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Sample records for temperature structural applications

  1. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  2. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi 2 -based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi 2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi 2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  3. A temperature-dependent theory for HeII: Application to the liquid structure factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1981-08-01

    A temperature-dependent theory is presented for HeII, which is based on both a gauge-theoretic formulation as well as a mean-field (Hartree) approach. A simple model calculation is then performed within this framework for the liquid structure factor of the system. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for the low-momentum-transfer and low-temperature limits, which seem to conform with the available experimental data. Further, the curvature of the structure factor is predicted, under these circumstances, to be only mildly dependent on temperature. Throughout, we compare and contrast with other theoretical attempts, including Feynman's. (author)

  4. Nonlinear structural analysis methods and their application to elevated temperature design: A US perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhalla, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Technological advances over the last two decades have been assimilated into the routine design of Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) structural components operating at elevated temperatures. The mature elevated temperature design technology is based upon: (a) an extensive material data base, (b) recent advances in nonlinear computational methods, and (c) conservative design criteria based upon past successful and reliable operating experiences with petrochemical and nonnuclear power plants. This survey paper provides a US perspective on the role of nonlinear analysis methods used in the design of LMR plants. The simplified and detailed nonlinear analysis methods and the level of computational effort required to qualify structural components for safe and reliable long-term operation are discussed. The paper also illustrates how a detailed nonlinear analysis can be used to resolve technical licensing issues, to understand complex nonlinear structural behavior, to identify predominant failure modes, and to guide future experimental programs

  5. Application of CCG Sensors to a High-Temperature Structure Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Xie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple methodology to perform a high temperature coupled thermo-mechanical test using ultra-high temperature ceramic material specimens (UHTCs, which are equipped with chemical composition gratings sensors (CCGs. The methodology also considers the presence of coupled loading within the response provided by the CCG sensors. The theoretical strain of the UHTCs specimens calculated with this technique shows a maximum relative error of 2.15% between the analytical and experimental data. To further verify the validity of the results from the tests, a Finite Element (FE model has been developed to simulate the temperature, stress and strain fields within the UHTC structure equipped with the CCG. The results show that the compressive stress exceeds the material strength at the bonding area, and this originates a failure by fracture of the supporting structure in the hot environment. The results related to the strain fields show that the relative error with the experimental data decrease with an increase of temperature. The relative error is less than 15% when the temperature is higher than 200 °C, and only 6.71% at 695 °C.

  6. Structural and dielectric characterization of sputtered Tantalum Titanium Oxide thin films for high temperature capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouahi, A., E-mail: rouahi_ahlem@yahoo.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, G2Elab, F-38000 (France); Laboratoire Matériaux Organisation et Propriétés (LMOP), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Challali, F. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériaux (LSPM)-CNRS-UPR3407, Université Paris13, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, 93430, Villetaneuse (France); Dakhlaoui, I. [Laboratoire Matériaux Organisation et Propriétés (LMOP), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Vallée, C. [CNRS, LTM, CEA-LETI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Salimy, S. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN) UMR CNRS 6502, Université de Nantes, 2, rue de la Houssinière, B.P. 32229, 44322, Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Jomni, F.; Yangui, B. [Laboratoire Matériaux Organisation et Propriétés (LMOP), Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Besland, M.P.; Goullet, A. [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel (IMN) UMR CNRS 6502, Université de Nantes, 2, rue de la Houssinière, B.P. 32229, 44322, Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Sylvestre, A. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, G2Elab, F-38000 (France)

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the dielectric properties of metal-oxide-metal capacitors based on Tantalum Titanium Oxide (TiTaO) thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on aluminum bottom electrode are investigated. The structure of the films was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The dielectric properties of TiTaO thin films were studied by complex impedance spectroscopy over a wide frequency range (10{sup -2} - to 10{sup 5} Hz) and temperatures in -50 °C to 325 °C range. The contributions of different phases, phases’ boundaries and conductivity effect were highlighted by Cole – Cole diagram (ε” versus ε’). Two relaxation processes have been identified in the electric modulus plot. A first relaxation process appears at low temperature with activation energy of 0.37 eV and it is related to the motion of Ti{sup 4+} (Skanavi’s model). A second relaxation process at high temperature is related to Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars relaxation with activation energy of 0.41 eV. - Highlights: • Titanium Tantalum Oxide thin films are grown on Aluminum substrate. • The existence of phases was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. • Conductivity effect appears in Cole-Cole plot. • At low temperatures, a relaxation phenomenon obeys to Skanavi’s model. • Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars polarization is processed at high temperatures.

  7. Temperature Effects on Mechanical Properties of Woven Thermoplastic Composites for Secondary Aircraft Structure Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of 8-H satin woven glass fabric/polyethylene sulfide (GF/PPS was investigated in this paper. Static-tensile tests were both conducted on notched and unnotched specimens at typical temperatures (ambient, 95°C and 125°C based on the glass transition temperatures (Tg of the neat resin and composite, their strength and moduli were obtained and compared. The damage patterns of failed specimens of notched and unnotched were examined with the aid of high-definition camera and stereomicroscope. The results of stress-strain relationships showed that the slight nonlinearity of the curves were observed for these two specimens, which was associated with the plastic deformation of localized resin. The damage patterns of notched and unnotched specimens at different temperatures proved that damage and plastic deformation were two simultaneous mechanisms and it was prominent in the notched. It was the overstress accommodation mechanism that led to a relative high strength rentention for the notched and a reduction of the hole sensitivity. The results obtained in this paper indicated that GF/PPS can be used as secondary aircraft structures at elevated temperatures higher than its Tg.

  8. High temperature structural integrity evaluation method and application studies by ASME-NH for the next generation reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Jae Han

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to establish the high temperature structural integrity evaluating procedures for the next generation reactors, which are to be operated at over 500 .deg. C and for 60 years. To do this, comparison studies of the high temperature structural design codes and assessment procedures such as the ASME-NH (USA), RCC-MR (France), DDS (Japan), and R5 (UK) are carried out in view of the accumulated inelastic strain and the creep-fatigue damage evaluations. Also the application procedures of the ASME-NH rules with the actual thermal and structural analysis results are described in detail. To overcome the complexity and the engineering costs arising from a real application of the ASME-NH rules by hand, all the procedures established in this study such as the time-dependent primary stress limits, total accumulated creep ratcheting strain limits, and the creep-fatigue damage limits are computerized and implemented into the SIE ASME-NH program. Using this program, the selected high temperature structures subjected to two cycle types are evaluated and the parametric studies for the effects of the time step size, primary load, number of cycles, normal temperature for the creep damage evaluations and the effects of the load history on the creep ratcheting strain calculations are investigated

  9. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  10. Mechanically activated combustion synthesis of molybdenum borosilicides for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, Alan A.; Shafirovich, Evgeny, E-mail: eshafirovich2@utep.edu

    2016-06-15

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. Materials based on Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (called T{sub 2}) phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. In the present paper, T{sub 2} phase based materials have been obtained using mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited a self-sustained propagation of a spinning combustion wave, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. The “chemical oven” technique has been successfully employed to fabricate denser and stronger Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiC, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2}, and Mo–Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–Mo{sub 3}Si materials. Among them, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} material exhibits the best oxidation resistance at temperatures up to 1500 °C. - Highlights: • Mechanical activation has enabled combustion synthesis of Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} based materials. • For the first time, the fabrication of Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} material has been reported. • Among the obtained materials, Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}–TiB{sub 2} exhibits the best oxidation resistance.

  11. Grain Oriented Perovskite Layer Structure Ceramics for High-Temperature Piezoelectric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuierer, Paul Anton

    The perovskite layer structure (PLS) compounds have the general formula (A^{2+}) _2(B^{5+})_2 O_7, or (A^ {3+})_2(B^{4+ })_2O_7, and crystallize in a very anisotropic layered structure consisting of parallel slabs made up of perovskite units. Several of these compounds possess the highest Curie temperatures (T_{rm c} ) of any known ferroelectrics. Two examples are Sr_2Nb_2O _7 with T_{rm c} of 1342^circC, and La_2Ti_2O _7 with T_{rm c} of 1500^circC. This thesis is an investigation of PLS ceramics and their feasibility as a high temperature transducer material. Piezoelectricity in single crystals has been measured, but the containerless float zone apparatus necessary to grow high quality crystals of these refractory compounds is expensive and limited to a small number of research groups. Previous attempts to pole polycrystalline Sr_2Nb _2O_7 have failed, and to this point piezoelectricity has been absent. The initiative taken in this research was to investigate PLS ceramics by way of composition and processing schemes such that polycrystalline bodies could be electrically poled. The ultimate objective then was to demonstrate piezoelectricity in PLS ceramics, especially at high temperatures. Donor-doping of both La_2Ti _2O_7 and Sr_2Nb_2O _7 was found to increase volume resistivities at elevated temperatures, an important parameter to consider during the poling process. Sr_2Ta _2O_7 (T _{rm c} = -107 ^circC) was used to make solid solution compositions with moderately high Curie temperatures, of about 850^circC, and lower coercive fields. A hot-forging technique was employed to produce ceramics with high density (>99% of theoretical) and high degree of grain orientation (>90%). Texturing was characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy. Considerable anisotropy was observed in physical and electrical properties, including thermal expansion, resistivity, dielectric constant, and polarization. The direction perpendicular to the forging axis proved to be the

  12. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to improve the strength and fracture toughness combination of P/M 2124 Al alloys in accordance with NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Two (2) P/M compositions based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.12 and 0.60 wt. pct. Zr were selected for investigation. The rapid solidification rates produced by atomization were observed to prohibit the precipitation of coarse, primary Al3Zr in both alloys. A major portion of the Zr precipitated as finely distributed, coherent Al3Zr phases during vacuum preheating and solution heat treatment. The proper balance between Cu and Mg contents eliminated undissolved, soluble constituents such as Al2CuMg and Al2Cu during atomization. The resultant extruded microstructures produced a unique combination of strength and fracture toughness. An increase in the volume fraction of coherent Al3Zr, unlike incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 dispersoids, strengthened the P/M Al base alloy either directly by dislocation-precipitate interactions, indirectly by a retardation of recrystallization, or a combination of both mechanisms. Furthermore, coherent Al3Zr does not appear to degrade toughness to the extent that incoherent Al20Cu2Mn3 does. Consequently, the addition of 0.60 wt. pct. Zr to the base alloy, incorporated with a 774K (935 F) solution heat treatment temperature, produces an alloy which exceeds all tensile property and fracture toughness goals for damage tolerant and fatigue resistant applications in the naturally aged condition.

  13. Development of powder metallurgy Al alloys for high temperature aircraft structural applications, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    In this continuing study, the development of mechanically alloyed heat resistant aluminum alloys for aircraft were studied to develop higher strength targets and higher service temperatures. The use of higher alloy additions to MA Al-Fe-Co alloys, employment of prealloyed starting materials, and higher extrusion temperatures were investigated. While the MA Al-Fe-Co alloys exhibited good retention of strength and ductility properties at elevated temperatures and excellent stability of properties after 1000 hour exposure at elevated temperatures, a sensitivity of this system to low extrusion strain rates adversely affected the level of strength achieved. MA alloys in the Al-Li family showed excellent notched toughness and property stability after long time exposures at elevated temperatures. A loss of Li during processing and the higher extrusion temperature 482 K (900 F) resulted in low mechanical strengths. Subsequent hot and cold working of the MA Al-Li had only a mild influence on properties.

  14. Application of ESCA spectroscopy to the study of electronic structure of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagoury, G.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of high T c oxide superconductors are very sensitive to slight variation of chemical composition, ESCA spectroscopy is used for identification of YBaCuO superconductivity. Binding energy of the different electronic levels and structure of valence band are determined [fr

  15. Finite element analysis of structures at high temperatures with special application to plane steel beams and frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, A.

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis of structures at high temperatures is studied. Both geometric and material nonlinearities are taken into account. Continuum mechanics relations are used to derive general finite element equations. An alternative formulation to Total Lagrangian (TL) and Updated Lagrangian (UL) formulations named Partially updated Lagrangian (PL) formulation is presented. An isotropic small strain constitutive model using the von Mises yield criterion is derived for high temperature conditions. The model developed can be characterized as combined elastic-plastic-viscoplastic. The strain components are treated separately but plastic strains and viscoplastic (creep)strains are allowed to interact. A new formulation of the creep behaviour is given. Both primary and secondary creep are considered. As an application of the derived finite element equations and the constitutive model steel beams and frames are studied. The theory is implemented in a computer program, CAMFEM. The program operates on a command language with possibilities to store user-defined matrices on files and to create macro commands. Comparison with experimental observation shows that the present theory well describes experimentally observed phenomena. (author)

  16. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  17. Corrosion Resistant Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besman, T.M.; Cooley, K.M.; Haynes, J.A.; Lee, W.Y.; Vaubert, V.M.

    1998-12-01

    Efforts to increase efficiency of energy conversion devices have required their operation at ever higher temperatures. This will force the substitution of higher-temperature structural ceramics for lower temperature materials, largely metals. Yet, many of these ceramics will require protection from high temperature corrosion caused by combustion gases, atmospheric contaminants, or the operating medium. This paper discusses examples of the initial development of such coatings and materials for potential application in combustion, aluminum smelting, and other harsh environments.

  18. Modeling and preliminary characterization of passive, wireless temperature sensors for harsh environment applications based on periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfin Manriquez, Diego I.

    Wireless temperature sensing has attained significant attention in recent years due to the increasing need to develop reliable and affordable sensing solutions for energy conversion systems and other harsh environment applications. The development of next generation sensors for energy production processing parameters, such as temperature and pressure, can result in better performance of the system. Particularly, continuous temperature monitoring in energy conversion systems can result in enhancements such as better system integrity, less pollution and higher thermal efficiencies. However, the conditions experienced in these system components hinder the performance of current solutions due to the presence of semi-conductor materials and welded joints. Additionally, the use of wired systems can result in complex wiring networks, increasing the cost of installation, maintenance and sensor replacement. Therefore, next generation sensing solutions must be developed to overcome current challenges in systems where adverse conditions are present. This research project proposes two novel passive, wireless temperature sensor designs based on concepts of guided mode resonance filters (GMRF) and metamaterials. For the GMRF, a tri-layer structure using a metallic encasing and a circular aperture grating layer was developed to have a resonance frequency of 10 GHz. While for the metamaterial-based sensor a continuation of previous work was presented by utilizing a dielectric substrate and an array of commercially available metallic washers divided in two layers. For both designs, High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) from ANSYSRTM was employed to assess the feasibility of the sensor as well as to optimize the geometry and guide the fabrication process. A systematic approach consisting of evaluating the unit cell, then assessing the number of periods needed, and finally characterizing the response of the final sensor was followed for each case. After the modeling process was

  19. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  20. The changes of ADI structure during high temperature annealing

    OpenAIRE

    A. Krzyńska; M. Kaczorowski

    2010-01-01

    The results of structure investigations of ADI during it was annealing at elevated temperature are presented. Ductile iron austempered at temperature 325oC was then isothermally annealed 360 minutes at temperature 400, 450, 500 and 550oC. The structure investigations showed that annealing at these temperatures caused substantial structure changes and thus essential hardness decrease, which is most useful property of ADI from point of view its practical application. Degradation advance of the ...

  1. Advanced FeCrAl ODS steels for high-temperature structural applications in energy generation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimentel, G.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Technologies and means for developing biomass plant with higher energy conversion efficiencies are essential in order to implement the commitment to renewable biomass energy generation. Advanced, indirect Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT systems offer overall biomass energy conversion efficiencies of 45 % and above, compared with the 35 % efficiency of conventional biomass steam plant. However to attain this efficiency in CCGT operation it will be necessary to develop a heat exchanger capable of gas operating temperatures and pressures of around 1100 °C and 15-30 bar, respectively, for entry heating the gas turbine working fluid. ODS ferritic steels is the kind of advance material to deal with this challenge, however work to optimize the coarse grain microstructure to improve creep hoop strength needs to be done. In this sense, this paper reports the recrystallisation behaviour of PM 2000 oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy which was cold deformed after hot-rolling and extrusion. The results can be interpreted if it is assumed that anything which makes the microstructure heterogeneous, stimulates recrystallisation. In this sense, larger strain gradients lead to more refined and more isotropic grain structures. The combination of these results with finite element modeling are used to interpret the role of residual shear stresses on the development of recrystallized grain structure.

    Las tecnologías y medios para desarrollar plantas de biomasa con alta eficiencia en la conversión de energía son esenciales para asentar la biomasa como una fuente de energía renovable. Los sistemas de turbinas de gas de ciclo combinado (CCGT permiten elevar la eficiencia de las plantas de biomasa del 35 % actual al 45 %. Sin embargo, para conseguir estos niveles de eficiencia en la conversión de energía, el intercambiador de calor de la caldera debe trabajar en condiciones extremas de temperatura (por encima de 1100 °C y presión (en torno a 15

  2. High-temperature materials and structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report gives a survey of research work in the area of high-temperature materials and structural ceramics of the KFA (Juelich Nuclear Research Center). The following topics are treated: (1) For energy facilities: ODS materials for gas turbine blades and heat exchangers; assessment of the remaining life of main steam pipes, material characterization and material stress limits for First-Wall components; metallic and graphitic materials for high-temperature reactors. (2) For process engineering plants: composites for reformer tubes and cracking tubes; ceramic/ceramic joints and metal/ceramic and metal/metal joints; Composites and alloys for rolling bearing and sliding systems up to application temperatures of 1000deg C; high-temperature corrosion of metal and ceramic material; porous ceramic high-temperature filters and moulding coat-mix techniques; electrically conducting ceramic material (superconductors, fuel cells, solid electrolytes); high-temperature light sources (high-temperature chemistry); oil vapor engines with caramic components; ODS materials for components in diesel engines and vehicle gas turbines. (MM) [de

  3. Material and structural mechanical modelling and reliability of thin-walled bellows at cryogenic temperatures. Application to LHC compensation system

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Cédric; Skoczen, Blazej

    The present thesis is dedicated to the behaviour of austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures. The plastic strain induced martensitic transformation and ductile damage are taken into account in an elastic-plastic material modelling. The kinetic law of →’ transformation and the evolution laws of kinematic/isotropic mixed hardening are established. Damage issue is analysed by different ways: mesoscopic isotropic or orthotropic model and a microscopic approach. The material parameters are measured from 316L fine gauge sheet at three levels of temperature: 293 K, 77 K and 4.2 K. The model is applied to thin-walled corrugated shell, used in the LHC interconnections. The influence of the material properties on the stability is studied by a modal analysis. The reliability of the components, defined by the Weibull distribution law, is analysed from fatigue tests. The impact on reliability of geometrical imperfections and thermo-mechanical loads is also analysed.

  4. Computer Aided Multi-scale Design of SiC-Si3N4 Nanoceramic Composites for High-Temperature Structural Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikas Tomer; John Renaud

    2010-08-31

    It is estimated that by using better and improved high temperature structural materials, the power generation efficiency of the power plants can be increased by 15% resulting in significant cost savings. One such promising material system for future high-temperature structural applications in power plants is Silicon Carbide-Silicon Nitride (SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanoceramic matrix composites. The described research work focuses on multiscale simulation-based design of these SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanoceramic matrix composites. There were two primary objectives of the research: (1) Development of a multiscale simulation tool and corresponding multiscale analyses of the high-temperature creep and fracture resistance properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites at nano-, meso- and continuum length- and timescales; and (2) Development of a simulation-based robust design optimization methodology for application to the multiscale simulations to predict the range of the most suitable phase morphologies for the desired high-temperature properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. The multiscale simulation tool is based on a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), cohesive finite element method (CFEM), and continuum level modeling for characterizing time-dependent material deformation behavior. The material simulation tool is incorporated in a variable fidelity model management based design optimization framework. Material modeling includes development of an experimental verification framework. Using material models based on multiscaling, it was found using molecular simulations that clustering of the SiC particles near Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain boundaries leads to significant nanocomposite strengthening and significant rise in fracture resistance. It was found that a control of grain boundary thicknesses by dispersing non-stoichiometric carbide or nitride phases can lead to reduction in strength however significant rise in fracture strength. The

  5. Compensation systems for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, Balzej T

    2004-01-01

    The book is dedicated to the behaviour of ductile materials at cryogenic temperatures, structural stability issues and reliability oriented parametric optimisation of compensation systems containing the corrugated bellows. The problems of local and global stability of systems containing bellows, coupling between the low-cycle fatigue and stability as well as evolution of plastic strain fields, micro-damage and strain induced phase transformation in the corrugated shells at cryogenic temperatures are presented. As a special feature reliability oriented optimum design of compensation systems under strength, stability, fatigue and geometrical constraints is discussed. The relevant applications in the particle accelerators and cryogenic transfer lines are shown.

  6. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which

  7. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  8. Structural behavior of reinforced concrete structures at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, N.; Yamazaki, M.; Mochida, T.; Mutoh, A.; Miyashita, T.; Ueda, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Sugiyama, K.; Hirakawa, K.; Kikuchi, R.; Hiramoto, M.; Saito, K.

    1995-01-01

    To establish a method to predict the behavior of reinforced concrete structures subjected simultaneously to high temperatures and external loads, this paper presents the results obtained in several series of tests carried out recently in Japan. This paper reports on the material properties of concrete and steel bars under high temperatures. It also considers the heat transfer properties of thick concrete walls under transient high temperatures, and the structural behavior of reinforced concrete beams subjected to high temperatures. In the tests, data up to 800 C were obtained for use in developing a computational method to estimate the non-linear behavior of reinforced concrete structures exposed to high temperatures. (orig.)

  9. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part II. High Temperature Structural Integrity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A high temperature structural integrity assessment belongs to the Part II of a whole preliminary guideline for the high temperature structure. The main contents of this guideline are the evaluation procedures of the creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth in high temperature condition, the high temperature LBB evaluation procedure, and the inelastic evaluations of the welded joints in SFR structures. The methodologies for the proper inelastic analysis of an SFR structures in high temperatures are explained and the guidelines of inelastic analysis options using ANSYS and ABAQUS are suggested. In addition, user guidelines for the developed NONSTA code are included. This guidelines need to be continuously revised to improve the applicability to the design and analysis of the SFR structures.

  10. Temperature profiles induced by a stationary CW laser beam in a multi-layer structure: application to solar cell interconnect welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J.E.; Ianno, N.J.; Ahmed, A.U.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional heat transfer model for heating of a multilayer structure by a stationary Gaussian CW CO/sub 2/ laser beam is developed and applied to solar cell interconnect welding. This model takes into account the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity as well as free carrier absorption of the incident beam in the silicon where appropriate. Finally, the theoretical temperature profiles are used to determine the weld spot size and these values are compared to results obtained from a simple welding experiment, where excellent agreement is obtained. 18 references, 13 figures.

  11. Applications of high-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malozemoff, A.P.; Gallagher, W.J.; Schwall, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The new high temperature superconductors open up possibilities for applications in magnets, power transmission, computer interconnections, Josephson devices and instrumentation, among many others. The success of these applications hinges on many interlocking factors, including critical current density, critical fields, allowable processing temperatures, mechanical properties and chemical stability. An analysis of some of these factors suggests which applications may be the easiest to realize and which may have the greatest potential

  12. High temperature turbine engine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, W.D.; Boyd, G.L.

    1993-07-20

    A hybrid ceramic/metallic gas turbine is described comprising; a housing defining an inlet, an outlet, and a flow path communicating the inlet with the outlet for conveying a flow of fluid through the housing, a rotor member journaled by the housing in the flow path, the rotor member including a compressor rotor portion rotatively inducting ambient air via the inlet and delivering this air pressurized to the flow path downstream of the compressor rotor, a combustor disposed in the flow path downstream of the compressor receiving the pressurized air along with a supply of fuel to maintain combustion providing a flow of high temperature pressurized combustion products in the flow path downstream thereof, the rotor member including a turbine rotor portion disposed in the flow path downstream of the combustor and rotatively expanding the combustion products toward ambient for flow from the turbine engine via the outlet, the turbine rotor portion providing shaft power driving the compressor rotor portion and an output shaft portion of the rotor member, a disk-like metallic housing portion journaling the rotor member to define a rotational axis therefore, and a disk-like annular ceramic turbine shroud member bounding the flow path downstream of the combustor and circumscribing the turbine rotor portion to define a running clearance therewith, the disk-like ceramic turbine shroud member having a reference axis coaxial with the rotational axis and being spaced axially from the metallic housing portion in mutually parallel concentric relation therewith and a plurality of spacers disposed between ceramic disk-like shroud member and the metallic disk-like housing portion and circumferentially spaced apart, each of the spacers having a first and second end portion having an end surface adjacent the shroud member and the housing portion respectively, the end surfaces having a cylindrical curvature extending transversely relative to the shroud member and the housing portion.

  13. Application of High Temperature Superconductors to Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, a large effort has been made by the scientific community to investigate this field towards a possible application of the new oxide superconductors to different devices like SMES, magnetic bearings, flywheels energy storage, magnetic shielding, transmission cables, fault current limiters, etc. However, all present day large scale applications using superconductivity in accelerator technology are based on conventional materials operating at liquid helium temperatures. Poor mechanical properties, low critical current density and sensitivity to the magnetic field at high temperature are the key parameters whose improvement is essential for a large scale application of high temperature superconductors to such devices. Current leads, used for transferring currents from the power converters, working at room temperature, into the liquid helium environment, where the magnets are operating, represent an immediate application of the emerging technology of high t...

  14. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  15. Ceramics for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocellin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Problems related to materials, their fabrication, properties, handling, improvements are examined. Silicium nitride and silicium carbide are obtained by vacuum hot-pressing, reaction sintering and chemical vapour deposition. Micrographs are shown. Mechanical properties i.e. room and high temperature strength, creep resistance fracture mechanics and fatigue resistance. Recent developments of pressureless sintered Si C and the Si-Al-O-N quaternary system are mentioned

  16. Cu cluster shell structure at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Bøssing; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1991-01-01

    Equilibrium structures of small (3–29)-atom Cu clusters are determined by simulated annealing, and finite-temperature ensembles are simulated by Monte Carlo techniques using the effective-medium theory for the energy calculation. Clusters with 8, 18, and 20 atoms are found to be particularly stable....... The equilibrium geometrical structures are determined and found to be determined by a Jahn-Teller distortion, which is found to affect the geometry also at high temperatures. The ‘‘magic’’ clusters retain their large stability even at elevated temperatures....

  17. Temperature Structure of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    we analyze the temperature structure of a coronal cavity observed in Aug. 2007. coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and x-rays. when these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs. It is important to establish the temperature structure of cavities in order to understand the thermodynamics of cavities in relation to their three-dimensional magnetic structure. To analyze the temperature we compare temperature ratios of a series of iron lines observed by the Hinode/EUv Imaging spectrometer (EIS). We also use those lines to constrain a forward model of the emission from the cavity and streamer. The model assumes a coronal streamer with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel lenth. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. The general cavity morphology and the cavity and streamer density have already been modeled using data from STEREO's SECCHI/EUVI and Hinode/EIS (Gibson et al 2010 and Schmit & Gibson 2011).

  18. Stable Structures for Distributed Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Eugen DUMITRASCU; Ion IVAN

    2008-01-01

    For distributed applications, we define the linear, tree and graph structure types with different variants and modalities to aggregate them. The distributed applications have assigned structures that through their characteristics influence the costs of stages for developing cycle and the costs for exploitation, transferred to each user. We also present the quality characteristics of a structure for a stable application, which is focused on stability characteristic. For that characteristic we ...

  19. Structural analysis for elevated temperature design of the LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, D.S.

    1976-02-01

    In the structural design of LMFBR components for elevated temperature service it is necessary to take account of the time-dependent, creep behavior of materials. The accommodation of creep to assure design reliability has required (1) development of new design limits and criteria, (2) development of more detailed representations of material behavior, and (3) application of the most advanced analysis techniques. These developments are summarized and examples are given to illustrate the current state of technology in elevated temperature design

  20. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  1. Potential applications of high temperature helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Kennedy, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses the DOE MHTGR-SC program's recent activity to improve the economics of the MHTGR without sacrificing safety performance and two potential applications of high temperature helium, the MHTGR gas turbine plant and a process heat application for methanol production from coal

  2. Numerical studies on a plasmonic temperature nanosensor based on a metal-insulator-metal ring resonator structure for optical integrated circuit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-mahmod, Md. Jubayer; Hyder, Rakib; Islam, Md Zahurul

    2017-07-01

    A nanosensor, based on a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic ring resonator, is proposed for potential on-chip temperature sensing and its performance is evaluated numerically. The sensor components can be fabricated by using planar processes on a silicon substrate, making its manufacturing compatible to planar electronic fabrication technology. The sensor, constructed using silver as the metal rings and a thermo-optic liquid ethanol film between the metal layers, is capable of sensing temperature with outstanding optical sensitivity, as high as -0.53 nm/°C. The resonance wavelength is found to be highly sensitive to the refractive index of the liquid dielectric film. The resonance peak can be tuned according to the requirement of intended application by changing the radii of the ring resonator geometries in the design phase. The compact size, planar and silicon-based design, and very high resolutions- these characteristics are expected to make this sensor technology a preferred choice for lab-on-a-chip applications, as compared to other contemporary sensors.

  3. High temperature structural ceramic materials manufactured by the CNTD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiglich, J.J. Jr.; Bhat, D.G.; Holzl, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Controlled Nucleation Thermochemical Deposition (CNTD) has emerged from classical chemical deposition (CVD) technology. This paper describes the techniques of thermochemical grain refinement. The effects of such refinement on mechanical properties of materials at room temperature and at elevated temperatures are outlined. Emphasis is given to high temperature structural ceramic materials such as SiC, Si 3 N 4 , AlN, and TiB 2 and ZrB 2 . An example of grain refinement accompanied by improvements in mechanical properties is SiC. Grain sizes of 500 to 1000 A have been observed in CNTD SiC with room temperature MOR of 1380 to 2070 MPa (4 pt bending) and MOR of 3450 to 4140 MPa (4 pt bending) at 1350 0 C. Various applications of these materials to the solution of high temperature structural problems are described. (author)

  4. Temperature structure of the Uranian upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, J. L.; Dunham, E.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature structure of the upper atmosphere of Uranus at two locations on the planet was determined from observations of the occultation of the star SAO158687 by Uranus on 10 March 1977, carried out at the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The temperature-pressure relationships obtained from the immersion and emersion data for 7280 A channel show peak-to-peak variations of 45 K for immersion and 35 K for emersion. The mean temperature for both immersion and emersion profiles is about 100 K, which shows that Uranus has a temperature inversion between 0.001 mbar and the 100 mbar level probed by IR measurements. Both profiles show wavelike temperature variations, which may be due to dynamical or photochemical processes.

  5. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I; Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W; Xu, H

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600 0 C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  6. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W [Kavli Insitute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft (Netherlands); Xu, H, E-mail: neil.young@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600{sup 0}C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  7. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  8. High temperature reactors for cogeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    There is a large potential for nuclear energy also in the non-electric heat market. Many industrial sectors have a high demand for process heat and steam at various levels of temperature and pressure to be provided for desalination of seawater, district heating, or chemical processes. The future generation of nuclear plants will be capable to enter the wide field of cogeneration of heat and power (CHP), to reduce waste heat and to increase efficiency. This requires an adjustment to multiple needs of the customers in terms of size and application. All Generation-IV concepts proposed are designed for coolant outlet temperatures above 500 C, which allow applications in the low and medium temperature range. A VHTR would even be able to cover the whole temperature range up to approx. 1 000 C.

  9. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  10. Bimetallic low thermal-expansion panels of Co-base and silicide-coated Nb-base alloys for high-temperature structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhein, R.K.; Novak, M.D.; Levi, C.G.; Pollock, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Low net thermal expansion bimetallic structural lattice constructed. → Temperatures on the order of 1000 deg. C reached. → Improved silicide coating for niobium alloy developed. - Abstract: The fabrication and high temperature performance of low thermal expansion bimetallic lattices composed of Co-base and Nb-base alloys have been investigated. A 2D sheet lattice with a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) lower than the constituent materials of construction was designed for thermal cycling to 1000 deg. C with the use of elastic-plastic finite element analyses. The low CTE lattice consisted of a continuous network of the Nb-base alloy C-103 with inserts of high CTE Co-base alloy Haynes 188. A new coating approach wherein submicron alumina particles were incorporated into (Nb, Cr, Fe) silicide coatings was employed for oxidation protection of the Nb-base alloy. Thermal gravimetric analysis results indicate that the addition of submicron alumina particles reduced the oxidative mass gain by a factor of four during thermal cycling, increasing lifetime. Bimetallic cells with net expansion of 6 x 10 -6 /deg. C and 1 x 10 -6 /deg. C at 1000 deg. C were demonstrated and their measured thermal expansion characteristics were consistent with analytical models and finite element analysis predictions.

  11. X-ray diffraction at high pressure and high/low temperatures using synchrotron radiation. Applications in the study of spinel structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerward, L.; Jiang, J.Z.; Olsen, J.S.; Recio, J.M.; Wakowska, A.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure x-ray diffraction made a quantum leap in the 1960's with the advent of the diamond-anvil cell. This ingenious device, where two opposing diamond faces apply pressure to a tiny sample, made it possible to replicate the pressure near the core of the Earth by turning a thumbscrew. Multianvil cells, such as the Japanese MAX80 press, were developed for combined high-pressure and high-temperature studies. The availability n at about the same time n of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources of hard x-rays was another big step forward. Since then, the white-beam energy-dispersive method has been the workhorse for high pressure, high-temperature x-ray diffraction, although it is now gradually being replaced by high-resolution monochromatic methods based on the image plate, the CCD camera or other electronic area detectors. The first part of the paper is a review of high-pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD), covering roughly the last three decades. Physical parameters, such as the bulk modulus, the compressibility and the equation of state, are defined. The diamond-anvil cell, the multianvil press and other high-pressure devices are described, as well as synchrotron radiation sources and recording techniques. Examples are drawn from current experimental and theoretical research on crystal structures of the spinel type. Accurate structural parameters have been determined at ambient conditions and at low temperatures using single-crystal diffraction and four-circle diffractometers. The uniform high-pressure behavior of the oxide spinels has been investigated in detail and compared with the corresponding behavior of selenium-based spinels. The synthesis of advanced novel materials is exemplified in the case of the cubic spinel Si 3 N 4 . This and other nitrogen spinels, which have a bulk modulus of about 300 GPa modulated by the actual cation, are opening a road towards superhard materials. The paper finishes off with an outlook into the future, where new

  12. Structural analysis technology for high-temperature design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    Results from an ongoing program devoted to the development of verified high-temperature structural design technology applicable to nuclear reactor systems are described. The major aspects addressed by the program are (1) deformation behavior; (2) failure associated with creep rupture, brittle fracture, fatigue, creep-fatigue interactions, and crack propagation; and (3) the establishment of appropriate design criteria. This paper discusses information developed in the deformation behavior category. The material considered is type 304 stainless steel, and the temperatures range to 1100 0 F (593 0 C). In essence, the paper considers the ingredients necessary for predicting relatively high-temperature inelastic deformation behavior of engineering structures under time-varying temperature and load conditions and gives some examples. These examples illustrate the utility and acceptability of the computational methods identified and developed for prediting essential features of complex inelastic behaviors. Conditions and responses that can be encountered under nuclear reactor service conditions and invoked in the examples. (Auth.)

  13. Comparison study of inelastic analysis codes for high temperature structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. K.; Geon, G. P.; Lee, J. H

    2004-02-01

    LMR high temperature structures subjected to operating and transient loadings may exhibit very complex deformation behaviors due to the use of ductile material such as 316SS and the systematic analysis technology of high temperature structure for reliable safety assessment is essential. In this project, comparative study with developed inelastic analysis program NONSTA and the existing analysis codes was performed applying various types of loading including non-proportional loading. The performance of NONSTA was confirmed and the effect of inelastic constants on the analysis result was analyzed. Also, the applicability of the inelastic analysis was enlarged as a result of applying both the developed program and the existing codes to the analyses of the enhanced creep behavior and the elastic follow-up behavior of high temperature structures and the necessary items for improvements were deduced. Further studies on the improvement of NONSTA program and the decision of the proper values of inelastic constants are necessary.

  14. High temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The meeting was organized to review industry/user needs designs, status of technology and the associated economics for high temperature applications. It was attended by approximately 100 participants from nine countries. The participants presented 17 papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schoenborn, B.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B{sub sn}, versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35{Angstrom} and 3.85{Angstrom}. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased.

  16. Myoglobin solvent structure at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.V.; Korszun, Z.R.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of the solvent surrounding myoglobin crystals has been analyzed using neutron diffraction data, and the results indicate that the water around the protein is not disordered, but rather lies in well-defined hydration shells. We have analyzed the structure of the solvent surrounding the protein by collecting neutron diffraction data at four different temperatures, namely, 80, 130, 180, and 240K. Relative Wilson Statistics applied to low resolution data showed evidence of a phase transition in the region of 180K. A plot of the liquidity factor, B sn , versus distance from the protein surface begins with a high plateau near the surface of the protein and drops to two minima at distances from the protein surface of about 2.35 Angstrom and 3.85 Angstrom. Two distinct hydration shells are observed. Both hydration shells are observed to expand as the temperature is increased

  17. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  18. Nickel aluminide alloy suitable for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.T.

    1998-03-10

    Alloys are disclosed for use in structural applications based upon NiAl to which are added selected elements to enhance room temperature ductility and high temperature strength. Specifically, small additions of molybdenum produce a beneficial alloy, while further additions of boron, carbon, iron, niobium, tantalum, zirconium and hafnium further improve performance of alloys at both room temperature and high temperatures. A preferred alloy system composition is Ni--(49.1{+-}0.8%)Al--(1.0{+-}0.8%)Mo--(0.7 + 0.5%)Nb/Ta/Zr/Hf--(nearly zero to 0.03%)B/C, where the % is at. % in each of the concentrations. All alloys demonstrated good oxidation resistance at the elevated temperatures. The alloys can be fabricated into components using conventional techniques. 4 figs.

  19. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitors for high temperature decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Normally, chemical decontamination of coolant systems of nuclear power reactors is carried out at temperatures less than 90 °C. At these temperatures, though magnetite dissolves effectively, the rate of dissolution of chromium and nickel containing oxides formed over stainless steel and other non-carbon steel coolant system surfaces is not that appreciable. A high temperature dissolution process using 5 mM NTA at 160 °C developed earlier by us was very effective in dissolving the oxides such as ferrites and chromites. However, the corrosion of structural materials such as carbon steel (CS) and stainless steel (SS) also increased beyond the acceptable limits at elevated temperatures. Hence, the control of base metal corrosion during the high temperature decontamination process is very important. In view of this, it was felt essential to investigate and develop a suitable inhibitor to reduce the corrosion that can take place on coolant structural material surfaces during the high temperature decontamination applications with weak organic acids. Three commercial inhibitors viz., Philmplus 5K655, Prosel PC 2116 and Ferroqest were evaluated at ambient and at 160 °C temperature in NTA formulation. Preliminary evaluation of these corrosion inhibitors carried out using electrochemical techniques showed maximum corrosion inhibition efficiency for Philmplus. Hence, it was used for high temperature applications. A concentration of 500 ppm was found to be optimum at 160 °C and at this concentration it showed an inhibition efficiency of 62% for CS. High temperature dissolution of oxides such as Fe 3 O 4 and NiFe 2 O 4 , which are relevant to nuclear reactors, was also carried out and the rate of dissolution observed was less in the presence of Philmplus. Studies were also carried out to evaluate hydrazine as a corrosion inhibitor for high temperature applications. The results revealed that for CS inhibition efficiency of hydrazine is comparable to that of Philmplus, while

  20. Stable Structures for Distributed Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen DUMITRASCU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For distributed applications, we define the linear, tree and graph structure types with different variants and modalities to aggregate them. The distributed applications have assigned structures that through their characteristics influence the costs of stages for developing cycle and the costs for exploitation, transferred to each user. We also present the quality characteristics of a structure for a stable application, which is focused on stability characteristic. For that characteristic we define the estimated measure indicators for a level. The influence of the factors of stability and the ways for increasing it are thus identified, and at the same time the costs of development stages, the costs of usage and the costs of maintenance to be keep on between limits that assure the global efficiency of application. It is presented the base aspects for distributed applications: definition, peculiarities and importance. The aspects for the development cycle of distributed application are detailed. In this article, we alongside give the mechanisms for building the defined structures and analyze the complexity of the defined structures for a distributed application of a virtual store.

  1. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  2. Thermomechanics of composite structures under high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrienko, Yu I

    2016-01-01

    This pioneering book presents new models for the thermomechanical behavior of composite materials and structures taking into account internal physico-chemical transformations such as thermodecomposition, sublimation and melting at high temperatures (up to 3000 K). It is of great importance for the design of new thermostable materials and for the investigation of reliability and fire safety of composite structures. It also supports the investigation of interaction of composites with laser irradiation and the design of heat-shield systems. Structural methods are presented for calculating the effective mechanical and thermal properties of matrices, fibres and unidirectional, reinforced by dispersed particles and textile composites, in terms of properties of their constituent phases. Useful calculation methods are developed for characteristics such as the rate of thermomechanical erosion of composites under high-speed flow and the heat deformation of composites with account of chemical shrinkage. The author expan...

  3. Fibre gratings for high temperature sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, J.; Sommer, K.; Englund, M.

    2001-07-01

    Phosphosilicate fibre gratings can be stabilized at temperatures in excess of 500 °C for sensor applications by optimizing thermal and UV presensitization recipes. Furthermore, the use of 193 nm presensitization prevents the formation of OH absorption bands, extending the use of fibre gratings across the entire wavelength spectrum. Gratings for operation at 700 °C retaining up to 70% reflectivity after 30 min are demonstrated.

  4. Polymer temperature sensor for textronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielska, Sylwia; Sibinski, Maciej; Lukasik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present research work of designing prototype textile sensors dedicated to human body temperature measurements. The sensor construction was especially elaborated to be integrated into protective clothing as a practical realization of intelligent e-textile concept. These types of sensors should be easily incorporable in clothing structures without disturbance of fabric flexibility (Carpi and De Rossi). The construction of the new type functional sensor testing is presented and illustrated by its parameters and thermal characteristics.

  5. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T c superconductors

  6. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F. [Prairie View A& M Univ., Texas (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T{sub c} superconductors.

