WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature sensors

  1. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  2. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU......) and Spencer C. Sorenson (ET). The theory which decribes in detail the overall dynamic chracteristics of the sensor was developed at IAU, DTU....

  3. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  4. Fast Air Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert

    1998-01-01

    The note documents briefly work done on a newly developed sensor for making fast temperature measurements on the air flow in the intake ports of an SI engine and in the EGR input line. The work reviewed has been carried out in close cooperation with Civ. Ing. Michael Føns, the author (IAU...

  5. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E. [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, 37150 Leon, Gto (Mexico)

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  7. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  8. Hall Sensors for Extreme Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Oszwaldowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the preparation of the first complete extreme temperature Hall sensor. This means that the extreme-temperature magnetic sensitive semiconductor structure is built-in an extreme-temperature package especially designed for that purpose. The working temperature range of the sensor extends from −270 °C to +300 °C. The extreme-temperature Hall-sensor active element is a heavily n-doped InSb layer epitaxially grown on GaAs. The magnetic sensitivity of the sensor is ca. 100 mV/T and its temperature coefficient is less than 0.04 %/K. This sensor may find applications in the car, aircraft, spacecraft, military and oil and gas industries.

  9. Flexible Temperature Sensors on Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sloma

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present research dedicated to the elaboration of novel, miniaturized flexible temperature sensors for textronic applications. Examined sensors were manufactured on a single yarn, which ensures their high flexibility and good compatibility with textiles. Stable and linear characteristics were obtained by special technological process and applied temperature profiles. As a thermo-sensitive materials the innovative polymer compositions filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes were used. Elaborated material was adapted to printing and dip-coating techniques to produce NTC composites. Nanotube sensors were free from tensometric effect typical for other carbon-polymer sensor, and demonstrated TCR of 0.13%/K. Obtained temperature sensors, compatible with textile structure, can be applied in rapidly developing smart textiles and be used for health and protections purposes.

  10. Battery system with temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  11. Flexible Temperature Sensors on Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Sibinski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Malgorzata; Sloma, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present research dedicated to the elaboration of novel, miniaturized flexible temperature sensors for textronic applications. Examined sensors were manufactured on a single yarn, which ensures their high flexibility and good compatibility with textiles. Stable and linear characteristics were obtained by special technological process and applied temperature profiles. As a thermo-sensitive materials the innovative polymer compositions filled with multiwalled carbon n...

  12. Embedded Temperature-Change Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Thakoor, Anil; Karmon, Dan

    1995-01-01

    Transducers sensitive to rates of change of temperature embedded in integrated circuits and discrete electronic components damaged by overheating, according to proposal. Used to detect onset of rapid heating and to trigger shutoffs of power or other corrective actions before temperatures rise beyond safe limits. Sensors respond fast and reliably to incipient overheating because they are in direct thermal contact with vulnerable circuit elements.

  13. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  14. Multiple Waveband Temperature Sensor (MWTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath; Wilson, Daniel; Stirbl, Robert; Blea, Anthony; Harding, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Multiple Waveband Temperature Sensor (MWTS). The MWTS project will result in a highly stable, monolithically integrated, high resolution infrared detector array sensor that records registered thermal imagery in four infrared wavebands to infer dynamic temperature profiles on a laser-irradiated ground target. An accurate surface temperature measurement of a target in extreme environments in a non-intrusive manner is required. The development challenge is to: determine optimum wavebands (suitable for target temperatures, nature of the targets and environments) to measure accurate target surface temperature independent of the emissivity, integrate simultaneously readable multiband Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIPs) in a single monolithic focal plane array (FPA) sensor and to integrate the hardware/software and system calibration for remote temperature measurements. The charge was therefore to develop and demonstrate a multiband infrared imaging camera with the detectors simultaneously sensitive to multiple distinct color bands for front surface temperature measurements Wavelength ( m) measurements. Amongst the requirements are: that the measurement system will not affect target dynamics or response to the laser irradiation and that the simplest criterion for spectral band selection is to choose those practically feasible spectral bands that create the most contrast between the objects or scenes of interest in the expected environmental conditions. There is in the presentation a review of the modeling and simulation of multi-wave infrared temperature measurement and also a review of the detector development and QWIP capacities.

  15. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  16. Ultrahigh Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Robust, miniaturized sensing systems are needed to improve performance, increase efficiency, and track system health status and failure modes of advanced propulsion systems. Because microsensors must operate in extremely harsh environments, there are many technical challenges involved in developing reliable systems. In addition to high temperatures and pressures, sensing systems are exposed to oxidation, corrosion, thermal shock, fatigue, fouling, and abrasive wear. In these harsh conditions, sensors must be able to withstand high flow rates, vibration, jet fuel, and exhaust. In order for existing and future aeropropulsion turbine engines to improve safety and reduce cost and emissions while controlling engine instabilities, more accurate and complete sensor information is necessary. High-temperature (300 to 1,350 C) capacitive pressure sensors are of particular interest due to their high measurement bandwidth and inherent suitability for wireless readout schemes. The objective of this project is to develop a capacitive pressure sensor based on silicon carbon nitride (SiCN), a new class of high-temperature ceramic materials, which possesses excellent mechanical and electric properties at temperatures up to 1,600 C.

