from the hot alkali and acid insoluble material (HAAIM). The chitosan was recovered from the acid solution by precipitation at lowered temperature and raised pH to 8-10. The treatment resulted in 0.34 g chitosan and 0.16 g HAAIM from each gram AIM. At the start, the AIM contained at least 17% phosphate, whereas after the purification, the corresponding phosphate content of the obtained chitosan was just 1%. The purity of this chitosan was higher than 83%. The AIM subjected directly to the treatment with hot sulfuric acid (at 120 °C for 45 min) resulted in a chitosan with a phosphate impurity of 18.5%.

  3. Tolerance of Coffea arabica L. seeds to sub zero temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Vilas Boas Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Preservation of the quality of coffee seeds is hindered by their intermediate behavior in storage. However, long-term storage at sub zero temperatures may be achieved by adjusting the water content of the seeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerance of coffee seeds to freezing, in relation to physiological and enzymatic modifications. Coffee seeds were dried in two manners, rapid and slow, to water contents of interest, 0.67, 0.43, 0.25, 0.18, 0.11, and 0.05 g H2O g-¹ dw (dry basis. After drying, the seeds were stored at a temperature of -20 ºC and of 86 ºC for 24 hours and for 12 months, and then compared to seeds in cold storage at 10 ºC. The seeds were evaluated through calculation of percentage of normal seedlings, percentage of seedlings with expanded cotyledonary leaves, dry matter of roots and of hypocotyls, and viability of embryos in the tetrazolium test. Expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase were evaluated by means of electrophoretic analysis. Only seeds dried more slowly to 0.18 g H2O g-1 dw present relative tolerance to storing at -20 °C for 12 months. Coffee seeds do not tolerate storage at a temperature of -86 ºC for 12 months. Water contents below 0.11g H2O g-¹ dw and above 0.43 g H2O g-¹ dw hurt the physiological quality of coffee seeds, regardless of the type of drying, temperature, and storage period. Coffee seed embryos are more tolerant to desiccation and to freezing compared to whole seeds, especially when the seeds are dried to 0.05 g H2O g-¹ dw. The catalase enzyme can be used as a biochemical marker to study tolerance to freezing in coffee seeds.

  4. Effect of temperature on iron leaching from bauxite residue by sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Rong; Zeng, Kai; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Bauxite residue, as solid waste from alumina production, contains mainly hematite [Fe2O3]. Kinetic study of iron leaching of bauxite residue by diluted sulfuric acid at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The results have been obtained as following: (i) Temperature play an important role in iron leaching from bauxite residue. Higher temperature is favor of Fe(III) leaching from bauxite residue. (ii) The leaching process is applicable to the intra-particle diffusion model and the apparent activation energy of model of leaching is found to be 17.32 kJ/mol.

  5. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia arethought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperaturesof the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation inthese regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlledlaboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here withdata obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets)chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. Theconditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrationsbet ween 5 × 105and 1 × 109cm3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally purebinary, to a maximum of ~1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation s...

  6. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  7. Uptake of hypobromous acid (HOBr by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions: low-temperature solubility and reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Iraci

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypobromous acid (HOBr is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45-70wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201-252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H*=104-107mol L-1atm-1. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with ΔH=-45.0±5.4 kJ mol-1 and ΔS=-101±24 J mol-1K-1 for 55-70wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into 55-70wt% H2SO4, the solubility is described by log H*=(2349±280/T-(5.27±1.24. At temperatures colder than ~213K, the solubility of HOBr in 45wt% H2SO4 is at least a factor of five larger than in 70wt% H2SO4, with log H*=(3665±270/T-(10.63±1.23. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Upon uptake of HOBr into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases, particularly for 70wt% H2SO4 solution, our measurements demonstrate chemical reaction of HOBr followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  8. Ontogenetic thermal tolerance and performance of ectotherms at variable temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavieres, G; Bogdanovich, J M; Bozinovic, F

    2016-07-01

    Early experience and environmental conditions during ontogeny may affect organismal structure, physiology and fitness. Here, we assessed the effect of developmental acclimation to environmental thermal variability on walking speed in Drosophila melanogaster adults. Our results showed a shift in the performance curve to the right. Thus, upper and lower thermal limits exhibited developmental plasticity. Additionally, in constant and variable climatic scenarios, flies shifted to the right the optimum temperature but the maximum performance decreased only in flies reared on high temperatures and high thermal variability. Overall, we showed that environmental cues during ontogeny might help to construct phenotypic variation, which supports the hypothesis of ontogenetic dependence of thermal tolerances. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  9. High Temperature Corrosion Problem of Boiler Components in presence of Sulfur and Alkali based Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debashis; Mitra, Swapan Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Material degradation and ageing is of particular concern for fossil fuel fired power plant components. New techniques/approaches have been explored in recent years for Residual Life assessment of aged components and material degradation due to different damage mechanism like creep, fatigue, corrosion and erosion etc. Apart from the creep, the high temperature corrosion problem in a fossil fuel fired boiler is a matter of great concern if the fuel contains sulfur, chlorine sodium, potassium and vanadium etc. This paper discusses the material degradation due to high temperature corrosion in different critical components of boiler like water wall, superheater and reheater tubes and also remedial measures to avoid the premature failure. This paper also high lights the Residual Life Assessment (RLA) methodology of the components based on high temperature fireside corrosion. of different critical components of boiler.

  10. Damage tolerance of nuclear graphite at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Gludovatz, Bernd; Barnard, Harold S.; Kuball, Martin; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear-grade graphite is a critically important high-temperature structural material for current and potentially next generation of fission reactors worldwide. It is imperative to understand its damage-tolerant behaviour and to discern the mechanisms of damage evolution under in-service conditions. Here we perform in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron X-ray computed micro-tomography at temperatures between ambient and 1,000 °C on a nuclear-grade Gilsocarbon graphite. We find that both the strength and fracture toughness of this graphite are improved at elevated temperature. Whereas this behaviour is consistent with observations of the closure of microcracks formed parallel to the covalent-sp2-bonded graphene layers at higher temperatures, which accommodate the more than tenfold larger thermal expansion perpendicular to these layers, we attribute the elevation in strength and toughness primarily to changes in the residual stress state at 800-1,000 °C, specifically to the reduction in significant levels of residual tensile stresses in the graphite that are `frozen-in' following processing.

  11. Multi-temperature state-dependent equivalent circuit discharge model for lithium-sulfur batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Propp, Karsten; Marinescu, Monica; Auger, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    pulse profile at four temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C, giving linearized ECN parameters for a range of states-of-charge, currents and temperatures. These are used to create a nonlinear polynomial-based battery model suitable for use in a battery management system. When the model is used to predict......Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are described extensively in the literature, but existing computational models aimed at scientific understanding are too complex for use in applications such as battery management. Computationally simple models are vital for exploitation. This paper proposes a non......-linear state-of-charge dependent Li-S equivalent circuit network (ECN) model for a Li-S cell under discharge. Li-S batteries are fundamentally different to Li-ion batteries, and require chemistry-specific models. A new Li-S model is obtained using a ‘behavioural’ interpretation of the ECN model; as Li...

  12. Temperature tolerance of young-of-the-year cisco, Coregonus artedii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Colby, Peter J.

    1970-01-01

    Young-of-the-year ciscoes (Coregonus artedii) acclimated to 2, 5, 10, 20 and 25 C and tested for tolerance to high and low temperatures provide the first detailed description of the thermal tolerance of coregonids in North America. The upper ultimate lethal temperature of the young ciscoes was 26 C (6 C higher than the maximum sustained temperature tolerated by adult ciscoes in nature) and the ultimate lower lethal temperature approached 0 C (near that commonly tolerated in nature by adult ciscoes). The temperature of 26 C is slightly higher than the lowest ultimate upper lethal temperature recorded for North American freshwater fishes; however, published information on the depth distributions of fishes in the Great Lakes suggests that some of the other coregonids may be less tolerant of high temperatures than the cisco.

  13. Analysis of Deactivation Mechanism on a Multi-Component Sulfur-Tolerant Steam Reforming Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Alkaline Fuel Cells (AFC) .............................................................................. 4 1.1.2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells ( PEMFC ...temperature fuel cells. Alkaline Fuel Cell (AFC), Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell ( PEMFC ), DMFC and Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) are low...1960s. 1.1.2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells ( PEMFC ) Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are said to be the best type of fuel cells to replace

  14. Leaf ontogeny strongly influences photosynthetic tolerance to drought and high temperature in Gossypium hirsutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperature and drought are major abiotic limitations to crop productivity worldwide. While abiotic stress physiology research has focused primarily on fully expanded leaves, no studies have investigated photosynthetic tolerance to concurrent drought and high temperature during leaf ontogeny. To add...

  15. UV absorption cross-sections of selected sulfur-containing compounds at temperatures up to 500°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the ultraviolet absorption cross-sections of three different sulfur containing compounds, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are presented between 200nm and 360nm at a resolution of 0.018nm. The absorption cross-sections for ea...

  16. AN EFFICIENT AND CHEMOSELECTIVE CBZ-PROTECTION OF AMINES USING SILICA-SULFURIC ACID AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, facile, and chemoselective N-benzyloxycarbonylation of amines using silica-sulfuric acid that proceeds under solvent-free conditions at room temperature has been achieved. These reactions are applicable to a wide variety of primary (aliphatic, cyclic) secondary amines, ...

  17. Multi-temperature state-dependent equivalent circuit discharge model for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Karsten; Marinescu, Monica; Auger, Daniel J.; O'Neill, Laura; Fotouhi, Abbas; Somasundaram, Karthik; Offer, Gregory J.; Minton, Geraint; Longo, Stefano; Wild, Mark; Knap, Vaclav

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are described extensively in the literature, but existing computational models aimed at scientific understanding are too complex for use in applications such as battery management. Computationally simple models are vital for exploitation. This paper proposes a non-linear state-of-charge dependent Li-S equivalent circuit network (ECN) model for a Li-S cell under discharge. Li-S batteries are fundamentally different to Li-ion batteries, and require chemistry-specific models. A new Li-S model is obtained using a 'behavioural' interpretation of the ECN model; as Li-S exhibits a 'steep' open-circuit voltage (OCV) profile at high states-of-charge, identification methods are designed to take into account OCV changes during current pulses. The prediction-error minimization technique is used. The model is parameterized from laboratory experiments using a mixed-size current pulse profile at four temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C, giving linearized ECN parameters for a range of states-of-charge, currents and temperatures. These are used to create a nonlinear polynomial-based battery model suitable for use in a battery management system. When the model is used to predict the behaviour of a validation data set representing an automotive NEDC driving cycle, the terminal voltage predictions are judged accurate with a root mean square error of 32 mV.

  18. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  19. Sulfur Removal in Bio-Briquette Combustion Using Seashell Waste Adsorbent at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahidin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently, biomass is mostly utilized as co-fuel in coal combustion in view of energy diversification and emission reduction. However, since the coal content of bio-briquettes is high (up to 80% in this study, gas emissions such as those of SOx still occur. Therefore, the introduction of SO2 adsorbent is common in coal briquette or bio-briquette combustion. A calcium-based material is usually used for this goal. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of desulfurization temperature and Ca/S ratio (Ca = calcium content in adsorbent; S = sulfur content in coal and biomass on desulfurization efficiency and kinetics. The ratio of coal to biomass (palm kernel shell/PKS was fixed at 90:10 (wt/wt and the ratios of Ca to S were varied at 1:1, 1.25:1, 1.5:1, 1.75:1 and 2:1. The mixtures of coal, PKS and adsorbent were briquetted at a molding pressure of 6 ton/cm2 with Jatropha curcas seeds and starch mixture as binding agents. Desulfurization was performed within a temperature range of 300 to 500°C for 720 seconds at an airflow rate of 1.2 L/min. The results showed that the highest desulfurization efficiency (90.6% was associated with the Ca/S ratio of 2:1 and temperature of 400°C. Moreover, the highest reaction rate constant of desulfurization was 0.280 min-1.

  20. Foliar temperature tolerance of temperate and tropical evergreen rain forest trees of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, S C; Read, J

    2006-11-01

    Australian rain forests extend from tropical climates in the north to temperate climates in the south, providing an opportunity to investigate physiological responses to temperature of both temperate and tropical species within the same forest type. Eight, rain forest canopy tree species were selected to cover the 33 degrees latitudinal range of rain forests in eastern Australia. Temperature tolerance was measured in 6-year-old plants grown in a common environment, by exposing leaves to a series of high temperatures during late summer and a series of freezing temperatures during midwinter. Damage was evaluated based on chlorophyll fluorescence measurements made 2 h after exposure and by visual assessment of leaf damage made a week after exposure. Leaves of the tropical species were more heat tolerant and less frost tolerant than leaves of the temperate species, which is consistent with their climate distributions. In contrast, the temperature tolerance of the photosynthetic apparatus was unrelated to climate in a species' native habitat. However, the tropical species underwent significant photoinhibition during winter. All species maintained the integrity of the photosynthetic apparatus and avoided tissue damage over a similar span of temperatures (about 60 degrees C), reflecting the similar annual temperature ranges in Australia's temperate and tropical rain forests. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and visual assessment of leaf damage provided different estimates of the absolute and relative temperature tolerances of the species, thus emphasizing the importance of a direct assessment of tissue damage for determining a species' temperature tolerance.

  1. Phenotypic plasticity in photosynthetic temperature acclimation among crop species with different cold tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Hikosaka, Kouki; Terashima, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    While interspecific variation in the temperature response of photosynthesis is well documented, the underlying physiological mechanisms remain unknown. Moreover, mechanisms related to species-dependent differences in photosynthetic temperature acclimation are unclear. We compared photosynthetic temperature acclimation in 11 crop species differing in their cold tolerance, which were grown at 15 degrees C or 30 degrees C. Cold-tolerant species exhibited a large decrease in optimum temperature for the photosynthetic rate at 360 microL L(-1) CO(2) concentration [Opt (A(360))] when growth temperature decreased from 30 degrees C to 15 degrees C, whereas cold-sensitive species were less plastic in Opt (A(360)). Analysis using the C(3) photosynthesis model shows that the limiting step of A(360) at the optimum temperature differed between cold-tolerant and cold-sensitive species; ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation rate was limiting in cold-tolerant species, while ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regeneration rate was limiting in cold-sensitive species. Alterations in parameters related to photosynthetic temperature acclimation, including the limiting step of A(360), leaf nitrogen, and Rubisco contents, were more plastic to growth temperature in cold-tolerant species than in cold-sensitive species. These plastic alterations contributed to the noted growth temperature-dependent changes in Opt (A(360)) in cold-tolerant species. Consequently, cold-tolerant species were able to maintain high A(360) at 15 degrees C or 30 degrees C, whereas cold-sensitive species were not. We conclude that differences in the plasticity of photosynthetic parameters with respect to growth temperature were responsible for the noted interspecific differences in photosynthetic temperature acclimation between cold-tolerant and cold-sensitive species.

  2. Wide Temperature Cycling Tolerant Electronic Packaging Substrates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary exploration missions require electronics packaging that can withstand extreme temperatures and numerous temperature cycles (-230C to +350C). The present...

  3. Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønder, Lars

    Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics is an experiment in re-orientation. The book is based on the wager that tolerance exceeds the more prevalent images of self-restraint and repressive benevolence because neither precludes the possibility of a more “active tolerance” motivated...... by the desire to experiment and to become otherwise. The objective is to discuss what gets lost, conceptually as well as politically, when we neglect the subsistence of active tolerance within other practices of tolerance, and to develop a theory of active tolerance in which tolerance's mobilizing character...... the current models of restraint and benevolence, other ways of understanding the politics of democratic pluralism might be developed, which will enable us to conceive of tolerance's future in terms different than those currently on offer. Tolerance: A Sensorial Orientation to Politics develops...

  4. Salinity and temperature tolerance of an emergent alien species, the Amazon fish Astronotus ocellatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrel, Silvia M M; Schofield, Pam; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Astronotus ocellatus (oscar), is native to the Amazon basin and, although it has been introduced to many countries, little is known regarding its tolerances for salinity and temperature. In this report, we provide data on the tolerance of A. ocellatus to abrupt and gradual changes in salinity, its high and low temperature tolerance, and information on how salinity, temperature, and fish size interact to affect survival. Fish were able to survive abrupt transfer to salinities as high as 16 ppt with no mortality. When salinity change was gradual (2 ppt/day), fish in the warm-temperature experiment (28°C) survived longer than fish in the cool-temperature experiment (18°C). Larger fish survived longer than smaller ones at the higher salinities when the temperature was warm, but when the temperature was cool fish size had little effect on survival. In the temperature-tolerance experiments, fish survived from 9 to 41°C for short periods of time. Overall, the species showed a wide range of temperature and salinity tolerance. Thus, in spite of the tropical freshwater origin of this species, physiological stress is not likely to hinder its dispersal to brackish waters, especially when temperatures are warm.

  5. Variation in temperature tolerance among families of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is associated with hypoxia tolerance, ventricle size and myoglobin level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anttila, Katja; Dhillon, Rashpal S; Boulding, Elizabeth G; Farrell, Anthony P; Glebe, Brian D; Elliott, Jake A K; Wolters, William R; Schulte, Patricia M

    2013-04-01

    In fishes, performance failure at high temperature is thought to be due to a limitation on oxygen delivery (the theory of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance, OCLTT), which suggests that thermal tolerance and hypoxia tolerance might be functionally associated. Here we examined variation in temperature and hypoxia tolerance among 41 families of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), which allowed us to evaluate the association between these two traits. Both temperature and hypoxia tolerance varied significantly among families and there was a significant positive correlation between critical maximum temperature (CTmax) and hypoxia tolerance, supporting the OCLTT concept. At the organ and cellular levels, we also discovered support for the OCLTT concept as relative ventricle mass (RVM) and cardiac myoglobin (Mb) levels both correlated positively with CTmax (R(2)=0.21, Pgenetic variation in thermal and hypoxia tolerance, which could respond to selection either in aquaculture or in response to anthropogenic stressors such as global climate change.

  6. An Experimental Study of Low-Temperature Sulfurization of Carbohydrates Using Various Sulfides Reveals Insights into Structural Characteristics and Sulfur Isotope Compositions of Macromolecular Organic Matter in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBeirne, M. D.; Werne, J. P.; Van Dongen, B.; Gilhooly, W., III

    2017-12-01

    Sulfurization of carbohydrates has been suggested as an important mechanism for the preservation of organic matter in anoxic/euxinic depositional environments. In this study, glucose was sulfurized under laboratory conditions at room temperature (24°C) using three commercially available sulfides - ammonium sulfide ([NH4]2S), sodium sulfide (Na2S), and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), each mixed with elemental sulfur to produce polysulfide solutions. The reaction products were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), which revealed structural differences among the products formed via the three sulfide reactants. Additionally, analysis of the bulk sulfur isotope compositions of reactants and products was used to determine the fractionation(s) associated with abiotic sulfur incorporation into organic matter. Samples from both modern (Mahoney Lake, British Colombia, Canada) and ancient (Jurassic aged Blackstone Band from the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, Dorset, United Kingdom) euxinic systems were also analyzed for comparison to laboratory samples. Results from this study provide experimental evidence for the structural and sulfur isotopic relationships of sulfurized organic matter in the geosphere.

  7. Metabolic phenotypes associated with high-temperature tolerance of Porphyra haitanensis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yangfang; Zhang, Limin; Yang, Rui; Luo, Qijun; Chen, Haimin; Yan, Xiaojun; Tang, Huiru

    2013-09-04

    Colored mutants of Porphyra haitanensis have superior production and quality characteristics, with two mutants, Shengfu 1 (SF-1) and Shengfu 2 (SF-2), having good high-temperature tolerances. To understand the molecular aspects of high-temperature tolerance, this study comprehensively investigated the metabolic differences between the high-temperature tolerant strains and wild type. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods identified 35 algal metabolites, including sugars, amino acids, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, amines, and nucleotides. The results indicated that the high-temperature tolerant strains had significantly different metabolic phenotypes from the wild type. The high-temperature tolerant mutants had significantly higher levels in a set of osmolytes consisting of betaine, taurine, laminitol, and isofloridoside than the wild type, indicating the particular importance of efficient osmoregulation for high-temperature resistance. These findings provided essential metabolic information about high-temperature adaptation for P. haitanensis and demonstrated NMR-based metabolomics as a useful tool for understanding the metabolic features related to resistance to stressors.

  8. Tolerance of corn lines seeds to high drying temperature

    OpenAIRE

    José, Solange Carvalho Barrios Roveri; Pinho, Édila Vilela de Resende Von; Pinho, Renzo Garcia Von; Silveira, César Martoreli da

    2004-01-01

    Cultivares tolerantes a altas temperaturas de secagem proporcionam redução no tempo de secagem, uma etapa crítica no sistema de produção de sementes de milho (Zea mays L.). Nesta pesquisa, foi avaliada a tolerância à alta temperatura de secagem de sementes de linhagens de milho, por meio de testes de germinação e vigor. As sementes foram colhidas manualmente em espigas com teor de água em torno de 35% e secas artificialmente à 45 C até atingirem 11% de teor de água. Em seguida, foram submetid...

  9. Fault-Tolerant, Multiple-Zone Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, James; Franklin, Brian; Michalik, Martin; Yates, Phillip; Peterson, Erik; Borders, James

    2008-01-01

    A computer program has been written as an essential part of an electronic temperature control system for a spaceborne instrument that contains several zones. The system was developed because the temperature and the rate of change of temperature in each zone are required to be maintained to within limits that amount to degrees of precision thought to be unattainable by use of simple bimetallic thermostats. The software collects temperature readings from six platinum resistance thermometers, calculates temperature errors from the readings, and implements a proportional + integral + derivative (PID) control algorithm that adjusts heater power levels. The software accepts, via a serial port, commands to change its operational parameters. The software attempts to detect and mitigate a host of potential faults. It is robust to many kinds of faults in that it can maintain PID control in the presence of those faults.

  10. Biodesulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mehran; Bassi, Amarjeet; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2007-01-01

    The stringent new regulations to lower sulfur content in fossil fuels require new economic and efficient methods for desulfurization of recalcitrant organic sulfur. Hydrodesulfurization of such compounds is very costly and requires high operating temperature and pressure. Biodesulfurization is a non-invasive approach that can specifically remove sulfur from refractory hydrocarbons under mild conditions and it can be potentially used in industrial desulfurization. Intensive research has been conducted in microbiology and molecular biology of the competent strains to increase their desulfurization activity; however, even the highest activity obtained is still insufficient to fulfill the industrial requirements. To improve the biodesulfurization efficiency, more work is needed in areas such as increasing specific desulfurization activity, hydrocarbon phase tolerance, sulfur removal at higher temperature, and isolating new strains for desulfurizing a broader range of sulfur compounds. This article comprehensively reviews and discusses key issues, advances and challenges for a competitive biodesulfurization process.

  11. Water and Temperature Stresses Impact Canola (Brassica napus L.) Fatty Acid, Protein, and Yield over Nitrogen and Sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammac, W Ashley; Maaz, Tai M; Koenig, Richard T; Burke, Ian C; Pan, William L

    2017-12-06

    Interactive effects of weather and soil nutrient status often control crop productivity. An experiment was conducted to determine effects of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) fertilizer rate, soil water, and atmospheric temperature on canola (Brassica napus L.) fatty acid (FA), total oil, protein, and grain yield. Nitrogen and sulfur were assessed in a 4-yr study with two locations, five N rates (0, 45, 90, 135, and 180 kg ha -1 ), and two S rates (0 and 17 kg ha -1 ). Water and temperature were assessed using variability across 12 site-years of dryland canola production. Effects of N and S were inconsistent. Unsaturated FA, oleic acid, grain oil, protein, and theoretical maximum grain yield were highly related to water and temperature variability across the site-years. A nonlinear model identified water and temperature conditions that enabled production of maximum unsaturated FA content, oleic acid content, total oil, protein, and theoretical maximum grain yield. Water and temperature variability played a larger role than soil nutrient status on canola grain constituents and yield.

  12. Effect of sulfurization temperature on the property of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin film by eco-friendly nanoparticle ink method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Honglie; Yao, Hanyu; Shang, Huirong; Tang, ZhengXia; Li, Yufang

    2017-09-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were fabricated by a low-cost nanoparticle ink method. The eco-friendly hydrophilic CZTS nanoparticles were mixed with low-cost n-propanol to form nanoparticle ink. To improve crystallinity and remove oxygen element, the CZTS thin films were sulfurized further. The effects of sulfurization temperature on the structure, morphologies, and photovoltaic performances of CZTS thin films were investigated. The results showed that the crystallinity of CZTS thin film was improved with increasing sulfurization temperature. The surface morphology studies demonstrated the formation of compact and homogenous CZTS thin film at a sulfurization temperature of 600 °C. By optimizing thickness of CZTS thin film, the CZTS thin-film solar cell with an optimal efficiency of 2.1% was obtained.

  13. Temperature determines toxicity: Bisphenol A reduces thermal tolerance in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, Alexander G.; Seebacher, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous pollutant around the globe, but whether environmental concentrations have toxic effects remains controversial. BPA interferes with a number of nuclear receptor pathways, including several that mediate animal responses to environmental input. Because thermal acclimation is regulated by these pathways in fish, we hypothesized that the toxicity of BPA would change with ambient temperature. We exposed zebrafish (Danio rerio) to ecologically relevant and artificially high concentrations of BPA at two acclimation temperatures, and tested physiological responses at two test temperatures that corresponded to acclimation temperatures. We found ecologically relevant concentrations of BPA (20 μg l −1 ) impair swimming performance, heart rate, muscle and cardiac SERCA activity and gene expression. We show many of these responses are temperature-specific and non-monotonic. Our results suggest that BPA pollution can compound the effects of climate change, and that its effects are more dynamic than toxicological assessments currently account for. - Highlights: • Whether environmental levels of BPA have toxic effects on local ecology remains controversial. • We show that ecological concentrations of BPA impair physiological performance in fish. • We also show that the toxic effects of BPA are temperature-specific and non-monotonic with dose. • BPA pollution will likely compound the effects of climate change, and vice-versa. • The toxic effects of BPA appear to be more dynamic than toxicological assessments account for. - BPA pollution is likely to compound the effects of climate change, and climate change may worsen the effects of BPA exposure. Its effects are likely to be more dynamic than toxicological assessments currently account for

  14. Effect of salinity on the upper lethal temperature tolerance of early-juvenile red drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Dusty; Bumguardner, Britt; Cason, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Previous work investigating the temperature tolerance of juvenile red drum ranging 18-50mm TL found evidence for positive size dependence (smaller fish less tolerant to higher temperatures) suggesting smaller size classes (<18mm TL) potentially may succumb to extreme summer water temperatures. Here, we explored the upper lethal temperature tolerance (ULT) in smaller-sized red drum which ranged from 10 to 20mm TL across multiple salinities to further understand the thermal limitations of this propagated game fish. In order to investigate the combined effect of temperature and salinity on ULT, temperature trials were conducted under three levels of salinity which commonly occur along the coast of Texas (25, 35, and 45ppt). The rate of temperature increase (+0.25°C/h) was designed to mimic a natural temperature increase of a summer day in Texas. We determined that the lethal temperature at 50% (LT50) did not differ between the three salinities examined statistically; median lethal temperature for individuals exposed to 25ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, 35ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, and 45ppt ranged from 36.1 to 37.4°C. Further, LT50 data obtained here for early-juvenile red drum did not differ from data of a similar experiment examining 25mm TL sized fish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Interactions between rates of temperature change and acclimation affect latitudinal patterns of warming tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L; Chown, Steven L; Janion-Scheepers, Charlene; Clusella-Trullas, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Critical thermal limits form an increasing component of the estimation of impacts of global change on ectotherms. Whether any consistent patterns exist in the interactive effects of rates of temperature change (or experimental ramping rates) and acclimation on critical thermal limits and warming tolerance (one way of assessing sensitivity to climate change) is, however, far from clear. Here, we examine the interacting effects of ramping rate and acclimation on the critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and minima (CTmin) and warming tolerance of six species of springtails from sub-tropical, temperate and polar regions. We also provide microhabitat temperatures from 26 sites spanning 5 years in order to benchmark environmentally relevant rates of temperature change. Ramping rate has larger effects than acclimation on CTmax, but the converse is true for CTmin. Responses to rate and acclimation effects are more consistent among species for CTmax than for CTmin. In the latter case, interactions among ramping rate and acclimation are typical of polar species, less marked for temperate ones, and reduced in species from the sub-tropics. Ramping rate and acclimation have substantial effects on estimates of warming tolerance, with the former being more marked. At the fastest ramping rates (>1.0°C/min), tropical species have estimated warming tolerances similar to their temperate counterparts, whereas at slow ramping rates (warming tolerance is much reduced in tropical species. Rates of temperate change in microhabitats relevant to the springtails are typically warming tolerance approach.

  16. Overexpression of Arabidopsis P3B increases heat and low temperature stress tolerance in transgenic sweetpotato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chang Yoon; Jin, Rong; Xu, Zhen; Kim, Ho Soo; Lee, Chan-Ju; Kang, Le; Kim, So-Eun; Lee, Hyeong-Un; Lee, Joon Seol; Kang, Chang Ho; Chi, Yong Hun; Lee, Sang Yeol; Xie, Yiping; Li, Hongmin; Ma, Daifu; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2017-08-14

    Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam) is suitable for growth on marginal lands due to its abiotic stress tolerance. However, severe environmental conditions including low temperature pose a serious threat to the productivity and expanded cultivation of this crop. In this study, we aimed to develop sweetpotato plants with enhanced tolerance to temperature stress. P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins that act as both protein and RNA chaperones to increase heat and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. Here, we generated transgenic sweetpotato plants expressing the Arabidopsis ribosomal P3 (AtP3B) gene under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter (referred to as OP plants). Three OP lines (OP1, OP30, and OP32) were selected based on AtP3B transcript levels. The OP plants displayed greater heat tolerance and higher photosynthesis efficiency than wild type (WT) plants. The OP plants also exhibited enhanced low temperature tolerance, with higher photosynthesis efficiency and less membrane permeability than WT plants. In addition, OP plants had lower levels of hydrogen peroxide and higher activities of antioxidant enzymes such as peroxidase and catalase than WT plants under low temperature stress. The yields of tuberous roots and aerial parts of plants did not significantly differ between OP and WT plants under field cultivation. However, the tuberous roots of OP transgenic sweetpotato showed improved storage ability under low temperature conditions. The OP plants developed in this study exhibited increased tolerance to temperature stress and enhanced storage ability under low temperature compared to WT plants, suggesting that they could be used to enhance sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  17. Characterization of genetic diversity of high temperature tolerance in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    As global warming becomes inevitable, the sustainability of agricultural production in US and worldwide faces serious threat from extreme weather conditions, such as drought and elevated extreme temperatures (heat waves). Among cereal crops, sorghum is considered a versatile crop for semiarid area a...

  18. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the tran...

  19. From lithium to sodium: cell chemistry of room temperature sodium–air and sodium–sulfur batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Adelhelm

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research devoted to room temperature lithium–sulfur (Li/S8 and lithium–oxygen (Li/O2 batteries has significantly increased over the past ten years. The race to develop such cell systems is mainly motivated by the very high theoretical energy density and the abundance of sulfur and oxygen. The cell chemistry, however, is complex, and progress toward practical device development remains hampered by some fundamental key issues, which are currently being tackled by numerous approaches. Quite surprisingly, not much is known about the analogous sodium-based battery systems, although the already commercialized, high-temperature Na/S8 and Na/NiCl2 batteries suggest that a rechargeable battery based on sodium is feasible on a large scale. Moreover, the natural abundance of sodium is an attractive benefit for the development of batteries based on low cost components. This review provides a summary of the state-of-the-art knowledge on lithium–sulfur and lithium–oxygen batteries and a direct comparison with the analogous sodium systems. The general properties, major benefits and challenges, recent strategies for performance improvements and general guidelines for further development are summarized and critically discussed. In general, the substitution of lithium for sodium has a strong impact on the overall properties of the cell reaction and differences in ion transport, phase stability, electrode potential, energy density, etc. can be thus expected. Whether these differences will benefit a more reversible cell chemistry is still an open question, but some of the first reports on room temperature Na/S8 and Na/O2 cells already show some exciting differences as compared to the established Li/S8 and Li/O2 systems.

  20. Plant tolerance to high temperature in a changing environment: scientific fundamentals and production of heat stress tolerant crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craita eBita

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is predicted to have a general negative effect on plant growth due to the negative effect of high temperatures on plant development. The increasing threat of climatological extremes, including very high temperatures might lead to catastrophic loss of crop productivity and result in wide spread famine. In this review we assess the impact of global climate change on the production of agricultural crop production. There is a differential effect of climate change both in terms of geographic location and the crops that have will be likely to show the most extreme reductions in yield as a result of warming in general and the expected fluctuations in temperature. High temperature stress has a wide range of effects on plants both in terms of physiology, biochemistry and gene regulation pathways. In this review we present the recent advances of research on all these level of investigation focusing on potential leads that may help to understand more fully the mechanisms that make plants tolerant or susceptible to heat stress. Finally we review possible mechanisms and methods which can lead to the generation of new varieties that will allow sustainable yield production in a world likely to be challenged both by increasing population, higher average temperatures and larger temperature fluctuations.

  1. Low temperature sulfur and sodium metal battery for grid-scale energy storage application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gao; Wang, Dongdong

    2018-03-27

    A re-chargeable battery comprising a non-dendrite forming sodium (Na)/potassium (K) liquid metal alloy anode, a sulfur and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) conductive polymer composite cathode, a polyethyleneoxide (PEO) solid electrolyte, a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed on the PEO solid electrolyte; and a cell housing, wherein the anode, cathode, and electrolyte are assembled into the cell housing with the PEO solid electrolyte disposed between the cathode and anode.

  2. GFOC Project results: High Temperature / High Pressure, Hydrogen Tolerant Optical Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Burov; A. Pastouret; E. Aldea; B. Overton; F. Gooijer; A. Bergonzo

    2012-02-12

    Tests results are given for exposure of multimode optical fiber to high temperatures (300 deg. C) and high partial pressure (15 bar) hydrogen. These results demonstrate that fluorine down doped optical fibers are much more hydrogen tolerant than traditional germanium doped multimode optical fibers. Also demonstrated is the similar hydrogen tolerance of carbon coated and non-carbon coated fibers. Model for reversible H2 impact in fiber versus T{sup o}C and H2 pressure is given. These results have significant impact for the longevity of use for distributed temperature sensing applications in harsh environments such as geothermal wells.

  3. The mean and variance of environmental temperature interact to determine physiological tolerance and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Bastías, Daniel A; Boher, Francisca; Clavijo-Baquet, Sabrina; Estay, Sergio A; Angilletta, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Global climate change poses one of the greatest threats to biodiversity. Most analyses of the potential biological impacts have focused on changes in mean temperature, but changes in thermal variance will also impact organisms and populations. We assessed the combined effects of the mean and variance of temperature on thermal tolerances, organismal survival, and population growth in Drosophila melanogaster. Because the performance of ectotherms relates nonlinearly to temperature, we predicted that responses to thermal variation (±0° or ±5°C) would depend on the mean temperature (17° or 24°C). Consistent with our prediction, thermal variation enhanced the rate of population growth (r(max)) at a low mean temperature but depressed this rate at a high mean temperature. The interactive effect on fitness occurred despite the fact that flies improved their heat and cold tolerances through acclimation to thermal conditions. Flies exposed to a high mean and a high variance of temperature recovered from heat coma faster and survived heat exposure better than did flies that developed at other conditions. Relatively high survival following heat exposure was associated with low survival following cold exposure. Recovery from chill coma was affected primarily by the mean temperature; flies acclimated to a low mean temperature recovered much faster than did flies acclimated to a high mean temperature. To develop more realistic predictions about the biological impacts of climate change, one must consider the interactions between the mean environmental temperature and the variance of environmental temperature.

  4. Sulfur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning Methyl isocyanate Case Definition: Methyl Isocyanate Poisoning Mustard gas (H) (sulfur mustard) Facts About Sulfur Mustard Case ... About Strychnine Case Definition: Strychnine Sulfur mustard (H) (mustard gas) Facts About Sulfur Mustard Case Definition: Vesicant (Mustards, ...

  5. Surface properties of W-implanted TiN coatings post-treated by low temperature ion sulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Bin; Yue, Wen; Wang, Chengbiao; Liu, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PVD TiN coatings are implanted with W ions at dose of 9 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 . • Low temperature ion sulfurization (LTIS) is adopted on W-implanted TiN coatings. • W content and depth in the W-implanted coatings reduce after LTIS. • LTIS cannot well improve friction and wear of W-implanted TiN under dry sliding. - Abstract: TiN coatings were implanted with W ions by metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source at dose of 9 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 , and then they were post-treated by low temperature ion sulfurization (LTIS) at 160 °C. The W-implanted TiN samples were characterized before and after post-treatment of LTIS, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Nano Indenter System. Friction and wear properties were evaluated using a ball-on-disc tribometer under dry sliding in air. After post-treatment of LTIS, XRD results showed no diffraction peaks of tungsten sulfides on surfaces of W-implanted TiN coatings; W-implanted TiN coatings were sputtered by the sulfur plasma with about 36% reducing of W depth. Further, the nano-hardness decreased mainly due to the amount decreasing of Ti 2 N and the formation of more metal oxides on surfaces of W-implanted TiN coatings after LTIS. As a result, LTIS treatment could not well improve tribological properties of W-implanted TiN coatings.

  6. Structural flexibility of the sulfur mustard molecule at finite temperature from Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Joanna; Goclon, Jakub; Rodziewicz, Pawel

    2016-04-05

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is one of the most dangerous chemical compounds used against humans, mostly at war conditions but also in terrorist attacks. Even though the sulfur mustard has been synthesized over a hundred years ago, some of its molecular properties are not yet resolved. We investigate the structural flexibility of the SM molecule in the gas phase by Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Thorough conformation analysis of 81 different SM configurations using density functional theory is performed to analyze the behavior of the system at finite temperature. The conformational diversity is analyzed with respect to the formation of intramolecular blue-shifting CH⋯S and CH⋯Cl hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that all structural rearrangements between SM local minima are realized either in direct or non-direct way, including the intermediate structure in the last case. We study the lifetime of the SM conformers and perform the population analysis. Additionally, we provide the anharmonic dynamical finite temperature IR spectrum from the Fourier Transform of the dipole moment autocorrelation function to mimic the missing experimental IR spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Jasmonates: emerging players in controlling temperature stress tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvi eSharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The sedentary life of plants has forced them to live in an environment that is characterized by the presence of numerous challenges in terms of biotic and abiotic stresses. Phytohormones play essential roles in mediating plant physiology and alleviating various environmental perturbations. Jasmonates are a group of oxylipin compounds occurring ubiquitously in the plant kingdom that play pivotal roles in response to developmental and environmental cues. Jasmonates (JAs have been shown to participate in unison with key factors of other signal transduction pathway, including those involved in response to abiotic stress. Recent findings have furnished large body of information suggesting the role of jasmonates in cold and heat stress. JAs have been shown to regulate C-repeat binding factor (CBF pathway during cold stress. The interaction between the integrants of JA signaling and components of CBF pathway demonstrates a complex relationship between the two. JAs have also been shown to counteract chilling stress by inducing ROS avoidance enzymes. In addition, several lines of evidence suggest the positive regulation of thermotolerance by JA. The present review provides insights into biosynthesis, signal transduction pathway of jasmonic acid and their role in response to temperature stress.

  8. Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide in Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K. K.; Compton, L. E.; Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    The solubility of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid was evaluated by regular solution theory, and the results verified by experimental measurements in the temperature range of 25 C to 70 C at pressures of 60 to 200 PSIA. The percent (wt./wt.) of sulfur dioxide in 50% (wt./wt.) sulfuric acid is given by the equation %SO2 = 2.2350 + 0.0903P - 0.00026P 10 to the 2nd power with P in PSIA.

  9. Dissolution kinetics of soil clays in sulfuric acid solutions: Ionic strength and temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, Irshad; Singh, Balwant; Silvester, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Acid sulfate dissolution of clay-rich sediments from inland acid sulfate site in flow-through reactor experiments at pH 1–4. • Enhanced Al and K release at the higher ionic strength of solutions compared to the lower ionic strength. • Acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of 1.11 kg H 2 SO 4 /tonne clay-rich sediment/day was provided at pH 1, 25 °C. • ANC provided at 45 °C by the same amount of clay-rich sediment was more than three times higher than the ANC at 25 °C. - Abstract: Significant amounts of sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) rich saline water can be produced by the oxidation of sulfide minerals contained in inland acid sulfate soils (IASS). In the absence of carbonate minerals, the dissolution of phyllosilicate minerals is one of very few processes that can provide long-term acid neutralisation. It is therefore important to understand the acid dissolution behavior of naturally occurring clay minerals from IASS under saline–acidic solutions. The objective of this study was to investigate the dissolution of a natural clay-rich sample under saline–acidic conditions (pH 1–4; ionic strengths = 0.01 and 0.25 M; 25 °C) and over a range of temperatures (25–45 °C; pH 1 and pH 4). The clay-rich sample referred to as Bottle Bend clay (BB clay) used was from an IASS (Bottle Bend lagoon) in south-western New South Wales (Australia) and contained smectite (40%), illite (27%), kaolinite (26%) and quartz (6%). Acid dissolution of the BB clay was initially rapid, as indicated by the fast release of cations (Si, Al, K, Fe, Mg). Relatively higher Al (pH 4) and K (pH 2–4) release was obtained from BB clay dissolution in higher ionic strength solutions compared to the lower ionic strength solutions. The steady state dissolution rate (as determined from Si, Al and Fe release rates; R Si , R Al , R Fe ) increased with decreasing solution pH and increasing temperature. For example, the highest log R Si value was obtained at pH 1 and 45 °C (−9

  10. Cold in the common garden: comparative low-temperature tolerance of boreal and temperate conifer foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Richard Strimbeck; Trygve D. Kjellsen; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula F. Murakami

    2007-01-01

    Because they maintain green foliage throughout the winter season, evergreen conifers may face special physiological challenges in a warming world. We assessed the midwinter low-temperature (LT) tolerance of foliage from eight temperate and boreal species in each of the genera Abies, Picea, and Pinus growing in an arboretum in...

  11. Development of frost tolerance in winter wheat as modulated by differential root and shoot temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, C.W.; van Hasselt, P.R

    Winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Urban), grown in nutrient solution, were exposed to differential shoot/root temperatures (i.e., 4/4, 4/20, 20/4 and 20/20 degrees C) for six weeks. Leaves grown at 4 degrees C showed an increase in frost tolerance from - 4 degrees C down to -11 degrees

  12. Selection of high temperature and salinity tolerant Trichoderma isolates with antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapati, Sowmya; Ravulapalli, Prasad Durga; Tippirishetty, Navaneetha; Vishwanathaswamy, Dinesh Kumar; Chunduri, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma isolates were collected from varied agro-climatic zones of India and screened for high temperature and salinity tolerance. Among all the isolates tested, T. asperellum, TaDOR673 was highly tolerant to heat shock of 52°C with a mean spore count (log c.f.u/ml) of 4.33. The isolate after recovery from heat shock possessed higher germination rate and biomass production compared to its wild counterpart, upon prolonged exposure to 37°C. Under stress, TaDOR673 accumulated >15% of trehalose and >5% of mannose and raffinose compared to the wild type strain signifying their role in stress tolerance. T. asperellum, TaDOR693 and T. asperellum, TaDORS3 were identified as superior salt-tolerant isolates. Interestingly, TaDOR673 also possessed similar tolerance levels to increasing saline concentrations as indicated by its improved colony growth under stress conditions. T. asperellum, TaDOR673 and T. asperellum, TaDOR7316 effectively controlled the collar rot disease in groundnut by 79.7% when screened in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the study identified a potential thermotolerant and saline tolerant strain of Trichoderma, TaDOR673 that could be used as potential bioagent in stressed soils.

  13. Proteomic analysis of chromium stress and sulfur deficiency responses in leaves of two canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars differing in Cr(VI) tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Mustafa; Terzi, Hakan

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur (S) is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development, and it plays an essential role in response to environmental stresses. Plants suffer with combined stress of S deficiency and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in the rhizosphere. Little is known about the impact of S deficiency on leaf metabolism of canola (Brassica napus L.) under Cr(VI) stress. Therefore, this study is the first to examine the effects of Cr(VI) stress and S deficiency in canola at a molecular level. A comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the differences in protein abundance between Cr-tolerant NK Petrol and Cr-sensitive Sary cultivars. The germinated seeds were grown hydroponically in S-sufficient (+S) nutrient solution for 7 days and then subjected to S-deficiency (-S) for 7 days. S-deficient and +S seedlings were then exposed to 100μM Cr(VI) for 3 days. Protein patterns analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed that 58 protein spots were differentially regulated by Cr(VI) stress (+S/+Cr), S-deficiency (-S/-Cr) and combined stress (-S/+Cr). Of these, 39 protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Differentially regulated proteins predominantly had functions not only in photosynthesis, but also in energy metabolism, stress defense, protein folding and stabilization, signal transduction, redox regulation and sulfur metabolism. Six stress defense related proteins including 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, glutathione S-transferase, ferritin-1, l-ascorbate peroxidase, thiazole biosynthetic enzyme and myrosinase-binding protein-like At3g16470 exhibited a greater increase in NK Petrol. The stress-related proteins play an important role in the detoxification of Cr(VI) and maintaining cellular homeostasis under variable S nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Selection of high temperature and salinity tolerant Trichoderma isolates with antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii

    OpenAIRE

    Poosapati, Sowmya; Ravulapalli, Prasad Durga; Tippirishetty, Navaneetha; Vishwanathaswamy, Dinesh Kumar; Chunduri, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma isolates were collected from varied agro-climatic zones of India and screened for high temperature and salinity tolerance. Among all the isolates tested, T. asperellum, TaDOR673 was highly tolerant to heat shock of 52°C with a mean spore count (log c.f.u/ml) of 4.33. The isolate after recovery from heat shock possessed higher germination rate and biomass production compared to its wild counterpart, upon prolonged exposure to 37°C. Under stress, TaDOR673 accumulated >15% of trehalo...

  15. Conservatism of lizard thermal tolerances and body temperatures across evolutionary history and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Joseph W; Buckley, Lauren B

    2013-04-23

    Species may exhibit similar thermal tolerances via either common ancestry or environmental filtering and local adaptation, if the species inhabit similar environments. We ask whether upper and lower thermal limits (critical thermal maxima and minima) and body temperatures are more strongly conserved across evolutionary history or geography for lizard populations distributed globally. We find that critical thermal maxima are highly conserved with location accounting for a higher proportion of the variation than phylogeny. Notably, thermal tolerance breadth is conserved across the phylogeny despite critical thermal minima showing little niche conservatism. Body temperatures observed during activity in the field show the greatest degree of conservatism, with phylogeny accounting for most of the variation. This suggests that propensities for thermoregulatory behaviour, which can buffer body temperatures from environmental variation, are similar within lineages. Phylogeny and geography constrain thermal tolerances similarly within continents, but variably within clades. Conservatism of thermal tolerances across lineages suggests that the potential for local adaptation to alleviate the impacts of climate change on lizards may be limited.

  16. Heat priming induces trans-generational tolerance to high temperature stress in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH, the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1 which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  17. Heat Priming Induces Trans-generational Tolerance to High Temperature Stress in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Xin, Caiyun; Cai, Jian; Zhou, Qin; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Wheat plants are very sensitive to high temperature stress during grain filling. Effects of heat priming applied to the first generation on tolerance of the successive generation to post-anthesis high temperature stress were investigated. Compared with the progeny of non-heat primed plants (NH), the progeny of heat-primed plants (PH) possessed higher grain yield, leaf photosynthesis and activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower cell membrane damage under high temperature stress. In the transcriptome profile, 1430 probes showed obvious difference in expression between PH and NH. These genes were related to signal transduction, transcription, energy, defense, and protein destination and storage, respectively. The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) which was involved in histone demethylation related to epigenetic modification was up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. The proteome analysis indicated that the proteins involved in photosynthesis, energy production and protein destination and storage were up-regulated in the PH compared with NH. In short, thermos-tolerance was induced through heritable epigenetic alternation and signaling transduction, both processes further triggered prompt modifications of defense related responses in anti-oxidation, transcription, energy production, and protein destination and storage in the progeny of the primed plants under high temperature stress. It was concluded that trans-generation thermo-tolerance was induced by heat priming in the first generation, and this might be an effective measure to cope with severe high-temperature stresses during key growth stages in wheat production.

  18. Polyamine accumulation in transgenic tomato enhances the tolerance to high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Zou, Yijing; Ding, Shuli; Zhang, Jiajing; Yu, Xiaolin; Cao, Jiashu; Lu, Gang

    2009-05-01

    Polyamines play an important role in plant response to abiotic stress. S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) is one of the key regulatory enzymes in the biosynthesis of polyamines. In order to better understand the effect of regulation of polyamine biosynthesis on the tolerance of high-temperature stress in tomato, SAMDC cDNA isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was introduced into tomato genome by means of Agrobacterium tumefaciens through leaf disc transformation. Transgene and expression was confirmed by Southern and Northern blot analyses, respectively. Transgenic plants expressing yeast SAMDC produced 1.7- to 2.4-fold higher levels of spermidine and spermine than wild-type plants under high temperature stress, and enhanced antioxidant enzyme activity and the protection of membrane lipid peroxidation was also observed. This subsequently improved the efficiency of CO(2) assimilation and protected the plants from high temperature stress, which indicated that the transgenic tomato presented an enhanced tolerance to high temperature stress (38 degrees C) compared with wild-type plants. Our results demonstrated clearly that increasing polyamine biosynthesis in plants may be a means of creating high temperature-tolerant germplasm.

  19. Influence of temperature, time, liquid/solid ratio and sulfuric acid concentration on the hydrolysis of palm empty fruit bunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Ana; Requejo, Ana; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Jiménez, Luis

    2013-02-01

    The influence of temperature (150-190 °C), time (0-20 min), liquid/solid ratio (6-8) and sulfuric acid concentration (0.1-0.5%), on the hydrolysis of palm empty fruit bunches (EFBs) was studied and the liquid and solid fractions were analyzed. Polynomial models were found to reproduce the experimental results with errors less than 15% in most of the cases (except for xylose concentration). Operating conditions of 190 °C for 15 min at a liquid/solid ratio of 6 and a sulfuric acid concentration of 0.1% resulted in the production of 3.12, 4.0, 2.35 and 2.28 g/L of glucose, xylose, arabinose and acetic acid, respectively, starting with 1000 g of EFBs. The yield was 67.96%. Soda-anthraquinone, ethanol and ethanolamine pulping of the solid fraction provided pulps with brightness values (63.24%, 28.78%, 48.76%), but with poor resistance properties (6.57-8.54 Nm/g for tensile index, 0.38-0.44 k N/g for burst index and 0.96-1.02 mN m2/g for tear index). Therefore it is advisable to use the pulps for speciality papers or for bioethanol-production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of High Temperature on the Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Emeraldine Salt Doped with DBSA and Sulfuric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Gul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of thermally treated polyaniline in its emeraldine salt form is presented here. It offers an understanding of the thermal stability of the polymer. Emeraldine salt was prepared by a novel emulsion polymerization pathway using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid together as dopants. The effect of temperature and heating rate on the degradation of this emeraldine salt was studied via thermogravimetric analysis. The thermally analyzed sample was collected at various temperatures, that is, 250, 490, 500, and 1000°C. The gradual changes in the structure of the emeraldine salt were followed through cyclic voltammetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that emeraldine salt shows high thermal stability up to 500°C. This is much higher working temperature for the use of emeraldine salt in higher temperature applications. Further heat treatment seems to induce deprotonation in emeraldine salt. Cyclic voltammetry and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy revealed that complete deprotonation takes place at 1000°C where it loses its electrical conductivity. It is interesting to note that after the elimination of the dopants, the basic backbone of emeraldine salt was not destroyed. The results reveal that the dopants employed have a stability effect on the skeleton of emeraldine salt.