  7. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  8. "Chameleon" Macromolecules: Synthesis, Structures and Applications of Stimulus Responsive Polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sui, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation and characterization of addressable responsive polymer structures and their versatile applications. Stimuli responsive polymer chains including temperature responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), PNIPAM, pH responsive poly(methacrylic acid), PMAA and redox

  9. Application specific integrated circuit for high temperature oil well applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallet, T.; Gakkestad, J.; Forre, G.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an integrated BiCMOS circuit for high temperature applications. The circuit contains Pierce oscillators with automatic gain control, and measurements show that it is operating up to 266{sup o}C. The relative frequency variation up to 200 {sup o}C is less than 60 ppm caused mainly by the crystal element itself. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Analusis techniques for elevated temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.J.; Hellen, T.K.

    1975-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the more generally used methods of analysis of stress and strain in structures at elevated temperatures, with particular emphasis on finite element methods. It is shown that where sufficiently large computers are available, and where cost is not a severe limitation, creep and plasticity behaviour can be computed for a wide range of components. Where these effects are encountered simultaneously, more knowledge of materials behaviour is required. Calculation of stress and strain is usually only a means to the designer's main aim, which is proving the life and integrity of his structure. The shortcomings of computational methods in this respect are discussed, and a brief review given of some of the 'short cut' methods of life assessment available to the designer. (author)

  11. European structural materials development for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaaf, B. van der E-mail: vanderschaaf@nrg-nl.com; Ehrlich, K.; Fenici, P.; Tavassoli, A.A.; Victoria, M

    2000-09-01

    Leading long term considerations for choices in the European Long Term Technology programme are the high temperature mechanical- and compatibility properties of structural materials under neutron irradiation. The degrees of fabrication process freedom are closely investigated to allow the construction of complex shapes. Another important consideration is the activation behaviour of the structural material. The ideal solution is the recycling of the structural materials after a relatively short 'cooling' period. The structural materials development in Europe has three streams. The first serves the design and construction of ITER and is closely connected to the choice made: water cooled austenitic stainless steel. The second development stream is to support the design and construction of DEMO relevant blanket modules to be tested in ITER. The helium cooled pebble bed and the water cooled liquid lithium concept rely both on RAFM steel. The goal of the third stream is to investigate the potential of advanced materials for fusion power reactors beyond DEMO. The major contending materials: SiCSiC composites, vanadium, titanium and chromium alloys hold the promise of high operating temperatures, but RAFM has also a high temperature potential applying oxide dispersion strengthening. The development of materials for fusion power application requires a high flux 14 MeV neutron source to simulate the fusion power environment.

  12. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  13. Fracture mechanical evaluation of high temperature structure and creep-fatigue defect assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2004-02-01

    This study proposed the evaluation procedure of high temperature structures from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics on the cylindrical structure applicable to the KALIMER, which is developed by KAERI. For the evaluation of structural integrity, linear and non-linear fracture mechanics parameters were analyzed. Parameters used in creep defect growth applicable to high temperature structure of liquid metal reactor and the evaluation codes with these parameters were analyzed. The evaluation methods of defect initiation and defect growth which were established in R5/R6 code(UK), JNC method (Japan) and RCC-MR A16(France) code were analyzed respectively. The evaluation procedure of leak before break applicable to KALIMER was preliminarily developed and proposed. As an application example of defect growth, the creep-fatigue defect growth on circumferential throughwall defect in high temperature cylindrical structure was evaluated by RCC-MR A16 and this application technology was established.

  14. High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plakida, Nikolay Maksimilianovich

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their...

  15. High-temperature cuprate superconductors. Experiment, theory, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their knowledge of this remarkable class of materials. (orig.)

  16. Biomedical applications using low temperature plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xiujuan; Jiang Nan

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature plasma technology and biomedicine are two different subjects, but the combination of the two may play a critical role in modern science and technology. The 21 st century is believed to be a biotechnology century. Plasma technology is becoming a widely used platform for the fabrication of biomaterials and biomedical devices. In this paper some of the technologies used for material surface modification are briefly introduced. Some biomedical applications using plasma technology are described, followed by suggestions as to how a bridge between plasma technology and biomedicine can be built. A pulsed plasma technique that is used for surface functionalization is discussed in detail as an example of this kind of bridge or combination. Finally, it is pointed out that the combination of biomedical and plasma technology will be an important development for revolutionary 21st century technologies that requires different experts from different fields to work together. (authors)

  17. Laser application in high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohse, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The scope and priorities of laser application in materials science and technology are attracting widespread interest. After a brief discussion of the unique capabilities of laser application in the various fields of materials science, main emphasis is given on the three areas of materials processing, surface modification and alloying, and property measurements at high temperatures. In materials processing the operational regimes for surface hardening, drilling, welding and laser glazing are discussed. Surface modifications by laser melting, quenching and surface alloying, the formation of solid solutions, metastable phases and amorphous solids on the basis of rapid solidification, ion implantation and ion beam mixing are considered. The influence of solidification rates and interface velocities on the surface properties are given. The extension of property measurements up to and beyond the melting point of refractory materials into their critical region by a transient-type dynamic laser pulse heating technique is given for the three examples of vapour pressure measurement, density and heat capacity determination in the solid and liquid phases. A new approach, the laser autoclave technique, applying laser heating and x-ray shadow technique under autoclave conditions to acoustically levitated spheres will be presented. (author)

  18. Development of powder metallurgy 2XXX series Al alloy plate and sheet materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications, FY 1983/1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to fabricate and evaluate PM 2124 Al alloy plate and sheet materials according to NASA program goals for damage tolerance and fatigue resistance. Previous research has indicated the outstanding strength-toughness relationship available with PM 2124 Al-Zr modified alloy compositions in extruded product forms. The range of processing conditions was explored in the fabrication of plate and sheet gage materials, as well as the resultant mechanical and metallurgical properties. The PM composition based on Al-3.70 Cu-1.85 Mg-0.20 Mn with 0.60 wt. pct. Zr was selected. Flat rolled material consisting of 0.250 in. thick plate was fabricated using selected thermal mechanical treatments (TMT). The schedule of TMT operations was designed to yield the extreme conditions of grain structure normally encountered in the fabrication of flat rolled products, specifically recrystallized and unrecrystallized. The PM Al alloy plate and sheet materials exhibited improved strength properties at thin gages compared to IM Al alloys, as a consequence of their enhanced ability to inhibit recrystallization and grain growth. In addition, the PM 2124 Al alloys offer much better combinations of strength and toughnessover equivalent IM Al. The alloy microstructures were examined by optical metallographic texture techniques in order to establish the metallurgical basis for these significant property improvements.

  19. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  20. Structural analysis for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Firstly, we discuss the use of elastic analysis for structural design of LMFBR components. The elastic analysis methods have been used for structural design of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor as well as the proposed prototype Test Breeder Reactor. The design of Fast Breeder Test Reactor which is nearing completion is the same as that of Rapsodie. Nevertheless, the design had to he checked against the latest design codes available, namely the ASME Code case 1592. This paper however, is confined to Structural analysis of PFBR components. The problems faced in the design of some of the components, in particular, the inner vessel (plenum separator) are discussed. As far as design codes are concerned, we make use of ASME Code Section III and the Code Case N-47, for high temperature design. The problem faced in the use of these rules are also described along with the description of analysis. Studies in the field of cyclic loading include extension of Bree's breakdown and plastic cycling criteria for ratchet free operation to biaxial stress fields. In other fields, namely, inelastic analysis, piping analysis in the creep regime etc. we are only at a start

  1. Structural analysis for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaze, M.K.K.

    1983-01-01

    The use of elastic analysis for structural design of LMFBR components is discussed. The elastic analysis methods have been used for structural design of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor as well as the proposed Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. The design of Fast Breeder Test Reactor which is nearing completion is same as that of Rapsodie. Nevertheless, the design had to be checked against the latest design codes available, namely the ASME Code case 1592. This paper however, is confined to Structural analysis of PFBR components. The problems faced in the design of some of the components, in particular, the inner vessel (plenum separator) are discussed. As far as design codes are concerned, ASME Code Section III and the Code Case N-47 are used for high temperature design. The problems faced in the use of these rules are also described along with the description of analysis. Studies in the field of cyclic loading include extension of Bree's shakedown and plastic cycling criteria for ratchet free operation to biaxial stress fields

  2. Structured alkali halides for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, B.; Fuchs, M.; Hell, E.; Knuepfer, W.; Hackenschmied, P.; Winnacker, A.

    2002-01-01

    Image plates based on storage phosphors are a major application of radiation defects in insulators. Storage phosphors absorb X-ray quanta creating trapped electron-hole pairs in the material. Optical stimulation of the electron causes recombination leading to light emission. Application of image plates requires an optimal compromise between resolution (represented by the modulation transfer function (MTF)) and sensitivity. In our paper we present a new solution of the problem of combining a high MTF with a high sensitivity by structuring the image plates in form of thin needles acting as light guides. This suppresses the lateral spread of light which is detrimental to resolution. As doped CsBr, e.g. CsBr:Ga [Physica Medica XV (1999) 301], can pose a good storage phosphor evaporated layers are of interest in computed radiography. Needle structured CsI:Tl is used as scintillator in direct radiography [IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 45 (3) (1998)]. CsBr layers have been produced by evaporation in vacuum and in inert gas atmosphere varying pressure and temperature. The resulting structures are of fibrous or columnar nature being in good agreement with the zone model of Thornton [Ann. Rev. Mater. Sci. 7 (1977) 239]. A zone model for CsBr has been developed. Measurements on doped alkali halide image plates having needle structure show good MTF at high sensitivity making a significant progress in image plate technology

  3. Diamond nanowires: fabrication, structure, properties, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Wu, Liangzhuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2014-12-22

    C(sp(3) )C-bonded diamond nanowires are wide band gap semiconductors that exhibit a combination of superior properties such as negative electron affinity, chemical inertness, high Young's modulus, the highest hardness, and room-temperature thermal conductivity. The creation of 1D diamond nanowires with their giant surface-to-volume ratio enhancements makes it possible to control and enhance the fundamental properties of diamond. Although theoretical comparisons with carbon nanotubes have shown that diamond nanowires are energetically and mechanically viable structures, reproducibly synthesizing the crystalline diamond nanowires has remained challenging. We present a comprehensive, up-to-date review of diamond nanowires, including a discussion of their synthesis along with their structures, properties, and applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  5. NASA space applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Sokoloski, Martin M.; Aron, Paul R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1992-01-01

    The application of superconducting technology in space has been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. The only means of attaining these temperatures has been with cryogenic fluids which severely limits mission lifetime. The development of materials with superconducting transition temperatures (T sub c) above 77 K has made superconducting technology more attractive and feasible for employment in aerospace systems. Potential applications of high-temperature superconducting technology in cryocoolers and remote sensing, communications, and power systems are discussed.

  6. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO 2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  7. Structural material properties for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A-A. F.

    2008-10-15

    Materials properties requirements for structural applications in the forthcoming and future fusion machines are analyzed with emphasis on safety requirements. It is shown that type 316L(N) used in the main structural components of ITER is code qualified and together with limits imposed on its service conditions and neutron radiation levels, can adequately satisfy ITER vacuum vessel licensing requirements. For the in-vessel components, where nonconventional fabrication methods, such as HIPing, are used, design through materials properties, data is combined with tests on representative mockups to meet the requirements. For divertor parts, where the operating conditions are too severe for components to last throughout the reactor life, replacement of most exposed parts is envisaged. DEMO operating conditions require extension of ITER design criteria to high temperature and high neutron dose rules, as well as to compatibility with cooling and tritium breeding media, depending on the blanket concept retained. The structural material favoured in EU is Eurofer steel, low activation martensitic steel with good ductility and excellent resistance to radiation swelling. However, this material, like other ferritic / martensitic steels, requires post-weld annealing and is sensitive to low temperature irradiation embrittlement. Furthermore, it shows cyclic softening during fatigue, complicating design against fatigue and creep-fatigue. (au)

  8. Temperature Effects on Aluminoborosilicate Glass and Melt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Stebbins, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    Quantitative determination of the atomic-scale structure of multi-component oxide melts, and the effects of temperature on them, is a complex problem. Ca- and Na- aluminoborosilicates are especially interesting, not only because of their major role in widespread technical applications (flat-panel computer displays, fiber composites, etc.), but because the coordination environments of two of their main network cations (Al3+ and B3+) change markedly with composition and temperature is ways that may in part be analogous to processes in silicate melts at high pressures in the Earth. Here we examine a series of such glasses with different cooling rates, chosen to evaluate the role modifier cation field strength (Ca2+ vs. Na+) and of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) content. To explore the effects of fictive temperature, fast quenched and annealed samples were compared. We have used B-11 and Al-27 MAS NMR to measure the different B and Al coordinations and calculated the contents of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). Lower cooling rates increase the fraction of [4]B species in all compositions. The conversion of [3]B to [4]B is also expected to convert NBO to bridging oxygens, which should affect thermodynamic properties such as configurational entropy and configurational heat capacity. For four compositions with widely varying compositions and initial NBO contents, analysis of the speciation changes with the same, simple reaction [3]B = [4]B + NBO yields similar enthalpy values of 25±7 kJ/mol. B-11 triple quantum MAS NMR allows as well the proportions of [3]B boroxol ring and non-ring sites to be determined, and reveals more [3]B boroxol ring structures present in annealed (lower temperature) glasses. In situ, high-temperature MAS NMR spectra have been collected on one of the Na-aluminoborosilicate and on a sodium borate glass at 14.1 T. The exchange of boron between the 3- and 4-coordinated sites is clearly observed well above the glass transition temperatures, confirming the

  9. Structural aspects of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeira, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the general structure of HTSC is known to be perovskite related involving layered stacking of perovskite and rock-salt like slabs with a specific sequence for a given type of structure. The prototype structures of various type of HTSC are now well established. Their detailed structural parameters are well documented. It is clear from that the number of oxygen atoms present in many of these structures is different from, and generally much less than, the number of anionic sites available. If the number of oxygens are in excess, they could of course occupy the interstitial sites. For example, in pure oxygen La 2 CuO 4+δ , the excess oxygen has been shown to go into interstitial sites. Although the prototypic structures of all HTSC are well established, their actual structures can have significant variations from the prototypes. In fact, their real structures are not yet fully known. Being nonstoichiometric, they are essentially metastable, entropy stabilized structures which exhibit wide compositional fluctuations and oxygen disorder effects. Their superconducting properties are known to be sensitive to their oxygen content and according to some theories the mechanism of superconductivity is presumably related to the oxygen defects or defectons. Neutron diffraction happens to be the method of choice for probing detailed structural features involving oxygen defects and associated distortions which are known to play a significant role on the properties of HTSC

  10. Structural Biology: Practical NMR Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Quincy

    2005-01-01

    This textbook begins with an overview of NMR development and applications in biological systems. It describes recent developments in instrument hardware and methodology. Chapters highlight the scope and limitation of NMR methods. While detailed math and quantum mechanics dealing with NMR theory have been addressed in several well-known NMR volumes, chapter two of this volume illustrates the fundamental principles and concepts of NMR spectroscopy in a more descriptive manner. Topics such as instrument setup, data acquisition, and data processing using a variety of offline software are discussed. Chapters further discuss several routine stategies for preparing samples, especially for macromolecules and complexes. The target market for such a volume includes researchers in the field of biochemistry, chemistry, structural biology and biophysics.

  11. Current and temperature structure of Rihand Lake

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Swamy, G.N.; Sadhuram, Y.

    The environmental parameters such as wind, water and air temperatures, and currents were measured in Rihand Lake, Madhya Pradesh, India during the hotest months, May-June of 1983. Rihand is an artificial lake having an area of 300 km super(2...

  12. Low temperature magnetic structure of MnSe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we report low temperature neutron diffraction studies on MnSe in order to understand the anomalous behaviour of their magnetic and transport prop- erties. Our study indicates that at low temperatures MnSe has two coexisting crystal structures, high temperature NaCl and hexagonal NiAs. NiAs phase ...

  13. Structural breaks in mean temperature over agroclimatic zones in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Birthal, P S; Khokhar, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    Amongst Asian countries India is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. During the past century, surface temperature in India has shown a significant increasing trend. In this paper, we have investigated behavior of mean monthly temperature during the period 1901-2001 over four agroclimatic zones of India and also tried to detect structural change in the temperature series. A structural break in the series has been observed at the national as well regional levels between 1970 and 1980. An analysis of trends before and after the structural break shows a significant increase in July temperature in the arid zone since 1972.

  14. Lanthanoid titanate film structure deposited at different temperatures in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kushkov, V.D.; Zaslavskij, A.M.; Mel'nikov, A.V.; Zverlin, A.V.; Slivinskaya, A.Eh.

    1991-01-01

    Influence of deposition temperature on the structure of lanthanoid titanate films, prepared by the method of high-rate vacuum condensation. It is shown that formation of crystal structure, close to equilibrium samples, proceeds at 1100-1300 deg C deposition temperatures. Increase of temperature in this range promotes formation of films with higher degree of structural perfection. Amorphous films of lanthanoid titanates form at 200-1000 deg C. Deposition temperature shouldn't exceed 1400 deg C to prevent the formation of perovskite like phases in films

  15. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the ......Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...... for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  16. 'Vanishing' structural effects of temperature in polymer glasses close to the glass-transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Suzuki, T.; Ito, Y.; Yu, R.S.; Kondo, K.; Yampolskii, Yu. P.; Alentiev, A.Yu.

    2007-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) measurements were used for observation of structural effects of temperature in polystyrene (PS), super-cross-linked polystyrene networks (CPS), and in polyimides (PI) below and in the vicinity of glass-transition temperature T g . 'Vanishing' of these structural effects in the repeating cycles of the temperature controlled PAL experiments due to the slow relaxation processes in different conditions and details of chemical structure is demonstrated. Obtained results illustrate complex, dependent on thermal history, inhomogeneous character of the glass structure. In fact, structure of some polymer glasses is changing continuously. Calculations of the number density of free volume holes in these conditions are discussed

  17. The atmospheric temperature structure of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, J. B.; Courtin, Regis; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of various factors to the thermal structure of Titan's past and present atmosphere are discussed. A one dimensional model of Titan's thermal structure is summarized. The greenhouse effect of Titan's atmosphere, caused primarily by pressure induced opacity of N2, CH4, and H2, is discussed together with the antigreenhouse effect dominated by the haze which absorbs incident sunlight. The implications for the atmosphere of the presence of an ocean on Titan are also discussed.

  18. Temperature field simulation of complex structures in fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weifen; Hao Zhiming; Li Minghai

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the typical model of the system of dangerous goods - steel - wood composite structure including components of explosives is used as the research object. Using MARC program, the temperature field of the structure in the fire environment is simulated. Radiation, conduction and convection heat transfer within the gap of the structure are taken into account, contact heat transfer is also considered. The phenomenon of thermal decomposition of wood in high temperature is deal with by equivalent method. The results show that the temperature of the explosives is not high in the fire environment. The timber inside the composite structure has played a very good insulation effect of explosives.

  19. Controlling LPG temperature for SI engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, Mehmet Akif; Kaleli, Alirıza; Güner, Erdoğan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the LPG temperature on the engine performance and the exhaust emission characteristics have been investigated experimentally on an SI engine. In conventional injection systems, the LPG temperature increases excessively during the phase change in pressure regulator, and reduces the engine volumetric efficiency. According to the test results, engine performance and NO emission characteristics can be improved by controlling the LPG temperature before injecting to the engine intake manifold. A new control system taking into account the results of the study has been developed and tested. In order to control the LPG temperature, the coolant flow rate in pressure regulator circuit was arranged by using a control valve activated by a PID controller unit. Results of the study showed that the engine brake power loss can be increased by about 1.85% and NO emissions can be decreased by about 2% as compared to the operation with the original LPG injection system. - Highlights: • Effects of the LPG temperature have been examined. • Engine performance characteristics and exhaust emissions have been studied. • Results reveal that the LPG temperature should be kept in a range. • A prototype LPG temperature control system has been successfully developed

  20. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment

  1. Testing the Application for Analyzing Structured Entities

    OpenAIRE

    Ion IVAN; Bogdan VINTILA

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the testing process of the application for the analysis of structured text entities. The structured entities are presented. Quality characteristics of structured entities are identified and analyzed. The design and building processes are presented. Rules for building structured entities are described. The steps of building the application for the analysis of structured text entities are presented. The objective of the testing process is defined. Ways of testing the applicat...

  2. Mechanical vapor compression refrigeration for low temperature industrial applications today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    If the super conductor industry settles out at a temperature of -100 0 F or above, mechanical refrigeration will be vying for the cooling business. Today there very definitely is a break point in the application of equipment at approximately -120 0 F or 189 0 K. Other technologies are generally utilized below this level. However, with market potential comes invention and breakthroughs in refrigeration can also occur. Today standard refrigeration systems are cost effective, reliable and produced in the millions for high temperature applications of +10 0 F to +40 0 F evaporator temperature. Lower temperatures require additional hardware, consume additional power and are produced today in limited quantities for special applications

  3. Structural relationships in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, I.K.; Segre, C.U.; Hinks, D.G.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Soderholm, L.; Beno, M.; Zhang, K.

    1987-09-01

    The recent discovery of two types of metallic copper oxide compounds which are superconducting to above 90 0 K has renewed interest in the search for new high temperature superconducting materials. It is significant that both classes of compounds, La/sub 2-x/Sr/sub x/CuO/sub 4-y/ and YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-δ/ are intimately related to the extensively studied perovskite family. Both compounds contain highly oxidized, covalently bonded Cu-O sublattices, however, they differ in geometry. In this paper we discuss the relationship of these features to the superconducting properties. 30 refs., 6 figs

  4. A proposal to develop a high temperature structural design guideline for HTGR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents some proposals for developing a high-temperature structural design guideline for HTGR structural components. It is appropriate that a basis for developing high-temperature structural design rules is rested on well-established elevated-temperature design guidelines, if the same failure modes are expected for high-temperature components as considered in such design guidelines. As for the applicability of ASME B and PV Code Case N-47 to structural design rules for high-temperature components (service temperatures ≥ 900 deg. C), the following critical issues on material properties and service life evaluation rules have been pointed out. (i) no work-hardening of stress-strain curves at high temperatures due to dynamic recrystallization; (ii) issues relating to very significant creep; (iii) ductility loss after long-term ageing at high temperatures; (iv) validity of life-fraction rule (Robinson-Taira rule) as creep-fatigue damage evaluation rule. Furthermore, the validity of design margins of elevated-temperature structural design guidelines to high-temperature design rules should be clarified. Solutions and proposals to these issues are presented in this paper. Concerning no work-hardening due to dynamic recrystallization, it is shown that viscous effects cannot be neglected even at high extension rate for tensile tests, and that changes in viscous deformation rates by dynamic recrystallization should be taken into account. The extension rate for tensile tests is proposed to change at high temperatures. The solutions and proposals to the above-mentioned issues lead to the conclusion that the design methodologies of N-47 are basically applicable to the high-temperature structural design guideline for HTGR structural components in service at about 900 deg. C. (author). 9 refs, 5 figs

  5. Tooling Foam for Structural Composite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Tom; Smith, Brett H.; Ely, Kevin; MacArthur, Doug

    1998-01-01

    Tooling technology applications for composite structures fabrication have been expanded at MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex (PEC). Engineers from NASA/MSFC and Lockheed Martin Corporation have developed a tooling foam for use in composite materials processing and manufacturing that exhibits superior thermal and mechanical properties in comparison with other tooling foam materials. This tooling foam is also compatible with most preimpregnated composite resins such as epoxy, bismaleimide, phenolic and their associated cure cycles. MARCORE tooling foam has excellent processability for applications requiring either integral or removable tooling. It can also be tailored to meet the requirements for composite processing of parts with unlimited cross sectional area. A shelf life of at least six months is easily maintained when components are stored between 50F - 70F. The MARCORE tooling foam system is a two component urethane-modified polyisocyanurate, high density rigid foam with zero ozone depletion potential. This readily machineable, lightweight tooling foam is ideal for composite structures fabrication and is dimensionally stable at temperatures up to 350F and pressures of 100 psi.

  6. Design for ASIC reliability for low-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Mojaradi, Mohammad; Westergard, Lynett; Billman, Curtis; Cozy, Scott; Burke, Gary; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to design for reliability for low temperature applications without requiring process improvement. The developed hot carrier aging lifetime projection model takes into account both the transistor substrate current profile and temperature profile to determine the minimum transistor size needed in order to meet reliability requirements. The methodology is applicable for automotive, military, and space applications, where there can be varying temperature ranges. A case study utilizing this methodology is given to design for reliability into a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a Mars exploration mission.

  7. High temperature resin matrix composites for aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments and the outlook for graphite-polyimide composite structures are briefly outlined. Laminates, skin-stiffened and honeycomb sandwich panels, chopped fiber moldings, and structural components were fabricated with Celion/LARC-160 and Celion/PMR-15 composite materials. Interlaminar shear and flexure strength data obtained on as-fabricated specimens and specimens that were exposed for 125 hours at 589 K indicate that epoxy sized and polyimide sized Celion graphite fibers exhibit essentially the same behavior in a PMR-15 matrix composite. Analyses and tests of graphite-polyimide compression and shear panels indicate that utilization in moderately loaded applications offers the potential for achieving a 30 to 50 percent reduction in structural mass compared to conventional aluminum panels. Data on effects of moisture, temperature, thermal cycling, and shuttle fluids on mechanical properties indicate that both LARC-160 and PMR-15 are suitable matrix materials for a graphite-polyimide aft body flap. No technical road blocks to building a graphite-polyimide composite aft body flap are identified.

  8. Probability based high temperature engineering creep and structural fire resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Razdolsky, Leo

    2017-01-01

    This volume on structural fire resistance is for aerospace, structural, and fire prevention engineers; architects, and educators. It bridges the gap between prescriptive- and performance-based methods and simplifies very complex and comprehensive computer analyses to the point that the structural fire resistance and high temperature creep deformations will have a simple, approximate analytical expression that can be used in structural analysis and design. The book emphasizes methods of the theory of engineering creep (stress-strain diagrams) and mathematical operations quite distinct from those of solid mechanics absent high-temperature creep deformations, in particular the classical theory of elasticity and structural engineering. Dr. Razdolsky’s previous books focused on methods of computing the ultimate structural design load to the different fire scenarios. The current work is devoted to the computing of the estimated ultimate resistance of the structure taking into account the effect of high temperatur...

  9. Sparse Bayesian Inference and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Byers, Jeff M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Crump, Nicholas A. [Naval Center for Space Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    Measuring the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere is critical to understanding how it is heated to high temperatures. Unfortunately, the temperature of the upper atmosphere cannot be observed directly, but must be inferred from spectrally resolved observations of individual emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures. Such observations are “inverted” to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures along the line of sight. This inversion is ill posed and, in the absence of regularization, tends to produce wildly oscillatory solutions. We introduce the application of sparse Bayesian inference to the problem of inferring the temperature structure of the solar corona. Within a Bayesian framework a preference for solutions that utilize a minimum number of basis functions can be encoded into the prior and many ad hoc assumptions can be avoided. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bayesian approach by considering a test library of 40 assumed temperature distributions.

  10. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Hinks, D.G.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Chmaissem, O.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Argyriou, D.N.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Mitchell, J.F.; Argonne Nat. Lab., IL; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of a large number of compounds have provided a consistent picture of what structural features give rise to the highest T c 's in copper-oxide superconductors. For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO 2 layers will lower T c and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T c 's are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa 2 Ca n-1 Cu n O 2n+2+x family) that have flat and square CuO 2 planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO 2 plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex lines by shortening or ''metallizing'' the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux. (orig.)

  11. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  12. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Moises E. [Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

  13. Application of high temperature superconductors for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.H.; Heller, R.; Schlachter, S.I.; Goldacker, W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) materials in future fusion machines can increase the efficiency drastically. For ITER, W7-X and JT-60SA the economic benefit of HTS current leads was recognized after a 70 kA HTS current lead demonstrator was designed, fabricated and successfully tested by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, which is a merge of former Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and University of Karlsruhe). For ITER, the Chinese Domestic Agency will provide the current leads as a part of the superconducting feeder system. KIT is in charge of design, construction and test of HTS current leads for W7-X and JT-60SA. For W7-X 14 current leads with a maximum current of 18.2 kA are required that are oriented with the room temperature end at the bottom. JT60-SA will need 26 current leads (20 leads - 20 kA and 6 leads - 25.7 kA) which are mounted in vertical, normal position. These current leads are based on BiSCCO HTS superconductors, demonstrating that HTS material is now state of the art for highly efficient current leads. With respect to future fusion reactors, it would be very promising to use HTS material not only in current leads but also in coils. This would allow a large increase of efficiency if the coils could be operated at temperatures ≥65 K. With such a high temperature it would be possible to omit the radiation shield of the coils, resulting in a less complex cryostat and a size reduction of the machine. In addition less refrigeration power is needed saving investment and operating costs. However, to come to an HTS fusion coil it is necessary to develop low ac loss HTS cables for currents well above 20 kA at high fields well above 10 T. The high field rules BiSCCO superconductors out at temperatures above 50 K, but RE-123 superconductors are promising. The development of a high current, high field RE-123 HTS fusion cable will not be targeted outside fusion community and has to be in the frame of a long term development programme for

  14. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dabrowski, B. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO{sub 2} layers will lower T{sub c} and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T{sub c}`s are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub n-1}CuO{sub 2n{plus}2{plus}x} family) that have flat and square CuO{sub 2} planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO{sub 2} plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ``metallizing`` the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux.

  15. Structural features that optimize high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, J.D.; Hinks, D.G. Chmaissem, O.; Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F.; Dabrowski, B.

    1996-01-01

    For example, various defects can be introduced into the blocking layer to provide the optimum carrier concentration, but defects that form in or adjacent to the CuO 2 layers will lower T c and eventually destroy superconductivity. After these requirements are satisfied, the highest T c 's are observed for compounds (such as the HgBa 2 Ca n-1 CuO 2n+2+x family) that have flat and square CuO 2 planes and long apical Cu-O bonds. This conclusion is confirmed by the study of materials in which the flatness of the CuO 2 plane can be varied in a systematic way. In more recent work, attention has focused on how the structure can be modified, for example, by chemical substitution, to improve flux pinning properties. Two strategies are being investigated: (1) Increasing the coupling of pancake vortices to form vortex-lines by shortening or ''metallizing'' the blocking layer; and (2) the formation of defects that pin flux

  16. Copper alloys for high heat flux structure applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of copper alloys are reviewed and compared with the requirements for high heat flux structural applications in fusion reactors. High heat flux structural materials must possess a combination of high thermal conductivity and high mechanical strength. The three most promising copper alloys at the present time are oxide dispersion-strengthened copper (Cu-Al 2 O 3 ) and two precipitation-hardened copper alloys (Cu-Cr-Zr and Cu-Ni-Be). These three alloys are capable of room temperature yield strengths >400 MPa and thermal conductivities up to 350 W/m-K. All of these alloys require extensive cold working to achieve their optimum strength. Precipitation-hardened copper alloys such Cu-Cr-Zr are susceptible to softening due to precipitate overaging and recrystallization during brazing, whereas the dislocation structure in Cu-Al 2 O 3 remains stabilized during typical high temperature brazing cycles. All three alloys exhibit good resistance to irradiation-induced softening and void swelling at temperatures below 300 degrees C. The precipitation-strengthened allows typically soften during neutron irradiation at temperatures above about 300 degrees C and therefore should only be considered for applications operating at temperatures 2 O 3 ) is considered to be the best candidate for high heat flux structural applications

  17. Rf breakdown studies in room temperature electron linac structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.; Wang, J.W.

    1988-05-01

    This paper is an overall review of studies carried out by the authors and some of their colleagues on RF breakdown, Field Emission and RF processing in room temperature electron linac structure. The motivation behind this work is twofold: in a fundamental way, to contribute to the understanding of the RF breakdown phenomenon, and as an application, to determine the maximum electric field gradient that can be obtained and used safely in future e/sup +-/ linear colliders. Indeed, the next generation of these machines will have to reach into the TeV (10 12 eV) energy range, and the accelerating gradient will be to be of the crucial parameters affecting their design, construction and cost. For a specified total energy, the gradient sets the accelerator length, and once the RF structure, frequency and pulse repetition rate are selected, it also determines the peak and average power consumption. These three quantities are at the heart of the ultimate realizability and cost of these accelerators. 24 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Temperature dependent electronic structure and magnetism of metallic systems with localized moments. Application on gadolinium; Temperaturabhaengige elektronische Struktur und Magnetismus von metallischen Systemen mit lokalisierten Momenten. Anwendung auf Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.A.M. dos

    2005-06-24

    This thesis focuses on the theoretical investigation of the temperature dependent electronic and magnetic properties of metallic 4f-systems with localized magnetic moments. The presented theory is based on the Kondo-lattice model, which describes the interaction between a system of 4f-localized magnetic moments and the itinerant conduction band electrons. This interaction is responsible for a remarkable temperature dependence of the electronic structure mainly induced by the subsystem of 4f-localized moments. The many-body problem provoked by the Kondo-lattice model is solved by using a moment conserving Green function technique, which takes care of several special limiting cases. This method reproduces the T=0-exact solvable limiting case of the ferromagnetically saturated semiconductor. The temperature dependent magnetic properties of the 4f-localized subsystem are evaluated by means of a modified Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type procedure, which together with the solution of the electronic part allows for a self-consistent calculation of all the electronic and magnetic properties of the model. Results of model calculations allow to deduce the conditions for ferromagnetism in dependence of the electron density n, exchange coupling J and temperature T. The self-consistently calculated Curie temperature T{sub C} is presented and discussed in dependence of relevant parameters (J, n, and W) of the model. The second part of the thesis is concerned with the investigation of the temperature dependence of the electronic and magnetic properties of the rare-earth metal Gadolinium (Gd). The original Kondo-lattice model is extended to a multi-band Kondo-lattice model and combined with an ab-initio band structure calculation to take into account for the multi-bands in real systems. The single-particle energies of the model are taken from an augmented spherical wave (ASW) band structure calculation. The proposed method avoids the double counting of relevant

  19. Pyrolyzed feather fibers for adsorbent and high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senoz, Erman

    used in applications such as adsorption, storage, and separation of small gas molecules. The maximum excess H2 storage capacity was 1.5 wt% at 77 K and at pressures below 2 MPa. The notable H2 adsorption of PCFF below 1 MPa can be justified by the abundance of microporosity and the nanopores available for H2 penetration. In the second step of the pyrolysis the protein matrix went through a series of transformations including cyclization and aromatization reactions above the melting point. A partially cyclic carbon-nitrogen framework (carbon/nitrogen ratio=2.38) supported by double and triple bonds and oxygen functionalities is the suggested structural model for the PCFF. The useful fibers and adsorbents produced from CFF in this dissertation can encourage researchers to use high temperature heat treatments on keratin-based fibers. Also, the identified pyrolysis mechanisms can serve as a guide for producing materials with desired properties from protein-based materials, particularly in textile, high performance composite and catalyst industries.

  20. Temperature-dependent structural properties of P3HT films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorian, S; Joshi, S; Pietsch, U, E-mail: grigorian@physik.uni-siegen.de [Institute of Physics, University Siegen, Walter Flex Strasse 3, D-57068, Siegen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Structural investigations of spin coated and drop cast poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT films have been performed under x-ray grazing incidence geometry. Drop cast films revealed to be highly oriented and crystalline and only slightly modify with the temperature. In contrast, spin coated films provided random orientational distribution of nanocrystallites and undergo significant morphological and structural changes during annealing. Interestingly, spin coated films of low and high molecular weight fractions behavior differently as a function of temperature. Crystalline domains of the low molecular weight fractions have been decreased, and, in contrast, we found an improvement of crystallinity of high molecular weight fraction with increase of the temperature.

  1. Temperature-dependent structural properties of P3HT films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorian, S; Joshi, S; Pietsch, U

    2010-01-01

    Structural investigations of spin coated and drop cast poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT films have been performed under x-ray grazing incidence geometry. Drop cast films revealed to be highly oriented and crystalline and only slightly modify with the temperature. In contrast, spin coated films provided random orientational distribution of nanocrystallites and undergo significant morphological and structural changes during annealing. Interestingly, spin coated films of low and high molecular weight fractions behavior differently as a function of temperature. Crystalline domains of the low molecular weight fractions have been decreased, and, in contrast, we found an improvement of crystallinity of high molecular weight fraction with increase of the temperature.

  2. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs.

  3. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs

  4. Temperature-induced structural changes in fluorozirconate glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Youngman, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic structure and its temperature dependence in fluorozirconate glasses and supercooled liquids have been studied with high-resolution and high-temperature 19 F and 23 Na nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 19 F NMR spectra in these glasses show the presence of multiple F environments. Temperature dependence of the 19 F magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra indicates a progressive change in the average F coordination environment in the glass structure, besides motional narrowing due to substantial mobility of F - ions. The observed change in the average 19 F NMR chemical shift is consistent with progressive breaking of the Zr-F-Zr linkages in the glass structure with increasing temperature. The onset of such a change in F speciation is observed at temperatures well below T g . This result is evidence of changes in the average equilibrium structure in an inorganic glass-forming liquid at T g , albeit on a local scale. The 23 Na NMR spectra indicate that the cations in these glasses become significantly mobile only at temperatures T≥T g , which allows for the onset of global structural relaxation and viscous flow

  5. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  6. Distributed Piezoelectric Sensor System for Damage Identification in Structures Subjected to Temperature Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, Jaime; Pozo, Francesc; Tibaduiza, Diego A; Anaya, Maribel

    2017-05-31

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a very important area in a wide spectrum of fields and engineering applications. With an SHM system, it is possible to reduce the number of non-necessary inspection tasks, the associated risk and the maintenance cost in a wide range of structures during their lifetime. One of the problems in the detection and classification of damage are the constant changes in the operational and environmental conditions. Small changes of these conditions can be considered by the SHM system as damage even though the structure is healthy. Several applications for monitoring of structures have been developed and reported in the literature, and some of them include temperature compensation techniques. In real applications, however, digital processing technologies have proven their value by: (i) offering a very interesting way to acquire information from the structures under test; (ii) applying methodologies to provide a robust analysis; and (iii) performing a damage identification with a practical useful accuracy. This work shows the implementation of an SHM system based on the use of piezoelectric (PZT) sensors for inspecting a structure subjected to temperature changes. The methodology includes the use of multivariate analysis, sensor data fusion and machine learning approaches. The methodology is tested and evaluated with aluminum and composite structures that are subjected to temperature variations. Results show that damage can be detected and classified in all of the cases in spite of the temperature changes.

  7. Distributed Piezoelectric Sensor System for Damage Identification in Structures Subjected to Temperature Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Vitola

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM is a very important area in a wide spectrum of fields and engineering applications. With an SHM system, it is possible to reduce the number of non-necessary inspection tasks, the associated risk and the maintenance cost in a wide range of structures during their lifetime. One of the problems in the detection and classification of damage are the constant changes in the operational and environmental conditions. Small changes of these conditions can be considered by the SHM system as damage even though the structure is healthy. Several applications for monitoring of structures have been developed and reported in the literature, and some of them include temperature compensation techniques. In real applications, however, digital processing technologies have proven their value by: (i offering a very interesting way to acquire information from the structures under test; (ii applying methodologies to provide a robust analysis; and (iii performing a damage identification with a practical useful accuracy. This work shows the implementation of an SHM system based on the use of piezoelectric (PZT sensors for inspecting a structure subjected to temperature changes. The methodology includes the use of multivariate analysis, sensor data fusion and machine learning approaches. The methodology is tested and evaluated with aluminum and composite structures that are subjected to temperature variations. Results show that damage can be detected and classified in all of the cases in spite of the temperature changes.

  8. Experimental study on the double barrier structure at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H Y; Chua, S J [Centre for Optoelectronics, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)

    1994-06-15

    An experimental study of AlAs / GaAs / AlAs double barrier structure is carried out. The double barrier and quantum well structure are grown by MBE. The peak-to-valley ratio 2.6 : 1 with peak current density of 1.6 kA/cm/sup 2 at room temperature have been achieved. (authors)

  9. High temperature structure design for FBRs and analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Koji

    1986-01-01

    In the case of FBRs, the operation temperature exceeds 500 deg C, therefore, the design taking the inelastic characteristics of structural materials, such as plasticity and creep, into account is required, and the high grade and detailed evaluation of design is demanded. This new high temperature structure design technology has been advanced in respective countries taking up experimental, prototype and demonstration reactors as the targets. The development of FBRs in Japan was begun with the experimental reactor 'Joyo' which has been operated since 1977, and now, the prototype FBR 'Monju' of 280 MWe is under construction, which is expected to attain the criticality in 1992. In order to realize FBRs which can compete with LWRs through the construction of a demonstration FBR, the construction of large scale plants and the heightening of the economy and reliability are necessary. The features and the role of FBR structural design, the method of high temperature structure design and the trend of its standardization, the trend of the structural analysis technology for FBRs such as inelastic analysis, buckling analysis and fluid and structure coupled vibration analysis, the present status of structural analysis programs, and the subjects for the future of high temperature structure design are explained. (Kako, I.)

  10. High-temperature superconductors in application - fight for the top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    For the superconductor market two-digit growth rates are predicted until after the year 2000. The decrosslinking of the high temperature superconductors initiated a worldwide race for first applications. The report considers the situation of raw materials and the application potentials in the USA, Japan and Western Europe. (orig.) [de

  11. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  13. A novel SOI pressure sensor for high temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sainan; Liang Ting; Wang Wei; Hong Yingping; Zheng Tingli; Xiong Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The silicon on insulator (SOI) high temperature pressure sensor is a novel pressure sensor with high-performance and high-quality. A structure of a SOI high-temperature pressure sensor is presented in this paper. The key factors including doping concentration and power are analyzed. The process of the sensor is designed with the critical process parameters set appropriately. The test result at room temperature and high temperature shows that nonlinear error below is 0.1%, and hysteresis is less than 0.5%. High temperature measuring results show that the sensor can be used for from room temperature to 350 °C in harsh environments. It offers a reference for the development of high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. (semiconductor devices)

  14. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  15. Miniaturized high-temperature superconducting multiplexer with cascaded quadruplet structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhang; Jingping, Liu; Shaolin, Yan; Lan, Fang; Bo, Zhang; Xinjie, Zhao

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, compact high temperature superconducting (HTS) multiplexers are presented for satellite communication applications. The first multiplexer consists of an input coupling node and three high-order bandpass filters, which is named triplexer. The node is realized by a loop microstrip line instead of conventional T-junction to eliminate the redundant susceptance due to combination of three filters. There are two eight-pole band-pass filters and one ten-pole band-pass filter with cascaded quadruplet structure for realizing high isolation. Moreover, the triplexer is extended to a multiplexer with six channels so as to verify the expansibility of the suggested approach. The triplexer is fabricated using double-sided YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on a 38 × 25 mm2 LaAlO3 substrate. The experimental results, when compared with those ones from the T-junction multiplexer, show that our multiplexer has lower insertion loss, smaller sizes and higher isolation between any two channels. Also, good agreement has been achieved between simulations and measurements, which illustrate the effectiveness of our methods for the design of high performance HTS multiplexers.