  17. Flexible Multiplexed Surface Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, L. A.; Johnson, Preston B.; Ash, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Unitary array of sensors measures temperatures at points distributed over designated area on surface. Useful in measuring surface temperatures of aerodynamic models and thermally controlled objects. Made of combination of integrated-circuit microchips and film circuitry. Temperature-sensing chips scanned at speeds approaching 10 kHz. Operating range minus 40 degrees C to 120 degrees C. Flexibility of array conforms to curved surfaces. Multiplexer eliminates numerous monitoring cables. Control of acquisition and recording of data effected by connecting array to microcomputers via suitable interface circuitry.

  18. Smart temperature sensors in standard CMOS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makinwa, K.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A smart temperature sensor is an integrated system consisting of a temperature sensor, its bias circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). When manufactured in CMOS technology, such sensors have found widespread use due to their low cost, small size and ease of use. In this paper the basic

  19. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  20. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  1. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  2. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay GORBACHUK; Mikhail LARIONOV; Aleksey FIRSOV; Nikolay SHATIL

    2014-01-01

    Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors) make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resis...

  3. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  4. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-10-25

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  5. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  6. Flexible PVDF ferroelectric capacitive temperature sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Naveed

    2015-08-02

    In this paper, a capacitive temperature sensor based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) capacitor is explored. The PVDF capacitor is characterized below its Curie temperature. The capacitance of the PVDF capacitor changes vs temperature with a sensitivity of 16pF/°C. The linearity measurement of the capacitance-temperature relation shows less than 0.7°C error from a best fit straight line. An LC oscillator based temperature sensor is demonstrated based on this capacitor.

  7. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400°C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 lm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  8. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig, E-mail: cgerardi@anl.gov; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Distributed temperature sensors measured high-resolution liquid-sodium temperatures. • DTSs worked well up to 400 °C. • A single DTS simultaneously detected sodium level and temperature. - Abstract: Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400 °C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 μm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  9. Integrated Temperature Sensors based on Heat Diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vroonhoven, C.P.L.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the theory, design and implementation of a new class of integrated temperature sensors, based on heat diffusion. In such sensors, temperature is sensed by measuring the time it takes for heat to diffuse through silicon. An on-chip thermal delay can be determined by geometry and

  10. Optical Temperature Sensor Has Digital Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K.; Quick, W.; Strahan, V. H.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument measures temperature reliabily and accurately. Device uses Fabry-Perot multiple-beam sensor. Both temperature sensor and optical lines are free of all electrical and electromagnetic effects and interference. Variation in spacer is made sensitive to other physical quantities, such as pressure. Sensing element itself is quite small, enhancing use in confined areas.

  11. Calibration of an ingestible temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A P; Stewart, I B

    2008-11-01

    An ingestible telemetric sensor for measuring core body temperature is increasingly being utilized in occupational and athletic studies of heat strain. There is a need for a uniform method of calibrating these sensors in the scientific community in order to effectively compare the results of different researchers. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine and present such a calibration procedure. Sensors were placed in a water bath heated to nine discrete temperatures, and the recorded values were compared to that of a traceable thermometer. It was observed that sensor 2 recorded temperatures higher than sensors 1 and 3, and that all sensors were higher than the traceable thermometer, highlighting the need for a calibration procedure. The findings of this study suggest a number of recommendations for a calibration procedure including: (1) four water bath temperatures in the range of 33-41 degrees C should be utilized; (2) sensors should be immersed for a minimum of 4 min prior to taking a measurement; (3) a linear regression relating sensor temperature to a traceable thermometer is an appropriate method to adjust raw data. Switching the sensor off after calibration and reactivating it prior to ingestion will not influence the accuracy of temperature measurement.

  12. Temperature Sensors Integrated into a CMOS Image Sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abarca Prouza, A.N.; Xie, S.; Markenhof, Jules; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a novel approach is presented for measuring relative temperature variations inside the pixel array of a CMOS image sensor itself. This approach can give important information when compensation for dark (current) fixed pattern noise (FPN) is needed. The test image sensor consists of

  13. Temperature control of micro heater using Pt thin film temperature sensor embedded in micro gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jun-gu; Park, Joon-Shik; Park, Kwang-Bum; Shin, Junho; Lee, Eung-An; Noh, Sangsoo; Lee, Hoo-Jeong

    2017-12-01

    Pt thin film temperature sensors (Pt T sensors) are embedded in micro gas sensors to measure and control the working temperature. We characterized electrical resistances of Pt T sensors and micro heaters with temperature changing in the oven and by Joule heating. In order to enhance the accuracy of temperature measurement by the Pt T sensors, we investigated the correlation among the Pt T sensor, micro heater, and the working temperature, which was linear proportional relation expressed as the equation: T2 = 6.466R1-642.8, where T2 = temperature of the Pt micro heater and R1 = the electrical resistance of the Pt T sensor. As the error by physically separated gap between Pt T sensor and micro heater calibrated, measuring and controlling temperature of micro heater in micro gas sensors were possible through the Pt T sensors. For the practical use of Pt T sensor in micro gas sensor, the gas sensing properties of fabricated micro gas sensors to 25 ppm CO and 1 ppm HCHO gases were characterized.

  14. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  15. Semiconductor Sensors for a Wide Temperature Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay GORBACHUK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prototype sensors are described that are applicable for pressure, position, temperature, and field measurements in the temperature range of 4.2 to 300 K. The strain gauges utilize the silicon substrate and thin film technology. The tensosensitivity of strain sensors is 40 µV/mln-1 or better depending on metrological characteristics of semiconductor films, orientation, and current. The temperature sensors (thermistors make use of the germanium powder bulk. The temperature coefficient of resistance is within 50-100 % /K at 4.2 K. The magnetic field sensors use GaAs films that offer weak temperature dependence of parameters at high sensitivity (up to 300-400 mV/T.