  1. Kinetics of hydrogen evolution at tantalum electrode in sulfuric acid media: effects of pH and solution temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherstobitova, I.N.; Stepanova, M.L.; Kichigin, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the range of 20-80 deg C and sulfuric acid and potassium sulfate solution pH in the range of pH=1.81-3.0 on kinetics of electrochemical reaction of hydrogen evolution on tantalum, which is characterized by Ta-H high binding energy, has been studied. It has been ascertained that the reaction occurs on the surface of electrode covered by a thin film of tantalum oxide. The oxide is preserved during cathode polarization, only its electrophysical and adsorption al properties change at the expense of hydrogen atoms penetration to the oxide film volume and appearance of low-valency; tantalum cations in the oxide

  2. SOLUBILITIES AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SATURATED SOLUTIONS IN THE COPPER SULFATE + SULFURIC ACID + SEAWATER SYSTEM AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Justel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Chile, the most important economic activity is mining, concentrated in the north of the country. This is a desert region with limited water resources; therefore, the mining sector requires research and identification of alternative sources of water. One alternative is seawater, which can be a substitute of the limited fresh water resources in the region. This work determines the influence of seawater on the solid-liquid equilibrium for acid solutions of copper sulfate at different temperatures (293.15 to 318.15 K, and its effect on physical properties (density, viscosity, and solubility. Knowledge of these properties and solubility data are useful in the leaching process and in the design of copper sulfate pentahydrate crystallization plants from the leaching process using seawater by means of the addition of sulfuric acid.

  3. Soft cutting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by low temperature ultrasonication in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuba, M V; Paddubskaya, A G; Kuzhir, P P; Maksimenko, S A; Ksenevich, V K; Niaura, G; Seliuta, D; Kasalynas, I; Valusis, G

    2012-12-14

    To decrease single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) lengths to a value of 100-200 nm, aggressive cutting methods, accompanied by a high loss of starting material, are frequently used. We propose a cutting approach based on low temperature intensive ultrasonication in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. The method is nondestructive with a yield close to 100%. It was applied to cut nanotubes produced in three different ways: gas-phase catalysis, chemical vapor deposition, and electric-arc-discharge methods. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to demonstrate that the cut carbon nanotubes have a low extent of sidewall degradation and their electronic properties are close to those of the untreated tubes. It was proposed to use the spectral position of the far-infrared absorption peak as a simple criterion for the estimation of SWCNT length distribution in the samples.

  4. Niobium Doped Lanthanum Strontium Ferrite as A Redox-Stable and Sulfur-Tolerant Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwei; Wei, Bo; Cao, Zhiqun; Yue, Xing; Zhang, Yaxin; Lü, Zhe

    2018-01-10

    The Nb-doped lanthanum strontium ferrite perovskite oxide La 0.8 Sr 0.2 Fe 0.9 Nb 0.1 O 3-δ (LSFNb) is evaluated as an anode material in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The effects of Nb partial substitution in the crystal structure, the electrical conductivity, and the valence of Fe ions are studied. LSFNb exhibits good structural stability in a severe reducing atmosphere at 800 °C, suggesting that high-valent Nb can effectively promote the stability of the lattice structure. The concentration of Fe 2+ increases after Nb doping, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The maximum power density of a thick Sc-stabilized zirconia (ScSZ) electrolyte-supported single cell reached 241.6 mW cm -2 at 800 °C with H 2 as fuel. The cell exhibited excellent stability for 100 h continuous operation without detectable degeneration. Scanning electron microscopy clearly revealed exsolution on the LSFNb surface after operation. Meanwhile, LSFNb particles agglomerated significantly during long-term stability testing. Impedance spectra suggested that both the LSFNb anode and the (La 0.75 Sr 0.25 ) 0.95 MnO 3-δ /ScSZ cathode underwent an activation process during long-term testing, through which the charge transfer ability increased significantly. Meanwhile, low-frequency resistance (R L ) mainly attributed to the anode (80 %) significantly increased, probably due to the agglomeration of LSFNb particles. The LSFNb anode exhibits excellent anti-sulfuring poisoning ability and redox stability. These results demonstrate that LSFNb is a promising anode material for SOFCs. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Sulfur poisoning and regeneration of the Ag/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for H2-assisted SCR of NOx by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doronkin, Dmitry E.; Khan, Tuhin Suvra; Bligaard, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur poisoning and regeneration mechanisms for a 2% Ag/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for the H2-assisted selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 are investigated. The catalyst has medium sulfur tolerance at low temperatures, however a good capability of regeneration at 670°C under lean conditions when H2...

  6. Temperature tolerance and stress proteins as mechanisms of invasive species success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn A Zerebecki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species are predicted to be more successful than natives as temperatures increase with climate change. However, few studies have examined the physiological mechanisms that theoretically underlie this differential success. Because correlative evidence suggests that invasiveness is related to the width of a species' latitudinal range, it has been assumed--but largely untested--that range width predicts breadth of habitat temperatures and physiological thermotolerances. In this study, we use empirical data from a marine community as a case study to address the hypotheses that (1 geographic temperature range attributes are related to temperature tolerance, leading to greater eurythermality in invasive species, and (2 stress protein expression is a subcellular mechanism that could contribute to differences in thermotolerance. We examined three native and six invasive species common in the subtidal epibenthic communities of California, USA. We assessed thermotolerance by exposing individuals to temperatures between 14°C and 31°C and determining the temperature lethal to 50% of individuals (LT(50 after a 24 hour exposure. We found a strong positive relationship between the LT(50 and both maximum habitat temperatures and the breadth of temperatures experience across the species' ranges. In addition, of the species in our study, invasives tended to inhabit broader habitat temperature ranges and higher maximum temperatures. Stress protein expression may contribute to these differences: the more thermotolerant, invasive species Diplosoma listerianum expressed higher levels of a 70-kDa heat-shock protein than the less thermotolerant, native Distaplia occidentalis for which levels declined sharply above the LT(50. Our data highlight differences between native and invasive species with respect to organismal and cellular temperature tolerances. Future studies should address, across a broader phylogenetic and ecosystem scope, whether this

  7. Effects of storage temperature on the physiological characteristics and vegetative propagation of desiccation-tolerant mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuewei; Zhao, Yunge

    2018-02-01

    Mosses, as major components of later successional biological soil crusts (biocrusts), play many critical roles in arid and semiarid ecosystems. Recently, some species of desiccation-tolerant mosses have been artificially cultured with the aim of accelerating the recovery of biocrusts. Revealing the factors that influence the vegetative propagation of mosses, which is an important reproductive mode of mosses in dry habitats, will benefit the restoration of moss crusts. In this study, three air-dried desiccation-tolerant mosses (Barbula unguiculata, Didymodon vinealis, and Didymodon tectorum) were hermetically sealed and stored at five temperature levels (0, 4, 17, 25, and 30 °C) for 40 days. Then, the vegetative propagation and physiological characteristics of the three mosses were investigated to determine the influence of storage temperature on the vegetative propagation of desiccation-tolerant mosses and the mechanism. The results showed that the vegetative propagation of the three mosses varied with temperature. The most variation in vegetative propagation among storage temperatures was observed in D. tectorum, followed by the variation observed in B. unguiculata. In contrast, no significant difference in propagation among temperatures was found in D. vinealis. The regenerative capacity of the three mosses increased with increasing temperature from 0 to 17 °C, accompanied by a decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and decreased thereafter. As the temperature increased, the chlorophyll and soluble protein contents increased in B. unguiculata but decreased in D. vinealis and D. tectorum. As to storage, the MDA and soluble sugar contents increased after storage. The MDA content of the three mosses increased at each of the investigated temperatures by more than 50 % from the initial values, and the soluble sugar content became higher than before in the three mosses. The integrity of cells and cell membranes is likely the most important factor influencing the

  8. Ambient temperature influences tolerance to plant secondary compounds in a mammalian herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnath, P; Merz, N D; Dearing, M D

    2016-01-13

    Growing evidence suggests that plant secondary compounds (PSCs) ingested by mammals become more toxic at elevated ambient temperatures, a phenomenon known as temperature-dependent toxicity. We investigated temperature-dependent toxicity in the desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida), a herbivorous rodent that naturally encounters PSCs in creosote bush (Larrea tridentata), which is a major component of its diet. First, we determined the maximum dose of creosote resin ingested by woodrats at warm (28-29°C) or cool (21-22°C) temperatures. Second, we controlled the daily dose of creosote resin ingested at warm, cool and room (25°C) temperatures, and measured persistence in feeding trials. At the warm temperature, woodrats ingested significantly less creosote resin; their maximum dose was two-thirds that of animals at the cool temperature. Moreover, woodrats at warm and room temperatures could not persist on the same dose of creosote resin as woodrats at the cool temperature. Our findings demonstrate that warmer temperatures reduce PSC intake and tolerance in herbivorous rodents, highlighting the potentially adverse consequences of temperature-dependent toxicity. These results will advance the field of herbivore ecology and may hone predictions of mammalian responses to climate change. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. The Low Temperature Induced Physiological Responses of Avena nuda L., a Cold-Tolerant Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paperaim of the was to study the effect of low temperature stress on Avena nuda L. seedlings. Cold stress leads to many changes of physiological indices, such as membrane permeability, free proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA content, and chlorophyll content. Cold stress also leads to changes of some protected enzymes such as peroxidase (POD, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. We have measured and compared these indices of seedling leaves under low temperature and normal temperature. The proline and MDA contents were increased compared with control; the chlorophyll content gradually decreased with the prolongation of low temperature stress. The activities of SOD, POD, and CAT were increased under low temperature. The study was designated to explore the physiological mechanism of cold tolerance in naked oats for the first time and also provided theoretical basis for cultivation and antibiotic breeding in Avena nuda L.

  10. Transients observed in the low temperature photolysis of alkyl radicals and divalent sulfur substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 253.7 nm photolysis of the isometric butyl radicals is described. These radicals are produced by electron capture during the γ-radiolysis of the corresponding butyl chlorides diluted in a rigid glass of 3-methylpentane-d14 at 77K. Thus t-butyl gives an equilibrium mixture of i-butyl and methyl radicals. Solvent radicals, M, are also produced and these obscure the former species in 3-MP-h14. Likewise sec-butyl radicals give rise to the ethyl, n-butyl, methyl and small amounts of the i-butyl radicals. Solvent radicals also rearrange and degrade in the photolytic beam, and the mechanism by which these processes occur is discussed. The procedure has also been used to study the formation and photolability of the alkyl thinyl and perthyl radicals occuring in the photolysis of RSH, RSR and RSSR. The thinyl radical is found to be unstable and gives the alkyl radical and atomic sulfur while the perthiyl radical is stable to radiation > 240 nm. (author)

  11. Thermodynamic stability of sulfur dioxide oxidation by Lyapunov function analysis against temperature perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangde, V. M.; Bhalekar, A. A.; Venkataramani, B.

    2007-04-01

    The present paper describes the thermodynamic stability study of the industrially important reaction of sulfur trioxide synthesis using a framework of comprehensive thermodynamic theory of stability of irreversible processes (CTTSIP). The mathematical steps involved, use the CTTSIP set-up. We construct an appropriate expression of \\mathcal{L}_s , the excess rate of entropy production, and use the constitutive equations of the perturbation coordinates and then establish the sign of the time rate of \\mathcal{L}_s. In doing so we expand \\mathcal{L}_s, in a Taylor expansion about the given non-equilibrium state (that is a point on the unperturbed trajectory). In the present case \\mathcal{L}_s has been defined using an appropriate irreversible thermodynamic expression for Σs, the rate of entropy production, that includes the entropy production from the existence of heat flux and the chemical conversion occurring at a finite rate. The operative expression of d\\mathcal{L}_s/dt has been derived using the above inputs and then by the help of 'Polymath 5.1' signs of \\mathcal{L}_s and d\\mathcal{L}_s/dt and their profiles are computed. The effect of variation of the overall heat transfer coefficient on the stability of the process has been analysed.

  12. Evidence for recent evolution of cold tolerance in grasses suggests current distribution is not limited by (low) temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Aelys M; Linder, H Peter

    2013-06-01

    · Temperature is considered an important determinant of biodiversity distribution patterns. Grasses (Poaceae) occupy among the warmest and coldest environments on earth but the role of cold tolerance evolution in generating this distribution is understudied. We studied cold tolerance of Danthonioideae (c. 280 species), a major constituent of the austral temperate grass flora. · We determined differences in cold tolerance among species from different continents grown in a common winter garden and assessed the relationship between measured cold tolerance and that predicted by species ranges. We then used temperatures in current ranges and a phylogeny of 81% of the species to study the timing and mode of cold tolerance evolution across the subfamily. · Species ranges generally underestimate cold tolerance but are still a meaningful representation of differences in cold tolerance among species. We infer cold tolerance evolution to have commenced at the onset of danthonioid diversification, subsequently increasing in both pace and extent in certain lineages. Interspecific variation in cold tolerance is better accounted for by spatial than phylogenetic distance. · Contrary to expectations, temperature - low temperature in particular - appears not to limit the distribution of this temperate clade. Competition, time or dispersal limitation could explain its relative absence from northern temperate regions. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Research and development on is process components for hydrogen production. (2) Corrosion resistance of glass lining in high temperature sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Iwatsuki, Jin; Kubo, Shinji; Terada, Atsuhiko; Onuki, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a research and development on hydrogen production system using High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. As a part of this effort, thermochemical water-splitting cycle featuring iodine- and sulfur-compounds (IS process) is under development considering its potential of large-scale economical hydrogen production. The IS process constitutes very severe environments on the materials of construction because of the corrosive nature of process chemicals, especially of the high temperature acidic solution of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid dissolving iodine. Therefore, selection of the corrosion-resistant materials and development of the components has been studied as a crucial subject of the process development. This paper discusses corrosion resistance of commercially available glass-lining material in high temperature sulfuric acid. Corrosion resistance of a soda glass used for glass-lining was examined by immersion tests. The experiments were performed in 47-90wt% sulfuric acids at temperatures of up to 400degC and for the maximum immersion time of 100 hours using an autoclave designed for the concerned tests. In every condition tested, no indication of localized corrosion such as defect formation or pitting corrosion was observed. Also, the corrosion rates decreased with the progress of immersion, and were low enough (≅0.1 mm/year) after 60-90 hours of immersion probably due to formation of a silica rich surface. (author)

  14. Sulfur resistance of Ce-Mn/TiO2 catalysts for low-temperature NH3-SCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Quan; Yang, Wenjing; Cui, Shitong; Street, Jason; Luo, Yan

    2018-03-01

    Ce-Mn/TiO2 catalyst prepared using a simple impregnation method demonstrated a better low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 (NH3-SCR) activity in comparison with the sol-gel method. The Ce-Mn/TiO2 catalyst loading with 20% Ce had the best low-temperature activity and achieved a NO conversion rate higher than 90% at 140-260°C with a 99.7% NO conversion rate at 180°C. The Ce-Mn/TiO2 catalyst only had a 6% NO conversion rate decrease after 100 ppm of SO2 was added to the stream. When SO2 was removed from the stream, the catalyst was able to recover completely. The crystal structure, morphology, textural properties and valence state of the metals involving the novel catalysts were investigated using X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption and desorption analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. The decrease of NH3-SCR performance in the presence of 100 ppm SO2 was due to the decrease of the surface area, change of the pore structure, the decrease of Ce4+ and Mn4+ concentration and the formation of the sulfur phase chemicals which blocked the active sites and changed the valence status of the elements.

  15. Impact of pretreatment with dilute sulfuric acid under moderate temperature on hydrolysis of corn stover with two enzyme systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chao; Keshwani, Deepak

    2014-03-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover with dilute sulfuric acid at moderate temperature was investigated, and glucan digestibility by Cellic CTec2 and Celluclast on the pretreated biomass was compared. Pretreatments were carried out from 60 to 180 min at the temperature from 105 to 135 °C, with acid concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 2% (w/v). Significant portion of xylan was removed during pretreatment, and the glucan digestibility by CTec2 was significantly better than that by Celluclast in all cases. Analysis showed that glucan digestibility by both two enzymes correlated directly with the extent of xylan removal in pretreatment. Confidence interval was built to give a more precise range of glucan conversion and to test the significant difference among pretreatment conditions. Response surface model was built to obtain the optimal pretreatment condition to achieve high glucan conversion after enzymatic hydrolysis. Considering the cost and energy savings, the optimal pretreatment condition of 1.75% acid for 160 min at 135 °C was determined, and glucan conversion can achieve the range from 72.86 to 76.69% at 95% confidence level after enzymatic hydrolysis, making total glucan recovery up to the range from 89.42 to 93.25%.

  16. Extreme temperature robust optical sensor designs and fault-tolerant signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel Agha [Oviedo, FL; Perez, Frank [Tujunga, CA

    2012-01-17

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) probe designs for extreme temperature and pressure sensing uses a single crystal SiC optical chip encased in a sintered SiC material probe. The SiC chip may be protected for high temperature only use or exposed for both temperature and pressure sensing. Hybrid signal processing techniques allow fault-tolerant extreme temperature sensing. Wavelength peak-to-peak (or null-to-null) collective spectrum spread measurement to detect wavelength peak/null shift measurement forms a coarse-fine temperature measurement using broadband spectrum monitoring. The SiC probe frontend acts as a stable emissivity Black-body radiator and monitoring the shift in radiation spectrum enables a pyrometer. This application combines all-SiC pyrometry with thick SiC etalon laser interferometry within a free-spectral range to form a coarse-fine temperature measurement sensor. RF notch filtering techniques improve the sensitivity of the temperature measurement where fine spectral shift or spectrum measurements are needed to deduce temperature.

  17. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  18. Physiology of the invasive apple snail Pomacea maculata: tolerance to low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Lewis E.; Schmidt, William; Leblanc, Brody; Carter, Jacoby; Mueck, Kristy; Merino, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Apple snails of the genus Pomacea native to South America have invaded and become established in Europe, Asia, and the United States. Both the channeled apple snail Pomacea canaliculata and the island apple snail Pomacea maculata have been reported in the United States. The two species are difficult to distinguish using morphological characters, leading to uncertainty about the identity of the animals from populations in the United States. Because the snails are subtropical, their tolerance of low temperatures is a critical factor in limiting the spread of the animals from present localities along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico to more northern areas. The tolerance of P. maculata collected in Louisiana to temperatures as low as 0°C was examined. There was no mortality among animals maintained in water at temperatures of 20°C or 15°C for 10 days. Survival of animals during a 10-day exposure to water at temperatures 10°C and 5°C was 50%. The LD50 for a 10-day exposure was 7°C. Snails did not survive more than 5 days in liquid water at 0°C. Ammonia excretion by animals in temperatures of 20°C and 15°C was comparable to values reported for freshwater gastropods; at very low temperatures, excretion of ammonia was decreased. There was no difference in the mean values of the osmolality of the hemolymph of animals exposed to 20°C, 15°C and 10°C for 10 days. Sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 identified the animals in the Louisiana population used in this study as P. maculata.

  19. Global phenotypic and genomic comparison of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains reveals a novel role of the sulfur assimilation pathway in adaptation at low temperature fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ríos, Estéfani; López-Malo, María; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2014-12-03

    The wine industry needs better-adapted yeasts to grow at low temperature because it is interested in fermenting at low temperature to improve wine aroma. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. We followed a global approach by comparing transcriptomic, proteomic and genomic changes in two commercial wine strains, which showed clear differences in their growth and fermentation capacity at low temperature. These strains were selected according to the maximum growth rate in a synthetic grape must during miniaturized batch cultures at different temperatures. The fitness differences of the selected strains were corroborated by directly competing during fermentations at optimum and low temperatures. The up-regulation of the genes of the sulfur assimilation pathway and glutathione biosynthesis suggested a crucial role in better performance at low temperature. The presence of some metabolites of these pathways, such as S-Adenosilmethionine (SAM) and glutathione, counteracted the differences in growth rate at low temperature in both strains. Generally, the proteomic and genomic changes observed in both strains also supported the importance of these metabolic pathways in adaptation at low temperature. This work reveals a novel role of the sulfur assimilation pathway in adaptation at low temperature. We propose that a greater activation of this metabolic route enhances the synthesis of key metabolites, such as glutathione, whose protective effects can contribute to improve the fermentation process.

  20. Reactions of sulfur fluorides and benzenes in a low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfer, Peter; Skapin, Tomaž; Kralj, Bogdan; Žigon, Dušan; Jesih, Adolf

    2000-10-01

    The introduction of pentafluorosulfanyl, SF_5, group into molecules can substantially change their physical, chemical and biological properties, making them potentially useful for a number of applications: high temperature and oxidation resistant materials, blood substitutes, energetic materials and surface-active agents. With the aim to determine possible formation of pentafluorosulfanylbenzenes, C_6H_5SF_5, in plasma, the gases SF_6, CF_3SF5 and ClSF5 were allowed to react with benzene, chlorobenzene and bromobenzene in an inductively coupled radio-frequency discharge. Reaction products were collected in a cold trap held at 77 K and subsequently analysed by combined GC-MS and GC-FTIR spectroscopy. The main reaction products were different halogenated benzenes along with sulfides, disulfides and biphenyl. The pentafluorosulfanylbenzene was produced in all reactions in very small quantities, which amounted to less than 1 % of all reaction products in favorable cases.

  1. Upper lethal temperatures in three cold-tolerant insects are higher in winter than in summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Henry M; Duman, John G

    2017-08-01

    Upper lethal temperatures (ULTs) of cold-adapted insect species in winter have not been previously examined. We anticipated that as the lower lethal temperatures (LLTs) decreased (by 20-30°C) with the onset of winter, the ULTs would also decrease accordingly. Consequently, given the recent increases in winter freeze-thaw cycles and warmer winters due to climate change, it became of interest to determine whether ambient temperatures during thaws were approaching ULTs during the cold seasons. However, beetle Dendroides canadensis (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae) larvae had higher 24 and 48 h ULT 50 (the temperature at which 50% mortality occurred) in winter than in summer. The 24 and 48 h ULT 50 for D. canadensis in winter were 40.9 and 38.7°C, respectively. For D. canadensis in summer, the 24 and 48 h ULT 50 were 36.7 and 36.4°C. During the transition periods of spring and autumn, the 24 h ULT 50 was 37.3 and 38.5°C, respectively. While D. canadensis in winter had a 24 h LT 50 range between LLT and ULT of 64°C, the summer range was only 41°C. Additionally, larvae of the beetle Cucujus clavipes clavipes (Coleoptera: Cucujidae) and the cranefly Tipula trivittata (Diptera: Tipulidae) also had higher ULTs in winter than in summer. This unexpected phenomenon of increased temperature survivorship at both lower and higher temperatures in the winter compared with that in the summer has not been previously documented. With the decreased high temperature tolerance as the season progresses from winter to summer, it was observed that environmental temperatures are closest to upper lethal temperatures in spring. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. A High-Performing Sulfur-Tolerant and Redox-Stable Layered Perovskite Anode for Direct Hydrocarbon Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hanping; Tao, Zetian; Liu, Shun; Zhang, Jiujun

    2015-01-01

    Development of alternative ceramic oxide anode materials is a key step for direct hydrocarbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Several lanthanide based layered perovskite-structured oxides demonstrate outstanding oxygen diffusion rate, favorable electronic conductivity, and good oxygen surface exchange kinetics, owing to A-site ordered structure in which lanthanide and alkali-earth ions occupy alternate (001) layers and oxygen vacancies are mainly located in [LnOx] planes. Here we report a nickel-free cation deficient layered perovskite, (PrBa)0.95(Fe0.9Mo0.1)2O5 + δ (PBFM), for SOFC anode, and this anode shows an outstanding performance with high resistance against both carbon build-up and sulfur poisoning in hydrocarbon fuels. At 800 °C, the layered PBFM showed high electrical conductivity of 59.2 S cm−1 in 5% H2 and peak power densities of 1.72 and 0.54 W cm−2 using H2 and CH4 as fuel, respectively. The cell exhibits a very stable performance under a constant current load of 1.0 A cm−2. To our best knowledge, this is the highest performance of ceramic anodes operated in methane. In addition, the anode is structurally stable at various fuel and temperature conditions, suggesting that it is a feasible material candidate for high-performing SOFC anode. PMID:26648509

  3. High-temperature phase relations and thermodynamics in the iron-lead-sulfur system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, R. Hurman; Ozok, Hakan

    1994-01-01

    The PbS activities in FeS-PbS liquid mattes were obtained at 1100 °C and 1200 °C by the dew-point method. Negative deviations were observed, and the liquid-matte solutions were modeled by the Krupkowski formalism. The liquid boundaries of the FeS-PbS phase diagram were derived from the model equations yielding a eutectic temperature of 842 °C at X Pbs = 0.46. A phase diagram of the pseudobinary FeS-PbS was also verified experimentally by quenching samples equilibrated in evacuated and sealed silica capsules. No terminal solid solution ranges could be found. Within the Fe-Pb-S ternary system, the boundaries of the immiscibility region together with the tie-line distributions were established at 1200 °C. Activities of Pb were measured by the dew-point technique along the metal-rich boundary of the miscibility gap. Activities of Fe, Pb, and S, along the miscibility gap were also calculated by utilizing the bounding binary thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and tie-lines.

  4. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-12-02

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  5. A global review of freshwater crayfish temperature tolerance, preference, and optimal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Jacob T.; Rosenberger, Amanda E.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation efforts, environmental planning, and management must account for ongoing ecosystem alteration due to a changing climate, introduced species, and shifting land use. This type of management can be facilitated by an understanding of the thermal ecology of aquatic organisms. However, information on thermal ecology for entire taxonomic groups is rarely compiled or summarized, and reviews of the science can facilitate its advancement. Crayfish are one of the most globally threatened taxa, and ongoing declines and extirpation could have serious consequences on aquatic ecosystem function due to their significant biomass and ecosystem roles. Our goal was to review the literature on thermal ecology for freshwater crayfish worldwide, with emphasis on studies that estimated temperature tolerance, temperature preference, or optimal growth. We also explored relationships between temperature metrics and species distributions. We located 56 studies containing information for at least one of those three metrics, which covered approximately 6 % of extant crayfish species worldwide. Information on one or more metrics existed for all 3 genera of Astacidae, 4 of the 12 genera of Cambaridae, and 3 of the 15 genera of Parastacidae. Investigations employed numerous methodological approaches for estimating these parameters, which restricts comparisons among and within species. The only statistically significant relationship we observed between a temperature metric and species range was a negative linear relationship between absolute latitude and optimal growth temperature. We recommend expansion of studies examining the thermal ecology of freshwater crayfish and identify and discuss methodological approaches that can improve standardization and comparability among studies.

  6. High-Performance High-Loading Lithium-Sulfur Batteries by Low Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition of Aluminum Oxide on Nanophase S Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangbo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville AR 72701 USA; Liu, Yuzi [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Cao, Yanqiang [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Ren, Yang [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Lu, Wenquan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Elam, Jeffrey W. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2017-05-18

    This study examines the effects of nanophase S and surface coatings via atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-loading sulfur cathodes for developing high-performance and high-energy lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. It is first verified that ball milling is an effective and facile route for nanoengineering microsized S powders and the resultant nanoscale S particles exhibit better performance. Using these ball milled nanoscale S cathodes, it is found that ALD Al2O3 performed at 50 degrees C yields deposits that evolve with ALD cycles from dispersed nanoparticles, to porous, connected films, and finally to dense and continuous films. Moreover, this low temperature ALD process suppresses S loss by sublimation. The ALD Al2O3 greatly improves sulfur cathode sustainable capacity and Coulombic efficiency. This study postulates two different mechanisms underlying the effects of ALD Al2O3 surface coatings depending on their morphology. ALD Al2O3 nanoparticles dispersed on the sulfur surface mainly function to adsorb polysulfides, thereby inhibiting S shuttling and improving sustainable capacity and Coulombic efficiency. By contrast, ALD Al2O3 films behave as a physical barrier to prevent polysulfides from contacting the liquid electrolyte and dissolving. The dispersed Al2O3 nanoparticles improve both sustainable capacity and Coulombic efficiency while the closed Al2O3 films improve Coulombic efficiency while decreasing the capacity

  7. The Role of Perturbations in the B-X UV Spectrum of S_{2} in a Temperature-Dependent Mechanism for Sulfur Mass Independent Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Alexander W.; Field, Robert W.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-06-01

    Sulfur mass independent fractionation (S-MIF) describes anomalous sulfur isotope ratios commonly found in sedimentary rocks older than 2.45 billion years. These anomalies likely originate from photochemistry of small, sulfur-containing molecules in the atmosphere, and their sudden disappearance from rock samples younger than 2.45 years is thought to be correlated with a sharp rise in atmospheric oxygen levels. The emergence of atmospheric oxygen is an important milestone in the development of life on Earth, but the mechanism for sulfur MIF in an anoxic atmosphere is not well understood. In this context, we present an analysis of the B-X UV spectrum of S_{2}, an extension of work presented last year. The B state of S_{2} is strongly perturbed by the nearby B" state, as originally described by Green and Western (1996). Our analysis suggests that a doorway-mediated transfer mechanism shifts excited state population from the short-lifetime B state to the longer-lifetime B" state. Furthermore, access to the perturbed doorway states is strongly dependent on the population distribution in the ground state. This suggests that the temperature of the Achaean atmosphere may have played a significant role in determining the extent of S-MIF.

  8. A comparison of dilute aqueous p-toluenesulfonic and sulfuric acid pretreatments and saccharification of corn stover at moderate temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekara, Ananda S; Wiredu, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Single step pretreatment-saccharification of corn stover was investigated in aqueous p-toluenesulfonic and sulfuric acid media. Dilute aqueous solution of p-toluenesulfonic acid was a better catalyst than aqueous sulfuric acid of the same H(+) ion concentration for single step pretreatment-saccharification of corn stover at moderate temperatures and pressures. For example, 100mg corn stover heated at 150°C for 1h in 0.100 M H(+) aqueous sulfuric acid produced 64 μmol of total reducing sugars (TRS), whereas the sample heated in 0.100 M H(+)p-toluenesulfonic acid produced 165 μmol of TRS under identical conditions. Glucose yield showed a similar trend, as aq. sulfuric acid and p-toluene sulfonic acid media produced 29 and 35 μmol of glucose respectively after 2.5h. Higher catalytic activity of p-toluenesulfonic acid may be due to an interaction with biomass, supported by repulsion of hydrophobic tolyl group by the aqueous phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperature-Dependent Effects of Cutaneous Bacteria on a Frog’s Tolerance of Fungal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Robak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Defense against pathogens is one of many benefits that bacteria provide to animal hosts. A clearer understanding of how changes in the environment affect the interactions between animals and their microbial benefactors is needed in order to predict the impact and dynamics of emerging animal diseases. Due to its dramatic effects on the physiology of animals and their pathogens, temperature may be a key variable modulating the level of protection that beneficial bacteria provide to their animal hosts. Here we investigate how temperature and the makeup of the skin microbial community affect the susceptibility of amphibian hosts to infection by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, one of two fungal pathogens known to cause the disease chytridiomycosis. To do this, we manipulated the skin bacterial communities of susceptible hosts, northern cricket frogs (Acris crepitans, prior to exposing these animals to Bd under two different ecologically relevant temperatures. Our manipulations included one treatment where antibiotics were used to reduce the skin bacterial community, one where the bacterial community was augmented with the antifungal bacterium, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and one in which the frog’s skin bacterial community was left intact. We predicted that frogs with reduced skin bacterial communities would be more susceptible (i.e., less resistant to and/or tolerant of Bd infection, and frogs with skin bacterial communities augmented with the known antifungal bacterium would be less susceptible to Bd infection and chytridiomycosis. However, we also predicted that this interaction would be temperature dependent. We found a strong effect of temperature but not of skin microbial treatment on the probability and intensity of infection in Bd-exposed frogs. Whether temperature affected survival; however, it differed among our skin microbial treatment groups, with animals having more S. maltophilia on their skin surviving longer at 14 but not at

  10. THE EFFECT OF LOW ROOT TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND LIPID-COMPOSITION OF LOW-TEMPERATURE TOLERANT ROOTSTOCK GENOTYPES FOR CUCUMBER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BULDER, HAM; DENNIJS, APM; SPEEK, EJ; VANHASSELT, PR; KUIPER, PJC

    1991-01-01

    In the framework of research directed to diminish energy consumption of glasshouse cucumber production, three low temperature tolerant rootstock genotypes for cucumber were compared. Firstly, growth at low root temperature of one Cucurbita ficifolia and two Sicyos angulatus genotypes was studied to

  11. Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katie E.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in snow cover due to climate change could alter the energetics and physiology of ectothermic animals that overwinter beneath snow, yet how snow cover interacts with physiological thresholds is unknown. We applied numerical simulation of overwintering metabolic rates coupled with field validation to determine the importance of snow cover and freezing to the overwintering lipid consumption of the freeze-tolerant Arctiid caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella. Caterpillars that overwintered above the snow experienced mean temperatures 1.3°C lower than those below snow and consumed 18.36 mg less lipid of a total 68.97-mg reserve. Simulations showed that linear temperature effects on metabolic rate accounted for only 30% of the difference in lipid consumption. When metabolic suppression by freezing was included, 93% of the difference between animals that overwintered above and below snow was explained. Our results were robust to differences in temperature sensitivity of metabolic rate, changes in freezing point, and the magnitude of metabolic suppression by freezing. The majority of the energy savings was caused by the non-continuous reduction in metabolic rate due to freezing, the first example of the importance of temperature thresholds in the lipid use of overwintering insects.

  12. Rechargeable Lithium Sulfur (Li-S) Battery with Specific Energy 400 Wh/kg and Operating Temperature Range -60°C to 60°C, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sion Power is developing a rechargeable lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery with a demonstrated specific energy exceeding 350 Wh/kg and the range of operating temperatures...

  13. Tolerância de sementes de linhagens de milho à alta temperatura de secagem Tolerance of corn lines seeds to high drying temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Carvalho Barrios Roveri José

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cultivares tolerantes a altas temperaturas de secagem proporcionam redução no tempo de secagem, uma etapa crítica no sistema de produção de sementes de milho (Zea mays L.. Nesta pesquisa, foi avaliada a tolerância à alta temperatura de secagem de sementes de linhagens de milho, por meio de testes de germinação e vigor. As sementes foram colhidas manualmente em espigas com teor de água em torno de 35% e secas artificialmente à 45 C até atingirem 11% de teor de água. Em seguida, foram submetidas aos testes de primeira contagem e contagem final de germinação, envelhecimento acelerado, teste de frio sem solo e de condutividade elétrica. Houve diferenças significativas nos valores de germinação e vigor de sementes das diferentes linhagens, sendo então classificadas em tolerantes e intolerantes. Pelos resultados, conclui-se que a sensibilidade das sementes à injúria por secagem à alta temperatura é dependente da linhagem.High drying temperature tolerant cultivars provide a reduction in the drying period, a critical phase of the corn seeds (Zea mays L. production system. In this research the tolerance of corn lines seeds to high drying temperature was evaluated by the germination and vigor tests. Seeds were handpicked in ears with water content around 35% and dried artificially at 45ºC up to 11% water content. Then, the seeds were submitted to the first and final germination counting tests, accelerated aging, cold test without soil and electrical conductivity. There were significant differences in the germination and vigor values of seeds from different lines, being classified into tolerant and intolerant. The results permitted to conclude that sensitivity of seeds to high drying temperature injury depends on the lines.

  14. Gaseous byproducts from high-temperature thermal conversion elemental analysis of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds with considerations for δ2H and δ18O analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, Glendon B; Tipple, Christopher A; Stern, Libby A

    2013-07-30

    High-temperature, conversion-reduction (HTC) systems convert hydrogen and oxygen in materials into H2 and CO for δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. HTC of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing materials produces unintended byproduct gases that could affect isotope analyses by: (1) allowing isotope exchange reactions downstream of the HTC reactor, (2) creating isobaric or co-elution interferences, and (3) causing deterioration of the chromatography. This study characterizes these HTC byproducts. A HTC system (ThermoFinnigan TC/EA) was directly connected to a gas chromatograph/quadrupole mass spectrometer in scan mode (m/z 8 to 88) to identify the volatile products generated by HTC at conversion temperatures of 1350 °C and 1450 °C for a range of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing solids [keratin powder, horse hair, caffeine, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, urea, and three nitrated organic explosives (PETN, RDX, and TNT)]. The prominent HTC byproduct gases include carbon dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, methane, acetylene, and water for all nitrogen-bearing compounds, as well as carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide for sulfur-bearing compounds. The 1450 °C reactor temperature reduced the abundance of most byproduct gases, but increased the significant byproduct, hydrogen cyanide. Inclusion of a post-reactor chemical trap containing Ascarite II and Sicapent, in series, eliminated the majority of byproducts. This study identified numerous gaseous HTC byproducts. The potential adverse effects of these gases on isotope ratio analyses are unknown but may be mitigated by higher HTC reactor temperatures and purifying the products with a purge-and-trap system or with chemical traps. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. High root temperature affects the tolerance to high light intensity in Spathiphyllum plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Adriana; Hernández, Laura; Quiles, María José

    2014-10-01

    Spathiphyllum wallisii plants were sensitive to temperature stress under high illumination, although the susceptibility of leaves to stress may be modified by root temperature. Leaves showed higher tolerance to high illumination, in both cold and heat conditions, when the roots were cooled, probably because the chloroplast were protected by excess excitation energy dissipation mechanisms such as cyclic electron transport. When the roots were cooled both the activity of electron donation by NADPH and ferredoxin to plastoquinone and the amount of PGR5 polypeptide, an essential component of cyclic electron flow around PSI, increased. However, when the stems were heated or cooled under high illumination, but the roots were heated, the quantum yield of PSII decreased considerably and neither the electron donation activity by NADPH and ferredoxin to plastoquinone nor the amount of PGR5 polypeptide increased. In such conditions, the cyclic electron flow cannot be enhanced by high light and PSII is damaged as a result of insufficient dissipation of excess light energy. Additionally, the damage to PSII induced the increase in both chlororespiratory enzymes, NDH complex and PTOX. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Low-temperature formation and stabilization of rare allotropes of cyclooctasulfur (β-S8 and γ-S8) in the presence of organic carbon at a sulfur-rich glacial site in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Graham E.; Cosmidis, Julie; Grasby, Stephen E.; Trivedi, Christopher B.; Spear, John R.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale deposits of elemental sulfur form annually on a glacier's surface at Borup Fiord Pass in the Canadian High Arctic. However, the mechanisms of mineralization and stabilization of elemental sulfur at this site are currently unknown. Here we show that X-ray diffraction (XRD) data for fresh sulfur precipitates collected from the surface of a melt pool over sulfide-rich ice reveal the presence of three sulfur allotropes, α-S8, β-S8, and γ-S8 (the three solid forms of cyclooctasulfur (S8)). The detection of the β-S8 allotrope of elemental sulfur is notable, since β-S8 typically only forms in high temperature environments (>96 °C). The γ-S8 allotrope is also rare in natural settings and has previously been implicated as a signature of microbial sulfur cycling. Using combustion and infrared spectroscopy approaches, organic carbon is also detected within the sample bearing the three allotropes of elemental sulfur. Electron microscopy and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the C K-edge show that the sulfur precipitates are intimately associated with the organic carbon at the submicron scale. The occurrence of β-S8 and γ-S8 in this low-temperature setting indicates that there are unknown pathways for the formation and stabilization of these rare allotropes of elemental sulfur. In particular, we infer that the occurrence of these allotropes is related to their association with organic carbon. The formation of carbon-associated sulfur globules may not be a direct by-product of microbial activity; however, a potential role of direct or indirect microbial mediation in the formation and stabilization of β-S8 and γ-S8 remains to be assessed.

  17. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAl alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations showed

  18. Tolerance of wheat and lettuce plants grown on human mineralized waste to high temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Sofya A.; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Shikhov, Valentin N.; Gros, Jean-Bernard; Golovko, Tamara K.; Dal'ke, Igor V.; Zakhozhii, Ilya G.

    2013-06-01

    The main objective of a life support system for space missions is to supply a crew with food, water and oxygen, and to eliminate their wastes. The ultimate goal is to achieve the highest degree of closure of the system using controlled processes offering a high level of reliability and flexibility. Enhancement of closure of a biological life support system (BLSS) that includes plants relies on increased regeneration of plant waste, and utilization of solid and liquid human wastes. Clearly, the robustness of a BLSS subjected to stress will be substantially determined by the robustness of the plant components of the phototrophic unit. The aim of the present work was to estimate the heat resistance of two plants (wheat and lettuce) grown on human wastes. Human exometabolites mineralized by hydrogen peroxide in an electromagnetic field were used to make a nutrient solution for the plants. We looked for a possible increase in the heat tolerance of the wheat plants using changes in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) intensity during heat stress. At age 15 days, plants were subjected to a rise in air temperature (from 23 ± 1 °C to 44 ± 1 °С) under different PAR intensities for 4 h. The status of the photosynthetic apparatus of the plants was assessed by external СО2 gas exchange and fluorescence measurements. The increased irradiance of the plants during the high temperature period demonstrated its protective action for both the photosynthetic apparatus of the leaves and subsequent plant growth and development. The productivity of the plants subjected to temperature changes at 250 W m-2 of PAR did not differ from that of controls, whereas the productivity of the plants subjected to the same heat stress but in darkness was halved.

  19. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  20. Tomato plants increase their tolerance to low temperature in a chilling acclimation process entailing comprehensive transcriptional and metabolic adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero-Gil, Javier; Huertas, Raúl; Rambla, José Luís; Granell, Antonio; Salinas, Julio

    2016-10-01

    Low temperature is a major environmental stress that seriously compromises plant development, distribution and productivity. Most crops are from tropical origin and, consequently, chilling sensitive. Interestingly, however, some tropical plants, are able to augment their chilling tolerance when previously exposed to suboptimal growth temperatures. Yet, the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying this adaptive process, termed chilling acclimation, still remain practically unknown. Here, we demonstrate that tomato plants can develop a chilling acclimation response, which includes comprehensive transcriptomic and metabolic adjustments leading to increased chilling tolerance. More important, our results reveal strong resemblances between this response and cold acclimation, the process whereby plants from temperate regions raise their freezing tolerance after exposure to low, non-freezing temperatures. Both chilling and cold acclimation are regulated by a similar set of transcription factors and hormones, and share common defence mechanisms, including the accumulation of compatible solutes, the mobilization of antioxidant systems and the rearrangement of the photosynthetic machinery. Nonetheless, we have found some important divergences that may account for the freezing sensitivity of tomato plants. The data reported in this manuscript should foster new research into the chilling acclimation response with the aim of improving tomato tolerance to low temperature. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Salinity tolerance of cultured Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis L.: Effects on growth and on survival as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Bayley, M.; Paulsen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Eurasian perch is generally only considered to be a candidate for freshwater aquaculture even though wild populations are found in estuarine and brackish water habitats. Little knowledge exists on two issues a) the effect of temperature on the salinity tolerance of perch and b) the long-term effe...

  2. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance and membrane phospholipid composition in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Tomcala, Ales; Sørensen, Jesper G

    2008-01-01

    and the composition of membrane GPLs in adult Drosophila melanogaster. Long-term cold survival was significantly improved by low acclimation temperature. After 60h at 0 degrees C, more than 80% of the 15 degrees C-acclimated flies survived while none of the 25 degrees C-acclimated flies survived. Cold shock tolerance...... acclimation temperature and correlated with the changes in GPL composition in membranes of adult D. melanogaster. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar...

  3. Expression responses of five cold tolerant related genes to two temperature dropping treatments in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengze; Chang, Yaqing; Pang, Zhenguo; Ding, Jun; Ji, Nanjing

    2015-03-01

    Environmental conditions, including ambient temperature, play important roles in survival, growth development, and reproduction of the Japanese sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus. Low temperatures result in slowed growth and skin ulceration disease. In a previous study, we investigated the effect of low temperature on gene expression profiles in A. japonicus by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Genes encoding Ferritin, Lysozyme, Hsp70, gp96, and AjToll were selected from a subtracted cDNA library of A. japonicus under acute cold stress. The transcriptional expression profiles of these genes were investigated in different tissues (coelomocyte, respiratory tree, intestine, longitudinal muscle) after exposure to acute and mild temperature dropping treatments. The results show that (1) the five cold-tolerance-related genes were found in all four tissues and the highest mRNA levels were observed in coelomocyte and respiratory tree; (2) under the temperature dropping treatments, three types of transcriptional regulation patterns were observed: primary suppression followed by up-regulation at -2°C, suppressed expression throughout the two treatments, and more rarely an initial stimulation followed by suppression; and (3) gene expression suppression was more severe under acute temperature dropping than under mild temperature dropping treatment. The five cold-tolerance-related genes that were distributed mainly in coelomocyte and respiratory tissues were generally down-regulated by low temperature stress but an inverse up-regulation event was found at the extreme temperature (-2°C).

  4. Interactive effects of sulfur and chromium on antioxidative defense systems and BnMP1 gene expression in canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars differing in Cr(VI) tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Hakan; Yıldız, Mustafa

    2015-07-01

    Plants suffer with combined stress of sulfur (S) deficiency and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in soils. There are a few reports on the interactive effects of S-deficiency and Cr(VI) stress. Therefore, the interactions between S nutrition and Cr(VI) stress were investigated in hydroponically grown canola (Brassica napus L.) cultivars differing in Cr(VI) tolerance. The relatively Cr(VI)-tolerant (NK Petrol) and Cr(VI)-susceptible (Sary) cultivars were grown in S-sufficient nutrient solution and then exposed to variable S concentrations [deficient (0 mM S, -S) and sufficient (1 mM S, +S)]. The seedlings were then exposed to 100 μM Cr(VI) for 3 days. S-deficiency (-S/-Cr) and combined stress (-S/+Cr) caused a significant decrease in growth parameters of Sary than NK Petrol (P < 0.05). In -S/+Cr treatment, Cr accumulation in Sary was significantly higher than NK Petrol. The higher level of Cr in Sary increased lipid peroxidation and decreased chlorophyll content. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and cysteine content were significantly higher in NK Petrol than in Sary under combined stress. The levels of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) were significantly decreased by S deficiency. The expression level of metallothionein gene (BnMP1) in the tolerant NK Petrol was increased by -S/+Cr treatment. However, expression level of BnMP1 gene in the susceptible Sary was enhanced by +S/+Cr treatment. This result suggests metallothionein (MT) may be involved in Cr(VI) tolerance under S-deficient condition. In conclusion, S nutrition influenced Cr accumulation and enhanced tolerance caused by a positive effect on defense systems and gene expression.

  5. Tick resistance and heat tolerance characteristics in cattle. II. Rectal temperature and respiratory frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília José Veríssimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The heat and Rhipicephalus microplus tick infestation are limiting factors to the livestock production in the tropics. Therefore, in a tropical sustainable livestock, cattle should be tick resistant and heat tolerant. The relationship between the Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick infestation and heat characteristics like rectal temperature and respiratory frequency was studied in 6 Nellore and 4 Holstein, seven-month-old steers. They were submitted to an artificial infestation (a.i. with 10,000 larvae (Holstein and 20,000 larvae (Nellore of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick in 16/Apr/2011. Females ticks bigger than 4.0 mm were counted in the left side from day 19 to 27 after the artificial infestation. The infestation rate was calculated by summing and multiplying by two the number of ticks counted, assuming that females are half of infesting larvae (5,000 for Holstein and 10,000 for Nellore. In days 20, 23 and 24 after the infestation, the 10 bigger females ticks found in whole animal were weighed and put in a chamber (27 oC and 80% RH, weighing the egg mass of each female fourteen days after. The rectal temperature (RT, measured by a digital thermometer in the animal’s rectum and respiratory frequency (RF, respiratory movements per minute were measured on days 14/Apr (2 days before the a.i. and on day 05/May (19 days after the a.i.. The RT and RF were measured in the morning and in the afternoon, after they had been exposed to noon sun. The experimental design was a non-probability sample restricted to the 10 available animals. Analyses of variance for the random variables RT and RF to evaluate the effects of period of day, date and breed were performed using the SPSS 12.0. The RF was greater in the afternoon (64.82 ± 2.44 mov/min versus 38.42 ± 2.44 mov/min in the morning, P<0.001 and did not varied between dates; Nellore cattle had lower RF (41.50 ± 2.20 mov/min than Holstein (61.75 ± 2.70 mov/min, P<0.001. About RT, breed

  6. Lightweight Damage Tolerant, High-Temperature Radiators for Nuclear Power and Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Paul D.; SanSoucie, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    is enabled. High thermal conductivity carbon fibers are lightweight, damage tolerant, and can be heated to high temperature. Areal densities in the NASA set target range of 2 to 4 kg/m2 (for enabling NEP) are achieved and with specific powers (kW/kg) a factor of about 7 greater than conventional metal fins and about 1.5 greater than carbon composite fins. Figure 2 shows one fin under test. All tests were done under vacuum conditions.

  7. Cloud Tolerance of Remote-Sensing Technologies to Measure Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Thomas R. H.; Hain, Christopher R.; Anderson, Martha C.; Crow, Wade T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional methods to estimate land surface temperature (LST) from space rely on the thermal infrared(TIR) spectral window and is limited to cloud-free scenes. To also provide LST estimates during periods with clouds, a new method was developed to estimate LST based on passive microwave(MW) observations. The MW-LST product is informed by six polar-orbiting satellites to create a global record with up to eight observations per day for each 0.25resolution grid box. For days with sufficient observations, a continuous diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) was fitted. The main characteristics of the DTC were scaled to match those of a geostationary TIR-LST product. This paper tests the cloud tolerance of the MW-LST product. In particular, we demonstrate its stable performance with respect to flux tower observation sites (four in Europe and nine in the United States), over a range of cloudiness conditions up to heavily overcast skies. The results show that TIR based LST has slightly better performance than MW-LST for clear-sky observations but suffers an increasing negative bias as cloud cover increases. This negative bias is caused by incomplete masking of cloud-covered areas within the TIR scene that affects many applications of TIR-LST. In contrast, for MW-LST we find no direct impact of clouds on its accuracy and bias. MW-LST can therefore be used to improve TIR cloud screening. Moreover, the ability to provide LST estimates for cloud-covered surfaces can help expand current clear-sky-only satellite retrieval products to all-weather applications.

  8. Solubility of acetic acid and trifluoroacetic acid in low-temperature (207-245 k) sulfuric acid solutions: implications for the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Mads P Sulbaek; Axson, Jessica L; Michelsen, Rebecca R H; Nielsen, Ole John; Iraci, Laura T

    2011-05-05

    The solubility of gas-phase acetic acid (CH(3)COOH, HAc) and trifluoroacetic acid (CF(3)COOH, TFA) in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was measured in a Knudsen cell reactor over ranges of temperature (207-245 K) and acid composition (40-75 wt %, H(2)SO(4)). For both HAc and TFA, the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, is inversely dependent on temperature. Measured values of H* for TFA range from 1.7 × 10(3) M atm(-1) in 75.0 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 242.5 K to 3.6 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 40.7 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 207.8 K. Measured values of H* for HAc range from 2.2 × 10(5) M atm(-1) in 57.8 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 245.0 K to 3.8 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 74.4 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 219.6 K. The solubility of HAc increases with increasing H(2)SO(4) concentration and is higher in strong sulfuric acid than in water. In contrast, the solubility of TFA decreases with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. The equilibrium concentration of HAc in UT/LS aerosol particles is estimated from our measurements and is found to be up to several orders of magnitude higher than those determined for common alcohols and small carbonyl compounds. On the basis of our measured solubility, we determine that HAc in the upper troposphere undergoes aerosol partitioning, though the role of H(2)SO(4) aerosol particles as a sink for HAc in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will only be discernible under high atmospheric sulfate perturbations.