  16. Effect of high temperature on integrity of concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of high temperature on concrete material properties and structural behavior are studied in order to relate these effects to the performance of concrete containment structures. Salient data obtained from a test program undertaken to study the behavior of a restrained concrete structure under thermal gradient loads up to its ultimate limit are described. The preliminary results indicate that concrete material properties can be considered to remain unaltered up to temperatures of 100 0 C. The presence of thermal gradients did not significantly affect the structures ultimate mechanical load capacity. Relaxation of restraint forces due to creep was found to be an important factor. The test findings are compared with the observations made in available literature. The effect of test findings on the integrity analysis of a containment structure are discussed. The problem is studied from the viewpoint of a CANDU heavy water reactor containment

  17. Creep rupture of structures subjected to variable loading and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojewodzki, W.

    1975-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to show on the basis of equations and the analysis of creep mechanisms the possibilities of a description of the creep behavior of material under variable temperature and loading conditions. Also the influence of cyclic proportional loading and temperature gradient upon the rupture life and strains of a thick cylinder is investigated in detail. The obtained theoretical creep curves coincide with the experimental results for investigated steel in the temperature range from 500 0 C to 575 0 C. The constitutive equations together with the functions determined previously are applied to solve the problem of thick cylinder subjected to cyclic proportional pressure and temperature gradient. Numerical results for the thick steel cylinder are presented both in diagrammatical and tabular form. The obtained new results clearly show the significant influence of temperature gradient, cyclic temperature gradient, and cyclic pressure upon the stress redistribution, the magnitude of deformation, the propagation of the front damage and the rupture life. It was found that small temperature fluctuations at elevated temperature can shorten the rupture life very considerably. The introduced description of the creep rupture behavior of material under variable temperature and loading conditions together with the results for the thick cylinder indicate the possibilities of solutions of practical problems encountered in structural mechanics of reactor technology

  18. Ferroelectrics principles, structure and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Merchant, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectric physics is a theory on ferroelectric phase transition for explaining various related phenomena, which is different from dielectric physics. Ferroelectric materials are important functional materials for various applications such as NVRAMs, high energy density capacitors, actuators, MEMs, sonar sensors, microphones and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). This book investigates the dielectric, ferroelectric and energy storage properties of barium zirconate-titanate/barium calcium-titanate (BZT-BCT) based ceramic for high energy density capacitors. It also compares the energy storage capabilities of ceramic powders with polymer-ceramic nanocomposites; and discusses dielectric properties of ferroelectricity in composition distributions.

  19. Basic interrupt and command structures and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.C.

    1974-01-01

    Interrupt and command structures of a real-time system are described through specific examples. References to applications of a real-time system and programing development references are supplied. (auth)

  20. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS UNDERGOING LAYERED ACCRETION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesniak, M. V.; Desch, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the temperature structures of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) around T Tauri stars heated by both incident starlight and viscous dissipation. We present a new algorithm for calculating the temperatures in disks in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium, based on Rybicki's method for iteratively calculating the vertical temperature structure within an annulus. At each iteration, the method solves for the temperature at all locations simultaneously, and converges rapidly even at high (>>10 4 ) optical depth. The method retains the full frequency dependence of the radiation field. We use this algorithm to study for the first time disks evolving via the magnetorotational instability. Because PPD midplanes are weakly ionized, this instability operates preferentially in their surface layers, and disks will undergo layered accretion. We find that the midplane temperatures T mid are strongly affected by the column density Σ a of the active layers, even for fixed mass accretion rate M-dot . Models assuming uniform accretion predict midplane temperatures in the terrestrial planet forming region several x 10 2 K higher than our layered accretion models do. For M-dot -7 M sun yr -1 and the column densities Σ a -2 associated with layered accretion, disk temperatures are indistinguishable from those of a passively heated disk. We find emergent spectra are insensitive to Σ a , making it difficult to observationally identify disks undergoing layered versus uniform accretion.

  1. Structure and application of galvanomagnetic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, H

    1969-01-01

    International Series of Monographs on Semiconductors, Volume 8: Structure and Application of Galvanomagnetic Devices focuses on the composition, reactions, transformations, and applications of galvanomagnetic devices. The book first ponders on basic physical concepts, design and fabrication of galvanomagnetic devices, and properties of galvanomagnetic devices. Discussions focus on changes in electrical properties on irradiation with high-energy particles, magnetoresistor field-plate, Hall generator, preparation of semiconductor films by vacuum deposition, structure of field-plate magnetoresist

  2. Modeling high temperature materials behavior for structural analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Naumenko, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents approaches to characterize inelastic behavior of materials and structures at high temperature. Starting from experimental observations, it discusses basic features of inelastic phenomena including creep, plasticity, relaxation, low cycle and thermal fatigue. The authors formulate constitutive equations to describe the inelastic response for the given states of stress and microstructure. They introduce evolution equations to capture hardening, recovery, softening, ageing and damage processes. Principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics are presented to provide a framework for the modeling materials behavior with the aim of structural analysis of high-temperature engineering components.

  3. Thermodynamic and structural characteristics of cement minerals at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Meike, A.; Viani, B.E.; Martin, S.; Phillips, B.L.

    1994-05-01

    We have instituted an experimental and including program designed to elucidate the structural and thermodynamic response of cement minerals to elevated temperature. Components of the program involve: (a) synthesis of hydrated Ca-silicates; (b) structural analysis of cement phases induced by heating and dehydration/rehydration; (c) mechanistic and thermodynamic descriptions of the hydration/dehydration behavior of hydrated Ca-silicates as a function of temperature, pressure and relative humidity; (d) study of naturally occurring hydrated Ca-silicates; and (e) measurements of thermodynamic data for hydrated Ca-silicates

  4. Testing the Application for Analyzing Structured Entities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the testing process of the application for the analysis of structured text entities. The structured entities are presented. Quality characteristics of structured entities are identified and analyzed. The design and building processes are presented. Rules for building structured entities are described. The steps of building the application for the analysis of structured text entities are presented. The objective of the testing process is defined. Ways of testing the application on components and as a whole are established. A testing strategy for different objectives is proposed. The behavior of users during the testing period is analyzed. Statistical analysis regarding the behavior of users in processes of infinite resources access are realized.

  5. Structural changes of manganese spinel at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guohua; Iijima, Yukiko; Azuma, Hideto [Nishi Battery Laboratories, Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okata, Kanagawa 243-0021 Atsugi (Japan); Kudo, Yoshihiro [Technical Support Center, Sony Corporation, 4-16-1 Okata, Kanagawa 243-0021 Atsugi (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    A chemical synthesis route to Cr-doped and undoped Mn spinel was developed for the purpose of detailed structural analysis for elucidating the relationship between storage performance and structural changes at elevated temperatures. We identified a two-phase segregation in the lithium compositional range of 0.6temperatures was observed for electrochemical cells. These two phases also coexist in Cr-doped spinel in the lithium compositional range of 0.4temperatures. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis revealed that the Cr-doped samples showed less change in the local structure after storage than the undoped spinel samples. These results suggest that the Cr-doped spinel has higher structural stability at elevated temperatures than the undoped spinel.

  6. Structural stability of high entropy alloys under pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Azkar S.; Su, Y.; Liu, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) is a key issue before their selection for industrial applications. In this study, in-situ high-pressure and high-temperature synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on three typical HEAs Ni20Co20Fe20Mn20Cr20, Hf25Nb25Zr25Ti...

  7. Synthesis, structure and low temperature study of electric transport ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Introduction. Layered perovskite oxides are a promising group of mixed- conducting materials with potential applications for oxygen- separation membranes, gas sensor devices and electrodes of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (Moseley and. Williams 1989; Meixner and Lampe 1996; Skinner and Kil-.

  8. On Industrial Application of Structural Reliability Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real applications is much smaller than what one would expect. At the beginning most applications were in the design/analyses area especially...

  9. Transparent wood for functional and structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Yang, Xuan; Berglund, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Optically transparent wood combines mechanical performance with optical functionalities is an emerging candidate for applications in smart buildings and structural optics and photonics. The present review summarizes transparent wood preparation methods, optical and mechanical performance, and functionalization routes, and discusses potential applications. The various challenges are discussed for the purpose of improved performance, scaled-up production and realization of advanced applications. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `New horizons for cellulose nanotechnology'.

  10. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, which allows a shape to be formed prior to the cure, and is then pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Basalt fibers are used for the reinforcement in the composite system. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material.

  12. Creep behavior of materials for high-temperature reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.; Hartnagel, W.; Iischner, B.; Schepp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) application are selected according to their creep behavior. For two alloys--Incoloy-800 used for the live steam tubing of the thorium high-temperature reactor and Inconel-617 evaluated for tubings in advanced HTGRs--creep curves are measured and described by equations. A microstructural interpretation is given. An essential result is that nonstable microstructures determine the creep behavior

  13. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  14. Mechanical properties of LMR structural materials at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. W.; Kuk, I. H.; Ryu, W. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Austenitic stainless is used for the structural material of liquid metal reactor (LMR) because of good mechanical properties at high temperature. Stainless steel having more resistant to temperature by adding minor element has been developing for operating the LMR at higher temperature. Of many elements, nitrogen is a prospective element to modify type 316L(N) stainless steel because nitrogen is the most effective element for solid solution and because nitrogen retards the precipitation of carbide at grain boundary. Ti, Nb, and V are added to improve creep properties by stabilizing the carbides through forming MC carbide. Testing techniques of tensile, fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue at high temperature are difficult. Moreover, testing times for creep and creep-fatigue tests are very long up to several tens of thousands hours because creep and creep-fatigue phenomena are time-dependent damage mechanism. So, it is hard to acquire the material data for designing LMR systems during a limited time. In addition, the integrity of LMR structural materials at the end of LMR life has to be predicted from the laboratory data tested during the short term because there is no data tested during 40 years. Therefore, the effect of elements on mechanical properties at high temperature was reviewed in this study and many methods to predict the long-term behaviors of structural materials by simulated modelling equation is shown in this report. (author). 32 refs., 9 tabs., 38 figs

  15. Survey of high-temperature nuclear heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, N.; Schaefer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear heat application at high temperatures can be divided into two areas - use of high-temperature steam up to 550 deg. C and use of high-temperature helium up to about 950 deg. C. Techniques of high-temperature steam and heat production and application are being developed in several IAEA Member States. In all these countries the use of steam for other than electricity production is still in a project definition phase. Plans are being discussed about using steam in chemical industries, oil refineries and for new synfuel producing plants. The use of nuclear generated steam for oil recovery from sands and shale is also being considered. High-temperature nuclear process heat production gives new possibilities for the application of nuclear energy - hard coals, lignites, heavy oils, fuels with problems concerning transport, handling and pollution can be converted into gaseous or liquid energy carriers with no loss of their energy contents. The main methods for this conversion are hydrogasification with hydrogen generated by nuclear heated steam reformers and steam gasification. These techniques will allow countries with large coal resources to replace an important part of their natural gas and oil consumption. Even countries with no fossil fuels can benefit from high-temperature nuclear heat - hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting, nuclear steel making, ammonia production and the chemical heat-pipe system are examples in this direction. (author)

  16. Effect of temperature on structure and corrosion resistance for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of plating temperatures between 60 and 90◦C on structure and corrosion resistance for elec- troless NiWP coatings ..... which helps to form fine grain. At 80 .... [23] Zhang W X, Jiang Z H, Li G Y and Jiang Q 2008 Surf. Coat. Technol.

  17. Quark structure of static correlators in high temperature QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Claude; DeGrand, Thomas A.; DeTar, Carleton; Gottlieb, Steven; Krasnitz, A.; Ogilvie, Michael C.; Sugar, R. L.; Toussaint, D.

    1992-07-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature with two flavors of Kogut-Susskind quarks on the Intel iPSC/860 parallel processor. We investigate the properties of the objects whose exchange gives static screening lengths by reconstructing their correlated quark-antiquark structure.

  18. Quark structure of static correlators in high temperature QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C.; Ogilvie, M.C.; DeGrand, T.A.; DeTar, C.; Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A.; Sugar, R.L.; Toussaint, D.

    1992-01-01

    We present results of numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature with two flavors of Kogut-Susskind quarks on the Intel iPSC/860 parellel processor. We investigate the properties of the objects whose exhange gives static screening lengths by reconstructing their correlated quark-antiquark structure. (orig.)

  19. Quark structure of static correlators in high temperature QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C.; Ogilvie, M.C. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Physics); DeGrand, T.A. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Physics Dept.); DeTar, C. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Physics Dept.); Gottlieb, S.; Krasnitz, A. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Sugar, R.L. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Toussaint, D. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics)

    1992-07-20

    We present results of numerical simulations of quantum chromodynamics at finite temperature with two flavors of Kogut-Susskind quarks on the Intel iPSC/860 parellel processor. We investigate the properties of the objects whose exhange gives static screening lengths by reconstructing their correlated quark-antiquark structure. (orig.).

  20. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  1. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoft-Christensen, P

    1998-06-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au) 32 refs.

  2. On industrial application of structural reliability theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoft-Christensen, P.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper it is shown that modern structural reliability theory is being successfully applied to a number of different industries. This review of papers is in no way complete. In the literature there is a large number of similar applications and also application not touched on in this presentation. There has been some concern among scientists from this area that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry. It is probably correct that structural reliability theory is not being used by industry as much as it should be used. However, the work by the ESReDA Working Group clearly shows the vary wide application of structural reliability theory by many different industries. One must also have in mind that industry often is reluctant to publish data related to safety and reliability. (au)

  3. Response of Soft Continuous Structures and Topological Defects to a Temperature Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Rei; Mitsui, Shun; Tanaka, Hajime

    2017-09-08

    Thermophoresis, which is mass transport induced by a temperature gradient, has recently attracted considerable attention as a new way to transport materials. So far the study has been focused on the transport of discrete structures such as colloidal particles, proteins, and polymers in solutions. However, the response of soft continuous structures such as membranes and gels to a temperature gradient has been largely unexplored. Here we study the behavior of a lamellar phase made of stacked surfactant bilayer membranes under a temperature gradient. We find the migration of membranes towards a low-temperature region, causing the increase in the degree of membrane undulation fluctuations towards that direction. This is contrary to our intuition that the fluctuations are weaker at a lower temperature. We show that this can be explained by temperature-gradient-induced migration of membranes under the topological constraint coming from the connectivity of each membrane. We also reveal that the pattern of an edge dislocation array formed in a wedge-shaped cell can be controlled by a temperature gradient. These findings suggest that application of a temperature gradient provides a novel way to control the organization of soft continuous structures such as membranes, gels, and foams, in a manner essentially different from the other types of fields, and to manipulate topological defects.

  4. Common rectifier diodes in temperature measurement applications below 50 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervelae, J; Stenvall, A; Mikkonen, R

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we studied the use of common electronic semiconductor diodes in temperature measurements at cryogenic atmosphere. The motivation for this is the high price of calibrated cryogenic temperature sensors since there are some applications, like quench detection, in which a cheaper and a less accurate sensor would suffice. We measured the forward voltage as a function of temperature, V f (T), of several silicon rectifier diodes to determine the accuracy and interchangeability of the diodes. The experimental results confirmed that V f (T) of common rectifier diodes are similar to cryogenic sensor diodes, but the variability between two samples is much larger. The interchangeability of the diodes proved to be poor if absolute temperatures are to be measured. However for sensing changes in temperature they proved to be adequate and thus can be used to measure e.g. quench propagation or sense quench ignition at multiple locations with cheap price.

  5. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.H.; Wang, X.D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q.P.; Xie, H.L.; Xiao, T.Q.; Zhang, D.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for self-diffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q_6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts. - Graphical abstract: Atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, which both demonstrate the existence of a liquid structural change together with reported density, viscosity, electric resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power data.

  6. Theoretical temperature model with experimental validation for CLIC Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2126138; Vamvakas, Alex; Alme, Johan

    Micron level stability of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) components is one of the main requirements to meet the luminosity goal for the future $48 \\,km$ long underground linear accelerator. The radio frequency (RF) power used for beam acceleration causes heat generation within the aligned structures, resulting in mechanical movements and structural deformations. A dedicated control of the air- and water- cooling system in the tunnel is therefore crucial to improve alignment accuracy. This thesis investigates the thermo-mechanical behavior of the CLIC Accelerating Structure (AS). In CLIC, the AS must be aligned to a precision of $10\\,\\mu m$. The thesis shows that a relatively simple theoretical model can be used within reasonable accuracy to predict the temperature response of an AS as a function of the applied RF power. During failure scenarios or maintenance interventions, the RF power is turned off resulting in no heat dissipation and decrease in the overall temperature of the components. The theoretica...

  7. Rapid and high throughput fabrication of high temperature stable structures through PDMS transfer printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, Erik; Freitag, Nathan; Korampally, Venumadhav

    2017-07-01

    We report on a facile and low cost fabrication approach for structures—gratings and enclosed nanochannels, through simple solution processed chemistries in conjunction with nanotransfer printing techniques. The ink formulation primarily consisting of an organosilicate polymeric network with a small percentage of added 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane crosslinker allows one to obtain robust structures that are not only stable towards high temperature processing steps as high as 550 °C but also exhibit exceptional stability against a host of organic solvent washes. No discernable structure distortion was observed compared to the as-printed structures (room temperature processed) when printed structures were subjected to temperatures as high as 550 °C. We further demonstrate the applicability of this technique towards the fabrication of more complex nanostructures such as enclosed channels through a double transfer method, leveraging the exceptional room temperature cross-linking ability of the printed structures and their subsequent resistance to dissolution in organic solvent washes. The exceptional temperature and physico-chemical stability of the nanotransfer printed structures makes this a useful fabrication tool that may be applied as is, or integrated with conventional lithographic techniques for the large area fabrication of functional nanostructures and devices.

  8. AMSAHTS 1990: Advances in Materials Science and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Larry H. (Editor); Flom, Yury (Editor); Moorjani, Kishin (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This publication is comprised of abstracts for oral and poster presentations scheduled for AMSAHTS '90. The conference focused on understanding high temperature superconductivity with special emphasis on materials issues and applications. AMSAHTS 90, highlighted the state of the art in fundamental understanding of the nature of high-Tc superconductivity (HTSC) as well as the chemistry, structure, properties, processing and stability of HTSC oxides. As a special feature of the conference, space applications of HTSC were discussed by NASA and Navy specialists.

  9. Novel structuring routines of titania films for application in photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Niedermeier, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Novel routines to structure titania thin films on various length scales are investigated regarding photovoltaic applications. The main focus of the investigations lies on the custom-tailoring of the morphologies of the titania films using sol-gel chemistry in combination with block copolymer templating. Additionally, a low-temperature routine for functional hybrid films as well as the growth of gold as electrode material on top of an organic hole-conductor are investigated. Im Hinblick auf...

  10. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...

  11. Low temperature impact testing of welded structural wrought iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Zachary

    During the second half of the 19th century, structural wrought iron was commonly used in construction of bridges and other structures. Today, these remaining structures are still actively in use and may fall under the protection of historic preservation agencies. Continued use and protection leads to the need for inspection, maintenance, and repair of the wrought iron within these structures. Welding can be useful to achieve the appropriate repair, rehabilitation, or replacement of wrought iron members. There is currently very little published on modern welding techniques for historic wrought iron. There is also no pre-qualified method for this welding. The demand for welding in the repair of historic structural wrought iron has led to a line of research investigating shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of historic wrought iron at the University of Colorado Denver. This prior research selected the weld type and other weld specifications to try and achieve a recognized specific welding procedure using modern SMAW technology and techniques. This thesis continues investigating SMAW of historic wrought iron. Specifically, this thesis addresses the toughness of these welds from analysis of the data collected from performing Charpy V-Notch (CVN) Impact Tests. Temperature was varied to observe the material response of the welds at low temperature. The wrought iron used in testing was from a historic vehicle bridge in Minnesota, USA. This area, and many other areas with wrought iron structures, can experience sustained or fluctuating temperatures far below freezing. Investigating the toughness of welds in historic wrought iron at these temperatures is necessary to fully understand material responses of the existing structures in need of maintenance and repair. It was shown that welded wrought iron is tougher and more ductile than non-welded wrought iron. In regards to toughness, welding is an acceptable repair method. Information on wrought iron, low temperature failure

  12. Proceedings, phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedell, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Phenomenology and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1991, was sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Materials Science, the Advanced Studies Program on High Temperature Superconductivity Theory (ASP) and the Exploratory Research and Development Center. This is the second symposium in the series. High Temperature Superconductivity, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1989, also published by Addison Wesley, focused on the cutting-edge theoretical and experimental issues in high temperature superconductors. This symposium, with its focus on the phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors, gives a complementary review of the aspects of the field closely related to the impact of high temperature superconductors on technology. The objective of ASP is to advance the field on a broad front with no specific point of view by bringing a team of leading academic theorists into a joint effort with the theoretical and experimental scientists of a major DOE national laboratory. The ASP consisted of fellows led by Robert Schrieffer (UCSB and now FSU) joined by David Pines (University of illinois), Elihu Abrahams (Rutgers), Sebastian Doniach (Stanford), and Maurice Rice (ETH, Zurich) and theoretical and experimental staff of Los Alamos National Laboratory. This synergism of academic, laboratory, theoretical and experimental research produced a level of interaction and excitement that would not be possible otherwise. This publication and the previous one in the series are just examples of how this approach to advancing science can achieve significant contributions

  13. High temperature structural and magnetic properties of cobalt nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Atmane, Kahina [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Zighem, Fatih [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Soumare, Yaghoub [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Ibrahim, Mona; Boubekri, Rym [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA CNRS UMR 5215, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Maurer, Thomas [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Margueritat, Jeremie [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Piquemal, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.piquemal@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, 15 rue J.-A. de Baief, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Ott, Frederic; Chaboussant, Gregory [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEA CNRS UMR 12, IRAMIS, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Schoenstein, Frederic; Jouini, Noureddine [LSPM, CNRS UPR 9001, Universite Paris XIII, Institut Galilee, 99 av. J.-B. Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Viau, Guillaume, E-mail: gviau@insa-toulouse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, LPCNO, INSA CNRS UMR 5215, 135 av. de Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2013-01-15

    We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanoparticles ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X ray diffraction (XRD) and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. The coercivity can be modelled by {mu}{sub 0}H{sub C}=2(K{sub MC}+K{sub shape})/M{sub S} with K{sub MC} the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant, K{sub shape} the shape anisotropy constant and M{sub S} the saturation magnetization. H{sub C} decreases linearly when the temperature is increased due to the loss of the Co magnetocrystalline anisotropy contribution. At 500 K, 50% of the room temperature coercivity is preserved corresponding to the shape anisotropy contribution only. We show that the coercivity drop is reversible in the range 300-500 K in good agreement with the absence of particle alteration. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. - Graphical abstract: We present in this paper the structural and magnetic properties of high aspect ratio Co nanorods ({approx}10) at high temperatures (up to 623 K) using in-situ X-ray diffraction and SQUID characterizations. We show that the anisotropic shapes, the structural and texture properties are preserved up to 500 K. Above 525 K, the magnetic properties are irreversibly altered either by sintering or by oxidation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferromagnetic Co nanorods are prepared using the polyol process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural and texture properties of the Co nanorods are preserved up to 500 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic properties of the Co nanorods are irreversibly altered above 525 K.

  14. Structural equation modeling methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jichuan

    2012-01-01

    A reference guide for applications of SEM using Mplus Structural Equation Modeling: Applications Using Mplus is intended as both a teaching resource and a reference guide. Written in non-mathematical terms, this book focuses on the conceptual and practical aspects of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Basic concepts and examples of various SEM models are demonstrated along with recently developed advanced methods, such as mixture modeling and model-based power analysis and sample size estimate for SEM. The statistical modeling program, Mplus, is also featured and provides researchers with a

  15. Applications of high-temperature superconductors in power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, John R

    2003-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in the late 1980s, many materials and families of materials have been discovered that exhibit superconductivity at temperatures well above 20 K. Of these, several families of HTSs have been developed for use in electrical power applications. Demonstration of devices such as motors, generators, transmission lines, transformers, fault-current limiters, and flywheels in which HTSs and bulk HTSs have been used has proceeded to ever larger scales. First-generation wire, made from bismuth-based copper oxides, was used in many demonstrations. The rapid development of second-generation wire, made by depositing thin films of yttrium-based copper oxide on metallic substrates, is expected to further accelerate commercial applications. Bulk HTSs, in which large single-grain crystals are used as basic magnetic components, have also been developed and have potential for electrical power applications

  16. Application of zirconia membranes as high-temperature PH sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neidrach, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The zirconia pH sensor behaves much like the classical glass electrode, but it extends the range of measurement to much higher temperatures - about 300 0 vs 120 0 C. It also has virtues over the glass electrode at lower temperatures because of the absence of an ''alkaline error.'' Like the glass electrode, it is insensitive to changes in the redox potential of the environment and, in turn, it exerts no influence on the environment. Such sensors have been finding application in the direct measurement of the pH of geothermal brines, of water in nuclear reactors, and in high-temperature corrosion studies. The sensors can also be used as ''pseudoreference'' electrodes for the measurement of redox and corrosion potentials in high-temperature media

  17. Status and future perspective of applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    The material research on the high temperature superconductivity for the past ten years gave us sufficient information on the new phenomena of these new materials. It seems that new applications in a very wide range of industries are increasing rapidly. In this report three main topics of the applications are given ; [a] progress of the superconducting bulk materials and their applications to the flywheel electricity storage system and others, [b] progress in the development of superconducting tapes and their applications to power cables, the high field superconducting magnet for the SMES and for the pulling system of large silicon single crystal, and [c] development of new superconducting electronic devices (SFQ) and the possiblity of the application to next generation supercomputers. These examples show the great capability of the superconductivity technology and it is expected that the real superconductivity industry will take off around the year of 2005.

  18. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  19. Temperature rise and stress induced by microcracks in accelerating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The temperature rise and induced stress due to Ohmic heating in the vicinity of microcracks on the walls of high-gradient accelerating structures are considered. The temperature rise and induced stress depend on the orientation of the crack with respect to the rf magnetic field, the shape of the crack, and the power and duration of the rf pulse. Under certain conditions the presence of cracks can double the temperature rise over that of a smooth surface. Stress at the bottom of the cracks can be several times larger than that of the case when there are no cracks. We study these effects both analytically and by computer simulation. It is shown that the stress in cracks is maximal when the crack depth is on the order of the thermal penetration depth.

  20. Application of Combined Sustained and Cyclic Loading Test Results to Alloy 617 Elevated Temperature Design Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jetter, Robert I [Global Egineering and Technology, LLC, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Sham, Sam [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Alloy 617 is a reference structural material for very high temperature components of advanced-gas cooled reactors with outlet temperatures in the range of 900-950°C . In order for designers to be able to use Alloy 617 for these high temperature components, Alloy 617 has to be approved for use in Section III (the nuclear section) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A plan has been developed to submit a draft code for Alloy 617 to ASME Section III by 2015. However, the current rules in Subsection NH for the evaluation of strain limits and creep-fatigue damage using simplified methods based on elastic analysis have been deemed inappropriate for Alloy 617 at temperatures above 1200°F (650°C). The rationale for this exclusion is that at higher temperatures it is not feasible to decouple plasticity and creep deformation, which is the basis for the current simplified rules. This temperature, 1200 °F, is well below the temperature range of interest for this material in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) applications. The only current alternative is, thus, a full inelastic analysis which requires sophisticated material models which have been formulated but not yet verified. To address this issue, proposed code rules have been developed which are based on the use of elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) analysis methods and which are expected to be applicable to very high temperatures.

  1. Structure and low temperature thermal relaxation of amorphized germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, C.J.; Ridgway, M.C.; Byrne, A.P.; Clerc, C.; Hansen, J.L.; Larsen, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of implantation-induced damage in amorphized Ge has been investigated using high resolution extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). EXAFS data analysis was performed with the Cumulant Method, allowing a full reconstruction of the interatomic distance distribution (RDF). For the case of MeV implantation at -196 deg C, for an ion-dose range extending two orders of magnitude beyond that required for amorphization, a dose-dependent asymmetric RDF was determined for the amorphous phase including an increase in bond-length as a function of ion dose. Low-temperature thermal annealing resulted in structural relaxation of the amorphous phase as evidenced by a reduction in the centroid, asymmetry and width of the RDF. Such an effect was attributed to the formation (and subsequent annihilation) of three- and five-fold Co-ordinated atoms, comparing favourably to theoretical simulations of the structure of a-Ge

  2. High temperature polymer film dielectrics for aerospace power conditioning capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Narayanan, E-mail: venkats3@gmail.co [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Dang, Thuy D. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Nanostructured and Biological Materials Branch (AFRL/RXBN) (United States); Bai Zongwu; McNier, Victor K. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); DeCerbo, Jennifer N. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Tsao, B.-H. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Stricker, Jeffery T. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Polymer dielectrics are the preferred materials of choice for capacitive energy-storage applications because of their potential for high dielectric breakdown strengths, low dissipation factors and good dielectric stability over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures, despite having inherently lower dielectric constants relative to ceramic dielectrics. They are also amenable to large area processing into films at a relatively lower cost. Air Force currently has a strong need for the development of compact capacitors which are thermally robust for operation in a variety of aerospace power conditioning applications. While such applications typically use polycarbonate (PC) dielectric films in wound capacitors for operation from -55 deg. C to 125 deg. C, future power electronic systems would require the use of polymer dielectrics that can reliably operate up to elevated temperatures in the range of 250-350 deg. C. The focus of this research is the generation and dielectric evaluation of metallized, thin free-standing films derived from high temperature polymer structures such as fluorinated polybenzoxazoles, post-functionalized fluorinated polyimides and fluorenyl polyesters incorporating diamond-like hydrocarbon units. The discussion is centered mainly on variable temperature dielectric measurements of film capacitance and dissipation factor and the effects of thermal cycling, up to a maximum temperature of 350 deg. C, on film dielectric performance. Initial studies clearly point to the dielectric stability of these films for high temperature power conditioning applications, as indicated by their relatively low temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) (approx2%) over the entire range of temperatures. Some of the films were also found to exhibit good dielectric breakdown strengths (up to 470 V/mum) and a film dissipation factor of the order of <0.003 (0.3%) at the frequency of interest (10 kHz) for the intended applications. The measured relative dielectric

  3. Multilayer ceramic capacitors for pulsed power, high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygan, S.; McLarney, J.; Prymak, J.; Bohn, P.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of the multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLC) in high frequency power applications has improved significantly over the last years. One of the possible applications of MLC capacitors is the automotive industry where repetitive discharging of capacitors is required. A 0.25-μF capacitor using NPO dielectric subjected to repetitive discharging with the rate of 700 pulses per second, magnitude of 600-V and 195-A peak currents showed no degradation in performance at 298 K or 398 K even after 1 billion discharge cycles. Less than a 5-K temperature rise was observed under these conditions. The most exciting, newly emerging utilization for MLC capacitors, however, might be the high temperature application (up to 473 K for underhood utilization), where ceramic capacitors with higher volumetric efficiency as compared to glass or polymer type capacitors prove very superior. Moreover ceramic capacitors, which next to glass capacitors exhibit the greatest radiation resistance among all insulating materials (Hanks and Hamman 1971), might also be best suited in the future for high temperature operation in space environment. The pulsed power performance of the 0.25-μF NPO capacitor was evaluated under repetitive discharge conditions (200 V, 700 pps) at high temperature, 473 K, and the results are presented in this paper

  4. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  5. Active Plasmonics: Principles, Structures, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nina; Zhuo, Xiaolu; Wang, Jianfang

    2018-03-28

    Active plasmonics is a burgeoning and challenging subfield of plasmonics. It exploits the active control of surface plasmon resonance. In this review, a first-ever in-depth description of the theoretical relationship between surface plasmon resonance and its affecting factors, which forms the basis for active plasmon control, will be presented. Three categories of active plasmonic structures, consisting of plasmonic structures in tunable dielectric surroundings, plasmonic structures with tunable gap distances, and self-tunable plasmonic structures, will be proposed in terms of the modulation mechanism. The recent advances and current challenges for these three categories of active plasmonic structures will be discussed in detail. The flourishing development of active plasmonic structures opens access to new application fields. A significant part of this review will be devoted to the applications of active plasmonic structures in plasmonic sensing, tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering, active plasmonic components, and electrochromic smart windows. This review will be concluded with a section on the future challenges and prospects for active plasmonics.

  6. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  7. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  8. Development of NONSTA code for the design and analysis of LMR high temperature structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, H. Y.; Yoo, B.

    1999-02-01

    Liquid metal reactor(LMR) operates at high temperature (500-550 dg C) and structural materials undergo complex deformation behavior like diffusion, dislocation glide, and dislocation climb due to high temperature environment. And the material life reduces rapidly due to the interaction of cavities created inside structural materials and high temperature fatigue cracks. Thus the establishment of high temperature structure analysis techniques is necessary for the reliability and safety evaluation of such structures. The objectives of this study are to develop NONSTA code as the subprogram of ABAQUS code adopting constitutive equations which can predict high temperature material behavior precisely and to build the systematic analysis procedures. The developed program was applied to the example problems such as the tensile analysis using exponential creep model and the repetitive tensile-compression analysis using Chaboche unified viscoplastic model. In addition, the problem of a plate with a center hole subjected to tensile load was solved to show the applicability of the program to multiaxial problem and the time dependent stress redistribution was observed. (Author). 40 refs., 2 tabs., 24 figs

  9. Temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in InGaN quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tong; Puchtler, Tim J.; Zhu, Tongtong; Jarman, John C.; Kocher, Claudius C.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of temperature-dependent fine structure splitting in semiconductor quantum dots using a non-polar (11-20) a-plane InGaN system, up to the on-chip Peltier cooling threshold of 200 K. At 5 K, a statistical average splitting of 443 ± 132 μeV has been found based on 81 quantum dots. The degree of fine structure splitting stays relatively constant for temperatures less than 100 K and only increases above that temperature. At 200 K, we find that the fine structure splitting ranges between 2 and 12 meV, which is an order of magnitude higher than that at low temperatures. Our investigations also show that phonon interactions at high temperatures might have a correlation with the degree of exchange interactions. The large fine structure splitting at 200 K makes it easier to isolate the individual components of the polarized emission spectrally, increasing the effective degree of polarization for potential on-chip applications of polarized single-photon sources.

  10. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-01-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures

  11. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E., E-mail: stephen.russek@nist.gov; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Geiss, Roy H. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Arenholz, Elke [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  12. Designing of Metallic Photonic Structures and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong-Sung Kim

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis our main interest has been to investigate metallic photonic crystal and its applications. We explained how to solve a periodic photonic structure with transfer matrix method and when and how to use modal expansion method. Two different coating methods were introduced, modifying a photonic structure's intrinsic optical properties and rigorous calculation results are presented. Two applications of metallic photonic structures are introduced. For thermal emitter, we showed how to design and find optimal structure. For conversion efficiency increasing filter, we calculated its efficiency and the way to design it. We presented the relation between emitting light spectrum and absorption and showed the material and structural dependency of the absorption spectrum. By choosing a proper base material and structural parameters, we can design a selective emitter at a certain region we are interested in. We have developed a theoretical model to analyze a blackbody filament enclosed by a metallic mesh which can increase the efficiency of converting a blackbody radiation to visible light. With this model we found that a square lattice metallic mesh enclosing a filament might increase the efficiency of incandescent lighting sources. Filling fraction and thickness dependency were examined and presented. Combining these two parameters is essential to achieve the maximum output result

  13. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  14. Solvated electrons at elevated temperatures in different alcohols: Temperature and molecular structure effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Lin, Mingzhang [Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke, E-mail: katsu@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fu, Haiying; Muroya, Yusa [Nuclear Professional School, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The absorption spectra of solvated electrons in pentanol, hexanol and octanol are measured from 22 to 200, 22 to 175 and 50 to150 {sup o}C, respectively, at a fixed pressure of 15 MPa, using nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique. The results show that the peak positions of the absorption spectra have a red-shift (shift to longer wavelengths) as temperature increases, similar to water and other alcohols. Including the above mentioned data, a compilation of currently available experimental data on the energy of absorption maximum (E{sub max}) of solvated electrons changed with temperature in monohydric alcohols, diols and triol is presented. E{sub max} of solvated electron is larger in those alcohols that have more OH groups at all the temperatures. The molecular structure effect, including OH numbers, OH position and carbon chain length, is investigated. For the primary alcohols with same OH group number and position, the temperature coefficient increases with increase in chain length. For the alcohols with same chain length and OH numbers, temperature coefficient is larger for the symmetric alcohols than the asymmetric ones.

  15. Electronic Structure of the Bismuth Family of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lisa

    2002-03-07

    High temperature superconductivity remains the central intellectual problem in condensed matter physics fifteen years after its discovery. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) directly probes the electronic structure, and has played an important role in the field of high temperature superconductors. With the recent advances in sample growth and the photoemission technique, we are able to study the electronic structure in great detail, and address regimes that were previously inaccessible. This thesis work contains systematic photoemission studies of the electronic structure of the Bi-family of high temperature superconductors, which include the single-layer system (Bi2201), the bi-layer system (Bi2212), and the tri-layer system (Bi2223). We show that, unlike conventional BCS superconductors, phase coherence information emerges in the single particle excitation spectrum of high temperature superconductors as the superconducting peak in Bi2212. The universality and various properties of this superconducting peak are studied in various systems. We argue that the origin of the superconducting peak may provide the key to understanding the mechanism of High-Tc superconductors. In addition, we identified a new experimental energy scale in the bilayer material, the anisotropic intra-bilayer coupling energy. For a long time, it was predicted that this energy scale would cause bilayer band splitting. We observe this phenomenon, for the first time, in heavily overdoped Bi2212. This new observation requires the revision of the previous picture of the electronic excitation in the Brillouin zone boundary. As the first ARPES study of a trilayer system, various detailed electronic proper- ties of Bi2223 are examined. We show that, comparing with Bi2212, both superconducting gap and relative superconducting peak intensity become larger in Bi2223, however, the strength of the interlayer coupling within each unit cell is possibly weaker. These results suggest that the

  16. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  17. Technological improvements to high temperature thermocouples for nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, R.; Leveque, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    The specific operating conditions of thermocouples in nuclear reactors have provided an incentive for further advances in high temperature thermocouple applications and performance. This work covers the manufacture and improvement of existing alloys, the technology of clad thermocouples, calibration drift during heat treatment, resistance to thermal shock and the compatibility of insulating materials with thermo-electric alloys. The results lead to specifying improved operating conditions for thermocouples in nuclear reactor media (pressurized water, sodium, uranium oxide) [fr

  18. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  19. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  20. On the evaluation of elastic follow-up of a high temperature discontinuous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. M.; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Lee, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    While high temperature structures of LMR experience inelastic deformation such as plasticity and creep due to high temperature operating temperature of 530∼550 .deg. C, geometric nonlinear structures may undergo elastic follow-up behavior due to the interaction between stiff region and weak region. Thus, careful consideration should be given to the design and analysis of high temperature geometric nonlinear structure. In this study, the elastic follow-up behavior of geometric nonlinear structure has been investigated and the current status of design method implemented in the ASME-NH, Japanese BDS, French RCC-MR, and UK R-5 codes to consider elastic follow-up behavior has been reviewed. It has been shown that the ratio of the stiff region and the weak region and the type of loading affect the elastic follow-up behavior greatly from the detailed inelastic analyses of two bar model and L-shaped structure subjected to various loading situation. The applicability and the conservatism of simplified analysis methods implemented among various design codes need to be studied further

  1. Thermal sensor based zinc oxide diode for low temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaya, R.O. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (South Africa); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Farooq, W.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yakuphanoglu, F., E-mail: fyhan@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Firat University, Elazig, 23169 (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    The device parameters of Al/p-Si/Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O-NiO/Al Schottky diode for x = 0.005 were investigated over the 50 K–400 K temperature range using direct current–voltage (I–V) and impedance spectroscopy. The films were prepared using the sol–gel method followed by spin-coating on p-Si substrate. The ideality factor, barrier height, resistance and capacitance of the diode were found to depend on temperature. The calculated barrier height has a mean. Capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements show that the capacitance decreases with increasing frequency, suggesting a continuous distribution of interface states over the surveyed 100 kHz to 1 MHz frequency range. The interface state densities, N{sub ss}, of the diode were calculated and found to peak as functions of bias and temperature in two temperature regions of 50 K–300 K and 300 K–400 K. A peak value of approximately 10{sup 12}/eV cm{sup 2} was observed around 0.7 V bias for 350 K and at 3 × 10{sup 12}/eVcm{sup 2} around 2.2 V bias for 300 K. The relaxation time was found to average 4.7 μs over all the temperatures, but showing its lowest value of 1.58 μs at 300 K. It is seen that the interface states of the diode is controlled by the temperature. This suggests that Al/p-Si/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al diode can be used as a thermal sensors for low temperature applications. - Highlights: • Al/pSi/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al Schottky diode was fabricated by sol gel method. • The interface state density of the diode is controlled by the temperature. • Zinc oxide based diode can be used as a thermal sensor for low temperature applications.

  2. Evaluation of high temperature structural adhesives for extended service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    High temperature stable adhesive systems were evaluated for potential Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) vehicle applications. The program was divided into two major phases: Phase I 'Adhesive Screening' evaluated eleven selected polyimide (PI) and polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) adhesive resins using eight different titanium (6Al-4V) adherend surface preparations; Phase II 'Adhesive Optimization and Characterization' extensively evaluated two adhesive systems, selected from Phase I studies, for chemical characterization and environmental durability. The adhesive systems which exhibited superior thermal and environmental bond properties were LARC-TPI polyimide and polyphenylquinoxaline both developed at NASA Langley. The latter adhesive system did develop bond failures at extended thermal aging due primarily to incompatibility between the surface preparation and the polymer. However, this study did demonstrate that suitable adhesive systems are available for extended supersonic cruise vehicle design applications.