  16. Surface-mount sapphire interferometric temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizheng; Wang, Anbo

    2006-08-01

    A fiber-optic high-temperature sensor is demonstrated by bonding a 45°-polished single-crystal sapphire fiber on the surface of a sapphire wafer, whose optical thickness is temperature dependent and measured by white-light interferometry. A novel adhesive-free coupling between the silica and sapphire fibers is achieved by fusion splicing, and its performance is characterized. The sensor's interference signal is investigated for its dependence on angular alignment between the fiber and the wafer. A prototype sensor is tested to 1170 °C with a resolution of 0.4 °C, demonstrating excellent potential for high-temperature measurement.

  17. Wirelessly Interrogated Wear or Temperature Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2010-01-01

    Sensors for monitoring surface wear and/or temperature without need for wire connections have been developed. Excitation and interrogation of these sensors are accomplished by means of a magnetic-field-response recorder. In a sensor of the present type as in the previously reported ones, the capacitance and, thus, the resonance frequency, varies as a known function of the quantity of interest that one seeks to determine. Hence, the resonance frequency is measured and used to calculate the quantity of interest.

  18. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Brauns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (<150 ms was developed. Operation with modulated temperature allows analysis of the signal spectrum with advanced information content, based on the Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal.

  19. Micro string resonators as temperature sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T.; Schmid, S.; Boisen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The resonance frequency of strings is highly sensitive to temperature. In this work we have investigated the applicability of micro string resonators as temperature sensors. The resonance frequency of strings is a function of the tensile stress which is coupled to temperature by the thermal...... to the low thermal mass of the strings. A temperature resolution of 2.5×10-4 °C has been achieved with silicon nitride strings. The theoretical limit for the temperature resolution of 8×10-8 °C has not been reached yet and requires further improvement of the sensor....

  20. High temperature sensors for exhaust diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningstorp, Henrik

    2000-07-01

    One of the largest problems that we will have to deal with on this planet this millennium is to stop the pollution of our environment. In many of the ongoing works to reduce toxic emissions, gas sensors capable of enduring rough environments and high temperatures, would be a great tool. The different applications where sensors like this would be useful vary between everything from online measurement in the paper industry and food industry to measurement in the exhaust pipe of a car. In my project we have tested Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensor as gas sensors operating at high temperatures. The measurement condition in the exhaust pipe of a car is extremely tough, not only is the temperature high and the different gases quite harmful, there are also a lot of particles that can affect the sensors in an undesirable way. In my project we have been testing Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensors based on SiC as high temperature sensors, both in the laboratory with simulated exhaust and after a real engine. In this thesis we conclude that these sensors can work in the hostile environment of an engines exhaust. It is shown that when measuring in a gas mixture with a fixed I below one, where the I-value is controlled by the O{sub 2} concentration, a sensor with a catalytic gate metal as sensitive material respond more to the increased O{sub 2} concentration than the increased HC concentration when varying the two correspondingly. A number of different sensors have been tested in simulated exhaust towards NO{sub x}. It was shown that resistivity changes in the thin gate metal influenced the gas response. Tests have been performed where sensors were a part of a SCR system with promising results concerning NH{sub 3} sensitivity. With a working temperature of 300 deg C there is no contamination of the metal surface.

  1. Optical Temperature Sensor For Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossey, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    New design promises accuracy even in presence of contamination. Improved sensor developed to measure gas temperatures up to 1,700 degree C in gas-turbine engines. Sensor has conical shape for mechanical strengths and optical configuration insensitive to deposits of foreign matter on sides of cone.

  2. Ion Based High-Temperature Pressure Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zdenek, Jeffrey S; Anthenien, Ralph A

    2004-01-01

    .... The environment encountered in such engines necessitates high temperature and durable (vibration resistant) devices. Traditional pressure sensors can be used, however thermal insulating materials must be used to protect the diaphragm...

  3. High Temperature Characterization of Ceramic Pressure Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fonseca, Michael A; English, Jennifer M; Von Arx, Martin; Allen, Mark G

    2001-01-01

    This work reports functional wireless ceramic micromachined pressure sensors operating at 450 C, with demonstrated materials and readout capability indicating potential extension to temperatures in excess of 600 C...

  4. High Temperature, Wireless Seismometer Sensor for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Taylor, Brandt; Beard, Steve; Meredith, Roger D.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter Gary W.; Kiefer, Walter S.

    2012-01-01

    Space agency mission plans state the need to measure the seismic activity on Venus. Because of the high temperature on Venus (462? C average surface temperature) and the difficulty in placing and wiring multiple sensors using robots, a high temperature, wireless sensor using a wide bandgap semiconductor is an attractive option. This paper presents the description and proof of concept measurements of a high temperature, wireless seismometer sensor for Venus. A variation in inductance of a coil caused by the movement of an aluminum probe held in the coil and attached to a balanced leaf-spring seismometer causes a variation of 700 Hz in the transmitted signal from the oscillator/sensor system at 426? C. This result indicates that the concept may be used on Venus.