  9. Relationship between tolerance factor and temperature coefficient of permittivity of temperature-stable high permittivity BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaphon Raengthon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature coefficient of permittivity (TCε of BaTiO3–Bi(MeO3 solid solutions were investigated. It was determined that as the tolerance factor was decreased with the addition of Bi(MeO3, the TCε shifted from large negative values to TCε values approaching zero. It is proposed that the different bonding nature of the dopant cation affects the magnitude and temperature stability of the permittivity. This study suggests that the relationship between tolerance factor and TCε can be used as a guide to design new dielectric compounds exhibiting temperature-stable high permittivity characteristics, which is similar to past research on perovskite and pyrochlore-based microwave dielectrics.

  10. Cellular mechanisms contributing to multiple stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with potential use in high-temperature ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitichantaropas, Yasin; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Harashima, Satoshi; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-12-01

    High-temperature ethanol fermentation has several benefits including a reduction in cooling cost, minimizing risk of bacterial contamination, and enabling simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. To achieve the efficient ethanol fermentation at high temperature, yeast strain that tolerates to not only high temperature but also the other stresses present during fermentation, e.g., ethanol, osmotic, and oxidative stresses, is indispensable. The C3253, C3751, and C4377 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, which have been previously isolated as thermotolerant yeasts, were found to be multiple stress-tolerant. In these strains, continuous expression of heat shock protein genes and intracellular trehalose accumulation were induced in response to stresses causing protein denaturation. Compared to the control strains, these multiple stress-tolerant strains displayed low intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and effective cell wall remodeling upon exposures to almost all stresses tested. In response to simultaneous multi-stress mimicking fermentation stress, cell wall remodeling and redox homeostasis seem to be the primary mechanisms required for protection against cell damage. Moreover, these strains showed better performances of ethanol production than the control strains at both optimal and high temperatures, suggesting their potential use in high-temperature ethanol fermentation.

  11. Cold-tolerant crop species have greater temperature homeostasis of leaf respiration and photosynthesis than cold-sensitive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Hikosaka, Kouki; Terashima, Ichiro

    2009-02-01

    Some plant species show constant rates of respiration and photosynthesis measured at their respective growth temperatures (temperature homeostasis), whereas others do not. However, it is unclear what species show such temperature homeostasis and what factors affect the temperature homeostasis. To analyze the inherent ability of plants to acclimate respiration and photosynthesis to different growth temperatures, we examined 11 herbace-ous crops with different cold tolerance. Leaf respiration (R(area)) and photosynthetic rate (P(area)) under high light at 360 microl l(-1) CO(2) concentrations were measured in plants grown at 15 and 30 degrees C. Cold-tolerant species showed a greater extent of temperature homeostasis of both R(area) and P(area) than cold-sensitive species. The underlying mechanisms which caused differences in the extent of temperature homeostasis were examined. The extent of temperature homeostasis of P(area) was not determined by differences in leaf mass and nitrogen content per leaf area, but by differences in photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE). Moreover, differences in PNUE were due to differences in the maximum catalytic rate of Rubisco, Rubisco contents and amounts of nitrogen invested in Rubisco. These findings indicated that the temperature homeostasis of photosynthesis was regulated by various parameters. On the other hand, the extent of temperature homeostasis of R(area) was unrelated to the maximum activity of the respiratory enzyme (NAD-malic enzyme). The R(area)/P(area) ratio was maintained irrespective of the growth temperatures in all the species, suggesting that the extent of temperature homeostasis of R(area) interacted with the photosynthetic rate and/or the homeostasis of photosynthesis.

  12. Rainbow trout adaptation to a warmer Patagonia and its potential to increase temperature tolerance in cultured stocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Alejandra Crichigno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The viability of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum, 1792 culture is being challenged progressively by global warming. Previous trials with Australian and Japanese rainbow trout lines suggested that improvements in thermal performance may be possible. Here, we hypothesized that strain-related differences in physiological response to temperature exist between a north Patagonian hatchery stock (CENSALBA, a Neotropical one (Criadero Boca de Río, and a thermal stream (Valcheta population of wild introduced rainbow trout. This was tested by comparing, at 20 °C, the thermal preference, specific metabolic rate, thermal tolerance, growth, and condition on juveniles of the three strains, and on a Valcheta stream male x CENSALBA female F1 cross. Preferred temperature (PT and loss of equilibrium temperature (LET, a measure of thermal tolerance of Valcheta stream and F1 were significantly higher than those of CENSALBA, and the average PTs of Valcheta stream and F1 were higher than the 95% confidence interval of available reference data for rainbow trout. These results suggest that the F1, reared under standard hatchery conditions and selected by growth and thermal preference, presents higher thermal preference and higher thermal tolerance than the current CENSALBA hatchery stock. Introduction of this naturally adapted strain to hatchery stocks would likely result in the improvement of their temperature resistance to warmer waters. Current studies on adults of this F1 generation are underway.

  13. Chemically defined media for the cultivation of Naegleria: pathogenic and high temperature tolerant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerad, T A; Visvesvara, G; Daggett, P M

    1983-05-01

    Chemically defined minimal media for the cultivation of high temperature tolerant and pathogenic Naegleria spp. have been developed. A defined minimal medium, identical for N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis, consists of eleven amino acids (arginine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, threonine, tryptophan, and valine), six vitamins (biotin, folic acid, hemin, pyridoxal, riboflavin, and thiamine), guanosine, glucose, salts, and metals. Three of the four strains of Naegleria fowleri tested (ATCC 30100, ATCC 30863, and ATCC 30896) and two strains of N. lovaniensis (ATCC 30467 and ATCC 30569) could be cultured beyond ten subcultures on this medium. For N. fowleri ATCC 30894 diaminopimelic acid, or lysine, or glutamic acid was also required. Mean generation time was reduced and population density increased for all strains with the introduction of glutamic acid. Glucose could be eliminated from the minimal medium only if glutamic acid was present. Without glucose, mean generation time increased and population density decreased. Diaminopimelic acid could substitute for lysin for ATCC 30894, indicating that Naegleria species may synthesize their lysine via the DAP pathway. Naegleria fowleri ATCC 30100 could be adapted to grow without serine or glycine in the minimal medium with glutamic acid added, but with mean generation time increased and population density decreased. The strain could be grown in the minimal medium in the absence of metals. For growth of N. australiensis ATCC 30958, modification of the medium by increasing metals ten-fold, substituting guanine for guanosine and adding lysine, glutamic acid, and six vitamins (p-aminobenzoic acid, choline chloride, inositol, vitamin B12, nicotinamide, and Ca pantothenate) was required.

  14. The effects of acclimation temperature, salinity, and behavior on the thermal tolerance of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Mallory; Sardella, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Mozambique tilapia have been shown to be incredibly stress tolerant with respect to environmental salinity, hypoxia, and ammonia concentrations. Temperature challenges to this species have shown that they have difficulty with cold acclimation. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of acclimation temperature and salinity on the thermal tolerance of Mozambique tilapia as assessed by critical thermal maxima (CT Max ) and critical thermal minima (CT Min ). We also monitored fish behavior and quantified ventilation rate. To our knowledge, this study was the first to investigate upper and lower thermal tolerances, and the effect of environmental salinity in this physiologically impressive species. Using predictive regression analyses of the thermal limits, thermal tolerance polygons were constructed and total areas were calculated 678.9°C 2 for freshwater (FW)-acclimated tilapia, and 739.4°C 2 seawater (SW)-acclimated tilapia. During the thermal challenges, we observed two novel behaviors in response to thermal challenge, ventilation cessation behavior (VCB) and aquatic surface respiration (ASR), and we conclude that the use of these behaviors extended the thermal limits of these fish in both FW and two-thirds SW by limiting the exposure of the gill epithelium to the changing environment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Temperature tolerance and daylength effects in isolates of Scytosiphon lomentaria (Phaeophyceae) of the North Atlantic and Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Dieck, Inka

    1987-09-01

    Fifteen geographical isolates of Scytosiphon lomentaria were investigated for their daylength response with regard to upright thallus formation, and nineteen isolates for their upper temperature tolerance. Six new day-neutral and two new photoperiodic strains were found. It became evident that day-neutral strains represent a common reaction group in this species, besides the photoperiodic group. The temperature regulation of photoperiodic and day-neutral strains did not show striking differences and it is assumed that temperature regulation may trigger seasonality of occurrrence in this species as well as photoperiod. The upper survival temperature after two weeks of heart stress is 28 29°C in all tested isolates. No temperature ecotypes were found.

  16. Behavior of sulfur during coal pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, D.; Hutchinson, E.J.; Heidbrink, J.; Pan, W.-P.; Chou, C.-L.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of sulfur in Illinois coals during pyrolysis was evaluated by thermogravimetry/ Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR) techniques. SO2, COS, and H2S were major gaseous sulfur-containing products observed during coal pyrolysis. The release rates of the gaseous sulfur species showed several peaks within the temperature ranges, which were due to the emission of different forms of sulfur in coal. ?? 1994.

  17. Effects of surface nanocrystallization pretreatment on low-temperature ion sulfurization behavior of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Guozheng; Xu Binshi; Wang Haidou; Si Hongjuan

    2010-01-01

    A nanocrystalline surface layer of 10 μm thickness was fabricated on 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel by means of supersonic fine particles bombarding (SFPB). The followed low-temperature ion sulfurizing was carried out on the original and the SFPBed (SFPB treated) surface, respectively, forming sulfide layers with certain thickness. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the phase constituents and grain size of the nanocrystallized surface layer. The surface morphologies and compositions of the sulfide layers were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) was used to detect the valence states of the sulfide layers. Elemental distribution with depth was measured by Auger energy spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the microstructure of the surface layer is refined to nano-grains with the grain size about 30 nm and random crystallographic orientations by SFPB treatment. The surface nanocrystallization pretreatment can significantly improve the thickness, density, and the FeS content ratio of the sulfide layers. The analysis indicates that, the enhancement in efficiency of the ion sulfurization treatment by SFPB surface nanocrystallization treatment is mainly attributed to the high-density crystal defects and the increase of surface chemical activity.

  18. Effects of various sugar feeding choices on survival and tolerance of honey bee workers to low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.F. Abou-Shaara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Beekeepers usually supply their colonies with alternatives to nectar (i.e. sugar feeding during dearth periods of the year, especially cold times of winter. The objective of the study was to determine the best substances to feed bees to enhance the tolerance and survival of honey bees (Apis mellifera L. to low temperatures. Seven feeding choices were compared under laboratory conditions. These feeding choices were: sugar syrup, liquid honey, creamed honey, honey candy, sugar candy, honey jelly, and honey/sugarcane juice jelly. The results showed that the number of bees attracted to each feeding choice was influenced significantly by feeding type. Worker bees were attracted to all feeding choices and showed a high preference to creamed honey, honey jelly or honey/juice jelly. The tolerance of honey bees to low temperature was enhanced when bees were fed on creamed honey, sugar syrup or honey candy. The mean time at which 50% of bees were able to survive ranged from 3 days (unfed bees to 15.8 days (honey candy group. The survival rate of worker bees was highest when they fed on honey candy, creamed honey or sugar candy. In light of this study, creamed honey or honey candy can be considered the best feeding choices for bee colonies during winter to enhance their survival and tolerance to low temperatures.

  19. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN primes Vitis vinifera L. and confers a better tolerance to low nonfreezing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Andreas; Bordiec, Sophie; Fernandez, Olivier; Paquis, Sandra; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaïd Ait

    2012-02-01

    Several endophytic bacteria reportedly induce resistance to biotic stress and abiotic stress tolerance in several plant species. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN is a plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that is able to colonize grapevine tissues and induce resistance to gray mold. Further, PsJN induces physiological changes that increase grapevine tolerance to low nonfreezing temperatures. To better understand how bacteria induced the observed phenomena, stress-related gene expression and metabolite accumulation were monitored in 6-week-old Chardonnay grapevine plantlets after exposure to low nonfreezing temperatures. Under normal conditions (26°C), plantlet bacterization had no significant effect on the monitored parameters. By contrast, at 4°C, both stress-related gene transcripts and metabolite levels increased earlier and faster, and reached higher levels in PsJN-bacterized plantlets than in nonbacterized counterparts, in accordance with priming phenomena. The recorded changes may be correlated with the tolerance to cold stress conferred by the presence of PsJN. This is the first time that PGPR-induced priming has been shown to protect plants against low-temperature stress. Moreover, 1 week after cold exposure, levels of stress-related metabolites had declined more in PsJN-bacterized plants, suggesting that the endophyte is involved in the cold acclimation process via the scavenging system.

  20. High Temperature Steam Oxidation Testing of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parkison, Adam [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2013-12-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign has initiated a multifold effort aimed at facilitating development of accident tolerant fuels in order to overcome the inherent shortcomings of light water reactor (LWR) fuels when exposed to beyond design basis accident conditions. The campaign has invested in development of experimental infrastructure within the Department of Energy complex capable of chronicling the performance of a wide range of concepts under prototypic accident conditions. This report summarizes progress made at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY13 toward these goals. Alternative fuel cladding materials to Zircaloy for accident tolerance and a significantly extended safety margin requires oxidation resistance to steam or steam-H2 environments at ≥1200°C for short times. At ORNL, prior work focused attention on SiC, FeCr and FeCrAl as the most promising candidates for further development. Also, it was observed that elevated pressure and H2 additions had minor effects on alloy steam oxidation resistance, thus, 1 bar steam was adequate for screening potential candidates. Commercial Fe-20Cr-5Al alloys remain protective up to 1475°C in steam and CVD SiC up to 1700°C in steam. Alloy development has focused on Fe-Cr-Mn-Si-Y and Fe-Cr-Al-Y alloys with the aluminaforming alloys showing more promise. At 1200°C, ferritic binary Fe-Cr alloys required ≥25% Cr to be protective for this application. With minor alloy additions to Fe-Cr, more than 20%Cr was still required, which makes the alloy susceptible to α’ embrittlement. Based on current results, a Fe-15Cr-5Al-Y composition was selected for initial tube fabrication and welding for irradiation experiments in FY14. Evaluations of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were conducted up to 1700°C in steam. The reaction of H2O with the alumina reaction tube at 1700°C resulted in Al(OH)3

  1. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organics has not been possible with traditional high-temperature conversion (HTC) because the formation of hydrogen-bearing reaction products other than molecular hydrogen (H2) is responsible for non-quantitative H2 yields and possible hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Our previously introduced, new chromium-based EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS (Elemental Analyzer–Chromium/High-Temperature Conversion Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry) technique focused primarily on nitrogen-bearing compounds. Several technical and analytical issues concerning halogen- and sulfur-bearing samples, however, remained unresolved and required further refinement of the reactor systems.

  2. Involvement of ascorbate peroxidase and heat shock proteins on citrus tolerance to combined conditions of drought and high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfagón, Damián; Zandalinas, Sara I; Baliño, Pablo; Muriach, María; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2018-03-27

    Usually several environmental stresses occur in nature simultaneously causing a unique plant response. However, most of the studies until now have focused in individually-applied abiotic stress conditions. Carrizo citrange (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf. X Citrus sinensis L. Osb.) and Cleopatra mandarin (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tan.) are two citrus rootstocks with contrasting tolerance to drought and heat stress and have been used in this work as a model for the study of plant tolerance to the combination of drought and high temperatures. According to our results, leaf integrity and photosynthetic machinery are less affected in Carrizo than in Cleopatra under combined conditions of drought and heat stress. The pattern of accumulation of three proteins (APX, HSP101 and HSP17.6) involved in abiotic stress tolerance shows that they do not accumulate under water stress conditions individually applied. However, contents of APX and HSP101 are higher in Carrizo than in Cleopatra under stress combination whereas HSP17.6 has a similar behavior in both types of plants. This, together with a better stomatal control and a higher APX activity of Carrizo, contributes to the higher tolerance of Carrizo plants to the combination of stresses and point to it as a better rootstock than Cleopatra (traditionally used in areas with scare water supplies) under the predictable future climatic conditions with frequent periods of drought combined with high temperatures. This work also provides the basis for testing the tolerance of different citrus varieties grafted on these rootstocks and growing under different field conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Sulfur Partitioning During Vitrification of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste: Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darab, John G.; Graham, Dennis D.; Macisaac, Brett D.; Russell, Renee L.; Smith, Harry D.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.

    2001-07-31

    The sodium bearing tank waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains high concentrations of sulfur (roughly 5 mass% of SO3 on a nonvolatile oxide basis). The amount of sulfur that can be feed to the melter will ultimately determine the loading of SBW in glass produced by the baseline (low-temperature, joule-heated, liquid-fed, ceramic-lined) melter. The amount of sulfur which can be fed to the melter is determined by several major factors including: the tolerance of the melter for an immiscible salt layer accumulation, the solubility of sulfur in the glass melt, the fraction of sulfur removed to the off-gas, and the incorporation of sulfur into the glass up to it?s solubility limit. This report summarizes the current status of testing aimed at determining the impacts of key chemical and physical parameters on the partitioning of sulfur between the glass, a molten salt, and the off-gas.

  4. Improving carbon tolerance of Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane by palladium addition for low temperature steam methane reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Moon; Won, Jong Min; Kim, Geo Jong; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Sung Su; Hong, Sung Chang

    2017-10-01

    Palladium was added on the Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane by wet impregnation and electroless plating methods. Its surface morphology characteristics and carbon deposition properties for the low temperature steam methane reforming were investigated. The addition of palladium could obviously be enhanced the catalytic activity as well as carbon tolerance of the Ni-YSZ porous membrane. The porous membranes were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), CH4 temperature-programmed reduction (CH4-TPR), and O2 temperature-programmed oxidation (O2-TPO). It was found that the Pd-Ni-YSZ catalytic porous membrane showed the superior stability as well as the deposition of carbon on the surface during carbon dissociation adsorption at 650 °C was also suppressed.

  5. Food crops face rising temperatures: An overview of responses, adaptive mechanisms, and approaches to improve heat tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeru Kaushal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The rising temperatures are resulting in heat stress for various agricultural crops to limit their growth, metabolism, and leading to significant loss of yield potential worldwide. Heat stress adversely affects normal plant growth and development depending on the sensitivity of each crop species. Each crop species has its own range of temperature maxima and minima at different developmental stages beyond which all these processes get inhibited. The reproductive stage is on the whole more sensitive to heat stress, resulting in impaired fertilization to cause abortion of flowers. During seed filling, heat stress retards seed growth by affecting all the biochemical events to reduce seed size. Unfavorable temperature may significantly affect photosynthesis, respiration, water balance, and membrane stability of leaves. To combat heat stress, plants acquire various defense mechanisms for their survival such as maintaining membrane stability, and scavenging reactive oxygen species by generating antioxidants and stress proteins. Thermo-tolerance can be improved by the accumulation of various compounds of low molecular mass known as thermo-protectants as well as phyto-hormones. Exogenous application of these molecules has benefited plants growing under heat stress. Alternatively, transgenic plants over-expressing the enzymes catalyzing the synthesis of these molecules may be raised to increase their endogenous levels to improve heat tolerance. In recent times, various transgenics have been developed with improved thermo-tolerance having potential benefits for inducing heat tolerance in food crops. Updated information about of the effects of heat stress on various food crops and their responses as well as adaptive mechanisms is reviewed here.

  6. [Arabidopsis CBF1 in plant tolerance to low temperature and drought stresses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen-Xia; Tan, Zhen-Bo; Zhu, Jian-Qing; Deng, Xiao-Jian

    2004-05-01

    Since it was established that the alteration in gene expression occur during cold acclimation, a major goal in cold acclimation research has been to identify cold-responsive genes and to determine whether they play roles in freezing tolerance. Many cold-regulated genes (COR) were isolated and characterized in Arabidopsis and other cold tolerant plant species. Studies on regulation of COR in Arabidopsis have resulted in the discovery of a family of transcriptional activators, of which, CBF1, a member of the gene family, controls expression of a battery of COR in Arabidopsis and other cold tolerant plant species. During recent years, CBF-like genes were found in the genomes of chilling-sensitive plant species such as tomato and maize. Over-expression of Arabidopsis CBF1 confers elevated tolerance to chilling and drought stresses in transgenic tomato. These results promote our effort to identify and characterize CBF-like genes to improve tolerance of chilling-sensitive plant species to chilling and drought stresses.

  7. Tolerance to high temperature extremes in an invasive lace bug, Corythucha ciliata (Hemiptera: Tingidae, in subtropical China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Ting Ju

    Full Text Available Biological invasions are predicted to be more frequent as climate change is increasing its positive impact on the prevalence of invasive exotic species. Success of insect invaders in different temperature zones is closely related to their tolerance to temperature extremes. In this study, we used an exotic lace bug (Corythucha ciliata as the study organism to address the hypotheses that an insect species invading a subtropical zone from temperate regions has a high capacity to survive and adapt to high temperatures, and that its thermal tolerance plays an important role in determining its seasonal abundance and geographic distribution. To test these hypotheses, the effects of heat shock on the survival and reproduction of C. ciliata adults were assessed in the laboratory. Adults were exposed to 26 (control, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43, and 45°C for 2 h, and then were transferred to 26°C. Heat-shock temperatures ranging from 35 to 41°C did not significantly affect survival pattern, longevity, and fecundity of adults, but heat shock at 43 and 45°C significantly reduced these traits. Exposing parent females to heat-shock treatments from 35 to 41°C did not significantly affect the hatching rate of their eggs, survival of the nymphs, and the proportion of female F(1 progeny, while no progeny were produced with treatments of 43 and 45°C. The results indicate that C. ciliata can tolerate high temperatures less than 41°C, which may contribute to its expansion into the lower latitudes in China where its hosts (Platanus trees are widely planted. Our findings have important implications for predicting seasonal abundance and understanding invasion mechanisms of this important urban invader under climate change.

  8. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  9. Tolerance of chufa (Cyperus esculentus) as a vegetation unit's representative of bioregenerative life support systems to elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklavtsova, Ekaterina; Ushakova, Sofya; Shikhov, Valentin; Kudenko, Yurii

    Plants inclusion in the photosynthesizing unit of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) expects knowledge of both production characteristics of plants cultivated under optimal condi-tions and their tolerance to stress-factors' effect caused by contingency origination in a system. The work was aimed at investigation of chufa (Cyperus esculentus) tolerance to the effect of super optimal air temperature of 44 subject to PAR intensity and exposure duration. Chufa was grown in light culture conditions by hydroponics method on expanded clay aggregate. The Knop solution was used as nutrition medium. Up to 30 days the plants were cultivated at the intensity of 690 micromole*m-2*s*-1 and air temperature of 25. Heat shock was employed at the age of 30 days under the air temperature of 44 during 7, 20 and 44 hours at two different PAR intensities of 690 and 1150 micromole*m-2*s*-1. Chufa heat tolerance was estimated by intensity of external 2 gas exchange and by state of leaves' photosynthetic apparatus (PSA). Effect of disturbing temperature during 44 hours at PAR intensity of 690 micromole*m-2*s*-1 resulted in frozen-in damage of PSA-leaves' die-off. Chufa plants exposed to heat stress at PAR intensity of 690 micromole*m-2*s*-1 during both 7 and 20-hours demonstrated respiration dominance over photosynthesis; and 2 emission was observed by light. Functional activity of photosynthetic apparatus estimated with respect to parameters of pulse-amplitude-modulated chlorophyll fluorescence of photosystem 2 (PS 2) decreased on 40

  10. Physiological and molecular mechanisms associated with cross tolerance between hypoxia and low temperature in Thaumatotibia leucotreta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman, Leigh; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Terblanche, John S

    2015-01-01

    correlated with increased membrane fluidity (increased UFA:SFA) and/or alterations in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70); while general mechanical stress (shaking) and heat (2 h at 35 C) do not elicit cross tolerance (no change in survival or molecular responses). We therefore found support for some limited cold...

  11. Sulfur cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    energy. At the end of the anaerobic food chain in bacteria they serve to purify the system of sulfide and other metabolic end products. In the process sulfur is returned to the system as sulfate. In transition zones from anaerobic to aerobic...

  12. Food Legumes and Rising Temperatures: Effects, Adaptive Functional Mechanisms Specific to Reproductive Growth Stage and Strategies to Improve Heat Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Sita

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambient temperatures are predicted to rise in the future owing to several reasons associated with global climate changes. These temperature increases can result in heat stress- a severe threat to crop production in most countries. Legumes are well-known for their impact on agricultural sustainability as well as their nutritional and health benefits. Heat stress imposes challenges for legume crops and has deleterious effects on the morphology, physiology, and reproductive growth of plants. High-temperature stress at the time of the reproductive stage is becoming a severe limitation for production of grain legumes as their cultivation expands to warmer environments and temperature variability increases due to climate change. The reproductive period is vital in the life cycle of all plants and is susceptible to high-temperature stress as various metabolic processes are adversely impacted during this phase, which reduces crop yield. Food legumes exposed to high-temperature stress during reproduction show flower abortion, pollen and ovule infertility, impaired fertilization, and reduced seed filling, leading to smaller seeds and poor yields. Through various breeding techniques, heat tolerance in major legumes can be enhanced to improve performance in the field. Omics approaches unravel different mechanisms underlying thermotolerance, which is imperative to understand the processes of molecular responses toward high-temperature stress.

  13. Numerical investigations of the aperture size effect for maintaining a constant temperature in a novel sulfur-ammonia water splitting cycle application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwar Jawad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar-driven thermochemical water splitting cycle is a promising, energy efficient and environmentally friendly approach to produce hydrogen. In this paper, numerical work has been undertaken using a cylindrical solar receiver to investigate fixed and variable aperture sizes to maintain constant steady-state temperature over a day for thermochemical part of a novel hybrid photo-thermochemical sulfur-ammonia cycle. A previously developed and validated optical model in commercial software, TracePro® is used to simulate the light sources of 10, 15, and 28 kW. The sunlight intensity variations for the designated reference day for this study is selected as July 1, 2011, at 39.74 N, 105.18 W and at an elevation of 1829 m. A developed and validated finite volume based coupled Monte Carlo, Heat Transfer model is used to calculate the steady-state temperatures in the receiver by utilizing the output of the optical model. The simulations are performed at different aperture diameters from 2 to 14 cm to quantify the effect of fixed aperture size on the steady-state temperatures of the receiver. Furthermore, simulations to maintain steady-state temperatures of 673, 823, and 1123 K for different sub-cycles of the selected cycle via variable aperture has been performed and compared with selected fixed apertures. It is found that the variable apertures can maintain desired constant temperatures over the day for each thermochemical sub-cycle. The comparison of overall power consumption and savings for fixed and variable apertures has also been investigated and reported.

  14. The PGI enzyme system and fitness response to temperature as a measure of environmental tolerance in an invasive species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Caroline Lefort

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of invasion ecology, the determination of a species’ environmental tolerance, is a key parameter in the prediction of its potential distribution, particularly in the context of global warming. In poikilothermic species such as insects, temperature is often considered the most important abiotic factor that affects numerous life-history and fitness traits through its effect on metabolic rate. Therefore the response of an insect to challenging temperatures may provide key information as to its climatic and therefore spatial distribution. Variation in the phosphoglucose-6-isomerase (PGI metabolic enzyme-system has been proposed in some insects to underlie their relative fitness, and is recognised as a key enzyme in their thermal adaptation. However, in this context it has not been considered as a potential mechanism contributing to a species invasive cability. The present study aimed to compare the thermal tolerance of an invasive scarabaeid beetle, Costelytra zealandica (White with that of the closely related, and in part sympatrically occurring, congeneric non-invasive species C. brunneum (Broun, and to consider whether any correlation with particular PGI genotypes was apparent. Third instar larvae of each species were exposed to one of three different temperatures (10, 15 and 20 °C over six weeks and their fitness (survival and growth rate measured and PGI phenotyping performed via cellulose acetate electrophoresis. No consistent relationship between PGI genotypes and fitness was detected, suggesting that PGI may not be contributing to the invasion success and pest status of C. zealandica.

  15. Protective proteins are differentially expressed in tomato genotypes differing for their tolerance to low-temperature storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, D; Gouble, B; Valot, B; Bouchet, J P; Callot, C; Kretzschmar, A; Causse, M; Renard, C M C G; Faurobert, M

    2010-07-01

    When stored at low temperature, tomato fruits exhibit chilling injury symptoms, such as rubbery texture and irregular ripening. To identify proteins related to chilling tolerance, we compared two tomato near isogenic lines differing for their texture phenotype at harvest in a fruit-storage trial including two temperatures (4 and 20 degrees C) along several days of conservation. Fruit evolution was followed by assessing fruit color, ethylene emission and texture parameters. The most contrasted samples were submitted to proteomic analysis including two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of protein spots to identify the proteins, whose expression varied according to the genotype or the storage conditions. Unexpectedly, the most firm genotype at harvest was the most sensitive to cold storage. The other genotype exhibited a delay in fruit firmness loss leading to the texture differences observed after 20 days of 4 degrees C storage. The proteome analysis of these contrasted fruits identified 85 proteins whose quantities varied with temperature or genotype. As expected, cold storage decreased the expression of proteins related to maturation process, such as acidic invertase, possibly controlled post-translational regulation of polygalacturonase and up-regulated proteins related to freezing tolerance. However, the study point out proteins involved in the differential resistance to chilling conditions of the two lines. This includes specific isoforms among the large family of small heat shocked proteins, and a set of proteins involved in the defense against of the reticulum endoplasmic stress.

  16. Physiological ecology of larval muskellunge and norlunge: temperature tolerance and growth rates under hatchery conditions. [Esox masquinongy, E. lucius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Critical Thermal Maxima (CTM) and growth rates of larval muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) and norlunge (E. masquinongy female x E. lucius male) were determined under hatchery conditions. Two groups of fish were maintained at ambient water temperatures with natural photoperiod. Weekly water samples were collected to monitor the troughs. Parameters measured were dissolved oxygen, pH, and ammonia which were within normal limits. Norlunge had higher temperature tolerance and developed faster than muskellunge. CTM of larval norlunge (30.9/sup 0/ to 36.0/sup 0/C, anti X = 34.0/sup 0/C) were significantly different (P< 0.01) from those of muskellunge (29.9/sup 0/ to 35.6/sup 0/C, anti X = 32.8/sup 0/C). Both species exhibited a sharp decrease in CTM during swim-up, followed by a slow recovery period indicated by a general increase in CTM values. Both species steadily increased in length during development. Weight remained stable through swim-up, decreased with absorption of the yolk sac and then increased as the fry began to feed. The results obtained in this study indicate that both age and past thermal history had a significant effect on the temperature tolerance of muskellunge and norlunge fry.

  17. Laccase Production from a Temperature and pH Tolerant Fungal Strain of Trametes hirsuta (MTCC 11397

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum Dhakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laccase production by a temperature and pH tolerant fungal strain (GBPI-CDF-03 isolated from a glacial site in Indian Himalayan Region (IHR has been investigated. The fungus developed white cottony mass on potato dextrose agar and revealed thread-like mycelium under microscope. ITS region analysis of fungus showed its 100% similarity with Trametes hirsuta. The fungus tolerated temperature from 4 to 48°C ± 2 (25°C opt. and pH 3–13 (5–7 opt.. Molecular weight of laccase was determined approximately 45 kDa by native PAGE. Amplification of laccase gene fragment (corresponding to the copper-binding conserved domain contained 200 bp. The optimum pH for laccase production, at optimum growth temperature, was determined between 5.5 and 7.5. In optimization experiments, fructose and ammonium sulfate were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, for enhancing the laccase production. Production of laccase was favored by high carbon/nitrogen ratio. Addition of CuSO4 (up to 1.0 mM induced laccase production up to 2-fold, in case of 0.4 mM concentration. Addition of organic solvents also induced the production of laccase; acetone showed the highest (2-fold induction. The study has implications in bioprospecting of ecologically resilient microbial strains.

  18. Limited tolerance by insects to high temperatures across tropical elevational gradients and the implications of global warming for extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Robledo, Carlos; Kuprewicz, Erin K; Staines, Charles L; Erwin, Terry L; Kress, W John

    2016-01-19

    The critical thermal maximum (CTmax), the temperature at which motor control is lost in animals, has the potential to determine if species will tolerate global warming. For insects, tolerance to high temperatures decreases with latitude, suggesting that similar patterns may exist along elevational gradients as well. This study explored how CTmax varies among species and populations of a group of diverse tropical insect herbivores, the rolled-leaf beetles, across both broad and narrow elevational gradients. Data from 6,948 field observations and 8,700 museum specimens were used to map the elevational distributions of rolled-leaf beetles on two mountains in Costa Rica. CTmax was determined for 1,252 individual beetles representing all populations across the gradients. Initial morphological identifications suggested a total of 26 species with populations at different elevations displaying contrasting upper thermal limits. However, compared with morphological identifications, DNA barcodes (cytochrome oxidase I) revealed significant cryptic species diversity. DNA barcodes identified 42 species and haplotypes across 11 species complexes. These 42 species displayed much narrower elevational distributions and values of CTmax than the 26 morphologically defined species. In general, species found at middle elevations and on mountaintops are less tolerant to high temperatures than species restricted to lowland habitats. Species with broad elevational distributions display high CTmax throughout their ranges. We found no significant phylogenetic signal in CTmax, geography, or elevational range. The narrow variance in CTmax values for most rolled-leaf beetles, especially high-elevation species, suggests that the risk of extinction of insects may be substantial under some projected rates of global warming.

  19. Adaptive Outlier-tolerant Exponential Smoothing Prediction Algorithms with Applications to Predict the Temperature in Spacecraft

    OpenAIRE

    Hu Shaolin; Zhang Wei; Li Ye; Fan Shunxi

    2011-01-01

    The exponential smoothing prediction algorithm is widely used in spaceflight control and in process monitoring as well as in economical prediction. There are two key conundrums which are open: one is about the selective rule of the parameter in the exponential smoothing prediction, and the other is how to improve the bad influence of outliers on prediction. In this paper a new practical outlier-tolerant algorithm is built to select adaptively proper parameter, and the exponential smoothing pr...

  20. Tolerance to high soil temperature in foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is related to shoot and root growth and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, Moses Kwame; Bdolach, Eyal; Fait, Aaron; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2016-09-01

    Roots play important roles in regulating whole-plant carbon and water relations in response to extreme soil temperature. Three foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) lines (448-Ames 21521, 463-P1391643 and 523-P1219619) were subjected to two different soil temperatures (28 and 38 °C). The gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, root morphology and central metabolism of leaves and roots were studied at the grain-filling stage. High soil temperature (38 °C) significantly influenced the shoot transpiration, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, root growth and metabolism of all lines. The root length and area were significantly reduced in lines 448 and 463 in response to the stress, while only a small non-specific reduction was observed in line 523 in response to the treatment. The shift of root metabolites in response to high soil temperature was also genotype specific. In response to high soil temperature, glutamate, proline and pyroglutamate were reduced in line 448, and alanine, aspartate, glycine, pyroglutamate, serine, threonine and valine were accumulated in line 463. In the roots of line 523, serine, threonine, valine, isomaltose, maltose, raffinose, malate and itaconate were accumulated. Root tolerance to high soil temperature was evident in line 523, in its roots growth potential, lower photosynthesis and stomatal conductance rates, and effective utilization and assimilation of membrane carbon and nitrogen, coupled with the accumulation of protective metabolites. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Low- and High-Temperature Tolerance and Acclimation for Chlorenchyma versus Meristem of the Cultivated Cacti Nopalea cochenillifera, Opuntia robusta, and Selenicereus megalanthus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Zutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dividing meristematic cells are thought to be more sensitive to extreme temperatures compared to other tissues, such as chlorenchyma. This was examined for low and high temperatures for three widely cultivated cacti: Nopalea cochenillifera, Opuntia robusta, and Selenicereus megalanthus. Temperature tolerances of chlorenchyma and meristem were based on the cellular uptake of the vital stain neutral red for plants at mean day/night air temperatures of 25/20°C and plants maintained at 10/5°C or 45/40°C to examine temperature acclimation. Meristematic cells tolerated 1.8°C lower low temperatures and 4.0°C higher high temperatures than chlorenchyma cells for the three species at 25/20°C. Both tissue types showed acclimation, with a decrease or increase in temperature tolerated at 10/5°C or 45/40°C, respectively. Meristematic cells were more tolerant of extreme temperatures compared to chlorenchyma, contrary to the prevailing belief, and may reflect an additional strategy for cacti to survive extreme temperatures.

  2. Water and temperature stresses impact canola (Brassica napus L.) fatty acid, protein and yield over nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactive effects of weather and soil nutrient status often control crop productivity. An experiment was conducted to determine effects of N and S fertilizer rate, soil water, and atmospheric temperature on canola fatty acid (FA), total oil, protein and grain yield. Nitrogen and S were assessed in...

  3. Sulfur and Water Resistance of Mn-Based Catalysts for Low-Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective catalytic reduction (SCR with NH3 is the most efficient and economic flue gas denitrification technology developed to date. Due to its high low-temperature catalytic activity, Mn-based catalysts present a great prospect for application in SCR de-NOx at low temperatures. However, overcoming the poor resistance of Mn-based catalysts to H2O and SO2 poison is still a challenge. This paper reviews the recent progress on the H2O and SO2 resistance of Mn-based catalysts for the low-temperature SCR of NOx. Firstly, the poison mechanisms of H2O and SO2 are introduced in detail, respectively. Secondly, Mn-based catalysts are divided into three categories—single MnOx catalysts, Mn-based multi-metal oxide catalysts, and Mn-based supported catalysts—to review the research progress of Mn-based catalysts for H2O and SO2 resistance. Thirdly, several strategies to reduce the poisonous effects of H2O and SO2, such as metal modification, proper support, the combination of metal modification and support, the rational design of structure and morphology, are summarized. Finally, perspectives and future directions of Mn-based catalysts for the low-temperature SCR of NOx are proposed.

  4. Low-temperature-active and salt-tolerant β-mannanase from a newly isolated Enterobacter sp. strain N18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jia; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-02-01

    A low-temperature-active and salt-tolerant β-mannanase produced by a novel mannanase-producer, Enterobacter sp. strain N18, was isolated, purified and then evaluated for its potential application as a gel-breaker in relation to viscosity reduction of guar-based hydraulic fracturing fluids used in oil field. The enzyme could lower the viscosity of guar gum solution by more than 95% within 10 min. The purified β-mannanase with molecular mass of 90 kDa displayed high activity in a broad range of pH and temperature: more than 70% of activity was retained in the pH range of 3.0-8.0 with the optimal pH 7.5, about 50% activity at 20°C with the optimal temperature 50°C. Furthermore, the enzyme retained >70% activity in the presence of 0.5-4.0 M NaCl. These properties implied that the enzyme from strain N18 had potential for serving as a gel-breaker for low temperature oil wells and other industrial fields, where chemical gel breakers were inactive due to low temperature. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A high-temperature tolerant species in clade 9 of the genus Phytophthora: P. hydrogena sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Gallegly, Mannon E; Hong, Chuanxue

    2014-01-01

    A previously unknown Phytophthora species was isolated from irrigation water in Virginia, USA. This novel species produces abundant noncaducous and nonpapillate sporangia in soil water extract solution. It sometimes produces chlamydospores and hyphal swellings in aged cultures and in Petri's solution. This species has optimum vegetative growth at 30 C and grows well at 35 C. The lowest and highest temperatures for growth are 5 and 40 C. All isolates examined in this study are compatibility type A1 and produce mostly plerotic oospores when paired with an A2 mating-type tester of P. cinnamomi. Sequence analyses of the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions and the mitochondrially encoded cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox 1) gene placed this species in clade 9 of the genus Phytophthora. These characteristics support the description of this taxon as a new species for which we propose the name P. hydrogena sp. nov. Further phylogenetic and physiological investigations of clade 9 species revealed a high-temperature tolerant cluster including P. hydrogena, P. aquimorbida, P. hydropathica, P. irrigata, P. chrysanthemi, P. insolita, P. polonica and P. parsiana. These species all grow well at 35 C. The monophyly of the species in this heat-tolerant cluster except P. insolita and P. polonica is highly supported by the maximum-likelihood analyses of the ITS and cox 1 sequences.

  6. CO tolerance by the PEMFC operational at temperatures up to 200°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; He, Ronghuan; Gao, Ji-An

    2003-01-01

    The CO poisoning effect on carbon-supported platinum catalysts in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been investigated in a temperature range from 125 to 200°C with the phosphoric acid-doped polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolyte. The effect is very temperature-dependent and can be s...

  7. Short-term salinity tolerance of northern pike, Esox lucius , fry, related to temperature and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lene; Skov, Christian; Koed, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The short-term tolerances of northern pike, Esox lucius L., fry reared in a freshwater hatchery, to salinity were examined in the laboratory. Survival of two size groups of pike fry (mean length 21 +/- 2 mm SD and 37 +/- 4 mm SD) was examined over 72- to 96-h periods at 9-14 ppt salinity in combi......The short-term tolerances of northern pike, Esox lucius L., fry reared in a freshwater hatchery, to salinity were examined in the laboratory. Survival of two size groups of pike fry (mean length 21 +/- 2 mm SD and 37 +/- 4 mm SD) was examined over 72- to 96-h periods at 9-14 ppt salinity...... than 13 ppt. Mortality at 12 ppt was significantly faster at 18 degrees C than 10 or 14 degrees C. Moreover, mortality was higher and faster for large than for small pike fry at 12 ppt and 14 degrees C. These results imply that pike raised in fresh water can survive stocking into brackish waters below...

  8. On the Breeding of Bivoltine Breeds of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae, Tolerant to High Temperature and High Humidity Conditions of the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harjeet Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The hot climatic conditions of tropics prevailing particularly in summer are contributing to the poor performance of the bivoltine breeds and the most important aspect is that many quantitative characters such as viability and cocoon traits decline sharply when temperature is high. Hence, in a tropical country like India, it is very essential to develop bivoltine breeds/hybrids which can withstand the high temperature stress conditions. This has resulted in the development of CSR18 × CSR19, compatible hybrid for rearing throughout the year by utilizing Japanese thermotolerant hybrids as breeding resource material. Though, the introduction of CSR18 × CSR19 in the field during summer months had considerable impact, the productivity level and returns realized do not match that of other productive CSR hybrids. Therefore, the acceptance level of this hybrid with the farmers was not up to the expected level. This has necessitated the development of a temperature tolerant hybrid with better productivity traits than CSR18 × CSR19. Though, it was a difficult task to break the negative correlation associated with survival and productivity traits, attempts on this line had resulted in the development of CSR46 × CSR47, a temperature tolerant bivoltine hybrid with better productivity traits than CSR18 × CSR19. However, though, these hybrids are tolerant to high temperature environments, they are not tolerant to many of the silkworm diseases. Keeping this in view, an attempt is made to develop silkworm hybrids tolerant to high temperature environments.

  9. Geochemistry of High Temperature Vent Fluids in Yellowstone Lake: Dissolved Carbon and Sulfur Concentrations and Isotopic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, C.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Tan, C.; Fu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park is a dynamic environment home to an array of geysers, hot springs, and hydrothermal vents fueled by the underlying continental magmatic intrusion. Yellowstone Lake vent fluids accounts for approximately 10% of the total geothermal flux for all of Yellowstone National Park. Though studying this remote hydrothermal system poses severe challenges, it provides an excellent natural laboratory to research hydrothermal fluids that undergo higher pressure and temperature conditions in an environment largely shielded from atmospheric oxygen. The location of these vents also provides chemistry that is characteristic of fluids deeper in the Yellowstone hydrothermal system. In August 2016, hydrothermal fluids were collected from the Stevenson Island vents in collaboration with the Hydrothermal Dynamics of Yellowstone Lake (HD-YLAKE) project using novel sampling techniques and monitoring instrumentation. The newly built ROV Yogi was deployed to reach the vents in-situ with temperatures in excess of 151oC at 100-120 m depth, equipped with a 12-cylinder isobaric sampler to collect the hydrothermal fluids. Results from geochemical analyses indicate the fluids are rich in gases such as CO2, CH4, and H2S, with sample concentrations of approximately 12 mM, 161 μm, and 2.1 mM respectively. However, lake water mixing with the hydrothermal endmember fluid likely diluted these concentrations in the collected samples. Isotopic analyses indicate CO2 has a δ13C of -6 indicating magmatic origins, however the CH4 resulted in a δ13C of -65 which is in the biological range. This biogenic signature is likely due to the pyrolysis of immature organic matter in the lake bottom sediment, since the high temperatures measured for the fluids would not allow the presence of methanogens. H2S concentrations have not been previously measured for the hydrothermal fluids in Yellowstone Lake, and our vent fluid samples indicate significantly higher H2S concentrations than reported

  10. Rootstock Sub-Optimal Temperature Tolerance Determines Transcriptomic Responses after Long-Term Root Cooling in Rootstocks and Scions of Grafted Tomato Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Ntatsi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grafting of elite cultivars onto tolerant rootstocks is an advanced strategy to increase tomato tolerance to sub-optimal temperature. However, a detailed understanding of adaptive mechanisms to sub-optimal temperature in rootstocks and scions of grafting combinations on a physiological and molecular level is lacking. Here, the commercial cultivar Kommeet was grafted either onto ‘Moneymaker’ (sensitive or onto the line accession LA 1777 of Solanum habrochaites (tolerant. Grafted plants were grown in NFT-system at either optimal (25°C or sub-optimal (15°C temperatures in the root environment with optimal air temperature (25°C for 22 days. Grafting onto the differently tolerant rootstocks caused differences in shoot fresh and dry weight, total leaf area and dry matter content of roots, in stomatal conductance and intercellular CO2 and guaiacol peroxidase activity but not in net photosynthesis, sugar, starch and amino acid content, lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity. In leaves, comparative transcriptome analysis identified 361 differentially expressed genes (DEG responding to sub-optimal root temperature when ‘Kommeet’ was grafted onto the sensitive but no when grafted onto the tolerant rootstock. 1509 and 2036 DEG responding to sub-optimal temperature were identified in LA 1777 and ‘Moneymaker’ rootstocks, respectively. In tolerant rootstocks down-regulated genes were enriched in main stress-responsive functional categories and up-regulated genes in cellulose synthesis suggesting that cellulose synthesis may be one of the main adaptation mechanisms to long-term sub-optimal temperature. Down-regulated genes of the sensitive rootstock showed a similar response, but functional categories of up-regulated genes pointed to induced stress responses. Rootstocks of the sensitive cultivar Moneymaker showed in addition an enrichment of up-regulated genes in the functional categories fatty acid desaturation, phenylpropanoids

  11. Extreme Temperature Radiation Tolerant Instrumentation for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop and commercialize a high reliability, high temperature smart neutron flux sensor for NASA Nuclear Thermal Propulsion...

  12. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are

  13. Acid tolerance in Salmonella typhimurium induced by culturing in the presence of organic acids at different growth temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-02-01

    The influence of growth temperature and acidification of the culture medium up to pH 4.25 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids on the growth and subsequent acid resistance at pH 3.0 of Salmonella typhimurium CECT 443 was studied. The minimum pH value which allowed for S. typhimurium growth within the temperature range of 25-37 degrees C was 4.5 when the pH was reduced using citric and hydrochloric acids, and 5.4 and 6.4 when lactic acid and acetic acid were used, respectively. At high (45 degrees C) or low (10 degrees C) temperatures, the growth pH boundary was increased about 1 pH unit. The growth temperature markedly modified the acid resistance of the resulting cells. In all cases, D-values were lower for cells grown at 10 degrees C and significantly increased with increasing growth temperature up to 37 degrees C, at which D-values obtained were up to 10 times higher. Cells grown at 45 degrees C showed D-values similar to those found for cells grown at 25 degrees C. The growth of cells in acidified media, regardless of the pH value, caused an increase in their acid resistance at the four incubation temperatures, although the magnitude of the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) observed depended on the growth temperature. Acid adapted cultures at 10 degrees C showed D-values ranging from 5.75 to 6.91 min, which turned out to be about 2 times higher than those corresponding to non-acid adapted cultures, while higher temperatures induced an increase in D-values of at least 3.5 times. Another finding was that, while at 10 and 45 degrees C no significant differences among the effect of the different acids tested in inducing an ATR were observed, when cells were grown at 25 and 37 degrees C citric acid generally turned out to be the acid which induced the strongest ATR. Results obtained in this study show that growth temperature is an important factor affecting S. typhimurium acid resistance and could contribute to find new strategies based on intelligent

  14. Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-lin; Liu, Ji-guang; Xiao, Han-xin; Ma, Shao-jian

    2017-11-01

    Sulfuric acid leaching of high iron-bearing zinc calcine was investigated to assess the effects of sulfuric acid concentration, liquid- to-solid ratio, leaching time, leaching temperature, and the stirring speed on the leaching rates of zinc and iron. The results showed that the sulfuric acid concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, leaching time, and leaching temperature strongly influenced the leaching of zinc and iron, whereas stirring speed had little influence. Zinc was mainly leached and the leaching rate of iron was low when the sulfuric acid concentration was less than 100 g/L. At sulfuric acid concentrations higher than 100 g/L, the leaching rate of iron increased quickly with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. This behavior is attributed to iron-bearing minerals such as zinc ferrite in zinc calcine dissolving at high temperatures and high sulfuric acid concentrations but not at low temperatures and low sulfuric acid concentrations.

  15. Corrosion resistance of materials of construction for high temperature sulfuric acid service in thermochemical IS process. Alloy 800, Alloy 600, SUSXM15J1 and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Onuki, Kaoru; Shimizu, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Akihisa

    2006-01-01

    Exposure tests of candidate materials were carried out up to 1000 hr in the sulfuric acid environments of thermochemical hydrogen production IS process, focusing on the corrosion of welded portion and of crevice area. In the gas phase sulfuric acid decomposition condition at 850degC, welded samples of Alloy 800 and of Alloy 600 showed the same good corrosion resistance as the base materials. In the boiling condition of 95 wt% sulfuric acid solution, test sample of SiC showed the same good corrosion resistance. Also negligible corrosion was observed in crevice corrosion. (author)

  16. Cloud tolerance of remote sensing technologies to measure land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional means to estimate land surface temperature (LST) from space relies on the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral window and is limited to cloud-free scenes. To also provide LST estimates during periods with clouds, a new method was developed to estimate LST based on passive microwave (MW) obse...

  17. TEMPERATURE TOLERANCE AND LATITUDINAL RANGE OF BROWN-ALGAE FROM TEMPERATE PACIFIC SOUTH-AMERICA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PETERS, AF; BREEMAN, AM

    Lower and upper survival temperatures of microthalli of 25 species of South American Phaeophyceae isolated from central Peru (14-degrees-S) to the Canal Beagle (55-degrees-S) were determined using 2-wk exposure for the upper and 4-wk exposure for the lower limit. All species survive 4 wks at -

  18. Effects of high and low temperatures on thermal tolerance in Folsomia candida (Collembola)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe; Holmstrup, Martin; Bayley, Mark

    2008-01-01

    to fluctuating temperatures. Possible mechanisms behind the heat hardening may be induction of protective stress proteins. The present study also elucidated if molecular responses such as changing activity of protein kinase and gene transcription of stress proteins were involved in the increased heat shock......% survival), - 6.4 or - 7.4 °C (100% mortality) compared with the control. In contrast, fluctuation between 20 and 30.1 °C (± 0.1°C) induced a significantly increased tolerance to a 34.6 °C heat shock with survival increasing from about 10% in the controls to a maximum of 80% in the animals exposed...

  19. 24-Epibrassinoslide enhances plant tolerance to stress from low temperatures and poor light intensities in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lirong; Zou, Zhirong; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yanyan; Yan, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (Brs) are a newly recognized group of active steroidal hormones that occur at low concentrations in all plant parts and one of the active and stable forms is 24-epibrassinolide (EBR). We investigated the effect of EBR on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) and its mechanism when seedlings were exposed to low temperature and poor light stress conditions. Leaves of stress-tolerant 'Zhongza9' and stress-sensitive 'Zhongshu4' cultivars were pre-treated with spray solutions containing either 0.1 μM EBR or no EBR (control). The plants were then transferred to chambers where they were exposed to low temperatures of 12 °C/6 °C (day/night) under a low light (LL) level of 80 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1). Exogenous application of EBR significantly increased the antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase, and decreased the rate of O2 · (-) formation and H2O2 and malondialdehyde contents. Additionally, the ATP synthase β subunit content was increased by exogenous hormone application. Based on these results, we conclude that exogenous EBR can elicit synergism between the antioxidant enzyme systems and the ATP synthase β subunit so that scavenging of reactive oxygen species becomes more efficient. These activities enable plants to cope better under combined low temperature and poor light stresses.