  3. On the causal structure between CO2 and global temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stips, Adolf; Macias, Diego; Coughlan, Clare; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Liang, X. San

    2016-01-01

    We use a newly developed technique that is based on the information flow concept to investigate the causal structure between the global radiative forcing and the annual global mean surface temperature anomalies (GMTA) since 1850. Our study unambiguously shows one-way causality between the total Greenhouse Gases and GMTA. Specifically, it is confirmed that the former, especially CO2, are the main causal drivers of the recent warming. A significant but smaller information flow comes from aerosol direct and indirect forcing, and on short time periods, volcanic forcings. In contrast the causality contribution from natural forcings (solar irradiance and volcanic forcing) to the long term trend is not significant. The spatial explicit analysis reveals that the anthropogenic forcing fingerprint is significantly regionally varying in both hemispheres. On paleoclimate time scales, however, the cause-effect direction is reversed: temperature changes cause subsequent CO2/CH4 changes. PMID:26900086

  4. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  5. Ultra light weight refractory material for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finke, V.; Kern, H. [Rath GmbH, Meissen (Germany); Springer, M. [Aug. Rath jun. GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The requirements on companies running high temperature processes, i.e. at temperatures about 1000 C and above, have increased dramatically within the last few years. For technological, economical and ecological purposes each application has to be checked carefully. As well the political discussion regarding environmental pollution, greenhouse effect and emission trading and the guidelines for climate and environmental protection exert massive influence on thermal process technology and pose an appropriate challenge for the companies. Next to costs of labour and raw materials the costs for energy and environmental costs play a decisive role more and more. The pressure on the management thereby incurred may have a lasting effect on innovations regarding increase of energy efficiency, decrease of CO{sub 2}-emission and often on non negligible increase of productivity. Mainly against the background of the highly scheduled European aims for emission reduction and also in consideration of the still proceeding globalisation the usage of state-of-the-art refractory technics in thermal process technology is of particular importance for business success, for reducing of environmental impact and last but not least for conservation and safeguarding of jobs in Europe and Germany. The applications for products made from high-temperature insulation wool in high temperature applications have strongly increased during the last five years. Especially the production capacities of polycrystalline wool (aluminium oxide wool e.g. Altra B72) have been doubled within the last three years. Primarily ultra light weight products made from HTIW are used in industrial furnaces with application temperatures above 1000 C and / or with high thermo-mechanical (thermal shock) and chemical exposure. The outstanding and essential advantages of these materials are obviously: Ultra light weight material with high resilience and flexibility, Optimised energy consumption (energy saving up to 50% compared

  6. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  7. Structure optimization of CFB reactor for moderate temperature FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan; Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Kai; You, Changfu [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering; Ministry of Education, Beijing (China). Key Lab. for Thermal Science and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactors for moderate temperature flue gas desulfurization (FGD) have significant influence on the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio for sulfur reaction. Experimental and numerical methods were used to investigate the influence of the key reactor structures, including the reactor outlet structure, internal structure, feed port and circulating port, on the gas velocity distribution, sorbent particle concentration distribution and particle residence time. Experimental results showed that the desulfurization efficiency increased 5-10% when the internal structure was added in the CFB reactor. Numerical analysis results showed that the particle residence time of the feed particles with the average diameter of 89 and 9 {mu}m increased 40% and 17% respectively, and the particle residence time of the circulating particles with the average diameter of 116 {mu}m increased 28% after reactor structure optimization. The particle concentration distribution also improved significantly, which was good for improving the contact efficiency between the sorbent particles and SO{sub 2}. In addition, the optimization guidelines were proposed to further increase the desulfurization efficiency and the sorbent calcium conversion ratio.

  8. Effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Siavash; Berbyuk, Viktor; Boström, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Effects of temperature on guided waves propagating in composite materials is a well-known problem which has been investigated in many studies. The majority of the studies is focused on effects of high temperature. Understanding the effects of low temperature has major importance in composite structures and components which are operating in cold climate conditions such as e.g. wind turbines operating in cold climate regions. In this study first the effects of temperature variations on guided waves propagating in a composite plate is investigated experimentally in a cold climate chamber. The material is a common material used to manufacture rotor blades of wind turbines. The temperature range is 25°C to -25°C and effects of temperature variations on amplitude and phase shift of the received signal are investigated. In order to apply the effects of lowering the temperature on the received signal, the Baseline Signal Stretch (BSS) method is modified and used. The modification is based on decomposing the signal into symmetric and asymmetric modes and applying two different stretch factors on each of them. Finally the results obtained based on the new method is compared with the results of application of BSS with one stretch factor and experimental measurements. Comparisons show that an improvement is obtained using the BSS with the mode decomposition method at temperature variations of more than 25°C.

  9. Pyroelectric Ceramics as Temperature Sensors for Energy System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge Luis

    Temperature is continuously monitored in energy systems to ensure safe operation temperatures, increase efficiency and avoid high emissions. Most of energy systems operate at high temperature and harsh environments to achieve higher efficiencies, therefore temperature sensing devices that can operate under these conditions are highly desired. The interest has increased in temperature sensors capable to operate and in harsh environments and temperature sensors capable to transmit thermal information wirelessly. One of the solutions for developing harsh environment sensors is to use ceramic materials, especially functional ceramics such as pyroelectrics. Pyroelectric ceramics could be used to develop active sensors for both temperature and pressure due to their capabilities in coupling energy among mechanical, thermal, and electrical domains. In this study, two different pyroelectric materials were used to develop two different temperature sensors systems. First, a high temperature sensor was developed using a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric ceramic. With its Curie temperature of 1210 °C, lithium niobate is capable to maintain its pyroelectric properties at high temperature making it ideal for temperature sensing at high temperature applications. Lithium niobate has been studied previously in the attempt to use its pyroelectric current as the sensing mechanism to measure temperatures up to 500 °C. Pyroelectric coefficient of lithium niobate is a function of temperature as reported in a previous study, therefore a dynamic technique is utilized to measure the pyroelectric coefficient of the lithium niobate used in this study. The pyroelectric coefficient was successfully measured up to 500 °C with coefficients ranging from -8.5 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at room temperature to -23.70 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at 500 °C. The lithium niobate sensor was then tested at higher temperatures: 220 °C, 280 °C, 410 °C and 500 °C with 4.31 %, 2.1 %, 0.4 % and 0.6 % deviation

  10. Application of high temperature superconductivity to electric motor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, J.S.; Sharma, D.K.; Jordan, H.E.; Edick, J.D.; Schiferl, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on progress made in a joint project conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute and Reliance Electric Company to study the possible application of High Temperature Super Conductors (HTSC), materials to electric motors. Specific applications are identified which can be beneficially served by motors constructed with HTSC materials. A summary is presented of the components and design issues related to HTSC motors designed for these applications. During the course of this development program, a three tier HTSC wire performance specification has evolved. The three specifications and the rationale behind these three levels of performance are explained. A description of a test motor that has been constructed to verify the electromagnetic analytical techniques of HTSC motor design is given. Finally, a DC motor with an HTSC field coil is described. Measured data with the motor running is presented showing that the motor is operating with the field winding in the superconducting state

  11. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  12. Rules for the analysis of mechanical structures at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowicz, H.; Petrequin, P.; Schaller, K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes how the experience gained by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) in design, construction and operation of pool type LMFBR, as well as in research an development, is used to establish rules for the analysis of mechanical structures at elevated temperatures. These rules are written by different working groups and approved by a committee named RAMSES. The working methods of the RAMSES committee are described. Some of the approved recommendations are presented. The ongoing work and futur topics are also described

  13. Analytic structure of ρ meson propagator at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Sarkar, Sourav; Mallik, S.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the structure of one-loop self-energy graphs for the ρ meson in real time formulation of finite temperature field theory. We find the discontinuities of these graphs across the unitary and the Landau cuts. These contributions are identified with different sources of medium modification discussed in the literature. We also calculate numerically the imaginary and the real parts of the self-energies and construct the spectral function of the ρ meson, which are compared with an earlier determination. A significant contribution arises from the unitary cut of the πω loop, that was ignored so far in the literature. (orig.)

  14. Generalized functions, convergence structures, and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pap, Endre; Pilipović, Stevan; Vladimirov, Vasilij; International Conference "Generalized functions, convergence structures and their applications" (GFCA-87)

    1988-01-01

    This Proceedings consists of a collection of papers presented at the International Conference "Generalized functions, convergence structures and their applications" held from June 23-27, 1987 in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia (GFCA-87): 71 participants from 21 countr~es from allover the world took part in the Conference. Proceedings reflects the work of the Conference. Plenary lectures of J. Burzyk, J. F. Colombeau, W. Gahler, H. Keiter, H. Komatsu, B. Stankovic, H. G. Tillman, V. S. Vladimirov provide an up-to-date account of the cur­ rent state of the subject. All these lectures, except H. G. Tillman's, are published in this volume. The published communications give the contemporary problems and achievements in the theory of generalized functions, in the theory of convergence structures and in their applications, specially in the theory of partial differential equations and in the mathematical physics. New approaches to the theory of generalized functions are presented, moti­ vated by concrete problems of applicat...

  15. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  16. Structure life prediction at high temperature: present and future capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboche, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The life prediction techniques for high temperature conditions include several aspects which are considered successively in this article. Crack initiation criteria themselves, defined for the isolated volume element (the tension-compression specimen for example), including parametric relationships and continuous damage approaches and calculation of local stress and strain fields in the structure and their evolution under cyclic plasticity, which poses several difficult problems to obtain stabilized cyclic solutions are examined. The use of crack initiation criteria or damage rules from the result of the cyclic inelastic analysis and the prediction of crack growth in the structure are considered. Different levels are considered for the predictive tools: the classical approach, future methods presently under development and intermediate rules, which are already in use. Several examples are given on materials and components used either in the nuclear industry or in gas turbine engines. (author)

  17. The local structure of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustre de Leon, J.; Conradson, S.D.; Bishop, A.R.; Raistrick, I.D.

    1992-01-01

    We show how x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) has been successfully used in the determination of the local crystal structure of high-temperature superconductors, with advantages over traditional diffraction techniques. We review the experimental results that yielded the first evidence for an axial-oxygen-centered lattice instability connected with the superconductivity transition. The interpretation of this instability in terms of a dynamical tunneling model suggests the presence of polarons in these materials. XAFS on Tl 2 Ba 2 CuO 6 and other Tl-based superconductors indicate the presence of local instabilities in the CuO 2 planes of these materials, in addition to axial-oxygen instabilities

  18. Evaluation procedure of creep-fatigue defect growth in high temperature condition and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2003-12-01

    This study proposed the evaluation procedure of creep-fatigue defect growth on the high-temperature cylindrical structure applicable to the KALIMER, which is developed by KAERI. Parameters used in creep defect growth and the evaluation codes with these parameters were analyzed. In UK, the evaluation procedure of defect initiation and growth were proposed with R5/R6 code. In Japan, simple evauation method was proposed by JNC. In France, RCC-MR A16 code which was evaluation procedure of the creep-fatigue defect initiation and growth related to leak before break was developed, and equations related to load conditions were modified lately. As an application example, the creep-fatigue defect growth on circumferential semi-elliptical surface defect in high temperature cylindrical structure was evaluated by RCC-MR A16

  19. Assessment of very high temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Spiewak, I.; Gambill, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    In April 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) authorized General Atomic Company, General Electric Company, and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory to assess the available technology for producing process heat utilizing a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The VHTR is defined as a gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactor. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been given a lead role in evaluating the VHTR reactor studies and potential applications of the VHTR. Process temperatures up to the 760 to 871 0 C range appear to be achievable with near-term technology. The major development considerations are high temperature materials, the safety questions (especially regarding the need for an intermediate heat exchanger) and the process heat exchanger. The potential advantages of the VHTR over competing fossil energy sources are conservation of fossil fuels and reduced atmospheric impacts. Costs are developed for nuclear process heat supplied from a 3000-MW(th) VHTR. The range of cost in process applications is competitive with current fossil fuel alternatives

  20. Nonlinear effects of high temperature on buckling of structural elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyengar, N.G.R.

    1975-01-01

    Structural elements used in nuclear reactors are subjected to high temperatures. Since with increase in temperature there is a gradual fall in the elastic modulus and the stress-strain relationship is nonlinear at these operating load levels, a realistic estimate of the buckling load should include this nonlinearity. In this paper the buckling loads for uniform columns with circular and rectangular cross-sections and different boundary conditions under high temperature environment are estimated. The stress-strain relationship for the material has been assumed to follow inverse Ramberg-Osgood law. In view of the fact that no closed form solutions are possible, approximate methods like perturbation and Galerkin techniques are used. Further, the solution for general value for 'm' is quite involved. Results have been obtained with values for 'm' as 3 and 5. Studies reveal that the influence of material nonlinearity on the buckling load is of the softening type, and it increases with increase in the value of 'm'. The nonlinear effects are more for clamped boundaries than for simply supported boundaries. For the first mode analysis both the methods are powerful. It is, however, felt that for higher modes the Galerkin method might be better in view of its simplicity. This investigation may be considered as a step towards a more general solution

  1. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  2. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2 0 K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2 0 K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness

  3. Design and application consideration of high temperature superconducting current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    As a potential major source of heat leak and the resultant cryogen boiloff, cryogenic current leads can significantly affect the refrigeration power requirement of cryogenic power equipment. Reduction of the heat leak associated with current leads can therefore contribute to the development and application of this equipment. Recent studies and tests have demonstrated that, due to their superconducting and low thermal conductivity properties, ceramic high temperature superconductor (HTSC) can be employed in current leads to significantly reduce the heat leak. However, realization of this benefit requires special design considerations pertaining to the properties and the fabrication technology of the relatively new ceramic superconductor materials. Since processing and fabrication technology are continuously being developed in the laboratories, data on material properties unrelated to critical states are quite limited. Therefore, design analysis and experiments have to be conducted in tandem to achieve a successful development. Due to the rather unique combination of superconducting and thermal conductivities which are orders of magnitude lower than copper, ceramic superconductors allow expansion of the operating scenarios of current leads. In addition to the conventional vapor-cooled lead type application, low heat leak conduction-cooled type current leads may be practical and are being developed. Furthermore, a current lead with an intermediate heat leak intercept has been successfully demonstrated in a multiple current lead assembly employing HTSC. These design and application considerations of high temperature superconducting current leads are addressed here

  4. Feasibility of Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Kevlar 49 aramid organic fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide laminates were characterized to determine the applicability of the material to high temperature aerospace structures. Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy laminates were fabricated and characterized for comparison with the Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide material. Flexural strengths and moduli and interlaminar shear strengths were determined from 75 to 600 F for the PMR-15 and from 75 to 450 F for the Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy material. The study also included the effects of hydrothermal and long-term elevated temperature exposures on the flexural strengths and moduli and the interlaminar shear strengths.

  5. Application of new design methodologies to very high-temperature metallic components of the HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Minoru; Baba, Osamu

    1991-01-01

    The high-temperature piping and helium-to-helium intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) are designed to be operating at very high temperatures of about 900deg C among the class 1 components of the HTTR. At such a high temperature, mechanical strength of heat-resistant metallic materials is very low and thermal expansions of structural members are large. Therefore, innovative design methodologies are needed to reduce both mechanical and thermal loads acting on these components. To the HTTR, the design methodologies which can separate the heat-resistant function from the pressure-retaining functions and allow them to expand freely are applied to reduce pressure and thermal loads. Since these design methodologies need to verify their applicability, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been performing many design and research works on their verifications. The details of the design methodologies and their verifications are given in this paper. (orig.)

  6. Structure of photosystem II and substrate binding at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Iris D; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Koroidov, Sergey; Brewster, Aaron S; Tran, Rosalie; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kroll, Thomas; Michels-Clark, Tara; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G; Stan, Claudiu A; Hussein, Rana; Zhang, Miao; Douthit, Lacey; Kubin, Markus; de Lichtenberg, Casper; Long Vo, Pham; Nilsson, Håkan; Cheah, Mun Hon; Shevela, Dmitriy; Saracini, Claudio; Bean, Mackenzie A; Seuffert, Ina; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Pastor, Ernest; Weninger, Clemens; Fransson, Thomas; Lassalle, Louise; Bräuer, Philipp; Aller, Pierre; Docker, Peter T; Andi, Babak; Orville, Allen M; Glownia, James M; Nelson, Silke; Sikorski, Marcin; Zhu, Diling; Hunter, Mark S; Lane, Thomas J; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason E; Robinson, Joseph; Liang, Mengning; Boutet, Sébastien; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Moriarty, Nigel W; Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Waterman, David G; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wernet, Philippe; Dobbek, Holger; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T; Zwart, Petrus H; Adams, Paul D; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Bergmann, Uwe; Sauter, Nicholas K; Kern, Jan; Yachandra, Vittal K; Yano, Junko

    2016-12-15

    Light-induced oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) in plants, algae and cyanobacteria has generated most of the dioxygen in the atmosphere. PS II, a membrane-bound multi-subunit pigment protein complex, couples the one-electron photochemistry at the reaction centre with the four-electron redox chemistry of water oxidation at the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). Under illumination, the OEC cycles through five intermediate S-states (S 0 to S 4 ), in which S 1 is the dark-stable state and S 3 is the last semi-stable state before O-O bond formation and O 2 evolution. A detailed understanding of the O-O bond formation mechanism remains a challenge, and will require elucidation of both the structures of the OEC in the different S-states and the binding of the two substrate waters to the catalytic site. Here we report the use of femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) to obtain damage-free, room temperature structures of dark-adapted (S 1 ), two-flash illuminated (2F; S 3 -enriched), and ammonia-bound two-flash illuminated (2F-NH 3 ; S 3 -enriched) PS II. Although the recent 1.95 Å resolution structure of PS II at cryogenic temperature using an XFEL provided a damage-free view of the S 1 state, measurements at room temperature are required to study the structural landscape of proteins under functional conditions, and also for in situ advancement of the S-states. To investigate the water-binding site(s), ammonia, a water analogue, has been used as a marker, as it binds to the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in the S 2 and S 3 states. Since the ammonia-bound OEC is active, the ammonia-binding Mn site is not a substrate water site. This approach, together with a comparison of the native dark and 2F states, is used to discriminate between proposed O-O bond formation mechanisms.

  7. Thermal-mechanical fatigue of high temperature structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renauld, Mark Leo

    Experimental and analytical methods were developed to address the effect of thermal-mechanical strain cycling on high temperature structural materials under uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Two materials were used in the investigation, a nickel-base superalloy of low ductility, IN-738LC and a high ductility material, 316 stainless steel. A uniaxial life prediction model for the IN-738LC material was based on tensile hysteresis energy measured in stabilized, mid-life hysteresis loops. Hold-time effects and temperature cycling were incorporated in the hysteresis energy approach. Crack growth analysis was also included in the model to predict the number of TMF cycles to initiate and grow a fatigue crack through the coating. The nickel-base superalloy, IN-738LC, was primarily tested in out-of-phase (OP) TMF with a temperature range from 482-871sp°C (900-1600sp°F) under continuous and compressive hold-time cycling. IN-738LC fatigue specimens were coated either with an aluminide, NiCoCrAlHfSi overlay or CoNiCrAlY overlay coating on the outer surface of the specimen. Metallurgical failure analysis via optical and scanning electron microscopy, was used to characterize failure behavior of both substrate and coating materials. Type 316 SS was subjected to continuous biaxial strain cycling with an in-phase (IP) TMF loading and a temperature range from 399-621sp°C (750-1150sp°F). As a result, a biaxial TMF life prediction model was proposed on the basis of an extended isothermal fatigue model. The model incorporates a frequency effect and phase factors to assess the different damage mechanisms observed during TMF loading. The model was also applied to biaxial TMF data generated on uncoated IN-738LC.

  8. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  9. Spectroscopy for Industrial Applications: High-Temperature Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Grosch, Helge; Clausen, Sønnik

    -dependent spectral absorption features gases of interest fora specic instrument can in principle be calculated by knowing only the gas temperature and pressure in the process under investigation/monitoring. The latest HITRAN-2012 database contains IR/UV spectral data for 47 molecules and it is still growing. However...... use of HITRAN is limited to low-temperature processes (available. Only a few molecules CO2, H2O, CO and NO are those of interest for e.......g. various combustion and astronomical applications are included. In the recent few years, several efforts towards a developmentof hot line lists have been made; those have been implemented in the latest HITRAN-2012 database. High-resolution absorption measurements of NH3 (IR, 0.1 cm-1) and phenol (UV,0...

  10. Applications of contact predictions to structural biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Simkovic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary pressure on residue interactions, intramolecular or intermolecular, that are important for protein structure or function can lead to covariance between the two positions. Recent methodological advances allow much more accurate contact predictions to be derived from this evolutionary covariance signal. The practical application of contact predictions has largely been confined to structural bioinformatics, yet, as this work seeks to demonstrate, the data can be of enormous value to the structural biologist working in X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM or NMR. Integrative structural bioinformatics packages such as Rosetta can already exploit contact predictions in a variety of ways. The contribution of contact predictions begins at construct design, where structural domains may need to be expressed separately and contact predictions can help to predict domain limits. Structure solution by molecular replacement (MR benefits from contact predictions in diverse ways: in difficult cases, more accurate search models can be constructed using ab initio modelling when predictions are available, while intermolecular contact predictions can allow the construction of larger, oligomeric search models. Furthermore, MR using supersecondary motifs or large-scale screens against the PDB can exploit information, such as the parallel or antiparallel nature of any β-strand pairing in the target, that can be inferred from contact predictions. Contact information will be particularly valuable in the determination of lower resolution structures by helping to assign sequence register. In large complexes, contact information may allow the identity of a protein responsible for a certain region of density to be determined and then assist in the orientation of an available model within that density. In NMR, predicted contacts can provide long-range information to extend the upper size limit of the technique in a manner analogous but complementary to experimental

  11. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Wang, Xin; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000 deg C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200 deg C, Beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  12. Processing and Characterization of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Composites for High Temperature Applications Using Polymer Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Sarah B.; Lui, Donovan; Gou, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The two PDCs used in this development are polysiloxane and polycarbosilane. Polysiloxanes contain a silicon oxycarbide backbone when pyrolized up to 1000C. Polycarbosilane, an organosilicon polymer, contain a silicon-carbon backbone; around 1200C, beta-SiC begins to crystallize. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in composites. Basalt is a naturally occurring material found in volcanic rock. Continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. Thermal and mechanical testing includes oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing.

  13. Assessment of potential solder candidates for high temperature applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    pressure to eliminate lead containing materials despite the fact that materials for high Pb containing alloys are currently not affected by any legislations. A tentative assessment was carried out to determine the potential solder candidates for high temperature applications based on the solidification...... criterion, phases predicted in the bulk solder and the thermodynamic stability of chlorides. These promising solder candidates were precisely produced using the hot stage microscope and its respective anodic and cathodic polarization curves were investigated using a micro-electrochemical set up...

  14. Elevated temperature erosion studies on some materials for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianren.

    1991-01-01

    The surface degradation of materials due to high temperature erosion or combined erosion corrosion is a serious problem in many industrial and aeronautical applications. As such, it has become an important design consideration in many situations. The materials investigated in the present studies are stainless steels, Ti-6Al-4V, alumina ceramics, with and without silicate glassy phase, and zirconia. These are some of the potential materials for use in the high temperature erosive-corrosive environments. The erosion or erosion-corrosion experiments were performed in a high temperature sand-blast type of test rig. The variables studied included the temperature, material composition, heat treatment condition, impingement velocity and angle, erodent concentration, etc. The morphological features of the eroded or eroded-corroded surfaces, substrate deformation, and oxide characteristics were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The scratch test, single ball impact, and indentation tests were used to understand the behavior of oxide film in particle impacts. Based on these studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical or combined mechanical and chemical actions in erosion was developed

  15. Summary of Structural Concept Development and High Temperature Structural Integrity Evaluation Technology for a Gen-IV SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Hyeong Yeon (and others)

    2008-04-15

    The economic improvement is a hot issue as one of Gen IV nuclear plant goals. It requires many researches and development works to meet the goal by securing the same level of plant safety. One of the key research items is the increase of the plant capacity with the minimum number of components and loops. Through the successful conceptual design experience for the KALIMER-600, the structural design study for a 1200MWe large capacity of sodium-cooled fast reactor has been performed to achieve the above plant size effects. The component number and reactor structural sizing were determined based on the core and fluid system design information. Several researches were performed to reduce the construction cost of NSSS in structural point of view, for example, a simplified component arrangement, concept proposals of integrated components, a high temperature LBB application technology, and an innovative in-service inspection (ISI) tool, and a computer program development of the ASME-NH design procedure of the class 1 structure and component under high temperature over 500 .deg. C. The IHTS piping arrangement was also proposed to minimize the length through the properly locating the SG and pump by 126m. Further studies of these concepts are required to confirm on the fabricability and the structural integrity for the operating and design loads. The proposed concepts will be optimized to a unified conceptual design through several trade-off studies.

  16. Low-Temperature Solution Processable Electrodes for Piezoelectric Sensors Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuukkanen, Sampo; Julin, Tuomas; Rantanen, Ville; Zakrzewski, Mari; Moilanen, Pasi; Lupo, Donald

    2013-05-01

    Piezoelectric thin-film sensors are suitable for a wide range of applications from physiological measurements to industrial monitoring systems. The use of flexible materials in combination with high-throughput printing technologies enables cost-effective manufacturing of custom-designed, highly integratable piezoelectric sensors. This type of sensor can, for instance, improve industrial process control or enable the embedding of ubiquitous sensors in our living environment to improve quality of life. Here, we discuss the benefits, challenges and potential applications of piezoelectric thin-film sensors. The piezoelectric sensor elements are fabricated by printing electrodes on both sides of unmetallized poly(vinylidene fluoride) film. We show that materials which are solution processable in low temperatures, biocompatible and environmental friendly are suitable for use as electrode materials in piezoelectric sensors.

  17. Small reactors for low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    In accordance with the Member States' calls for information exchange in the field of nuclear heat application (NHA) two IAEA meetings were organized already in 1976 and 1977. After this ''promising period'', the development of relevant programmes in IAEA Member States was slowed down and therefore only after several years interruption a new Technical Committee Meeting with a Workshop was organized in late 1983, to review the status of NHA, after a few new specific plans appeared in some IAEA Member States in the early 1980's for the use of heat from existing or constructed NPPs and for developing nuclear heating plants (NHP). In June 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting was convened in Winnipeg, Canada, to discuss and formulate a state-of-the-art review on ''Small Reactors for Low Temperature Nuclear Heat Application''. Information on this subject gained up to 1987 in the Member States whose experts attended this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Report. Figs and tabs

  18. Temperature Dependent Surface Structures and Electronic Properties of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, M.-H.; Teague, M. L.; Huang, J.-S.; Tseng, W.-S.; Yeh, N.-C.

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, arising from research of low-cost high performance photovoltaics, have become promising materials not only for solar cells but also for various optoelectronic and spintronic applications. An interesting aspect of the hybrid perovskites is that their material properties, such as the band gap, can be easily tuned by varying the composition, temperature, and the crystalline phases. Additionally, the surface structure is critically important for their optoelectronic applications. It is speculated that different crystalline facets could show different trap densities, thus resulting in microscopically inhomogeneous performance. Here we report direct studies of the surface structures and electronic properties of hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS). We found long-range spatially homogeneous tunneling conductance spectra with a well-defined energy gap of (1.55 +/- 0.1) eV at 300 K in the tetragonal phase, suggesting high quality of the single crystals. The energy gap increased to (1.81 +/- 0.1) eV in the orthorhombic phase, below the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition temperature at 150 K. Detailed studies of the temperature evolution in the spatially resolved surface structures and local density of states will be discussed to elucidate how these properties may influence the optoelectronic performance of the hybrid perovskites. We thank the support from NTU in Taiwan and from NSF in the US.

  19. New alloys for high temperature applications in incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinz, H.P.; Koeck, W.

    1993-01-01

    The hot components of incineration plants exposed to temperatures between 800 and 1,200 C like boilers, grates, thermocouple sheaths and nozzles suffer from severe joint slag and hot gas attack. Considering corrosion resistance only, ceramic materials show excellent performance under these conditions. But because of the ceramics' brittleness metallic materials exhibit an overall advantage although being corroded faster. Within the class of suitable metals PM-ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened)-superalloys based on iron or nickel and PM-Cr-base-alloys are among the most promising ones. This can be derived from various laboratory and field tests which were performed up to now. Laboratory oxidation tests indicate that these new alloys can be used at temperatures up to 1,300 C in hot air. High temperature erosion tests with quartz particles show that PM 2,000 (Fe 19,5Cr5,5Al0,5Ti0,5Y 2 O 3 ) and Ducropur (99.7% Cr) have almost the same resistance against particle impact as alumina or zirconia at 900 C. The corresponding laboratory and field tests under typical joint slag and hot gas conditions at temperatures up to 1,200 C show good results for PM 2,000 and already lead to the actual application of boiler components. Extensive testing has been performed in the field of municipal waste incineration. Depending on temperature, slag and hot gas composition selected grades of the PM-ODS and Cr-base-alloy-group give satisfactory results in the field tests. In the pulp industry black liquor, an alkaline solution with high concentrations of organic waste, is incinerated for the recovery of caustic soda. Flame sprayed coatings of Ducrolloy Cr50Ni give a sixfold increase of the lifetime of the burner nozzles compared to unprotected stainless steel

  20. Shark skin inspired riblet structures as aerodynamically optimized high temperature coatings for blades of aeroengines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Büttner, Claudia C; Schulz, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with different structuring methods for high temperature resistant nickel alloys. The ideal structured surface for a possible application on the blades of aeroengines combines high oxidation resistance with low drag in a hot gas flow. The effect of drag reduction due to riblet structured surfaces was originally inspired by shark scales, which have a drag reducing riblet structure. The necessary riblet sizes for effective drag reduction depend on the temperature, pressure and velocity of the flowing medium (gas or liquid). These riblet sizes were calculated for the different sections in an aeroengine. The riblets were successfully produced on a NiCoCrAlY coating by picosecond laser treatment. This method is suitable for larger structures within the range of some tens of micrometers. Furthermore, experiments were performed by depositing different materials through polymer and metal masks via electrodeposition and physical vapor deposition. All fabricated structures were oxidized at 900–1000 °C for up to 100 h to simulate the temperature conditions in an aeroengine. The resulting shape of the riblets was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The most accurate structures were obtained by using photolithography with a subsequent electrodeposition of nickel. This method is suited for single digit micrometer structures. The reduction of the wall shear stress was measured in an oil channel. The riblet structures prior to oxidation showed a reduction of the wall shear stress of up to 4.9% compared to a normal smooth surface. This proves that the fabricated riblet design can be used as a drag reducing surface

  1. Temperature driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes filled with Fe3C nano crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Zhang, Xiaotian; Corrias, Anna

    2018-02-01

    We report the observation of novel temperature-driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with Fe3C nano-crystals. These structural-transitions were measured by means of temperature (T) dependent x-ray diffraction (XRD) in the T-range from 298 K to 12 K. A clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 002-peak of the graphitic-CNTs-walls is found with the decrease of the temperature. As determined by Rietveld refinement, such 2θ-shift translates in a not previously reported decrease in the value of the CNT graphitic c-axis with the decrease of the temperature (from 298 K to 12 K). Also, a clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 031 and 131 diffraction-peaks of Fe3C is observed within the same T-range. Rietveld refinements confirm the existence of such memory-effect and also reveal a gradual decrease of the 010-axis of Fe3C with the decrease of the temperature. These observations imply that the observed structural-memory-effect is a characteristic of CNTs when Fe3C is the encapsulated ferromagnet. The generality of such memory-effects was further confirmed by additional measurements performed on other types of CNTs characterized by continuous Fe3C-filling. XRD measurements in the T-range from 298 K to 673 K revealed also an unusual reversible decrease of the Fe3C-peak intensities with the increase of the temperature. These observations can have important implications on the magnetic data recording applications of these nanostructures by helping in better understanding the unusual temperature-dependent magnetic instabilities of iron-based nano-crystals which have been recently reported in literature.

  2. Electronic structure of the high-temperature oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity above 30 K by Bednorz and Mueller in the La copper oxide system, the critical temperature has been raised to 90 K in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and to 110 and 125 K in Bi-based and Tl-based copper oxides, respectively. In the two years since this Nobel-prize-winning discovery, a large number of electronic structure calculations have been carried out as a first step in understanding the electronic properties of these materials. In this paper these calculations (mostly of the density-functional type) are gathered and reviewed, and their results are compared with the relevant experimental data. The picture that emerges is one in which the important electronic states are dominated by the copper d and oxygen p orbitals, with strong hybridization between them. Photon, electron, and positron spectroscopies provide important information about the electronic states, and comparison with electronic structure calculations indicates that, while many features can be interpreted in terms of existing calculations, self-energy corrections (''correlations'') are important for a more detailed understanding. The antiferromagnetism that occurs in some regions of the phase diagram poses a particularly challenging problem for any detailed theory. The study of structural stability, lattice dynamics, and electron-phonon coupling in the copper oxides is also discussed. Finally, a brief review is given of the attempts so far to identify interaction constants appropriate for a model Hamiltonian treatment of many-body interactions in these materials

  3. Inorganic nanolayers: structure, preparation, and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifullah, Bullo; Hussein, Mohd Zobir B

    2015-01-01

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds are two-dimensional inorganic nanolayers also known as clay minerals or anionic clays or layered double hydroxides/layered hydroxy salts, and have emerged as a single type of material with numerous biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, gene delivery, cosmetics, and biosensing. Inorganic nanolayers are promising materials due to their fascinating properties, such as ease of preparation, ability to intercalate different type of anions (inorganic, organic, biomolecules, and even genes), high thermal stability, delivery of intercalated anions in a sustained manner, high biocompatibility, and easy biodegradation. Inorganic nanolayers have been the focus for researchers over the last decade, resulting in widening application horizons, especially in the field of biomedical science. These nanolayers have been widely applied in drug and gene delivery. They have also been applied in biosensing technology, and most recently in bioimaging science. The suitability of inorganic nanolayers for application in drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing technology, and bioimaging science makes them ideal materials to be applied for theranostic purposes. In this paper, we review the structure, methods of preparation, and latest advances made by inorganic nanolayers in such biomedical applications as drug delivery, gene delivery, biosensing, and bioimaging.

  4. Fluid-structure interaction and biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Galdi, Giovanni; Nečasová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    This book presents, in a methodical way, updated and comprehensive descriptions and analyses of some of the most relevant problems in the context of fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Generally speaking, FSI is among the most popular and intriguing problems in applied sciences and includes industrial as well as biological applications. Various fundamental aspects of FSI are addressed from different perspectives, with a focus on biomedical applications. More specifically, the book presents a mathematical analysis of basic questions like the well-posedness of the relevant initial and boundary value problems, as well as the modeling and the numerical simulation of a number of fundamental phenomena related to human biology. These latter research topics include blood flow in arteries and veins, blood coagulation and speech modeling. We believe that the variety of the topics discussed, along with the different approaches used to address and solve the corresponding problems, will help readers to develop a more holis...

  5. High Temperature Wireless Communication And Electronics For Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Beheim, G. M.; Ponchak, G. E.; Chen, L.-Y

    2007-01-01

    In order for future aerospace propulsion systems to meet the increasing requirements for decreased maintenance, improved capability, and increased safety, the inclusion of intelligence into the propulsion system design and operation becomes necessary. These propulsion systems will have to incorporate technology that will monitor propulsion component conditions, analyze the incoming data, and modify operating parameters to optimize propulsion system operations. This implies the development of sensors, actuators, and electronics, with associated packaging, that will be able to operate under the harsh environments present in an engine. However, given the harsh environments inherent in propulsion systems, the development of engine-compatible electronics and sensors is not straightforward. The ability of a sensor system to operate in a given environment often depends as much on the technologies supporting the sensor element as the element itself. If the supporting technology cannot handle the application, then no matter how good the sensor is itself, the sensor system will fail. An example is high temperature environments where supporting technologies are often not capable of operation in engine conditions. Further, for every sensor going into an engine environment, i.e., for every new piece of hardware that improves the in-situ intelligence of the components, communication wires almost always must follow. The communication wires may be within or between parts, or from the engine to the controller. As more hardware is added, more wires, weight, complexity, and potential for unreliability is also introduced. Thus, wireless communication combined with in-situ processing of data would significantly improve the ability to include sensors into high temperature systems and thus lead toward more intelligent engine systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is presently leading the development of electronics, communication systems, and sensors capable of prolonged stable

  6. Temperature Effects on Adhesive Bond Strengths and Modulus for Commonly Used Spacecraft Structural Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Cassandra E.; Oakes, Eric J.; Hill, Jennifer R.; Aldi, Dominic; Forsberg, Gustaf A.

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to observe how changes in temperature and substrate material affected the strength and modulus of an adhesive bondline. Seven different adhesives commonly used in aerospace bonded structures were tested. Aluminum, titanium and Invar adherends were cleaned and primed, then bonded using the manufacturer's recommendations. Following surface preparation, the coupons were bonded with the adhesives. The single lap shear coupons were then pull tested per ASTM D 1002 Standard Test Method for Apparent Shear Strength of Single- Lap-Joint over a temperature range from -150 deg C up to +150 deg C. The ultimate strength was calculated and the resulting data were converted into B-basis design allowables. Average and Bbasis results were compared. Results obtained using aluminum adherends are reported. The effects of using different adherend materials and temperature were also studied and will be reported in a subsequent paper. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to study variations in adhesive modulus with temperature. This work resulted in a highly useful database for comparing adhesive performance over a wide range of temperatures, and has facilitated selection of the appropriate adhesive for spacecraft structure applications.

  7. Influence of variations in creep curve on creep behavior of a high-temperature structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    It is one of the key issues for a high-temperature structural design guideline to evaluate the influence of variations in creep curve on the creep behavior of a high-temperature structure. In the present paper, a comparative evaluation was made to clarify such influence. Additional consideration was given to the influence of the relationship between creep rupture life and minimum creep rate, i.e., the Monkman-Grant's relationship, on the creep damage evaluation. The consideration suggested that the Monkman-Grant's relationship be taken into account in evaluating the creep damage behavior, especially the creep damage variations. However, it was clarified that the application of the creep damage evaluation rule of ASME B and P.V. Code Case N-47 to the ''standard case'' which was predicted from the average creep property would predict the creep damage on the safe side. (orig./GL)

  8. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: From Design to Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Norton

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures.

  9. Structural DNA Nanotechnology: From Design to Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Reza M.; Norton, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures. PMID:22837684

  10. Structural DNA nanotechnology: from design to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Reza M; Norton, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of DNA for the production of nanoscale architectures presents a young yet paradigm breaking approach, which addresses many of the barriers to the self-assembly of small molecules into highly-ordered nanostructures via construct addressability. There are two major methods to construct DNA nanostructures, and in the current review we will discuss the principles and some examples of applications of both the tile-based and DNA origami methods. The tile-based approach is an older method that provides a good tool to construct small and simple structures, usually with multiply repeated domains. In contrast, the origami method, at this time, would appear to be more appropriate for the construction of bigger, more sophisticated and exactly defined structures.

  11. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor: reformer application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This Application Study evaluates the HTGR-R with a core outlet temperature of 850 0 C as a near-term Lead Project and as a vehicle to long-term HTGR Program objectives. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-R technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-R markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-R plants, and the evaluation of the program scope and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-R technology through the completion of the Lead Project. In order to properly assess the potential of the HTGR-R and the suitability of the HTGR-R as a Lead Project, additional work must be performed before a final judgment is rendered. Design trade-off studies and alternative applications must be investigated to determine if a commercial potential exists for the HTGR-R at 850 0 C. If commercial incentives are only identified for the HTGR-R with core outlet temperatures greater than 850 0 C, the design and development program duration and cost and the demonstration path for the HTGR-R must be reassessed

  12. Potential of low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    At present, more than one third of the fossil fuel currently used is being consumed to produce space heating and to meet industrial needs in many countries of the world. Imported oil still represents a large portion of this fossil fuel and despite its present relatively low price future market evolutions with consequent upward cost revisions cannot be excluded. Thus the displacement of the fossil fuel by cheaper low-temperature heat produced in nuclear power plants is a matter which deserves careful consideration. Technico-economic studies in many countries have shown that the use of nuclear heat is fully competitive with most of fossil-fuelled plants, the higher investment costs being offset by lower production cost. Another point in favour of heat generation by nuclear source is its indisputable advantage in terms of benefits to the environment. The IAEA activity plans for 1985-86 concentrate on information exchange with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications of heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and existing power plants backfitted for additional heat applications. The information gained up to 1985 was discussed during the Advisory Group Meeting on the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Applications held in the Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland in September 1985 and, is included in the present Technical Document

  13. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingshu; Sun, Yubo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bermel, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  14. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xingshu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  15. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  16. Magnetic refrigeration--towards room-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, E.; Tegus, O.; Li, X.W.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Modern society relies very much on readily available cooling. Magnetic refrigeration based on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has become a promising competitive technology for the conventional gas-compression/expansion technique in use today. Recently, there have been two breakthroughs in magnetic-refrigeration research: one is that American scientists demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator; the other one is that we discovered a new class of magnetic refrigerant materials for room-temperature applications. The new materials are manganese-iron-phosphorus-arsenic (MnFe(P,As)) compounds. This new material has important advantages over existing magnetic coolants: it exhibits a huge MCE, which is larger than that of Gd metal; and its operating temperature can be tuned from about 150 to about 335 K by adjusting the P/As ratio. Here we report on further improvement of the materials by increasing the Mn content. The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. Addition of Mn reduces the thermal hysteresis, which is intrinsic to the first-order transition. This implies that already moderate applied magnetic fields of below 2 T may suffice

  17. Temperature structure and emergent flux of the Jovian planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvaggio, P.; Sagan, C.

    1978-01-01

    Long path, low temperature, moderate resolution spectra of methane and ammonia, broadened by hydrogen and helium, are used to calculate non-gray model atmospheres for the four Jovian planets. The fundamental and first overtone of hydrogen contributes enough absorption to create a thermal inversion for each of the planets. The suite of emergent spectral fluxes and representative limb darkenings and brightenings are calculated for comparison with the Voyager infrared spectra. The temperature differences between Jovian belts and zones corresponds to a difference in the ammonia cirrus particle radii (1 to 3 micron in zones; 10 micron in belts). The Jovian tropopause is approximately at the 0.1 bar level. A thin ammonia cirrus haze should be distributed throughout the Saturnian troposphere; and NH3 gas must be slightly supersaturated or ammonia ice particles are carried upwards convectively in the upper troposphere of Saturn. Substantial methane clouds exist on both Uranus and Neptune. There is some evidence for almost isothermal structures in the deep atmospheres of these two planets.