  5. Pengujian Kehandalan LM 35 Sebagai Sensor Temperatur

    OpenAIRE

    Nainggolan, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Pada Tugas Akhir ini Penulis membahas masalah yang berjudul “Pengujian Kehandalan LM 35 Sebagai Sensor Temperatur”. Alat ini berfungsi untuk mengukur temperature suhu yang ada di dalam ruangan. Dalam hal ini simulasi dilakukan dengan menggunakan Mikrokontroller ATMega 8535, sensor suhu LM 35, PSA, Seven Segment. Pada pengujian kali ini, penulis ingin melihat seberapa besar keakuratan LM 35 dalam mengukur temperatur suhu pada bahan pengujian dengan menganalisis air raksa, ter...

  6. Optical Ring Resonator Based Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addya, Subhankar; Dey, Sabitabrata; Mandal, Sanjoy

    2017-12-01

    Temperature sensor based on optical ring resonator has been demonstrated with its constituent material as silicon (Si-fiber) and germanium (Ge-fiber) in this work. It has been done through optical delay line signal processing technique in Z-domain. The group indices of both the materials vary with the change in temperature due to the thermo-optic effect in materials. Thus temperature dependence of free spectral range forms the basis of modeling the sensors. Silicon (Si) fiber based optical sensor can sense the temperature in the range 30-500 °C and that for germanium (Ge) fiber the range is -25 to 300 °C. Obtained temperature sensitivities for Ge and Si-fibers are 5.55 and 2.97 MHz/°C respectively.

  7. Comparison of neonatal skin sensor temperatures with axillary temperature: does skin sensor placement really matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Dorothea; Boogaart, Sheri; Johnson, Lynette; Keezel, Catherine; Ruperts, Liga; Vander Laan, Karen J

    2014-02-01

    Appropriate thermoregulation affects both morbidity and mortality in the neonatal setting. Nurses rely on information from temperature sensors and radiant warmers or incubators to appropriately maintain a neonate's body temperature. Skin temperature sensors must be repositioned to prevent skin irritation and breakdown. This study addresses whether there is a significant difference between skin sensor temperature readings from 3 locations on the neonate and whether there is a significant difference between skin sensor temperatures compared with digital axillary temperatures. The study participants included 36 hemodynamically stable neonates, with birth weight of 750 g or more and postnatal age of 15 days or more, in a neonatal intensive care unit. Gestational age ranged from 29.6 to 36.1 weeks at the time of data collection. A method-comparison design was used to evaluate the level of agreement between skin sensor temperatures and digital axillary thermometer measurements. When the neonate's skin sensor was scheduled for routine site change, 3 new skin sensors were placed-1 each on the right upper abdomen, left flank, and right axilla. The neonate was placed in a supine position and redressed or rewrapped if previously dressed or wrapped. Subjects served as their own controls, with temperatures measured at all 3 skin sensor sites and followed by a digital thermometer measurement in the left axilla. The order of skin sensor temperature measurements was randomly assigned by a computer-generated number sequence. An analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to test for statistical differences between the skin sensor temperatures. The difference in axillary and skin sensor temperatures was calculated by subtracting the reference standard temperature (digital axillary) from the test temperatures (skin temperatures at 3 different locations), using the Bland-Altman method. The level of significance was set at P temperature readings obtained from the 3 sites (F2

  8. Sensors for low temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  9. Precision bridge circuit using a temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A precision bridge measurement circuit connected to a current source providing a linear output voltage versus resistance change of a variable resistance (resistance temperature transducer) including a voltage follower in one branch of the bridge so that the zero setting of the transducer resistance does not depend upon the current source or upon an excitation voltage. The zero setting depends only on the precision and stability of the three resistances. By connecting the output of an instrumentation amplifier to a feedback resistor and then to the output of the voltage follower, minor nonlinearities in the resistance-vs-temperature output of a resistance-temperature transducer, such as a platinum temperature sensor, may be corrected. Sensors which have nonlinearity opposite in polarity to platinum, such as nickel-iron sensors, may be linearized by inserting an inverting amplifier into the feedback loop.

  10. Thick Film Temperature Sensors Using Standard Pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Janoska, I.; Haskard, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Standard thick film resistor pastes exhibit changes in their electrical characteristics when printed on top of dielectric layers. Of particular interest is the inherent change in their temperature coefficient of resistance. Simple temperature sensors were formed by deliberately printing thick film resistor pastes on top of larger area dielectric layers. Temperature tests carried out on these devices have shown that by selecting the correct paste combination and resistor aspect ratio ...

  11. 1700 deg C optical temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossey, P. W.; Shaffernocker, W. M.; Mulukutla, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new gas temperature sensor was developed that shows promise of sufficient ruggedness to be useful as a gas turbine temperature sensor. The sensor is in the form of a single-crystal aluminum oxide ceramic, ground to a cone shape and given an emissive coating. A lens and an optical fiber conduct the thermally emitted light to a remote and near-infrared photodetector assembly. Being optically coupled and passive, the sensor is highly immune to all types of electrical interference. Candidate sensors were analyzed for optical sensor performance, heat transfer characteristics, stress from gas loading. This led to the selection of the conical shape as the most promising for the gas turbine environment. One uncoated and two coated sensing elements were prepared for testing. Testing was conducted to an indicated 1750 C in a propane-air flame. Comparison with the referee optical pyrometer shows an accuracy of + or - 25 C at 1700 C for this initial development. One hundred cycles from room temperature to 1700 C left the sapphire cone intact, but some loss of the platinum, 6% rhodium coating was observed. Several areas for improving the overall performance and durability are identified.