  20. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature affect the tolerance of the free-living marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta to acute copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevenkamp, Lisa; Brown, Alastair; Hauton, Chris; Kordas, Anna; Thatje, Sven; Vanreusel, Ann

    2017-11-01

    Potential deep-sea mineral extraction poses new challenges for ecotoxicological research since little is known about effects of abiotic conditions present in the deep sea on the toxicity of heavy metals. Due to the difficulty of collecting and maintaining deep-sea organisms alive, a first step would be to understand the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and low temperatures on heavy metal toxicity using shallow-water relatives of deep-sea species. Here, we present the results of acute copper toxicity tests on the free-living shallow-water marine nematode Halomonhystera disjuncta, which has close phylogenetic and ecological links to the bathyal species Halomonhystera hermesi. Copper toxicity was assessed using a semi-liquid gellan gum medium at two levels of hydrostatic pressure (0.1MPa and 10MPa) and temperature (10°C and 20°C) in a fully crossed design. Mortality of nematodes in each treatment was assessed at 4 time intervals (24 and 48h for all experiments and additionally 72 and 96h for experiments run at 10°C). LC 50 values ranged between 0.561 and 1.864mg Cu 2+ L -1 and showed a decreasing trend with incubation time. Exposure to high hydrostatic pressure significantly increased sensitivity of nematodes to copper, whereas lower temperature resulted in an apparently increased copper tolerance, possibly as a result of a slower metabolism under low temperatures. These results indicate that hydrostatic pressure and temperature significantly affect metal toxicity and therefore need to be considered in toxicity assessments for deep-sea species. Any application of pollution limits derived from studies of shallow-water species to the deep-sea mining context must be done cautiously, with consideration of the effects of both stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  2. Upper temperature tolerance of North Atlantic and North Pacific geographical isolates of Chondrus species (Rhodophyta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüning, K.; Guiry, M. D.; Masuda, M.

    1987-09-01

    The upper survival temperature for most isolates of Chondrus crispus from localities ranging from northern Norway and Iceland to Spain, and for an isolate from Nova Scotia, was 28 °C after 2 weeks of exposure to temperatures of 20 31 °C at intervals of 1 °C. An upper survival limit of 29 °C was exhibited by a few European isolates from the English Channel, the North Sea, and one Irish isolate from the upper intertidal. The warm-temperate Japanese species C. nipponicus and C. giganteus forma flabellatus survived 30 °C, whereas 29 °C was the upper survival limit for the coldtemperature C. pinnulatus forma pinnulatus from northern Japan. A possible origin of C. crispus in the north Pacific is discussed.

  3. Enhancement of co-tolerance in polymer electrolyte fuel cells by increased cell temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajbolouri, F.; Andreaus, B.; Scherer, G.; Wokaun A

    2003-03-01

    AC-impedance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the temperature dependence of CO-poisoning in a 30 cm{sup 2} fuel cell for commercial Pt E-tek electrodes. An inductive behavior was shown to be characteristic for the CO-poisoning on Pt at higher current densities, above 200 mA/cm{sup 2}, and for CO-contents higher than 50 ppm. At lower current densities where the CO-oxidation is slight or negligible no inductive behavior was observed. The increase of cell temperature from 90 {sup o}C to 100 {sup o}C decreased the charge transfer resistivity by a factor of 4. A simple model was established for a quantitative analysis of CO-poisoning. (author)

  4. The effects of sulfur on carbon partitioning and solubility in high pressure-temperature alloy-silicate systems: Implications for fractionation of carbon and sulfur during accretion and core formation of Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuno, K.; Dasgupta, R.; Grewal, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining the carbon (C) fractionation between the silicate magma ocean (MO) and core-forming alloy liquid is required to determine the origin and evolution of C between reservoirs such as atmosphere, crust, mantle, and core of terrestrial planets. [1]. Alloy-silicate partitioning experiments of C have shown that preferential fractionation of C into the alloy liquid would have left the bulk silicate Earth (BSE) devoid of C [2-4]. Merger of a sulfur (S)-rich differentiated planetary embryo into the proto-Earth could have supplied almost the entire C budget of the present-day BSE [5], however, experimental data on the systematic effect of S on C solubility in Fe-Ni alloy liquid and its partitioning between the alloy liquid and silicate melt are lacking. We have performed multi anvil experiments with alloy-silicate±glassy carbon mixtures at 6-13 GPa and 1800-2000 °C, fO2 of ΔIW of -0.4 to -2.3, using graphite or MgO capsules and varying alloy S content from 10 to 36 wt.%. We find that C content of the alloy liquid decreases from 4.6 to 0.2 wt.% with increasing alloy S content of 10 to 36 wt.%. Temperature has a small positive effect and pressure has little effect on alloy C solubility. Alloy-silicate partition coefficient of C also decreases with increasing alloy S content at a given P-T-fO2. We used the data to quantify the distribution of C between the silicate MO and core-forming alloy liquid of an S-rich planetary embryo. The model calculations using our data suggest that the addition of a relatively oxidized, C-poor ( 0.3 wt.%) and S-rich ( 3 wt.%) large embryo (6-20% of the present-day Earth mass) to a volatile-poor growing Earth can establish the C and S contents [6, 7] and C/S ratio [8] in BSE. The resulting core composition after the accretion and core formation process is estimated to be C- and S-poor ( 0.05 wt.% and 0.6 wt.%, respectively). On the other hand, a single stage core formation on Mars that results in a core with 8-10 wt.% S can yield a

  5. Heat-Related Deaths in Hot Cities: Estimates of Human Tolerance to High Temperature Thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Harlan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥65 during the months May–October for years 2000–2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90–97 °F; 32.2‒36.1 °C were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C. Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C. Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide.

  6. Heat-related deaths in hot cities: estimates of human tolerance to high temperature thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlan, Sharon L; Chowell, Gerardo; Yang, Shuo; Petitti, Diana B; Morales Butler, Emmanuel J; Ruddell, Benjamin L; Ruddell, Darren M

    2014-03-20

    In this study we characterized the relationship between temperature and mortality in central Arizona desert cities that have an extremely hot climate. Relationships between daily maximum apparent temperature (ATmax) and mortality for eight condition-specific causes and all-cause deaths were modeled for all residents and separately for males and females ages <65 and ≥ 65 during the months May-October for years 2000-2008. The most robust relationship was between ATmax on day of death and mortality from direct exposure to high environmental heat. For this condition-specific cause of death, the heat thresholds in all gender and age groups (ATmax = 90-97 °F; 32.2-36.1 °C) were below local median seasonal temperatures in the study period (ATmax = 99.5 °F; 37.5 °C). Heat threshold was defined as ATmax at which the mortality ratio begins an exponential upward trend. Thresholds were identified in younger and older females for cardiac disease/stroke mortality (ATmax = 106 and 108 °F; 41.1 and 42.2 °C) with a one-day lag. Thresholds were also identified for mortality from respiratory diseases in older people (ATmax = 109 °F; 42.8 °C) and for all-cause mortality in females (ATmax = 107 °F; 41.7 °C) and males <65 years (ATmax = 102 °F; 38.9 °C). Heat-related mortality in a region that has already made some adaptations to predictable periods of extremely high temperatures suggests that more extensive and targeted heat-adaptation plans for climate change are needed in cities worldwide.

  7. Effects of radiational heating at low air temperature on water balance, cold tolerance, and visible injury of red spruce foliage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, J L; Amundson, R G

    1992-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that winter needle mortality in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) is increased by exposure to direct solar radiation, possibly as a result of photo-oxidative damage, accelerated winter desiccation, or reduced cold tolerance due to heating of sun-exposed needles. In an experiment at controlled subfreezing air temperatures of -10 to -20 degrees C, visible radiation was less effective than infrared radiation in producing needle desiccation and visible injury during freeze-thaw cycles. However, visible radiation produced a red-brown color in injured needles, similar to natural winter injury, whereas injured needles exposed to infrared radiation were yellow and injured needles kept in darkness were dark brown. Thus, visible radiation was necessary to produce the red-brown color of damaged needles, but not the injury itself. Needle desiccation was not strongly correlated with visible injury, but the pattern of variation in visible injury among trees and the positive correlation between electrolyte leakage and visible injury suggested that freezing damage following freeze-thaw cycles might cause the visible injury. This was confirmed by a second experiment that showed loss of cold hardiness in needles thawed by radiational heating for six consecutive days. Even with a constant nighttime temperature of -10 degrees C, six days of radiational heating of needles to above freezing caused a small (2.8 degrees C) mean decrease in needle cold tolerance, as measured by electrolyte leakage. Continuous darkness at -10 degrees C for six days resulted in an estimated 5.6 degrees C mean increase in needle cold tolerance. Freezing injury stimulated desiccation: cooling at 4 degrees C h(-1) to -43 or -48 degrees C increased the dehydration rate of isolated shoots by a factor of two to three during the first day after thawing. Within three days at 15 to 22 degrees C and 50% relative humidity, the mean water content of these shoots fell to 60% or lower, compared to

  8. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  9. The adsorption of sulfur by microporous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The sorption of sulfur by the zeolites NaX (= 13X) and CaA (= 5A) and an activated charcoal prepared from sugar was investigated at temperatures between 150 and 350°C and relative sulfur pressures between 10−4 and 10−1. The adsorbate-adsorbate interaction indicated by the S-shaped isotherm for the

  10. Sulfur Removal by Adding Iron During the Digestion Process of High-sulfur Bauxite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanwei, Liu; Hengwei, Yan; Wenhui, Ma; Keqiang, Xie; Dunyong, Li; Licong, Zheng; Pengfei, Li

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to sulfur removal by adding iron during the digestion process. Iron can react with high-valence sulfur (S2O3 2-, SO3 2-, SO4 2-) to generate S2- at digestion temperature, and then S2- enter red mud in the form of Na3FeS3 to be removed. As iron dosage increases, high-valence sulfur concentration decreases, but the concentration of S2- increases; sulfur digestion rate decreases while sulfur content in red mud markedly increases; the alumina digestion rate, conversely, remains fairly stable. So sulfur can be removed completely by adding iron in digestion process, which provide a theoretical basis for the effective removal of sulfur in alumina production process.

  11. Proteomic study of low-temperature responses in strawberry cultivars (Fragaria x ananassa) that differ in cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Gage; Wilson, Robert C; Goodpaster, John V; Sønsteby, Anita; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A; You, Jin-Sam; Rohloff, Jens; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2012-08-01

    To gain insight into the molecular basis contributing to overwintering hardiness, a comprehensive proteomic analysis comparing crowns of octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars that differ in freezing tolerance was conducted. Four cultivars were examined for freeze tolerance and the most cold-tolerant cultivar ('Jonsok') and least-tolerant cultivar ('Frida') were compared with a goal to reveal how freezing tolerance is achieved in this distinctive overwintering structure and to identify potential cold-tolerance-associated biomarkers. Supported by univariate and multivariate analysis, a total of 63 spots from two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis and 135 proteins from label-free quantitative proteomics were identified as significantly differentially expressed in crown tissue from the two strawberry cultivars exposed to 0-, 2-, and 42-d cold treatment. Proteins identified as cold-tolerance-associated included molecular chaperones, antioxidants/detoxifying enzymes, metabolic enzymes, pathogenesis-related proteins, and flavonoid pathway proteins. A number of proteins were newly identified as associated with cold tolerance. Distinctive mechanisms for cold tolerance were characterized for two cultivars. In particular, the 'Frida' cold response emphasized proteins specific to flavonoid biosynthesis, while the more freezing-tolerant 'Jonsok' had a more comprehensive suite of known stress-responsive proteins including those involved in antioxidation, detoxification, and disease resistance. The molecular basis for 'Jonsok'-enhanced cold tolerance can be explained by the constitutive level of a number of proteins that provide a physiological stress-tolerant poise.

  12. Decreased TK activity alters growth, yield and tolerance to low temperature and low light intensity in transgenic cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Huangai; Dong, Xubing; Wu, Guoxiu; Wang, Meiling; Ai, Xizhen

    2015-02-01

    Four CsTK antisense transgenic cucumber plants were obtained. Decreased TK activity decreased the photosynthetic rate, seed germination rate, growth yield, and the tolerance to low temperature and weak light stress. Transketolase (TK, EC 2.2.1.1) is a key enzyme in the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (Calvin cycle). A cDNA fragment (526 bp) encoding transketolase was cloned from cucumber plants (Cucumis sativa L. cv 'Jinyou 3') by RT-PCR. The antisense expression [(PBI-CsTK(-)] vector containing the CsTK gene fragment was constructed. The resulting plasmid was introduced into the cucumber inbred lines '08-1' using the agrobacterium-mediated method, and four antisense transgenic cucumber plants were obtained. Decreased CsTK expression either unaltered or slightly increased the mRNA abundance and activities of the other main enzymes in the Calvin cycle, however, it decreased the TK activity and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) in antisense transgenic cucumber leaves. Antisense plants showed decreases in the growth, ratio of female flowers and yield compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The decrease in Pn, stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and the increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) were greater in antisense transgenic plants than in WT plants under low temperature (5 °C) and low light intensity (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)).

  13. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ . Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  14. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  15. Viability, Acid and Bile Tolerance of Spray Dried Probiotic Bacteria and Some Commercial Probiotic Supplement Products Kept at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-06-01

    Production of probiotic food supplements that are shelf-stable at room temperature has been developed for consumer's convenience, but information on the stability in acid and bile environment is still scarce. Viability and acid and bile tolerance of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplements were evaluated. Bifidobacterium and L. acidophilus were encapsulated with casein-based emulsion using spray drying. Water activity (aw ) of the microspheres containing Bifidobacterium or L. acidophilus (SD GM product) was adjusted to 0.07 followed by storage at 25 °C for 10 wk. Encapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplement products (AL, GH, RE, and BM) were tested. Since commercial probiotic products contained mixed bacteria, selective media MRS-LP (containing L-cysteine and Na-propionate) and MRS-clindamycin agar were used to grow Bifidobacterium spp. or L. acidophilus, respectively, and to inhibit the growth of other strains. The results showed that aw had a strong negative correlation with the viability of dehydrated probiotics of the 6 products. Viable counts of Bifidobacterium spp. and L. acidophilus of SD GM, AL, and GH were between 8.3 and 9.2 log CFU/g, whereas that of BM and RE were between 6.7 and 7.3 log CFU/g. Bifidobacterium in SD GM, in AL, and in GH products and L. acidophilus in SD GM, in AL, and in BM products demonstrated high tolerance to acid. Most of dehydrated probiotic bacteria were able to survive in bile environment except L. acidophilus in RE product. Exposure to gastric juice influenced bacterial survivability in subsequent bile environment. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Mercury chemisorption by sulfur adsorbed in porous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Peppelenbos, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The sorption of mercury vapor by adsorbed sulfur in the zeolites CaA (= 5A) and NaX (=13X) and two types of active carbon has been measured at a temperature of 50°C. With increasing degree of micropore filling by sulfur the fraction of sulfur accessible to mercury atoms decreased for CaA and NaX.

  17. A temperature and salt-tolerant L-glutaminase from gangotri region of uttarakhand himalaya: enzyme purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Balvinder; Adhikari, Dilip Kumar; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Ghosh, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Purification and characterization of halotolerant, thermostable alkaline L-glutaminase from a Bacillus sp. LKG-01 (MTCC 10401), isolated from Gangotri region of Uttarakhand Himalaya, is being reported in this paper. Enzyme has been purified 49-fold from cell-free extract with 25% recovery (specific activity 584.2 U/mg protein) by (NH₄)₂SO₄ precipitation followed by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Enzyme has a molecular weight of 66 kDa. L-Glutaminase is most active at pH 11.0 and stable in the pH range 8.0-11.0. Temperature optimum is 70 °C and is completely stable after 3 h pre-incubation at 50 °C. Enzyme reflects more enhanced activity with 1-20% (w/v) NaCl, which is further reduced to 80% when NaCl concentration was increased up to 25%. L-Glutaminase is almost active with K⁺, Zn²⁺, and Ni²⁺ ions and K(m) and V(max) values of 240 μM and 277.77 ± 1.1 U/mg proteins, respectively. Higher specific activity, purification fold, better halo-tolerance, and thermostability would make this enzyme more attractive for food fermentation with respect to other soil microbe derived L-glutaminase reported so far.

  18. Significantly enhanced substrate tolerance of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase via atmospheric and room temperature plasma and cell immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting-Ting; Gong, Jin-Song; Gu, Bing-Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Heng; Lu, Zhen-Ming; Lu, Mao-Lin; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the study was to enhance the substrate tolerance of Pseudomonas putida nitrilase via atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) and cell immobilization. The mutant library was constructed by ARTP and rapidly screened by an OPA-TCA microscale reaction. A mutant strain of mut-D3 was obtained and its optimum substrate concentration was improved to 150mM from 100mM. It could accumulate 189g/L nicotinic acid (NA) from 3-cyanopyridine (3-CP), which was increased by 42% compared with that of wild type (WT). Additionally, composite immobilization of mut-D3 was performed and SA-PVA immobilized cells could catalyze 250mM 3-CP each batch with finally accumulating 346g/L NA, while free cells accumulated 175g/L NA. These results indicated that the free or immobilized catalysts of mut-D3 could serve as a good choice for NA production. This is the first report on mutation breeding of nitrilase-producing microorganisms by ARTP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A dominant major locus in chromosome 9 of rice (Oryza sativa L.) confers tolerance to 48°C high temperature at seedling stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, He; Liu, Jianping; Wang, Ya; Huang, Nongrong; Zhang, Xiaobo; Wang, Liangchao; Zhang, Jiwen; Tu, Jumin; Zhong, Xuhua

    2013-03-01

    In an earlier greenhouse screening, we identified a local indica cultivar HT54 tolerant to high temperature at both seedling and grain-filling stages. In this study, we develop an optimized procedure for fine assessment of this heat tolerance. The results indicated that HT54 seedlings could tolerate high temperature up to 48 °C for 79h. The genetic analysis of F(1) and F(2) offspring derived from the cross between HT54 and HT13, a heat-sensitive breeding line, reveals that the heat tolerance of HT54 was controlled by a dominant major locus, which has been designated as OsHTAS (Oryza sativa heat tolerance at seedling stage). This locus was mapped on rice chromosome 9 within an interval of 420kb between markers of InDel5 and RM7364. The determined candidate ZFP gene has been confirmed to be cosegregated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) developed PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker RBsp1407 in its promoter region. Another heat tolerance-associated SNP was identified in the first intron of its 5'-untranslated region. The existence of these SNPs thereby indicated that the OsHTAS locus contains at least two alleles. We named the one from HT54 as OsHTAS ( a ) and the one from HT13 as OsHTAS ( b ). Further dynamic expression analysis demonstrated that OsHTAS ( a ) was actively responsive to 45 °C high temperature stress compared with the OsHTAS ( b ) allele.

  20. The ecological coherence of temperature and salinity tolerance interaction and pigmentation in a non-marine vibrio isolated from Salar de Atacama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karem Gallardo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of microorganisms from the Vibrio genus in saline lakes from northern Chile had been evidenced using Numerical Taxonomy decades before and, more recently, by phylogenetic analyses of environmental samples and isolates. Most of the knowledge about this genus came from marine isolates and showed temperature and salinity to be integral agents in shaping the niche of the Vibrio populations. The stress tolerance phenotypes of Vibrio sp. Teb5a1 isolated from Salar de Atacama was investigated. It was able to grow without NaCl and tolerated up to 100 g/L of the salt. Furthermore, it grew between 17° and 49°C (optimum 30°C in the absence of NaCl, and the range was expanded into cold temperature (4-49°C in the presence of the salt. Other additional adaptive strategies were observed in response to the osmotic stress: pigment production, identified as the known antibacterial prodigiosin, swimming and swarming motility and synthesis of a polar flagellum. It is possible to infer that environmental congruence might explain the cellular phenotypes observed in Vibrio sp. considering that coupling between temperature and salinity tolerance, the production of antibacterial agents at higher temperatures, flagellation and motility increase the chance of Vibrio sp. to survive in salty environments with high daily temperature swings and UV radiation.

  1. Acclimatization to high-variance habitats does not enhance physiological tolerance of two key Caribbean corals to future temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Emma F; Smith, David J; Evenhuis, Chris; Enochs, Ian; Manzello, Derek; Woodcock, Stephen; Suggett, David J

    2016-05-25

    Corals are acclimatized to populate dynamic habitats that neighbour coral reefs. Habitats such as seagrass beds exhibit broad diel changes in temperature and pH that routinely expose corals to conditions predicted for reefs over the next 50-100 years. However, whether such acclimatization effectively enhances physiological tolerance to, and hence provides refuge against, future climate scenarios remains unknown. Also, whether corals living in low-variance habitats can tolerate present-day high-variance conditions remains untested. We experimentally examined how pH and temperature predicted for the year 2100 affects the growth and physiology of two dominant Caribbean corals (Acropora palmata and Porites astreoides) native to habitats with intrinsically low (outer-reef terrace, LV) and/or high (neighbouring seagrass, HV) environmental variance. Under present-day temperature and pH, growth and metabolic rates (calcification, respiration and photosynthesis) were unchanged for HV versus LV populations. Superimposing future climate scenarios onto the HV and LV conditions did not result in any enhanced tolerance to colonies native to HV. Calcification rates were always lower for elevated temperature and/or reduced pH. Together, these results suggest that seagrass habitats may not serve as refugia against climate change if the magnitude of future temperature and pH changes is equivalent to neighbouring reef habitats. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Influence of Sulfur Fertilization on the Antioxidant Activities of Onion Juices Prepared by Thermal Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eunmi; Surh, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Two onions (Sulfur-1 and Sulfur-4) cultivated with different sulfur applications were thermally processed to elucidate the effects of heat treatment on browning index and antioxidant activity. Sulfur-4 onion had higher sulfur content compared with the Sulfur-1 onion. After thermal processing, browning intensity was different between the two onions juices, with lower values observed for Sulfur-4 onion juice. This suggests that sulfur inhibits the Maillard browning reaction. The total reducing capacity of the juices increased at higher thermal processing temperatures; however, it was also lower in the Sulfur-4 onion juice. This suggests that the heat treatment of onions enhanced their antioxidant activity, but the effect was offset in the Sulfur-4 onion juice presumably due to higher sulfur content. This study indicates that sulfur, a core element for the functionality of onions, can decrease the antioxidant activity of thermally processed onions because of its potential as a Maillard reaction inhibitor. PMID:27390734

  3. Analysis of the U.S. forest tolerance patterns depending on current and future temperature and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean Lienard; John Harrison; Nikolay. Strigul

    2015-01-01

    Forested ecosystems are shaped by climate, soil and biotic interactions, resulting in constrained spatial distribution of species and biomes. Tolerance traits of species determine their fundamental ecological niche, while biotic interactions narrow tree distributions to the realized niche. In particular, shade, drought and waterlogging tolerances have been well-...

  4. Graphene oxide as a sulfur immobilizer in high performance lithium/sulfur cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuegang; Cairns, Elton J.; Ji, Liwen; Rao, Mumin

    2017-06-06

    The loss of sulfur cathode material as a result of polysulfide dissolution causes significant capacity fading in rechargeable lithium/sulfur cells. Embodiments of the invention use a chemical approach to immobilize sulfur and lithium polysulfides via the reactive functional groups on graphene oxide. This approach obtains a uniform and thin (.about.tens of nanometers) sulfur coating on graphene oxide sheets by a chemical reaction-deposition strategy and a subsequent low temperature thermal treatment process. Strong interaction between graphene oxide and sulfur or polysulfides demonstrate lithium/sulfur cells with a high reversible capacity of 950-1400 mAh g.sup.-1, and stable cycling for more than 50 deep cycles at 0.1 C.

  5. Graphene oxide as a sulfur immobilizer in high performance lithium/sulfur cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuegang; Cairns, Elton J.; Ji, Liwen; Rao, Mumin

    2017-12-26

    The loss of sulfur cathode material as a result of polysulfide dissolution causes significant capacity fading in rechargeable lithium/sulfur cells. Embodiments of the invention use a chemical approach to immobilize sulfur and lithium polysulfides via the reactive functional groups on graphene oxide. This approach obtains a uniform and thin (.about.tens of nanometers) sulfur coating on graphene oxide sheets by a chemical reaction-deposition strategy and a subsequent low temperature thermal treatment process. Strong interaction between graphene oxide and sulfur or polysulfides demonstrate lithium/sulfur cells with a high reversible capacity of 950-1400 mAh g.sup.-1, and stable cycling for more than 50 deep cycles at 0.1 C.

  6. Enhanced tolerance to methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress and high temperature in transgenic potato plants overexpressing the CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Duck; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Lee, Haeng-Soon

    2010-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a major threat for plants exposed to various environmental stresses. Previous studies found that transgenic potato plants expressing both copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) (referred to as SSA plants), or nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) (SN plants), showed enhanced tolerance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress and high temperature. This study aimed to develop transgenic plants that were more tolerant of oxidative stress by introducing the NDPK2 gene into SSA potato plants under the control of an oxidative stress-inducible peroxidase (SWPA2) promoter to create SSAN plants. SSAN leaf discs and whole plants showed enhanced tolerance to MV, as compared to SSA, SN or non-transgenic (NT) plants. SSAN plants sprayed with 400 µM MV exhibited about 53 and 83% less visible damage than did SSA and SN plants, respectively. The expression levels of the CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 genes in SSAN plants following MV treatment correlated well with MV tolerance. SOD, APX, NDPK and catalase antioxidant enzyme activities were also increased in MV-treated SSAN plants. In addition, SSAN plants were more tolerant to high temperature stress at 42°C, exhibiting a 6.2% reduction in photosynthetic activity as compared to plants grown at 25°C. In contrast, the photosynthetic activities of SN and SSA plants decreased by 50 and 18%, respectively. These results indicate that the simultaneous overexpression of CuZnSOD, APX and NDPK2 is more effective than single or double transgene expression for developing plants with enhanced tolerance to various environmental stresses. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  7. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  8. At the edge of the thermal window: effects of elevated temperature on the resting metabolism, hypoxia tolerance and upper critical thermal limit of a widespread African cichlid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Laura H; Chapman, Lauren J

    2015-01-01

    Tropical inland fishes are predicted to be especially vulnerable to thermal stress because they experience small temperature fluctuations that may select for narrow thermal windows. In this study, we measured resting metabolic rate (RMR), critical oxygen tension (P crit) and critical thermal maximum (CTMax) of the widespread African cichlid (Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae) in response to short-term acclimation to temperatures within and above their natural thermal range. Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor collected in Lake Kayanja, Uganda, a population living near the upper thermal range of the species, were acclimated to 23, 26, 29 and 32°C for 3 days directly after capture, and RMR and P crit were then quantified. In a second group of P. multicolor from the same population, CTMax and the thermal onset of agitation were determined for fish acclimated to 26, 29 and 32°C for 7 days. Both RMR and P crit were significantly higher in fish acclimated to 32°C, indicating decreased tolerance to hypoxia and increased metabolic requirements at temperatures only slightly (∼1°C) above their natural thermal range. The CTMax increased with acclimation temperature, indicating some degree of thermal compensation induced by short-term exposure to higher temperatures. However, agitation temperature (likely to represent an avoidance response to increased temperature during CTMax trials) showed no increase with acclimation temperature. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that P. multicolor is able to maintain its RMR and P crit across the range of temperatures characteristic of its natural habitat, but incurs a higher cost of resting metabolism and reduced hypoxia tolerance at temperatures slightly above its present range.

  9. Sulfur-Containing Agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendar, Ponnam; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-10-09

    Modern agricultural chemistry has to support farmers by providing innovative agrochemicals. In this context, the introduction of sulfur atoms into an active ingredient is still an important tool in modulating the properties of new crop-protection compounds. More than 30% of today's agrochemicals contain at least one sulfur atom, mainly in fungicides, herbicides and insecticides. A number of recently developed sulfur-containing agrochemical candidates represent a novel class of chemical compounds with new modes of action, so we intend to highlight the emerging interest in commercially active sulfur-containing compounds. This chapter gives a comprehensive overview of selected leading sulfur-containing pesticidal chemical families namely: sulfonylureas, sulfonamides, sulfur-containing heterocyclics, thioureas, sulfides, sulfones, sulfoxides and sulfoximines. Also, the most suitable large-scale synthetic methods of the recently launched or provisionally approved sulfur-containing agrochemicals from respective chemical families have been highlighted.

  10. A novel cold-regulated gene from Phlox subulata, PsCor413im1, enhances low temperature tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aimin; Sun, Hongwei; Feng, Shuang; Zhou, Mi; Gong, Shufang; Wang, Jingang; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2018-01-08

    Low temperature stress adversely affects plant growth, development, and crop productivity. Analysis of the function of genes in the response of plants to low temperature stress is essential for understanding the mechanism of chilling and freezing tolerance. In this study, PsCor413im1, a novel cold-regulated gene isolated from Phlox subulata, was transferred to Arabidopsis to investigate its function under low temperature stress. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that PsCor413im1 expression was induced by cold and abscisic acid. Subcellular localization revealed that PsCor413im1-GFP fusion protein was localized to the periphery of the chloroplast, consistent with the localization of chloroplast inner membrane protein AtCor413im1, indicating that PsCor413im1 is a chloroplast membrane protein. Furthermore, the N-terminal of PsCor413im1 was determined to be necessary for its localization. Compared to the wild-type plants, transgenic plants showed higher germination and survival rates under cold and freezing stress. Moreover, the expression of AtCor15 in transgenic plants was higher than that in the wild-type plants under cold stress. Taken together, our results suggest that the overexpression of PsCor413im1 enhances low temperature tolerance in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action (SDA) and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis). The critical thermal maxima (CTmax), critical thermal minima (CTmin), lethal thermal maxima (LTmax), lethal thermal minima (LTmin), critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and fast-start escape response after 30 d acclimation to three constant temperatures (15, 20 and 25 °C) and one diel-fluctuating temperature (20±5 °C) were measured. In addition, feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) were measured. The diel-fluctuating temperature group showed lower CTmin than the 20 °C group but a similar CTmax, indicating a wider thermal scope. SDA linearly increased with the temperature. Temperature variation between 20 and 25 °C had little effect on either swimming or growth performance. However, fish in the 15 °C group exhibited much poorer swimming and growth performance than those in the 20 °C group. Ucrit decreased slightly under low acclimation temperature due to the pronounced improvement in swimming efficiency under cold temperature. Fish in the diel-fluctuating temperature group fed more but exhibited similar SGR compared to 20 °C group, possibly due in part to an increase in energy expenditure to cope with the temperature fluctuation. The narrower thermal scope and lower CTmax of Chinese bream together with the conservation of CTmax with temperature acclimation, suggests that local water temperature elevations may have more profound effects on Chinese bream than on other fish species in the Three Gorges Reservoir. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dwarf apple MbDREB1 enhances plant tolerance to low temperature, drought, and salt stress via both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Chi, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Chang-Ai; Li, Yan-Ze; Song, Li-Li; Liu, Xiu-Ming; Wang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Fa-Wei; Zhang, Chuang; Liu, Yang; Zong, Jun-Mei; Li, Hai-Yan

    2011-02-01

    In higher plants, DREB1/CBF-type transcription factors play an important role in tolerance to low temperatures, drought, and high-salt stress. These transcription factors bind to CRT/DRE elements in promoter regions of target genes, regulating their expression. In this study, we cloned and characterized a novel gene encoding a DREB1 transcription factor from dwarf apple, Malus baccata (GenBank accession number: EF582842). Expression of MbDREB1 was induced by cold, drought, and salt stress, and also in response to exogenous ABA. Subcellular localization analyses revealed that MbDREB1 localizes in the nucleus. A yeast activity assay demonstrated that the MbDREB1 gene encodes a transcription activator, which specifically binds to DRE/CRT elements. Compared with wild-type plants, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing MbDREB1 showed increased tolerance to low temperature, drought, and salt stresses. Analysis of the MbDREB1 promoter revealed an ABA-responsive element (ABRE), an inducer of CBF expression 1 (ICE1)-like binding site, two MYB recognition sites, and three stress-inducible GT-1 boxes. GUS activities driven by the MbDREB1 promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis increased in response to ABA, cold temperature, drought, and salt treatments. Interestingly, the expression of both ABA-independent and ABA-dependent stress-induced genes (COR15a and rd29B, respectively) was activated under normal growth conditions in Arabidopsis overexpressing MbDREB1. These results suggest that MbDREB1 functions as a transcription factor and increases plant tolerance to low temperature, drought, and salt stress via both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways.

  13. Tolerating Zero Tolerance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian N.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of zero tolerance dates back to the mid-1990s when New Jersey was creating laws to address nuisance crimes in communities. The main goal of these neighborhood crime policies was to have zero tolerance for petty crime such as graffiti or littering so as to keep more serious crimes from occurring. Next came the war on drugs. In federal…

  14. A study on carbothermal reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur using oilsands fluid coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejarano, C.A.; Jia, C.Q.; Chung, K.H. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    2001-02-15

    Experiments and reaction equilibrium calculations were carried out for the SO{sub 2} gas and oilsands fluid coke system. The goal was to develop a coke-based sulfur-producing flue gas desulfurization (SP-FGD) process that removes SO{sub 2} from flue gases and converts it into elemental sulfur. The conversion of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur proceeded efficiently at temperatures higher than 600{degree}C, and the sulfur yield reached a maximum ({lt} 95%) at about 700{degree}C. An increase of temperature beyond 700{degree}C enhanced the reduction of product elemental sulfur, resulting in the formation of reduced sulfur species (COS and CS{sub 2}), which lowered the sulfur yield at 900{degree}C to 90%. Although equilibrium calculations suggest that a lower temperature favors the conversion of SO{sub 2} as well as the yield of elemental sulfur, experiments showed no formation of elemental sulfur at 600{degree}C and below, likely due to hindered kinetics. Faster reduction of SO{sub 2} was observed at a higher temperature in the range of 700-1000{degree}C. A complete conversion of SO{sub 2} was achieved in about 8 s at 700{degree}C. Prolonging the product gas-coke contact, the yield of elemental sulfur decreased due to the formation of COS and CS{sub 2} while the SO{sub 2} conversion remained complete. Equilibrium calculations suggest that the ultimate yield of elemental sulfur maximizes at the C/SO{sub 2} ratio of 1, which represents the stoichiometry of SO{sub 2} + C {yields} CO{sub 2} + S. For the C/SO{sub 2} ratio {lt} 1, equilibrium calculations predict elemental sulfur and CO{sub 2} being major products, suggesting that SO{sub 2} + C {yields} CO{sub 2} + S is the predominant reaction if SO{sub 2} is in excess. Experiments revealed that elemental sulfur and CO{sub 2} were the only major products if the conversion of SO{sub 2} was incomplete, which is in agreement with the result of the equilibrium modeling. 18 refs., 12 figs.

  15. Global approach for the selection of high temperature comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography experimental conditions and quantitative analysis in regards to sulfur-containing compounds in heavy petroleum cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, Laure; Dutriez, Thomas; Courtiade, Marion; Thiébaut, Didier; Dulot, Hugues; Bertoncini, Fabrice

    2011-01-21

    Extending the knowledge on sulfur-containing compounds is crucial for the petroleum industry because they contribute to atmospheric pollution by combustion. Most of them are concentrated in heavy petroleum cuts, such as vacuum gas oils (VGOs). However, the resolution of the existing analytical methods does not allow a quantitative speciation of S-compounds contained in VGOs. Therefore, a high temperature GC×GC chromatograph hyphenated to a SCD was implemented in this study to obtain a quantitative S-compounds speciation. Firstly, various thermally stable stationary phases, in particular the new ionic liquid IL59 and Mega Wax-HT, were investigated in 1D-GC as a way to reduce the number of columns sets to be used in GC×GC. Consequently, several normal and reversed configurations of these columns were selected and tested in GC×GC. Then, a decision method was applied to facilitate the choice of the best combination of columns. Finally, the most adapted methods led to an innovative group type quantification and to a quantitative distribution of heavy sulfur species contained in a VGO sample. These results represent a major step towards the study of S-compounds in heavy petroleum cuts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  17. Radiolysis of Sulfuric Acid, Sulfuric Acid Monohydrate, and Sulfuric Acid Tetrahydrate and Its Relevance to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Carlson, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report laboratory studies on the 0.8 MeV proton irradiation of ices composed of sulfuric acid (H2SO4), sulfuric acid monohydrate (H2SO4 H2O), and sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (H2SO4 4H2O) between 10 and 180 K. Using infrared spectroscopy, we identify the main radiation products as H2O, SO2, (S2O3)x, H3O+, HSO4(exp -), and SO4(exp 2-). At high radiation doses, we find that H2SO4 molecules are destroyed completely and that H2SO4 H2O is formed on subsequent warming. This hydrate is significantly more stable to radiolytic destruction than pure H2SO4, falling to an equilibrium relative abundance of 50% of its original value on prolonged irradiation. Unlike either pure H2SO4 or H2SO4 H2O, the loss of H2SO4 4H2O exhibits a strong temperature dependence, as the tetrahydrate is essentially unchanged at the highest irradiation temperatures and completely destroyed at the lowest ones, which we speculate is due to a combination of radiolytic destruction and amorphization. Furthermore, at the lower temperatures it is clear that irradiation causes the tetrahydrate spectrum to transition to one that closely resembles the monohydrate spectrum. Extrapolating our results to Europa s surface, we speculate that the variations in SO2 concentrations observed in the chaotic terrains are a result of radiation processing of lower hydration states of sulfuric acid and that the monohydrate will remain stable on the surface over geological times, while the tetrahydrate will remain stable in the warmer regions but be destroyed in the colder regions, unless it can be reformed by other processes, such as thermal reactions induced by diurnal cycling.

  18. Tolerance testing of passive radio frequency identification tags for solvent, temperature, and pressure conditions encountered in an anatomic pathology or biorepository setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina A Leung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency identification (RFID tags have potential for use in identifying and tracking biospecimens in anatomic pathology and biorepository laboratories. However, there is little to no data on the tolerance of tags to solutions, solvents, temperatures, and pressures likely to be encountered in the laboratory. The functioning of the Hitachi Mu-chip RFID tag, a candidate for pathology use, was evaluated under such conditions. Methods: The RFID tags were affixed to cryovials containing tissue or media, glass slides, and tissue cassettes. The tags were interrogated for readability before and after each testing condition or cycle. Individual tags were subjected to only one testing condition but for multiple cycles. Testing conditions were: 1 Ten wet autoclave cycles (121˚C, 15 psi; 2 Ten dry autoclave cycles (121˚C, 26 psi; 3 Ten tissue processor cycles; 4 Ten hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining cycles; 5 Ten antigen retrieval pressure cooker cycles (125˚C, 15 psi; 6 75 o C for seven days; 7 75-59 o C day/night cycles for 7 days; 8 -80 o C, -150 o C, or -196 o C for 12 months; 9 Fifty freeze-thaw cycles (-196 o C to 22 o C. Results: One hundred percent of tags exposed to cold temperatures from -80 to -196 o C (80 tags, 1120 successful reads, high temperatures from 52 to 75 o C (40 tags, 420 reads, H & E staining (20 tags, 200 reads, pressure cooker antigen retrieval (20 tags, 200 reads, and wet autoclaving (20 tags, 200 reads functioned well throughout and after testing. Of note, all 20 tested tags tolerated 50 freeze-thaw cycles and all 60 tags subjected to sustained freezing temperatures were readable after 1 year. One dry autoclaved tag survived nine cycles but failed after the tenth. The remaining 19 tags were readable after all 10 dry autoclave cycles. One tag failed after the first tissue processing cycle while the remaining 19 tags survived all 10 tissue processing cycles. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, these RFID

  19. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  20. Heat-tolerant versus heat-sensitive Bos taurus cattle: influence of air temperature and breed on the acute phase response to a provocative immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J A; Burdick Sanchez, N C; Chaffin, R; Chase, C C; Coleman, S W; Spiers, D E

    2013-10-01

    The difference in the acute phase response of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive Bos taurus breed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge when housed at different air temperatures (Ta) was studied. Angus (ANG; heat-sensitive; n = 11; 306 ± 26 kg BW) and Romosinuano (RO; heat-tolerant; n = 10; 313 ± 32 kg BW) heifers were transported from the USDA Agricultural Research Service SubTropical Agricultural Research Station in Florida to the Brody Environmental Chambers at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Heifers were housed in stanchions in 4 temperature-controlled environmental chambers. Initially, Ta in the 4 chambers was cycling at thermoneutrality (TN; 18.5°C-23.5°C) for a 1-wk adjustment period, followed by an increase in 2 of the 4 chambers to cycling heat stress (HS; 24°C-38°C) for 2 wk. On day 19, heifers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording devices. On day 20, heifers were challenged with LPS (0.5 μg/kg BW; 0 h), sickness behavior scores (SBSs) were recorded, and blood samples were collected at 0.5-h intervals from -2 to 8 h and again at 24 h relative to LPS challenge at 0 h. Serum was isolated and stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol and cytokine concentrations. A breed by Ta interaction (P heat-tolerant RO and heat-sensitive ANG heifers under different Ta which may aid in elucidating differences in productivity, disease resistance, and longevity among cattle breeds. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Liquid and Emulsified Sulfur in Submarine Solfatara Fields of two Northern Mariana Arc Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Embley, R. W.; Chadwick, W. W.; Butterfield, D. A.; Takano, B.; Resing, J. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; Lilley, M. D.; Lupton, J. E.; Merle, S. G.; Inagaki, F.

    2006-12-01

    Because elemental sulfur melting point is ca 100 deg C (depend on allotropes and heating rate, S8 triple point temperature: 115 deg C), the evidence of liquid sulfur has been known for many subaerial crater lakes and small ponds in geothermal regions throughout the world. But the milky nature of water (sulfur-in- water emulsion in limited water mass) prohibited the direct observation of on-going processes at the bottom of these subaerial lakes. In the passive degassing environment at the summit craters of Daikoku and Nikko Seamounts of the northern Mariana Arc, the continuous flushing of sulfur emulsion by seawater allowed us to observe on- going submarine solfatara processes and associated chemistry through dives with ROVs during the NT05-18 cruise (JAMSTEC R/V Natsushima and ROV hyper-Dolphin) and the Submarine Ring of Fire 2006 cruise (R/V Melville and ROV JASON II). A higher viscosity for liquid elemental sulfur relative to that of seawater, as well as a limited stability of sulfur emulsion (aqueous sulfur sol) at high temperatures in electrolyte solution (seawater), ensures limited mobility of liquid sulfur in the conduits of hydrothermal vents. The subseafloor boiling depth of hydrothermal fluid limits the locus of any liquid sulfur reservoir. It was observed in an exposed liquid sulfur pond that the penetration of gas bubbles (mostly CO2) created sulfur emulsion while collapsing liquid sulfur film between seawater and gas bubbles. Liquid sulfur pits, encrusted sulfur, liquid sulfur fountain structure, sulfur stalactites and stalagmites, mini-pillow lava-like sulfur flows, accretionary sulfur lapilli and sulfur deltas were also observed at the summits of two volcanoes. Note: Solfatara: Italian. A type of fumarole, the gases of which are characteristically sulfurous. In 'Glossary of geology.'

  2. Toxicokinetics of sulfur mustard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberg, J.P.; Schans, M.J. van der; Noort, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter an overview is presented on the state of knowledge concerning the toxicokinetics of sulfur mustard. The procedures to analyze intact sulfur mustard in the blood and tissues of laboratory animals at toxicologically relevant levels are discussed. In view of the fact that the reviewed

  3. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Cottrell

    Full Text Available Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables.Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1% concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01 than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01 compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C. Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1 with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species' resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis.Lack of consideration for the role of organic matter and

  4. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Heterologous expression of three Camellia sinensis small heat shock protein genes confers temperature stress tolerance in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingle; Zou, Zhongwei; Li, Qinghui; Xin, Huahong; Zhu, Xujun; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xinghui

    2017-07-01

    CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 expressions are induced by heat and cold stresses, and CsHSP overexpression confers tolerance to heat and cold stresses in transgenic Pichia pastoris and Arabidopsis thaliana. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are crucial for protecting plants against biotic and abiotic stresses, especially heat stress. However, knowledge concerning the functions of Camellia sinensis sHSP in heat and cold stresses remains poorly understood. In this study, three C. sinensis sHSP genes (i.e., CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8) were isolated and characterized using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technology. The CsHSPs expression levels in C. sinensis leaves were significantly up-regulated by heat and cold stresses. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 belong to sHSP Classes I, II, and IV, respectively. Heterologous expression of the three CsHSP genes in Pichia pastoris cells enhanced heat and cold stress tolerance. When exposed to heat and cold treatments, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing CsHSP17.7, CsHSP18.1, and CsHSP21.8 had lower malondialdehyde contents, ion leakage, higher proline contents, and transcript levels of stress-related genes (e.g., AtPOD, AtAPX1, AtP5CS2, and AtProT1) compared with the control line. In addition, improved seed germination vigor was also observed in the CsHSP-overexpressing seeds under heat stress. Taken together, our results suggest that the three identified CsHSP genes play key roles in heat and cold tolerance.

  6. Effects of acclimation temperature on thermal tolerance, locomotion performance and respiratory metabolism in Acheta domesticus L. (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenicht, M W; Clusella-Trullas, S; Boardman, L; Le Roux, C; Terblanche, J S

    2010-07-01

    The effects of acclimation temperature on insect thermal performance curves are generally poorly understood but significant for understanding responses to future climate variation and the evolution of these reaction norms. Here, in Acheta domesticus, we examine the physiological effects of 7-9 days acclimation to temperatures 4 degrees C above and below optimum growth temperature of 29 degrees C (i.e. 25, 29, 33 degrees C) for traits of resistance to thermal extremes, temperature-dependence of locomotion performance (jumping distance and running speed) and temperature-dependence of respiratory metabolism. We also examine the effects of acclimation on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) enzyme activity. Chill coma recovery time (CRRT) was significantly reduced from 38 to 13min with acclimation at 33-25 degrees C, respectively. Heat knockdown resistance was less responsive than CCRT to acclimation, with no significant effects of acclimation detected for heat knockdown times (25 degrees C: 18.25, 29 degrees C: 18.07, 33 degrees C: 25.5min). Thermal optima for running speed were higher (39.4-40.6 degrees C) than those for jumping performance (25.6-30.9 degrees C). Acclimation temperature affected jumping distance but not running speed (general linear model, p=0.0075) although maximum performance (U(MAX)) and optimum temperature (T(OPT)) of the performance curves showed small or insignificant effects of acclimation temperature. However, these effects were sensitive to the method of analysis since analyses of T(OPT), U(MAX) and the temperature breadth (T(BR)) derived from non-linear curve-fitting approaches produced high inter-individual variation within acclimation groups and reduced variation between acclimation groups. Standard metabolic rate (SMR) was positively related to body mass and test temperature. Acclimation temperature significantly influenced the slope of the SMR-temperature reaction norms, whereas no variation in the intercept was found. The CCO

  7. A bell pepper cultivar tolerant to chilling enhanced nitrogen allocation and stress-related metabolite accumulation in the roots in response to low root-zone temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidoo, Moses Kwame; Sherman, Tal; Lazarovitch, Naftali; Fait, Aaron; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2017-10-01

    Two bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) cultivars, differing in their response to chilling, were exposed to three levels of root-zone temperatures. Gas exchange, shoot and root phenology, and the pattern of change of the central metabolites and secondary metabolites caffeate and benzoate in the leaves and roots were profiled. Low root-zone temperature significantly inhibited gaseous exchange, with a greater effect on the sensitive commercial pepper hybrid (Canon) than on the new hybrid bred to enhance abiotic stress tolerance (S103). The latter was less affected by the treatment with respect to plant height, shoot dry mass, root maximum length, root projected area, number of root tips and root dry mass. More carbon was allocated to the leaves of S103 than nitrogen at 17°C, while in the roots at 17°C, more nitrogen was allocated and the ratio between C/N decreased. Metabolite profiling showed greater increase in the root than in the leaves. Leaf response between the two cultivars differed significantly. The roots accumulated stress-related metabolites including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), proline, galactinol and raffinose and at chilling (7°C) resulted in an increase of sugars in both cultivars. Our results suggest that the enhanced tolerance of S103 to root cold stress, reflected in the relative maintenance of shoot and root growth, is likely linked to a more effective regulation of photosynthesis facilitated by the induction of stress-related metabolism. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  9. In situ tribochemical sulfurization of molybdenum oxide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Ripoll, Manel; Tomala, Agnieszka; Gabler, Christoph; DraŽić, Goran; Pirker, Luka; Remškar, Maja

    2018-02-15

    MoS 2 nanoparticles are typically obtained by high temperature sulfurization of organic and inorganic precursors under a S rich atmosphere and have excellent friction reduction properties. We present a novel approach for making the sulfurization unnecessary for MoO 3 nanotubes during the synthesis process for friction and wear reduction applications while simultaneously achieving a superb tribological performance. To this end, we report the first in situ sulfurization of MoO 3 nanotubes during sliding contact in the presence of sulfur-containing lubricant additives. The sulfurization leads to the tribo-chemical formation of a MoS 2 -rich low-friction tribofilm as verified using Raman spectroscopy and can be achieved both during sliding contact and under extreme pressure conditions. Under sliding contact conditions, MoO 3 nanotubes in synergy with sulfurized olefin polysulfide and pre-formed zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate tribofilms achieve an excellent friction performance. Under these conditions, the tribochemical sulfurization of MoO 3 nanotubes leads to a similar coefficient of friction to the one obtained using a model nanolubricant containing MoS 2 nanotubes. Under extreme pressure conditions, the in situ sulfurization of MoO 3 nanotubes using sulfurized olefin polysulfide results in a superb load carrying capacity capable of outperforming MoS 2 nanotubes. The reason is that while MoO 3 nanotubes are able to continuously sulfurize during sliding contact conditions, MoS 2 nanotubes progressively degrade by oxidation thus losing lubricity.

  10. Determination of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens using high-temperature molecular absorption spectrometry in flames and furnaces-A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welz, Bernhard; Lepri, Fabio G.; Araujo, Rennan G.O.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C.; Huang Maodong; Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    The literature about the investigation of molecular spectra of phosphorus, sulfur and the halogens in flames and furnaces, and the use of these spectra for the determination of these non-metals has been reviewed. Most of the investigations were carried out using conventional atomic absorption spectrometers, and there were in essence two different approaches. In the first one, dual-channel spectrometers with a hydrogen or deuterium lamp were used, applying the two-line method for background correction; in the second one, a line source was used that emitted an atomic line, which overlapped with the molecular spectrum. The first approach had the advantage that any spectral interval could be accessed, but it was susceptible to spectral interference; the second one had the advantage that the conventional background correction systems could be used to minimize spectral interferences, but had the problem that an atomic line had to be found, which was overlapping sufficiently well with the maximum of the molecular absorption spectrum. More recently a variety of molecular absorption spectra were investigated using a low-resolution polychromator with a CCD array detector, but no attempt was made to use this approach for quantitative determination of non-metals. The recent introduction and commercial availability of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometers is offering completely new possibilities for molecular absorption spectrometry and its use for the determination of non-metals. The use of a high-intensity continuum source together with a high-resolution spectrometer and a CCD array detector makes possible selecting the optimum wavelength for the determination and to exclude most spectral interferences.