  18. Si quantum dot structures and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbyna, L.; Torchynska, T.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents briefly the history of emission study in Si quantum dots (QDs) in the last two decades. Stable light emission of Si QDs and NCs was observed in the spectral ranges: blue, green, orange, red and infrared. These PL bands were attributed to the exciton recombination in Si QDs, to the carrier recombination through defects inside of Si NCs or via oxide related defects at the Si/SiOx interface. The analysis of recombination transitions and the different ways of the emission stimulation in Si QD structures, related to the element variation for the passivation of surface dangling bonds, as well as the plasmon induced emission and rare earth impurity activation, have been presented. The different applications of Si QD structures in quantum electronics, such as: Si QD light emitting diodes, Si QD single union and tandem solar cells, Si QD memory structures, Si QD based one electron devices and double QD structures for spintronics, have been discussed as well. Note the significant worldwide interest directed toward the silicon-based light emission for integrated optoelectronics is related to the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor compatibility and the possibility to be monolithically integrated with very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The different features of poly-, micro- and nanocrystalline silicon for solar cells, that is a mixture of both amorphous and crystalline phases, such as the silicon NCs or QDs embedded in a α-Si:H matrix, as well as the thin film 2-cell or 3-cell tandem solar cells based on Si QD structures have been discussed as well. Silicon NC based structures for non-volatile memory purposes, the recent studies of Si QD base single electron devices and the single electron occupation of QDs as an important component to the measurement and manipulation of spins in quantum information processing have been analyzed as well.

  19. The effect of temperature and pressure on the crystal structure of piperidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Laura E; Ibberson, Richard M; Marshall, William G; Parsons, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The response of molecular crystal structures to changes in externally applied conditions such as temperature and pressure are the result of a complex balance between strong intramolecular bonding, medium strength intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonds, and weaker intermolecular van der Waals contacts. At high pressure the additional thermodynamic requirement to fill space efficiently becomes increasingly important. The crystal structure of piperidine-d11 has been determined at 2 K and at room temperature at pressures between 0.22 and 1.09 GPa. Unit cell dimensions have been determined between 2 and 255 K, and at pressures up to 2.77 GPa at room temperature. All measurements were made using neutron powder diffraction. The crystal structure features chains of molecules formed by NH…N H-bonds with van der Waals interactions between the chains. Although the H-bonds are the strongest intermolecular contacts, the majority of the sublimation enthalpy may be ascribed to weaker but more numerous van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the thermal expansion data in the light of phonon frequencies determined in periodic DFT calculations indicates that the expansion at very low temperature is governed by external lattice modes, but above 100 K the influence of intramolecular ring-flexing modes also becomes significant. The principal directions of thermal expansion are determined by the sensitivity of different van der Waals interactions to changes in distance. The principal values of the strain developed on application of pressure are similarly oriented to those determined in the variable-temperature study, but more isotropic because of the need to minimise volume by filling interstitial voids at elevated pressure. Graphical AbstractThough H-bonds are important interactions in the crystal structure of piperidine, the response to externally-applied conditions are determined by van der Waals interactions.

  20. Design Investigation on Applicable Mesh Structures for Medical Stent Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shoji; He, Jianmei

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, utilization of medical stents is one of effective treatments for stenosis and occlusion occurring in a living body’s lumen indispensable for maintenance of human life such as superficial femoral artery (SFA) occlusion. However, there are concerns about the occurrence of fatigue fractures caused by stress concentrations, neointimal hyperplasia and the like due to the shape structure and the manufacturing method in the conventional stents, and a stent having high strength and high flexibility is required. Therefore, in this research, applicable mesh structures for medical stents based on the design concepts of high strength, high flexibility are interested to solve various problem of conventional stent. According to the shape and dimensions of SFA occlusion therapy stent and indwelling delivery catheter, shape design of the meshed stent are performed using 3-dimensional CAD software Solid Works first. Then analytical examination on storage characteristics and compression characteristics of such mesh structure applied stent models were carried out through finite element analysis software ANSYS Workbench. Meshed stent models with higher strength and higher flexibility with integral molding are investigated analytically. It was found that the storage characteristics and compression characteristics of meshed stent modles are highly dependent on the basic mesh shapes with same surface void ratio. Trade-off relationship between flexibility and storage characteristics is found exited, it is required to provide appropriate curvatures during basic mesh shape design.

  1. Resistance of superhydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces to varied temperature applications on 316L SS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Hamza; Basit, Kanza; Saleem, Sajid; Siddiqui, Bilal A.

    316L SS also called Marine Stainless Steel is an important material for structural and marine applications. When superhydrophobic and oleophobic coatings are applied on 316L SS it shows significant resistance to wear and corrosion. This paper aims to validate the coatings manufacturer's information on optimal temperature range and test the viability of coating against multiple oil based cleaning agents. 316L SS was coated with multiple superhydrophic and oleohobic coatings and observed under SEM for validity of adhesion and thickness and then scanned under FFM to validate the tribological information. The samples were then dipped into multiple cleaning agents maintained at the range of operating temperatures specified by the manufacturer. Coating was observed for deterioration over a fixed time intervals through SEM and FFM. A comparison was drawn to validate the most critical cleaning agent and the most critical temperature at which the coating fails to leave the base substrate exposed to the environment.

  2. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  3. Low Temperature Regolith Bricks for In-Situ Structural Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Kevin; Sakthivel, Tamil S.; Mantovani, James; Seal, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Current technology for producing in-situ structural materials on future missions to Mars or the moon relies heavily on energy-intensive sintering processes to produce solid bricks from regolith. This process requires heating the material up to temperatures in excess of 1000 C and results in solid regolith pieces with compressive strengths in the range of 14000 to 28000 psi, but are heavily dependent on the porosity of the final material and are brittle. This method is currently preferred over a low temperature cementation process to prevent consumption of precious water and other non-renewable materials. A high strength structural material with low energy requirements is still needed for future colonization of other planets. To fulfill these requirements, a nano-functionalization process has been developed to produce structural bricks from regolith simulant and shows promising mechanical strength results. Functionalization of granular silicate particles into alkoxides using a simple low temperature chemical process produces a high surface area zeolite particles that are held together via inter-particle oxygen bonding. Addition of water in the resulting zeolite particles produces a sol-gel reaction called "inorganic polymerization" which gives a strong solid material after a curing process at 60 C. The aqueous solution by-product of the reaction is currently being investigated for its reusability; an essential component of any ISRU technology. For this study, two batches of regolith bricks are synthesized from JSC-1A; the first batch from fresh solvents and chemicals, the second batch made from the water solution by-product of the first batch. This is done to determine the feasibility of recycling necessary components of the synthesis process, mainly water. Characterization including BET surface area, SEM, and EDS has been done on the regolith bricks as well as the constituent particles,. The specific surface area of 17.53 sq m/g (average) of the granular regolith

  4. Biological and Biomimetic Low-Temperature Routes to Materials for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, Daniel E. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Inst. for Collaborative Biotechnologies

    2016-08-29

    New materials are needed to significantly improve the efficiencies of energy harnessing, transduction and storage, yet the synthesis of advanced composites and multi-metallic semiconductors with nanostructures optimized for these functions remains poorly understood and even less well controlled. To help address this need, we proposed three goals: (1) to further investigate the hierarchical structure of the biologically synthesized silica comprising the skeletal spicules of sponges that we discovered, to better resolve the role and mechanism of templating by the hierarchically assembled silicatein protein filament; (2) to extend our molecular and genetic analyses and engineering of silicatein, the self-assembling, structure-directing, silica-synthesizing enzyme we discovered and characterized, to better understand and manipulate the catalysis and templating of semiconductor synthesis,; and (3) to further investigate, scale up and harness the biologically inspired, low-temperature, kinetically controlled catalytic synthesis method we developed (based on the mechanism we discovered in silicatein) to investigate the kinetic control of the structure-function relationships in magnetic materials, and develop new materials for energy applications. The bio-inspired catalytic synthesis method we have developed is low-cost, low temperature, and operates without the use of polluting chemicals. In addition to direct applications for improvement of batteries and fuel cells, the broader impact of this research includes a deeper fundamental understanding of the factors governing kinetically controlled synthesis and its control of the emergent nanostructure and performance of a wide range of nanomaterials for energy applications.

  5. High-temperature process heat applications with an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    An 842-MW(t) HTGR-process heat (HTGR-PH) design and several synfuels and energy transport processes to which it could be coupled are described. As in other HTGR designs, the HTGR-PH has its entire primary coolant system contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) which provides the necessary biological shielding and pressure containment. The high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. With a capability to produce hot helium in the secondary loop at 800 0 C (1472 0 F) with current designs and 900 0 C (1652 0 F) with advanced designs, a large number of process heat applications are potentially available. Studies have been performed for coal liquefaction and gasification using nuclear heat

  6. A 15-pole high temperature superconductor filter for radar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Xi, Weibin; Wu, Songtao

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a compact and high first harmonic frequency resonator. The characteristics of this resonator are theoretically analyzed. A highly selective 15-pole Chebyshev high temperature superconducting ultra-high frequency narrowband filter for radar applications was fabricated by using this resonator. The filter has a center frequency of 495 MHz and a fractional bandwidth of 1%. The first harmonic frequency is more than 3.3 times the fundamental frequency. The measured filter shows excellent selectivity, better than 85 dB/1 MHz skirt slopes, and more than 85 dB of rejection at 497.5 MHz from the band edge. The filter was fabricated on a 2 inch YBCO thin film with a 0.5 mm thick MgO substrate. The experimental results are consistent with the simulations.

  7. Thermochemical heat storage for high temperature applications. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felderhoff, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Urbanczyk, Robert; Peil, Stefan [Institut fuer Energie- und Umwelttechnik e.V. (IUTA), Duisburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Heat storage for high temperature applications can be performed by several heat storage techniques. Very promising heat storage methods are based on thermochemical gas solid reactions. Most known systems are metal oxide/steam (metal hydroxides), carbon dioxide (metal carbonates), and metal/hydrogen (metal hydrides) systems. These heat storage materials posses high gravimetric and volumetric heat storage densities and because of separation of the reaction products and their storage in different locations heat losses can be avoided. The reported volumetric heat storage densities are 615, 1340 and 1513 [ kWh m{sup -3}] for calcium hydroxide Ca(OH){sub 2}, calcium carbonate CaCO{sub 3} and magnesium iron hydride Mg{sub 2}FeH{sub 6} respectively. Additional demands for gas storage decrease the heat storage density, but metal hydride systems can use available hydrogen storage possibilities for example caverns, pipelines and chemical plants. (orig.)

  8. A complex autoregressive model and application to monthly temperature forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Gu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex autoregressive model was established based on the mathematic derivation of the least squares for the complex number domain which is referred to as the complex least squares. The model is different from the conventional way that the real number and the imaginary number are separately calculated. An application of this new model shows a better forecast than forecasts from other conventional statistical models, in predicting monthly temperature anomalies in July at 160 meteorological stations in mainland China. The conventional statistical models include an autoregressive model, where the real number and the imaginary number are separately disposed, an autoregressive model in the real number domain, and a persistence-forecast model.

  9. High temperature reactor and application to nuclear process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulten, R; Kugeler, K [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-01-01

    The principle of high temperature nuclear process heat is explained and the main applications (hydrogasification of coal, nuclear chemical heat pipe, direct reduction of iron ore, coal gasification by steam and water splitting) are described in more detail. The motivation for the introduction of nuclear process heat to the market, questions of cost, of raw material resources and environmental aspects are the next point of discussion. The new technological questions of the nuclear reactor and the status of development are described, especially information about the fuel elements, the hot gas ducts, the contamination and some design considerations are added. Furthermore the status of development of helium heated steam reformers, the main results of the work until now and the further activities in this field are explained.

  10. Structural analysis of bioceramic materials for denture application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, Nurlaela, E-mail: n-rauf@fmipa.unhas.ac.id; Tahir, Dahlang; Arbiansyah, Muhammad [Dept of Physics, FMIPA-Univ. Hasanuddin Makassar Indonesia (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    Structural analysis has been performed on bioceramic materials for denture application by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRF is using for analysis chemical composition of raw materials. XRF shows the ratio 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 between feldspar, quartz, kaolin and eggshell, respectively, resulting composition CaO content of 56.78 %, which is similar with natural tooth. Sample preparation was carried out on temperature of 800 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C. X-ray diffraction result showed that the structure is crystalline with trigonal crystal system for SiO{sub 2} (a=b=4.9134 Å and c=5.4051 Å) and CaH{sub 2}O{sub 2} (a=b=3.5925 Å and c=4.9082 Å). Based on the Scherrer’s equation showed the crystallite size of the highest peak (SiO{sub 2}) increase with increasing the temperature preparation. The highest hardness value (87 kg/mm{sup 2}) and match with the standards of dentin hardness. The surface structure was observed by using SEM also discussed.

  11. Type T reference function suitability for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, D.

    2013-09-01

    Type T thermocouples are commonly used in industrial measurement applications due to their accuracy relative to other thermocouple types, low cost, and the ready availability of measurement equipment. Type T thermocouples are very effective when used in differential measurements, as there is no cold junction compensation necessary for the connections to the measurement equipment. Type T's published accuracy specifications result in its frequent use in low temperature applications. An examination of over 328 samples from a number of manufacturers has been completed for this investigation. Samples were compared to a Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometer (SPRT) at the LN2 boiling point along with four other standardized measurement points using a characterized ice point reference, low-thermal EMF scanner and an 8.5 digit multimeter, and the data compiled and analyzed. The test points were approximately -196 °C, -75 °C, 0 °C, +100 °C, and +200 °C. These data show an anomaly in the conformance to the reference functions where the reference functions meet at 0 °C. Additionally, in the temperature region between -100 °C to -200 °C, a positive offset of up to 5.4 °C exists between the reference function equations published in the ASTM E230-06 for the nitrogen point and the measured response of the actual wire. This paper will examine the historical and technological reasons for this anomaly in the both the ASTM and IEC reference functions. At the request of the author and the Proceedings Editor the above article has been replaced with a corrected version. The original PDF file supplied to AIP Publishing contained several figures with missing information/characters—caused by processes used to generate the PDF file. All figures were affected by this error. The article has been replaced and these figures now display correctly. The corrected article was published on 7 November 2013.

  12. Effect of dope solution temperature on the membrane structure and membrane distillation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawi, N. I. M.; Bilad, M. R.; Nordin, N. A. H. M.

    2018-04-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is a non-isothermal process applicable to purify water using hydrophobic membrane. Membrane in MD is hydrophobic, permeable to water vapor but repels liquid water. MD membrane is expected to pose high flux, high fouling and scaling resistances and most importantly high wetting resistance. This study develops flat-sheet polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane by exploring both liquid-liquid and liquid-solid phase inversion technique largely to improve its wetting resistance and flux performance. We hypothesize that temperature of dope solution play roles in solid-liquid separation during membrane formation and an optimum balance between liquid-liquid and liquid-solid (crystallization) separation leads to highly performance PVDF membrane. Findings obtained from differential scanning calorimeter test show that increasing dope solution temperature reduces degree of PVDF crystallinity and suppresses formation of crystalline structure. The morphological images of the resulting membranes show that at elevated dope solution temperature (40, 60, 80 and 100°C), the spherulite-like structures are formed across the thickness of membranes ascribed from due to different type of crystals. The performance of direct-contact MD shows that the obtained flux of the optimum dope temperature (60°C) of 10.8 L/m2h is comparable to commercial PTFE-based MD membrane.

  13. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  14. The application of microwave techniques to temperature measurement in biotelemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of a microwave dielectric resonator for temperature measurement in Biotelemetry offers the advantage that a passive temperature telemeter can be used. The telemeter is powered by a source remote from the host creature, thus permitting greater miniaturisation of the implant than is possible with conventional techniques. This is essential, especially for application to small animals where the telemeter size and weight become critical. The design of the telemeter which is based upon a novel microwave technique, and the associated practical considerations are discussed. Included in this work is a criticism of initially promising ideas which after an in-depth investigation had to be disregarded. Although the transponder could not be built in its final form due to the unavailability of certain key materials, the transponder operation was tested and found to be successful. A specification of the transponder and transmitter requirements for a working system are included. A theoretical and experimental appraisal of dielectric resonators as miniature microwave filters, also forms a large part of this work. Dielectric resonators offer a significant volume reduction compared to air-filled metallic cavities, and simple coupling to microstrip combined with ease of tuning permits incorporation into Microwave Integrated Circuits. A computer program which can form the basis for a dielectric resonator filter design is provided, and some unusual results of tests on dielectric resonators are presented. It is believed that this will help to popularise and increase understanding of the dielectric resonator - which is an exciting, yet still emerging technology

  15. Engineering the electronic band structures of novel cubic structured germanium monochalcogenides for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar; AlFaify, S.; Ahmed, R.; Butt, Faheem K.; Laref, A.; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Tahir, S. A.

    2018-05-01

    Germanium mono-chalcogenides have received considerable attention for being a promising replacement for the relatively toxic and expensive chalcogenides in renewable and sustainable energy applications. In this paper, we explore the potential of the recently discovered novel cubic structured (π-phase) GeS and GeSe for thermoelectric applications in the framework of density functional theory coupled with Boltzmann transport theory. To examine the modifications in their physical properties, the across composition alloying of π-GeS and π-GeSe (such as π-GeS1-xSex for x =0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1) has been performed that has shown important effects on the electronic band structures and effective masses of charge carriers. An increase in Se composition in π-GeS1-xSex has induced a downward shift in their conduction bands, resulting in the narrowing of their energy band gaps. The thermoelectric coefficients of π-GeS1-xSex have been accordingly influenced by the evolution of the electronic band structures and effective masses of charge carriers. π-GeS1-xSex features sufficiently larger values of Seebeck coefficients, power factors and figures of merit (ZTs), which experience further improvement with an increase in temperature, revealing their potential for high-temperature applications. The calculated results show that ZT values equivalent to unity can be achieved for π-GeS1-xSex at appropriate n-type doping levels. Our calculations for the formation enthalpies indicate that a π-GeS1-xSex alloying system is energetically stable and could be synthesized experimentally. These intriguing characteristics make π-GeS1-xSex a promising candidate for futuristic thermoelectric applications in energy harvesting devices.

  16. Proceedings of Prof. Brahm Prakash birth centenary workshop on high temperature materials and hot structures: souvenir and book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, monolithic ceramics and refractory metals were identified for use at high temperatures. Considerations such as higher operating temperatures, increased thermostructural loads, lower density, etc. brought exotic materials such as ceramic matrix composites, carbon based composites, ODS alloy, intermetallics and thermal barrier coatings to the horizon. Advent of ultra high temperature ceramics and functionally graded materials further pushed the threshold of applicability of high temperature materials and hot structures. Impressive progress in this area has been possible because of the fact that characterization tools along with design and simulation techniques have constantly kept pace with advancement occurring in the processing methods of these materials. The workshop scope includes: Thermal Protection Systems and Materials, Hot Structures, Ceramic and Carbon Matrix Composites, Ultra High Temperature Ceramics, Coating Technology, Simulation and Characterization. Articles relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. Role of substrate and annealing temperature on the structure of ZnO and Al{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O thin films for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nambala, Fred Joe [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Zambia, PO Box 32379, Great East Road Campus, Lusaka (Zambia); Nel, Jacqueline M.; Machatine, Augusto G.J. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, Bonex W. [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, PO Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Njoroge, Eric G. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Maabong, Kelebogile [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone (Botswana); Das, Arran G.M. [Monash University, Private Bag X60, Roodepoort 1725 (South Africa); Diale, Mmantsae, E-mail: mmantsae.diale@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the deposition of pure and 5 at% Al doped ZnO (AZO) prepared by sol–gel and applied to the substrates by spin-coating, and the role of annealing temperature on the crystallinity of these layers. It is found that both ZnO and AZO are largely amorphous when coated on glass compared to n-Si(111), as substrates. On both substrates, X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the crystallinity improves as annealing temperature is raised from 200 to 600 °C with better crystallinity on Si substrates. The thickness of the films on substrates was determined as 120 nm by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Specular ultra-violet visible (UV–vis) gives the direct transition optical band gaps (E{sub g}) for AZO as-deposited films are 2.60 and 3.35 eV while that of 600 °C annealed films are 3.00 and 3.60 eV. The E{sub g} calculated from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) UV–vis are more diverse in ZnO- and AZO-Si than the ZnO- and AZO-glass samples, although in both sets the E{sub g} tend to converge after annealing 600 °C. The Raman spectra of samples show multiphonon processes of higher order from the AZO and substrates. It is found that residual stresses are related to E{sub 2} Raman mode.

  18. Mathematical Structure in Quantum Systems and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavero-Pelaez, I.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.; Muñoz--Castañeda, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This volume contains most of the contributions presented at the Conference 'Mathematical Structures in Quantum Systems and applications', held at the Centro de Ciencias de Benasque 'Pedro Pascual', Benasque (Spain) from 8-14 July 2012. The aim of the Conference was to bring together physicists working on different applications of mathematical methods to quantum systems in order to enable the different communities to become acquainted with other approaches and techniques that could be used in their own fields of expertise. We concentrated on three main subjects: – the geometrical description of Quantum Mechanics; – the Casimir effect and its mathematical implications; – the Quantum Zeno Effect and Open system dynamics. Each of these topics had a set of general lectures, aimed at presenting a global view on the subject, and other more technical seminars. We would like to thank all participants for their contribution to creating a wonderful scientific atmosphere during the Conference. We would especially like to thank the speakers and the authors of the papers contained in this volume, the members of the Scientific Committee for their guidance and support and, of course, the referees for their generous work. Special thanks are also due to the staff of the Centro de Ciencias de Benasque 'Pedro Pascual' who made this successful meeting possible. On behalf of the organising committee and the authors we would also like to acknowledge the partial support provided by the ESF-CASIMIR network ('New Trends and Applications of the Casimir Effect'), the QUITEMAD research Project (“Quantum technologies at Madrid”, Ref. Comunidad de Madrid P2009/ESP-1594), the MICINN Project (MTM2011-16027-E) and the Government from Arag´on (DGA) (DGA, Department of Industry and Innovation and the European Social Fund, DGA-Grant 24/1) who made the Conference and this Proceedings volume possible.

  19. APPLICATION OF POSTFLOTATION TAILINGS IN HYDROENGINEERING STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Stefaniak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic development stimulated by the increased demand for production of consumer goods and the growing human population result in increasing amounts of various wastes, including tailings. The mining industry in Poland, comprising also mining of non-ferrous metal ores, is a strategic branch of the national economy and at the same time a leading waste producer. Tailings management is a significant problem both in Poland and worldwide. Frequently considerable amounts of wastes are accumulated in mine spoil tips, in areas not always suitable for their deposition, thus leading to the degradation of the surrounding environment. At the huge volume of produced wastes their rational and economically viable management is becoming crucial. On the other hand, depletion of natural aggregate deposits is an important incentive to search for substitutes, which would be suitable for the development of road infrastructure or which could be used in earth structure engineering to construct hydroengineering objects. Since no profitable recovery technologies are available at present, tailings generated by copper mining are deposited in tailings storage facilities. The largest and at the same time the only currently operating facility in Poland is the Żelazny Most Mining Tailings Storage Facility, belonging to KGHM Polska Miedź S.A. The paper presents criteria for material quality and density imposed on the material embedded in the static core of the tailings pond dam. For this purpose studies were conducted to confirm applicability of sorted tailings as a material for the construction of earth structures.

  20. Temperature-induced transitions between domain structures of ultrathin magnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakova, T.; Zablotskii, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Understanding of the influence of temperature on behavior of domain patterns of ultrathin magnetic films is of high significance for the fundamental physics of nanomagnetism as well as for technological applications. A thickness-dependent Curie temperature of ultrathin films may cause many interesting phenomena in the thermal evolution of domain structures (DS): i) nontrivial changes of the anisotropy constants as a function of the film thickness; ii) so-called inverse melting of DSs (processes where a more symmetric domain phase is found at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures - the inverse phase sequence) [1]; iii) temperature-induced transitions between domain structures. The possibility of such transitions is determined by lowering of the potential barriers separating different magnetization states as the film temperature approaches the Curie point. In this case with an increase of temperature, due to a significant decrease of the anisotropy constant, the domain wall energy is low enough and allows the system to reach equilibrium by a change of the domain wall number in the sample. This manifests itself in a transition from a metastable DS to a more stable DS which corresponds to new values of the anisotropy constant and magnetizations saturation. Thus, the temperature-induced transitions are driven by temperature changes of the magnetic parameters of the film. The key parameters controlling the DS geometry and period are the characteristic length, l c =σ/4πM S 2 (the ratio between the domain wall and demagnetization energies), and the quality factor Q =K/2πM S 2 (K is the first anisotropy constant). We show that for films with a pronounced nonmonotonic temperature dependence of l c one can expect a counter thermodynamic behavior: the inverse phase sequence and cooling-induced disordering. On changing temperature the existing domain structure should accommodate itself under new magnitudes of l c and Q. There are the two possible

  1. Low temperature Zn diffusion for GaSb solar cell structures fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulima, Oleg V.; Faleev, Nikolai N.; Kazantsev, Andrej B.; Mintairov, Alexander M.; Namazov, Ali

    1995-01-01

    Low temperature Zn diffusion in GaSb, where the minimum temperature was 450 C, was studied. The pseudo-closed box (PCB) method was used for Zn diffusion into GaAs, AlGaAs, InP, InGaAs and InGaAsP. The PCB method avoids the inconvenience of sealed ampoules and proved to be simple and reproducible. The special design of the boat for Zn diffusion ensured the uniformality of Zn vapor pressure across the wafer surface, and thus the uniformity of the p-GaSb layer depth. The p-GaSb layers were studied using Raman scattering spectroscopy and the x-ray rocking curve method. As for the postdiffusion processing, an anodic oxidation was used for a precise thinning of the diffused GaSb layers. The results show the applicability of the PCB method for the large-scale production of the GaSb structures for solar cells.

  2. Hydrothermal temperature effect on crystal structures, optical properties and electrical conductivity of ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhafina, Wan Almaz; Salleh, Hasiah; Daud, Mohd Zalani; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Ghazali, Salmah Mohd

    2017-09-01

    ZnO is an wide direct band gap semiconductor and possess rich family of nanostructures which turned to be a key role in the nanotechnology field of applications. Hydrothermal method was proven to be simple, robust and low cost among the reported methods to synthesize ZnO nanostructures. In this work, the properties of ZnO nanostructures were altered by varying temperatures of hydrothermal process. The changes in term of morphological, crystal structures, optical properties and electrical conductivity were investigated. A drastic change of ZnO nanostructures morphology and decreases of 002 diffraction peak were observed as the hydrothermal temperature increased. The band gap of samples decreased as the size of ZnO nanostructure increased, whereas the electrical conductivity had no influence on the band gap value but more on the morphology of ZnO nanostructures instead.

  3. Studying Structural, Optical, Electrical, and Sensing Properties of Nanocrystalline SnO2:Cu Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Method for CO Gas Sensor Application at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jawad, Selma M. H.; Elttayf, Abdulhussain K.; Saber, Amel S.

    Nanocrystalline SnO2 and SnO2:Cu thin films derived from SnCl2ṡ2H2O precursors have been prepared on glass substrates using sol-gel dip-coating technique. The deposited film was 300±20nm thick and the films were annealed in air at 500∘C for 1h. Structural, optical and sensing properties of the films were studied under different preparation conditions, such as Cu-doping concentration of 2%, 4% and 6wt.%. X-ray diffraction studies show the polycrystalline nature with tetragonal rutile structure of SnO2 and Cu:SnO2 thin films. The films have highly preferred orientation along (110). The crystallite size of the prepared samples reduced with increasing Cu-doping concentrations and the addition of Cu as dopants changed the structural properties of the thin films. Surface morphology was determined through scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Results show that the particle size decreased as doping concentration increased. The films have moderate optical transmission (up to 82.4% at 800nm), and the transmittance, absorption coefficient and energy gap at different Cu-doping concentration were measured and calculated. Results show that Cu-doping decreased the transmittance and energy gap whereas it increased the absorption coefficient. Two peaks were noted with Cu-doping concentration of 0-6wt.%; the first peak was positioned exactly at 320nm ultraviolet emission and the second was positioned at 430-480nm. Moreover, emission bands were noticed in the photoluminescence spectra of Cu:SnO2. The electrical properties of SnO2 films include DC electrical conductivity, showing that the films have two activation energies, namely, Ea1 and Ea2, which increase as Cu-doping concentration increases. Cudoped nanocrystalline SnO2 gas-sensing material has better sensitivity to CO gas compared with pure SnO2.

  4. Temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Modelling and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Z.

    2000-01-01

    DSC. Some shortcomings of TMDSC have been noticed in both modelling and application work. Firstly, any experiments for purpose of either understanding or the quantitative measurements of TMDSC output quantities should be performed under carefully selected conditions which can satisfy the linear response assumption. Secondly, some signals in particular those associated with kinetic processes may not be fully sampled by TMDSC due to the limit of the observing window of a modulation. Thirdly, the TMDSC evaluation procedure introduces mathematical artefacts into the output signals. As a consequence, it is preferable to include as many temperature modulations as possible within any transition being studied in order obtain good quality experimental signals by eliminating or minimising these artefacts. (author)

  5. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  6. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1995-07-01

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author)

  7. Feedback circuit application for multiple fluid temperature rise or drop; Visestruko dizanje i spustanje temperature fluida povratnom spregom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M [Tehnoloski fakultet Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Stefanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Blagojevic, B [MaSinski fakultet, Nis (Yugoslavia); Stoiljkovic, S [Tehnoloski fakultet, Leskovac (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    Multiplication of temperature rise or drop is proposed and explained by Feedback method. Application of this method is proposed for different elementary processes of temperature variation (non isothermal processes). The paper points to possibilities of increasing performance of existing apparatuses and new ways for performing heating or cooling. (author.) 2 refs. 3 figs. 1 tabs.

  8. Comparative Study of Micro- and Nano-structured Coatings for High-Temperature Oxidation in Steam Atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, F.J.; Castañeda, I.; Hierro, M.P.; Escobar Galindo, R.; Sánchez-López, J.C.; Mato, S.

    2014-01-01

    For many high-temperature applications, coatings are applied in order to protect structural materials against a wide range of different environments: oxidation, metal dusting, sulphidation, molten salts, steam, etc. The resistance achieved by the use of different kind of coatings, such as functionally graded material coatings, has been optimized with the latest designs. In the case of supercritical steam turbines, many attempts have been made in terms of micro-structural coatings design, main...

  9. Japanese HTTR program for demonstration of high temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, T.; Hada, K.; Shiozawa, S.

    1997-01-01

    Construction works of the HTTR started in March 1991 in order to establish and upgrade the HTGR technology basis, to carry out innovative basic researches on high temperature engineering and to demonstrate high temperature heat utilization and application of nuclear heat. This report describes the demonstration program of high temperature heat utilization and application. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  10. Effect of cold compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Towle-Millard, Heather A; Rankin, David C; Roush, James K

    2013-03-01

    To measure the effect of cold compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs. 10 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 (superficial), 1.0 (middle), and 1.5 (deep) cm into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Cold (-16.8°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no cold compress. Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of application at the superficial depth was significantly decreased, compared with control temperatures. Application for 10 and 20 minutes significantly reduced the temperature at all depths, compared with controls and 5 minutes of application. Twenty minutes of application significantly decreased temperature at only the middle depth, compared with 10 minutes of application. With this method of cold treatment, increasing application time from 10 to 20 minutes caused a further significant temperature change at only the middle tissue depth; however, for maximal cooling, the minimum time of application should be 20 minutes. Possible changes in tissue temperature and adverse effects of application > 20 minutes require further evaluation.

  11. Thermophysical characterization tools and numerical models for high temperature thermo-structural composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorrette, Ch.

    2007-04-01

    This work is an original contribution to the study of the thermo-structural composite materials thermal behaviour. It aims to develop a methodology with a new experimental device for thermal characterization adapted to this type of material and to model the heat transfer by conduction within these heterogeneous media. The first part deals with prediction of the thermal effective conductivity of stratified composite materials in the three space directions. For that, a multi scale model using a rigorous morphology analysis of the structure and the elementary properties is proposed and implemented. The second part deals with the thermal characterization at high temperature. It shows how to estimate simultaneously the thermal effusiveness and the thermal conductivity. The present method is based on the observation of the heating from a plane sample submitted to a continuous excitation generated by Joule Effect. Heat transfer is modelled with the quadrupole formalism, temperature is here measured on two sides of the sample. The development of both resistive probes for excitation and linear probes for temperature measurements enables the thermal properties measured up to 1000 C. Finally, some experimental and numerical application examples lead to review the obtained results. (author)

  12. High power multiple wavelength diode laser stack for DPSSL application without temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong; Yin, Xia; Wang, Jingwei; Chen, Shi; Zhan, Yun; Li, Xiaoning; Fan, Yingmin; Liu, Xingsheng

    2018-02-01

    High power diode laser stack is widely used in pumping solid-state laser for years. Normally an integrated temperature control module is required for stabilizing the output power of solid-state laser, as the output power of the solid-state laser highly depends on the emission wavelength and the wavelength shift of diode lasers according to the temperature changes. However the temperature control module is inconvenient for this application, due to its large dimension, high electric power consumption and extra adding a complicated controlling system. Furthermore, it takes dozens of seconds to stabilize the output power when the laser system is turned on. In this work, a compact hard soldered high power conduction cooled diode laser stack with multiple wavelengths is developed for stabilizing the output power of solid-state laser in a certain temperature range. The stack consists of 5 laser bars with the pitch of 0.43mm. The peak output power of each bar in the diode laser stack reaches as much as 557W and the combined lasing wavelength spectrum profile spans 15nm. The solidstate laser, structured with multiple wavelength diode laser stacks, allows the ambient temperature change of 65°C without suddenly degrading the optical performance.

  13. Inference of domain structure at elevated temperature in fine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thermal variation of the number of domains (nd) for Fe7S8 particles (within the size range 1-30 mm and between 20 and 300°C), has been inferred from the room temperature analytic expression between nd and particle size (L), the temperature dependences of the anisotropy energy constant (K) and the spontaneous ...

  14. Applications of a high temperature sessile drop device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, B; Eisenmenger-Sittner, C [Vienna University of Technology, Insitute of Solid State Physics E-138, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Worbs, P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Materialforschung, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: bernhard.schwarz@ifp.tuwien.ac.at

    2008-03-01

    The wettability of a liquid metal on a solid surface is of great technological interest for the industry (soldering, brazing, infiltration) as well as for fundamental research (diffusion, chemical reaction, intermetallic phases). The characterization of wetting is done by measuring the contact angle at the triple line of the liquid on the solid. A High Temperature Sessile Drop Device (HTSDD) was constructed and several applications were tested: (i) a wettability study of a copper-based brazing alloy (Cu-ABA) on TiN{sub x} coatings with different stoichiometries. The data derived from the HTSDD show that the reduction of the nitrogen content in the TiN coating reduces the time for reaching the final contact angle. Also for substoichiometric TiC a similar behaviour is predicted in literature. (ii) The liquid surface energy of molten metals can be estimated from the curvature of flattened droplets due to the influence of gravity. Two models were used for the calculation of the liquid surface energy of different liquid metals. (iii) From the droplet radius vs. time curves it is possible to distinguish between two different reactive wetting regimes - the diffusion and the reaction controlled reactive wetting. The beginning of this research topic will be discussed.

  15. Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larbalestier, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbations to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development

  16. Silver-polypyrrole-silver structure fabrication and characterization over wide temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunk, Manish; Chand, Subhash

    2012-10-01

    Semiconducting polymers have applications in many electronic devices such as organic light emitting diodes, organic solar cells, field effect transistors, memory devices, and many flexible electronic devices. In the organic electronic devices, metal-organic semiconductor interface plays a major role in determining the electrical transport. Earlier most of the studies were performed on electrochemically polymerized polypyrrole. In this study polypyrrole-poly(vinylidene) fluoride composite films synthesized by chemical oxidation method were used for contact fabrication in sandwiched geometry. Electrical transport measurements have been carried out in silver-polypyrrole-silver sandwich structure to understand conduction mechanism in the temperature range of 10-300K. It has been observed that Ag forms Ohmic contact with PPy and bulk controlled space charge limited conduction was the dominant current transport process in these sandwiched structures.

  17. The characteristics of carbon nanotubes grown at low temperature for electronic device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Seob [Department of Photoelectronics Information, Chosun College of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaehyeong, E-mail: jaehyeong@skku.edu [School of Information and Communications Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440–746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    For the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in flexible electronic devices, the CNTs were grown on Corning 1737 glass substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. To deposit the catalyst layer, TiN buffer layer of 200 nm thickness and Ni catalyst layer of 60 nm were first deposited on the glass by r.f. magnetron sputtering method. The CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2} gases are used as the synthesis gas of CNTs and the working pressure was about 2.13 kPa, and the substrate bias was about − 200 V. The growth time was from 2 min to 5 min and the microwave power was about 800 W. The substrate temperature as the main parameter was changed from 400 °C to 550 °C. The structural properties of CNTs synthesized with the substrate temperature were investigated using Raman, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy methods. The surface and electrical properties of CNTs grown by MPECVD method were studied by scanning probe microscopy and four-point probe methods. We obtained the multi-walled CNTs (MW-CNTs). Multi-walled CNTs were vertically grown on Ni/TiN/glass substrates below 500 °C without any glass deformations. As the substrate temperature was increased, the crystallinity of CNTs was improved. Ni catalyst was found at the tip of CNT by the TEM observation and the grown CNTs were found to have a multi-walled with bamboo like structure. - Highlights: • Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Effects of substrate temperature on carbon nanotubes properties. • Improvement of the crystallinity with increasing substrate temperature. • Reduction of sheet resistance with increasing substrate temperature.

  18. Structural characteristics and elevated temperature mechanical properties of AJ62 Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubásek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz; Vojtěch, D.; Martínek, M.

    2013-12-15

    Structure and mechanical properties of the novel casting AJ62 (Mg–6Al–2Sr) alloy developed for elevated temperature applications were studied. The AJ62 alloy was compared to commercial casting AZ91 (Mg–9Al–1Zn) and WE43 (Mg–4Y–3RE) alloys. The structure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometry. Mechanical properties were characterized by Viskers hardness measurements in the as-cast state and after a long-term heat treatment at 250 °C/150 hours. Compressive mechanical tests were also carried out both at room and elevated temperatures. Compressive creep tests were conducted at a temperature of 250 °C and compressive stresses of 60, 100 and 140 MPa. The structure of the AJ62 alloy consisted of primary α-Mg dendrites and interdendritic nework of the Al{sub 4}Sr and massive Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 13}Sr phases. By increasing the cooling rate during solidification from 10 and 120 K/s the average dendrite arm thickness decreased from 18 to 5 μm and the total volume fraction of the interdendritic phases from 20% to 30%. Both factors slightly increased hardness and compressive strength. The room temperature compressive strength and hardness of the alloy solidified at 30 K/s were 298 MPa and 50 HV 5, i.e. similar to those of the as-cast WE43 alloy and lower than those of the AZ91 alloy. At 250 °C the compressive strength of the AJ62 alloy decreased by 50 MPa, whereas those of the AZ91 and WE43 alloys by 100 and 20 MPa, respectively. The creep rate of the AJ62 alloy was higher than that of the WE43 alloy, but significantly lower in comparison with the AZ91 alloy. Different thermal stabilities of the alloys were discussed and related to structural changes during elevated temperature expositions. - Highlights: • Small effect of cooling rate on the compressive strength and hardness of AJ 62 • A bit lower compressive strength of AJ 62 compared to AZ91 at room temperature • Higher resistance of the AJ 62

  19. High Temperature Electrical Insulation Materials for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art high temperature insulation materials of which higher working temperature, high...

  20. Lightweight, Ultra-High-Temperature, CMC-Lined Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Matthew J.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) is an established engineering material used extensively in aerospace. The beneficial properties of C/C include high strength, low density, and toughness. Its shortcoming is its limited usability at temperatures higher than the oxidation temperature of carbon . approximately 400 C. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are used instead, but carry a weight penalty. Combining a thin laminate of CMC to a bulk structure of C/C retains all of the benefits of C/C with the high temperature oxidizing environment usability of CMCs. Ultramet demonstrated the feasibility of combining the light weight of C/C composites with the oxidation resistance of zirconium carbide (ZrC) and zirconium- silicon carbide (Zr-Si-C) CMCs in a unique system composed of a C/C primary structure with an integral CMC liner with temperature capability up to 4,200 F (.2,315 C). The system effectively bridged the gap in weight and performance between coated C/C and bulk CMCs. Fabrication was demonstrated through an innovative variant of Ultramet fs rapid, pressureless melt infiltration processing technology. The fully developed material system has strength that is comparable with that of C/C, lower density than Cf/SiC, and ultra-high-temperature oxidation stability. Application of the reinforced ceramic casing to a predominantly C/C structure creates a highly innovative material with the potential to achieve the long-sought goal of long-term, cyclic high-temperature use of C/C in an oxidizing environment. The C/C substructure provided most of the mechanical integrity, and the CMC strengths achieved appeared to be sufficient to allow the CMC to perform its primary function of protecting the C/C. Nozzle extension components were fabricated and successfully hot-fire tested. Test results showed good thermochemical and thermomechanical stability of the CMC, as well as excellent interfacial bonding between the CMC liner and the underlying C/C structure. In particular, hafnium-containing CMCs on

  1. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, F.C., E-mail: khannaf@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, A.P.C., E-mail: adolfo@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C., E-mail: jmalboui@ufba.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Santana, A.E., E-mail: asantana@unb.br [International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Instituto de Física, Universidade de Brasília, 70910-900, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus Γ{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}×R{sup D−d} is developed from a Lie-group representation and c{sup ∗}-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ{sub 4}{sup 1}. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space–time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy–momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross–Neveu and Nambu

  2. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, F.C.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Malbouisson, J.M.C.; Santana, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus Γ D d =(S 1 ) d ×R D−d is developed from a Lie-group representation and c ∗ -algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ 4 1 . The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space–time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy–momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross–Neveu and Nambu–Jona-Lasinio models, are considered. Then

  3. Design methods for high temperature power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townley, C.H.A.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (scope of paper - reviews of design methods and design criteria currently in use for both nuclear and fossil fuelled power plant; examples chosen are (a) BS 1113, representative of design codes employed for power station boiler plant; (b) ASME Code Case N47, which is being developed for high temperature nuclear reactors, especially the liquid metal fast breeder reactor); design codes for power station boilers; Code Case N47 (design in the absence of thermal shock and thermal fatigue; design against cyclic loading at high temperature; further research in support of high temperature design methods and criteria for LMFBRs); concluding remarks. (U.K.)