  12. Improved Optical-Fiber Temperature Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Robert S.; Egalon, Claudio O.

    1993-01-01

    In optical-fiber temperature sensors of proposed type, phosphorescence and/or fluorescence in temperature-dependent coating layers coupled to photodetectors. Phosphorescent and/or fluorescent behavior(s) of coating material(s) depend on temperature; coating material or mixture of materials selected so one can deduce temperature from known temperature dependence of phosphorescence and/or fluorescence spectrum, and/or characteristic decay of fluorescence. Basic optical configuration same as that of optical-fiber chemical detectors described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Detectors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525).

  13. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  14. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  15. Electrochemical high-temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruhan, B.; Stranzenbach, M.; Yüce, A.; Gönüllü, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Combustion produced common air pollutant, NOx associates with greenhouse effects. Its high temperature detection is essential for protection of nature. Component-integration capable high-temperature sensors enable the control of combustion products. The requirements are quantitative detection of total NOx and high selectivity at temperatures above 500°C. This study reports various approaches to detect NO and NO2 selectively under lean and humid conditions at temperatures from 300°C to 800°C. All tested electrochemical sensors were fabricated in planar design to enable componentintegration. We suggest first an impedance-metric gas sensor for total NOx-detection consisting of NiO- or NiCr2O4-SE and PYSZ-electrolyte. The electrolyte-layer is about 200μm thickness and constructed of quasi-single crystalline columns. The sensing-electrode (SE) is magnetron sputtered thin-layers of NiO or NiCr2O4. Sensor sensitivity for detection of total NOx has been measured by applying impedance analysis. The cross-sensitivity to other emission gases such as CO, CO2, CH4 and oxygen (5 vol.%) has been determined under 0-1000ppm NO. Sensor maintains its high sensitivity at temperatures up to 550°C and 600°C, depending on the sensing-electrode. NiO-SE yields better selectivity to NO in the presence of oxygen and have shorter response times comparing to NiCr2O4-SE. For higher temperature NO2-sensing capability, a resistive DC-sensor having Al-doped TiO2-sensing layers has been employed. Sensor-sensitivity towards NO2 and cross-sensitivity to CO has been determined in the presence of H2O at temperatures 600°C and 800°C. NO2 concentrations varying from 25 to 100ppm and CO concentrations from 25 to 75ppm can be detected. By nano-tubular structuring of TiO2, NO2 sensitivity of the sensor was increased.

  16. Optimize Etching Based Single Mode Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ajay Kumar; Dr. Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    ...) optic sensors in specified constant time and temperature. We propose a single mode optical fiber based temperature sensor, where the temperature sensing region is obtained by etching its cladding diameter over small length to a critical value...

  17. Integrated Shear Stress/Temperature Micromachined Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    During this project we were able to design and initiate the fabrication of an integrated Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based shear stress/temperature sensor for flow control applications. A brief summary of the completed activities during this project is presented.

  18. [Thinking and status of research on acupoint temperature sensor needle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Yang, Hua-yuan; Liu, Tang-yi; Gao, Ming; Hu, Yin-e

    2010-09-01

    ABSTRACT Based on acupoint temperature sensor needle related literatures, the development and the applications of temperature sensor needle and the measuring instrument which is used for measuring the temperature of acupoints are introduced in the present paper. This paper summarizes the basic structure and measuring principle of temperature sensor needle; it also summarizes the hardware and measuring procedures of the measuring instrument. According to the characteristics of the temperature sensor needle, this paper states its broad applications and development trend.

  19. Fiber Bragg Grating Filter High Temperature Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Brass, Eric D.; Pencil, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a scaled-down method for determining high temperatures using fiber-based Bragg gratings. Bragg gratings are distributed along the length of the optical fiber, and have high reflectivities whenever the optical wavelength is twice the grating spacing. These spatially distinct Bragg regions (located in the core of a fiber) are sensitive to local temperature changes. Since these fibers are silica-based they are easily affected by localized changes in temperature, which results in changes to both the grating spacing and the wavelength reflectivity. We exploit the shift in wavelength reflectivity to measure the change in the local temperature. Note that the Bragg region (sensing area) is some distance away from where the temperature is being measured. This is done so that we can measure temperatures that are much higher than the damage threshold of the fiber. We do this by affixing the fiber with the Bragg sensor to a material with a well-known coefficient of thermal expansion, and model the heat gradient from the region of interest to the actual sensor. The research described in this paper will culminate in a working device as well as be the second portion of a publication pending submission to Optics Letters.

  20. Ultra-High Temperature Distributed Wireless Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Russell; Rumpf, Raymond; Coggin, John; Davis, Williams; Yang, Taeyoung; O' Donnell, Alan; Bresnahan, Peter

    2013-03-31

    Research was conducted towards the development of a passive wireless sensor for measurement of temperature in coal gasifiers and coal-fired boiler plants. Approaches investigated included metamaterial sensors based on guided mode resonance filters, and temperature-sensitive antennas that modulate the frequency of incident radio waves as they are re-radiated by the antenna. In the guided mode resonant filter metamaterial approach, temperature is encoded as changes in the sharpness of the filter response, which changes with temperature because the dielectric loss of the guided mode resonance filter is temperature-dependent. In the mechanically modulated antenna approach, the resonant frequency of a vibrating cantilever beam attached to the antenna changes with temperature. The vibration of the beam perturbs the electrical impedance of the antenna, so that incident radio waves are phase modulated at a frequency equal to the resonant frequency of the vibrating beam. Since the beam resonant frequency depends on temperature, a Doppler radar can be used to remotely measure the temperature of the antenna. Laboratory testing of the guided mode resonance filter failed to produce the spectral response predicted by simulations. It was concluded that the spectral response was dominated by spectral reflections of radio waves incident on the filter. Laboratory testing of the mechanically modulated antenna demonstrated that the device frequency shifted incident radio waves, and that the frequency of the re-radiated waves varied linearly with temperature. Radio wave propagation tests in the convection pass of a small research boiler plant identified a spectral window between 10 and 13 GHz for low loss propagation of radio waves in the interior of the boiler.