  11. Multiple heat priming enhances thermo-tolerance to a later high temperature stress via improving subcellular antioxidant activities in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Wollenweber, Bernd; Jiang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Seedlings of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were firstly twice heat-primed at 32/24 °C, and subsequently subjected to a more severe high temperature stress at 35/27 °C. The later high temperature stress significantly decreased plant biomass and leaf total soluble sugars concentration. However, plants experienced priming (PH) up-regulated the Rubisco activase B encoding gene RcaB, which was in accordance with the higher photosynthesis rate in relation to the non-primed plants (NH) under the later high temperature stress. In relation to NH, the major chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene Cab was down-regulated in PH plants, implying a reduction of the light absorption to protect the photosystem II from excitation energy under high temperature stress. At the same time, under the later high temperature stress PH plants showed significantly higher actual photochemical efficiency, indicating an improvement of light use efficiency due to the priming pre-treatment. Under the later high temperature stress, PH could be maintained a better redox homeostasis than NH, as exemplified by the higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in chloroplasts and glutathione reductase (GR), and of peroxidase (POD) in mitochondria, which contributed to the lower superoxide radical production rate and malondialdehyde concentration in both chloroplasts and mitochondria. The improved antioxidant capacity in chloroplasts and mitochondria was related to the up-regulated expressions of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and GR in PH. Collectively, heat priming effectively improved thermo-tolerance of wheat seedlings subjected to a later high temperature stress, which could be largely ascribed to the enhanced anti-oxidation at the subcellular level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Digestion of Bangka monazite with sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesna Prassanti

    2012-01-01

    Technology of Bangka monazite processing with alkaline method has been mastered by PPGN BATAN with the product in the form of RE (Rare Earth) which is contain U < 2 ppm and Th 12 - 16 ppm. Hence, as comparator, the research of Bangka monazite processing with acid method using sulfuric acid has been done. The aim of this research is to obtain the optimal condition of Bangka monazite's digestion using sulfuric acid so that all elements contained in the monazite that are U, Th, RE, PO 4 dissolved as much as possible. The research parameter's arc monazite particle's size, sulfuric acid consumption (weight ratio of monazite ore : sulfuric acid), digestion temperature, digestion time and consumption of wash water. The results showed that the optimal conditions of digestion are 250+ 325 mesh of monazite particle's size, 1 : 2.5 of weight ratio of monazite ore: sulfuric acid, 190°C of digestion temperature, 3 hours of digestion time and 8 times of weight monazite's feed of wash water with the recovery of digested U = 99.90 %, Th = 99.44 %, RE = 98.64 % and PO 4 = 99.88 %. (author)

  13. A four-component reaction of aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborates, sulfur dioxide, 1,2-dibromoethane, and hydrazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Danqing; Kuang, Yunyan; Wu, Jie

    2015-11-07

    A four-component reaction of aryldiazonium tetrafluoroborates, sulfur dioxide, 1,2-dibromoethane, and hydrazines under metal-free conditions is described, providing a novel and efficient approach to 2-arylsulfonyl hydrazones. This transformation proceeds smoothly via insertion of sulfur dioxide under mild conditions with good functional group tolerance.

  14. Simultaneous alloy-silicate fractionation of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur at high pressures and temperatures: Implications for establishing the volatile budget of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, D. S.; Dasgupta, R.; Sun, C.; Tsuno, K.

    2017-12-01

    Constraining the origin, distribution and evolution of volatiles such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) in terrestrial planets is essential to understand planetary differentiation, habitability and comparative planetology [1]. C/N ratio of Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) is superchondritic (40 ± 8), while C/S ratio is nearly chondritic (0.49 ± 0.14) [2]. Accretion, core formation, and magma ocean (MO) crystallization are the key processes that could have set the relative budgets of C, N and S in different planetary reservoirs [3]. However, experiments using either C-N or C-S-bearing systems have shown that C is more siderophile than N and S, consequently core formation would have left behind subchondritic C/N and C/S ratios in BSE [4-6]. Accretion of extremely C-rich bodies during core formation or/and as a late veneer along with an early atmospheric blow-off are amongst the scenarios that have been suggested to explain C/N ratio while the addition of a differentiated body with a C-rich mantle has been suggested to explain C/S ratio in BSE [4-6]. However, no internally consistent explanations exist on the origin of all the volatile elements. We performed piston cylinder and multi-anvil experiments, using Fe-Ni-N-C±S alloy with variable amounts of S and mafic-ultramafic silicate mixtures in graphite saturated conditions at 1-7 GPa, 1600-1800 °C, and fO2 ranging from ΔIW of -1.1 to -0.3. EPMA and SIMS were used to determine major elements and volatile abundances in the coexisting alloy and silicate melt phases, while the speciation of the volatiles was determined using Raman spectroscopy. Our experimental data reveals that C becomes less siderophile in the presence of N and S during core-mantle differentiation involving an S-rich alloy. Using a set of inverse Monte-Carlo simulations, we propose that a disequilibrium merger of a Mars-sized planetary embryo with a C-saturated, S-rich core to a volatile-depleted proto-Earth during the main stage of accretion

  15. Study by neutron diffusion of local order liquid sulfur around the polymerization transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descotes, L.

    1994-05-01

    We studied the liquid sulfur according to the temperature. The sulfur is one of the most complicated elementary liquid. We experimented the neutron diffusion by the powder orthorhombic sulfur. The complexity at the polymerization transition are only accompanied by weak local structural transfer. 231 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs., 3 annexes

  16. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  17. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  18. Effect of pyrolysis temperature and sulfuric acid during the fast pyrolysis of cellulose and douglas fir in an atmospheric pressure wire mesh reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Zhouhong; Zhou, Shuai; Pecha, Brennan; Westerhof, Roel J M; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to better understand important reactions responsible for the suppression of anhydrosugars during the pyrolysis of microcrystalline Avicel, ball-milled Avicel, levoglucosan, cellobiosan, and Douglas fir at varied pyrolysis conditions (heating rate 100°C/s, temperature

  19. Effect of air temperature, relative humidity and growth stage on rimsulfuron tolerance in selected field maize hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes Cilia L.

    2002-12-01

    " SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Emphasis" />

    The effect of temperature (T, relative humidity (RH, and growth stage (GS of six field maize hybrids on the level of tolerance to rimsulfuron [N-((4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-yl aminocarbonyl-3-(ethylsulfonyl-2-pyridincsulfonamide] applied at 20, 40 and 60 g a.i ha-l were evaluated. The hybríds tested are adapted to three

  20. A facile in situ sulfur deposition route to obtain carbon-wrapped sulfur composite cathodes for lithium–sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yusheng; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon-wrapped sulfur composite was obtained via an in situ sulfur deposition route. ► Sulfur–carbon composite suppresses the shuttle effect during charging. ► Sulfur–carbon composite shows enhanced cyclability and rate capability. ► Sulfur–carbon composite retains structural integrity and low impedance during cycling. - Abstract: An in situ sulfur deposition route has been developed for synthesizing sulfur–carbon composites as cathode materials for lithium–sulfur batteries. This facile synthesis method involves the precipitation of elemental sulfur at the interspaces between carbon nanoparticles in aqueous solution at room temperature. The product has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, charge–discharge measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The sulfur–carbon composite cathode with 75 wt.% active material thus obtained exhibits a remarkably high first discharge capacity of 1116 mAh g −1 with good cycle performance, maintaining 777 mAh g −1 after 50 cycles. The significantly improved electrochemical performance of the sulfur–carbon composite cathode is attributed to the carbon-wrapped sulfur network structure, which suppresses the loss of active material during charging/discharging and the migration of the polysulfide ions to the anode (i.e., shuttling effect). The integrity of the cathode structure during cycling is reflected in low impedance values observed after cycling. This facile in situ sulfur deposition route represents a low-cost approach to obtain high-performance sulfur–carbon composite cathodes for rechargeable Li–S batteries.

  1. Some preliminary studies on the ability of Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to tolerate cold temperatures when placed inside a refrigerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, C I; Aquino, I S; Azeredo, G A; Price, J M

    1997-12-01

    Cold is often suggested as an ecological mechanism to prevent the migration of Africanized honey bees. The ability of Africanized honey bees to tolerate cold temperatures was investigated. In one study an observation hive was placed inside a refrigerator at 25 degrees C. The study was conceptualized as a choice experiment in which the colony could remain in a cold environment or leave for a warm environment. Analysis indicated that the bees remained at 9 +/- 1 degrees C for 14 days before leaving. In a second series of studies, testing the tolerance to 0 degree C, 280 bees were placed individually in small metal tubes. The data gathered included survival rate, time to regain consciousness, and ability to feed. Analysis indicated that Africanized bees can survive for up to 3 hr. at 0 degree C with few ill effects. At 4 hr., however, the survival rate is low. Limitations of the study, the use of cold as a possible deterrent to honey bee mites, and suggestions for additional research are discussed.

  2. Elevated growth temperatures alter hydraulic characteristics in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: implications for tree drought tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielle A. Way; Jean-Christophe Domec; Robert B. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Although climate change will alter both soil water availability and evaporative demand, our understanding of how future climate conditions will alter tree hydraulic architecture is limited. Here, we demonstrate that growth at elevated temperatures (ambient +5 °C) affects hydraulic traits in seedlings of the deciduous boreal tree species Populus tremuloides, with the...

  3. Method of making a sodium sulfur battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Perry E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of making a portion of a sodium sulfur battery is disclosed. The battery portion made is a portion of the container which defines the volume for the cathodic reactant materials which are sulfur and sodium polysulfide materials. The container portion is defined by an outer metal casing with a graphite liner contained therein, the graphite liner having a coating on its internal diameter for sealing off the porosity thereof. The steel outer container and graphite pipe are united by a method which insures that at the operating temperature of the battery, relatively low electrical resistance exists between the two materials because they are in intimate contact with one another.

  4. Putrescine Is Involved in Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation by Regulating Abscisic Acid Levels in Response to Low Temperature1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Juan C.; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  5. Temperature-dependence of hydrogen oxidation reaction rates and CO-tolerance at carbon-supported Pt, Pt-Co, and Pt-Ru catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Kenji; Aoki, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2009-03-21

    The temperature-dependence of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) rate was examined at commercial Pt, Pt3Co, PtRu, and PtRu(1.5) nano-sized catalysts (diameter, d = ca. 3 nm) supported on carbon black in 0.1 M HClO4 solution in the presence and absence of carbon monoxide by use of a channel flow electrode at temperatures from 30 to 90 degrees C. It was found that the values of the apparent rate constant k(app) (per real Pt active surface area) for the HOR at these supported catalysts agreed beautifully with those of the corresponding bulk electrodes in the whole temperature range. The dependence of the kinetically controlled current density (jk) on CO coverage at each supported catalyst was also identical to that of the bulk. Hence, no particle size effect was observed on the HOR activity and the CO tolerance, at least, was brought down to d = 3 nm.

  6. Sulfur Based Thermochemical Heat Storage for Baseload Concentrated Solar Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Bunsen [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-11-01

    This project investigates the engineering and economic feasibility of supplying baseload power using a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant integrated with sulfur based thermochemical heat storage. The technology stores high temperature solar heat in the chemical bonds of elemental sulfur. Energy is recovered as high temperature heat upon sulfur combustion. Extensive developmental and design work associated with sulfur dioxide (SO2) disproportionation and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) decomposition chemical reactions used in this technology had been carried out in the two completed phases of this project. The feasibility and economics of the proposed concept was demonstrated and determined.

  7. Effects of Au and Pd Additions on Joint Strength, Electrical Resistivity, and Ion-Migration Tolerance in Low-Temperature Sintering Bonding Using Ag2O Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takeyasu; Ogura, Tomo; Hirose, Akio

    2012-09-01

    A new bonding process using an Ag2O paste consisting of Ag2O particles mixed with a triethylene glycol reducing agent has been proposed as an alternative joining approach for microsoldering in electronics assembly, which currently uses Pb-rich, high-temperature solders. Ag nanoparticles were formed at approximately 130°C to 160°C through a reduction process, sintered to one another immediately, and bonded to a metal substrate. An Au-coated Cu specimen was successfully bonded using the Ag2O paste. The resulting joint exhibited superior strength compared with joints fabricated using conventional Pb-rich solders. To improve ion-migration tolerance, the Ag2O paste was mixed with Au and Pd microparticles to form sintered Ag-Au and Ag-Pd layers, respectively. The additions of Au and Pd improved the ion-migration tolerance of the joint. Regarding the mechanical properties of the joints, addition of secondary Au and Pd both resulted in decreased joint strength. To match the joint strength of conventional Pb-10Sn solder, the mixing ratios of Au and Pd were estimated to be limited to 16 vol.% and 7 vol.%, respectively. The electrical resistivities of the sintered layers consisting of 16 vol.% Au and 7 vol.% Pd were lower than that of Pb-10Sn solder. Thus, the additive fractions of Au and Pd to the Ag2O paste should be less than 16 vol.% and 7 vol.%, respectively, to avoid compromising the mechanical and electrical properties of the sintered layer relative to those of contemporary Pb-10Sn solder. Following the addition of Au and Pd to the paste, the ion-migration tolerances of the sintered layers were approximately 3 and 2 times higher than that of pure Ag, respectively. Thus, the addition of Au was found to improve the ion-migration tolerance of the sintered Ag layer more effectively and with less sacrifice of the mechanical and electrical properties of the sintered layer than the addition of Pd.

  8. Process for removal of sulfur oxides from hot gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, G. L.; Kohl, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from two gas streams containing the same. One gas stream is introduced into a spray dryer zone and contacted with a finely dispersed spray of an aqueous medium containing an absorbent for sulfur oxides. The aqueous medium is introduced at a controlled rate so as to provide water to the gas in an amount to produce a cooled product gas having a temperature at least 7 0 C. above its adiabatic saturation temperature and from about 125-300% of the stoichiometric amount of absorbent required to react with the sulfur oxides to be removed from the gas stream. The effluent from the spray dryer zone comprises a gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and contains entrained dry particulate reaction products including unreacted absorbent. This gas stream is then introduced into a particulate removal zone from which is withdrawn a gas stream substantially free of particles and having a reduced sulfur oxide content. the dry particulate reaction products are collected and utilized as a source of absorbent for a second aqueous scrubbing medium containing unreacted absorbent for the sulfur oxides. An effluent gas stream is withdrawn from the aqueous scrubbing zone and comprises a water-saturated gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and substantially free of particles. The effluent gas streams from the particulate removal zone and the aqueous scrubbing zone are combined in such proportions that the combined gas stream has a temperature above its adiabatic saturation temperature

  9. Effect of concentration, exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity on the toxicity of sulfur dioxide to the spores of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.; Uota, M.

    1961-12-01

    When spores of Botrytis cinerea are exposed to SO/sub 2/ gas, the subsequent reduction in spore germination is quantitatively proportional to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the exposure time. The toxicity of SO/sub 2/ increases with increasing relative humidity. In an atmosphere of 96% RH, SO/sub 2/ is more than 20 times as effective as at 75% RH. The toxicity also increases about 1.5 times for each 10/sup 0/C rise in temperature between 0/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  10. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  11. Osmotic tolerance of avian spermatozoa: Influence of time, temperature, cryoprotectant and membrane ion pump function on sperm viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, J.M.; Long, J.A.; Gee, G.; Donoghue, A.M.; Wildt, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    Potential factors influencing sperm survival under hypertonic conditions were evaluated in the Sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) and turkey (Meleagridis gallopavo). Sperm osmotolerance (300-3000 mOsm/kg) was evaluated after: (1) equilibration times of 2, 10, 45 and 60 min at 4 ?C versus 21 ?C; (2) pre-equilibrating with dimethylacetamide (DMA) or dimethylsulfoxide (Me2SO) at either 4 ?C or 21 ?C; and (3) inhibition of the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ionic pumps. Sperm viability was assessed using the eosin-nigrosin live/dead stain. Species-specific differences occurred in response to hypertonic conditions with crane sperm remaining viable under extreme hypertonicity (3000 mOsm/kg), whereas turkey sperm viability was compromised with only slightly hypertonic (500 mOsm/kg) conditions. The timing of spermolysis under hypertonic conditions was also species-specific, with a shorter interval for turkey (2 min) than crane (10 min) sperm. Turkey sperm osmotolerance was slightly improved by lowering the incubation temperature from 21 to 4 ?C. Pre-equilibrating sperm with DMA reduced the incidence of hypertonic spermolysis only in the crane, at both room and refrigeration temperature. Inhibiting the Na+/K+ and the Na+/H+ antiporter membrane ion pumps did not impair resistance of crane and turkey spermatozoa to hypertonic stress; pump inhibition actually increased turkey sperm survival compared to control sperm. Results demonstrate marked species specificity in osmotolerance between crane and turkey sperm, as well as in the way temperature and time of exposure affect sperm survival under hypertonic conditions. Differences are independent of the role of osmotic pumps in these species.

  12. Organic sulfur metabolisms in hydrothermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Karyn L; Schulte, Mitchell D

    2012-07-01

    Sulfur is central to the metabolisms of many organisms that inhabit extreme environments. While biotic and abiotic cycling of organic sulfur compounds has been well documented in low-temperature anaerobic environments, cycling of organic sulfur in hydrothermal environments has received less attention. Recently published thermodynamic data have been used to estimate aqueous alkyl thiol and sulfide activities in deep-sea hydrothermal systems. Here we use geochemical mixing models to predict fluid compositions that result from mixing end-member hydrothermal fluid from the East Pacific Rise with bottom seawater. These fluid compositions are combined with estimates of methanethiol and dimethylsulfide activities to evaluate energy yields for potential organic sulfur-based metabolisms under hydrothermal conditions. Aerobic respiration has the highest energy yields (over -240 kJ/mol e⁻) at lower temperature; however, oxygen is unlikely to persist at high temperatures, restricting aerobic respiration to mesophilic communities. Nitrite reduction to N₂ has the highest energy yields at higher temperatures (greater than ∼40 °C). Nitrate and nitrite reduction to ammonium also yield significant energy (up to -70 kJ/mol e⁻). Much lower, but still feasible energy yields are calculated for sulfate reduction, disproportionation, and reduction with H₂. Organic compound family and the activity of methanethiol and dimethylsulfide were less important than metabolic strategy in determining overall energy yields. All metabolic strategies considered were exergonic within some portion of the mixing regime suggesting that organic sulfur-based metabolisms may be prevalent within deep-sea hydrothermal vent microbial communities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Temperature acclimation and heat tolerance of photosynthesis in Norwegian Saccharina latissima (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogn Andersen, Guri; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius

    2013-01-01

    Kelps, seaweeds and seagrasses provide important ecosystem services in coastal areas, and loss of these macrophytes is a global concern. Recent surveys have documented severe declines in populations of the dominant kelp species, Saccharina latissima, along the south coast of Norway. S. latissima...... performance, fluorescence parameters, and pigment concentrations were measured. S. latissima obtained almost identical photosynthetic characteristics when grown at 10 and 15°C, indicating thermal acclimation at these temperatures. In contrast, plants grown at 20°C suffered substantial tissue deterioration...

  14. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III.

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities

  15. Adaptation to high temperature mitigates the impact of water deficit during combined heat and drought stress in C3 sunflower and C4 maize varieties with contrasting drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Dilek; Bussotti, Filippo; Raschi, Antonio; Haworth, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Heat and drought stress frequently occur together, however, their impact on plant growth and photosynthesis (P N ) is unclear. The frequency, duration and severity of heat and drought stress events are predicted to increase in the future, having severe implications for agricultural productivity and food security. To assess the impact on plant gas exchange, physiology and morphology we grew drought tolerant and sensitive varieties of C3 sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and C4 maize (Zea mays) under conditions of elevated temperature for 4 weeks prior to the imposition of water deficit. The negative impact of temperature on P N was most apparent in sunflower. The drought tolerant sunflower retained ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity under heat stress to a greater extent than its drought sensitive counterpart. Maize exhibited no varietal difference in response to increased temperature. In contrast to previous studies, where a sudden rise in temperature induced an increase in stomatal conductance (G s ), we observed no change or a reduction in G s with elevated temperature, which alongside lower leaf area mitigated the impact of drought at the higher temperature. The drought tolerant sunflower and maize varieties exhibited greater investment in root-systems, allowing greater uptake of the available soil water. Elevated temperatures associated with heat-waves will have profound negative impacts on crop growth in both sunflower and maize, but the deleterious effect on P N was less apparent in the drought tolerant sunflower and both maize varieties. As C4 plants generally exhibit water use efficiency (WUE) and resistance to heat stress, selection on the basis of tolerance to heat and drought stress would be more beneficial to the yields of C3 crops cultivated in drought prone semi-arid regions. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Tolerance of endolithic algae to elevated temperature and light in the coral Montipora monasteriata from the southern Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Maoz; Meroz-Fine, Efrat; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic endolithic algae and cyanobacteria live within the skeletons of many scleractinians. Under normal conditions, less than 5% of the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) reaches the green endolithic algae because of the absorbance of light by the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates and the carbonate skeleton. When corals bleach (loose dinoflagellate symbionts), however, the tissue of the corals become highly transparent and photosynthetic microendoliths may be exposed to high levels of both thermal and solar stress. This study explores the consequence of these combined stresses on the phototrophic endoliths inhabiting the skeleton of Montipora monasteriata, growing at Heron Island, on the southern Great Barrier Reef. Endoliths that were exposed to sun after tissue removal were by far more susceptible to thermal photoinhibition and photo-damage than endoliths under coral tissue that contained high concentrations of brown dinoflagellate symbionts. While temperature or light alone did not result in decreased photosynthetic efficiency of the endoliths, combined thermal and solar stress caused a major decrease and delayed recovery. Endoliths protected under intact tissue recovered rapidly and photoacclimated soon after exposure to elevated sea temperatures. Endoliths under naturally occurring bleached tissue of M. monasteriata colonies (bleaching event in March 2004 at Heron Island) acclimated to increased irradiance as the brown symbionts disappeared. We suggest that two major factors determine the outcome of thermal bleaching to the endolith community. The first is the microhabitat and light levels under which a coral grows, and the second is the susceptibility of the coral-dinoflagellates symbiosis to thermal stress. More resistant corals may take longer to bleach allowing endoliths time to acclimate to a new light environment. This in turn may have implications for coral survival.

  17. Sulfur doping of M/In2O3 (M=Al,W) nanowires with room temperature near infra red emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervos, M.; Mihailescu, C.; Giapintzakis, J.; Othonos, A.; Travlos, A.

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the growth of Al doped In2O3 nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism at 800°C using Au as a catalyst. We find that the Al is not incorporated into the cubic bixbyite crystal structure of In2O3 but nevertheless was detected in the form of Al2O3. The nanowires had metallic like conductivities and exhibited photoluminescence at 2.3 eV which shifted to 1.5 eV after exposure to H2S above 500°C due to the formation of β-In2S3 and deep donor to acceptor transitions with a lifetime of ≈1 μs. The near infra red emission was also observed in W/In2O3 but not in W/SnO2 core-shell nanowires after processing under H2S at 600°C, confirming it is related to β-In2S3. The nanowires remain one dimensional up to 900°C due to the shell which is interesting for the fabrication of high temperature nanowire sensors.

  18. Sulfur doping of M/In2O3 (M=Al,W nanowires with room temperature near infra red emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zervos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the growth of Al doped In2O3 nanowires via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism at 800°C using Au as a catalyst. We find that the Al is not incorporated into the cubic bixbyite crystal structure of In2O3 but nevertheless was detected in the form of Al2O3. The nanowires had metallic like conductivities and exhibited photoluminescence at 2.3 eV which shifted to 1.5 eV after exposure to H2S above 500°C due to the formation of β-In2S3 and deep donor to acceptor transitions with a lifetime of ≈1 μs. The near infra red emission was also observed in W/In2O3 but not in W/SnO2 core-shell nanowires after processing under H2S at 600°C, confirming it is related to β-In2S3. The nanowires remain one dimensional up to 900°C due to the shell which is interesting for the fabrication of high temperature nanowire sensors.

  19. Observations of industrial sulfur flows - Implications for Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeley, R.; Lee, S.W.; Crown, D.A.; Lancaster, N.

    1990-01-01

    A study of industrial liquid sulfur flows at about 130 C yields information on the thermal and rheological characteristics of the sulfur encountered in Io's volcanic activity. As the local sulfur flow cools and/or the local flow rate decreases, the formation of a crust over much of the surface does not prevent a continuation of flow underneath. Subsequent rapid development of a durable crust implies the formation of extensive crusts on Ionian sulfur flows, significantly reducing heat loss and extending flow length. It is suggested on the basis of the present laboratory results that the colors of proposed sulfur flows on Io may correlate with neither the temperature nor the inferred rheological properties attributed to the colors. 52 refs

  20. Sulfur self-retention in ash a grain model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manović Vasilije

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A developed overall model for sulfur self-retention in ash during coal particle combustion is presented in the paper. The total sulfur content in char, after devolatilization, is evaluated using a derived correlation. It is assumed that sulfur retention during char combustion occurs due to the reaction between SO2 and the active part of the Ca in the form of uniformly distributed CaO grains. Parametric analysis shows that the process is limited by solid diffusion through the product layer formed on the CaO grains and that the most important coal characteristics which influence sulfur self-retention are coal rank, content of sulfur forms, molar Ca/S ratio and particle radius. The model predicts relatively well the levels of the experimentally obtained values of SSR efficiencies, as well as the influence of temperature, particle size and the surrounding conditions.

  1. Sulfur isotopic constraints from a single enzyme on the cellular to global sulfur cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M. S.; Adkins, J. F.; Sessions, A. L.; Orphan, V. J.; McGlynn, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since first reported more than a half century ago, sulfur isotope fractionation between sulfate and sulfide has been used as a diagnostic indicator of microbial sulfate reduction, giving added dimensions to the microbial ecological and geochemical studies of the sulfur cycle. A wide range of fractionation has attracted particular attention because it may serve as a potential indicator of environmental or physiological variables such as substrate concentrations or specific respiration rates. In theory, the magnitude of isotope fractionation depends upon the sulfur isotope effect imparted by the involved enzymes and the relative rate of each enzymatic reaction. The former defines the possible range of fractionation quantitatively, while the latter responds to environmental stimuli, providing an underlying rationale for the varying fractionations. The experimental efforts so far have concentrated largely on the latter, the factors affecting the size of fractionation. Recently, however, the direct assessment of intracellular processes emerges as a promising means for the quantitative analysis of microbial sulfur isotope fractionation as a function of environmental or physiological variables. Here, we experimentally determined for the first time the sulfur isotope fractionation during APS reduction, the first reductive step in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway, using the enzyme purified from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki. APS reductase carried out the one-step, two-electron reduction of APS to sulfite, without the production of other metabolic intermediates. Nearly identical isotope effects were obtained at two different temperatures, while the rate of APS reduction more than quadrupled with a temperature increase from 20 to 32°C. When placed in context of the linear network model for microbial sulfur isotope fractionation, our finding could provide a new, semi-quantitative constraint on the sulfur cycle at levels from cellular to global.

  2. Tolerance of Ruppia sinensis Seeds to Desiccation, Low Temperature, and High Salinity With Special Reference to Long-Term Seed Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruiting; Zhou, Yi; Song, Xiaoyue; Xu, Shaochun; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lin, Haiying; Xu, Shuai; Yue, Shidong; Zhu, Shuyu

    2018-01-01

    Seeds are important materials for the restoration of globally-threatened marine angiosperm (seagrass) populations. In this study, we investigated the differences between different Ruppia sinensis seed types and developed two feasible long-term R. sinensis seed storage methods. The ability of R. sinensis seeds to tolerate the short-term desiccation and extreme cold had been investigated. The tolerance of R. sinensis seeds to long-term exposure of high salinity, cold temperature, and desiccation had been considered as potential methods for long-term seed storage. Also, three morphological and nine physiological indices were measured and compared between two types of seeds: Shape L and Shape S. We found that: (1) wet storage at a salinity of 30-40 psu and 0°C were the optimal long-term storage conditions, and the proportion of viable seeds reached over 90% after a storage period of 11 months since the seeds were collected from the reproductive shoots; (2) dry condition was not the optimal choice for long-term storage of R. sinensis seeds; however, storing seeds in a dry condition at 5°C and 33 ± 10% relative humidity for 9 months had a relatively high percentage (74.44 ± 2.22%) of viable seeds, consequently desiccation exposure could also be an acceptable seed storage method; (3) R. sinensis seeds would lose vigor in the interaction of extreme cold (-27°C) and desiccation; (4) there were significant differences in seed weight, seed curvature, and endocarp thickness between the two types of seeds. These findings provided fundamental physiological information for R. sinensis seeds and supported the long-term storage of its seeds. Our results may also serve as useful reference for seed storage of other threatened seagrass species and facilitate their ex situ conservation and habitat restoration.

  3. Tolerance of Ruppia sinensis Seeds to Desiccation, Low Temperature, and High Salinity With Special Reference to Long-Term Seed Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiting Gu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Seeds are important materials for the restoration of globally-threatened marine angiosperm (seagrass populations. In this study, we investigated the differences between different Ruppia sinensis seed types and developed two feasible long-term R. sinensis seed storage methods. The ability of R. sinensis seeds to tolerate the short-term desiccation and extreme cold had been investigated. The tolerance of R. sinensis seeds to long-term exposure of high salinity, cold temperature, and desiccation had been considered as potential methods for long-term seed storage. Also, three morphological and nine physiological indices were measured and compared between two types of seeds: Shape L and Shape S. We found that: (1 wet storage at a salinity of 30–40 psu and 0°C were the optimal long-term storage conditions, and the proportion of viable seeds reached over 90% after a storage period of 11 months since the seeds were collected from the reproductive shoots; (2 dry condition was not the optimal choice for long-term storage of R. sinensis seeds; however, storing seeds in a dry condition at 5°C and 33 ± 10% relative humidity for 9 months had a relatively high percentage (74.44 ± 2.22% of viable seeds, consequently desiccation exposure could also be an acceptable seed storage method; (3 R. sinensis seeds would lose vigor in the interaction of extreme cold (-27°C and desiccation; (4 there were significant differences in seed weight, seed curvature, and endocarp thickness between the two types of seeds. These findings provided fundamental physiological information for R. sinensis seeds and supported the long-term storage of its seeds. Our results may also serve as useful reference for seed storage of other threatened seagrass species and facilitate their ex situ conservation and habitat restoration.

  4. Gm1-MMP is involved in growth and development of leaf and seed, and enhances tolerance to high temperature and humidity stress in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sushuang; Liu, Yanmin; Jia, Yanhong; Wei, Jiaping; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhou, Yali; Zhu, Yajing; Gu, Weihong; Ma, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases. Gm1-MMP was found to play an important role in soybean tissue remodeling during leaf expansion. In this study, Gm1-MMP was isolated and characterized. Its encoding protein had a relatively low phylogenetic relationship with the MMPs in other plant species. Subcellular localization indicated that Gm1-MMP was a plasma membrane protein. Gm1-MMP showed higher expression levels in mature leaves, old leaves, pods, and mature seeds, as well as was involved in the development of soybean seed. Additionally, it was involved in response to high temperature and humidity (HTH) stress in R7 leaves and seeds in soybean. The analysis of promoter of Gm1-MMP suggested that the fragment from -399 to -299 was essential for its promoter activity in response to HTH stress. The overexpression of Gm1-MMP in Arabidopsis affected the growth and development of leaves, enhanced leaf and developing seed tolerance to HTH stress and improved seed vitality. The levels of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and ROS in transgenic Arabidopsis seeds were lower than those in wild type seeds under HTH stress. Gm1-MMP could interact with soybean metallothionein-II (GmMT-II), which was confirmed by analysis of yeast two-hybrid assay and BiFC assays. All the results indicated that Gm1-MMP plays an important role in the growth and development of leaves and seeds as well as in tolerance to HTH stress. It will be helpful for us understanding the functions of Gm1-MMP in plant growth and development, and in response to abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tolerance of Ruppia sinensis Seeds to Desiccation, Low Temperature, and High Salinity With Special Reference to Long-Term Seed Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruiting; Zhou, Yi; Song, Xiaoyue; Xu, Shaochun; Zhang, Xiaomei; Lin, Haiying; Xu, Shuai; Yue, Shidong; Zhu, Shuyu

    2018-01-01

    Seeds are important materials for the restoration of globally-threatened marine angiosperm (seagrass) populations. In this study, we investigated the differences between different Ruppia sinensis seed types and developed two feasible long-term R. sinensis seed storage methods. The ability of R. sinensis seeds to tolerate the short-term desiccation and extreme cold had been investigated. The tolerance of R. sinensis seeds to long-term exposure of high salinity, cold temperature, and desiccation had been considered as potential methods for long-term seed storage. Also, three morphological and nine physiological indices were measured and compared between two types of seeds: Shape L and Shape S. We found that: (1) wet storage at a salinity of 30–40 psu and 0°C were the optimal long-term storage conditions, and the proportion of viable seeds reached over 90% after a storage period of 11 months since the seeds were collected from the reproductive shoots; (2) dry condition was not the optimal choice for long-term storage of R. sinensis seeds; however, storing seeds in a dry condition at 5°C and 33 ± 10% relative humidity for 9 months had a relatively high percentage (74.44 ± 2.22%) of viable seeds, consequently desiccation exposure could also be an acceptable seed storage method; (3) R. sinensis seeds would lose vigor in the interaction of extreme cold (-27°C) and desiccation; (4) there were significant differences in seed weight, seed curvature, and endocarp thickness between the two types of seeds. These findings provided fundamental physiological information for R. sinensis seeds and supported the long-term storage of its seeds. Our results may also serve as useful reference for seed storage of other threatened seagrass species and facilitate their ex situ conservation and habitat restoration.

  6. Process for forming sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen-Tong P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved electrode is disclosed for the anode in a sulfur cycle hydrogen generation process where sulfur dioxie is oxidized to form sulfuric acid at the anode. The active compound in the electrode is palladium, palladium oxide, an alloy of palladium, or a mixture thereof. The active compound may be deposited on a porous, stable, conductive substrate.

  7. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  8. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALB, P.

    2001-08-22

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ({approx}$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  9. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella

    2015-01-01

    The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits the disti......The multiple sulfur isotope composition of porewater sulfate from the anoxic marine sapropel of Mangrove Lake, Bermuda was measured in order to establish how multiple sulfur isotopes are fractionated during reoxidative sulfur cycling. The porewater-sulfate d34S and D33S dataset exhibits......, informed by the chemistry of sulfur intermediate compounds in Mangrove Lake, reveals that sulfate reduction produces a relatively small intrinsic fractionation and that an active reoxidative sulfur cycle increases the fractionation of the measured values. Based on the model results, the reoxidative cycle...... of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate...

  10. Sulfur recirculation for increased electricity production in Waste-to-Energy plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Sven; Blomqvist, Evalena W; Bäfver, Linda; Jones, Frida; Davidsson, Kent; Froitzheim, Jan; Karlsson, Martin; Larsson, Erik; Liske, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur recirculation is a new technology for reducing boiler corrosion and dioxin formation. It was demonstrated in full-scale tests at a Waste to Energy plant in Göteborg (Sweden) during nearly two months of operation. Sulfur was recirculated as sulfuric acid from the flue gas cleaning back to the boiler, thus creating a sulfur loop. The new technology was evaluated by extensive measurement campaigns during operation under normal conditions (reference case) and operation with sulfur recirculation. The chlorine content of both fly ash and boiler ash decreased and the sulfur content increased during the sulfur recirculation tests. The deposit growth and the particle concentration decreased with sulfur recirculation and the dioxin concentration (I-TEQ) of the flue gas was reduced by approximately 25%. Sulfuric acid dew point measurements showed that the sulfuric acid dosage did not lead to elevated SO3 concentrations, which may otherwise induce low temperature corrosion. In the sulfur recirculation corrosion probe exposures, the corrosion rate decreased for all tested materials (16Mo3, Sanicro 28 and Inconel 625) and material temperatures (450 °C and 525 °C) compared to the reference exposure. The corrosion rates were reduced by 60-90%. Sulfur recirculation prevented the formation of transition metal chlorides at the metal/oxide interface, formation of chromate and reduced the presence of zinc in the corrosion products. Furthermore, measured corrosion rates at 525 °C with sulfur recirculation in operation were similar or lower compared to those measured at 450 °C material temperature in reference conditions, which corresponds to normal operation at normal steam temperatures. This implies that sulfur recirculation allows for higher steam data and electricity production without increasing corrosion. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced sulfur in euxinic sediments of the Cariaco Basin : Sulfur isotope contraints on organic sulfur formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Werne, J.; Lyons, T.W.; Hollander, D.J.; Formolo, M.

    2003-01-01

    Reduced sulfur accumulation in Holocene and latest Pleistocene euxinic marine sediments from the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela, was investigated to constrain the timing and possible pathways of organic matter (OM) sulfurization. Data were collected for a diverse suite of sulfur species, including

  12. Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R.; Steinberg, M.

    This invention relates to high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280/sup 0/C and containing as little as 36 mo1% ethylene and about 41 to 51 mo1% sulfur dioxide, and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10 to 50/sup 0/C, and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

  13. A temperature-tolerant multiplex elements and genes screening system for genetically modified organisms based on dual priming oligonucleotide primers and capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Wei, Shuang; Wang, Chenguang; Du, Zhixin; Zhu, Pengyu; Wu, Xiyang; Wu, Gang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2017-08-15

    High throughput screening systems are the preferred solution to meet the urgent requirement of increasing number of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, we have successfully developed a multiplex GMO element screening system with dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers. This system can detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S), terminator of nopaline synthase gene (NOS), figwort mosaic virus 35S (FMV 35S) promoter, neomycin phosphotransferaseII (NPTII), Bt Cry 1Ab, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase genes (bar) and Streptomyces viridochromogenes (pat) simultaneously, which covers more than 90% of all authorized GMO species worldwide. This system exhibits a high tolerance to annealing temperatures, high specificity and a limit of detection equal to conventional PCR. A total of 214 samples from markets, national entry-exit agencies, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement (IRMM) and the American Oil Chemists' Society (AOCS) were also tested for applicability. This screening system is therefore suitable for GMO screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of the THS4302 and the Class V Radiation-Tolerant THS4304-SP Silicon Germanium Wideband Amplifiers at Extreme Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Elbuluk, Malik; Hammoud, Ahmad; VanKeuls, Frederick W.

    2009-01-01

    This report discusses the performance of silicon germanium, wideband gain amplifiers under extreme temperatures. The investigated devices include Texas Instruments THS4304-SP and THS4302 amplifiers. Both chips are manufactured using the BiCom3 process based on silicon germanium technology along with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) buried oxide layers. The THS4304-SP device was chosen because it is a Class V radiation-tolerant (150 kRad, TID silicon), voltage-feedback operational amplifier designed for use in high-speed analog signal applications and is very desirable for NASA missions. It operates with a single 5 V power supply [1]. It comes in a 10-pin ceramic flatpack package, and it provides balanced inputs, low offset voltage and offset current, and high common mode rejection ratio. The fixed-gain THS4302 chip, which comes in a 16-pin leadless package, offers high bandwidth, high slew rate, low noise, and low distortion [2]. Such features have made the amplifier useful in a number of applications such as wideband signal processing, wireless transceivers, intermediate frequency (IF) amplifier, analog-to-digital converter (ADC) preamplifier, digital-to-analog converter (DAC) output buffer, measurement instrumentation, and medical and industrial imaging.

  15. Ultrasound assisted regioselective sulfonation of aromatic compounds with sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin S; Deshmukh, Krishna M; Jagtap, Sachin R; Nandurkar, Nitin S; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2009-03-01

    A simple and convenient methodology for selective sulfonation of aromatic compounds using sulfuric acid under sonication is described. The present methodology shows a considerable enhancement in the reaction rate along with improved selectivity compared with the reactions performed under silent conditions. The effect of various parameters such as agitation speed, sulfuric acid concentration, and temperature on reaction system have been investigated and are explained on the basis of ultrasonically generated cavitational effects.

  16. [Transformation of sulfur forms during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification in a fixed bed reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Cao, Yan; Zhang, Jianmin; Huang, Jiejie; Wang, Yang; Chen, Fuyan

    2003-03-01

    The development of various process to the pre-desulfurization of coal was drawn more attention. In present study, the transformation of sulfur forms of three different ranks high sulfur coals during coal pyrolysis and partial gasification were investigated in a fixed bed reactor. The sulfur and carbon content analysis of original coal and coal char produced were determined by LECO SC-444 and wet chemical analysis according to Sugawara's method. The results showed that half of inorganic sulfur and partial of organic sulfur were removed during coal pyrolysis. And the sulfur removal was much more than carbon during pyrolysis process; and the sulfur in the coal char, especially the sulfide sulfur was removed completely during partial gasification process for both Datong coal and Xishan coal, the degree of sulfide sulfur removal could be increased with increasing temperature. At the same time, the results of Yima coal showed that the effect of fixed-sulfur by alkaline metals increased when the temperature was higher than 700 degrees C, which attribute to the increase of the fixed sulfur reaction rate and the decrease of mass-transfer limitation.

  17. Sulfur in zircons: A new window into melt chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Bell, E. A.; Boehnke, P.; Barboni, M.; Harrison, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    The abundance and isotopic composition of sulfur are important tools for exploring the photochemistry of the atmosphere, the thermal history of mantle and igneous rocks, and ancient metabolic processes on the early Earth. Because the oldest terrestrial samples are zircons, we developed a new in-situ procedure to analyze the sulfur content of zircons using the CAMECA ims 1290 at UCLA. We analyzed zircons from three metaluminous/I-type granites (reduced and oxidized Peninsular range and Elba), which exhibit low sulfur abundance with the average of 0.5ppm, and one peraluminous/S-type zircon (Strathbogie Range), which shows an elevated sulfur level with the average of 1.5ppm. Additionally, we found that sulfur content ranges between 0.4 and 2.3 ppm in young volcanic zircons (St. Lucia). Our analyses of zircons from the Jack Hills, Western Australia, whose ages range between 3.4 and 4.1 Ga, show a variety of sulfur contents. Three out of the ten zircons are consistent with the sulfur contents of S-type zircons; the rest have low sulfur contents, which are similar to those of I-type zircons. The high sulfur content in some of these Jack Hills zircons can be interpreted as indicating their origin in either a S-type granite or a volcanic reservoir. We favor the former interpretation since the Ti-in-zircon temperatures of our Jack Hills zircons is lower than those of volcanic zircons. Future work will be undertaken to develop a systematic understanding of the relationship between melt volatile content, melt chemistry, and zircon sulfur content.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni/ CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocsachoque, Marco A., E-mail: ocmarco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Eugenio Russman, Juan I.; Irigoyen, Beatriz [Instituto de Tecnologías del Hidrógeno y Energías Sostenibles (ITHES), Departamento de Ingeniería Química, Facultad de Ingeniería (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gazzoli, Delia [Dipartimento di Chimia, Universitá di Roma “La Sapienza”, Roma (Italy); González, María G. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas “Dr Jorge J. Ronco”, (CONICET, CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Cs Exactas (UNLP), Calle 48 N° 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur deactivation of Ni/CeO{sub 2} and Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts were examined through an experimental and theoretical study. These catalysts were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption, X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed reaction, thermogravimetric analysis, Uv–visible spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, and tested under the methane dry reforming reaction in the presence of H{sub 2}S. On the other hand, different possible interactions of sulfur with Rh, Ni or surface sites of the CeO{sub 2} support were evaluated by performing energy calculations with the density functional theory (DFT). Overall, the results indicate that tolerance to sulfur of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalyst is higher than that of Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. In this sense, TPR measurements show that reduction of CeO{sub 2} is promoted by the presence of Rh. This effect, probably caused by hydrogen spillover to CeO{sub 2} support during the reduction of RhO{sub x} species, could be linked to a high oxygen donation capacity of Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. Accordingly, the O{sup 2−} species existing on Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, revealed by Raman spectra of these samples, could favor sulfur oxidation and prevent Rh–S interactions. Likewise, the theoretical calculations show that desorption of S–O species from Rh/CeO{sub 2} system is more favorable than that from Ni/CeO{sub 2} one. Therefore, our experimental and theoretical study about sulfur deactivation of Ni and Rh supported on CeO{sub 2} allow us to postulate that Rh can help to desorb SO{sub x} species formed on the support, retarding sulfur poisoning of the Rh/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. - Highlights: • CeO{sub 2} support can act as a sacrifice trap decreasing sulfur poisoning. • Theoretical calculations indicate an important nickel affinity with sulfur. • Rh would favor desorption of S–O species formed on the support. • The O{sup 2−} species present on the Rh–CeO{sub 2} sample favor sulfur removal.

  19. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  20. Dynamics of a Novel Class of Polymers: Polymerized Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Kevin; Kim, Jenny; Oleshko, Vladimir; Griebel, Jared; Chung, Woo; Simmons, Adam; Pyun, Jeff; Soles, Christopher

    2013-03-01

    In this study we investigate the dynamics of a new type of polymer, consisting mainly of sulfur. Room-temperature stable polymerized sulfur samples were prepared by crosslinking the well-known living sulfur polymers formed at elevated temperatures by the addition of a crosslinking agent. This reverse vulcanization process was used to create a series of samples with different amounts of crosslinking agent. These polymers show great promise for use in advanced batteries as cathode materials. Each system exhibits a glassy-state beta relaxation, with the intensity of this relaxation proportional to the crosslinking content. A dynamic glass transition is also observed for each system, and the glass transition temperature/segmental relaxation moves to higher temperatures with increased crosslink content as is typically observed in crosslinked systems. As is typical of polymers, ion motion in these systems is closely coupled to the backbone motion of the host polymer. National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship

  1. TEMPERATURE TOLERANCES AND OSMOREGULATION IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occur in the middle reaches of the Swartkops estuary, near Port Elizabeth. ... although they are occasionally exposed to practically fresh overlying water for a few days. Zoologica Alr/CQIIQ 9 (1): 1-13 (1974). 1. R ep rod u ced b y Sa b in et G a tew a. y u ... Twenty-five specimens of Dosinia hepatica (Lamy) and 25 specimens.

  2. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  3. Some thoughts on GAIA and the sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data hypothesis states that the composition, oxidation reduction state, and temperature of the troposphere are actively regulated by the biota for the biota. One of the early predictions of the Gaia hypothesis was that there should be a sulfur compound made by the biota in the oceans. It would need to be stable enough against oxidation in water to allow its transfer to the air. Either the sulfur compound itself or its atmospheric oxidation product would have to return sulfur from the sea to the land surfaces. The most likely candidate for this role was dimethyl sulfide. Another sulfur compound of interest from a Gaian viewpoint CS2 (carbon disulfide) is discussed. Theories on the production of dimethyl sulfide and carbon disulfide related to the Gaian hypothesis are examined.

  4. Geometrical isomerization of fatty acids with sulfur as a catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grompone, M.A.; Tancredi, N.A. (Catedra de Fisicoquimica, Facultad de Quimica, General Flores 2124, Montevideo, 00598 (UY))

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the kinetics of the geometrical isomerization of oleic and palmitoleic acids, both contained in U.S.P. oleic acid that were studied. Sulfur powder was used as a catalyst. The methyl esters of fatty acids were analyzed by GLC with 15% OV-275 columns. The sulfur-catalyzed isomerization at 180 and 225{degrees} C proceeds via two consecutive mechanisms. The position of equilibrium is reached by the second mechanism. For this, at any particular initial concentration of sulfur, the pseudo- first-order rate dependence on substrate for a reversible reaction holds. The full rate has been shown to be proportional to the initial sulfur concentration taken to the 1.2 power. The rate constants at both temperatures and the activation energies were calculated.

  5. Microbiological disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai

    2008-01-01

    The disproportionation of inorganic sulfur intermediates at moderate temperatures (0-80 °C) is a microbiologically catalyzed chemolithotrophic process in which compounds like elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and sulfite serve as both electron donor and acceptor, and generate hydrogen sulfide...... and sulfate. Thus the overall process is comparable to the fermentation of organic compounds such as glucose and is consequently often described as 'inorganic fermentation'. The process is primarily carried out by microorganisms with phylogenetic affiliation to the so called sulfate-reducing bacteria within...... the delta subclass of Proteobacteria. The organisms grow with sulfate as their external electron acceptor and low-molecular weight organic compounds or hydrogen as energy sources. Studies of the biochemistry of a few isolates indicate that the disproportionating microbes reverse the sulfate reduction...

  6. Potentially hazardous sulfur conditions on beef cattle ranches in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel H; Dargatz, David A; Garry, Franklyn B; Hamar, Dwayne W; Ross, Paul F

    2002-09-01

    To analyze the sulfur content of water and forage samples from a geographically diverse sample of beef cow-calf operations in the United States and to estimate frequency and distribution of premises where forage and water resources could result in consumption of hazardous amounts of sulfur by cattle. Cross-sectional study. 709 forage samples from 678 beef cow-calf operations and individual water samples from 498 operations in 23 states. Sulfur content of forage samples and sulfate concentration of water samples were measured. Total sulfur intake was estimated for pairs of forage and water samples. Total sulfur intake was estimated for 454 pairs of forage and water samples. In general, highest forage sulfur contents did not coincide with highest water sulfate concentrations. Overall, 52 of the 454 (11.5%) sample pairs were estimated to yield total sulfur intake (as a percentage of dry matter) > or = 0.4%, assuming water intake during conditions of high ambient temperature. Most of these premises were in north-central (n = 19) or western (19) states. Results suggest that on numerous beef cow-calf operations throughout the United States, consumption of forage and water could result in excessively high sulfur intake. All water sources and dietary components should be evaluated when assessing total sulfur intake. Knowledge of total sulfur intake may be useful in reducing the risk of sulfur-associated health and performance problems in beef cattle.

  7. The role of sulfur nutrition in the pea response to water deficit

    OpenAIRE

    Henriet, Charlotte; Zivy, Michel; Vernoud, Vanessa; Gallardo, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) produces seeds rich in proteins for human and animal nutrition and its cultivation enriches the soils in nitrogen, thus decreasing the need for nitrogen fertilization. Increasing pea cultivation and productivity is an agroecological challenge which requires to improve its tolerance to environmental stresses. Water deficit and the lack of sulfur in soils are two abiotic stresses that interact in the current context of climate change and low-input practices. Sulfur metabo...

  8. Transient Studies of a Sodium Sulfur Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprio, Sarah

    entropy change. Species conservation equations are written in the sulfur electrode by considering the phase transition and change in the composition depending on the SOD. The electrochemical reactions are modeled by using Arrhenius-type rate equations with temperature-dependent terms and varying species concentration depending on the SOD. Species conservation equations are written in the beta"-alumina electrolyte for the ionic species by considering the change in composition due to diffusion and migration. In addition, the potential distribution, and the cell resistance for this spatially distributed system has been modeled. The physicochemical properties are considered to be temperature-dependent. The model is used to study both charging and discharging characteristics of the cell at varying current densities. The PDE-based model is solved in Aspen Custom Modeler by using method of lines. Our work shows that an appropriate thermal management strategy is necessary for high current-density operation, especially in the case of high penetration of the renewable energy into the grid.

  9. Study on the utilization of a sodium-sulfuric acid solution for the uranium minerals' leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echenique, Patricia; Fruchtenicht, Fernando; Gil, Daniel; Vigo, Daniel; Bouza, Angel; Vert, Gabriela; Becquart, Elena

    1988-01-01

    Argentine uranium minerals have been leached at bench scale with a different agent trying to reduce sulfuric acid consumption. The leaching agent was a sodium sulfate-sulfuric acid solution and the ore was from Sierra Pintada (San Rafael - Mendoza). The work was performed in stirred vessel at atmospheric pressure. The influence of different variables, pH, temperature, oxidant agent, sodium sulfate concentration and time, in the sulfuric acid consumption and the uranium yield was studied. (Author) [es

  10. Lithium sulfur batteries and electrolytes and sulfur cathodes thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Goncharenko, Nikolay; Nimon, Vitaliy; Petrov, Alexei; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Katz, Bruce D.; Loginova, Valentina

    2017-05-23

    Lithium sulfur battery cells that use water as an electrolyte solvent provide significant cost reductions. Electrolytes for the battery cells may include water solvent for maintaining electroactive sulfur species in solution during cell discharge and a sufficient amount of a cycle life-enhancing compound that facilitates charging at the cathode. The combination of these two components enhances one or more of the following cell attributes: energy density, power density and cycle life. For instance, in applications where cost per Watt-Hour (Wh) is paramount, such as grid storage and traction applications, the use of an aqueous electrolyte in combination with inexpensive sulfur as the cathode active material can be a key enabler for the utility and automotive industries, for example, providing a cost effective and compact solution for load leveling, electric vehicles and renewable energy storage. Sulfur cathodes, and methods of fabricating lithium sulfur cells, in particular for loading lithium sulfide into the cathode structures, provide further advantages.