  4. High temperature effects on compact-like structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Lima, E.E.M.; Losano, L. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    In this work we investigate the transition from kinks to compactons at high temperatures. We deal with a family of models, described by a real scalar field with standard kinematics, controlled by a single parameter, real and positive. The family of models supports kink-like solutions, and the solutions tend to become compact when the parameter increases to larger and larger values. We study the one-loop corrections at finite temperature, to see how the thermal effects add to the effective potential. The results suggest that the symmetry is restored at very high temperatures. (orig.)

  5. Lithium based alloy-thionyl chloride cells for applications at temperatures to 200 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, P.; Marincic, N.; Epstein, J.; Lindsey, A.

    A long-life lithium battery for industrial applications at temperatures up to 200 C was developed by combining Li-based alloy anodes with oxyhalide electrolytes. Cathodes were fabricated by rolling the blend of polycarbonomonofluoride, a conductive carbon additive, and a binder, while anodes were fabricated as those used in oxyhalide cells, incorporating a modified anode current collector designed to prevent the formation of 'lithium islands' at the end of discharge; nonwoven glass fiber separators were pretreated to remove excessive binders and lubricants. Various active electrode surface areas were combined with a corresponding thickness of electrodes and separators, matched in capacity. Tests of the high-rate electrode structure, using Li-Mg alloy anode in conjunction with thionyl chloride electrolyte, have demonstrated that the battery with this anode can be used under abusive conditions such as short circuit and external heating (at 175 C). Raising the operating temperature to 200 C did require some modifications of regular cell hardware.

  6. High Temperature Structures With Inherent Protection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The hot structures for current space vehicles require an atmospheric entry thermal protection system. Reusable hot structures that can function without requiring any...

  7. Effect of some structural parameters on high-temperature crack resistance of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents results of physicomechanical studied in high-temperature crack resistance of tungsten produced by powder metallurgy methods. It is shown that at high temperatures (>2000 deg C) a structure is formed in the material and fails at stresses independent of temperature. It is found that high-temperature tungsten crack resistance is affected neighter by changes in the effictive grain size, nor by appearance of grain-boundary microcraks in the material under high-temperature action

  8. Finescale Structure of the Temperature-Salinity Relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polzin, Kurt L; Ferrari, Raffaele

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal of this project is to understand the processes that establish the temperature-salinity relationship in the ocean, with emphasis on the interplay between advection at the large scale...

  9. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantsker, E.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO 3 -YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room

  10. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  11. Transmissive/Reflective Structural Color Filters: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural color filters, which obtain color selection by varying structures, have attracted extensive research interest in recent years due to the advantages of compactness, stability, multifunctions, and so on. In general, the mechanisms of structural colors are based on the interaction between light and structures, including light diffraction, cavity resonance, and surface plasmon resonance. This paper reviews recent progress of various structural color techniques and the integration applications of structural color filters in CMOS image sensors, solar cells, and display.

  12. Application of high precision temperature control technology in infrared testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haiyuan; Cheng, Yong; Zhu, Mengzhen; Chu, Hua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    In allusion to the demand of infrared system test, the principle of Infrared target simulator and the function of the temperature control are presented. The key technology of High precision temperature control is discussed, which include temperature gathering, PID control and power drive. The design scheme of temperature gathering is put forward. In order to reduce the measure error, discontinuously current and four-wire connection for the platinum thermal resistance are adopted. A 24-bits AD chip is used to improve the acquisition precision. Fuzzy PID controller is designed because of the large time constant and continuous disturbance of the environment temperature, which result in little overshoot, rapid response, high steady-state accuracy. Double power operational amplifiers are used to drive the TEC. Experiments show that the key performances such as temperature control precision and response speed meet the requirements.

  13. Application of low temperature plasmas for restoration/conservation of archaeological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krčma, F.; Blahová, L.; Fojtíková, P.; Graham, W. G.; Grossmannová, H.; Hlochová, L.; Horák, J.; Janová, D.; Kelsey, C. P.; Kozáková, Z.; Mazánková, V.; Procházka, M.; Přikryl, R.; Řádková, L.; Sázavská, V.; Vašíček, M.; Veverková, R.; Zmrzlý, M.

    2014-12-01

    The low-temperature low-pressure hydrogen based plasmas were used to study the influence of processes and discharge conditions on corrosion removal. The capacitive coupled RF discharge in the continuous or pulsed regime was used at operating pressure of 100-200 Pa. Plasma treatment was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. To be able to study influence of various process parameters, the model corroded samples with and without sandy incrustation were prepared. The SEM-EDX analyzes were carried out to verify corrosion removal efficiency. Experimental conditions were optimized for the selected most frequent materials of original metallic archaeological objects (iron, bronze, copper, and brass). Chlorides removal is based on hydrogen ion reactions while oxides are removed mainly by neutral species interactions. A special focus was kept for the samples temperature because it was necessary to avoid any metallographic changes in the material structure. The application of higher power pulsed regime with low duty cycle seems be the best treatment regime. The low pressure hydrogen plasma is not applicable for objects with a very broken structure or for nonmetallic objects due to the non-uniform heat stress. Due to this fact, the new developed plasmas generated in liquids were applied on selected original archaeological glass materials.

  14. Computational structural biology: methods and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwede, Torsten; Peitsch, Manuel Claude

    2008-01-01

    ... sequencing reinforced the observation that structural information is needed to understand the detailed function and mechanism of biological molecules such as enzyme reactions and molecular recognition events. Furthermore, structures are obviously key to the design of molecules with new or improved functions. In this context, computational structural biology...

  15. Application of piezoceramic materials in low temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, A.P.; Panich, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the voltage-to-movement conversion coefficients for piezoceramic domestic materials PKR and TsTS-19 are measured using a capacitance dilatometer in the 0.4< T<300K temperature range. Anisotropy of thermal expansion of materials determined by the polarization vector is observed. Some recommendations concerning the use of the given materials in low-temperature scanning tunnel microscopes are given

  16. Metal-coated optical fibers for high temperature sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Wysokiński, Karol; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Kołakowska, Agnieszka; Nasiłowski, Piotr; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    An novel low-temperature method was used to enhance the corrosion resistance of copper or gold-coated optical fibers. A characterization of the elaborated materials and reports on selected studies such as cyclic temperature tests together with tensile tests is presented. Gold-coated optical fibers are proposed as a component of optical fiber sensors working in oxidizing atmospheres under temperatures exceeding 900 °C.

  17. Experimental Study on Temperature Behavior of SSC (Stiffened Steel Plate Concrete) Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K. J.; Ham, K. W.; Park, D. S.; Kwon, K. J.

    2008-01-01

    SSC(Stiffened Steel plate Concrete) module method uses steel plate instead of reinforcing bar and mold in existing RC structure. Steel plate modules are fabricated in advance, installed and poured with concrete in construction field, so construction period is remarkably shortened by SC module technique. In case of existence of temperature gap between internal and external structure surface such as containment building, thermal stress is taken place and as a result of it, structural strength is deteriorated. In this study, we designed two test specimens and several tests with temperature heating were conducted to evaluate temperature behavior of SSC structures and RC structure

  18. Application of phosphor thermometry to a Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andrews, W.H.; Beshears, D.L.; Cates, M.R.; Childs, R.M.; Grann, E.B.; Manges, W.W.; McIntyre, T.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Simpson, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System (GTMS) was developed for the American Iron and Steel Institute by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through a partnership with the National Steel Midwest Division in Portage, Indiana. The GTMS provides crucial on-line thermal process control information during the manufacturing of galvanneal steel. The system has been used with the induction furnaces to measure temperatures ranging from 450 to 700 degrees C with an accuracy of better than +/-5 Degrees C. The GTMS provides accurate, reliable temperature information thus ensuring a high quality product, reducing waste, and saving energy. The production of uniform, high-quality galvanneal steel is only possible through strict temperature control

  19. Evolution of low-temperature phases in a low-temperature structural transition of a La cuprate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Horibe, Y.; Koyama, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure produced by a low-temperature structural phase transition in La 1.5 Nd 0.4 Sr 0.1 CuO 4 has been examined by transmission electron microscopy with the help of imaging plates. The low-temperature transition was found to be proceeded not only by the growth of the Pccn/low-temperature-tetragonal phases nucleated along the twin boundary but also by the nucleation and growth of the phases in the interior of the low-temperature-orthorhombic domain. In addition, because the map of the octahedron tilt as an order parameter is not identical to that of the spontaneous strain accompanied by the transition, the microstructure below the transition is understood to be a very complex mixture of the low-temperature phases. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Nanotube MMC for structural applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aluminum based metal matrix composites are particularly attractive in aviation and aerospace applications because of their exceptional strength and...

  1. Structural evolution of calcite at high temperatures: Phase V unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Nobuo; Setoguchi, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi

    2013-01-01

    The calcite form of calcium carbonate CaCO3 undergoes a reversible phase transition between Rc and Rm at ~1240 K under a CO2 atmosphere of ~0.4 MPa. The joint probability density function obtained from the single-crystal X-ray diffraction data revealed that the oxygen triangles of the CO3 group in the high temperature form (Phase V) do not sit still at specified positions in the space group Rm, but migrate along the undulated circular orbital about carbon. The present study also shows how the room temperature form (Phase I) develops into Phase V through an intermediate form (Phase IV) in the temperature range between ~985 K and ~1240 K. PMID:24084871

  2. Technology for Elevated Temperature Tests of Structural Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for full-field measurement of surface temperature and in-plane strain using a single grid imaging technique was demonstrated on a sample subjected to thermally-induced strain. The technique is based on digital imaging of a sample marked by an alternating line array of La2O2S:Eu(+3) thermographic phosphor and chromium illuminated by a UV lamp. Digital images of this array in unstrained and strained states were processed using a modified spin filter. Normal strain distribution was determined by combining unstrained and strained grid images using a single grid digital moire technique. Temperature distribution was determined by ratioing images of phosphor intensity at two wavelengths. Combined strain and temperature measurements demonstrated on the thermally heated sample were DELTA-epsilon = +/- 250 microepsilon and DELTA-T = +/- 5 K respectively with a spatial resolution of 0.8 mm.

  3. Effect of temperature on crack initiation in gas formed structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohari, S.; Vrcelj, Z.; Sharifi, S.; Sharifishourabi, G.; Abadi, R. [Universiti Teknlogi Malaysia, Skudai (Malaysia)

    2013-12-15

    In the gas forming process, the work piece is formed by applying gas pressure. However, the gas pressure and the accompanying gas temperature can result in crack initiation and unstable crack growth. Thus, it is vital to determine the critical values of applied gas pressure and temperature to avoid crack and fracture failure. We studied the mechanism of fracture using an experimental approach and finite element simulations of a perfect aluminum sheet containing no inclusions and voids. The definition of crack was based on ductile damage mechanics. For inspection of initiation of crack and rupture in gas-metal forming, the ABAQUS/EXPLICIT simulation was used. In gas forming, the applied load is the pressure applied rather than the punching force. The results obtained from both the experimental approach and finite element simulations were compared. The effects of various parameters, such as temperature and gas pressure value on crack initiation, were taken into account.

  4. Modeling protein structures: construction and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, C S; Cohen, F E

    1993-06-01

    Although no general solution to the protein folding problem exists, the three-dimensional structures of proteins are being successfully predicted when experimentally derived constraints are used in conjunction with heuristic methods. In the case of interleukin-4, mutagenesis data and CD spectroscopy were instrumental in the accurate assignment of secondary structure. In addition, the tertiary structure was highly constrained by six cysteines separated by many residues that formed three disulfide bridges. Although the correct structure was a member of a short list of plausible structures, the "best" structure was the topological enantiomer of the experimentally determined conformation. For many proteases, other experimentally derived structures can be used as templates to identify the secondary structure elements. In a procedure called modeling by homology, the structure of a known protein is used as a scaffold to predict the structure of another related protein. This method has been used to model a serine and a cysteine protease that are important in the schistosome and malarial life cycles, respectively. The model structures were then used to identify putative small molecule enzyme inhibitors computationally. Experiments confirm that some of these nonpeptidic compounds are active at concentrations of less than 10 microM.

  5. Future Perspectives for the Application of Low Temperature Detectors in Heavy Ion Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.

    2009-01-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics is given, and the next generation heavy ion facility FAIR is described with a special emphasis on the potential advantage of Low Temperature Detectors (LTDs) for applications in heavy ion physics. For prototype LTDs for the energy sensitive detection of heavy ions excellent results with respect to energy resolution down to δE/E = 1-2x10 -3 for a wide range of incident energies, and with respect to other detector properties, such as energy linearity with no indication of pulse height defects even for the heaviest ions, have been obtained. In addition, prototype detectors for hard X-rays have shown energy resolutions down to δE = 30-40eV at 60 keV. Consequently, both detector schemes have already been successfully used for first experiments. At present, the design and setup of large solid angle detector arrays is in progress. With the already achieved performance, LTDs promise a large potential for applications in atomic and nuclear heavy ion physics. A brief overview of prominent examples, including high-resolution nuclear spectroscopy, nuclear structure studies with radioactive beams, superheavy element research, as well as high-resolution atomic spectroscopy on highly charged ions and tests of QED in strong electromagnetic fields is presented.

  6. Low temperature phase transition and crystal structure of CsMgPO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Maria, E-mail: maria.p.orlova@gmail.com [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, Innsbruck 6020 (Austria); Khainakov, Sergey [Departamento de Química Física y Analítica, Universidad de Oviedo—CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Servicios Científico Técnicos, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Michailov, Dmitriy [Department of Chemistry, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin av., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Perfler, Lukas [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, Innsbruck 6020 (Austria); Langes, Christoph [Institute of Pharmacy, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, Innsbruck 6020 (Austria); Kahlenberg, Volker [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, Innsbruck 6020 (Austria); Orlova, Albina [Department of Chemistry, University of Nizhny Novgorod, 23 Gagarin av., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    CsMgPO{sub 4} doped with radioisotopes is a promising compound for usage as a radioactive medical source. However, a low temperature phase transition at temperatures close to ambient conditions (∼−40 °C) was observed. Information about such kind of structural changes is important in order to understand whether it can cause any problem for medical use of this compound. The phase transition has been investigated in detail using synchrotron powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations. The structure undergoes a transformation from an orthorhombic modification, space group Pnma (RT phase) to a monoclinic polymorph, space group P2{sub 1}/n (LT phase). New LT modification adopts similar to RT but slightly distorted unit cell: a=9.58199(2) Å, b=8.95501(1) Å, c=5.50344(2) Å, β=90.68583(1)°, V=472.198(3) Å{sup 3}. CsMgPO{sub 4} belongs to the group of framework compounds and is made up of strictly alternating MgO{sub 4}- and PO{sub 4}-tetrahedra sharing vertices. The cesium counter cations are located in the resulting channel-like cavities. Upon the transformation a combined tilting of the tetrahedra is observed. A comparison with other phase transitions in ABW-type framework compounds is given. - Graphical abstract: Structural behavior of β-tridymite-type phosphate CsMgPO{sub 4}, considered as potential chemical form for radioactive Cs-source has been studied at near ambient temperatures. A phase transition at (∼−40 °C) has been found and investigated. It has been established that the known orthorhombic RT modification, space group Pnma, adopts a monoclinic cell with space group P2{sub 1}/n at low temperatures. In this paper, we present results of structural analysis of changes accompanying this phase transition and discuss its possible impact on the application properties. - Highlights: • β-Tridymite type phosphate CsMgPO{sub 4} undergoes so called translationengleiche phase transition of index 2 at −40 °C. • The structure

  7. Structure of maraging steel after thermomechanical treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Mozzhukhin, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    Developed polygonized substructure is formed in austenite of maraging Cr-Ni steels under the selected conditions of hot deformation during high temperature mechanical treatment (HTMT). Substructure of hot deformed austenite is inherited by packet martensite during cooling. Presence of developed polygonized substructure in austenite results in grinding and high uniformity of packet sizes of martensite crystals. Substructure of α-phase of the investigated steels after HTMT, as well as the one inherited from hot deformed austenite, is inherited at α→γ-transformation in the process of repetitive austenization, and it can be preserved within a limited temperature-time range of heating in γ-region [ru

  8. Ultrasonic level and temperature sensor for power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dress, W.B.; Miller, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic waveguide employing torsional and extensional acoustic waves has been developed for use as a level and temperature sensor in pressurized and boiling water nuclear power reactors. Features of the device include continuous measurement of level, density, and temperature producing a real-time profile of these parameters along a chosen path through the reactor vessel

  9. Chamber for uniaxial pressure application at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, M.L.N.; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Picon, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    A chamber for alignment of low temperature ferroelastic domains in crystals by the use of uniaxial stress was built. The system allows the use of EPR and optical techniques, as well as X-ray irradiation at temperatures as low as 77K. (Author) [pt

  10. High temperature structural design and R and Ds for heat transport system components of FBR 'Monju'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumikawa, Masaharu; Nakagawa, Yukio; Fukuda, Yoshio; Sukegawa, Masayuki; Ishizaki, Tairo.

    1980-01-01

    The machines and equipments of cooling system for the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'' are operated in creep temperature region, and the upper limit temperature to apply the domestic structural design standard for nuclear machines and equipment is exceeded, therefore the guideline for high temperature structural design is being drawn up, reflecting the results of recent research and development, by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. and others. In order to obtain the basic data for the purpose, the tests on the high temperature characteristics of main structural members and structural elements were carried out, and eight kinds of the inelastic structural analysis program ''HI-EPIC'' series were developed, thus the fundamental technologies of structural desigh in non-linear region were established. Also in the non-linear region, enormous physical quantities must be evaluated, and in the design method based on real elastic analysis, many design diagrams must be employed, therefore for the purpose of improving the reliability of evaluation, the automatic evaluation program ''HI-TEP'' was developed, and preparation has been made for the design of actual machines. The high temperature structural design in ''Monju'', the development of inelastic structural analysis program and high temperature structural analysis evaluation program, and the development of high temperature structures and materials are described. (Kako, I.)

  11. Effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Towle-Millard, Heather A; Rankin, David C; Roush, James K

    2013-03-01

    To measure the effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs. 10 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 cm (superficial), 1.0 cm (middle), and 1.5 cm (deep) into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Warm (47°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no warm compress. Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of heat application at the superficial, middle, and deep depths was significantly increased, compared with the control temperature. Application for 10 minutes significantly increased the temperature at all depths, compared with 5 minutes of application. Mean temperature associated with 20 minutes of application was not different at the superficial or middle depths, compared with 10 minutes of application. Temperature at the deep depth associated with 10 minutes of application was significantly higher, compared with 20 minutes of application, but all temperature increases at this depth were minimal. Results suggested that application of a warm compress should be performed for 10 minutes. Changes in temperature at a tissue depth of 1.5 cm were minimal or not detected. The optimal compress temperature to achieve therapeutic benefits was not determined.

  12. Fracture toughness and reliability in high-temperature structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    advanced propulsion systems, such as gas turbine engines .... cing current commercial high strength SiC fibres such as. Nicalon ... of the polymer pyrolysis technique to produce CFCC. ... tural applications in aerospace, military, and industrial.

  13. Application of subsurface temperature measurements in geothermal prospecting in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flóvenz, Ólafur G.

    1985-12-01

    In geothermal areas in Iceland aquifers are in most cases found to occur in highly permeable near-vertical fractures in the low permeability basaltic crust. Therefore heat transfer in the rocks surrounding the aquifers is mainly conductive. Temperature profiles in shallow non-flowing boreholes are used to construct a two dimensional model of the temperature distribution in the vicinity of near vertical aquifers. This is done by finite element solution of the equation of heat transfer which requires knowledge of the regional temperature gradient outside the area of geothermal activity and some constraints on the temperature within the aquifers. The model is helpful in estimating dip and location of near-vertical water bearing fractures and thus in siting production wells. An example of successful use to the method and of soil temperature measurements from a geothermal field in North-Iceland is demonstrated.

  14. Effect of sintering temperature on structural and electrical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    to reduce the operating temperature, two approaches are widely applied. ... simple and cost-effective method, is often adopted to pre- pare bulk ... The lattice parameter 'a' was calculated using the relation. 2. 2. 2 ,. a d h k l. = ⋅. +. +. (1).

  15. Gap-closing test structures for temperature budget determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik Jouwert; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the extension of a method for determining the temperature budget of the process side of silicon substrates and chips, employing silicide formation reactions. In this work, silicon-on-insulator type substrates are used instead of bulk silicon wafers. By an appropriate choice of the layer

  16. Temperature structure function in the Bolgiano regime of thermal convection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, Ladislav; Niemela, J. J.; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Donnelly, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2002), 036303/1-036303/6 ISSN 1063-651X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : thermal convection * temperature fluctuations * Bolgiano regime Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.397, year: 2002

  17. Structural properties of gold clusters at different temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahladisa, MA

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of gold clusters consisting of aggregates of from 13 to 147 atoms was studied using the Sutton-Chen type many-body potential in molecular dynamics simulations. The properties of these clusters at temperatures from 10 K to 1000 K were...

  18. Infrared investigation of the temperature structure of the solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    Narrow-band continuum limb darkening observations of the sun were taken with the Infrared Spectrometer and the West Auxiliary of the McMath Solar Telescope during the first half of 1974. The infrared limb darkening measures were used with a few absolute intensity and limb darkening measures of other investigators to develop a series of empirical solar models. The temperatures in most of the solar models were adjusted until the predictions of the model atmosphere program matched the observational measures as well as possible. Limb darkening residuals were calculated by subtracting the observational measures of the limb darkening from the limb darkening measures that were computed from the program. Experiments with several models indicated that a steep temperature gradient was needed to fit the observations at short wavelengths while a rather low temperature gradient was needed at long wavelengths. Non-LTE effects and errors in the H - opacity were ruled out as possible sources of this discrepancy. An excellent fit to the observations was ultimately achieved with a two-component LTE solar model. The hot component of this model represents the half of the solar surface that is above the median temperature at each depth; while the cool component represents the half of the solar surface that is below the median temperature. Most of the observations are fitted to within the expected errors by this model. Discrepancies below 4500 A are probably due to line blanketing. The splitting between the hot and cool components of the model is consistent with current estimates of the rms intensity fluctuations in the solar atmosphere. The model also resembles several theoretical two-component models that have recently appeared in the literature

  19. Application of positron annihilation to the characterization of polymer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Yu, R.S.; Ito, Y.; Kondo, K.; Shantarovich, V.

    2005-01-01

    Positron annihilation has been applied to study characteristics of polymers last many years. Positron behaves as a nano-meter probe and brings out information of chemical structures, geometric structures, and momentum of electrons through the annihilation gamma-rays. Positrons injected in polymers tends to form positronium, which is similar structure to hydrogen atom and consists of electron and positron. Positronium diffuses through polymer structures and preferentially trapped by intermolecular spaces, if there is not any strong polar group in the chemical structure. Inside the spaces positronium annihilates through pick-off annihilation with electrons constituting walls of the spaces. Thus the pick-off annihilation brings out information about the interaction with electrons on the walls forming the spaces. These information can be measured by the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy: from the former lifetimes and intensities of positronium can be measured and from the latter energy spectrum of the positron annihilation gamma-rays. The lifetimes are connected with the nano-meter size of the spaces and, using an empirical formula, the pore size can be estimated quantitatively. However the intensities bring out many kinds of information. Knowing the sample chemical structures, the values can be simply connected with the amount of spaces and often reflect the polar effect and temperature effect. In the positron annihilation technique, the energy distribution of-positron annihilation gamma-rays plays important role in the investigation of positron interaction with atoms constituting polymer chemical structures. The energy distribution can be measured using a high pure Ge detector. Although the spectrum obtained by one Ge detector has a large peak to back-ground ratio, using a coincidence technique of two Ge detectors, the coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum (CDBS) can improve the ratio from the order of 10-2 to 10

  20. Network structure and thermal stability study of high temperature seal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K.; Mahapatra, M. K.

    2008-10-01

    High temperature seal glass has stringent requirement on glass thermal stability, which is dictated by glass network structures. In this study, a SrO-La2O3-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 based glass system was studied using nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction for solid oxide cell application purpose. Glass structural unit neighboring environment and local ordering were evaluated. Glass network connectivity as well as silicon and boron glass former coordination were calculated for different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. Thermal stability of the borosilicate glasses was studied after thermal treatment at 850 °C. The study shows that high B2O3 content induces BO4 and SiO4 structural unit ordering, increases glass localized inhomogeneity, decreases glass network connectivity, and causes devitrification. Glass modifiers interact with either silicon- or boron-containing structural units and form different devitrified phases at different B2O3:SiO2 ratios. B2O3-free glass shows the best thermal stability among the studied compositions, remaining stable after thermal treatment for 200 h at 850 °C.

  1. Application of molecular spectroscopy to the determination of organic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicknam, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Some brief accounts are presented followed by a discussion about various physico-chemical techniques: Raman spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, conformational analysis and polarized Rayleigh diffusion. Applications of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance to nucleotide structure in aqueous solution are described as well as some applications of neutron scattering to the study of organic structures [fr

  2. Applicability and performance of an imaging plate at subzero temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawabe, Atsushi; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2010-01-01

    The performance of imaging plates (IPs) has not been studied at temperatures lower than 0 o C. In the present study, an IP was irradiated with gamma rays emitted from the mineral monazite at temperatures between -80 and 30 o C to determine its fundamental properties. The IP response as a function of irradiation time was found to be linear, suggesting that the IP works properly at low temperatures. Fading, an effect which should be considered at temperatures of more than 0 o C, was not observed at -30 and -80 o C. Furthermore, the fading-corrected PSL value of the IP irradiated at -80 o C was lower than at other temperatures (30, 5 and -30 o C). This can be explained by thermostimulated luminescence (TSL). Since the only intensive TSL peak in the temperature range from -80 to 30 o C is present at about -43 o C, some of the electrons trapped at F centers recombine with holes through the process of TSL before the stored radiation image is read out at room temperature. This finding suggests that the apparent sensitivity of the IP is lower at -80 o C although it is similar to sensitivities between -30 and 30 o C. This low sensitivity should be corrected to perform quantitative measurements.

  3. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  4. High Temperature Electro-Mechanical Devices For Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require a number of electro-mechanical devices, for example, Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDM's) to control the raising and lowering of control rods and Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) to circulate the primary coolant. There are potential benefits in locating electro-mechanical components in areas of the plant with high ambient temperatures. One such benefit is the reduced need to make penetrations in pressure vessels leading to simplified plant design and improved inherent safety. The feature that limits the ambient temperature at which most electrical machines may operate is the material used for the electrical insulation of the machine windings. Conventional electrical machines generally use polymer-based insulation that limits the ambient temperature they can operate in to below 200 degrees Celsius. This means that when a conventional electrical machine is required to operate in a hot area it must be actively cooled necessitating additional systems. This paper presents data gathered during investigations undertaken by Rolls-Royce into the design of high temperature electrical machines. The research was undertaken at Rolls-Royce's University Technology Centre in Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives at Sheffield University. Rolls- Royce has also been investigating high temperature wire and encapsulants and latterly techniques to provide high temperature insulation to terminations. Rolls-Royce used the experience gained from these tests to produce a high temperature electrical linear actuator at sizes representative of those used in reactor systems. This machine was tested successfully at temperatures equivalent to those found inside the reactor vessel of a pressurised water reactor through a full series of operations that replicated in service duty. The paper will conclude by discussing the impact of the findings and potential electro-mechanical designs that may utilise such high temperature technologies. (authors)

  5. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulriya, P.K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A.K.; Avasthi, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 10 13 ions/cm 2 . The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures

  6. Experimental and Computational Investigation of High Entropy Alloys for Elevated-Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, Peter [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Fan [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Chuan [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Wang, Gongyao [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Xie, Xie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Diao, Haoyan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kuo, Chih-Hsiang [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); An, Zhinan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hemphill, Michael [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-07-30

    To create and design novel structural materials with enhanced creep-resistance, fundamental studies have been conducted on high-entropy alloys (HEAs), using (1) thermodynamic calculations, (2) mechanical tests, (3) neutron diffraction, (4) characterization techniques, and (5) crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling (CPFEM), to explore future candidates for next-generation power plants. All the constituent binary and ternary systems of the Al-Cr-Cu-Fe-Mn-Ni and Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni systems were thermodynamically modeled within the whole composition range. Comparisons between the calculated phase diagrams and literature data are in good agreement. Seven types of HEAs were fabricated from Al-Cr-Cu-Fe-Mn-Ni and Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni systems. The AlxCrCuFeMnNi HEAs have disordered [face-centered cubic (FCC) + body-centered cubic (BCC)] crystal structures, not FCC or BCC single structure. Excessive alloying of the Al element results in the change of both microstructural and mechanical properties in AlxCoCrFeNi HEAs. There are mainly three structural features in AlxCoCrFeNi: (1) the morphology, (2) the volume fractions of the constitute phases, and (3) existing temperatures of all six phases. After homogenization, the Al0.3CoCrFeNi material is a pure FCC solid solution. After aging at 700 °C for 500 hours, the optimal microstructure combinations, the FCC matrix, needle-like B2 phase within grains, and granular σ phase along grain boundary, is achieved for Al0.3CoCrFeNi. The cold-rolling process is utilized to reduce the grain size of Al0.1CoCrFeNi and Al0.3CoCrFeNi. The chemical elemental partitioning of FCC, BCC, B2, and σphases at different temperatures, before and after mechanical tests, in Al-Cr-Cu-Fe-Mn-Ni and Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Ni systems are quantitatively characterized by both synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction with levitation, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), advanced atom probe

  7. Structure determination at room temperature and phase transition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. MS received 9 May 2002 ... exhibit a ferroelectric–paraelectric phase transition at ele- ..... The pattern decomposition and peak extraction methods ...

  8. Application of photoreflectance to advanced multilayer structures for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertes Marrón, D.; Cánovas, E.; Artacho, I.; Stanley, C.R.; Steer, M.; Kaizu, T.; Shoji, Y.; Ahsan, N.; Okada, Y.; Barrigón, E.; Rey-Stolle, I.; Algora, C.; Martí, A.; Luque, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Application of photoreflectance to advanced PV structures. ► Probing optoelectronics of nanostructures and multinary compounds. ► Determination of intensity of electric fields from FKOs. ► Distinguishing different oscillatory phenomena in PR. ► PR as a useful diagnostic tool in QD-, QW-SCs and MJSCs. -- Abstract: Photoreflectance (PR) is a convenient characterization tool able to reveal optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials and structures. It is a simple non-destructive and contactless technique which can be used in air at room temperature. We will present experimental results of the characterization carried out by means of PR on different types of advanced photovoltaic (PV) structures, including quantum-dot-based prototypes of intermediate band solar cells, quantum-well structures, highly mismatched alloys, and III–V-based multi-junction devices, thereby demonstrating the suitability of PR as a powerful diagnostic tool. Examples will be given to illustrate the value of this spectroscopic technique for PV including (i) the analysis of the PR spectra in search of critical points associated to absorption onsets; (ii) distinguishing signatures related to quantum confinement from those originating from delocalized band states; (iii) determining the intensity of the electric field related to built-in potentials at interfaces according to the Franz–Keldysh (FK) theory; and (v) determining the nature of different oscillatory PR signals among those ascribed to FK-oscillations, interferometric and photorefractive effects. The aim is to attract the interest of researchers in the field of PV to modulation spectroscopies, as they can be helpful in the analysis of their devices

  9. Application of photoreflectance to advanced multilayer structures for photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuertes Marrón, D., E-mail: dfuertes@ies-def.upm.es [Instituto de Energía Solar – ETSIT, Technical University of Madrid, UPM, Madrid (Spain); Cánovas, E.; Artacho, I. [Instituto de Energía Solar – ETSIT, Technical University of Madrid, UPM, Madrid (Spain); Stanley, C.R.; Steer, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kaizu, T.; Shoji, Y.; Ahsan, N.; Okada, Y. [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo (Japan); Barrigón, E.; Rey-Stolle, I.; Algora, C.; Martí, A.; Luque, A. [Instituto de Energía Solar – ETSIT, Technical University of Madrid, UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Application of photoreflectance to advanced PV structures. ► Probing optoelectronics of nanostructures and multinary compounds. ► Determination of intensity of electric fields from FKOs. ► Distinguishing different oscillatory phenomena in PR. ► PR as a useful diagnostic tool in QD-, QW-SCs and MJSCs. -- Abstract: Photoreflectance (PR) is a convenient characterization tool able to reveal optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials and structures. It is a simple non-destructive and contactless technique which can be used in air at room temperature. We will present experimental results of the characterization carried out by means of PR on different types of advanced photovoltaic (PV) structures, including quantum-dot-based prototypes of intermediate band solar cells, quantum-well structures, highly mismatched alloys, and III–V-based multi-junction devices, thereby demonstrating the suitability of PR as a powerful diagnostic tool. Examples will be given to illustrate the value of this spectroscopic technique for PV including (i) the analysis of the PR spectra in search of critical points associated to absorption onsets; (ii) distinguishing signatures related to quantum confinement from those originating from delocalized band states; (iii) determining the intensity of the electric field related to built-in potentials at interfaces according to the Franz–Keldysh (FK) theory; and (v) determining the nature of different oscillatory PR signals among those ascribed to FK-oscillations, interferometric and photorefractive effects. The aim is to attract the interest of researchers in the field of PV to modulation spectroscopies, as they can be helpful in the analysis of their devices.

  10. Temperature-dependent structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Lviv Sci. and Res. Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Academy of Management and Administration, 18 Niedzialkowski str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Shpotyuk, O. [Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, 42201, Czestochowa (Poland); Gorecki, Cz. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The origin of structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of T{sub g}, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures T{sub a}>90{sup o}C. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints. -- Highlights: → In this study we report experimental evidence for temperature-dependent constraints theory. → Structural relaxation of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass at higher annealing temperatures is studied by DSC technique. → Accompanied changes in the structure are monitored by in situ EXAFS measurements.

  11. High temperature flexible ultrasonic transducers for structural health monitoring and NDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, J.L. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kobayashi, M.; Jen, C.K.; Tatibouet, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, PQ (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.; Mrad, N. [Department of National Defence, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Air Vehicles Research Station

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are often used for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of pipes in nuclear and fossil fuel power plants, petrochemical plants and other structures as a method to improve safety and extend the service life of the structure. In such applications, ultrasonic transducers (UTs) must be able to operate at high temperature, and must come in contact with structures that have surfaces with different curvatures. As such, flexible UTs (FUTs) are most suitable because they ensure self-alignment to the object's surface. The purpose of this study was to develop FUTs that have high flexibility similar to commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride PVDF FUTs, but which can operate at up to at least 150 degrees C and have a high ultrasonic performance comparable to commercial broadband UTs. The fabrication of the FUT consisted of a sol-gel based sensor fabrication process. The substrate was a 75 {mu}m thick titanium (Ti) membrane, a piezoelectric composite with a thickness larger than 85 {mu}m and a top electrode. The ultrasonic performance of the FUT in terms of signal strength was found to be at least as good as commercially available broadband ultrasonic transducers at room temperature. Onsite gluing and brazing installation techniques which bond the FUTs onto steel pipes for SHM and NDT purposes up to 100 and 150 degrees C were developed, respectively. The best thickness measurement accuracy of FUT at 150 degrees C was estimated to be 26 {mu}m. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  12. Structure of liquid water at high pressures and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Eggert, J H; Loubeyre, P

    2002-01-01

    We report quantitatively accurate structure-factor and radial-distribution-function measurements of liquid water in a diamond-anvil cell (DAC) using x-ray diffraction. During the analysis of our diffraction data, we found it possible (and necessary) to also determine the density. Thus, we believe we present the first-ever diffraction-based determination of a liquid structure factor and equation of state in a DAC experiment.

  13. Temperature Variation of the Magnetic Structure of HoSb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nils Axel; Kjems, Jørgen; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Neutron diffraction has been used to show that the magnetic moment vector in the antiferromagnet HoSb changes direction as a function of temperature below TN=5.7K. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a recent theoretical prediction by Jensen et al. (1980) which ascribe the ...... the changing directions to a competition between the crystal fields and the dipolar interactions....

  14. Application of Wireless Sensor Networks for Indoor Temperature Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojkoska, Biljana Risteska; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Chatzimisios, Periklis

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks take a major part in our everyday lives by enhancing systems for home automation, healthcare, temperature control, energy consumption monitoring, and so forth. In this paper we focus on a system used for temperature regulation for residential, educational, industrial...... energy savings by reducing the amount of data transmissions through the network. Furthermore, the framework explores techniques for localization, such that the location of the nodes can be used by algorithms that regulate temperature settings......., and commercial premises, and so forth. We propose a framework for indoor temperature regulation and optimization using wireless sensor networks based on ZigBee platform. This paper considers architectural design of the system, as well as implementation guidelines. The proposed system favors methods that provide...

  15. High-temperature-structural design and research and development for reactor system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Makoto; Hada, Mikio

    1985-01-01

    The design of reactor system components requires high-temperature-structural design guide with the consideration of the creep effect of materials related to research and development on structural design. The high-temperature-structural design guideline for the fast prototype reactor MONJU has been developed under the active leadership by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and Toshiba has actively participated to this work with responsibility on in-vessel components, performing research and development programs. This paper reports the current status of high-temperature-structural-design-oriented research and development programs and development of analytical system including stress-evaluation program. (author)

  16. Experimental Study on Temperature Behavior of SC Structures under Pure Bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, K. W.; Lee, K. J.; Park, D. S.; Jeon, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    SC(Steel plate Concrete) module method uses steel plate instead of reinforcing bar and mold in existing RC structure. Steel plate modules are fabricated in advance, installed and poured with concrete in construction field, so construction period is remarkably shortened by SC module technique. In case of existence of temperature gap between internal and external structure surface such as spent fuel storage pool, thermal stress is taken place and as a result of it, structural strength is deteriorated. In this study, we designed three test specimens and several tests with or without temperature heating were conducted to evaluate temperature behavior of SC structures under pure bending loading condition

  17. Selection of fiber-optical components for temperature measurement for satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, P.; Kuhenuri Chami, N.; Koch, A. W.; Hurni, A.; Roner, M.; Obermaier, J.; Lemke, N. M. K.

    2017-11-01

    The Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) is a modular system for housekeeping measurements for space applications. The focus here is the fiber-optical module and the used fiber-Bragg gratings (FBGs) for temperature measurements at up to 100 measuring points. The fiber-optial module uses a tunable diode laser to scan through the wavelength spectrum and a passive optical network for reading back the reflections from the FBG sensors. The sensors are based on FBGs which show a temperature dependent shift in wavelength, allowing a high accuracy of measurement. The temperature at each sensor is derivated from the sensors Bragg wavelength shift by evaluating the measured spectrum with an FBG peak detection algorithm and by computing the corresponding temperature difference with regard to the calibration value. It is crucial to eliminate unwanted influence on the measurement accuracy through FBG wavelength shifts caused by other reasons than the temperature change. The paper presents gamma radiation test results up to 25 Mrad for standard UV-written FBGs in a bare fiber and in a mechanically housed version. This high total ionizing dose (TID) load comes from a possible location of the fiber outside the satellite's housing, like e.g. on the panels or directly embedded into the satellites structure. Due to the high shift in wavelength of the standard written gratings also the femto-second infrared (fs- IR) writing technique is investigated in more detail. Special focus is given to the deployed fibers for the external sensor network. These fibers have to be mechanically robust and the radiation induced attenuation must be low in order not to influence the system's performance. For this reason different fiber types have been considered and tested to high dose gamma radiation. Dedicated tests proved the absence of enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS). Once the fiber has been finally selected, the fs-IR grating will be written to these fibers and the FBGs will be tested in order to

  18. High temperature superconductivity: Concept, preparation and testing of high Tc superconductor compounds, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harara, Wafik

    1992-06-01

    Many studies have been carried out on high temperature superconductors with transition temperature above that of the liquid nitrogen. In this scientific study the concept and the mechanism of this phenomena are discussed, in addition the examples of preparation and testing of high temperature superconductors compounds are shown. Also the most important applications in industry are explained. (author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 18 figs

  19. SiC Matrix Composites for High Temperature Hypersonic Vehicle Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable high temperature materials are required for hypersonic engine and structural thermal protection systems. In particular, 2700ºF or greater capable structural...

  20. Sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites with high energy density and great charge–discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Liu, Feihua; Yang, Tiannan; Gadinski, Matthew R.; Zhang, Guangzu; Chen, Long-Qing; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    The demand for a new generation of high-temperature dielectric materials toward capacitive energy storage has been driven by the rise of high-power applications such as electric vehicles, aircraft, and pulsed power systems where the power electronics are exposed to elevated temperatures. Polymer dielectrics are characterized by being lightweight, and their scalability, mechanical flexibility, high dielectric strength, and great reliability, but they are limited to relatively low operating temperatures. The existing polymer nanocomposite-based dielectrics with a limited energy density at high temperatures also present a major barrier to achieving significant reductions in size and weight of energy devices. Here we report the sandwich structures as an efficient route to high-temperature dielectric polymer nanocomposites that simultaneously possess high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss. In contrast to the conventional single-layer configuration, the rationally designed sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites are capable of integrating the complementary properties of spatially organized multicomponents in a synergistic fashion to raise dielectric constant, and subsequently greatly improve discharged energy densities while retaining low loss and high charge–discharge efficiency at elevated temperatures. At 150 °C and 200 MV m−1, an operating condition toward electric vehicle applications, the sandwich-structured polymer nanocomposites outperform the state-of-the-art polymer-based dielectrics in terms of energy density, power density, charge–discharge efficiency, and cyclability. The excellent dielectric and capacitive properties of the polymer nanocomposites may pave a way for widespread applications in modern electronics and power modules where harsh operating conditions are present. PMID:27551101

  1. High Temperature Metallic Seal Development For Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on metallic high temperature static seal development at NASA for gas turbine applications is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature Static Seal Development; 2) Program Review; 3) Phase IV Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 4) Spring Design; 5) Phase IV: Innovative Seal with Blade Alloy Spring; 6) PHase IV: Testing Results; 7) Seal Seating Load; 8) Spring Seal Manufacturing; and 9) Other Applications for HIgh Temperature Spring Design

  2. Real Time Structured Light and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob

    Structured light scanning is a versatile method for 3D shape acquisition. While much faster than most competing measurement techniques, most high-end structured light scans still take in the order of seconds to complete. Low-cost sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and time of flight cameras have made......, increased processing power, and methods presented in this thesis, it is possible to perform structured light scans in real time with 20 depth measurements per second. This offers new opportunities for studying dynamic scenes, quality control, human-computer interaction and more. This thesis discusses...... several aspects of real time structured light systems and presents contributions within calibration, scene coding and motion correction aspects. The problem of reliable and fast calibration of such systems is addressed with a novel calibration scheme utilising radial basis functions [Contribution B...