  1. 46 CFR 153.565 - Special requirement for temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirement for temperature sensors. 153.565... Equipment Special Requirements § 153.565 Special requirement for temperature sensors. If a cargo listed in table 1 of this part refers to this section, temperature sensors must be used to monitor the cargo pump...

  2. Differential temperature sensor system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy A. (Inventor); Yu, Nan (Inventor); Maleki, Lute (Inventor); Iltchenko, Vladimir S. (Inventor); Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Strekalov, Dmitry V. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A differential temperature sensor system and method of determining a temperature shift of an optical resonator and its surroundings are provided. The differential temperature sensor system includes a light generating device capable of generating a beam having a carrier frequency, a modulator capable of modulating the beam with a sideband frequency, and an optical resonator capable of supporting an ordinary mode and an extraordinary mode. The system includes an ordinary mode-lock setup capable of locking the carrier frequency of the beam to the ordinary mode of the optical resonator and an extraordinary mode-lock setup capable of locking the sideband frequency of the beam to the extraordinary mode of the optical resonator by providing a specific radio frequency to the modulator substantially corresponding to a frequency shift between the ordinary mode and the extraordinary mode of the optical resonator resulting from a temperature change of the optical resonator. A processor precisely calculates the differential temperature based upon the frequency shift between the ordinary mode and extraordinary mode of the optical resonator.

  3. Robust high temperature oxygen sensor electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders

    reaction kinetics. At oxygen partial pressures below 10-6 bar at 700 C, the mass transport processes dominated the response time. The response time increased with decreasing oxygen partial pressure and inlet gas flow rate. A series of porous platinum electrodes were impregnated with the ionically...... conducting gadolinium-doped cerium oxide (CGO). The addition of CGO was found to decrease the polarisation resistance of the oxygen reaction by up to an order of magnitude compared with a single phase platinum electrode by increasing the effective triple phase boundary (TPB) length. It did not have any......Platinum is the most widely used material in high temperature oxygen sensor electrodes. However, platinum is expensive and the platinum electrode may, under certain conditions, suffer from poisoning, which is detrimental for an oxygen sensor. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate electrode...

  4. Modulated-splitting-ratio fiber-optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Anthan, Donald J.; Rys, John R.; Fritsch, Klaus; Ruppe, Walter A.

    1988-01-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor is described, which uses a small silicon beamsplitter whose splitting ratio varies as a function of temperature. A four-beam technique is used to measure the sensor's temperature-indicating splitting ratio. This referencing method provides a measurement that is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's optical fiber link. A significant advantage of this sensor, relative to other fiber-optic sensors, is its high stability, which permits the fiber-optic components to be readily substituted, thereby simplifying the sensor's installation and maintenance.

  5. Modulated-splitting-ratio fiber-optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Anthan, Donald J.; Rys, John R.; Fritsch, Klaus; Ruppe, Walter R.

    1989-06-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor is described that uses a small silicon beamsplitter whose splitting ratio varies as a function of temperature. A four-beam technique is used to measure the sensor's temperature-indicating splitting ratio. This referencing method provides a measurement that is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's optical fiber link. A significant advantage of this sensor, relative to other fiber-optic sensors, is its high stability, which permits the fiber-optic components to be readily substituted, thereby simplifying the sensor's installation and maintenance.

  6. Temperature compensation of the SAW yarn tension sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenke; Feng, Yang; Zhu, Changchun; Zheng, Jianli

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the possibility of the temperature compensation for the surface acoustic wave (SAW) yarn tension sensor. The motivation for this work was prompted by the oscillation frequency of the SAW yarn tension sensor varying with the temperature. In this paper, we deduce the functional relationship between the temperature variation and the oscillation frequency shift caused by the temperature. This functional relationship and the temperature sensor are used to get the oscillation frequency shift caused by the temperature, so that we can use the oscillation frequency shift caused by the temperature to implement the temperature compensation of the SAW yarn tension sensor. In this paper, we also get the relative error of the temperature compensation. The theoretical and experimental results confirm that this temperature compensation method can implement the temperature compensation of the SAW yarn tension sensor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Precision radiometric surface temperature (PRST) sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, James T.; Roberts, Carson; Bodkin, Andrew; Sundberg, Robert; Beaven, Scott; Weinheimer, Jeffrey

    2013-05-01

    There is a need for a Precision Radiometric Surface Temperature (PRST) measurement capability that can achieve noncontact profiling of a sample's surface temperature when heated dynamically during laser processing, aerothermal heating or metal cutting/machining. Target surface temperature maps within and near the heated spot provide critical quantitative diagnostic data for laser-target coupling effectiveness and laser damage assessment. In the case of metal cutting, this type of measurement provides information on plastic deformation in the primary shear zone where the cutting tool is in contact with the workpiece. The challenge in these cases is to measure the temperature of a target while its surface's temperature and emissivity are changing rapidly and with incomplete knowledge of how the emissivity and surface texture (scattering) changes with temperature. Bodkin Design and Engineering, LLC (BDandE), with partners Spectral Sciences, Inc. (SSI) and Space Computer Corporation (SCC), has developed a PRST Sensor that is based on a hyperspectral MWIR imager spanning the wavelength range 2-5 μm and providing a hyperspectral datacube of 20-24 wavelengths at 60 Hz frame rate or faster. This imager is integrated with software and algorithms to extract surface temperature from radiometric measurements over the range from ambient to 2000K with a precision of 20K, even without a priori knowledge of the target's emissivity and even as the target emissivity may be changing with time and temperature. In this paper, we will present a description of the PRST system as well as laser heating test results which show the PRST system mapping target surface temperatures in the range 600-2600K on a variety of materials.