  11. Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Beaver

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an aerosol flow tube apparatus, we have studied the effects of aliphatic aldehydes (C3 to C10 and ketones (C3 and C9 on ice nucleation in sulfuric acid aerosols. Mixed aerosols were prepared by combining an organic vapor flow with a flow of sulfuric acid aerosols over a small mixing time (~60 s at room temperature. No acid-catalyzed reactions were observed under these conditions, and physical uptake was responsible for the organic content of the sulfuric acid aerosols. In these experiments, aerosol organic content, determined by a Mie scattering analysis, was found to vary with the partial pressure of organic, the flow tube temperature, and the identity of the organic compound. The physical properties of the organic compounds (primarily the solubility and melting point were found to play a dominant role in determining the inferred mode of nucleation (homogenous or heterogeneous and the specific freezing temperatures observed. Overall, very soluble, low-melting organics, such as acetone and propanal, caused a decrease in aerosol ice nucleation temperatures when compared with aqueous sulfuric acid aerosol. In contrast, sulfuric acid particles exposed to organic compounds of eight carbons and greater, of much lower solubility and higher melting temperatures, nucleate ice at temperatures above aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Organic compounds of intermediate carbon chain length, C4-C7, (of intermediate solubility and melting temperatures nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Interpretations and implications of these results for cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  12. Lithium-Sulfur Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mok-Hwa; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Xi, Kai; Kumar, R Vasant; Jung, Dae Soo; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Roh, Kwang Chul

    2018-02-21

    Although many existing hybrid energy storage systems demonstrate promising electrochemical performances, imbalances between the energies and kinetics of the two electrodes must be resolved to allow their widespread commercialization. As such, the development of a new class of energy storage systems is a particular challenge, since future systems will require a single device to provide both a high gravimetric energy and a high power density. In this context, we herein report the design of novel lithium-sulfur capacitors. The resulting asymmetric systems exhibited energy densities of 23.9-236.4 Wh kg -1 and power densities of 72.2-4097.3 W kg -1 , which are the highest reported values for an asymmetric system to date. This approach involved the use of a prelithiated anode and a hybrid cathode material exhibiting anion adsorption-desorption in addition to the electrochemical reduction and oxidation of sulfur at almost identical rates. This novel strategy yielded both high energy and power densities, and therefore establishes a new benchmark for hybrid systems.

  13. Crafting tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Antje; Freitag, Markus; Rapp, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing changes in social structures, orientation, and value systems confront us with the growing necessity to address and understand transforming patterns of tolerance as well as specific aspects, such as social tolerance. Based on hierarchical analyses of the latest World Values Survey (2005...... results show that specific institutional qualities, which reduce status anxiety, such as inclusiveness, universality, and fairness, prevail over traditional socio-economic, societal, cultural, and democratic explanations....

  14. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  15. Influence of sulfur on cadmium (Cd) stress tolerance in Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... accumulation. However, S-exposed plants clearly exhibited enhanced antioxidant enzymes activity. (catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase), chlorophyll a and b content and total soluble ... that application of S mitigated the adverse effects of Cd stress by enhancing TSC, photosynthetic pigments ...

  16. 76 FR 56644 - Sulfur Dioxide; Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... drinking water and in residential settings, but does not include occupational exposure. Section 408(b)(2)(C... exposures for which there is reliable information.'' This includes exposure through drinking water and in... concentrations of >100 ppm may be found in dried fruits (excluding dark raisins and prunes), lemon and lime...

  17. Influence of sulfur on cadmium (Cd) stress tolerance in Triticum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... (TSC) accumulation, and decreased MDA content in wheat plants. The results indicate that application of S mitigated the adverse effects of Cd stress by enhancing TSC, photosynthetic pigments and antioxidant enzymes. Key words: Antioxidant, cadmium stress, carbohydrates, photosynthetic pigments, Triticum aestivum.

  18. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  19. Preservation of organic matter on Mars by sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; McAdam, A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Millan, M.; Glavin, D. P.; Szopa, C.; Conrad, P. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Deltaic-lacustrine mudstones at Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars yielded a variety of sulfur-containing volatiles upon heating to 500-860°C, as detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover. The detection of organosulfur compounds comprising thiophenes, dimethylsulfide and thiols by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and evolved gas analyses, together with aromatic and other hydrocarbon molecules with distributions specific to the sample (i.e., not from the SAM background) indicate that some or all of these organic fragments released at high temperatures are indigenous to the mudstones. The organosulfur compounds are most likely derived from sulfur organics in the sediments. However, there is a possibility that sulfurization of some organic fragments occurred in the oven. On Earth, sulfurization of organic matter is a key process that aids preservation over geological time-scales. This is because it reduces reactive functional groups and adds cross links between small unstable molecules thereby converting them into recalcitrant macromolecules. Sulfurization of organic materials prior to deposition and during early diagenesis may have been a key mechanism responsible for organic matter preservation in the Murray formation mudstones. Sulfur-bearing organics have also been observed in carbonaceous meteorites and there is indication of their presence in the Tissint martian meteorite. A quantitative assessment of organosulfur compounds relative to their non-organic counterparts will be presented for the Murray formation mudstones analyzed by SAM and meteorites analyzed in the laboratory under similar analytical conditions.

  20. Fossilization of melanosomes via sulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria E; van Dongen, Bart E; Lockyer, Nick P; Bull, Ian D; Orr, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Fossil melanin granules (melanosomes) are an important resource for inferring the evolutionary history of colour and its functions in animals. The taphonomy of melanin and melanosomes, however, is incompletely understood. In particular, the chemical processes responsible for melanosome preservation have not been investigated. As a result, the origins of sulfur-bearing compounds in fossil melanosomes are difficult to resolve. This has implications for interpretations of original colour in fossils based on potential sulfur-rich phaeomelanosomes. Here we use pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GCMS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to assess the mode of preservation of fossil microstructures, confirmed as melanosomes based on the presence of melanin, preserved in frogs from the Late Miocene Libros biota (NE Spain). Our results reveal a high abundance of organosulfur compounds and non-sulfurized fatty acid methyl esters in both the fossil tissues and host sediment; chemical signatures in the fossil tissues are inconsistent with preservation of phaeomelanin. Our results reflect preservation via the diagenetic incorporation of sulfur, i.e. sulfurization (natural vulcanization), and other polymerization processes. Organosulfur compounds and/or elevated concentrations of sulfur have been reported from melanosomes preserved in various invertebrate and vertebrate fossils and depositional settings, suggesting that preservation through sulfurization is likely to be widespread. Future studies of sulfur-rich fossil melanosomes require that the geochemistry of the host sediment is tested for evidence of sulfurization in order to constrain interpretations of potential phaeomelanosomes and thus of original integumentary colour in fossils.

  1. Evaluation of Sulfur 'Concrete' for Use as a Construction Material on the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Combining molten sulfur with any number of aggregate materials forms, when solid, a mixture having attributes similar, if not better, to conventional water-based concrete. As a result the use of sulfur "concrete" on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive environments. Consequently, discovery of troilite (FeS) on the lunar surface prompted numerous scenarios about its reduction to elemental sulfur for use, in combination with lunar regolith, as a potential construction material; not requiring water, a precious resource, for its manufacture is an obvious advantage. However, little is known about the viability of sulfur concrete in an environment typified by extreme temperatures and essentially no atmosphere. The experimental work presented here evaluates the response of pure sulfur and sulfur concrete subjected to laboratory conditions that approach those expected on the lunar surface, the results suggesting a narrow window of application.

  2. Second Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-30

    The present report summarizes and discusses the current results and on-going activity towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program.

  3. Tolerance to and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A C; Burch, J B; de Fiebre, C M; Marks, M J

    1988-02-01

    Female DBA mice were subjected to one of four treatments: ethanol-containing or control diets, nicotine (0.2, 1.0, 5.0 mg/kg/hr) infusion or saline infusion. After removal from the liquid diets or cessation of infusion, the animals were challenged with an acute dose of ethanol or nicotine. Chronic ethanol-fed mice were tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature and open field activity and were cross tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and heart rate. Nicotine infused animals were tolerant to the effects of nicotine on body temperature and rotarod performance and were cross tolerant to the effects of ethanol on body temperature. Ethanol-induced sleep time was decreased in chronic ethanol- but not chronic nicotine-treated mice. Chronic drug treatment did not alter the elimination rate of either drug. Chronic ethanol treatment did not alter the number or affinity of brain nicotinic receptors whereas chronic nicotine treatment elicited an increase in the number of [3H]-nicotine binding sites. Tolerance and cross tolerance between ethanol and nicotine is discussed in terms of potential effects on desensitization of brain nicotinic receptors.

  4. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  5. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals for lithium–sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yong; Lu, Mengna; Ling, Xuetao; Jiao, Zheng; Chen, Lingli; Chen, Lu; Hu, Pengfei; Zhao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D porous GA/S nanocrystals are prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method. • The structure is affected by hydrothermal temperature and liquid sulfur’s viscosity. • The hybrid delivers a capacity of 716.2 mA h g −1 after 50 cycles at 100 mA g −1 . • The nanosized S, strong adsorbability and intimate contact of GNS are main factors. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries are receiving significant attention as a new energy source because of its high theoretical capacity and specific energy. However, the low sulfur loading and large particles (usually in submicron dimension) in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density and lead to the instability of the cathode and rapid capacity decay. Herein, we introduce a one-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals to suppress the rapid fading of sulfur electrode. It is found that the hydrothermal temperature and viscosity of liquid sulfur have significant effects on particle size and loading mass of sulfur nanocrystals, graphitization degree of graphene and chemical bonding between sulfur and oxygen-containing groups of graphene. The hybrid could deliver a specific capacity of 716.2 mA h g −1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g −1 and reversible capacity of 517.9 mA h g −1 at 1 A g −1 . The performance we demonstrate herein suggests that Li–S battery may provide an opportunity for development of rechargeable battery systems

  6. Synthesis of sulfur-containing lubricant additives on the basis of fatty acid ethyl esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iurii S. Bodachivskyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reveals an energy-, resource- and eco-friendly method for preparation of sulfur-containing lubricant additives via interaction of fatty acid ethyl esters of rapeseed oil with elemental sulfur. The structure of synthesized compounds under various reactants ratio (5–50 wt.% of sulfur, duration (30–240 min and temperature of the process (160–215°С was investigated using various analytical techniques. According to the established data, aside from addition to double bonds, the side reaction of hydrogen substitution at α-methylene groups near these bonds occurs and induces the formation of conjugated systems and chromophoric sulfur-rich derivatives. Also, we found that increase of process duration evokes growth of polysulfane chains, in contrast to the raise of temperature, which leads to the formation of sulfur-containing heterocycles and hydrogen sulfide, as a result of elimination. Influence of accelerators on sulfurization of fatty acid ethyl esters was also examined. The most effective among them are mixtures of zinc dibutyldithiocarbamate with zinc oxide or stearic acid, which soften synthesis conditions and doubly decrease duration of the high-temperature stage. In addition, sulfur-containing compositions of ethyl esters and α-olefins, vulcanized esters by benzoyl peroxide, nonylphenols and zinc dinonylphenyldithiophosphate were designed. The study identified that lithium lubricant with sulfurized vulcanized esters provides improved tribological properties, in comparison with base lubricant or lubricant with the non-modified product.

  7. Solubility of sulfur in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubskij, S.D.; Petrova, E.F.; Rogov, A.I.; Shvartsman, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The solubility of 35 S was determined in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys in the range of temperatures between 910 and 1050 deg C by the method of radiometric analysis. It was found that the solubility of sulfur increases with the concentration of chromium in alloys with 20% Ni

  8. ascorbic acid retention in canned lime juice preserved with sulfur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ASCORBIC ACID RETENTION IN CANNED LIME JUICE. PRESERVED WITH SULFUR DIOXIDE AND BENZOIC ACID. Francis M Malhooko“ and Elizabeth N Kiniiya'. ABSTRACT. The effects of two levels each of sodium metabisulfite and sodium benzoate on the shelf-life of canned lime juice stored at ambient temperature ...

  9. Silica sulfuric acid: a versatile and reusable heterogeneous catalyst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the reactions were done at room temperature and the N-acyl carbamates and oxazolidinones were obtained with high yields and purity via an easy work-up procedure. This method is attractive and is in a close agreement with green chemistry. KEY WORDS: N-Acyl carbamates, N-Acyl oxazolidinones, Silica sulfuric acid, ...

  10. Intolerant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushf, G

    1994-04-01

    The Hyde Amendment and Roman Catholic attempts to put restrictions on Title X funding have been criticized for being intolerant. However, such criticism fails to appreciate that there are two competing notions of tolerance, one focusing on the limits of state force and accepting pluralism as unavoidable, and the other focusing on the limits of knowledge and advancing pluralism as a good. These two types of tolerance, illustrated in the writings of John Locke and J.S. Mill, each involve an intolerance. In a pluralistic context where the free exercise of religion is respected, John Locke's account of tolerance is preferable. However, it (in a reconstructed form) leads to a minimal state. Positive entitlements to benefits like artificial contraception or nontherapeutic abortions can legitimately be resisted, because an intolerance has already been shown with respect to those that consider the benefit immoral, since their resources have been coopted by taxation to advance an end that is contrary to their own. There is a sliding scale from tolerance (viewed as forbearance) to the affirmation of communal integrity, and this scale maps on to the continuum from negative to positive rights.

  11. For sale: Sulfur emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiderscheit, J.

    1992-01-01

    The allowance trading market has started a slow march to maturity. Competitive developers should understand the risks and opportunities now presented. The marketplace for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions allowances - the centerpiece of Title 4's acid rain reduction program - remains enigmatic 19 months after the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 were passed. Yet it is increasingly clear that the emission allowance market will likely confound the gloom and doom of its doubters. The recently-announced $10 million dollar Wisconsin Power and Light allowance sales to Duquesne Light and the Tennessee Valley Authority are among the latest indications of momentum toward a stabilizing market. This trend puts additional pressure on independent developers to finalize their allowance strategies. Developers who understand what the allowance trading program is and what it is not, know the key players, and grasp the unresolved regulatory issues will have a new competitive advantage. The topics addressed in this article include the allowance marketplace, marketplace characteristics, the regulatory front, forward-looking strategies, and increasing marketplace activity

  12. Flash pyrolysis of coal, coal maceral, and coal-derived pyrite with on-line characterization of volatile sulfur compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Lake, M.A.; Griffin, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A Pyroprobe flash pyrolysis-gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector was used to study volatile sulfur compounds produced during the thermal decomposition of Illinois coal, coal macerals and coal-derived pyrite. Maximum evolution of volatile organic sulfur compounds from all coal samples occurred at a temperature of approximately 700??C. At this temperature, the evolution of thiophene, its alkyl isomers, and short-chain dialkyl sulfide compounds relative to the evolution of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene compounds was greater from coal high in organic sulfur than from coal low in organic sulfur. The variation in the evolution of sulfur compounds observed for three separate coal macerals (exinite, vitrinite, and inertinite) was similar to that observed for whole coal samples. However, the variation trend for the macerals was much more pronounced. Decomposition of coal-derived pyrite with the evolution of elemental sulfur was detected at a temperature greater than 700??C. The results of this study indicated that the gas chromotographic profile of the volatile sulfur compounds produced during flash pyrolysis of coals and coal macerals varied as a function of the amount of organic sulfur that occurred in the samples. Characterization of these volatile sulfur compounds provides a better understanding of the behavior of sulfur in coal during the thermolysis process, which could be incorporated in the design for coal cleaning using flash pyrolysis techniques. ?? 1988.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Condensation of Sulfuric Acid and Water in a Large Two-stroke Marine Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Jens Honore; Karvounis, Nikolas; Pang, Kar Mun

    2016-01-01

    on the sulfuric acid gas phase. A linear correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the sulfuric acid condensation rate. The initial in-cylinder water content is found not to affect the sulfuric acid condensation but it has a high impact on water condensation. The scavenging pressure level shows...... an inverse correlation between pressure and condensation rate due to change in the flame propagation speed. Finally, increasing the cylinder liner temperature significantly decreases water condensation but has a negligible influence on the condensation of sulfuric acid.......We present results from computational fluid dynamics simulations of the condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine. The model uses a reduced n-heptane skeletal chemical mechanism coupled with a sulfur subsetto simulate the combustion process...

  14. Photocatalytic transformations of organic sulfur compounds and H2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    Modern views on the products, pathways and kinetic features of liquid- and gas-phase photocatalytic reactions of sulfur compounds in the presence of heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysts are generalised. Attention is focussed on the aliphatic and aromatic reduced sulfur compounds and pesticides. The reaction rate in the liquid and gas phases are analysed as function of solution pH, temperature, catalyst content, substrate concentration, solvent type, air moisture and added oxidants. Photocatalyst deactivation and the ways for recovery of its activity are considered.

  15. Volcanogenic Sulfur on Earth and Io: Composition and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargel, J.S.; Delmelle, P.; Nash, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    The causes of Io's variegated surface, especially the roles of sulfur, and the geochemical history of sulfur compounds on Io are not well understood. Suspecting that minor impurities in sulfur might be important, we have investigated the major and trace element chemistry and spectroscopic reflectance of natural sulfur from a variety of terrestrial volcanic-hydrothermal environments. Evidence suggests that Io may be substantially coated with impure sulfur. On Earth, a few tenths of a percent to a few percent of chalcophile trace elements (e.g., As and Se) comonly occur in sulfur and appear to stabilize material of yellow, brown, orange, and red hues, which may persist even at low temperatures. Percentage levels of chalcophile impurities are reasonably expected to occur on Io in vapor sublimate deposits and flows derived from such deposits. Such impurities join a host of other mechanisms that might explain Io's reds and yellows. Two-tenths to two percent opaque crystalline impurities, particularly pyrite (FeS2), commonly produces green, gray, and black volcanic sulfur on Earth and might explain areas of Io having deposits of these colors. Pyrite produces a broad absorption near 1 ??m that gradually diminishes out to 1.6 ??m - similar but not identical to the spectrum of Io seen in Galileo NIMS data. Percentage amounts of carbonaceous impurities and tens of percent SiO2 (as silicates) also strongly affect the spectral properties of Earth's sulfur. Io's broad absorption between 0.52 and 0.64 ??m remains unexplained by these data but could be due to sodium sulfides, as suggested previously by others, or to As, Se, or other impurities. These impurities and others, such as P and Cl (which could exist on Io's surface in amounts over 1% that of sulfur), greatly alter the molecular structure of molten and solid sulfur. Minor impurities could impact Io's geology, such as the morphology of sulfur lava flows and the ability of sulfur to sustain high relief. We have not found

  16. COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

    2008-05-30

    , the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

  17. Cloning of Gossypium hirsutum Sucrose Non-Fermenting 1-Related Protein Kinase 2 Gene (GhSnRK2) and Its Overexpression in Transgenic Arabidopsis Escalates Drought and Low Temperature Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Babatunde; Zhang, Xueyan; Liu, Chuanliang; Yang, Zhaoen; Yang, Zuoren; Wang, Qianhua; Zhao, Ge; Li, Fuguang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance and the use of modern genetics approaches for the improvement of drought stress tolerance have been major focuses of plant molecular biologists. In the present study, we cloned the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 (GhSnRK2) gene and investigated its functions in transgenic Arabidopsis. We further elucidated the function of this gene in transgenic cotton using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) techniques. We hypothesized that GhSnRK2 participates in the stress signaling pathway and elucidated its role in enhancing stress tolerance in plants via various stress-related pathways and stress-responsive genes. We determined that the subcellular localization of the GhSnRK2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) was localized in the nuclei and cytoplasm. In contrast to wild-type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing GhSnRK2 exhibited increased tolerance to drought, cold, abscisic acid and salt stresses, suggesting that GhSnRK2 acts as a positive regulator in response to cold and drought stresses. Plants overexpressing GhSnRK2 displayed evidence of reduced water loss, turgor regulation, elevated relative water content, biomass, and proline accumulation. qRT-PCR analysis of GhSnRK2 expression suggested that this gene may function in diverse tissues. Under normal and stress conditions, the expression levels of stress-inducible genes, such as AtRD29A, AtRD29B, AtP5CS1, AtABI3, AtCBF1, and AtABI5, were increased in the GhSnRK2-overexpressing plants compared to the wild-type plants. GhSnRK2 gene silencing alleviated drought tolerance in cotton plants, indicating that VIGS technique can certainly be used as an effective means to examine gene function by knocking down the expression of distinctly expressed genes. The results of this study suggested that the GhSnRK2 gene, when incorporated into Arabidopsis, functions in positive responses to drought stress and in low temperature tolerance. PMID:25393623

  18. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  19. Production of petroleum bitumen by oxidation of heavy oil residue with sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileuberdi, Ye.; Akkazyn, Ye. A.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper production of bitumen adding elemental sulfur at oxidation of oil residue are investigated. The objects of research were distilled residue of Karazhanbas crude oil and elemental sulfur. These oil residue characterized by a low output of easy fractions and the high content of tar-asphaltene substances, therefore is the most comprehensible feedstock for producing bitumen. The sulfur is one of the oil product collected in oil extraction regions. Oxidation process of hydrocarbons carried out at temperatures from 180 up to 210 °С without addition of sulfur and with the addition of sulfur (5-10 wt. %) for 4 hours. At 200 °С oxidation of hydrocarbons with 5, 7 and 10 wt.% sulfur within 3-4 h allows receiving paving bitumen on the mark BND 200/300, BND 130/200, BN 90/130 and BN 70/30. Physical and mechanical characteristics of oxidation products with the addition of 5-7 wt. % sulfur corresponds to grade of paving bitumen BND 40/60. At the given temperature oxidized for 2.5-3 h, addition of 10 wt. % sulfur gave the products of oxidation describing on parameters of construction grades of bitumen (BN 90/10).

  20. Augmenting Sulfur Metabolism and Herbivore Defense in Arabidopsis by Bacterial Volatile Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eAziz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an element necessary for the life cycle of higher plants. Its assimilation and reduction into essential biomolecules are pivotal factors determining a plant’s growth and vigor as well as resistance to environmental stress. While certain soil microbes can enhance ion solubility via chelating agents or oxidation, microbial regulation of plant-sulfur assimilation has not been reported. With an increasing understanding that soil microbes can activate growth and stress tolerance in plants via chemical signaling, the question arises as to whether such beneficial bacteria also regulate sulfur assimilation. Here we report a previously unidentified mechanism by which the growth-promoting rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (GB03 transcriptionally activates genes responsible for sulfur assimilation, increasing sulfur uptake and accumulation in Arabidopsis. Transcripts encoding for sulfur-rich aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates are also GB03 induced. As a result, GB03-exposed plants with elevated glucosinolates exhibit greater protection against the generalist herbivore, Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm. In contrast, a previously-characterized glucosinolate mutant compromised in the production of both aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates is also compromised in terms of GB03-induced protection against insect herbivory. As with in vitro studies, soil-grown plants show enhanced glucosinolate accumulation and protection against beet armyworm feeding with GB03 exposure. These results demonstrate the potential of microbes to enhance plant sulfur assimilation and emphasize the sophisticated integration of microbial signaling in plant defense.

  1. ADDITIVE TESTING FOR IMPROVED SULFUR RETENTION: PRELIMINARY REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.; Fox, K.

    2011-09-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory is collaborating with Alfred University to evaluate the potential for additives in borosilicate glass to improve sulfur retention. This preliminary report provides further background on the incorporation of sulfur in glass and outlines the experiments that are being performed by the collaborators. A simulated waste glass composition has been selected for the experimental studies. The first phase of experimental work will evaluate the impacts of BaO, PbO, and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} at concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 wt % on sulfate retention in simulated high level waste borosilicate glass. The second phase of experimental work will evaluate the effects of time at the melt temperature on sulfur retention. The resulting samples will be characterized to determine the amount of sulfur remaining as well as to identify the formation of any crystalline phases. The results will be used to guide the future selection of frits and glass forming chemicals in vitrifying Department of Energy wastes containing high sulfur concentrations.

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  3. Multiple heat priming enhances thermo-tolerance to a later high temperature stress via improving subcellular antioxidant activities in wheat seedlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    Seedlings of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were firstly twice heat-primed at 32/24 °C, and subsequently subjected to a more severe high temperature stress at 35/27 °C. The later high temperature stress significantly decreased plant biomass and leaf total soluble sugars concentration. Howeve...

  4. Bioenergetic studies of coal sulfur oxidation by extremely thermophilic bacteria. Final report, September 15, 1992--August 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.; Han, C.J.

    1997-12-31

    Thermoacidophilic microorganisms have been considered for inorganic sulfur removal from coal because of expected improvements in rates of both biotic and abiotic sulfur oxidation reactions with increasing temperature. In this study, the bioenergetic response of the extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula, to environmental changes have been examined in relation to its capacity to catalyze pyrite oxidation in coal. Given an appropriate bioenergetic challenge, the metabolic response was to utilize additional amounts of energy sources (i.e., pyrite) to survive. Of particular interest were the consequences of exposing the organism to various forms of stress (chemical, nutritional, thermal, pH) in the presence of coal pyrite. Several approaches to take advantage of stress response to accelerate pyrite oxidation by this organism were examined, including attempts to promote acquired thermal tolerance to extend its functional range, exposure to chemical uncouplers and decouplers, and manipulation of heterotrophic and chemolithotrophic tendencies to optimize biomass concentration and biocatalytic activity. Promising strategies were investigated in a continuous culture system. This study identified environmental conditions that promote better coupling of biotic and abiotic oxidation reactions to improve biosulfurization rates of thermoacidophilic microorganisms.

  5. Sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery with improved cyclic stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zihao; Li, Xiaogang; Liao, Youhao; Li, Xiaoping; Li, Weishan

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel composite of sulfur loaded in micropore-rich carbon aerogel (CA-S), as cathode of lithium-sulfur battery. Carbon aerogel (CA) is synthesized through phenol-formaldehyde reaction with a low catalyst concentration and carbonization under high temperature, and loaded with sulfur via chemical deposition and heat treatment. The physical properties of the resulting CA and the electrochemical performances of the resulting CA-S are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic discharge/charge test, with a comparison of a common carbon material, acetylene black (AB), and sulfur loaded in AB (AB-S). It is found that the CA is micropore-rich with micropore volume over 66% of total pore volume, and the CA-S exhibits significantly improved cyclic stability compared with AB-S. The improved performance of CA-S is attributed to the confinement of the micropores in CA to small sulfur allotropes and corresponding lithium sulfides.

  6. Infectious Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, ...

  7. Lunar Sulfur Capture System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  8. Advanced Lithium Sulfur Battery, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG proposes to develop an Advanced Lithium Sulfur Battery (LSB) based on combining a novel super ion conducting ceramic electrolyte, entrapped sulfur cathode, and a...

  9. Advanced Lithium Sulfur Battery, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG proposes to develop an Advanced Lithium Sulfur Battery (LSB) based on combining a novel super ion conducting ceramic electrolyte, entrapped sulfur cathode, and a...

  10. Lunar Sulfur Capture System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  11. Infectious Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Kakirman, Hacer; Stassen, Michael; Knop, Jürgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg) are mandatory for maintaining immunologic self-tolerance. We demonstrate that the cell-cell contact–mediated suppression of conventional CD4+ T cells by human CD25+ Treg cells is fixation resistant, independent from membrane-bound TGF-β but requires activation and protein synthesis of CD25+ Treg cells. Coactivation of CD25+ Treg cells with Treg cell–depleted CD4+ T cells results in anergized CD4+ T cells that in turn inhibit the activation of conventional, freshly isolated CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. This infectious suppressive activity, transferred from CD25+ Treg cells via cell contact, is cell contact–independent and partially mediated by soluble transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. The induction of suppressive properties in conventional CD4+ Th cells represents a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of infectious tolerance. This explains previously published conflicting data on the role of TGF-β in CD25+ Treg cell–induced immunosuppression. PMID:12119350

  12. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot-gas desulfurization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Ortiz, A.; Harrison, D.P.; Groves, F.R.; White, J.D.; Zhang, S.; Huang, W.N.; Zeng, Y.

    1998-01-01

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500C to 700C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a

  13. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in

  14. Genetic engineering of sulfur-degrading Sulfolobus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, N.W.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research is to first establish a plasmid-mediated genetic transformation system for the sulfur degrading Sulfolobus, and then to clone and overexpress the genes encoding the organic-sulfur-degrading enzymes from Sulfolobus- as well as from other microorganisms, to develop a Sulfolobus-based microbial process for the removal of both organic and inorganic sulfur from coal.

  15. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  17. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  18. Eagle-Picher Industries Sodium Sulfur Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvey, Ronald L.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the sodium sulfur program are presented. Sodium sulfur low earth orbit (LEO) cells are described. Topics covered include cell sizes, areas of improvement, and NaS cell testing. Sodium sulfur cell and battery designs continue to evolve with significant improvement demonstrated in resistance, rechargeability, cycle life, energy density, and electrolyte characterization.

  19. Design and cost of the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor for the sulfur based hydrogen processes - HTR2008-58009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T. Y.; Connolly, S. M.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kriel, W.

    2008-01-01

    The key interface component between the reactor and chemical systems for the sulfuric acid based processes to make hydrogen is the sulfuric acid decomposition reactor. The materials issues for the decomposition reactor are severe since sulfuric acid must be heated, vaporized and decomposed. SiC has been identified and proven by others to be an acceptable material. However, SiC has a significant design issue when it must be interfaced with metals for connection to the remainder of the process. Westinghouse has developed a design utilizing SiC for the high temperature portions of the reactor that are in contact with the sulfuric acid and polymeric coated steel for low temperature portions. This design is expected to have a reasonable cost for an operating lifetime of 20 years. It can be readily maintained in the field, and is transportable by truck (maximum OD is 4.5 meters). This paper summarizes the detailed engineering design of the Westinghouse Decomposition Reactor and the decomposition reactor's capital cost. (authors)

  20. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of sulfur poisoning in Ce-O-S and La-O-S systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karjalainen, Heidi; Lassi, Ulla; Rahkamaa-Tolonen, Katariina; Kroeger, Virpi; Keiski, Riitta L. [University of Oulu, Department of Process and Environmental Engineering, P.O. Box 4300, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2005-02-28

    Sulfur poisoning is still a problem in many application areas of exhaust gas catalysts despite the fact that the sulfur levels, e.g. in gasoline are being continuously reduced. The aim of this study was to calculate thermodynamic equilibrium compositions of sulfur in Ce-O-S and La-O-S systems in the presence of precious metals (Pt, Pd, and Rh), which all were considered as bulk materials, in order to understand the experimentally observed sulfur poisoning under the real applications of exhaust gas catalysts. Depending on temperature and oxygen partial pressure, sulfur can be present in the form of sulfates, sulfides and oxysulfides. It is thermodynamically favorable that cerium oxide reacts with SO{sub 2} to form cerium sulfate at low temperatures and cerium oxysulfides at high temperatures. Lanthanum oxide reacts with SO{sub 2} to form sulfate under oxidizing conditions and sulfides under reducing conditions.

  1. Improved method for minimizing sulfur loss in analysis of particulate organic sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Kwang Young

    2014-02-04

    The global sulfur cycle depends primarily on the metabolism of marine microorganisms, which release sulfur gas into the atmosphere and thus affect the redistribution of sulfur globally as well as the earth's climate system. To better quantify sulfur release from the ocean, analysis of the production and distribution of organic sulfur in the ocean is necessary. This report describes a wet-based method for accurate analysis of particulate organic sulfur (POS) in the marine environment. The proposed method overcomes the considerable loss of sulfur (up to 80%) that occurs during analysis using conventional methods involving drying. Use of the wet-based POS extraction procedure in conjunction with a sensitive sulfur analyzer enabled accurate measurements of cellular POS. Data obtained using this method will enable accurate assessment of how rapidly sulfur can transfer among pools. Such information will improve understanding of the role of POS in the oceanic sulfur cycle.

  2. Fixation à haute et moyenne température de l'hydrogène sulfuré par des masses de captation régénérables Hydrogen-Sulfide Fixation At High and Medium Temperature by Regenerable Capture Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotier G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'intérêt de la désulfuration haute température comparée à la même opération conduite à basse température est renforcé quand la désulfuration a lieu entre deux opérations de niveau thermique élevé comme la gazéification du charbon et la production d'électricité par cycles combinés turbine à gaz-turbine à vapeur. Les masses absorbantes à base d'oxyde de fer peuvent réaliser une bonne désulfuration mais résistent mal aux chocs thermiques. Un agent de régénération particulièrement efficace est le dioxyde de soufre qui peut réoxyder le sulfure de fer par une réaction légèrement endothermique. Un des principaux avantages de cette réaction est la production directe de soufre élémentaire. Ses désavantages sont une faible conversion par passe et la sulfatation de l'oxyde de calcium (une des nombreuses impuretés des boues rouges qui composent la masse. Lorsque l'on emploie de la vapeur pour diluer le SO2 deux autres réactions ont lieu. La production de soufre est augmentée et la sulfatation disparaît. Les productions principales du procédé sont du soufre élémentaire et de la vapeur haute pression. On rencontre deux zones de réactions (l'une de captation, l'autre de régénération séparées par un tampon de gaz inerte et une circulation de la masse. Aucune autre unité de traitement de soufre n'est requise sur le site. Une évaluation économique préliminaire montre que ce procédé est compétitif lorsqu'on le compare à un lavage des gaz par solvant, à froid. The interest of a high temperature unit compared to a low temperature one is enhanced when desulphurization takes place between two hotoperations like coal gasification and power generation by combined cycles. Iron oxide based sorbents such as redmuds can achieve good desulphurization but cannot withstand high temperature gradients. An efficient regenerating agent is sulphur dioxide. SO2 can regenerate iron sulphide with a slightly endothermic

  3. Thermal transformations of organic and inorganic sulfur in Type II kerogen quantified by S-XANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Simon R.; Sansone, Michael; Walters, Clifford C.; Kwiatek, Peter J.; Bolin, Trudy

    2012-04-01

    Sulfur X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy (S-XANES) was used to quantify the thermal transformations of organic and inorganic sulfur forms in pyrite-containing Type II kerogens and kerogen chars after open system pyrolysis for a series of well-defined times and temperatures. These results are compared to identical experiments conducted on the same kerogens treated to be pyrite-free. No significant differences were found in the thermal transformations of organic sulfur between the pyrite-containing and pyrite-free kerogen. The loss of aliphatic sulfur forms occurs early (equivalent Ro 1.5%). In pyrite-containing kerogens, the complete conversion of pyrite (FeS2) into pyrrhotite (Fe1-xS) occurs by a laboratory equivalent Ro = 1.5%, followed by the conversion of pyrrhotite into troilite (FeS) at higher maturity. The availability of hydrogen from hydrocarbons generated from kerogen accelerates the initial decomposition of pyrite resulting in pyrrhotite and H2S evolution. H2S evolution up to Ro = 2.4% corresponds to the sulfur loss associated with pyrrhotite and troilite formation and aliphatic sulfur loss, indicating that sulfur from pyrite results almost exclusively in H2S evolution with no significant incorporation and retention of sulfur into the organic matter of the kerogen chars under the current set of open system pyrolysis conditions.

  4. Determination of total sulfur content via sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N. [Fluid Data, Inc., Angleton, TX (United States); DiSanzo, F.P. [Paulsboro Research Lab., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A specially designed system, based upon sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD), was developed to permit the determination of total sulfur content in a variety of samples. This type of detection system possesses several advantages such as excellent linearity and selectivity, low minimum detectable levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. This paper will focus on the design and application of a sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection system for use in determining total sulfur content in gasoline.

  5. Influence of acclimation to sublethal temperature on heat tolerance of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae exposed to 50°C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Lü

    Full Text Available Tribolium castaneum (Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae is a serious pest of stored agricultural products and one of the most common insects found in grain storage and food processing facilities. Heat treatment has been revisited to control stored-product insects as a potential alternative to methyl bromide for disinfesting mills and food-processing facilities. The influence of acclimation of T. castaneum adults, pupae, larvae, and eggs to sublethal temperatures of 36, and 42°C on their subsequent susceptibility to lethal temperature of 50°C was respectively investigated. The acclimation of T. castaneum eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults to 36, and 42°C significantly decreased their subsequent susceptibility to lethal high temperature of 50°C. The influence of acclimation to 42°C was significantly greater than that of acclimation to 36°C. The most influential acclimation times at 42°C for mortality of T. castaneum eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults were 15, 5, 5, and 5 h, respectively, and their corresponding mortality were 41.24, 5.59, 20.19, and 4.48%, compared to 100% mortality of T. castaneum eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults without acclimation when exposed to 50°C for 35 min, respectively. The present results have important implications for developing successful heat treatment protocols to control T. castaneum, improving disinfestation effectiveness of heat treatment and understanding insect response to high temperatures.

  6. Growth and mebrane lipid composition in cucumber : Morphological and physiological differences between two low temperature tolerant cucumber lines and a control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulder, Hermana Adriana Maria

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to get more insight into the physiological background of a better fuctioning of cucumber plants under a suboptimal temperature regime (20/12˚C day/night instead of 25/20˚C day/night) and low light condtitions. Young cucumber platns were uesd with the goals of

  7. Seasonal acquisition of chill tolerance and restructuring of membrane glycerophospholipids in an overwintering insect: triggering by low temperature, desiccation and diapause progression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomčala, Aleš; Tollarová, Michaela; Overgaard, J.; Šimek, Petr; Košťál, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 209, č. 20, (2006), s. 4102-4114 ISSN 0022-0949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/0099 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : membrane phospholipids * temperature * acclimatization Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2006

  8. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhimi, Moez; Bajic, Goran; Ilhammami, Rimeh; Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle; Haser, Richard; Aghajari, Nushin

    2011-11-10

    L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Here we reported the purification and the biochemical characterization of

  9. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we reported the purification and the

  10. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhimi Moez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we

  11. First Annual Progress Report on Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The present report summarizes and discusses the first year efforts towards developing a modern, nuclear grade FeCrAl alloy designed to have enhanced radiation tolerance and weldability under the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program. Significant efforts have been made within the first year of this project including the fabrication of seven candidate FeCrAl alloys with well controlled chemistry and microstructure, the microstructural characterization of these alloys using standardized and advanced techniques, mechanical properties testing and evaluation of base alloys, the completion of welding trials and production of weldments for subsequent testing, the design of novel tensile specimen geometry to increase the number of samples that can be irradiated in a single capsule and also shorten the time of their assessment after irradiation, the development of testing procedures for controlled hydrogen ingress studies, and a detailed mechanical and microstructural assessment of weldments prior to irradiation or hydrogen charging. These efforts and research results have shown promise for the FeCrAl alloy class as a new nuclear grade alloy class.

  12. A high-performance, cobalt-free cathode for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with excellent CO2 tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yun-fei; Zhong, Qin; Chen, Dong-Chang; Chen, Yu; Lai, Samson Yuxiu; Wei, Tao; Sun, Hai-bin; Ding, Dong; Liu, Meilin

    2016-07-01

    Compared with some cobalt-rich cathodes which have been proven to yield high performance in SOFCs, interest in cobalt-free cathodes has increased due to their reduced thermal expansion coefficients (TECs), high structural stability, and CO2 tolerance. In this report, a new robust Co-free complex perovskite oxide PrLa0.4Ba0.6Fe0.8Zn0.2O5+δ (PLBFZ) has been synthesized and evaluated. The TEC is 14.4 × 10-6 K-1. With the introduction of Sm0.2Ce0.8O2 (SDC), the composite cathode PLBFZ-SDC with a mass ratio of 7:3 (PLBFZ-SDC 73) exhibited the best electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction under OCV conditions, with polarization values of 0.044, 0.079, 0.124, 0.251, 0.572, and 1.297 Ω cm-2 at 800, 750, 700, 650, 600, and 550 °C, respectively. The power densities of the cell were 1309, 1079, 788 and 586 mW cm-2 at 750, 700, 650, and 600 °C, respectively. Moreover, it appears to have good stability in air containing 1% CO2 (volume ratio) for 150 h based on Raman and polarization resistance (Rp) analysis. These results suggest that PLBFZ and its SDC composite are promising cathodes for IT-SOFCs.

  13. Rhodanese functions as sulfur supplier for key enzymes in sulfur energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussignargues, Clément; Giuliani, Marie-Cécile; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Guiral, Marianne; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-06-08

    How microorganisms obtain energy is a challenging topic, and there have been numerous studies on the mechanisms involved. Here, we focus on the energy substrate traffic in the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. This bacterium can use insoluble sulfur as an energy substrate and has an intricate sulfur energy metabolism involving several sulfur-reducing and -oxidizing supercomplexes and enzymes. We demonstrate that the cytoplasmic rhodanese SbdP participates in this sulfur energy metabolism. Rhodaneses are a widespread family of proteins known to transfer sulfur atoms. We show that SbdP has also some unusual characteristics compared with other rhodaneses; it can load a long sulfur chain, and it can interact with more than one partner. Its partners (sulfur reductase and sulfur oxygenase reductase) are key enzymes of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus and share the capacity to use long sulfur chains as substrate. We demonstrate a positive effect of SbdP, once loaded with sulfur chains, on sulfur reductase activity, most likely by optimizing substrate uptake. Taken together, these results lead us to propose a physiological role for SbdP as a carrier and sulfur chain donor to these key enzymes, therefore enabling channeling of sulfur substrate in the cell as well as greater efficiency of the sulfur energy metabolism of A. aeolicus.

  14. Solubilization of sulfur compounds in the crude oil by nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk Kyu; Han, Ji Won; Park, Sang Kwon; Lo, Jong Choo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Byung Hong; Shin, Pyung Gyun [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In this study, polyoxyethylene(POE) nonionic surfactants were used in order ro enhance the solubilization of sulfur compounds contained in the crude oil and the solubilized sulfur contents in the aqueous surfactant solutions were measured by X-ray sulfur spectrometer. The most hydrophobic surfactant among used during this study showed the maximum solubilization capacity for the sulfur compounds in the crude oil and the solubilization of sulfur compounds was found to be increased with temperature and to be abruptly increased at above 1 wt % surfactant solutions. It was found that Tergitol series surfactants showed higher solubilizing capacity than Neodol series surfactants presumably due to the disruption of the regular packing in the hydrocarbon region of the surfactant aggregates. The addition of a cosurfactant such as alcohol and/or an electrolyte increased the solubilization of sulfur compound in the crude oil. It was found that preheating phenomena were shown to be significant with an hydrophobic surfactant at high temperature and the growth of sulfur reducing microorganisms was not greatly affected by the addition of nonionic surfactants. 21 ref s.,11 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Bacterial sulfur cycle shapes microbial communities in surface sediments of an ultramafic hydrothermal vent field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauer, Regina; Røy, Hans; Augustin, Nico

    2011-01-01

    RNA sequence analysis, was characterized by the capability to metabolize sulfur components. High sulfate reduction rates as well as sulfide depleted in (34)S further confirmed the importance of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle. In contrast, methane was found to be of minor relevance for microbial life in mat......, these sediments were investigated in order to determine biogeochemical processes and key organisms relevant for primary production. Temperature profiling at two mat-covered sites showed a conductive heating of the sediments. Elemental sulfur was detected in the overlying mat and metal-sulfides in the upper...

  16. Thermal Regeneration of Sulfuric Acid Hydrates after Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to more completely understand the surface chemistry of the jovian icy satellites, we have investigated the effect of heating on two irradiated crystalline sulfuric acid hydrates, H2SO4 4H2O and H2SO4 H2O. At temperatures relevant to Europa and the warmer jovian satellites, post-irradiation heating recrystallized the amorphized samples and increased the intensities of the remaining hydrate's infrared absorptions. This thermal regeneration of the original hydrates was nearly 100% efficient, indicating that over geological times, thermally-induced phase transitions enhanced by temperature fluctuations will reform a large fraction of crystalline hydrated sulfuric acid that is destroyed by radiation processing. The work described is the first demonstration of the competition between radiation-induced amorphization and thermally-induced recrystallization in icy ionic solids relevant to the outer Solar System.

  17. New ZnO-Based Regenerable Sulfur Sorbents for Fluid-Bed/Transport Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slimane, R.B.; Lau, F.S.; Abbasian, J.; Ho, K.H.

    2002-09-19

    The overall objective of the ongoing sorbent development work at GTI is the advancement to the demonstration stage of a promising ZnO-TiO2 sulfur sorbent that has been developed under DCCA/ICCI and DOE/NETL sponsorship. This regenerable sorbent has been shown to possess an exceptional combination of excellent chemical reactivity, high effective capacity for sulfur absorption, high resistance to attrition, and regenerability at temperatures lower than required by typical zinc titanates.

  18. Thermal stress analysis of sulfur deactivated solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shumao; Parbey, Joseph; Yu, Guangsen; Xu, Min; Li, Tingshuai; Andersson, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide in fuels can deactivate catalyst for solid oxide fuel cells, which has become one of the most critical challenges to stability. The reactions between sulfur and catalyst will cause phase changes, leading to increase in cell polarization and mechanical mismatch. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach based on the finite element method (FEM) is thus used to investigate the polarization, temperature and thermal stress in a sulfur deactivated SOFC by coupling equations for gas-phase species, heat, momentum, ion and electron transport. The results indicate that sulfur in fuels can strongly affect the cell polarization and thermal stresses, which shows a sharp decrease in the vicinity of electrolyte when 10% nickel in the functional layer is poisoned, but they remain almost unchanged even when the poisoned Ni content was increased to 90%. This investigation is helpful to deeply understand the sulfur poisoning effects and also benefit the material design and optimization of electrode structure to enhance cell performance and lifetimes in various hydrocarbon fuels containing impurities.

  19. Exposure experiments of trees to sulfur dioxide gas. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, A.

    1974-12-01

    The effects of gaseous sulfur dioxide on trees were studied. Twenty species of plant seedlings (70 cm in height) including Cedrus deodara, Metasequoia glyptostroboides, Ginkgo biloba, Celmus parvifolia var. albo-marginata, Pinus thumbergii, P. densiflora, Cryptomeria japonica, and Quercus myrsinaefolia, were exposed in a room to gaseous sulfur dioxide at 0.8 ppm for 7.5 hr/day (from 9 am to 4:30 pm) for 24 days at a temperature of 20-35 deg C and RH of 55-75%. Visible damage to plants was lighter in C.j. and Chamae cyparis obtusa, more severe in P.t., G.b., and C.d. The damage appeared earlier in G.b., Cinnamomum camphona, and Ilex rotunda, and the change of early symptoms was smaller in P.t., C.j., and C.o. The leaves of the 4-5th positions from the sprout were apt to be damaged. Although the sulfur content of exposed leaves increased markedly, that in other parts did not increase. Because of the high concentration of the gas and the short period of exposure, the absorption of sulfur into leaves should have differed from the situation in fields where longer exposure to lower concentrations of the gas would be expected. 6 references.

  20. Volatile earliest Triassic sulfur cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Marine biodiversity decreases and ecosystem destruction during the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) have been linked to widespread marine euxinic conditions. Changes in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and marine dissolved sulfate concentrations during...... is based on the S isotope fractionation between sulfate and sulfide associated with MSR in natural aquatic environments. This fractionation is proxied by the difference in S isotope compositions between chromium-reducible sulfur (CRS) and carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS), i.e., δ34SCAS-CRS. We show that......, despite region-specific redox conditions, δ34SCAS-CRS exhibits a nearly invariant value of 15-16‰ in both study sections. By comparing our record with a δ34Ssulfate-sulfide density distribution for modern marine sediments, we deduce that porewater Rayleigh distillation, carbonate diagenesis, and other...

  1. What temperature can tolerate the marsh frog from thermal habitats? Preliminary results concerning the 1 Mai Spa’s population (NW Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Hajnalka KOVACS

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the experimental determination of the maximum limit of temperature in which marsh frogs (P. ridibundus from thermal water habitats can still survive. For the experiment ten marsh frogs captured from the nonhibernating population from 1 Mai Spa were used. During the experiment we had determined for each frog the value of two parameters: VTMax and CTMax. Following the experiment we did not identify significant differences regarding the thermoresistance of the studied frogs. Thus VTMax had a mean value of 33.9°C and CTMax had the mean value of 36.7°C.

  2. Study by neutron diffusion of local order liquid sulfur around the polymerization transition; Etude par diffusion de neutrons de l`ordre local du soufre liquide autour de la transition de polymerisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descotes, L.

    1994-05-01

    We studied the liquid sulfur according to the temperature. The sulfur is one of the most complicated elementary liquid. We experimented the neutron diffusion by the powder orthorhombic sulfur. The complexity at the polymerization transition are only accompanied by weak local structural transfer. 231 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs., 3 annexes.

  3. Organic solvent tolerance of an α-amylase from haloalkaliphilic bacteria as a function of pH, temperature, and salt concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sandeep; Singh, S P

    2012-04-01

    A haloalkaliphilic bacterium was isolated from salt-enriched soil of Mithapur, Gujarat (India) and identified as Bacillus agaradhaerens Mi-10-6₂ based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis (NCBI gene bank accession, GQ121032). The bacterium was studied for its α-amylase characteristic in the presence of organic solvents. The enzyme was quite active and it retained considerable activity in 30% (v/v) organic solvents, dodecane, decane, heptane, n-hexane, methanol, and propanol. At lower concentrations of solvents, the catalysis was quite comparable to control. Enzyme catalysis at wide range of alkanes and alcohol was an interesting finding of the study. Mi-10-6₂ amylase retained activity over a broader alkaline pH range, with the optimal pH at 10-11. Two molars of salt was optimum for catalysis in the presence of most of the tested solvents, though the enzyme retained significant activity even at 4 M salt. With dodecane, the optimum temperature shifted from 50 °C to 60 °C, while the enzyme was active up to 80 °C. Over all, the present study focused on the effect of organic solvents on an extracellular α-amylase from haloalkaliphilic bacteria under varying conditions of pH, temperature, and salt.

  4. Viscosity of plasticized sulfur-extended asphalt: two-factor sequential optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkikh Vitaliy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The compounding properties of construction materials for pavements strongly depend on dynamic viscosity of the binder. The favorable class of binder is plasticized sulfur-extended asphalt. Unfortunately, the viscosity of such a binder has not been studied in detail. In the present work we have performed experimental two-factor sequential constrained optimization of the viscosity. The binders under examination were made of asphalt, sulfur and paraffin. It was revealed that the addition of sulfur and paraffin leads to a significant decrease of the dynamic viscosity. The obtained results allowed us to estimate mixture and temperature that correspond to optimal compounding properties of the sulfur-extended asphalt concrete. In particular, for plasticized asphalt concrete with 30% of sulfur and 5% of paraffin, the optimal processing temperature is 25 °C lower than for ordinary asphalt. Since low preparation temperatures correspond to low emission of toxic gases and low processing costs, we can consider the concretes that will be based on plasticized sulfur-extended asphalt as green paving materials.