  3. Lifetime of Nano-Structured Black Silicon for Photovoltaic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plakhotnyuk, Maksym; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping pro......, respectively. This is promising for use of black silicon RIE nano-structuring in a solar cell process flow......In this work, we present recent results of lifetime optimization for nano-structured black silicon and its photovoltaic applications. Black silicon nano-structures provide significant reduction of silicon surface reflection due to highly corrugated nanostructures with excellent light trapping...

  4. Impact of Brake Pad Structure on Temperature and Stress Fields of Brake Disc

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guoshun; Fu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing ABAQUS finite element software, the study established the relationship between a brake pad structure and distributions of temperature and thermal stress on brake disc. By introducing radial structure factor and circular structure factor concepts, the research characterized the effect of friction block radial and circumferential arrangement on temperature field of the brake disc. A method was proposed for improving heat flow distribution of the brake disc through optimizing the posit...

  5. Solubility Temperature Dependence Predicted from 2D Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to find a computational procedure to normalize solubility data determined at various temperatures (e.g., 10 – 50 oC to values at a “reference” temperature (e.g., 25 °C. A simple procedure was devised to predict enthalpies of solution, ΔHsol, from which the temperature dependence of intrinsic (uncharged form solubility, log S0, could be calculated. As dependent variables, values of ΔHsol at 25 °C were subjected to multiple linear regression (MLR analysis, using melting points (mp and Abraham solvation descriptors. Also, the enthalpy data were subjected to random forest regression (RFR and recursive partition tree (RPT analyses. A total of 626 molecules were examined, drawing on 2040 published solubility values measured at various temperatures, along with 77 direct calori    metric measurements. The three different prediction methods (RFR, RPT, MLR all indicated that the estimated standard deviations in the enthalpy data are 11-15 kJ mol-1, which is concordant with the 10 kJ mol-1 propagation error estimated from solubility measurements (assuming 0.05 log S errors, and consistent with the 7 kJ mol-1 average reproducibility in enthalpy values from interlaboratory replicates. According to the MLR model, higher values of mp, H‑bond acidity, polarizability/dipolarity, and dispersion forces relate to more positive (endothermic enthalpy values. However, molecules that are large and have high H-bond basicity are likely to possess negative (exothermic enthalpies of solution. With log S0 values normalized to 25 oC, it was shown that the interlaboratory average standard deviations in solubility measurement are reduced to 0.06 ‑ 0.17 log unit, with higher errors for the least-soluble druglike molecules. Such improvements in data mining are expected to contribute to more reliable in silico prediction models of solubility for use in drug discovery.

  6. Prospects for zirconium structural alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.R.

    1969-05-01

    Improved station efficiencies and lower capital costs provide incentives for the development of zirconium alloys for pressure tubes which can operate at temperatures above 450 o C. The experience of the Ti industry indicates that a complex alloy containing solution hardeners of Sn or Al and precipitation hardeners of Mo and Nb and perhaps Si will be required. The thermal neutron cross-section of the alloy will be about 10% higher than Zircaloy-2 and because of its poor corrosion resistance will require cladding with a corrosion resistant alloy such as Zr-Cr. Results to date indicate that such a pressure tube is feasible. (author)

  7. Effect of bath temperature on structure, morphology and thermoelectric properties of CoSb{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Suchitra, E-mail: suchitrayadav87@gmail.com; Pandya, Dinesh K.; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Thin Film Laboratory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2016-05-23

    CoSb{sub 3} thin films are deposited on conducting glass substrates (FTO) by electrodeposition at different bath temperatures (60°C, 70°C and 80°C) and the resulting influence of the bath temperature on the structure, morphology and electrical properties of films is investigated. X-ray diffraction confirms the formation of CoSb{sub 3} phase in the films. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that different morphologies ranging from branched nano-flakes to nano-needles evolve as bath temperature increases. It is concluded that a growth temperature of 80°C is suitable for producing CoSb{sub 3} films with such properties that show potential feasibility for thermoelectric applications.

  8. Inorganic biomaterials structure, properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiang C

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a practical guide to the use and applications of inorganic biomaterials. It begins by introducing the concept of inorganic biomaterials, which includes bioceramics and bioglass. This concept is further extended to hybrid biomaterials consisting of inorganic and organic materials to mimic natural biomaterials. The book goes on to provide the reader with information on biocompatibility, bioactivity and bioresorbability. The concept of the latter is important because of the increasing role resorbable biomaterials are playing in implant applications. The book also introduces a n

  9. BiFeO3 Crystal Structure at Low Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palewicz, A.; Sosnowska, I.; Przenioslo, R.; Hewat, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal and magnetic structure of BiFeO 3 have been studied with the use of high resolution neutron diffraction between 5 K and 300 K. The atomic coordinates in BiFeO 3 are almost unchanged between 5 K and 300 K. (authors)

  10. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  11. The Effect of Elevated Temperature on Concrete Materials and Structures - a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, Dan J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this limited study was to provide an overview of the effects of elevated temperature on the behavior of concrete materials and structures. In meeting this objective the effects of elevated temperatures on the properties of ordinary Portland cement concrete constituent materials and concretes are summarized. The effects of elevated temperature on high-strength concrete materials are noted and their performance compared to normal strength concretes. A review of concrete materials for elevated-temperature service is presented. Nuclear power plant and general civil engineering design codes are described. Design considerations and analytical techniques for evaluating the response of reinforced concrete structures to elevated-temperature conditions are presented. Pertinent studies in which reinforced concrete structural elements were subjected to elevated temperatures are described.

  12. Optimisation and application of electrochemical techniques for high temperature aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojinov, M.; Laitinen, B. T.; Maekelae, K.; Maekelae, M; Saario, T.; Sirkiae, P.; Beverskog, B.

    1999-01-01

    Different localised corrosion phenomena may pose a serious hazard to construction materials employed in high-temperature aqueous environments. The operating temperatures in electric power production have been increased to improve plant efficiencies. This has lead to the demand for new, further improved engineering materials. The applicability of these materials in the operating power plant environments largely depends on the existence of a protective surface oxide film. Extensive rupture of these films can lead to increased reaction of the underlying metal with environment. Therefore by modifying the composition of the base metal the properties of the surface oxides can be optimised to withstand the new operational environments of interest. To mitigate the risk of detrimental corrosion phenomena of structural materials, mechanistic understanding of the contributing processes is required. This calls for more experimental information and necessitates the development of new experimental techniques and procedures capable of operating in situ in high temperature aqueous environments. The low conductivity of the aqueous medium complicates electrochemical studies on construction and fuel cladding materials carried out in simulated LWR coolant conditions or in actual plant conditions, especially in typical BWR environments. To obtain useful information of reactions and transport processes occurring on and within oxide films on different materials, an electrochemical arrangement based on a thin-layer electrode (TLEC) concept was developed. In this presentation the main results are shown from work carried out to optimise further the geometry of the TLEC arrangement and to propose recommendations for how to use this arrangement in different low-conductivity environments. Results will be also given from the test in which the TLEC arrangement was equipped with a detector electrode. The detector electrode allows detecting soluble products and reaction intermediates at

  13. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John; Glisic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc.) and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc.) to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature-deformation-displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i) the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii) the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  14. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Gambill, W.R.; Fox, E.C.

    1976-11-01

    An overview is presented of the technical and economic feasibility for the development of a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) and associated processes. A critical evaluation of VHTR technology for process temperatures of 1400 and 2000 0 F is made. Additionally, an assessment of potential market impact is made to determine the commercial viability of the reactor system. It is concluded that VHTR process heat in the range of 1400 to 1500 0 F is attainable with near-term technology. However, process heat in excess of 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. The potential for the VHTR could include a major contribution to synthetic fuel, hydrogen, steel, and fertilizer production and to systems for transport and storage of high-temperature heat. A recommended development program including projected costs is presented

  15. High Per formance and Flexible Supercapacitors based on Carbonized Bamboo Fibers for Wide Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zequine, Camila; Ranaweera, C. K.; Wang, Z.; Singh, Sweta; Tripathi, Prashant; Srivastava, O. N.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Ramasamy, K.; Kahol, P. K.; Dvornic, P. R.; Gupta, Ram K.

    2016-08-01

    High performance carbonized bamboo fibers were synthesized for a wide range of temperature dependent energy storage applications. The structural and electrochemical properties of the carbonized bamboo fibers were studied for flexible supercapacitor applications. The galvanostatic charge-discharge studies on carbonized fibers exhibited specific capacity of ~510F/g at 0.4 A/g with energy density of 54 Wh/kg. Interestingly, the carbonized bamboo fibers displayed excellent charge storage stability without any appreciable degradation in charge storage capacity over 5,000 charge-discharge cycles. The symmetrical supercapacitor device fabricated using these carbonized bamboo fibers exhibited an areal capacitance of ~1.55 F/cm2 at room temperature. In addition to high charge storage capacity and cyclic stability, the device showed excellent flexibility without any degradation to charge storage capacity on bending the electrode. The performance of the supercapacitor device exhibited ~65% improvement at 70 °C compare to that at 10 °C. Our studies suggest that carbonized bamboo fibers are promising candidates for stable, high performance and flexible supercapacitor devices.

  16. Organo-metallic structures for spintronic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiba, M.V.

    2005-01-01

    The revolution in (semi)conducting organic materials has been one of the highlights in physics over the past decade. Molecular and polymeric thin films are projected to be used as active elements in a wide range of electronic and optoelectronic applications. Among the main driving forces for such

  17. Probabilistic Relational Structures and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domotor, Zoltan

    The principal objects of the investigation reported were, first, to study qualitative probability relations on Boolean algebras, and secondly, to describe applications in the theories of probability logic, information, automata, and probabilistic measurement. The main contribution of this work is stated in 10 definitions and 20 theorems. The basic…

  18. Application of fibre reinforced plastic sandwich structures for automotive crashworthiness applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukaszewicz, D.; Blok, L.G.; Kratz, J.; Ward, C.; Kassapoglou, C.; Elmarakbi, A.; Araújo, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    In this work the application of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) sandwich
    structures, with particular focus on aramid fibre tufted sandwiches is being studied for
    automotive crashworthiness applications using impact testing and numerical simulation.

  19. Application of 'SPICE' to predict temperature distribution in heat pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H M; Liu, Y; Damodaran, M [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (SG). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    1991-11-01

    This article presents a new alternative approach to predict temperature distribution in heat pipes. In this method, temperature distribution in a heat pipe, modelled as an analogous electrical circuit, is predicted by applying SPICE, a general-purpose circuit simulation program. SPICE is used to simulate electrical circuit designs before the prototype is assembled. Useful predictions are obtained for heat pipes with and without adiabatic sections and for heat pipes with various evaporator and condenser lengths. Comparison of the predicted results with experiments demonstrates fairly good agreement. It is also shown how interdisciplinary developments could be used appropriately. (author).

  20. Is applicable thermodynamics of negative temperature for living organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2017-11-01

    During organismal development the moment of sexual maturity can be characterizes by nearly maximum basal metabolic rate and body mass. Once the living organism reaches extreme values of the mass and the basal metabolic rate, it reaches near equilibrium thermodynamic steady state physiological level with maximum organismal complexity. Such thermodynamic systems that reach equilibrium steady state level at maximum mass-energy characteristics can be regarded from the prospective of thermodynamics of negative temperature. In these systems the increase of the internal and free energy is accompanied with decrease of the entropy. In our study we show the possibility the living organisms to regard as thermodynamic system with negative temperature

  1. Temperature control of power semiconductor devices in traction applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugachev, A. A.; Strekalov, N. N.

    2017-02-01

    The peculiarity of thermal management of traction frequency converters of a railway rolling stock is highlighted. The topology and the operation principle of the automatic temperature control system of power semiconductor modules of the traction frequency converter are designed and discussed. The features of semiconductors as an object of temperature control are considered; the equivalent circuit of thermal processes in the semiconductors is suggested, the power losses in the two-level voltage source inverters are evaluated and analyzed. The dynamic properties and characteristics of the cooling fan induction motor electric drive with the scalar control are presented. The results of simulation in Matlab are shown for the steady state of thermal processes.

  2. High-temperature spectroscopy for nuclear waste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Robouch, P.; Torres, R.A.; Silva, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Instrumentation has been developed to perform uv-vis-nir absorbance measurements remotely and at elevated temperatures and pressures. Fiber-optic spectroscopy permits the interrogation of radioactive species within a glovebox enclosure at temperatures ranging from ambient to >100 degree C. Spectral shifts as a function of metal- ligand coordination are used to compute thermodynamic free energies of reaction by matrix regression analysis. Pr 3+ serves as a convenient analog for trivalent actinides without attendant radioactivity hazards, and recent results obtained from 20 degree--95 degree C with the Pr-acetate complexation system are presented. Preliminary experimentation on Am(3) hydrolysis is also described. 16 refs., 1 tab

  3. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambard, V.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  4. Metals Technology for Aerospace Applications in 2020: Development of High Temperature Aluminum Alloys For Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicus, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The role of trace additions on the nucleation and stability of the primary strengthening phase, omega, is of paramount importance for the enhancement of mechanical properties for moderate temperature application of Al-Cu-Mg-(Ag) alloys. In order to better understand the competition for solute, which governs the microstructural evolution of these alloys, a series of Al-Cu-Mg-Si quaternary alloys were prepared to investigate the role of trace Si additions on the nucleation of the omega phase. Si additions were found to quell omega nucleation in conjunction with the enhanced matrix precipitation of competing phases. These initial results indicate that it is necessary to overcome a critical Mg/Si ratio for omega precipitation, rather than a particular Si content.

  5. Low Temperature Graphene Growth and Its Applications in Electronic and Optical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Sunny

    Graphene, a two dimensional allotrope of carbon in a honeycomb lattice, has gathered wide attention due to its excellent electrical, thermal, optical and mechanical properties. It has extremely high electron/hole mobility, very high thermal conductivity and fascinating optical properties, and combined with its mechanical strength and elasticity, graphene is believed to find commercial applications in existing as well as novel technologies. One of the biggest reasons behind the rapid development in graphene research during the last decade is the fact that laboratory procedures to obtain high quality graphene are rather cheap and simple. However, any new material market is essentially driven by the progress in its large scale commercial production with minimal costs, with properties that are suited for different applications. And it is in this aspect that graphene is still required to make a huge progress before its commercial benefits can be derived. Laboratory graphene synthesis techniques such as mechanical exfoliation, liquid phase exfoliation and SiC graphene growth pose several challenges in terms of cost, reliability and scalability. To this end, Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth of graphene has emerged as a widely used synthesis method that overcomes these problems. Unfortunately, conventional thermal CVD requires a high temperature of growth and a catalytic metal substrate, making the undesirable step of graphene transfer a necessity. Besides requiring a catalyst, the high temperature of growth also limits the range of growth substrates. In this work, I have successfully demonstrated low temperature ( 550 °C) growth of graphene directly on dielectric materials using a Plasma-Enhanced CVD (PECVD) process. The PECVD technique described here solves the issues faced by conventional CVD methods and provides a direct route for graphene synthesis on arbitrary materials at relatively low temperatures. Detailed growth studies, as described here, illustrate the

  6. Computational applications of DNA structural scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    that these scales provide an alternative or complementary compact representation of DNA sequences. As an example, we construct a strand-invariant representation of DNA sequences. The scales can also be used to analyze and discover new DNA structural patterns, especially in combination with hidden Markov models......Studies several different physical scales associated with the structural features of DNA sequences from a computational standpoint, including dinucleotide scales, such as base stacking energy and propeller twist, and trinucleotide scales, such as bendability and nucleosome positioning. We show...

  7. Effect of temperature on internal structure of uranyl gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Urbanek, V.

    1983-01-01

    Tempering freshly prepared uranyl gel serves the homogenization of the volume of the individual spheres and the whole volume of the processed material. Tempering is carried out at a temperature of 90 degC in a special countercurrent through-flow column. The tempered gel particles were analyzed for specific surface and porosity using different methods, subjected to phase analysis, and the crystallite mean size was determined. It was found that the quality of the final gel depends on the residence time in the tempering column. Gel recrystallization probably takes place during tempering leading to stress and cracks which in the final stage lead to the disintegration of the xerogel. Maximum permissible gel residence time in the tempering column is 15 mins. (M.D.)

  8. A Silicon Carbide Wireless Temperature Sensing System for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an extreme environment-capable temperature sensing system based on state-of-art silicon carbide (SiC) wireless electronics is presented. In conjunction with a Pt-Pb thermocouple, the SiC wireless sensor suite is operable at 450 °C while under centrifugal load greater than 1,000 g. This SiC wireless temperature sensing system is designed to be non-intrusively embedded inside the gas turbine generators, acquiring the temperature information of critical components such as turbine blades, and wirelessly transmitting the information to the receiver located outside the turbine engine. A prototype system was developed and verified up to 450 °C through high temperature lab testing. The combination of the extreme temperature SiC wireless telemetry technology and integrated harsh environment sensors will allow for condition-based in-situ maintenance of power generators and aircraft turbines in field operation, and can be applied in many other industries requiring extreme environment monitoring and maintenance. PMID:23377189

  9. Changing the cubic ferrimagnetic domain structure in temperature region of spin flip transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuraev, D.R.; Niyazov, L.N.; Saidov, K.S.; Sokolov, B.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The transformation of cubic ferrimagnetic Tb 0.2 Y 2.8 Fe 5 O 12 domain structure has been studied by magneto optic method in the temperature region of spontaneous spin flip phase transition (SPT). It has been found that SPT occurs in a finite temperature interval where the coexistence of low- and high- temperature magnetic phase domains has observed. A character of domain structure evolution in temperature region of spin flip essentially depends on the presence of mechanical stresses in crystal. Interpretation of experimental results has been carried out within the framework of SPT theory for a cubic crystal. (authors)

  10. Inkjet printing and low temperature sintering for organic electronic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wünscher, S.; Teichler, A.; Perelaer, J.; Abbel, R.J.; Schubert, U.S.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, inkjet printing is increasingly used as a flexible and digital patterning technique in order to deposit functional materials for the manufacturing of microelectronic applications, including radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic light

  11. A new temperature threshold detector - Application to missile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coston, C. J.; Higgins, E. V.

    Comprehensive thermal surveys within the case of solid propellant ballistic missile flight motors are highly desirable. For example, a problem involving motor failures due to insulator cracking at motor ignition, which took several years to solve, could have been identified immediately on the basis of a suitable thermal survey. Using conventional point measurements, such as those utilizing typical thermocouples, for such a survey on a full scale motor is not feasible because of the great number of sensors and measurements required. An alternate approach recognizes that temperatures below a threshold (which depends on the material being monitored) are acceptable, but higher temperatures exceed design margins. In this case hot spots can be located by a grid of wire-like sensors which are sensitive to temperature above the threshold anywhere along the sensor. A new type of temperature threshold detector is being developed for flight missile use. The considered device consists of KNO3 separating copper and Constantan metals. Above the KNO3 MP, galvanic action provides a voltage output of a few tenths of a volt.

  12. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain carbon steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel, and carbon-silicon steel may convert to graphite. (b) (Reproduces 124.2.B.) Upon prolonged exposure to...

  13. Mechanical Properties of Ceramics for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-01

    meets another aim of gas turbine ceramics. Temperature measuring by optical pyrometer gives here a reproducibility of approximately 150 C. The...with a similar acoustic impedence to the host material (e.g., certain inclusions, large grains) will be minimal, signal averaging instrumentation

  14. CMOS bandgap references and temperature sensors and their applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.

    2005-01-01

    Two main parts have been presented in this thesis: device characterization and circuit. In integrated bandgap references and temperature sensors, the IC(VBE, characteristics of bipolar transistors are used to generate the basic signals with high accuracy. To investigate the possibilities to

  15. Heterojunction Structures for Photon Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-21

    IR: Fourier-transform infrared FTO: Fluorine doped tin oxide G-R: generation-recombination HEIWIP: heterojunction interfacial workfunction internal...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The work presented here report findings in (1) infrared detectors based on p-GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunctions , (2) J and H...aggregate sensitized heterojunctions for solar cell and photon detection applications, (3) heterojunctions sensitized with quantum dots as low cost

  16. Structured Piezoelectric Composites: Materials and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Ende, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The piezoelectric effect, which causes a material to generate a voltage when it deforms, is very suitable for making integrated sensors, and (micro-) generators. However, conventional piezoelectric materials are either brittle ceramics or certain polymers with a low thermal stability, which limits their practical application to certain specific fields. Piezoelectric composites, which contain an active piezoelectric (ceramic) phase in a robust polymer matrix, can potentially have better proper...

  17. Investigation of mesoporous structures for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, A.; Carstensen, J.; Foell, H.; Boor, J.; Schmidt, V.

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous silicon is an attractive material for thermoelectric application. For pore wall thicknesses around <100 nm, phonons can not penetrate the porous layer while electrons still can, due to there smaller mean free path length. The resulting good electrical and bad thermal conductivity is a premise for efficient thermoelectric devices. This paper presents results regarding homogeneity, high porosity, and optimal pore wall thicknesses for porous silicon based thermoelectric devices.

  18. Recovery and residual stress of SMA wires and applications for concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Cho, Sung-Chul; Park, Taehyo; Hu, Jong Wan; Chung, Young-Soo

    2010-01-01

    In general, NiTi shape memory alloys are used for applications in civil structures. NiTi SMAs show good superelasticity and shape memory effect properties. However, for application of the shape memory effect, it is desirable for SMAs to show a wide temperature hysteresis, especially for civil structures which are exposed to severe environmental conditions. NiTiNb SMAs, in general, show a wider temperature hysteresis than NiTi SMAs and are more applicable for civil structures. This study examines the temperature hysteresis of NiTiNb and NiTi SMAs, and their recovery and residual stress are investigated. In addition, the tensile behaviors of SMA wires under residual stress are evaluated. This study explains the possible applications for concrete structures with the shape memory effect and illustrates two experimental results of concrete cylinders and reinforced concrete columns. For both tests, SMA wires of NiTiNb and NiTi are used to confine concrete using residual stress. The SMA wire jackets on the concrete cylinders increase the peak strength and the ductility compared to the plain concrete cylinders. In addition, the SMA wire jackets on reinforced concrete columns increase the ductility greatly without flexural strength degradation

  19. Microstructural and electron-structural anomalies and high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, L.; Huang, Z.J.; Bechtold, J.; Hor, P.H.; Chu, C.W.; Xue, Y.Y.; Sun, Y.Y.; Meng, R.L.; Tao, Y.K.

    1989-01-01

    Microstructural and electron-structural anomalies have been found to exist in all HYSs by x-ray diffraction and positron annihilation experiments. These anomalies are induced either by doping near the metal-insulator phase boundary at 300 K, or by cooling the HTSs below T c . This has been taken as evidence for a charge transfer between the CuO 2 -layers and their surroundings, which suggests the importance of charge transfers and implies the importance of charge fluctuations in HTS. Several new compounds with the T'- and T*-phases have been found. Further implications of these observations are discussed

  20. Structure-to-glass transition temperature relationships in high temperature stable condensation polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, W. B.; Gratz, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) connecting group in aryl dianhydrides used to prepare aromatic condensation polyimides provides high glass transition temperature (T sub g) polyimides with excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if a trifluorophenyl-ethylidene (3F) connecting group would have a similar effect on the T sub g of aromatic condensation polyimides. A new dianhydride containing the 3F connecting group was synthesized. This dianhydride and an aromatic diamine also containing the 3F connecting group were used together and in various combinations with known diamines or known dianhydrides, respectively, to prepare new 3F containing condensation polyimides. Known polyimides, including some with the 6F connecting linkage, were also prepared for comparison purposes. The new 3F containing polymers and the comparison polymers were prepared by condensation polymerization via the traditional amic-acid polymerization method in N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent. The solutions were characterized by determining their inherent viscosities and then were thermally converted into polyimide films under nitrogen atmosphere at 300 to 500 C, usually 350 C. The T sub g's of the films and resin discs were then determined by thermomechanical analysis and were correlated as a function of the final processing temperatures of the films and resin discs. The results showed that similarities existed in the T sub g's depending on the nature of the connecting linkage in the monomers used to prepare the condensation polyimides.

  1. Temperature effects on chemical structure and motion in coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, G.E.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this project was to apply recently developed, state-of-the-art nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to examine in situ changes in the chemical structure and molecular/macromolecular motion in coal as the temperature is increased above room temperature. Although alterations in the chemical structure of coal have been studied previously by {sup 13}C NMR, using quenched samples, the goal of this project was to examine these chemical structural changes, and changes in molecular/macromolecular mobility that may precede or accompany the chemical changes, at elevated temperatures, using modern {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR techniques, especially {sup 1}H dipolar-dephasing techniques and related experiments pioneered in the laboratory for examining pyridine-saturated coals. This project consisted of the following four primary segments and related efforts on matters relevant to the first four tasks. (1) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure and mobility as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (2) {sup 1}H NMR characterization of coal structure, mobility and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a temperature range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (3) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure/mobility as a function of temperature over a temperature range (30--240 C) for which substantial chemical transformations were not anticipated. (4) {sup 13}C NMR investigation of coal structure, dynamics and conversion as a function of temperature variation over a range (240--500 C) for which chemical transformations of coal are known to occur. (5) Related matters relevant to the first four tasks: (a) {sup 1}H CRAMPS NMR characterization of oil shales and their kerogen concentrates; and (b) improved quantitation in {sup 13}C MAS characterization of coals.

  2. Determining the baking isotherm temperature of Söderberg electrodes and associated structural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Shoko, L.; Beukes, J.P.; Strydom, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most commonly employed electrode systems in industrial metal smelting applications is continuous self-baking electrodes, i.e. the Söderberg electrode system. In this system, the temperature at which transition from a liquid/soft paste to a solid carbonaceous electrode takes place is termed the baking isotherm temperature. This temperature is extremely important within the context of electrode management. In this paper, thermo mechanical analysis (TMA) was used to measure the dimens...

  3. High Temperature Multimode Harvester for Wireless Strain Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monitoring of structural strain is a well-established method for assessing the fatigue life and operational loads of aerospace vessels, aircraft, bridges, and other...

  4. PFEM application in fluid structure interaction problems

    OpenAIRE

    Celigueta Jordana, Miguel Ángel; Larese De Tetto, Antonia; Latorre, Salvador

    2008-01-01

    In the current paper the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), an innovative numerical method for solving a wide spectrum of problems involving the interaction of fluid and structures, is briefly presented. Many examples of the use of the PFEM with GiD support are shown. GiD framework provides a useful pre and post processor for the specific features of the method. Its advantages and shortcomings are pointed out in the present work. Peer Reviewed

  5. Formation of Green compact structure of low-temperature ceramics with taking into account the thermal degradation of the binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovpinets, A. O.; Leytsin, V. N.; Dmitrieva, M. A.; Ivonin, I. V.; Ponomarev, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    The solution of the tasks in the field of creating and processing materials for additive technologies requires the development of a single theory of materials for various applications and processes. A separate class of materials that are promising for use in additive technologies includes materials whose consolidation is ensured by the presence of low-melting components in the initial mixture which form a matrix at a temperature not exceeding the melting point, recrystallization or destruction of any of the responsible refractory components of the initial dispersion. The study of the contribution of the binder thermal destruction to the structure and phase composition of the initial compact of the future composite is essential for the development of modern technologies for the synthesis of low-temperature ceramics. This paper investigates the effect of the thermal destruction of a binder on the formation of a green compact of low-temperature ceramics and the structural-mechanical characteristics of sintered ceramics. The approach proposed in Ref. [1] for evaluating the structure and physical characteristics of sintered low-temperature ceramics is improved to clarify the structure of green compacts obtained after thermal destruction of the polymer binder, with taking into account the pores formed and the infusible residue. The obtained results enable a more accurate prediction of thermal stresses in the matrix of sintered ceramics and serve as a basis for optimization.

  6. OOA composite structures applicable in railway industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusnáková Soňa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite sandwich structures offers several advantages over conventional structural materials such as lightweight, high bending and torsional stiffness, superior thermal insulation and excellent acoustic damping. In the aerospace industry, sandwich composites are commonly manufactured using the autoclave process which is associated with high operating cost. Out-of-autoclave (OOA manufacturing has been shown to be capable of producing low cost and high performance composites. In this paper we present results of experimental testing of various sandwich materials according various standards and actual requirements in transport industry. We compared the different types of surface and paint systems, because these layers are the most important in contact with the surrounding environment and load conditions. In the experimental measurements were used various materials. For the core of the sandwich structure were selected aluminium honeycomb, aramid honeycomb and PET (Polyethylene terephthalate foam core. Support layers were chosen two kinds of predimpregnated materials. The conditions of measurements were requirements for strength and rigidity, safety - flame resistance and reflectivity resistance. The samples were tested at the 3 - point bending test according to standard EN ISO 178, by modified test to determine the force required to rapture threaded insert, by test of reflectivity according to UIC CODE 844-4 R and according to standard EN 45545-2 fire protection of railway vehicles.

  7. An explication of the Graphite Structural Design Code of core components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Toyota, Junji; Shiozawa, Shusaku

    1991-05-01

    The integrity evaluation of the core graphite components for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) will be carried out based upon the Graphite Structural Design Code for core components. In the application of this design code, it is necessary to make clear the basic concept to evaluate the integrity of core components of HTTR. Therefore, considering the detailed design of core graphite structures such as fuel graphite blocks, etc. of HTTR, this report explicates the design code in detail about the concepts of stress and fatigue limits, integrity evaluation method of oxidized graphite components and thermal irradiation stress analysis method etc. (author)

  8. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reilly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc. and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc. to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature–deformation–displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  9. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Wang, Hui; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming; Li, Quan; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery. (paper)

  10. Construction of crystal structure prototype database: methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuanxun; Lv, Jian; Li, Quan; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lijun; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2017-04-26

    Crystal structure prototype data have become a useful source of information for materials discovery in the fields of crystallography, chemistry, physics, and materials science. This work reports the development of a robust and efficient method for assessing the similarity of structures on the basis of their interatomic distances. Using this method, we proposed a simple and unambiguous definition of crystal structure prototype based on hierarchical clustering theory, and constructed the crystal structure prototype database (CSPD) by filtering the known crystallographic structures in a database. With similar method, a program structure prototype analysis package (SPAP) was developed to remove similar structures in CALYPSO prediction results and extract predicted low energy structures for a separate theoretical structure database. A series of statistics describing the distribution of crystal structure prototypes in the CSPD was compiled to provide an important insight for structure prediction and high-throughput calculations. Illustrative examples of the application of the proposed database are given, including the generation of initial structures for structure prediction and determination of the prototype structure in databases. These examples demonstrate the CSPD to be a generally applicable and useful tool for materials discovery.

  11. Aspects of the application of low temperatures in electrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-01

    After a short assessment of superconductors and high field coils as well as normal conductors at low temperature, refrigerating units and thermal insulation are discussed. In the case of superconductor direct current cables for 2 by 400 kV, a comparison is made with hvdc overhead lines and it was found that the cost of erection, as well as the annual operating costs, are equivalent for a transmitted load of 2 to 3 GW.

  12. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Dooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    A class of devices known as integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 0 C is described. The evolution of the ITC concept is discussed. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Recent experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits have successfully operated in 500 0 C environments for extended periods of time

  13. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc [SBT, UMR-E CEA / UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, Grenoble, F-38054 (France); Daniel, Christophe [CNES, 18, avenue Edouard Belin, Toulouse, F-31401 (France)

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  14. LVDT Development for High Temperature Irradiation Test and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Yong; Ban, Chae Min; Choo, Kee Nam; Jun, Byung Hyuk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer) is used to measure the elongation and pressure of a nuclear fuel rod, or the creep and fatigue of the material during a reactor irradiation test. This device must be a radiation-resistant LVDT for use in a research reactor. Norway Halden has LVDTs for an irradiation test by the own development and commercialized. But Halden's LVDTs have limited the temperature of the use until to 350 .deg. C. So, KAERI has been developing a new LVDT for high temperature irradiation test. This paper describes the design of a LVDT, the fabrication process of a LVDT, and the result of the performance test. The designed LVDT uses thermocouple cable for coil wire material and one MI cable as signal cable. This LVDT for a high temperature irradiation test can be used until a maximum of 900 .deg. C. Welding is a very important factor for the fabrication of an LVDT. We are using a 150W fiber laser welding system that consists of a welding head, monitoring vision system and rotary index.

  15. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  16. Detonation-synthesis nanodiamonds: synthesis, structure, properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolmatov, Valerii Yu [Federal State Unitary Enterprise Special Design-Technology Bureau (FSUE SDTB) ' ' Tekhnolog' ' at the St Petersburg State Institute of Technology (Technical University) (Russian Federation)

    2007-04-30

    The review outlines the theoretical foundations and industrial implementations of modern detonation synthesis of nanodiamonds and chemical purification of the nanodiamonds thus obtained. The structure, key properties and promising fields of application of detonation-synthesis nanodiamonds are considered.

  17. Detonation-synthesis nanodiamonds: synthesis, structure, properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolmatov, Valerii Yu

    2007-01-01

    The review outlines the theoretical foundations and industrial implementations of modern detonation synthesis of nanodiamonds and chemical purification of the nanodiamonds thus obtained. The structure, key properties and promising fields of application of detonation-synthesis nanodiamonds are considered.

  18. Responsibility structure in medical radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beekman, Z.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses the various aspects of the responsibilities of physicians and clinical physicists with regard to radiation protection in medical applications of ionizing radiation. It becomes still clearer that the physician, who carries out the examination or the treatment, also has to bear the responsibility. this holds for the indication assessment as well as for optimization of the quality of the examination or treatment versus radiation burden of the patient, radiologic worker and thirds. Further it is clear that the physician in these will have to delegate specific tasks and responsibilities, whether or not in the elongated-arm construction. The clinical physicist is responsible in particular for the applications of the physical methods and watches the quality of the apparatus and methods used. As such he also is responsible for the technical workers, who take care of the preventive and corrective maintenance. The principal responsibility of the clinical physicist however lies in the field of standardization and calibration of medical-physical instruments. Besides this investigation into and development of new techniques, methods and apparatus come up, while also education and training of various profession groups involved need attention. (author). 6 refs.; 1 tab

  19. A review of multifunctional structure technology for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairajan, K. K.; Aglietti, G. S.; Mani, K. M.

    2016-03-01

    The emerging field of multifunctional structure (MFS) technologies enables the design of systems with reduced mass and volume, thereby improving their overall efficiency. It requires developments in different engineering disciplines and their integration into a single system without degrading their individual performances. MFS is particularly suitable for aerospace applications where mass and volume are critical to the cost of the mission. This article reviews the current state of the art of multifunctional structure technologies relevant to aerospace applications.

  20. Review of Industrial Applications of Structural Reliability Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real practical applications is much smaller than what one would expect.......For the last two decades we have seen an increasing interest in applying structural reliability theory to many different industries. However, the number of real practical applications is much smaller than what one would expect....

  1. GH62 arabinofuranosidases: Structure, function and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Dumon, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by industrial demands and ongoing scientific discoveries continuous efforts are made to identify and create improved biocatalysts dedicated to plant biomass conversion. α-1,2 and α-1,3 arabinofuranosyl specific α-l-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are debranching enzymes catalyzing...... exclusively α-l-arabinofuranosidases and these are of fungal and bacterial origin. Twenty-two GH62 enzymes out of 223 entries in the CAZy database have been characterized and very recently new knowledge was acquired with regard to crystal structures, substrate specificities, and phylogenetics, which overall...

  2. Applications of American design codes for elevated temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severud, L.K.

    1980-03-01

    A brief summary of the ASME Code rules of Case N-47 is presented. An overview of the typical procedure used to demonstrate Code compliance is provided. Application experience and some examples of detailed inelastic analysis and simplified-approximate methods are given. Recent developments and future trends in design criteria and ASME Code rules are also presented

  3. An Evaluation Report on the High Temperature Design of the KALIMER-600 Reactor Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-03-15

    This report is on the validity evaluation of high temperature structural design for the reactor structures and piping of the pool-type Liquid Metal Reactor, KALIMER-600 subjected to the high temperature thermal load condition. The structural concept of the Upper Internal Structure located above the core is analyzed and the adequate UIS conceptual design for KALIMER-600 is proposed. Also, the high temperature structural integrity of the thermal liner which is to protect the UIS bottom plate from the high frequency thermal fatigue damage was evaluated by the thermal stripping analysis. The high temperature structural design of the reactor internal structure by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle was carried out and the structural integrity of it for a normal operating condition as well as the transient condition of the primary pump trip accident was confirmed. Additionally the structure design of the reactor internal structural was changed to prevent the non-uniform deformation of the primary pump which is induced by the thermal expansion difference between the reactor head and the baffle plate. The arrangement of the IHTS piping system which is a part of the reactor system is carried out and the structural integrity and the accumulated deformation by considering the reactor startup-shutdown cycle of a normal operating condition were evaluated. The structural integrity and the accumulated deformation of the PDRC hot leg piping by considering the PDRC operating condition were evaluated. The validity of KALIMER-600 high temperature structural design is confirmed through this study, and it is clearly found that the methodology research to evaluate the structural integrity considering the reactor life time of 60 years ensured is necessary.

  4. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  5. Effect of Sintering Temperature and Applied Load on Anode-Supported Electrodes for SOFC Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Vien Nguyen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anode-supported cells are prepared by a sequence of hot pressing and co-sintering processes for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC applications. Commercially available porous anode tape (NiO/YSZ = 50 wt %/50 wt %, anode tape (NiO/YSZ = 30 wt %/70 wt %, and YSZ are used as the anode substrate, anode functional layer, and electrolyte layer, respectively. After hot pressing, the stacked layers are then sintered at different temperatures (1250 °C, 1350 °C, 1400 °C and 1450 °C for 5 h in air. Different compressive loads are applied during the sintering process. An (La,SrMnO3 (LSM paste is coated on the post-sintered anode-supported electrolyte surface as the cathode, and sintered at different temperatures (1100 °C, 1150 °C, 1200 °C and 1250 °C for 2 h in air to generate anode-supported cells with dimensions of 60 × 60 mm2 (active reaction area of 50 × 50 mm2. SEM is used to investigate the anode structure of the anode-supported cells. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy is used to investigate the roughness of the cathode surfaces. At sintering temperatures of 1400 °C and 1450 °C, there is significant grain growth in the anode. Furthermore, the surface of the cathode is smoother at a firing temperature of 1200 °C. It is also found that the optimal compressive load of 1742 Pa led to a flatness of 168 µm/6 cm and a deformation of 0.72%. The open circuit voltage and power density of the anode-supported cell at 750 °C were 1.0 V and 178 mW·cm−2, respectively.

  6. Indium antimonide quantum well structures for electronic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisooriya, Madhavie

    on GaAs substrates that are oriented 2° away from the [011] direction. Chapter 3 discusses designing InSb QW layer structures that are strain balanced. By applying these defect-reducing techniques, the electron mobility in InSb quantum wells at room temperature was significantly increased. For complementary logic technology, p-channel transistors with high mobility are equally as important as n-channel transistors. However, achieving a high hole mobility in III-V semiconductors is challenging. A controlled introduction of strain in the quantum-well material is an effective technique for enhancing the hole mobility beyond its value in bulk material. The strain reduces the hole effective mass by splitting the heavy hole and light hole valence bands. Chapter 4 discusses a successful attempt to realize p-type InSb quantum well structures. The biaxial strain applied via a relaxed metamorphic buffer resulted in a significantly higher room-temperature hole mobility and a record high low-temperature hole mobility. To demonstrate the usefulness of high mobility in a device structure, magnetoresistive devices were fabricated from remotely doped InSb QWs. Such devices have numerous practical applications such as position and speed sensors and as read heads in magnetic storage systems. In a magnetoresistive device composed of a series of shorted Hall bars, the magnetoresistance is proportional to the electron mobility squared for small magnetic fields. Hence, the high electron mobility in InSb QWs makes them highly preferable for geometrical magnetoresistors. Chapter 5 reports the fabrication and characterization of InSb quantum-well magnetoresistors. The excellent transport properties of the InSb QWs resulted in high room-temperature sensitivity to applied magnetic fields. Finally, Chapter 6 provides the conclusions obtained during this research effort, and makes suggestions for future work.

  7. Superalloy Lattice Block Developed for Use in Lightweight, High-Temperature Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Krause, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Successful development of advanced gas turbine engines for aircraft will require lightweight, high-temperature components. Currently titanium-aluminum- (TiAl) based alloys are envisioned for such applications because of their lower density (4 g/cm3) in comparison to superalloys (8.5 g/cm3), which have been utilized for hot turbine engine parts for over 50 years. However, a recently developed concept (lattice block) by JAMCORP, Inc., of Willmington, Massachusetts, would allow lightweight, high-temperature structures to be directly fabricated from superalloys and, thus, take advantage of their well-known, characterized properties. In its simplest state, lattice block is composed of thin ligaments arranged in a three dimensional triangulated trusslike configuration that forms a structurally rigid panel. Because lattice block can be fabricated by casting, correctly sized hardware is produced with little or no machining; thus very low cost manufacturing is possible. Together, the NASA Glenn Research Center and JAMCORP have extended their lattice block methodology for lower melting materials, such as Al alloys, to demonstrate that investment casting of superalloy lattice block is possible. This effort required advances in lattice block pattern design and assembly, higher temperature mold materials and mold fabrication technology, and foundry practice suitable for superalloys (ref. 1). Lattice block panels have been cast from two different Ni-base superalloys: IN 718, which is the most commonly utilized superalloy and retains its strength up to 650 C; and MAR M247, which possesses excellent mechanical properties to at least 1100 C. In addition to the open-cell lattice block geometry, same-sized lattice block panels containing a thin (1-mm-thick) solid face on one side have also been cast from both superalloys. The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the open cell and face-sheeted superalloy lattice block panels are currently being examined, and the

  8. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  9. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human–robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as α f + ξ f and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, α f + ξ f has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10 −6  °C −1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10 −6  °C −1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C. (paper)

  10. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human-robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as αf + ξf and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, αf + ξf has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10-6 °C-1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10-6 °C-1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C.