  8. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-09-25

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and reduction of drift due to aging for a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. The offset voltage signal generated by each magnetic field sensor is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  9. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensor for Harsh Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wireless Sensor Technologies has for several years been developing a passive Wireless Temperature Sensor (WTS) for gas turbine engine and other harsh environment...

  10. Use of Polythiophene as a Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. KELKAR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The polythiophene was chemically synthesized using 2,5–dibromothiophene by debromination with magnesium, catalyzed by nickel chloride. The synthesized polymer was undoped using liquid ammonia and then doped again using 5 % aqueous FeCl3 for 2.5 and 5 hour duration. Characterization of undoped as well as doped samples using elemental analysis has been carried out. Elemental analysis shows that concentration of Fe+ ions increases as the duration of doping increases. All samples were pressed into pellets of about 1cm in diameter and were coated, on both sides, by aluminum using vacuum deposition technique. I – V measurements of undoped and FeCl3 doped samples, after coating have been carried out using two probe method. I – V measurements were carried out by applying +ve potential on one side from 0 V to 1 V in steps of 0.1 V and then from 1 V to 10 V in steps of 1 V. The measurements were again carried out after interchanging the polarity of the applied voltage. I – V measurements were also carried out at room temperature as well as at various temperatures in the range from 301 K to 331 K in steps of 5K. These characteristics are just similar to the characteristics of conventional p – n junction diode. The effect of doping is to reduce the knee voltage. I – V characteristics of undoped polythiophene after interchanging the polarity (like reverse bias condition in p–n junction diode at various temperature are plotted. From the graphs it is observed that the magnitude of current increases as temperature is increased. A straight line graph of temperature versus current for an applied voltage of 3 V indicates that undoped polythiophene can be used as temperature sensor in the temperature range from 301 K to 331 K.

  11. Photonic Crystal Fiber Sensors for Strain and Temperature Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Ju; Wei Jin

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the applications of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) for strain and temperature measurement. Long-period grating sensors and in-fiber modal interferometric sensors are described and compared with their conventional single-mode counterparts. The strain sensitivities of the air-silica PCF sensors are comparable or higher than those implemented in conventional single-mode fibers but the temperature sensitivities of the PCF sensors are much lower.

  12. Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  13. Photonic Crystal Fiber Sensors for Strain and Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ju

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the applications of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs for strain and temperature measurement. Long-period grating sensors and in-fiber modal interferometric sensors are described and compared with their conventional single-mode counterparts. The strain sensitivities of the air-silica PCF sensors are comparable or higher than those implemented in conventional single-mode fibers but the temperature sensitivities of the PCF sensors are much lower.

  14. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR PRECISE CALIBRATION OF TEMPERATURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Solovyev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A calibration technique for cryogenic temperature sensors is proposed and implemented. The experimental setup is based on the helium cryogenerator, providing calibration of the temperature sensors of various types in wide temperature range, including cryogenic band (25-100K. A condensation thermometer with hydrogen, neon, argon and xenon as working gases is used as a reference sensor. The experimental setup was successfully used for precise (0.1K precision calibration of platinum resistive temperature detectors (Pt-100 for international nuclear physics experiments MuSun and PolFusion. The setup can also be used for calibration of temperature sensors of the other types.

  15. Encapsulation for smart textile electronics - humidity and temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Tran, Thanh-Nam; Aasmundtveit, Knut E; Seeberg, Trine M

    2015-01-01

    A combined humidity and temperature sensor was packaged by vacuum casting onto three different types of textiles; cotton, nylon and a waterproof fabric. This was done in order to integrate the sensor in a jacket in a soft and reliable way without changing the sensor performance. A membrane was custom made and integrated into the device to protect the sensor from the environment. The packaged sensors performance was characterized in a climate chamber were the relative humidity and temperature ranged from 25 % to 95 % and -10 °C to 75 °C respectively. The packaged sensors showed insignificant to limited performance degradation.

  16. 40 CFR 1065.215 - Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sensors, and dewpoint sensors. 1065.215 Section 1065.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Measurement of Engine Parameters and Ambient Conditions § 1065.215 Pressure transducers, temperature sensors, and dewpoint sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified in this section to measure...

  17. 46 CFR 153.440 - Cargo temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo temperature sensors. 153.440 Section 153.440 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS... Temperature Control Systems § 153.440 Cargo temperature sensors. (a) Except as prescribed in paragraph (c) of...