  5. Reaction kinetics of waste sulfuric acid using H2O2catalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiade; Hong, Binxun; Tong, Xinyang; Qiu, Shufeng

    2016-12-01

    The process of recovering waste sulfuric acids using H 2 O 2 catalytic oxidation is studied in this paper. Activated carbon was used as catalyst. Main operating parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H 2 O 2 , and catalyst dosage, have effects on the removal of impurities from waste sulfuric acids. The reaction kinetics of H 2 O 2 catalytic oxidation on impurities are discussed. At a temperature of 90°C, H 2 O 2 feeding rate of 50 g (kg waste acid) -1 per hour, and catalyst dosage of 0.2 wt% (waste acid weight), the removal efficiencies of COD and chrominance were both more than 99%, the recovery ratio of sulfuric acid was more than 95%, and the utilization ratio of H 2 O 2 was 88.57%. Waste sulfuric acid is a big environmental problem in China. The amount of waste sulfuric acid is huge every year. Many small and medium-sized businesses produced lots of waste acids, but they don't have an appropriate method to treat and recover them. H 2 O 2 catalytic oxidation has been used to treat and recover waste sulfuric acid and activated carbon is the catalyst here. Main parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H 2 O 2 , and catalyst dosage, have been investigated. The reaction kinetics are discussed. This method can be economical and feasible for most small and medium-sized businesses.

  6. Sulfur globule oxidation in green sulfur bacteria is dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holkenbrink, Carina; Ocón Barbas, Santiago; Mellerup, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to sulfate with extracellular globules of elemental sulfur as intermediate. Here we investigated which genes are involved in the formation and consumption of these sulfur globules in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum. We show...... that sulfur globule oxidation is strictly dependent on the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) system. Deletion of dsrM/CT2244 or dsrT/CT2245 or the two dsrCABL clusters (CT0851-CT0854, CT2247-2250) abolished sulfur globule oxidation and prevented formation of sulfate from sulfide, whereas deletion of dsr...

  7. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Effect of different sulfur levels from various sources on brassica napus growth and soil sulfur fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, R.; Khan, K.S.; Islam, M.; Yousaf, M.; Shabbir, G.

    2012-01-01

    A two year field study was conducted at two different locations in northern rain fed Punjab, Pakistan to assess the effect of different rates of sulfur application from various sources on soil sulfur fractions and growth of Brassica napus. The treatments included three sulfur sources i. e., single super phosphate, ammonium sulfate and gypsum each applied at five different rates (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 kg S ha/sup -1/ ). Sulfur application had a significant positive effect on the growth and yield parameters of Brassica napus. Among the sulfur sources ammonium sulfate resulted in maximum increase in plant growth and yield parameters, followed by single super phosphate. Sulfur content and uptake by crop plants was significantly higher with ammonium sulfate application as compared to other two sulfur sources. Sulfur application also exerted a significant positive effect on different S fractions in the soils. On an average, 18.0% of the applied sulfur got incorporated into CaCl/sub 2/ extractable sulfur fraction, while 15.6% and 35.5% entered into adsorbed and organic sulfur fractions in the soils, respectively. The value cost ratio increased significantly by sulfur application up to 30 kg ha/sup -1/. Among sulfur sources, ammonium sulfate performed best giving the highest net return. (author)

  9. Role of Sulfur in the Formation of Magmatic-Hydrothermal Copper-Gold Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, J.; Guillong, M.; Heinrich, C.

    2009-05-01

    Sulfur plays essential roles in hydrothermal ore-forming processes [1], which calls for precise and accurate quantitative sulfur determination in fluid inclusions. Feasibility tests for sulfur quantification by comparing data from both LA-Quadrupole (Q) - ICP-MS and LA-High Resolution (HR) - ICP-MS show that reliable sulfur quantification in fluid inclusions is possible [2], provided that a very careful baseline correction is applied. We investigate the metal transporting capabilities of sulfur by measuring sulfur together with copper and other elements in cogenetic brine and vapor inclusions ('boiling assemblages') in single healed crack hosted by quartz veins. Samples are from high-temperature magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits and miarolitic cavities of barren granitoid. Clear compositional correlations of sulfur with copper and gold were found. A molar S/Cu ratio commonly close to 2 but never above 2, indicates sulfur-complexed metal transportation in the high-temperature hydrothermal vapor, and probably also in the Na-Fe-K-Cl-enriched brines. Vapor/brine partitioning trends of the S and Cu are shown to be related with the chemistry of the fluids (possibly by various sulfur speciations in varying pH, fO2) and causative magma source. In the boiling hydrothermal environments, higher vapor partitioning of Cu and S is observed at reduced and peraluminous Sn-W granite, whereas oxidized and perakaline porphyry-style deposits have a lower partitioning to the vapor although the total concentration of S, Cu, Au in both fluid phase is higher than in the Sn-W granite [3]. Vapor inclusion in the boiling assemblages from magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits and granitic intrusions generally contain an excess of sulfur over ore metals such as Cu, Fe, and Mo. This allows efficient sulfide ore precipitation in high-temperature porphyry-type deposits, and complexation of gold by the remaining sulfide down to lower temperatures. The results confirm earlier interpretations [1] and

  10. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds in urban aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, R L

    1979-01-01

    This paper reports results from a detailed chemical and meteorological data base that has been accumulated for the New York City subregion. Aerosol sampling during August 1976 and February 1977 sampling periods was done only in an urban New York site and a background site at High Point, NJ. The sampling program was expanded to Brookhaven (Long Island) and New Haven, Connecticut sites during summer 1977 and winter 1978 sampling. Time resolution for aerosol filter samples was 6 hr, with some 3 hr sampling for the latter three periods. Parameters measured included chemical constituents: strong acid (quartz filters only), ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, sulfuric acid (limited data); physical parameters: aerosol size distributions by cascade impactor, cyclone sampler, EAA, on optical counter and a special diffusion battery-CNC apparatus; light scattering nephelometer and other instrumentation; chemically-speciated size classification by diffusion sampler; trace metals by atomic absorption; halogen compounds by NAA; meteorological measurements of RH, temperature, wind speed and direction; gaseous measurements of SO/sub 2/, ozone, NO/sub x/ and hydrocarbons at some locations for some sampling periods. The existence of aerosol sulfate in the ambient environment predominantly in the chemical form of sulfuric acid mostly neutralized by ammonia is now well documented. The average composition of fine particle (< 3.5 ..mu..m) sulfate in summer 1976 aerosols was approximately that letovicite ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 3/H(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/). Based on the impactor data, about 85% of the aerosol sulfate mass was in the fine particle fraction. About 50% of this aerosol sulfate was deduced to be in the suboptical size regime (< 0.25 ..mu..m) from diffusion processor data. The H/sup +//SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ ratio in suboptical aerosols did not significantly differ from that in fine fraction aerosol. The coarse particle sulfate was not associated with H/sup +/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/ and comprised

  11. A dynamic study on the sulfuric acid distillation column for VHTR-assisted hydrogen production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngjoon, Shin; Heesung, Shin; Jiwoon, Jang; Kiyoung, Lee; Jonghwa, Chang

    2007-01-01

    The sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle and the Westinghouse sulfur hybrid cycle coupled to a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) are well known as a feasible technology to produce hydrogen. The concentration of the sulfuric acid solution and its decomposition are essential parts in both cycles. In this paper, the thermophysical properties which are the boiling point, latent heat, and the partial pressures of water, sulfuric acid, and sulfur trioxide have been correlated as a function of the sulfuric acid concentration for the H 2 SO 4 and H 2 O binary chemical system, based on the data in Perry's chemical engineers' hand-book and other experimental data. By using these thermophysical correlations, a dynamic analysis of a sulfuric acid distillation column has been performed to establish the column design requirements and its optimum operation condition. From the results of the dynamic analysis, an optimized column system is anticipated for a distillation column equipped with 2 ideal plates and a second plate feeding system from the bottom plate. The effects of the hold-up of the re-boiler and the reflux ratio from the top product stream on the elapsing time when the system progresses toward a steady state have been analyzed. (authors)

  12. Improvement of sulfur resistance of Pd/Ce-Zr-Al-O catalysts for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Haebin; Baek, Minsung; Ro, Youngsoo; Song, Changyeol; Lee, Kwan-Young; Song, In Kyu

    2018-01-01

    Two kinds of mesoporous ceria-zirconia-alumina supports were prepared by a single-step epoxide-driven sol-gel method (SGCZA) and by a co-precipitation method (PCZA). Palladium catalysts supported on these materials were then prepared by a wet impregnation method (Pd/SGCZA and Pd/PCZA). The prepared catalysts were applied to the CO oxidation reaction before and after sulfur aging. XRD and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses revealed that these two catalysts retained different physicochemical properties. Pd/SGCZA had higher surface area and larger pore volume than Pd/PCZA before and after sulfur aging. TPR (Temperature-programmed reduction), CO chemisorption, FT-IR, and XPS analyses showed that the catalysts were differently influenced by sulfur species. Pd/SGCZA formed less sulfate and retained higher palladium dispersion than Pd/PCZA after sulfur aging. In the CO oxidation, Pd/PCZA showed better activity than Pd/SGCZA before sulfur aging. However, Pd/SGCZA showed higher CO conversion than Pd/PCZA after sulfur aging. We concluded that Pd/SGCZA was less poisoned by sulfur species than Pd/PCZA.

  13. Sulfur emission from Victorian brown coal under pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion and gasification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2013-02-05

    Sulfur emission from a Victorian brown coal was quantitatively determined through controlled experiments in a continuously fed drop-tube furnace under three different atmospheres: pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion, and carbon dioxide gasification conditions. The species measured were H(2)S, SO(2), COS, CS(2), and more importantly SO(3). The temperature (873-1273 K) and gas environment effects on the sulfur species emission were investigated. The effect of residence time on the emission of those species was also assessed under oxy-fuel condition. The emission of the sulfur species depended on the reaction environment. H(2)S, SO(2), and CS(2) are the major species during pyrolysis, oxy-fuel, and gasification. Up to 10% of coal sulfur was found to be converted to SO(3) under oxy-fuel combustion, whereas SO(3) was undetectable during pyrolysis and gasification. The trend of the experimental results was qualitatively matched by thermodynamic predictions. The residence time had little effect on the release of those species. The release of sulfur oxides, in particular both SO(2) and SO(3), is considerably high during oxy-fuel combustion even though the sulfur content in Morwell coal is only 0.80%. Therefore, for Morwell coal utilization during oxy-fuel combustion, additional sulfur removal, or polishing systems will be required in order to avoid corrosion in the boiler and in the CO(2) separation units of the CO(2) capture systems.

  14. Macroporous Activated Carbon Derived from Rapeseed Shell for Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbo Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium–sulfur batteries have drawn considerable attention because of their extremely high energy density. Activated carbon (AC is an ideal matrix for sulfur because of its high specific surface area, large pore volume, small-size nanopores, and simple preparation. In this work, through KOH activation, AC materials with different porous structure parameters were prepared using waste rapeseed shells as precursors. Effects of KOH amount, activated temperature, and activated time on pore structure parameters of ACs were studied. AC sample with optimal pore structure parameters was investigated as sulfur host materials. Applied in lithium–sulfur batteries, the AC/S composite (60 wt % sulfur exhibited a high specific capacity of 1065 mAh g−1 at 200 mA g−1 and a good capacity retention of 49% after 1000 cycles at 1600 mA g−1. The key factor for good cycling stability involves the restraining effect of small-sized nanopores of the AC framework on the diffusion of polysulfides to bulk electrolyte and the loss of the active material sulfur. Results demonstrated that AC materials derived from rapeseed shells are promising materials for sulfur loading.

  15. Thermochemical Study on the Sulfurization of Fission Products in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Won; Yang, M. S.; Park, G. I.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, J. W.

    2005-11-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of the sulfurization of Nd, and Eu element, which are contained in spent nuclear fuel as fission products was investigated through collection and properties analysis of thermodynamic data in sulfurization of uranium oxides, thermodynamic properties analysis for the oxidation and reduction of fission products, and test and analysis for sulfurization characteristics of Nd and Eu oxide. And also, analysis on thermodynamic data, such as M-O-S phase stability diagram and changes of Gibbs free energy for sulfurization of uranium and Nd 2 O 3 and Eu 2 O 3 were carried out. Nd 2 O 3 and Eu 2 O 3 are sulfurized into Nd 2 O 2 S and Eu 2 O 2 S or NdySx and EuySx at a range of 400 to 450 .deg. C, while uranium oxides, such as UO 2 and U 3 O 8 remain unreacted up to 450 .deg. C Formation of UOS at 500 .deg. C is initiated by sulfurization of uranium oxides. Hence, reaction temperature for the sulfurization of the Nd 2 O 3 and Eu 2 O 3 was selected as a 450 .deg. C

  16. Electrolytic nature of aqueous sulfuric acid. 2. Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2012-09-27

    In part 1 of this study, I reported that the Debye-Hückel limiting law and the smaller-ion shell (SiS) model of strong electrolyte solutions fit nicely with the experimental mean ionic activity coefficient (γ(±)) of aqueous sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and of temperature when the acid is assumed to be a strong 1-3 electrolyte. Here, I report that the SiS-derived activity coefficient of H(+), γ(H(+)), of the 1-3 acid is comparable to that of aqueous HCl. This agrees with titration curves showing, as well-known, that sulfuric acid in water is parallel in strength to aqueous HCl. The calculated pH is in good accord with the Hammett acidity function, H(0), of aqueous sulfuric acid at low concentration, and differences between the two functions at high concentration are discussed and explained. This pH-H(0) relation is consistent with the literature showing that the H(0) of sulfuric acid (in the 1-9 M range) is similar to those of HCl and the other strong mineral monoprotic acids. The titration of aqueous sulfuric acid with NaOH does not agree with the known second dissociation constant of 0.010 23; rather, the constant is found to be ~0.32 and the acid behaves upon neutralization as a strong diprotic acid practically dissociating in one step. A plausible reaction pathway is offered to explain how the acid may transform, upon base neutralization, from a dissociated H(4)SO(5) (as 3H(+) and HSO(5)(3-)) to a dissociated H(2)SO(4) even though the equilibrium constant of the reaction H(+) + HSO(5)(3-) ↔ SO(4)(2-) + H(2)O, at 25 °C, is 10(-37) (part 1).

  17. Need total sulfur content? Use chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubala, S.W.; Campbell, D.N. [Fluid Data, Inc., Angleton, TX (United States); DiSanzo, F.P. [Mobil Technology Co., Paulsboro, NJ (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Regulations issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency require petroleum refineries to reduce or control the amount of total sulfur present in their refined products. These legislative requirements have led many refineries to search for online instrumentation that can produce accurate and repeatable total sulfur measurements within allowed levels. Several analytical methods currently exist to measure total sulfur content. They include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), microcoulometry, lead acetate tape, and pyrofluorescence techniques. Sulfur-specific chemiluminescence detection (SSCD) has recently received much attention due to its linearity, selectivity, sensitivity, and equimolar response. However, its use has been largely confined to the area of gas chromatography. This article focuses on the special design considerations and analytical utility of an SSCD system developed to determine total sulfur content in gasoline. The system exhibits excellent linearity and selectivity, the ability to detect low minimum levels, and an equimolar response to various sulfur compounds. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Novel low-temperature-active, salt-tolerant and proteases-resistant endo-1,4-β-mannanase from a new Sphingomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junpei; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yajie; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Wang, Feng; Li, Chao; Dong, Yanyan; Huang, Zunxi

    2012-05-01

    Sphingomonas sp. JB13, isolated from slag of a >20-year-old phosphate rock-stacking site, showed the highest 16S rDNA (1343bp) identity of 97.2% with Sphingomonas sp. ERB1-3 (FJ948169) and active enzymes: showing apparent optimal at 40°C, ~55% of the maximum activity at 20°C and ~20% at 10°C, and thermolability at 45°C (~15min half-life). The potential mechanism for low-temperature-activity of GH 26 endo-1,4-β-mannanases might be ascribed to the more hydrophobic residues (AILFWV) and less polar residues (NCQSTY) compared with typical thermophilic and mesophilic counterparts. The purified rManAJB13 exhibited >85% mannanase activity at the concentration of 0-4.0M NaCl. No loss of enzyme activity was observed after incubating the enzyme with 1M or 2M NaCl, or trypsin or proteinase K at 37°C and pH 6.5 for 1h. The K(m), V(max) and k(cat) values were 5.0mgml(-1), 277.8μmol min(-1)mg(-1), and 211.9s(-1), respectively, using locust bean gum as the substrate. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfuric acid. 184.1095 Section 184.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Sulfuric acid (H2SO4, CAS Reg. No. 7664-93-9), also...

  20. A convenient method for the quantitative determination of elemental sulfur in coal by HPLC analysis of perchloroethylene extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D.H.; Coombs, K.J.; Murphy, P.M.; Chaven, C.

    1993-01-01

    A convenient method for the quantitative determination of elemental sulfur in coal is described. Elemental sulfur is extracted from the coal with hot perchloroethylene (PCE) (tetrachloroethene, C2Cl4) and quantitatively determined by HPLC analysis on a C18 reverse-phase column using UV detection. Calibration solutions were prepared from sublimed sulfur. Results of quantitative HPLC analyses agreed with those of a chemical/spectroscopic analysis. The HPLC method was found to be linear over the concentration range of 6 ?? 10-4 to 2 ?? 10-2 g/L. The lower detection limit was 4 ?? 10-4 g/L, which for a coal sample of 20 g is equivalent to 0.0006% by weight of coal. Since elemental sulfur is known to react slowly with hydrocarbons at the temperature of boiling PCE, standard solutions of sulfur in PCE were heated with coals from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample program. Pseudo-first-order uptake of sulfur by the coals was observed over several weeks of heating. For the Illinois No. 6 premium coal, the rate constant for sulfur uptake was 9.7 ?? 10-7 s-1, too small for retrograde reactions between solubilized sulfur and coal to cause a significant loss in elemental sulfur isolated during the analytical extraction. No elemental sulfur was produced when the following pure compounds were heated to reflux in PCE for up to 1 week: benzyl sulfide, octyl sulfide, thiane, thiophene, benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, sulfuric acid, or ferrous sulfate. A sluury of mineral pyrite in PCE contained elemental sulfur which increased in concentration with heating time. ?? 1993 American Chemical Society.

  1. Drought increases heat tolerance of leaf respiration in Eucalyptus globulus saplings grown under both ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Paul P G; Crous, Kristine Y; Ayub, Gohar; Duan, Honglang; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Ellsworth, David S; Tjoelker, Mark G; Evans, John R; Tissue, David T; Atkin, Owen K

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is resulting in increasing atmospheric [CO2], rising growth temperature (T), and greater frequency/severity of drought, with each factor having the potential to alter the respiratory metabolism of leaves. Here, the effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2], sustained warming, and drought on leaf dark respiration (R(dark)), and the short-term T response of R(dark) were examined in Eucalyptus globulus. Comparisons were made using seedlings grown under different [CO2], T, and drought treatments. Using high resolution T-response curves of R(dark) measured over the 15-65 °C range, it was found that elevated [CO2], elevated growth T, and drought had little effect on rates of R(dark) measured at T <35 °C and that there was no interactive effect of [CO2], growth T, and drought on T response of R(dark). However, drought increased R(dark) at high leaf T typical of heatwave events (35-45 °C), and increased the measuring T at which maximal rates of R(dark) occurred (Tmax) by 8 °C (from 52 °C in well-watered plants to 60 °C in drought-treated plants). Leaf starch and soluble sugars decreased under drought and elevated growth T, respectively, but no effect was found under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increased the Q 10 of R(dark) (i.e. proportional rise in R(dark) per 10 °C) over the 15-35 °C range, while drought increased Q 10 values between 35 °C and 45 °C. Collectively, the study highlights the dynamic nature of the T dependence of R dark in plants experiencing future climate change scenarios, particularly with respect to drought and elevated [CO2]. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Charles H. Winston and Confederate Sulfuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmiller, Steven

    1995-07-01

    Sulfuric acid turned out to be one of the critical chemicals made in the South during the Civil War. It was necessary for the manufacture of mercury fulminate which was used in the production of percussion caps and sulfuric acid was used in the Daniells cell to produce electricity. Charles H. Winston, president of the Richmond Female Institute and later professor at the University of Richmond (VA) was instrumental in the establishment of a plant to manufacture sulfuric acid in Charlotte, North Carolina. His patent and method of manufacture plus the uses of sulfuric acid during the Civil War are discussed.

  3. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of cattails for cellulose conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Lijun; Shahbazi, Abolghasem; Diallo, Oumou; Whitmore, Allante

    2011-10-01

    The use of aquatic plant cattails to produce biofuel will add value to land and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by replacing petroleum products. Dilute-sulfuric acid pretreatment of cattails was studied using a Dionex accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) varying acid concentration (0.1-1%), treatment temperature (140-180 °C), and residence time (5-10 min). The highest total glucose yield for both the pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis stages (97.1% of the cellulose) was reached at a temperature of 180 °C, a sulfuric acid concentration of 0.5%, and a time of 5 min. Cattails pretreated with 0.5% sulfuric acid are digestible with similar results at enzyme loadings above 15 FPU/g glucan. Glucose from cattails cellulose can be efficiently fermented to ethanol with an approximately 90% of the theoretical yield. The results in this study indicate that cattails are a promising source of feedstock for advanced renewable fuel production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbon with high electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huan; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Guo, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of novel sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC-S). • OMC-S as metal-free electrocatalyst for ORR. • High electrocatalytic activity and excellent tolerance to crossover effect. • Sulfide groups (-C-S-C-) playing an important role in promoting ORR. -- Abstract: Sulfur-doped ordered mesoporous carbons (OMC-S-X) (X = 1, 2 and 3) with different sulfur contents were synthesized as metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDX), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were employed to confirm the characterizations of OMC and OMC-S. The prepared OMC-S-3 exhibits high electrocatalytic activity, good stability and excellent tolerance to crossover effect for ORR. The high electrocatalytic activity of OMC-S-3 for ORR can be mainly ascribed to the doping of sulfur especially the existence of sulfide groups (-C-S-C-) which play an important role in promoting the ORR

  5. Reaction of isoprene on thin sulfuric acid films: kinetics, uptake, and product analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Brandon M; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-06-15

    A high vacuum Knudsen flow reactor was used to determine the reactive uptake coefficient, gamma, of isoprene on sulfuric acid films as a function of sulfuric acid weight percent, temperature, and relative humidity. No discernible dependence was observed for gamma over the range of temperatures (220 - 265 K) and pressures (10(-7) Torr -10(-4) Torr) studied. However, the uptake coefficient increased with increased sulfuric acid concentration between the range of 78 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-4)) and 93 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-3)). In addition to the Knudsen Cell, a bulk study was conducted between 60 and 85 wt % H(2)SO(4) to quantify uptake at lower acid concentrations and to determine reaction products. After exposing sulfuric acid to gaseous isoprene the condensed phase products were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Isoprene was observed to polymerize in the sulfuric acid and form yellow/red colored monoterpenes and cyclic sesquiterpenes. Finally, addition of water to the 85 wt % sulfuric acid/isoprene product mixture released these terpenes from the condensed phase into the gas phase. Together these experiments imply that direct isoprene uptake will not produce significant SOA; however, terpene production from the small uptake may be relevant for ultrafine particles and could affect growth and nucleation.

  6. Genomic and Evolutionary Perspectives on Sulfur Metabolism in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are anaerobic photoautotrophs that oxidize sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for growth. We present here an analysis of the distribution and evolution of enzymes involved in oxidation of sulfur compounds in GSB based on genome sequence...

  7. Electrical properties of a new sulfur-containing polymer for optoelectronic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAkemi, ElMehdi; Jaballah, Nejmeddine; Ouada, Hafedh Ben; Majdoub, Mustapha

    2015-06-01

    An original polythiophene derivative was characterized to develop the optoelectronic properties of sulfur-containing π-conjugated polymer. The optical properties of the polymer were investigated by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Investigations of the electrical characteristics of polymer diodes are reported. We present current-voltage characteristics and impedance spectroscopy measurements performed on partially sulfur-containing thin films in sandwich structure ITO/sulfur-containing polymer/Al. The conduction mechanisms in these layers are identified to be a space-charge-limited current. The AC electrical transport of the sulfur-containing polymer is studied as a function of frequency (100 Hz-10 MHz) and temperature in impedance spectroscopy analyses. We interpreted Cole-Cole plots in terms of the equivalent circuit model as a single parallel resistance and a capacitance network in series with a relatively small resistance. The evolution of the electrical parameters deduced from fitting of the experimental data is discussed.

  8. A sulfuric-lactic acid process for efficient purification of fungal chitosan with intact molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Mitra; Zamani, Akram; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2014-02-01

    The most recent method of fungal chitosan purification, i.e., two steps of dilute sulfuric acid treatment, pretreatment of cell wall at room temperature for phosphate removal and extraction of chitosan from the phosphate free cell wall at high temperature, significantly reduces the chitosan molecular weight. This study was aimed at improvement of this method. In the pretreatment step, to choose the best conditions, cell wall of Rhizopus oryzae, containing 9% phosphate, 10% glucosamine, and 21% N-acetyl glucosamine, was treated with sulfuric, lactic, acetic, nitric, or hydrochloric acid, at room temperature. Sulfuric acid showed the best performance in phosphate removal (90%) and cell wall recovery (89%). To avoid depolymerisation of chitosan, hot sulfuric acid extraction was replaced with lactic acid treatment at room temperature, and a pure fungal chitosan was obtained (0.12 g/g cell wall). Similar pretreatment and extraction processes were conducted on pure shrimp chitosan and resulted in a chitosan recovery of higher than 87% while the reduction of chitosan viscosity was less than 15%. Therefore, the sulfuric-lactic acid method purified the fungal chitosan without significant molecular weight manipulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Method of making sulfur-resistant composite metal membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, J Douglas [Boulder, CO; Lusk, Mark [Golden, CO; Thoen, Paul [Littleton, CO

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides thin, hydrogen-permeable, sulfur-resistant membranes formed from palladium or palladium-alloy coatings on porous, ceramic or metal supports. Also disclosed are methods of making these membranes via sequential electroless plating techniques, wherein the method of making the membrane includes decomposing any organic ligands present on the substrate, reducing the palladium crystallites on the substrate to reduced palladium crystallites, depositing a film of palladium metal on the substrate and then depositing a second, gold film on the palladium film. These two metal films are then annealed at a temperature between about 200.degree. C. and about 1200.degree. C. to form a sulfur-resistant, composite PdAu alloy membrane.

  10. Transferring the Incremental Capacity Analysis to Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Kalogiannis, Theodoros; Purkayastha, Rajlakshmi

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the battery degradation and to estimate their health, various techniques can be applied. One of them, which is widely used for Lithium-ion batteries, is the incremental capacity analysis (ICA). In this work, we apply the ICA to Lithium-Sulfur batteries, which differ in many...... aspects from Lithium-ion batteries and possess unique behavior. One of the challenges of applying the ICA to Lithium-Sulfur batteries is the representation of the IC curves, as their voltage profiles are often non-monotonic, resulting in more complex IC curves. The ICA is at first applied to charge...... and discharge processes at various temperature levels and afterward the technique is applied to a cell undergoing cycling degradation. It is shown that the ageing processes are trackable from the IC curves and it opens a possibility for their utilization for state-of-health estimation....

  11. New progresses in safe, clean and efficient development technologies for high-sulfur gas reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In China, there are a lot of high-sulfur gas reservoirs with total proved reserves of over 1 trillion m3, most of which were discovered in the Sichuan Basin. Most high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China, distributed in marine carbonate zones, are characterized by great buried depths, complex geologic conditions, high temperatures, high pressures, high H2S and CO2 content, presenting various challenges in gas field development engineering and production safety. Since the development of Sinian high-sulfur gas reservoirs in the Weiyuan area of the Sichuan Basin started in the 1960s, Wolonghe, Zhongba and other medium to small-scale gas reservoirs with medium to low sulfur content have been developed. Ever since 2009, successful production of Longgang and Puguang in the Sichuan Basin, together with some other high-sulfur gas reservoirs highlighted the breakthroughs in development technologies for high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China. This paper reviews the progress made in gas reservoir engineering, drilling and completion engineering, gas production, pipeline transportation, corrosion control, natural gas purification, HSE and other aspects with consideration of specific requirements related to safe, clean and high-efficient development of high-sulfur gas reservoirs since the “12th Five-Year Plan” period. Finally, considering the challenges in the development of high-sulfur gas reservoirs in China, we summarized the trend in future technological development with the following goals of reducing risks, minimizing environmental damages, and enhancing the efficiency of high-sulfur gas reservoir development.

  12. Ameliorating influence of sulfur on germination attributes of canola (brassica napus l.) under chromium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, S.; Iqbal, S.; Jabeen, K.; Sadaf, S.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was performed to evaluate the role of sulfur to induce tolerance in Brassica napus L. against chromium stress by estimating the changes in germination parameters. Petriplates were assembled in Randomized Complete Block Design. A total 9 sets of treatments viz., control, chromium treated (40 and 160ppm), sulfur treated (50 and 150ppm) and sulfur (50 and 150ppm) combined with chromium (40 and 160ppm) with three replicates was used. Chromium under both concentrations was responsible for significant decline in germination parameters i.e. germination percentage, germination rate, seedling vigor index, shoot and root length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings. Sulfur application under chromium stress resulted in improvement of germination parameters such as germination percentage, germination rate, seedling vigor index, shoot and root length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings in contrast to chromium treatment. So, it can be concluded that sulfur in appropriate dose can be used to ameliorate the negative effects of chromium by increasing the germination potential of canola. (author)

  13. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  14. The Relationship Between Corrosion and the Biological Sulfur Cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Little, Brenda

    2000-01-01

    .... Sulfur and sulfur compounds, including sulfides, bisulfides, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), thiosulfates, polythionates and sulfuric acid, may be trapped or bound up in biofilms causing direct corrosion of materials...

  15. Multiphysics Modelling of Sodium Sulfur Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jerry Hunter

    Due to global climate change and the desire to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, large scale energy storage has become a critical issue. Renewable energy sources such as wind and solar will not be a viable energy source unless the storage problem is solved. One of the practical and cost effective solutions for this problem is sodium sulfur batteries. These batteries are comprised of liquid electrode materials suspended in porous media and operate at relatively high temperatures (>300°C). The sodium anode and the sulfur/sodium-polysulfide cathode are separated by a solid electrolyte made of beta-alumina or NASICON material. Due to the use of porous materials in the electrodes, capillary pressure and the combination of capillary action and gravity become important. Capillary pressure has a strong dependence on the wetting phase (liquid electrode material) saturation; therefore sharp concentration gradients can occur between the inert gas and the electrode liquid, especially within the cathode. These concentration gradients can have direct impacts on the electrodynamics of the battery as they may produce areas of high electrical potential variation, which can decrease efficiency and even cause failures. Then, thermal management also becomes vital since the electrochemistry and material properties are sensitive to temperature gradients. To investigate these phenomena in detail and to attempt to improve upon battery design a multi-dimensional, multi-phase code has been developed and validated in this study. Then a porous media flow model is implemented. Transport equations for charge, mass and heat are solved in a time marching fashion using finite volume method. Material properties are calculated and updated as a function of time. The porous media model is coupled with the continuity equation and a separate diffusion equation for the liquid sodium in the melt. The total mass transport model is coupled with charge transport via Faraday's law. Results show that

  16. Quantitative analysis of sulfur forms of coal and the pyrolysis behavior of sulfur compounds; Sekitanchu no io kagobutsu no keitaibetsu gan`yuryo no teiryo to sono netsubunkai kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mae, K.; Miura, K.; Shimada, M. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    As part of the studies on coal utilization basics, considerations were given on quantification of sulfur forms of coal and the pyrolysis behavior of sulfur compounds. With the temperature raising oxidation method, a thermo-balance was connected directly to a mass analyzer, and the coal temperature was raised at a rate of 5{degree}C per minute and gasified. Peak division was performed on SO2 and COS production to derive sulfur forms of coal. Using the slow-speed pyrolysis method, production rates of H2S, COS, SO2 and mercaptans were measured at a temperature raising rate of 20{degree}C per minute. Sulfur content in char was also measured. With the quick pyrolysis method, a Curie point pyrolyzer was connected directly to a gas chromatograph, by which secondary reaction is suppressed, and initial pyrolytic behavior can be tracked. All kinds of coals produce a considerable amount of SO2 in the slow-speed pyrolysis, but very little in the quick pyrolysis. Instead, H2S and mercaptans are produced. Sulfur compound producing mechanisms vary depending on the temperature raising rates. By using a parallel primary reaction model, analysis was made on reactions of H2S production based on different activation energies, such as those generated from pyrite decomposition and organic sulfur decomposition. The analytic result agreed also with that from the temperature raising oxidation method. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Sulfur-carbon nanocomposites and their application as cathode materials in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chengdu; Dudney, Nancy J.; Howe, Jane Y.

    2017-08-01

    The invention is directed in a first aspect to a sulfur-carbon composite material comprising: (i) a bimodal porous carbon component containing therein a first mode of pores which are mesopores, and a second mode of pores which are micropores; and (ii) elemental sulfur contained in at least a portion of said micropores. The invention is also directed to the aforesaid sulfur-carbon composite as a layer on a current collector material; a lithium ion battery containing the sulfur-carbon composite in a cathode therein; as well as a method for preparing the sulfur-composite material.

  18. Reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences between two types of winterfat (forage) seeds with physiological differences in low temperature tolerance using synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P; Wang, R; Bai, Y

    2005-11-30

    Winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) (forage seed) is a long-lived native shrub with superior forage quality for livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to use advanced synchrotron technology [S-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR)] as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences in terms of protein secondary structures between the two types of winterfat (forage) seeds, which show physiological differences in low-temperature tolerances. This experiment was performed at beamline U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), U.S. Department of Energy (NSLS-BNL, New York). The results showed that with the synchrotron analytical technique (S-FTIR), the molecular structural-chemical makeup and characteristics of the winterfat seed tissues could be imaged and revealed. The protein secondary structures differed between the large and the small seed tissues. By using the multicomponent peaks modeling method, the results show that the large seeds contained no significant differences (P > 0.05) in percentage of beta-sheet (average 37.0%) and alpha-helix (average 24.1%). However, the large seeds contained a lower (P seed size variation and may affect germination behaviors.

  19. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  20. 21 CFR 182.3862 - Sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sulfur dioxide. 182.3862 Section 182.3862 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3862 Sulfur...

  1. Sulfuric Acid and Water: Paradoxes of Dilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenson, I. A.

    2004-01-01

    On equilibrium properties of aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid, Julius Thomsen has marked that the heat evolved on diluting liquid sulfuric acid with water is a continuous function of the water used, and excluded absolutely the acceptance of definite hydrates as existing in the solution. Information about thermochemical measurement, a discussion…

  2. Numerical simulation of condensation of sulfuric acid and water in a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karvounis, Nikolas; Pang, Kar Mun; Mayer, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    correlation is found between the fuel sulfur content and the total condensed mass of sulfuric acid. The level of humidity of the scavenging air does not affect the condensation of sulfuric acid considerably, relative to the humidity increase, but it has a high impact on water condensation. The study...... of the scavenging pressure level reveals a counter intuitive behavior where the condensation rates decrease with higher scavenging pressures due to the flow regime and flame size. Next, increasing the cylinder liner temperature decreases significantly the water condensation contrary to the sulfuric acid...... condensation which is marginally affected. The increase in lubricant film thickness results in a decrease for both the sulfuric acid and water condensation with a more pronounced reduction for water. Finally, a comparison between the high and low load operating conditions reveals a small drop in the total...

  3. Sulfate- and Sulfur-Reducing Bacteria as Terrestrial Analogs for Microbial Life on Jupiter's Satellite Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations from the Voyager and Galileo spacecraft have revealed Jupiter's moon Io to be the most volcanically active body of our Solar System. The Galileo Near Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (NIMS) detected extensive deposits of sulfur compounds, elemental sulfur and SO2 frost on the surface of Io. There are extreme temperature variations on Io's surface, ranging from -130 C to over 2000 C at the Pillan Patera volcanic vent. The active volcanoes, fumaroles, calderas, and lava lakes and vast sulfur deposits on this frozen moon indicate that analogs of sulfur- and sulfate-reducing bacteria might inhabit Io. Hence Io may have great significance to Astrobiology. Earth's life forms that depend on sulfur respiration are members of two domains: Bacteria and Archaea. Two basic links of the biogeochemical sulfur cycle of Earth have been studied: 1) the sulfur oxidizing process (occurring at aerobic conditions) and 2) the process of sulfur-reduction to hydrogen sulfide (anaerobic conditions). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (StRB) and sulfur-reducing bacteria (SrRB) are responsible for anaerobic reducing processes. At the present time the systematics of StRB include over 112 species distributed into 35 genera of Bacteria and Archaea. Moderately thermophilic and mesophilic SrRB belong to the Bacteria. The hyperthermophilic SrRB predominately belong to the domain Archaea and are included in the genera: Pyrodictium, Thermoproteus, Pyrobaculum, Thermophilum, Desulfurococcus, and Thermodiscus. The StRB and SrRB use a wide spectrum of substrates as electron donors for lithotrophic and heterotrophic type nutrition. The electron acceptors for the StRB include: sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, sulfur, arsenate, dithionite, tetrathionate, sulfur monoxide, iron, nitrite, selenite, fumarate, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and chlorine-containing phenol compounds. The Sulfate- and Sulfur-reducing bacteria are widely distributed in anaerobic ecosystems, including extreme environments like hot springs

  4. Teaching Tolerance? Associational Diversity and Tolerance Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Carolin; Freitag, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance is a basic democratic principle that helps civil societies cope with rising levels of diversity stemming from increased immigration and individualism. During the last decade the question of how tolerance may be fostered has dominated debates in public and academic spheres. In this article...

  5. NOx Pollution Analysis for a Sulfur Recovery Unit Thermal Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Lang

    2017-12-01

    A sulfur recovery unit (SRU) thermal reactor is the most important equipment in a sulfur plant. It is negatively affected by high temperature operations. In this paper, NOx emissions from the SRU thermal reactors are simulated. Both the prototype thermal reactor and its modifications, including changing fuel mass fraction, changing inlet air quantity, changing inlet oxygen mole fraction, and changing burner geometry, are analyzed to investigate their influences on NOx emissions. In respect of the fuel mass fraction, the simulation results show that the highest NO emission occurs at a zone 1 fuel mass fraction of 0.375, around which the reactor maximum temperature and the zone 1 average temperature reach maximum values. Concerning the inlet air quantity, the highest NO emission occurs when the inlet air quantity is 2.4 times the designed inlet air quantity. This is very close to the inlet air quantity at which the maximum average temperature occurs. Regarding the inlet oxygen mole fraction, the NO emission increases as the inlet oxygen mole fraction increases. With regard to the burner geometry, the NO emission increases as the clearance of the burner acid gas tip increases. In addition, the NO emission increases as the swirling strength increases.

  6. SALT TOLERANCE OF CROP PLANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdia, M. A; Shaddad, M. A. K.

    2010-01-01

    Several environmental factors adversely affect plant growth and development and final yield performance of a crop. Drought, salinity, nutrient imbalances (including mineral toxicities and deficiencies) and extremes of temperature are among the major environmental constraints to crop productivity worldwide. Development of crop plants with stress tolerance, however, requires, among others, knowledge of the physiological mechanisms and genetic controls of the contributing traits at different pla...

  7. Dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules on sulfuric acid-water surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, P; Scharfenort, U; Ataya, K; Zellner, R

    2009-09-28

    A molecular beam technique has been used to study the dynamics and mass accommodation of HCl molecules in collision with sulfuric acid-water surfaces. The experiments were performed by directing a nearly mono-energetic beam of HCl molecules onto a continuously renewed liquid film of 54-76 wt% sulfuric acid at temperatures between 213 K and 243 K. Deuterated sulfuric acid was used to separate sticking but non-reactive collisions from those that involved penetration through the phase boundary followed by dissociation and recombination with D+. The results indicate that the mass accommodation of HCl on sulfuric acid-water surfaces decreases sharply with increasing acidity over the concentration range 54-76 wt%. Using the capillary wave theory of mass accommodation this effect is explained by a change of the surface dynamics. Regarding the temperature dependence it is found that the mass accommodation of HCl increases with increasing temperature and is limited by the bulk phase viscosity and driven by the restoring forces of the surface tension. These findings imply that under atmospheric conditions the uptake of HCl from the gas phase depends crucially on the bulk phase parameters of the sulfuric acid aerosol.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells are highly resistant to sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Annette; Scherer, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-05

    The effect of sulfur mustard (SM) to the direct injured tissues of the skin, eyes and airways is well investigated. Little is known about the effect of SM to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, this is an interesting aspect. Comparing the clinical picture of SM it is known today that MSC play an important role e.g. in chronic impaired wound healing. Therefore we wanted to get an understanding about how SM affects MSC and if these findings might become useful to get a better understanding of the effect of sulfur mustard gas with respect to skin wounds. We used mesenchymal stem cells, isolated from femoral heads from healthy donors and treated them with a wide range of SM to ascertain the dose-response-curve. With the determined inhibitory concentrations IC1 (1μM), IC5 (10μM), IC10 (20μM) and IC25 (40μM) we did further investigations. We analyzed the migratory ability and the differentiation capacity under influence of SM. Already very low concentrations of SM demonstrated a strong effect to the migratory activity whereas the differentiation capacity seemed not to be affected. Putting these findings together it seems to be likely that a link between MSC and the impaired wound healing after SM exposure might exist. Same as in patients with chronic impaired wound healing MSC had shown a reduced migratory activity. The fact that MSC are able to tolerate very high concentrations of SM and still do not lose their differentiation capacity may reveal new ways of treating wounds caused by sulfur mustard. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling the condensation of sulfuric acid and water on the cylinder liner of a large two-stroke marine diesel engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Mayer, Stefan; Eskildsen, Svend S.

    2018-01-01

    Corrosive wear of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines that burn heavy fuel oil containing sulfur is coupled to the formation of gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO3) and subsequent combined condensation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and water (H2O) vapor. The present work seeks to address...... vapor liquid equilibrium. By assuming homogenous cylinder gas mixtures condensation is modeled using a convective heat and mass transfer analogy combined with realistic liner temperature profiles. Condensation of water is significantly altered by the liner temperature and charge air humidity while...... how fuel sulfur content, charge air humidity and liner temperature variations affects the deposition of water and sulfuric acid at low load operation. A phenomenological engine model is applied to simulate the formation of cylinder/bulk gas combustion products and dew points comply with H2O–H2SO4...

  10. Sulfuric Acid Intercalated Graphite Oxide for Graphene Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yanzhong; Wang, Zhiyong; Jin, Xianbo

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has shown enormous potential for innovation in various research fields. The current chemical approaches based on exfoliation of graphite via graphite oxide (GO) are potential for large-scale synthesis of graphene but suffer from high cost, great operation difficulties, and serious waste discharge. We report a facile preparation of graphene by rapid reduction and expansion exfoliation of sulfuric acid intercalated graphite oxide (SIGO) at temperature just above 100°C in ambient atmosphere, noting that SIGO is easily available as the immediate oxidation descendent of graphite in sulfuric acid. The oxygenic and hydric groups in SIGO are mainly removed through dehydration as catalyzed by the intercalated sulfuric acid (ISA). The resultant consists of mostly single layer graphene sheets with a mean diameter of 1.07 μm after dispersion in DMF. This SIGO process is reductant free, easy operation, low-energy, environmental friendly and generates graphene with low oxygen content, less defect and high conductivity. The provided synthesis route from graphite to graphene via SIGO is compact and readily scalable. PMID:24310650

  11. Lactose tolerance tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen ...

  12. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  13. Selective adsorption of refractory sulfur species on active carbons and carbon based CoMo catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Hamdy

    2007-03-01

    Adsorption technique could be a reliable alternative in removing to a certain remarkable extent the sulfur species from the feedstock of petroleum oil. The performance of various carbons on adsorption of model sulfur compounds in a simulated feed solution and the sulfur containing compounds in the real gas oil was evaluated. The adsorption experiments have been carried out in a batch scale at ambient temperature and under the atmospheric pressure. In general, the most refractory sulfur compounds in the hydrotreatment reactions were selectively removed and adsorbed. It was found that the adsorbents affinities to dibenzothiophene and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene were much more favored and pronounced than the aromatic matrices like fluorene, 1-methylnaphthalene and 9-methylanthracene. Among the sulfur species, 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was the highest to be removed in terms of both selectivity and capacity over all the present adsorbents. The studied adsorbents showed significant capacities for the polyaromatic thiophenes. The electronic characteristics seem to play a certain role in such behavior. Regeneration of the used adsorbent was successfully attained either by washing it with toluene or by the release of the adsorbates through heat treatment. A suggested adsorptive removal process of sulfur compounds from petroleum distillate over carbon supported CoMo catalyst was discussed.

  14. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...... hydrolysis are compared. The effects of temperature, acid concentration, composition of organic phase (for sulfuric acid), and pressure (for nitric acid) on the effectiveness of pretreatment were analyzed. It is shown that the use of organosolv with 0.5% sulfuric acid allows us to increase the reactivity...

  15. Sulfur isotope studies of biogenic sulfur emissions at Wallops Island, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitchcock, D.R.; Black, M.S.; Herbst, R.P.

    1978-03-01

    This research attempted to determine whether it is possible to measure the stable sulfur isotope distributions of atmospheric particulate and gaseous sulphur, and to use this information together with measurements of the ambient levels of sulfur gases and particulate sulfate and sodium in testing certain hypotheses. Sulfur dioxide and particulate sulfur samples were collected at a coastal marine location and their delta (34)S values were determined. These data were used together with sodium concentrations to determine the presence of biogenic sulfur and the identity of the biological processes producing it. Excess (non-seasalt) sulfate levels ranged from 2 to 26 micrograms/cu m and SO2 from 1 to 9 ppb. Analyses of air mass origins and lead concentrations indicated that some anthropogenic contaminants were present on all days, but the isotope data revealed that most of the atmospheric sulfur originated locally from the metabolism of bacterial sulfate reducers on all days, and that the atmospheric reactions leading to the production of sulfate from this biogenic sulfur source are extremely rapid. Delta 34 S values of atmospheric sulfur dioxide correlated well with those of excess sulfate, and implied little or no sulfur isotope fractionation during the oxidation of sulfur gases to sulfate

  16. Multiple sulfur isotopes fractionations associated with abiotic sulfur transformations in Yellowstone National Park geothermal springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexey; Druschel, Gregory; Mansaray, Zahra F; Farquhar, James

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a quantification of main (hydrogen sulfide and sulfate), as well as of intermediate sulfur species (zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), thiosulfate, sulfite, thiocyanate) in the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hydrothermal springs and pools. We combined these measurements with the measurements of quadruple sulfur isotope composition of sulfate, hydrogen sulfide and zero-valent sulfur. The main goal of this research is to understand multiple sulfur isotope fractionation in the system, which is dominated by complex, mostly abiotic, sulfur cycling. Water samples from six springs and pools in the Yellowstone National Park were characterized by pH, chloride to sulfate ratios, sulfide and intermediate sulfur species concentrations. Concentrations of sulfate in pools indicate either oxidation of sulfide by mixing of deep parent water with shallow oxic water, or surface oxidation of sulfide with atmospheric oxygen. Thiosulfate concentrations are low (hot parent water body. In two pools δ(34)S values of sulfate varied significantly from the values calculated from this model. Sulfur isotope fractionation between ZVS and hydrogen sulfide was close to zero at pH < 4. At higher pH zero-valent sulfur is slightly heavier than hydrogen sulfide due to equilibration in the rhombic sulfur-polysulfide - hydrogen sulfide system. Triple sulfur isotope ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S) fractionation patterns in waters of hydrothermal pools are more consistent with redox processes involving intermediate sulfur species than with bacterial sulfate reduction. Small but resolved differences in ∆(33)S among species and between pools are observed. The variation of sulfate isotopic composition, the origin of differences in isotopic composition of sulfide and zero-valent sulfur, as well as differences in ∆(33)S of sulfide and sulfate are likely due to a complex network of abiotic redox reactions, including disproportionation pathways.

  17. Configuring the thermochemical hydrogen sulfuric acid process step for the Tandem Mirror Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, T.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper identifies the sulfuric acid step as the critical part of the thermochemical cycle in dictating the thermal demands and temperature requirements of the heat source. The General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle is coupled to a Tandem Mirror. The sulfuric acid decomposition process step is focused on specifically since this step can use the high efficiency electrical power of the direct converter together with the other thermal-produced electricity to Joule-heat a non-catalytic SO 3 decomposer to approximately 1250 0 K. This approach uses concepts originally suggested by Dick Werner and Oscar Krikorian. The blanket temperature can be lowered to about 900 0 K, greatly alleviating materials problems, the level of technology required, safety problems, and costs. A moderate degree of heat has been integrated to keep the cycle efficiency around 48%, but the number of heat exchangers has been limited in order to keep hydrogen production costs within reasonable bounds

  18. Results of Study of Sulfur Oxide Reduction During Combustion of Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Through use of Sulfur Capturing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murko Vasiliy I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that an effective way of burning high sulfur coal is to burn coal-water slurry fuel (CWF prepared on its basis containing a sulfur capture agent (SCA entered in the slurry at the stage of preparation. The technique of thermodynamic analysis of chemical reactions during CWF burning has been developed including burning in the presence of SCA. Using the developed calculation program, the optimal temperature conditions have been determined as required for the effective reduction of sulfur oxides in flue gases when using different types of SCA. According to the results of calculating the composition of CWF combustion products when entering various substances in the burner space as SCA it has been determined that magnesite, calcite, and dolomite are the most effective natural minerals. The analysis of calculated and experimental data proves the efficiency of SCA addition as well as validity of the obtained results.

  19. Evolution of sulfur speciation in bitumen through hydrous pyrolysis induced thermal maturation of Jordanian Ghareb Formation oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael; Bake, Kyle D.; Bolin, Trudy B.; Craddock, Paul R.; Forsythe, Julia C.; Pomerantz, Andrew E.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies on the distribution of bulk sulfur species in bitumen before and after artificial thermal maturation using various pyrolysis methods have indicated that the quantities of reactive (sulfide, sulfoxide) and thermally stable (thiophene) sulfur moieties change following consistent trends under increasing thermal stress. These trends show that sulfur distributions change during maturation in ways that are similar to those of carbon, most clearly illustrated by the increase in aromatic sulfur (thiophenic) as a function of thermal maturity. In this study, we have examined the sulfur moiety distributions of retained bitumen from a set of pre- and post-pyrolysis rock samples in an organic sulfur-rich, calcareous oil shale from the Upper Cretaceous Ghareb Formation. Samples collected from outcrop in Jordan were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (HP). Sulfur speciation in extracted bitumens was examined using K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The most substantial changes in sulfur distribution occurred at temperatures up to the point of maximum bitumen generation (∼300 °C) as determined from comparison of the total organic carbon content for samples before and after extraction. Organic sulfide in bitumen decreased with increasing temperature at relatively low thermal stress (200–300 °C) and was not detected in extracts from rocks subjected to HP at temperatures above around 300 °C. Sulfoxide content increased between 200 and 280 °C, but decreased at higher temperatures. The concentration of thiophenic sulfur increased up to 300 °C, and remained essentially stable under increasing thermal stress (mg-S/g-bitumen basis). The ratio of stable-to-reactive+stable sulfur moieties ([thiophene/(sulfide+sulfoxide+thiophene)], T/SST) followed a sigmoidal trend with HP temperature, increasing slightly up to 240 °C, followed by a substantial increase between 240 and 320 °C, and approaching a constant value (∼0.95) at

  20. Hysteresis Phenomena in Sulfur Dioxide Oxidation over Supported Vanadium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masters, Stephen G.; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    Catalyst deactivation and hysteresis behavior in industrial SO2-oxidation catalysts have been studied in the temperature region 350-480 C by combined in situ EPR spectroscopy and catalytic activity measurements. The feed gas composition simulated sulfuric acid synthesis gas and wet/dry deNOx'ed f......NOx'ed flue gas. The vanadium (IV) compound K4(VO)3(SO4)5 precipitated during all the investigated conditions hence causing catalyst deactivation. Hysteresis behavior of both the catalytic activity and the V(IV) content was observed during reheating....