  11. Generalized rough sets hybrid structure and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    The book introduces the concept of “generalized interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft sets”. It presents the basic properties of these sets and also, investigates an application of generalized interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft sets in decision making with respect to interval of degree of preference. The concept of “interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft rough sets” is discussed and interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft rough set based multi criteria group decision making scheme is presented, which refines the primary evaluation of the whole expert group and enables us to select the optimal object in a most reliable manner. The book also details concept of interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets of type 2. It presents the basic properties of these sets. The book also introduces the concept of “interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy soft topological space (IVIFS topological space)” together with intuitionistic fuzzy soft open sets (IVIFS open sets) and intuitionistic fuzzy soft cl...

  12. Magnetic domain structure of MnAs thin films as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, Masaki; Manago, Takashi; Akinaga, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Hiromi; Okabayashi, Jun

    2003-01-01

    We have investigate magnetic domain structures of MnAs thin films grown on GaAs substrates by a magnetic force microscope. We observed, by an atomic force microscope, rectangular defects along GaAs [110] direction which disperse randomly on the surface of MnAs/GaAs(001). The Curie temperature of MnAs is 45degC, and it is successfully confirmed directly by the variable temperature magnetic force microscope observation. We also investigated magnetic domain structures of MnAs/GaAs(111)B, and no apparent relation was observed between the topographic structure and the magnetic domain structure. (author)

  13. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R"2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. - Highlights: • The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. • Distinct diurnal and temporal Brightness Temperature behavior divide the city into four segments. • We assess air temperature from satellite surface temperature (R"2 = 0.81). - The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. Distinct diurnal and temporal Surface Temperature behavior divide the city into four different segments.

  14. 500 C Electronic Packaging and Dielectric Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for exploring the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by these high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed. High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for probing the inner solar planets and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and eventual applications of high temperature electronics and sensors. High temperature passive components are also necessary for high temperature electronic systems. This talk will discuss ceramic packaging systems developed for high electronics and related testing results of SiC circuits at 500C and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) integrated circuits at temperatures beyond commercial limit facilitated by high temperature packaging technologies. Dielectric materials for high temperature multilayers capacitors will also be discussed.

  15. Structural transformation of implanted diamond layers during high temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubanov, S.; Fairchild, B.A.; Suvorova, A.; Olivero, P.; Prawer, S.

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years graphitization of ion-beam induced amorphous layers became the basic tool for device fabrication in diamond. The etchable graphitic layers can be removed to form free-standing membranes into which the desired structures can be sculpted using FIB milling. The optical properties of the devices fabricated using this method are assumed on the model of sharp diamond–air interface. The real quality of this interface could depend on degree of graphitization of the amorphous damage layers after annealing. In the present work the graphitization process was studied using conventional and analytical TEM. It was found that annealing at 550 °C results in a partial graphitization of the implanted volume with formation of the nano-crystalline graphitic phase sandwiched between layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon. Annealing at 1400 °C resulted in complete graphitization of the amorphous layers. The average size of graphite nano-crystals did not exceed 5 nm with predominant orientation of c-planes normal to the sample surface.

  16. Applicability Problem in Optimum Reinforced Concrete Structures Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashara Assedeq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum reinforced concrete structures design is very complex problem, not only considering exactness of calculus but also because of questionable applicability of existing methods in practice. This paper presents the main theoretical mathematical and physical features of the problem formulation as well as the review and analysis of existing methods and solutions considering their exactness and applicability.

  17. Heat waves measured with MODIS land surface temperature data predict changes in avian community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Murray K. Clayton; Curtis H. Flather; Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff

    2011-01-01

    Heat waves are expected to become more frequent and severe as climate changes, with unknown consequences for biodiversity. We sought to identify ecologically-relevant broad-scale indicators of heat waves based on MODIS land surface temperature (LST) and interpolated air temperature data and assess their associations with avian community structure. Specifically, we...

  18. Progress in DOE high temperature superconductivity electric power applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, J.G.; Sheahn, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) leads national R and D effort to develop US industry's capability to produce a wide range of advanced energy-efficient electric power products. The immediate need is to make high temperature superconductivity (HTS) wire. Wire developers at the DOE National laboratories are working wit industrial partners toward this objective. In this paper, the authors describe the progress to date, citing both the difficulties associated with making wire from these ceramic materials, and achievements at several organizations. Results for progress over the next five years are stated

  19. Characterization of commercial supercapacitors for low temperature applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iwama, Etsuro; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Azais, Philippe; Brégeon, Laurent; Simon, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Electrochemical characterizations at low temperature and floating tests have been performed on 600F commercial supercapacitor (SC) for acetonitrile (AN)-based and AN + methyl acetate (MA) mixed electrolytes. From −40 to +20 °C, AN electrolyte showed slightly higher capacitance than those of AN + MA mixed electrolytes (25 and 33 vol.% of MA). At −55 °C, however, AN electrolyte did not cycle at all, while MA mixed electrolyte normally cycled with a slight decrease in the...

  20. High emissivity coatings for high temperature application: Progress and prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaodong; Li Yibin; Wang Lidong; Sun Yue; Zhang, Sam

    2009-01-01

    High emissivity coatings are widely used in many cases where heat transfers through electromagnetic radiation that arises due to the temperature of a body. Extensive theoretical and experimental efforts have been made to synthesize and investigate high emissivity coatings. The emissivity can be improved through various or combined mechanisms. The characterization of the emissivity is still a fully open problem. In this paper, we review the various mechanisms associated with the emissivity enhancement and emissivity characterization techniques. Based on these literature reviews, the prospect will be presented in the concluding remarks.

  1. Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Metallurgy , 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003. DOI: 10.1002/0471434027. 2. O. Grong, Metallurgical Modelling of Welding , 2ed., Materials Modelling...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6394--16-9690 Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using...PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Validation of Temperature Histories for Structural Steel Welds Using Estimated Heat-Affected-Zone Edges S.G. Lambrakos

  2. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Laboratory (Ret.), private communication. 33. S. Kou, Welding Metallurgy , 2nd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003. DOI: 10.1002/0471434027. 34. J. K...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--15-9665 Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds ...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Laser and Hybrid Laser-GMA Welds Calculated Using Multiple

  3. Thin Film Materials and Devices for Resistive Temperature Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), TEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) did...composition and structure by real time spectroscopic ellipsometry," Physica Status Solidi A, vol. 205, pp. 892-895, 2008. [92] H. Fujiwara, J. Koh , P. I

  4. Structural shell analysis understanding and application

    CERN Document Server

    Blaauwendraad, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical description of the properties of a shell is much more elaborate than those of beam and plate structures. Therefore many engineers and architects are unacquainted with aspects of shell behaviour and design, and are not familiar with sufficiently reliable shell theories for the different shell types as derived in the middle of the 20th century. Rather than contributing to theory development, this university textbook focuses on architectural and civil engineering schools. Of course, practising professionals will profit from it as well. The book deals with thin elastic shells, in particular with cylindrical, conical and spherical types, and with elliptic and hyperbolic paraboloids. The focus is on roofs, chimneys, pressure vessels and storage tanks. Special attention is paid to edge bending disturbance zones, which is indispensable knowledge in FE meshing. A substantial part of the book results from research efforts in the mid 20th century at Delft University of Technology. As such, it is a valua...

  5. Nuclear structure calculations for astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, P.; Kratz, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    Here we present calculated results on such diverse properties as nuclear energy levels, ground-state masses and shapes, β-decay properties and fission-barrier heights. Our approach to these calculations is to use a unified theoretical framework within which the above properties can all be studied. The results are obtained in the macroscopic-microscopic approach in which a microscopic nuclear-structure single-particle model with extensions is combined with a macroscopic model, such as the liquid drop model. In this model the total potential energy of the nucleus may be calculated as a function of shape. The maxima and minima in this function correspond to such features as the ground state, fission saddle points and shape-isomeric states. Various transition rate matrix elements are determined from wave-functions calculated in the single-particle model with pairing and other relevant residual interactions taken into account

  6. Ultrathin magnetic structures IV applications of nanomagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Bretislav

    2004-01-01

    The ability to understand and control the unique properties of interfaces has created an entirely new field of magnetism which already has a profound impact in technology and is providing the basis for a revolution in electronics. The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of magnetic devices for information technology but also in the basic understanding of the physics of magnetic nanostructures. Volume III describes thin film magnetic properties and methods for characterising thin film structure topics that underpin the present 'spintronics' revolution in which devices are based on combined magnetic materials and semiconductors. The present volume (IV) deals with the fundamentals of spintronics: magnetoelectronic materials, spin injection and detection, micromagnetics and the development of magnetic random access memory based on GMR and tunnel junction devices. Together these books provide readers with a comprehensive account of an exciting and rapidly developing field. The treatment is de...

  7. Growth, defect structure, and THz application of stoichiometric lithium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lengyel, K.; Péter, Á.; Kovács, L.; Corradi, G.; Dravecz, G.; Hajdara, I.; Szaller, Zs.; Polgár, K. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1121 Budapest, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33 (Hungary); Pálfalvi, L.; Unferdorben, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pécs, 7624 Pécs, Ifjúság útja 6 (Hungary); MTA-PTE High Field Terahertz Research Group, 7624 Pécs (Hungary)

    2015-12-15

    Owing to the extraordinary richness of its physical properties, congruent lithium niobate has attracted multidecade-long interest both for fundamental science and applications. The combination of ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as the strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects offers a great potential for applications in modern optics. To provide powerful optical components in high energy laser applications, tailoring of key material parameters, especially stoichiometry, is required. This paper reviews the state of the art of growing large stoichiometric LiNbO{sub 3} (sLN) crystals, in particular, the defect engineering of pure and doped sLN with emphasis on optical damage resistant (ODR) dopants (e.g., Mg, Zn, In, Sc, Hf, Zr, Sn). The discussion is focused on crystals grown by the high temperature top seeded solution growth (HTTSSG) technique using alkali oxide fluxing agents. Based on high-temperature phase equilibria studies of the Li{sub 2}O–Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}–X{sub 2}O ternary systems (X = Na, K, Rb, Cs), the impact of alkali homologue additives on the stoichiometry of the lithium niobate phase will be analyzed, together with a summary of the ultraviolet, infrared, and far-infrared absorption spectroscopic methods developed to characterize the composition of the crystals. It will be shown that using HTTSSG from K{sub 2}O containing flux, crystals closest to the stoichiometric composition can be grown characterized by a UV-edge position of at about 302 nm and a single narrow hydroxyl band in the IR with a linewidth of less than 3 cm{sup −1} at 300 K. The threshold concentrations for ODR dopants depend on crystal stoichiometry and the valence of the dopants; Raman spectra, hydroxyl vibration spectra, and Z-scan measurements prove to be useful to distinguish crystals below and above the photorefractive threshold. Crystals just above the threshold are

  8. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  9. Current high-temperature superconducting coils and applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, T.

    2000-01-01

    In Japan, four projects for the application of Bi-based superconducting magnets to practical apparatus are currently underway. These projects involve the development of an insert magnet for a 1 GHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, a magnet for a silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus, a magnet for a magnetic separation system, and a 1 T pulse magnet for a superconducting magnet energy storage system. For example, the magnet for the silicon single-crystal pulling apparatus is of the class with stored energy of 1 MJ to be operated at around 20 K. This review focuses on the present status of the development of these magnets, followed by a discussion of the problems of the present superconducting tapes that need to be overcome for future applications. (author)

  10. Low-temperature tar and oil: properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, R

    1942-01-01

    In Germany the value of low-temperature tar is largely dependent on its fuel fractions; these vary with the coal and the method of carbonization (external heating or recirculated gases). Brown-coal tars can be processed by distillation, cracking under pressure, hydrogenation under pressure (largest volume of tar is processed by this method) and by solvent extraction, with EtOH, SO/sub 2/, or phenol. Each of these processes is discussed in detail. In the pressure-hydrogenation process, 1.25 kilogram of brown-coal tar yields approximately 1 kilogram of gasoline with an octane number of 60 to 70. Low-temperature tars from bituminous coals can be hydrogenated readily but are not well adapted to solvent extraction. Attempts should be made to produce tar approximating the desired characteristics for fuel directly from the carbonizing apparatus. For laboratory carbonization tests, an approximation to results secured by externally heated retorts is secured by using an insert consisting of a series of perforated trays in the 200-gram Fischer aluminum retort; this reduces the capacity to 100 gram. Fractional condensation is used to separate heavy oil, middle oil, and liquor; low-boiling products are condensed at -20/sup 0/ by solid CO/sub 2/.

  11. Thermophysical characterization tools and numerical models for high temperature thermo-structural composite materials; Outils de caracterisation thermophysique et modeles numeriques pour les composites thermostructuraux a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorrette, Ch

    2007-04-15

    This work is an original contribution to the study of the thermo-structural composite materials thermal behaviour. It aims to develop a methodology with a new experimental device for thermal characterization adapted to this type of material and to model the heat transfer by conduction within these heterogeneous media. The first part deals with prediction of the thermal effective conductivity of stratified composite materials in the three space directions. For that, a multi scale model using a rigorous morphology analysis of the structure and the elementary properties is proposed and implemented. The second part deals with the thermal characterization at high temperature. It shows how to estimate simultaneously the thermal effusiveness and the thermal conductivity. The present method is based on the observation of the heating from a plane sample submitted to a continuous excitation generated by Joule Effect. Heat transfer is modelled with the quadrupole formalism, temperature is here measured on two sides of the sample. The development of both resistive probes for excitation and linear probes for temperature measurements enables the thermal properties measured up to 1000 C. Finally, some experimental and numerical application examples lead to review the obtained results. (author)

  12. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  13. Complex temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Sahadev, Nishaina; Bindu, R.; Kumar, Neeraj; Dhar, S. K.; Thamizhavel, A.; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2014-01-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of CaFe 2 As 2 , which is a parent compound of high temperature superconductors—CaFe 2 As 2 exhibits superconductivity under pressure as well as doping of charge carriers. Photoemission results of CaFe 2 As 2 in this study reveal a gradual shift of an energy band, α away from the chemical potential with decreasing temperature in addition to the spin density wave (SDW) transition induced Fermi surface reconstruction across SDW transition temperature. The corresponding hole pocket eventually disappears at lower temperatures, while the hole Fermi surface of the β band possessing finite p orbital character survives till the lowest temperature studied. These results, thus, reveal signature of complex charge redistribution among various energy bands as a function of temperature

  14. Pressure vessel design codes: A review of their applicability to HTGR components at temperatures above 800 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, P.T.; Over, H.H.; Bieniussa, K.

    1984-01-01

    The governments of USA and Federal Republic of Germany have approved of cooperation between the two countries in an endeavour to establish structural design code for gas reactor components intended to operate at temperatures exceeding 800 deg C. The basis of existing codes and their applicability to gas reactor component design are reviewed in this paper. This review has raised a number of important questions as to the direct applicability of the present codes. The status of US and FRG cooperative efforts to obtain answers to these questions are presented

  15. Novel, Functionally Graded Coating System for Reusable, Very High Temperature Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses some of the most challenging materials issues with respect to multi-mission, very high temperature, up to 4000°F, applications. The very...

  16. A Mechanistic Design Approach for Graphite Nanoplatelet (GNP) Reinforced Asphalt Mixtures for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This report explores the application of a discrete computational model for predicting the fracture behavior of asphalt mixtures at low temperatures based on the results of simple laboratory experiments. In this discrete element model, coarse aggregat...

  17. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, David E [El Cerrito, CA; Pollard, Martin J [El Cerrito, CA; Elkin, Christopher J [San Ramon, CA

    2009-02-03

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are further improvements to aspects of the hybrid magnetic structure, including additional elements and for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use in biotechnology and high throughput processes.

  18. Application of flexible micro temperature sensor in oxidative steam reforming by a methanol micro reformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Shen, Chia-Chieh; Yeh, Chuin-Tih; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM), with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  19. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Man Lo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM, with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  20. Application of betatrons to quality control of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevtsov, V.A.; Matveev, Yu.K.; Trefilov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    The results of laboratory investigations on the applicability of modificated PMB-6 betatron to quality control of reinforced concrete structures are presented. The investigations have been performed for the purposes of refinement of the technique for detecting voids and establishing real reinforcement. On the basis of experimental investigations the technique and schemes of structure translucence have been developed. Examples of using betatrons for flaw detection of reinforred concrete structures are given

  1. Stresses and strains in pavement structures due to the effect of temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svilar Mila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At its absolute amount, stresses due to the effect of temperature in the pavement structures, especially those rigid, are often of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from vehicles' load, but it happens that due to such impact many slabs become cracked before the road is handed over into operation. The temperature stresses which occur in pavement structures include stresses due to bending and buckling, stresses due to friction and hidden stresses. Stresses caused by the influence of temperature in the pavement structure during the day are generally below the strength of the component materials so they do not cause the consequences for structure. However, appearance of residual stresses and their accumulation after a sufficiently long period of time may lead to failure in structure, i.e. thermal fatigue. The paper presents the effects of temperature changes on the pavement structures in the physical and mechanical terms, and the manner in which the temperature is taken into account during the design of pavement structures.

  2. Matrix Transfer Function Design for Flexible Structures: An Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, T. J.; Compito, A. V.; Doran, A. L.; Gustafson, C. L.; Wong, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The application of matrix transfer function design techniques to the problem of disturbance rejection on a flexible space structure is demonstrated. The design approach is based on parameterizing a class of stabilizing compensators for the plant and formulating the design specifications as a constrained minimization problem in terms of these parameters. The solution yields a matrix transfer function representation of the compensator. A state space realization of the compensator is constructed to investigate performance and stability on the nominal and perturbed models. The application is made to the ACOSSA (Active Control of Space Structures) optical structure.

  3. Guidelines for the structural design of experimental multi-purpose VHTR at the elevated temperature services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Sueo; Uga, Takeo; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Muto, Yasushi; Ikushima, Takeshi

    1976-02-01

    The guidelines are presented for structural design of the experimental multi-purpose VHTR(Very High Temperature Reactor) at the elevated temperature services. Covered are features of the VHTR structural design, specifications, safety design, seismic design, failure modes to be considered, stress criteria for various load combinations and the mechanical properties of the materials. The guidelines were prepared by referring to safety criteria of high-temperature gas cooled reactors, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code, Section III, case 1592 and the domestic seismic design guide of nuclear power facilities. (auth.)

  4. Structure of boron nitride after the high-temperature shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdyumov, A.V.; Ostrovskaya, N.F.; Pilipenko, V.A.; Pilyankevich, A.N.; Savvakin, G.I.; Trefilov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Boron nitride structure changes as a result of high temperature dynamic compression are studied. The X-ray technique and transmission electron microscopy have been applied. The data on the structure and regularities of formation of diamond-like modifications of boron nitride at high temperature impact compression permit to consider martensite transformation as the first stage of formation of the sphalerite phase stable at high pressures. The second stage is possible if the temperature at the impact moment is sufficiently high for intensive diffusion processes

  5. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J

    1997-12-31

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au). 111 refs.

  6. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au). 111 refs.

  7. Ceramic high temperature superconductors for high current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Composite Reaction Texturing (CRT) is a technique which uses a fine distribution of pre-aligned seeds as nucleating sites for texturing oxide superconductors. It has successfully been applied to the texturing of Bi-2212 compounds. A furhter application of CRT is reported in which Y-123 is biaxially textured using seeds of other Rare Earth-123 compounds with higher melting points as nucleating sites. The resultant textured microstructure exhibits mainly low angle grain boundaries (up to 5 deg. misorientation). Results will be presented on the seed alignment techniques, the development of microstructure during reaction of the composite preform and preliminary measurements of electromagnetic properties. (au)

  8. Application and analysis of palladium vapor deposited on stainless steel for high temperature electrical contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodeh, S.

    2008-01-01

    Using electron beam evaporation. Pd thin films of 300 nm thickness have been deposited on 301 stainless steel for high temperature electrical contact studies. The structure and compost ion of the helms were studied in detail x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (Sem), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S) with sputter depth profiling. The contact properties such as contact resistance, fretting wear resistance, and thermal stability have been measured.The contact resistance rem ins low after heat-aging in air for 168 h at 150 and 200 deg., but increases significantly after heat-aging at 340 deg.. This increase in contact resistance is caused by the formation of about a 27 nm (1 μin.) thick Pdo. In contrast, the thickness of the Pdo is too thin to cause measurable contact resistance increases after heat-aging at 150 and 200 deg.. The fretting wear resistance of Pd coated 301 stainless steel is better than that of electroplated Sn of ser veal thousand nm thickness. Thus, vapor deposited Pd coating on 301 stainless steel may replace electroplated Sn for electrical contact application at elevated temperatures.

  9. Waste to wealth concept: Disposable RGO filter paper for flexible temperature sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neella, Nagarjuna; Kedambaimoole, Vaishakh; Gaddam, Venkateswarlu; Nayak, M. M.; Rajanna, K.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed a flexible reduced graphene oxide (RGO) temperature sensor on filter paper based cellulose substrate using vacuum filtration method. One of the most commonly used synthesized methods for RGO thin films is vacuum filtration process. It has several advantages such as simple operation and good controllability. The structural analysis was carried out by FE-SEM, in which the surface morphology images confirm the formation of RGO nanostructures on the filter paper substrate. It was observed that the pores of the filter paper were completely filled with the RGO material during the filtration process, subsequently the formation of continuous RGO thin films. As a results, the RGO films exhibits a piezoresistive property. The resulted RGO based films on the filter paper reveals the semiconducting behavior having sensitivity of 0.278 Ω /°C and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) about -0.00254 Ω/ Ω / °C. Thus, we demonstrate a simplified way for the fabrication of RGO films on filter paper that possesses better and easier measurable macroscopic electrical properties. Our approach is for easy way of electronics, cost-effective and environment friendly fabrication route for flexible conducting graphene films on filter paper. This will enable for the potential applications in flexible electronics in various fields including biomedical, automobile and aerospace engineering.

  10. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950 0 C (1562 to 1742 0 F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required

  11. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-12

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha -1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha -1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results

  12. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-01

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha-1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha-1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results suggest

  13. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium; Mesure des constantes elastiques a haute temperature application au plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu{sub {delta}} and Pu{sub {epsilon}}. E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (author) [French] Nous decrivons un appareil qui permet de mesurer les constantes elastiques (module de Young et module de Poisson) jusqu'a 700 deg. C a partir des frequences de resonance de barreaux cylindriques. Nous avons plus specialement etudie le plutonium et determine pour la premiere fois a notre connaissance le module de Young des phases {delta} et {epsilon}: E{sub {delta}} 360 deg. C = 1.6 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}; E{sub {epsilon}} 490 deg. C = 1.1 10{sup 11} dy/cm{sup 2}, {sigma}{sub {epsilon}} = 0.25 {+-} 0.03 Nos mesures nous ont permis de calculer la compressibilite, la temperature de Debye, la constante de Gruneisen et la chaleur specifique electronique de Pu{sub {epsilon}}. (auteur)

  14. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  15. Current Status of the Elevated Temperature Structure Design Codes for VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Bum; Kim, Seok-Hoon; Park, Keun-Bae; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    An elevated temperature structure design and analysis is one of the key issues in the VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) project to achieve an economic production of hydrogen which will be an essential energy source for the near future. Since the operating temperature of a VHTR is above 850 .deg. C, the existing code and standards are insufficient for a high temperature structure design. Thus the issues concerning a material selection and behaviors are being studied for the main structural components of a VHTR in leading countries such as US, France, UK, and Japan. In this study, the current status of the ASME code, French RCC-MR, UK R5, and Japanese code were investigated and the necessary R and D items were discussed

  16. Advanced composite design data for spacecraft structural applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskins, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to investigate the long-term effects of space environment on the mechanical properties and thermal expansion of two graphite/epoxy materials: T300/934, a high-strength system with a 350 F capability, and GY70/X30, an ultra-high-modulus system used for high-stiffness and thermally stable applications. The effects of space environment were simulated by exposing the materials to three levels of uniform radiation. Changes in mechanical properties due to radiation were small, except at high temperatures. Since radiation clearly lowered the glass transition temperature below the upper test temperature, both tensile and shear strengths were lowered at the elevated temperatures. There was also some indication that the lower radiation levels may even improve the mechanical properties, which however needs further investigation

  17. Research Trends on Defect and Life Assessment of High Temperature Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Lee Jae Han

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the analysis on the state-of-the-art research trends on defect assessment and life evaluation of high temperature structure based on the papers presented in the two international conferences of ASME PVP 2007 / CREEP 8 which was held in 2007 and ICFDSM VI(International Conference on Fatigue Damage of Structural Materials VI) which was held in 2006

  18. Lithium-ion battery structure that self-heats at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Xu, Terrence; Ji, Yan; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Leng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer severe power loss at temperatures below zero degrees Celsius, limiting their use in applications such as electric cars in cold climates and high-altitude drones. The practical consequences of such power loss are the need for larger, more expensive battery packs to perform engine cold cranking, slow charging in cold weather, restricted regenerative braking, and reduction of vehicle cruise range by as much as 40 per cent. Previous attempts to improve the low-temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries have focused on developing additives to improve the low-temperature behaviour of electrolytes, and on externally heating and insulating the cells. Here we report a lithium-ion battery structure, the ‘all-climate battery’ cell, that heats itself up from below zero degrees Celsius without requiring external heating devices or electrolyte additives. The self-heating mechanism creates an electrochemical interface that is favourable for high discharge/charge power. We show that the internal warm-up of such a cell to zero degrees Celsius occurs within 20 seconds at minus 20 degrees Celsius and within 30 seconds at minus 30 degrees Celsius, consuming only 3.8 per cent and 5.5 per cent of cell capacity, respectively. The self-heated all-climate battery cell yields a discharge/regeneration power of 1,061/1,425 watts per kilogram at a 50 per cent state of charge and at minus 30 degrees Celsius, delivering 6.4-12.3 times the power of state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells. We expect the all-climate battery to enable engine stop-start technology capable of saving 5-10 per cent of the fuel for 80 million new vehicles manufactured every year. Given that only a small fraction of the battery energy is used for self-heating, we envisage that the all-climate battery cell may also prove useful for plug-in electric vehicles, robotics and space exploration applications.

  19. Lithium-ion battery structure that self-heats at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Guangsheng; Ge, Shanhai; Xu, Terrence; Ji, Yan; Yang, Xiao-Guang; Leng, Yongjun

    2016-01-28

    Lithium-ion batteries suffer severe power loss at temperatures below zero degrees Celsius, limiting their use in applications such as electric cars in cold climates and high-altitude drones. The practical consequences of such power loss are the need for larger, more expensive battery packs to perform engine cold cranking, slow charging in cold weather, restricted regenerative braking, and reduction of vehicle cruise range by as much as 40 per cent. Previous attempts to improve the low-temperature performance of lithium-ion batteries have focused on developing additives to improve the low-temperature behaviour of electrolytes, and on externally heating and insulating the cells. Here we report a lithium-ion battery structure, the 'all-climate battery' cell, that heats itself up from below zero degrees Celsius without requiring external heating devices or electrolyte additives. The self-heating mechanism creates an electrochemical interface that is favourable for high discharge/charge power. We show that the internal warm-up of such a cell to zero degrees Celsius occurs within 20 seconds at minus 20 degrees Celsius and within 30 seconds at minus 30 degrees Celsius, consuming only 3.8 per cent and 5.5 per cent of cell capacity, respectively. The self-heated all-climate battery cell yields a discharge/regeneration power of 1,061/1,425 watts per kilogram at a 50 per cent state of charge and at minus 30 degrees Celsius, delivering 6.4-12.3 times the power of state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells. We expect the all-climate battery to enable engine stop-start technology capable of saving 5-10 per cent of the fuel for 80 million new vehicles manufactured every year. Given that only a small fraction of the battery energy is used for self-heating, we envisage that the all-climate battery cell may also prove useful for plug-in electric vehicles, robotics and space exploration applications.

  20. The Application of High Temperature Superconducting Materials to Power Switches

    CERN Document Server

    March, S A; Ballarino, A

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting switches may find application in superconducting magnet systems that require energy extraction. Such superconducting switches could be bypass-switches that are operated in conjunction with a parallel resistor or dump-switches where all of the energy is dissipated in the switch itself. Bypass-switches are more suited to higher energy circuits as a portion of the energy can be dissipated in the external dump resistor. Dump- switches require less material and triggering energy as a lower switch resistance is needed to achieve the required total dump resistance. Both superconducting bypass-switches and superconducting dump-switches can be ther- mally activated. Switching times that are comparable to those obtained with mechanical bypass-switch systems can be achieved using a co-wound heater that is powered by a ca- pacitor discharge. Switches that have fast thermal diffusion times through the insulation can be modelled as a lumped system whereas those with slow thermal diffusion times were modelle...

  1. Characterization of commercial supercapacitors for low temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, E.; Taberna, P. L.; Azais, P.; Brégeon, L.; Simon, P.

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical characterizations at low temperature and floating tests have been performed on 600F commercial supercapacitor (SC) for acetonitrile (AN)-based and AN + methyl acetate (MA) mixed electrolytes. From -40 to +20 °C, AN electrolyte showed slightly higher capacitance than those of AN + MA mixed electrolytes (25 and 33 vol.% of MA). At -55 °C, however, AN electrolyte did not cycle at all, while MA mixed electrolyte normally cycled with a slight decrease in their capacitance. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, the whole resistance for AN-based cells at -55 °C was found to be about 10,000 times higher than that of +20 °C, while a 40-fold increase in the cell resistance was obtained for the MA mixture between 20 and -55 °C. From the results of floating tests at 2.7 V and 60 °C for 1 month, the 25 vol.% MA mixture showed no change and slight decreased but stable capacitance.

  2. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-01-01

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature

  3. Static reliability of concrete structures under extreme temperature, radiation, moisture and force loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanek, P.; Stastnik, S.; Salajka, V.; Hradil, P.; Skolar, J.; Chlanda, V.

    2003-01-01

    The contribution presents some aspects of the static reliability of concrete structures under temperature effects and under mechanical loading. The mathematical model of a load-bearing concrete structure was performed using the FEM method. The temperature field and static stress that generated states of stress were taken into account. A brief description of some aspects of evaluation of the reliability within the primary circuit concrete structures is stated. The knowledge of actual physical and mechanical characteristics and chemical composition of concrete were necessary for obtaining correct results of numerical analysis. (author)

  4. Temperature- and field-induced structural transitions in magnetic colloidal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rojas, J.; Calvo, F.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic colloidal clusters can form chain, ring, and more compact structures depending on their size. In the present investigation we examine the combined effects of temperature and external magnetic field on these configurations by means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations and a dedicated analysis based on inherent structures. Various thermodynamical, geometric, and magnetic properties are calculated and altogether provide evidence for possibly multiple structural transitions at low external magnetic field. Temperature effects are found to overcome the ordering effect of the external field, the melted stated being associated with low magnetization and a greater compactness. Tentative phase diagrams are proposed for selected sizes.

  5. Low-temperature structural phase transition in deuterated and protonated lithium acetate dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F., E-mail: schroeder@kristall.uni-frankfurt.d [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Abt. Kristallographie, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Winkler, B.; Haussuehl, E. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Institut fuer Geowissenschaften, Abt. Kristallographie, Altenhoeferallee 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Cong, P.T.; Wolf, B. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, Physikalisches Institut, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Avalos-Borja, M. [Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, A.C. Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4 seccion CP 78216, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Quilichini, M.; Hennion, B. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, CEN Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-08-15

    Heat capacity measurements of protonated lithium acetate dihydrate show a structural phase transition at T = 12 K. This finding is in contrast to earlier work, where it was thought that only the deuterated compound undergoes a low temperature structural phase transition. This finding is confirmed by low temperature ultrasound spectroscopy, where the structural phase transition is associated with a velocity decrease of the ultrasonic waves, i.e. with an elastic softening. We compare the thermodynamic properties of the protonated and deuterated compounds and discuss two alternatives for the mechanism of the phase transition based on the thermal expansion measurements.

  6. Development of a Computer Application to Simulate Porous Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Reis

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Geometric modeling is an important tool to evaluate structural parameters as well as to follow the application of stereological relationships. The obtention, visualization and analysis of volumetric images of the structure of materials, using computational geometric modeling, facilitates the determination of structural parameters of difficult experimental access, such as topological and morphological parameters. In this work, we developed a geometrical model implemented by computer software that simulates random pore structures. The number of nodes, number of branches (connections between nodes and the number of isolated parts, are obtained. Also, the connectivity (C is obtained from this application. Using a list of elements, nodes and branches, generated by the software, in AutoCAD® command line format, the obtained structure can be viewed and analyzed.

  7. Study of robust thin film PT-1000 temperature sensors for cryogenic process control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, R.; Boguhn, D.; Fillinger, H.; Schlachter, S. I.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    In some cryogenic process measurement applications, for example, in hydrogen technology and in high temperature superconductor based generators, there is a need of robust temperature sensors. These sensors should be able to measure the large temperature range of 20 - 500 K with reasonable resolution and accuracy. Thin film PT 1000 sensors could be a choice to cover this large temperature range. Twenty one sensors selected from the same production batch were tested for their temperature sensitivity which was then compared with different batch sensors. Furthermore, the sensor's stability was studied by subjecting the sensors to repeated temperature cycles of 78-525 K. Deviations in the resistance were investigated using ice point calibration and water triple point calibration methods. Also the study of directional oriented intense static magnetic field effects up to 8 Oersted (Oe) were conducted to understand its magneto resistance behaviour in the cryogenic temperature range from 77 K - 15 K. This paper reports all investigation results in detail.

  8. Influence of a Cyclic Events Configuration on a Elevated Temperature Structural Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang-Gyu; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi; Lee, Jae-Han

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear power plant generally undergoes the various types of operating events for a plant life time. The cyclic events for a life time may bring about a structural failure such as fatigue damage. The structures of the LMR(Liquid Metal Reactor) operated in a elevated temperature environment are seriously affected by a thermal deformation and strain. Therefore, the thermal transient condition is a key factor for ensuring the structural integrity for the LMR reactor structures. Since it is not easy to consider the entire operating events at the preliminary or conceptual design stage, the LMR structural integrity is evaluated with representative duty cycle events. In this study, the influence of the elevated temperature structural integrity evaluation per the combination and sequence of the duty cycle events is investigated

  9. Structural and room temperature ferromagnetic properties of Ni doped ZnO nanoparticles via low-temperature hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Changzhen, E-mail: liuchangzhen94@163.com; Chen, Rui; Fang, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Xiuling; Liu, Jie

    2016-12-01

    A series of Zn{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}O (x=0, 1%, 3%, 5%) nanoparticles have been synthesized via a low-temperature hydrothermal method. Influence of Ni doping concentration on the structure, morphology, optical properties and magnetism of the samples was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer and vibrating sample magnetometer instruments. The results show that the undoped and doped ZnO nanoparticles are both hexagonal wurtzite structures. The surface analysis was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The images of SEM reveal that the structure of pure ZnO and Ni doped samples are nanoparticles which intended to form flakes with thickness of few nanometers, being overlain with each one to develop the network with some pores and voids. Based on the ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy analysis, it indicates that the band gap energy decreases with the increasing concentration of Ni. Furthermore, The Ni doped ZnO samples didn't exhibit higher ultraviolet-light-driven photocatalytic activity compared to the undoped ZnO sample. Vibrating sample magnetometer was used for the magnetic property investigations, and the result indicates that room temperature ferromagnetism property of 3% Ni doped sample is attributed to oxygen vacancy and interaction between doped ions.

  10. RF Application of High Temperature Single Domain Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferendeci, M.

    2004-01-01

    Large single domain YBa2Cu3Ox materials have been successfully fabricated with superb RF properties by employing the seeded-melt growth (SMG) method. Commercially available Y-123 and Y-211 phase precursor powders were mixed thoroughly and pressed into various solid and cavity shapes. The solid pieces were then diced into cylindrical flat plates and polished. Following the growth procedure, the materials were then oxygenated in an oven for at least 7 days. The plates were then used as a part of a dielectric resonator cavity and the surface resistances were measured. The cavities were also tested in a closed cycle cryo cooler. The cavity resonance frequencies for the TM010 and TE111 modes, and the corresponding quality factors (Q values) were measured. From the measured Q values, the surface resistances of the cavity surfaces were calculated. Experimentally measured surface resistance values and various combinations of cavity structures for realizing highly selective RF filters will be presented

  11. High pressure and temperature induced structural and elastic properties of lutetium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriya, S.; Kinge, R.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties of rock salt to CsCl structures in semiconducting LuX (X = S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides compound have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, melting temperature TM, Hardness (HV), and young modulus (E) the LuX lattice infers mechanical stiffening, and thermal softening.

  12. A review on the electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids in nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    A mini review on the electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) in nuclear fuel cycle is presented. It is shown that how the fascinating properties of RTIL can be tuned to deliver desirable application in aqueous and non-aqueous reprocessing and in nuclear waste management. (author)

  13. High temperature, radiation hardened electronics for application to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Electronic circuits were developed and built at Sandia for many aerospace and energy systems applications. Among recent developments were high temperature electronics for geothermal well logging and radiation hardened electronics for a variety of aerospace applications. Sandia has also been active in technology transfer to commercial industry in both of these areas

  14. Some like it hot, some like it cold: Temperature dependent biotechnological applications and improvements in extremophilic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2015-12-01

    The full biotechnological exploitation of enzymes is still hampered by their low activity, low stability and high cost. Temperature-dependent catalytic properties of enzymes are a key to efficient and cost-effective translation to commercial applications. Organisms adapted to temperature extremes are a rich source of enzymes with broad ranging thermal properties which, if isolated, characterized and their structure-function-stability relationship elucidated, could underpin a variety of technologies. Enzymes from thermally-adapted organisms such as psychrophiles (low-temperature) and thermophiles (high-temperature) are a vast natural resource that is already under scrutiny for their biotechnological potential. However, psychrophilic and thermophilic enzymes show an activity-stability trade-off that necessitates the use of various genetic and chemical modifications to further improve their properties to suit various industrial applications. This review describes in detail the properties and biotechnological applications of both cold-adapted and thermophilic enzymes. Furthermore, the review critically examines ways to improve their value for biotechnology, concluding by proposing an integrated approach involving thermally-adapted, genetically and magnetically modified enzymes to make biocatalysis more efficient and cost-effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly Sensitive Reentrant Cavity-Microstrip Patch Antenna Integrated Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor for High Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reentrant cavity-microstrip patch antenna integrated wireless passive pressure sensor was proposed in this paper for high temperature applications. The reentrant cavity was analyzed from aspects of distributed model and equivalent lumped circuit model, on the basis of which an optimal sensor structure integrated with a rectangular microstrip patch antenna was proposed to better transmit/receive wireless signals. In this paper, the proposed sensor was fabricated with high temperature resistant alumina ceramic and silver metalization with weld sealing, and it was measured in a hermetic metal tank with nitrogen pressure loading. It was verified that the sensor was highly sensitive, keeping stable performance up to 300 kPa with an average sensitivity of 981.8 kHz/kPa at temperature 25°C, while, for high temperature measurement, the sensor can operate properly under pressure of 60–120 kPa in the temperature range of 25–300°C with maximum pressure sensitivity of 179.2 kHz/kPa. In practical application, the proposed sensor is used in a method called table lookup with a maximum error of 5.78%.

  16. A critical view on temperature modelling for application in weather derivatives markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Benth, Fred Espen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a stochastic model for daily average temperature. The model contains seasonality, a low-order autoregressive component and a variance describing the heteroskedastic residuals. The model is estimated on daily average temperature records from Stockholm (Sweden). By comparing the proposed model with the popular model of Campbell and Diebold (2005), we point out some important issues to be addressed when modelling the temperature for application in weather derivatives market. - Highlights: ► We present a stochastic model for daily average temperature, containing seasonality, a low-order autoregressive component and a variance describing the heteroskedastic residuals. ► We compare the proposed model with the popular model of Campbell and Diebold (2005). ► Some important issues to be addressed when modelling the temperature for application in weather derivatives market are pointed out.

  17. TiAu based shape memory alloys for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadood, Abdul; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko; Hosoda, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    TiAu (equiatomic) exhibits phase transformaion from B2 (ordered bcc) to thermo-elastic orthorhombic B19 martensite at about 875K and thus TiAu is categorized as high temperature shape memory alloy. In this study, recent research and developments related to TiAu based high temperature shape memory alloys will be discussed in the Introduction part. Then some results of our research group related to strengthening of TiAu based high temperature shape memory alloys will be presented. Potential of TiAu based shape memory alloys for high temperature shape memory materials applications will also be discussed

  18. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  19. Application of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique for the determination of the specific heat of copper nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Robertis, E.; Cosme, E.H.H.; Neves, R.S.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Campos, A.P.C.; Landi, S.M.; Achete, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry technique to measure specific heat of copper nanofluids by using the ASTM E2719 standard procedure, which is generally applied to thermally stable solids and liquids. The one-step method of preparation of copper nanofluid samples is described. The synthesized nanoparticles were separated from the base fluid and examined by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy in order to evaluate their structure, morphology and chemical nature. The presence of copper nanoparticles in the base fluid alters the characteristics of crystallization and melting processes and reduces the specific heat values of nanofluids in the whole studied temperature range. - Highlights: ► Copper nanofluids prepared by one-step method. ► Methodology of synthesis improved nanofluid stability. ► Specific heat determinations using modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry. ► Good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  20. Effect of curing conditions on the dimensional and thermal stability of calcium phosphate cement for elevated temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, Johan [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium); Rahier, Hubert [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Research Group of Physical Chemistry and Polymer Sciences, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium); Wastiels, Jan, E-mail: Jan.Wastiels@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Mechanics of Materials and Constructions, Pleinlaan 2, Brussels 1050 (Belgium)

    2014-12-15

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are attractive materials for elevated temperature applications, like moulds to process thermoplastics up to 300 °C. The CPC resulting from the reaction of wollastonite with phosphoric acid cured at room temperature however contains hydrated phases like brushite, and is thus not stable when exposed to temperatures above 200 °C. A non-contact method based on digital image correlation demonstrated that isothermal curing at 60 °C reduces the thermal shrinkage up to 300 °C by 25%. This curing method results in the direct formation of the more stable monetite in a shorter curing time. The correlated results of TGA, pH of the filtration water, and DSC analysis on partially cured material indicate this. XRD diffractograms and SEM images in combination with EDX show the evolution of the transformation of wollastonite into monetite, and the structure and morphology of the formed material.