  1. THE PERFORMANCE OF NATURAL SORBENTS IN THE SULFUR DIOXIDE ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. L. Rakyts’ka

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The performance of natural sorbents with different mineralogical makeup (zeolites, layered aluminosilicates, basalt tuffs, and dispersed silicas in the adsorption-desorption of sulfur dioxide at its contents in the gas-air mixture of 150 and 200 mg/m3 and at the temperature of 20 °C has been studied. The S02 adsorption has been found to be predominately the physical one. The adsorption capacity values obtained experimentally for the sorbents have been compared with the data presented in the literature.

  2. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  3. Reveal Protein Molecular Structural-Chemical Differences Between Two Types of Winterfat (Forage) Seeds with Physiological Differences in Low Temperature Tolerance Using Synchrotron-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.; Wang, R.; Bai, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) (forage seed) is a long-lived native shrub with superior forage quality for livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to use advanced synchrotron technology [S-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR)] as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences in terms of protein secondary structures between the two types of winterfat (forage) seeds, which show physiological differences in low-temperature tolerances. This experiment was performed at beamline U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS in Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL, U.S. Department of Energy (NSLS-BNL, New York). The results showed that with the synchrotron analytical technique (S-FTIR), the molecular structural-chemical makeup and characteristics of the winterfat seed tissues could be imaged and revealed. The protein secondary structures differed between the large and the small seed tissues. By using the multicomponent peaks modeling method, the results show that the large seeds contained no significant differences (P > 0.05) in percentage of β-sheet (average 37.0%) and α-helix (average 24.1%). However, the large seeds contained a lower (P < 0.05) percentage of β-turns (18.1 vs. 20.1%) and a lower (P < 0.05) ratio of β-turns to α-helices (0.8 vs. 0.9) and β-turns to β-sheets (0.5 vs. 0.6). Our results demonstrate the potential of highly spatially resolved synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy to reveal differences of structural molecular chemistry and protein secondary structures, which are associated with seed size variation and may affect germination behaviors

  4. Use of probabilistic safety analysis for design of emergency mitigation systems in hydrogen producer plant with sulfur-iodine technology, Section II: sulfuric acid decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, A.; Nelson E, P. F.; Francois L, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decades, the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases has prompted the development of technologies for the production of clean fuels through the use of primary energy resources of zero emissions, as the heat of nuclear reactors of high temperature. Within these technologies, one of the most promising is the hydrogen production by sulfur-iodine cycle coupled to a high temperature reactor initially proposed by General Atomics. By their nature and because it will be large-scale plants, the development of these technologies from its present phase to its procurement and construction, will have to incorporate emergency mitigation systems in all its parts and interconnections to prevent undesired events that could put threaten the plant integrity and the nearby area. For the particular case of sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle, most analysis have focused on hydrogen explosions and failures in the primary cooling systems. While these events are the most catastrophic, is that there are also many other events that even taking less direct consequences, could jeopardize the plant operation, the people safety of nearby communities and carry the same economic consequences. In this study we analyzed one of these events, which is the formation of a toxic cloud prompted by uncontrolled leakage of concentrated sulfuric acid in the second section of sulfur-iodine process of General Atomics. In this section, the sulfuric acid concentration is near to 90% in conditions of high temperature and positive pressure. Under these conditions the sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides from the reactor will form a toxic cloud that the have contact with the plant personnel could cause fatalities, or to reach a town would cause suffocation, respiratory problems and eye irritation. The methodology used for this study is the supported design in probabilistic safety analysis. Mitigation systems were postulated based on the isolation of a possible leak, the neutralization of a pond of

  5. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  6. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...

  7. Sulfurized carbon: a class of cathode materials for high performance lithium/sulfur batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng S. Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid electrolyte lithium/sulfur (Li/S batteries cannot come into practical applications because of many problems such as low energy efficiency, short cycle life, and fast self-discharge. All these problems are related to the dissolution of lithium polysulfide, a series of sulfur reduction intermediates, in the liquid electrolyte, and resulting parasitic reactions with the Li anode. Covalently binding sulfur onto carbon surface is a solution to completely eliminate the dissolution of lithium polysulfide and make the Li/S battery viable for practical applications. This can be achieved by replacing elemental sulfur with sulfurized carbon as the cathode material. This article reviews the current efforts on this subject and discusses the syntheses, electrochemical properties, and prospects of the sulfurized carbon as a cathode material in the rechargeable Li/S batteries.

  8. Sulfur-Kβ /sub emission studies on sulfur-bearing heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.R.; Andermann, G.G.; Fujiwara, F.

    1986-01-01

    Sulfur-K/β /sub x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFS) has been used to study the electronic structure and bonding in sulfur-bearing heterocycles. XFS not only has the capability of experimentally measuring valence electron energies in molecular species, but can also provide intensity data which can help define the nature of the molecular orbitals defined by the electrons. This report discusses the feasibility of using XFS as an analytical tool for the determination of total and specific sulfur heterocycle content in samples. A variety of compounds were studied. These include thiophene, thiophene derivatives, tetranydrothiophene, several more complex saturated and unsaturated sulfur heterocycles, and heterocycles containing both sulfur and nitrogen. The sulfur-K/β /sub spectra were obtained using a double crystal spectrometer which provided an instrumental resolution of about 0.7 eV

  9. Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiment Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russ, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle was determined to be the best cycle for coupling to a high temperature reactor (HTR) because of its high efficiency and potential for further improvement. The Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has also selected the SI process for further development and has successfully completed bench-scale demonstrations of the SI process at atmospheric pressure. JEA also plans to proceed with pilot-scale demonstrations of the SI process and eventually plans to couple an SI demonstration plant to its High Temperature Test Reactor (HHTR). As part of an international NERI project, GA, SNL, and the Frech Commissariat L'Energie Atomique performed laboratory-scale demonstrations of the SI process at prototypical temperatures and pressures. This demonstration was performed at GA in San Diego, CA and concluded in April 2009.

  10. Sulfur-Iodine Integrated Lab Scale Experiment Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, Ben

    2011-05-27

    The sulfur-iodine (SI) cycle was deermined to be the best cycle for coupling to a high temperature reactor (HTR) because of its high efficiency and potential for further improvement. The Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has also selected the SI process for further development and has successfully completed bench-scale demonstrations of the SI process at atmospheric pressure. JEA also plans to proceed with pilot-scale demonstrations of the SI process and eventually plans to couple an SI demonstration plant to its High Temperature Test Reactor (HHTR). As part of an international NERI project, GA, SNL, and the Frech Commissariat L'Energie Atomique performed laboratory-scale demonstrations of the SI process at prototypical temperatures and pressures. This demonstration was performed at GA in San Diego, CA and concluded in April 2009.

  11. Dental erosion in workers exposed to sulfuric acid in lead storage battery manufacturing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Yuji; Takaku, Satoru; Okawa, Yoshikazu; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Dental erosion, and specifically its symptoms, has long been studied in Japan as an occupational dental disease. However, in recent years, few studies have investigated the development of this disease or labor hygiene management aimed at its prevention. As a result, interest in dental erosion is comparatively low, even among dental professionals. Our investigation at a lead storage battery factory in 1991 found that the work environmental sulfuric acid density was above the tolerable range (1.0mg/m(3)) and that longterm workers had dental erosion. Therefore, workers handling sulfuric acid were given an oral examination and rates of dental erosion by tooth type, rates of erosion by number of working years and rates of erosion by sulfuric acid density in the work environment investigated. Where dental erosion was diagnosed, degree of erosion was identified according to a diagnostic criterion. No development of dental erosion was detected in the maxillary teeth, and erosion was concentrated in the anterior mandibular teeth. Its prevalence was as high as 20%. Rates of dental erosion rose precipitously after 10 working years. The percentages of workers with dental erosion were 42.9% for 10-14 years, 57.1% for 15-19 years and 66.7% for over 20 years with 22.5% for total number of workers. The percentages of workers with dental erosion rose in proportion to work environmental sulfuric acid density: 17.9% at 0.5-1.0, 25.0% at 1.0-4.0 and 50.0% at 4.0-8.0mg/m(3). This suggests that it is necessary to evaluate not only years of exposure to sulfuric acid but also sulfuric acid density in the air in factory workers.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2004-11-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results

  13. Laboratory simulated slipstream testing of novel sulfur removal processes for gasification application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Roland; Tsang, Albert; Cross, Joe; Summers, Clinton; Kornosky, Bob

    2008-01-01

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is investigating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) concept to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production from coal and other carbonaceous feedstocks. Research, development and testing (RD and T) that is currently being conducted under the project is evaluating cost effective process systems for removing contaminants, particularly sulfur species, from the generated gas which contains mainly synthesis gas (syngas), CO 2 and steam at concentrations acceptable for the methanol synthesis catalyst. The RD and T includes laboratory testing followed by bench-scale and field testing at the SG Solutions Gasification Plant located in West Terre Haute, Indiana. Actual synthesis gas produced by the plant was utilized at system pressure and temperature for bench-scale field testing. ConocoPhillips Company (COP) developed a sulfur removal technology based on a novel, regenerable sorbent - S Zorb trademark - to remove sulfur contaminants from gasoline at high temperatures. The sorbent was evaluated for its sulfur removal performance from the generated syngas especially in the presence of other components such as water and CO 2 which often cause sorbent performance to decline over time. This publication also evaluates the performance of a regenerable activated carbon system developed by Nucon International, Inc. in polishing industrial gas stream by removing sulfur species to parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. (author)

  14. Mechanical tolerance stackup and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Bryan R

    2004-01-01

    BackgroundDimensioning and TolerancingTolerance Format and Decimal PlacesConverting Plus/Minus Dimensions and Tolerances into Equal Bilaterally Toleranced DimensionsVariation and Sources of VariationTolerance AnalysisWorst-case Tolerance StackupsStatistical Tolerance StackupsGeometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (GD&T)Converting Plus/Minus Tolerancing to Positional Tolerancing and Projected Tolerance ZonesDiametral and Radial Tolerance StackupsSpecifying Material Condition Modifiers and Their Effect on Tolerance Stackups The Tolerance Stackup SketchThe Tolerance Stackup Report FormTolerance S

  15. Sulfur cycling, retention, and mobility in soils: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Sulfur inputs to forests originate from mineral weathering, atmospheric deposition, and organic matter decomposition. In the soil, sulfur occurs in organic and inorganic forms and is cycled within and between those forms via mobilization, immobilization, mineralization, oxidation, and reduction processes. Organic sulfur compounds are largely immobile. Inorganic sulfur...

  16. 46 CFR 151.50-21 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 151.50-21 Section 151.50-21 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-21 Sulfuric acid. (a) How sulfuric acid may be carried. (1) Sulfuric acid of concentration of 77.5 percent (1.7019 specific gravity) (59.8...

  17. The effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase transformation from the mixed CuO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system to Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} during the sulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lijian; Jin, Xin; Yuan, Chenchen; Jiang, Guoshun; Liu, Weifeng, E-mail: liuwf@ustc.edu.cn; Zhu, Changfei, E-mail: cfzhu@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} thin films were creatively fabricated by sulfurizing metal oxide precursor. • The phase transformation mechanism during the sulfurization process was studied. • The reason why the excess S restrained the formation of Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} was discussed. • The effect of temperature on film morphology and bandgap was studied. - Abstract: The ternary semiconductor Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, as a promising light-absorber material for thin film solar cells, was creatively synthesized by sulfurizing the mixed metal oxides precursor film deposited by spin-coating chemical solution method. Two kinds of sulfurization techniques were introduced to study the effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase formation for the pure Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}. It was found that Cu-poor S-rich phases such as Cu{sub 3}Bi{sub 3}S{sub 7} and Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} were easily generated at high S concentration and then can transform to Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} phase by a simple desulphurization process, which means the sulfur concentration had a significant influence on the formation of Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} during the sulfurization process. The probable transformation mechanism from the mixed metal oxides to the pure Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} phase during the sulfurization process was studied in detail through the XRD analysis and thermodynamic calculation. In addition, the electrical properties were characterized by Hall measurement and the effects of sulfurization temperature on the phase transformation, morphology and optical band gap of the absorber layer were also studied in detail.

  18. Use of sulfur concrete for radioecological problems solution in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takibaev, Zh.; Belyashov, D.; Vagin, S.

    2001-01-01

    At present during intensive development of oil and gas fields in Kazakhstan a lot amount of sulfur is extracting. The problem of sulfur utilization demands its immediate solution. One of the perspective trends of sulfur utilization is use it in production of sulfur polymer concrete. It is well known, that encapsulation of low level radioactive and toxic wastes in sulfur polymer concrete and design from it radiation protection facilities have good perspectives for solution of radioecological problems. Sulfur concrete has high corrosion and radiation stability, improved mechanical and chemical properties. Unique properties of sulfur concrete allow to use it in materials ensuring protection from external irradiation

  19. Environmental behavior and analysis of agricultural sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Corey M; Woodrow, James E; Seiber, James N

    2015-11-01

    Sulfur has been widely used for centuries as a staple for pest and disease management in agriculture. Presently, it is the largest-volume pesticide in use worldwide. This review describes the sources and recovery methods for sulfur, its allotropic forms and properties and its agricultural uses, including development and potential advantages of nanosulfur as a fungicide. Chemical and microbial reactivity, interactions in soil and water and analytical methods for determination in environmental samples and foodstuffs, including inexpensive analytical methods for sulfur residues in wine, beer and other food/beverage substrates, will be reviewed. The toxicology of sulfur towards humans and agriculturally important fungi is included, with some restrictions on use to promote safety. The review concludes with areas for which more research is warranted. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991 at a set of point locations across the...

  1. ROE Total Sulfur Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset identifies the amount of wet, dry, and total deposition of sulfur in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013 at a set of point locations across the...

  2. Sulfur Mustard Damage to Cornea: Preventive Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Varma, Shambhu

    2004-01-01

    .... A preventive effect has been observed at the level of tissue morphology. Studies are in progress at the level of cellular metabolism, Here, CEES has been used as a representative compound simulating the action of sulfur mustard (HD...

  3. Peatland Acidobacteria with a dissimilatory sulfur metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hausmann, Bela; Pelikan, Claus; Herbold, Craig W

    2018-01-01

    Sulfur-cycling microorganisms impact organic matter decomposition in wetlands and consequently greenhouse gas emissions from these globally relevant environments. However, their identities and physiological properties are largely unknown. By applying a functional metagenomics approach to an acidic...

  4. Properties of sulfur-extended asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladkikh Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, increased functional reliability of asphalt concrete coatings associated with various modifying additives that improve the durability of pavements. Promising builder is a technical sulfur. Asphalt concrete, made using a complex binder consisting of petroleum bitumen and technical sulfur, were calledsSulfur-Extended Asphalt Concrete. Such asphalt concrete, due to changes in the chemical composition of particulate and bitumen, changes the intensity of the interaction at the interface have increased rates of physical and mechanical properties. There was a lack of essential knowledge concerning mechanical properties of the sulfur-bituminous concrete with such an admixture; therefore, we had carried out the necessary examination. It is revealed that a new material satisfies local regulations in terms of compressive and tensile strength, shear resistance, and internal friction.

  5. Microporous Carbon Polyhedrons Encapsulated Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibers as Sulfur Immobilizer for Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye-Zheng; Wu, Zhen-Zhen; Pan, Gui-Ling; Liu, Sheng; Gao, Xue-Ping

    2017-04-12

    Microporous carbon polyhedrons (MCPs) are encapsulated into polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by electrospinning the mixture of MCPs and PAN. Subsequently, the as-prepared MCPs-PAN nanofibers are employed as sulfur immobilizer for lithium-sulfur battery. Here, the S/MCPs-PAN multicomposites integrate the advantage of sulfur/microporous carbon and sulfurized PAN. Specifically, with large pore volume, MCPs inside PAN nanofibers provide a sufficient sulfur loading. While PAN-based nanofibers offer a conductive path and matrix. Therefore, the electrochemical performance is significantly improved for the S/MCPs-PAN multicomposite with a suitable sulfur content in carbonate-based electrolyte. At the current density of 160 mA g -1 sulfur , the S/MPCPs-PAN composite delivers a large discharge capacity of 789.7 mAh g -1 composite , high Coulombic efficiency of about 100% except in the first cycle, and good capacity retention after 200 cycles. In particular, even at 4 C rate, the S/MCPs-PAN composite can still release the discharge capacity of 370 mAh g -1 composite . On the contrary, the formation of the thick SEI layer on the surface of nanofibers with a high sulfur content are observed, which is responsible for the quick capacity deterioration of the sulfur-based composite in carbonate-based electrolyte. This design of the S/MCPs-PAN multicomposite is helpful for the fabrication of stable Li-S battery.

  6. Developing porous carbon with dihydrogen phosphate groups as sulfur host for high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhui; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Junwei; Liang, Xiao; Baker, Andrew P.; Qu, Deyang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Huayu; Zhang, Xinhe

    2018-02-01

    Carbon matrix (CM) derived from biomass is low cost and easily mass produced, showing great potential as sulfur host for lithium sulfur batteries. In this paper we report on a dihydrogen phosphate modified CM (PCM-650) prepared from luffa sponge (luffa acutangula) by phosphoric acid treatment. The phosphoric acid not only increases the surface area of the PCM-650, but also introduces dihydrogen phosphate onto PCM-650 (2.28 at% P). Sulfur impregnated (63.6 wt%) PCM-650/S, in comparison with samples with less dihydrogen phosphate LPCM-650/S, shows a significant performance improvement. XPS analysis is conducted for sulfur at different stages, including sulfur (undischarged), polysulfides (discharge to 2.1 V) and short chain sulfides (discharge to 1.7 V). The results consistently show chemical shifts for S2p in PCM-650, suggesting an enhanced adsorption effect. Furthermore, density functional theory (DFT) calculations is used to clarify the molecular binding: carbon/sulfur (0.86 eV), carbon/Li2S (0.3 eV), CH3-O-PO3H2/sulfur (1.24 eV), and CH3-O-PO3H2/Li2S (1.81 eV). It shows that dihydrogen phosphate group can significantly enhance the binding with sulfur and sulfide, consistent with XPS results. Consequently a CM functionalised with dihydrogen phosphate shows great potential as the sulfur host in a Li-S battery.

  7. The glassy and supercooled state of elemental sulfur: Vibrational modes, structure metastability, and polymer content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrikopoulos, K. S.; Kalampounias, A. G.; Falagara, O.; Yannopoulos, S. N.

    2013-09-01

    We report a detailed investigation of vibrational modes, structure, and dynamics of elemental sulfur in the glassy and the supercooled state, using Raman scattering and ab initio calculations. Polarized Raman spectra are recorded - for sulfur quenched from 473 K - over a broad temperature range from 93 K to 273 K where the supercooled liquid crystallized. The temperature induced shifts of the majority of the vibrational modes are determined and compared with the corresponding ones of crystalline sulfur. Analysis of the reduced isotropic spectra showed that the structure of the quenched product is composed of eight member rings (S8) and polymeric chains (Sμ) with a relative fraction comparable to that of the parent liquid at 473 K. Low temperature spectra, where spectral line broadening due to thermal effects is limited, revealed that two different polymeric species are present in the glass with distinct vibrational frequencies. Their interpretation was assisted by ab initio calculations used to simulate the vibrational frequencies of polymeric chains S8k (k = 1, …, 7). Theoretical results exhibit an increasing breathing mode frequency for sulfur chains up to k = 2, although it remains constant beyond the above value. The polymeric content is metastable; heating the glass above its glass transition temperature, Tg, destabilizes the chains and drives them back to the more thermodynamically stable rings. This bond interchange mechanism provides the structural origin of a secondary relaxation process in supercooled sulfur reported long ago, which has been also considered as a complication in the correct fragility estimation of this material. Finally, the Boson peak of the glass was found to exhibit strong temperature dependence even at temperatures below Tg.

  8. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2002-10-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. The PFS product was used in pilot-scale tests at a municipal water treatment facility and gave good results in removal of turbidity and superior results in removal of disinfection byproduct precursors (TOC, DOC, UV-254) when compared with equal doses of ferric chloride.

  9. Continuos extraction of uranium and molibdenum by lixiviation with sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cripiani, M.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology for collecting data of uranium and molibdenum extraction by lixiviation with sulfuric acid is showed. Discontinuous tests of lixiviation, time influence, temperature, granulation, acid/ore relation, oxidant/ore relation and solid percentage are studied. (C.G.C.) [pt

  10. Characteristics of Sulfuric Acid Condensation on Cylinder Liners of Large Two-Stroke Marine Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Rasmus Lage; Mayer, Stefan; Schramm, Jesper

    The present work seeks to clarify the characteristics of sulfuric acid condensation on the cylinder liner of a large two–stroke marine engine. The liner is directly exposed to the cylin-der gas (i.e. no protective lube oil film) and is represented by a constant temperature over the full stroke. F...

  11. Prehydrolysis of aspen wood with water and with dilute aqueous sulfuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward L. Springer; John F. Harris

    1982-01-01

    Water prehydrolysis of aspen wood was compared with 0.40% sulfuric acid prehydrolysis at a reaction temperature of 170°C. Acid prehydrolysis gave much higher yields of total anhydroxylose units in the prehydrolyzate and removed significantly less anhydroglucose from the wood than did the water treatment. At maximum yields of total anhydroxylose units in the...

  12. Sulfur dioxide initiates global climate change in four ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change, prior to the 20th century, appears to have been initiated primarily by major changes in volcanic activity. Sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) is the most voluminous chemically active gas emitted by volcanoes and is readily oxidized to sulfuric acid normally within weeks. But trace amounts of SO 2 exert significant influence on climate. All major historic volcanic eruptions have formed sulfuric acid aerosols in the lower stratosphere that cooled the earth's surface ∼ 0.5 o C for typically three years. While such events are currently happening once every 80 years, there are times in geologic history when they occurred every few to a dozen years. These were times when the earth was cooled incrementally into major ice ages. There have also been two dozen times during the past 46,000 years when major volcanic eruptions occurred every year or two or even several times per year for decades. Each of these times was contemporaneous with very rapid global warming. Large volumes of SO 2 erupted frequently appear to overdrive the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere resulting in very rapid warming. Such warming and associated acid rain becomes extreme when millions of cubic kilometers of basalt are erupted in much less than one million years. These are the times of the greatest mass extinctions. When major volcanic eruptions do not occur for decades to hundreds of years, the atmosphere can oxidize all pollutants, leading to a very thin atmosphere, global cooling and decadal drought. Prior to the 20th century, increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) followed increases in temperature initiated by changes in SO 2 . By 1962, man burning fossil fuels was adding SO 2 to the atmosphere at a rate equivalent to one 'large' volcanic eruption each 1.7 years. Global temperatures increased slowly from 1890 to 1950 as anthropogenic sulfur increased slowly. Global temperatures increased more rapidly after 1950 as the rate of anthropogenic sulfur emissions increased. By

  13. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Nam Long Doan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes.

  14. Sulfur Oxides Risk and Exposure Assessment Planning ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In conducting risk/exposure assessments for the Sulfur Oxides NAAQS review, EPA will first develop a draft Scope and Methods Plan which will describe the proposed scope of the quantitative and qualitative analyses to be performed and the tools/methods that may be employed Provide opportunity for CASAC feedback on EPA's plans for the risk and exposure assessment for the Sulfur Oxides NAAQS review

  15. Plutonium oxides analysis. Sulfur potentiometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Total sulfur determination (sulfur, sulfates, sulfides ...) in plutonium oxides, suitable for sulfate ion content between 0.003 percent to 0.2 percent, by dissolution in nitric hydrofluoric acid, nitrates elimination, addition of hydrochloric acid and reduction in hydrogen sulfide which is carried by an inert gas and neutralized by sodium hydroxide. Sodium sulfide is titrated with mercuric acetate by constant intensity potentiometry [fr

  16. Ocular Effects of Sulfur Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To review current knowledge about ocular effects of sulfur mustard (SM and the associated histopathologic findings and clinical manifestationsMethods: Literature review of medical articles (human and animal studies was accomplished using PubMed, Scopus and ISI databases. A total of 274 relevant articles in English were retrieved and reviewed thoroughly.Results: Eyes are the most sensitive organs to local toxic effects of mustard gas. Ocular injuries are mediated through different toxic mechanisms including: biochemical damages, biomolecular and gene expression modification, induction of immunologic and inflammatory reactions, disturbing ultrastructural architecture of the cornea, and long-lasting corneal denervation. The resulting ocular injuries can roughly be categorized into acute or chronic complications. Most of the patients recover from acute injuries, but a minority of victims will suffer from chronic ocular complications. Mustard gas keratopathy (MGK is a devastating late complication of SM intoxication that proceeds from limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD.Conclusion: SM induces several different damaging changes in case of ocular exposure; hence leading to a broad spectrum of ocular manifestations in terms of severity, timing and form. Unfortunately, no effective strategy has been introduced yet to inhibit or restore these damaging changes.

  17. Serpentinization of abyssal peridotites from the MARK area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Sulfur geochemistry and reaction modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2003-01-01

    The opaque mineralogy and the contents and isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinized peridotites from the MARK (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Kane Fracture Zone) area were examined to understand the conditions of serpentinization and evaluate this process as a sink for seawater sulfur. The serpentinites contain a sulfur-rich secondary mineral assemblage and have high sulfur contents (up to 1 wt.%) and elevated ??34Ssulfide (3.7 to 12.7???). Geochemical reaction modeling indicates that seawater-peridotite interaction at 300 to 400??C alone cannot account for both the high sulfur contents and high ??34Ssulfide. These require a multistage reaction with leaching of sulfide from subjacent gabbro during higher temperature (???400??C) reactions with seawater and subsequent deposition of sulfide during serpentinization of peridotite at ???300??C. Serpentinization produces highly reducing conditions and significant amounts of H2 and results in the partial reduction of seawater carbonate to methane. The latter is documented by formation of carbonate veins enriched in 13C (up to 4.5???) at temperatures above 250??C. Although different processes produce variable sulfur isotope effects in other oceanic serpentinites, sulfur is consistently added to abyssal peridotites during serpentinization. Data for serpentinites drilled and dredged from oceanic crust and from ophiolites indicate that oceanic peridotites are a sink for up to 0.4 to 6.0 ?? 1012 g seawater S yr-1. This is comparable to sulfur exchange that occurs in hydrothermal systems in mafic oceanic crust at midocean ridges and on ridge flanks and amounts to 2 to 30% of the riverine sulfate source and sedimentary sulfide sink in the oceans. The high concentrations and modified isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinites could be important for mantle metasomatism during subduction of crust generated at slow spreading rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Geochemistry of sulfur isotopes in basaltic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubberten, H.W.; Puchelt, H.

    1980-01-01

    Sulfur isotope ratios in oceanic basalts from three different localities (Bermuda Triangle, East Pacific Rise, and Galapagos Spreading Centre and in terrestrial basalts from Saudi Arabia have been analyzed by mass spectroscopy. In order to recognize and to interpret, if possible, secondary isotopic changes of basalts, various sulfurous materials occurring together with basalts gypsum, deep thermal pyrites) have been investigated too. By mechanochemical sample preparation it was possible to determine various sulfur carriers separately. Sulfides occurring as droplets in basalts showed values of -0.4 to -0.8 0 / 00 in materials from Bermuda Triangle, Galapagos Spreading Centre, and Saudi Arabia. The values are in agreement with those suggested for primary sulfur in the earth mantle. The basalts of East Pacific Rise show a significant 34 S enrichment with a mean value of +3 0 / 00 , which may be caused by processes in the course of magmatic differentiation. Because of secondary effects sulfate sulfur, including secondary pyrite, varies considerably in its sulfur isotope ratio (delta values between -12 to +22 0 / 00 ). Samples without recognizable secondary effects have delta values of about +1.5 0 / 00 , which can be supposed for primary sulfates. Mechanically separated pyrites from deep thermal superimposed basalts show slightly negative 34 S values

  19. Microphysical simulations of sulfur burdens from stratospheric sulfur geoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. English

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent microphysical studies suggest that geoengineering by continuous stratospheric injection of SO2 gas may be limited by the growth of the aerosols. We study the efficacy of SO2, H2SO4 and aerosol injections on aerosol mass and optical depth using a three-dimensional general circulation model with sulfur chemistry and sectional aerosol microphysics (WACCM/CARMA. We find increasing injection rates of SO2 in a narrow band around the equator to have limited efficacy while broadening the injecting zone as well as injecting particles instead of SO2 gas increases the sulfate burden for a given injection rate, in agreement with previous work. We find that injecting H2SO4 gas instead of SO2 does not discernibly alter sulfate size or mass, in contrast with a previous study using a plume model with a microphysical model. However, the physics and chemistry in aircraft plumes, which are smaller than climate model grid cells, need to be more carefully considered. We also find significant perturbations to tropospheric aerosol for all injections studied, particularly in the upper troposphere and near the poles, where sulfate burden increases by up to 100 times. This enhanced burden could have implications for tropospheric radiative forcing and chemistry. These results highlight the need to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions rather than attempt to cool the planet through geoengineering, and to further study geoengineering before it can be seriously considered as a climate intervention option.

  20. Room Temperature Sulfur Battery Cathode Design and Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rachel

    As the population grows and energy demand increases, climate change threatens causing energy storage research to focus on fulfilling the requirements of two major energy sectors with next generation batteries: (1) portable energy and (2) stationary storage.1 Where portable energy can decrease transportation-related harmful emissions and enable advanced next-generation technologies,1 and stationary storage can facilitate widespread deployment of renewable energy sources, alleviating the demand on fossil fuels and lowering emissions. Portable energy can enable zero-emission transportation and can deploy portable power in advanced electronics across fields including medical and defense. Currently fully battery powered cars are limited in driving distance, which is dictated by the energy density and weight of the state-of-the-art Li-ion battery, and similarly advancement of portable electronics is significantly hindered by heavy batteries with short charge lives. In attempt to enable advanced portable energy, significant research is aiming to improve the conventional Li-ion batteries and explore beyond Li-ion battery chemistries with the primary goal of demonstrating higher energy density to enable lighter weight cells with longer battery life. Further, with the inherent intermittency challenges of our most prominent renewable energy sources, wind and solar, discovery of batteries capable of cost effectively and reliably balancing the generation of the renewable energy sources with the real-time energy demand is required for grid scale viability. Stationary storage will provide load leveling to renewable resources by storing excess energy at peak generation and delivering stored excess during periods of lower generation. This application demands highly abundant, low-cost active materials and long-term cycle stability, since infrastructure costs (combined with the renewable) must compete with burning natural gas. Development of a battery with these characteristics will require exploration of chemistries beyond the Li-ion battery for a system consisting of low cost active materials and promising device performance. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  1. The effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase transformation from the mixed CuO-Bi2O3 system to Cu3BiS3 during the sulfurization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Jin, Xin; Yuan, Chenchen; Jiang, Guoshun; Liu, Weifeng; Zhu, Changfei

    2016-12-01

    The ternary semiconductor Cu3BiS3, as a promising light-absorber material for thin film solar cells, was creatively synthesized by sulfurizing the mixed metal oxides precursor film deposited by spin-coating chemical solution method. Two kinds of sulfurization techniques were introduced to study the effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase formation for the pure Cu3BiS3. It was found that Cu-poor S-rich phases such as Cu3Bi3S7 and Cu4Bi4S9 were easily generated at high S concentration and then can transform to Cu3BiS3 phase by a simple desulphurization process, which means the sulfur concentration had a significant influence on the formation of Cu3BiS3 during the sulfurization process. The probable transformation mechanism from the mixed metal oxides to the pure Cu3BiS3 phase during the sulfurization process was studied in detail through the XRD analysis and thermodynamic calculation. In addition, the electrical properties were characterized by Hall measurement and the effects of sulfurization temperature on the phase transformation, morphology and optical band gap of the absorber layer were also studied in detail.

  2. Acidithiobacillus caldus sulfur oxidation model based on transcriptome analysis between the wild type and sulfur oxygenase reductase defective mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxu Chen

    Full Text Available Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus is widely used in bio-leaching. It gains energy and electrons from oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs for carbon dioxide fixation and growth. Genomic analyses suggest that its sulfur oxidation system involves a truncated sulfur oxidation (Sox system (omitting SoxCD, non-Sox sulfur oxidation system similar to the sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans, and sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR. The complexity of the sulfur oxidation system of A. caldus generates a big obstacle on the research of its sulfur oxidation mechanism. However, the development of genetic manipulation method for A. caldus in recent years provides powerful tools for constructing genetic mutants to study the sulfur oxidation system.An A. caldus mutant lacking the sulfur oxygenase reductase gene (sor was created and its growth abilities were measured in media using elemental sulfur (S(0 and tetrathionate (K(2S(4O(6 as the substrates, respectively. Then, comparative transcriptome analysis (microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR of the wild type and the Δsor mutant in S(0 and K(2S(4O(6 media were employed to detect the differentially expressed genes involved in sulfur oxidation. SOR was concluded to oxidize the cytoplasmic elemental sulfur, but could not couple the sulfur oxidation with the electron transfer chain or substrate-level phosphorylation. Other elemental sulfur oxidation pathways including sulfur diooxygenase (SDO and heterodisulfide reductase (HDR, the truncated Sox pathway, and the S(4I pathway for hydrolysis of tetrathionate and oxidation of thiosulfate in A. caldus are proposed according to expression patterns of sulfur oxidation genes and growth abilities of the wild type and the mutant in different substrates media.An integrated sulfur oxidation model with various sulfur oxidation pathways of A. caldus is proposed and the features of this model are summarized.

  3. Acidithiobacillus caldus sulfur oxidation model based on transcriptome analysis between the wild type and sulfur oxygenase reductase defective mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linxu; Ren, Yilin; Lin, Jianqun; Liu, Xiangmei; Pang, Xin; Lin, Jianqiang

    2012-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus caldus (A. caldus) is widely used in bio-leaching. It gains energy and electrons from oxidation of elemental sulfur and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds (RISCs) for carbon dioxide fixation and growth. Genomic analyses suggest that its sulfur oxidation system involves a truncated sulfur oxidation (Sox) system (omitting SoxCD), non-Sox sulfur oxidation system similar to the sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans, and sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR). The complexity of the sulfur oxidation system of A. caldus generates a big obstacle on the research of its sulfur oxidation mechanism. However, the development of genetic manipulation method for A. caldus in recent years provides powerful tools for constructing genetic mutants to study the sulfur oxidation system. An A. caldus mutant lacking the sulfur oxygenase reductase gene (sor) was created and its growth abilities were measured in media using elemental sulfur (S(0)) and tetrathionate (K(2)S(4)O(6)) as the substrates, respectively. Then, comparative transcriptome analysis (microarrays and real-time quantitative PCR) of the wild type and the Δsor mutant in S(0) and K(2)S(4)O(6) media were employed to detect the differentially expressed genes involved in sulfur oxidation. SOR was concluded to oxidize the cytoplasmic elemental sulfur, but could not couple the sulfur oxidation with the electron transfer chain or substrate-level phosphorylation. Other elemental sulfur oxidation pathways including sulfur diooxygenase (SDO) and heterodisulfide reductase (HDR), the truncated Sox pathway, and the S(4)I pathway for hydrolysis of tetrathionate and oxidation of thiosulfate in A. caldus are proposed according to expression patterns of sulfur oxidation genes and growth abilities of the wild type and the mutant in different substrates media. An integrated sulfur oxidation model with various sulfur oxidation pathways of A. caldus is proposed and the features of this model are summarized.

  4. Magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.; Park, H.; Podila, R.; Wadehra, A.; Ayala, P.; Oliveira, L.; He, J.; Zakhidov, A.A.; Howard, A.; Wilkins, J.; Rao, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    While studying magnetism of d- and f-electron systems has been consistently an active research area in physics, chemistry, and biology, there is an increasing interest in the novel magnetism of p-electron systems, especially in graphene and graphene-derived nanostructures. Bulk graphite is diamagnetic in nature, however, graphene is known to exhibit either a paramagnetic response or weak ferromagnetic ordering. Although many groups have attributed this magnetism in graphene to defects or unintentional magnetic impurities, there is a lack of compelling evidence to pinpoint its origin. To resolve this issue, we systematically studied the influence of entropically necessary intrinsic defects (e.g., vacancies, edges) and extrinsic dopants (e.g., S-dopants) on the magnetic properties of graphene. We found that the saturation magnetization of graphene decreased upon sulfur doping suggesting that S-dopants demagnetize vacancies and edges. Our density functional theory calculations provide evidence for: (i) intrinsic defect demagnetization by the formation of covalent bonds between S-dopant and edges/vacancies concurring with the experimental results, and (ii) a net magnetization from only zig-zag edges, suggesting that the possible contradictory results on graphene magnetism in the literature could stem from different defect-types. Interestingly, we observed peculiar local maxima in the temperature dependent magnetizations that suggest the coexistence of different magnetic phases within the same graphene samples. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of pristine and S-doped graphene were investigated. • Pristine graphene with intrinsic defects exhibits a non-zero magnetic moment. • The addition of S-dopants was found to quench the magnetic ordering. • DFT calculations confirmed that magnetization in graphene arises from defects. • DFT calculations show S-dopants quench local magnetic moment of defect structures.

  5. Magnetic properties of sulfur-doped graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Clemson Nanomaterial Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Park, H. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Podila, R., E-mail: rpodila@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Clemson Nanomaterial Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Wadehra, A. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Ayala, P. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Oliveira, L.; He, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Zakhidov, A.A.; Howard, A. [Alan G. MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Wilkins, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Rao, A.M., E-mail: arao@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Clemson Nanomaterial Center, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); COMSET, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    While studying magnetism of d- and f-electron systems has been consistently an active research area in physics, chemistry, and biology, there is an increasing interest in the novel magnetism of p-electron systems, especially in graphene and graphene-derived nanostructures. Bulk graphite is diamagnetic in nature, however, graphene is known to exhibit either a paramagnetic response or weak ferromagnetic ordering. Although many groups have attributed this magnetism in graphene to defects or unintentional magnetic impurities, there is a lack of compelling evidence to pinpoint its origin. To resolve this issue, we systematically studied the influence of entropically necessary intrinsic defects (e.g., vacancies, edges) and extrinsic dopants (e.g., S-dopants) on the magnetic properties of graphene. We found that the saturation magnetization of graphene decreased upon sulfur doping suggesting that S-dopants demagnetize vacancies and edges. Our density functional theory calculations provide evidence for: (i) intrinsic defect demagnetization by the formation of covalent bonds between S-dopant and edges/vacancies concurring with the experimental results, and (ii) a net magnetization from only zig-zag edges, suggesting that the possible contradictory results on graphene magnetism in the literature could stem from different defect-types. Interestingly, we observed peculiar local maxima in the temperature dependent magnetizations that suggest the coexistence of different magnetic phases within the same graphene samples. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of pristine and S-doped graphene were investigated. • Pristine graphene with intrinsic defects exhibits a non-zero magnetic moment. • The addition of S-dopants was found to quench the magnetic ordering. • DFT calculations confirmed that magnetization in graphene arises from defects. • DFT calculations show S-dopants quench local magnetic moment of defect structures.

  6. Vulcanization Kinetics of Natural Rubber Based On Free Sulfur Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Hasan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The determination of free sulfur in the rubber vulcanizates provided significant representation of vulcanization reaction. In this research, the effects of vulcanization temperature, the mixing method of carbon black into rubber, the ingredients mixing sequence and the type of carbon black were studied on masticated and milled natural rubber in which the reaction was observed by un-reacted sulfur determination. The results showed that higher vulcanization temperature provided faster vulcanization reaction and greater reaction rate constant. Similarly, the mixing sequence of ingredient and carbon black into rubber influenced the rate of vulcanization reaction. The subsequent ingredients mixing sequence, in this case, resulted in higher vulcanization rate compared to that of the simultaneous one. However, the mixing method of carbon black into rubber brought small effect on the rate of vulcanization reaction. The type of carbon black applied was observed to influence the reaction rate of vulcanization. Smaller particle sizes of carbon black gave larger reaction rate constant. In this case, the type of carbon black N 330 gave faster vulcanization rate than that of N 660.

  7. Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of sunflower stalks for sugar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Encarnación; Romero, Inmaculada; Moya, Manuel; Cara, Cristóbal; Vidal, Juan D; Castro, Eulogio

    2013-07-01

    In this work the pretreatment of sunflower stalks by dilute sulfuric acid is studied. Pretreatment temperature and the concentration of acid solution were selected as operation variables and modified according to a central rotatable composite experimental design. Based on previous studies pretreatment time was kept constant (5 min) while the variation range for temperature and acid concentration was centered at 175°C and 1.25% (w/v) respectively. Following pretreatment the insoluble solids were separated by filtration and further submitted to enzymatic hydrolysis, while liquid fractions were analyzed for sugars and inhibitors. Response surface methodology was applied to analyze results based on the combined severity of pretreatment experiments. Optimized results show that up to 33 g of glucose and xylose per 100g raw material (65% of the glucose and xylose present in the raw material) may be available for fermentation after pretreatment at 167°C and 1.3% sulfuric acid concentration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substrat...

  9. Amelioration of Adverse Effects of Salt Stress on Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cultivars by Exogenous Application of Sulfur at Seedling Stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffat, A.; Ahmad, M. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur is an important plant nutrient involved in seed germination and seedling establishment. It also plays an important role in response of plants to tolerate abiotic stresses such as salinity. A study was conducted to assess the role of sulfur on salinity tolerance of maize (Zea mays L.) at seed germination stage. Six varieties (Sadaf, MMRI, Pearl Basic, Agaitti 2003, Saiwal 2002 and Pak Afgoi 2003) and two hybrids (Yusafwala Hybrid and Hybrid 1898) of maize were used to assess the modulation of salt stress by exogenously applied sulfur. Three NaCl (25, 50 and 75 mM) and five potassium sulfate (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mM) levels were applied to plants as sand amendment at sowing time along with a control. The experiment was laid down in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replicates. The data for various germination attributes were recorded. The results revealed that sulfur application significantly modulated all germination parameters i-e. germination percentage germination index, coefficient of velocity of emergence, mean emergence time, vigour index, germination energy, germination speed, mean daily germination and germination value and thus reduced the toxic effect of salinity. It was found that sulfur at 60 and 80 mM had more pronounced effect in enhancing seed germination. Application of sulfur at 60 to 80 mM improved all germination parameters and reduced time needed for 50 percent seed to germinate. The phylogenetic tree constructed by NTSysPC clearly clustered all genotypes the two distinct clusters. The tolerant cluster mainly contained 4 varieties (Sadaf, MMRI, Pearl Basic and Agati 2003) while the sensitive cluster included two varieties (Sahiwal 2002, Pak Afgoi 2003) and two hybrids (Hybrid 1898 and Yusaf wala hybrid). Based on the distance matrixes generated by software, Agati 2003 proved to be the most tolerant genotype. In comparison, a maize variety (Pak Afgoi-2003) and a Hybrid-1898 showed the least improvement by exogenously applied

  10. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  11. Capital cost: high and low sulfur coal plants-1200 MWe. [High sulfur coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This Commercial Electric Power Cost Study for 1200 MWe (Nominal) high and low sulfur coal plants consists of three volumes. The high sulfur coal plant is described in Volumes I and II, while Volume III describes the low sulfur coal plant. The design basis and cost estimate for the 1232 MWe high sulfur coal plant is presented in Volume I, and the drawings, equipment list and site description are contained in Volume II. The reference design includes a lime flue gas desulfurization system. A regenerative sulfur dioxide removal system using magnesium oxide is also presented as an alternate in Section 7 Volume II. The design basis, drawings and summary cost estimate for a 1243 MWe low sulfur coal plant are presented in Volume III. This information was developed by redesigning the high sulfur coal plant for burning low sulfur sub-bituminous coal. These coal plants utilize a mechanical draft (wet) cooling tower system for condenser heat removal. Costs of alternate cooling systems are provided in Report No. 7 in this series of studies of costs of commercial electrical power plants.

  12. Genomic Insights into the Sulfur Metabolism of Phototrophic Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Green sulfur bacteria (GSB) utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, ferrous iron, and hydrogen for anaerobic photoautotrophic growth. Genome sequence data is currently available for 12 strains of GSB. We present here a genome-based survey of the distribution...

  13. Infiltrating sulfur into a highly porous carbon sphere as cathode material for lithium–sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kim, Dul-Sun [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won [Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwon-Koo, E-mail: kkcho66@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon, E-mail: jhahn@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Research Institute for Green Energy Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-dong, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A highly porous carbon (HPC) with regular spherical morphology was synthesized. • Sulfur/HPC composites were prepared by melt–diffusion method. • Sulfur/HPC composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life. - Abstract: Sulfur composite material with a highly porous carbon sphere as the conducting container was prepared. The highly porous carbon sphere was easily synthesized with resorcinol–formaldehyde precursor as the carbon source. The morphology of the carbon was observed with field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, which showed a well-defined spherical shape. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis indicated that it possesses a high specific surface area of 1563 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a total pore volume of 2.66 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} with a bimodal pore size distribution, which allow high sulfur loading and easy transportation of lithium ions. Sulfur carbon composites with varied sulfur contents were prepared by melt–diffusion method and lithium sulfur cells with the sulfur composites showed improved cyclablity and long-term cycle life.

  14. Functional Groups and Sulfur K-Edge XANES Spectra : Divalent Sulfur and Disulfides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijovilovich, A.E.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur K-edge XANES was measured for two divalent sulfurs (dibenzyl and benzyl phenyl) and two disulfides (dibenzyl and diphenyl). The absorption spectra could be assigned using density functional theory with the "half core hole" approximation for the core hole including relaxation of selected

  15. Quantification of Discrete Oxide and Sulfur Layers on Sulfur-Passivated InAs by XPS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrovykh, D. Y; Sullivan, J. M; Whitman, L. J

    2005-01-01

    .... The S-passivated InAs(001) surface can be modeled as a sulfur-indium-arsenic layer-cake structure, such that characterization requires quantification of both arsenic oxide and sulfur layers that are at most a few monolayers thick...

  16. Coenzyme F420-Dependent Sulfite Reductase-Enabled Sulfite Detoxification and Use of Sulfite as a Sole Sulfur Source by Methanococcus maripaludis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric F.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2008-01-01

    Coenzyme F420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr) of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, a sulfite-tolerant methanogen, was expressed with activity in Methanococcus maripaludis, a sulfite-sensitive methanogen. The recombinant organism reduced sulfite to sulfide and grew with sulfite as the sole sulfur source, indicating that Fsr is a sulfite detoxification and assimilation enzyme for methanogens and that M. maripaludis synthesizes siroheme. PMID:18378657

  17. Production of Sulfur Allotropes in Electron Irradiated Jupiter Trojans Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Eiler, John M.; Brown, Michael E.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Hodyss, Robert; Hand, Kevin P.; Carlson, Robert; Choukroun, Mathieu

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate sulfur chemistry in laboratory analogs of Jupiter Trojans and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). Electron irradiation experiments of CH3OH-NH3-H2O and H2S-CH3OH-NH3-H2O ices were conducted to better understand the chemical differences between primordial planetesimals inside and outside the sublimation line of H2S. The main goal of this work is to test the chemical plausibility of the hypothesis correlating the color bimodality in Jupiter Trojans with sulfur chemistry in the incipient solar system. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of the irradiated mixtures allows the detection of small sulfur allotropes (S3 and S4) after the irradiation of H2S containing ice mixtures. These small, red polymers are metastable and could polymerize further under thermal processing and irradiation, producing larger sulfur polymers (mainly S8) that are spectroscopically neutral at wavelengths above 500 nm. This transformation may affect the spectral reflectance of Jupiter Trojans in a different way compared to KBOs, thereby providing a useful framework for possibly differentiating and determining the formation and history of small bodies. Along with allotropes, we report the production of organo-sulfur molecules. Sulfur molecules produced in our experiment have been recently detected by Rosetta in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The very weak absorption of sulfur polymers in the infrared range hampers their identification on Trojans and KBOs, but these allotropes strongly absorb light at UV and Visible wavelengths. This suggests that high signal-to-noise ratio UV-Vis spectra of these objects could provide new constraints on their presence.

  18. Mesoporous binary metal oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J., E-mail: praveenjella10@gmail.com; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Singh, Beer; Gopi, T.; Krishna, R.

    2016-04-15

    Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. They were synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis of X rays, X ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption data indicated the presence of pores with diameter ranging from 10 to 70 nm in the binary metal oxide nanocomposites and these materials exhibited surface area values in the range of 76–134 m{sup 2}/g. These binary metal oxide nanocomposites demonstrated large decontamination efficiencies against sulfur mustard when compared to their single component metal oxide nanoparticles. The binary metal oxide nanocomposites effectively decontaminated sulfur mustard into relatively non toxic products such as chloro ethyl vinyl sulfide, divinyl sulfide, 1,4-oxathiane, etc. The promising decontamination properties of binary metal oxide nanocomposites against sulfur mustard were attributed to the basic sites, Lewis acid sites, and the presence of these sites was confirmed by CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. - Highlights: • Binary metal oxide nanocomposites were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • They were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. • They decontaminated sulfur mustard into non toxic products. • MnO{sub 2}–ZnO and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO nanocomposites showed greater decontamination efficiency.

  19. Mesoporous binary metal oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and decontamination of sulfur mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Singh, Beer; Gopi, T.; Krishna, R.

    2016-01-01

    Mesoporous MnO 2 –ZnO, Fe 2 O 3 –ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO 2 –ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. They were synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis of X rays, X ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption data indicated the presence of pores with diameter ranging from 10 to 70 nm in the binary metal oxide nanocomposites and these materials exhibited surface area values in the range of 76–134 m 2 /g. These binary metal oxide nanocomposites demonstrated large decontamination efficiencies against sulfur mustard when compared to their single component metal oxide nanoparticles. The binary metal oxide nanocomposites effectively decontaminated sulfur mustard into relatively non toxic products such as chloro ethyl vinyl sulfide, divinyl sulfide, 1,4-oxathiane, etc. The promising decontamination properties of binary metal oxide nanocomposites against sulfur mustard were attributed to the basic sites, Lewis acid sites, and the presence of these sites was confirmed by CO 2 and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous MnO 2 –ZnO, Fe 2 O 3 –ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO 2 –ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. - Highlights: • Binary metal oxide nanocomposites were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • They were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. • They decontaminated sulfur mustard into non toxic products. • MnO 2 –ZnO and CeO 2 –ZnO nanocomposites showed greater decontamination efficiency.

  20. Sulfur removal from fuel using zeolites/polyimide mixed matrix membrane adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ligang; Wang, Andong; Dong, Meimei; Zhang, Yuzhong; He, Benqiao; Li, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Membrane adsorption process is proposed for sulfur removal. Three-dimensional network structure is key to fulfill adsorption function of MMMs, which adsorption/desorption behavior is markedly related with binding force with sulfur molecules. Highlights: ► Membrane adsorption process is proposed for sulfur removal. ► Three-dimensional network structure of MMMs is key to fulfill adsorption function. ► Adsorption/desorption behavior is markedly related with binding force. - Abstract: A novel membrane adsorption process was proposed for the sulfur removal from fuels. The mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) adsorbents composed of polyimide (PI) and various Y zeolites were prepared. By the detailed characterization of FT-IR, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of MMMs adsorbents, combining the adsorption and desorption behavior research, the process–structure–function relationship was discussed. Field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images show that the functional particles are incorporated into the three-dimensional network structure. MMMs adsorbents with 40% of zeolites content possess better physical properties, which was confirmed by mechanical strength and thermo stability analysis. Influence factors including post-treatment, content of incorporated zeolites, adsorption time, temperature, initial sulfur concentration as well as sulfur species on the adsorption performance of MMMs adsorbents have been evaluated. At 4 wt.% zeolites content, adsorption capacity for NaY/PI, AgY/PI and CeY/PI MMMs adsorbents come to 2.0, 7.5 and 7.9 mg S/g, respectively. And the regeneration results suggest that the corresponding spent membranes can recover about 98%, 90% and 70% of the desulfurization capacity, respectively. The distinct adsorption and desorption behavior of MMMs adsorbents with various functional zeolites was markedly related with their various binding force and binding mode with sulfur compounds.