  18. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  19. Gallium Oxide Nanostructures for High Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chintalapalle, Ramana V. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Gallium oxide (Ga2O3) thin films were produced by sputter deposition by varying the substrate temperature (Ts) in a wide range (Ts=25-800 °C). The structural characteristics and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films were evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of growth temperature is significant on the chemistry, crystal structure and morphology of Ga2O3 films. XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the Ga2O3 films grown at lower temperatures were amorphous while those grown at Ts≥500 oC were nanocrystalline. RBS measurements indicate the well-maintained stoichiometry of Ga2O3 films at Ts=300-800 °C. The electronic structure determination indicated that the nanocrystalline Ga2O3films exhibit a band gap of ~5 eV. Tungsten (W) incorporated Ga2O3 films were produced by co-sputter deposition. W-concentration was varied by the applied sputtering-power. No secondary phase formation was observed in W-incorporated Ga2O3 films. W-induced effects were significant on the structure and electronic properties of Ga2O3 films. The band gap of Ga2O3 films without W-incorporation was ~5 eV. Oxygen sensor characteristics evaluated using optical and electrical methods indicate a faster response in W-doped Ga2O3 films compared to intrinsic Ga2O3 films. The results demonstrate the applicability of both intrinsic and W-doped Ga-oxide films for oxygen sensor application at temperatures ≥700 °C.

  20. A systematic performance evaluation of brain and body temperature sensors using ultra-stable temperature references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, G; Childs, C

    2010-04-01

    The impact of a rise in the temperature of the human brain in patients who have suffered cerebral damage is not completely understood. Current studies are ambiguous; some show that a high brain temperature, and others a low brain temperature, is an indicator of poor prognosis. The reported effect is often very subtle, at the temperature sensor. This study investigates the first of these issues, i.e. the performance of the sensor. Here performance validation is undertaken for three commonly used temperature sensors for brain and body temperature measurement, using ultra-stable temperature references. At body temperature all three sensor types performed within manufacturer's specifications. Given that only a small number of temperature sensors were tested, the indication is that, provided the sensors are located correctly, the small observed differences in temperature are real - though the issue of clinical significance is still to be addressed.

  1. Development of metamaterial based low cost passive wireless temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Hasanul; Shuvo, Mohammad Arif Ishtiaq; Delfin, Diego; Lin, Yirong; Choudhuri, Ahsan; Rumpf, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    Wireless passive temperature sensors are gaining increasing attention due to the ever-growing need of precise monitoring of temperature in high temperature energy conversion systems such as gas turbines and coal-based power plants. Unfortunately, the harsh environment such as high temperature and corrosive atmosphere present in these systems limits current solutions. In order to alleviate these issues, this paper presents the design, simulation, and manufacturing process of a low cost, passive, and wireless temperature sensor that can withstand high temperature and harsh environment. The temperature sensor was designed following the principle of metamaterials by utilizing Closed Ring Resonators (CRR) embedded in a dielectric matrix. The proposed wireless, passive temperature sensor behaves like an LC circuit that has a resonance frequency that depends on temperature. A full wave electromagnetic solver Ansys Ansoft HFSS was used to perform simulations to determine the optimum dimensions and geometry of the sensor unit. The sensor unit was prepared by conventional powder-binder compression method. Commercially available metal washers were used as CRR structures and Barium Titanate (BTO) was used as the dielectric materials. Response of the fabricated sensor at room temperature was analyzed using a pair of horn antenna connected with a network analyzer.

  2. Temperature Sensor Based on Ge-Doped Microstructured Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Torres-Peiró

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental mode cutoff properties of Ge-doped microstructured fibers, filled with a liquid, permit the implementation of wavelength- and amplitude-encoded temperature sensors with an ultra-high sensitivity. The cutoff wavelength changes with temperature, and the thermo-optic coefficient of the liquid determines the sensitivity of the sensor. Sensitivity as high as 25 nm/∘C is reported. In addition, simple amplitude interrogation techniques can be implemented using the same sensor heads.

  3. Automated general temperature correction method for dielectric soil moisture sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilaratne, R. G. C. Jeewantinie; Lu, Minjiao

    2017-08-01

    An effective temperature correction method for dielectric sensors is important to ensure the accuracy of soil water content (SWC) measurements of local to regional-scale soil moisture monitoring networks. These networks are extensively using highly temperature sensitive dielectric sensors due to their low cost, ease of use and less power consumption. Yet there is no general temperature correction method for dielectric sensors, instead sensor or site dependent correction algorithms are employed. Such methods become ineffective at soil moisture monitoring networks with different sensor setups and those that cover diverse climatic conditions and soil types. This study attempted to develop a general temperature correction method for dielectric sensors which can be commonly used regardless of the differences in sensor type, climatic conditions and soil type without rainfall data. In this work an automated general temperature correction method was developed by adopting previously developed temperature correction algorithms using time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements to ThetaProbe ML2X, Stevens Hydra probe II and Decagon Devices EC-TM sensor measurements. The rainy day effects removal procedure from SWC data was automated by incorporating a statistical inference technique with temperature correction algorithms. The temperature correction method was evaluated using 34 stations from the International Soil Moisture Monitoring Network and another nine stations from a local soil moisture monitoring network in Mongolia. Soil moisture monitoring networks used in this study cover four major climates and six major soil types. Results indicated that the automated temperature correction algorithms developed in this study can eliminate temperature effects from dielectric sensor measurements successfully even without on-site rainfall data. Furthermore, it has been found that actual daily average of SWC has been changed due to temperature effects of dielectric sensors with a

  4. Optical fiber voltage sensors for broad temperature ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, A. H.; Day, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the development of an optical fiber ac voltage sensor for aircraft and spacecraft applications. Among the most difficult specifications to meet for this application is a temperature stability of +/- 1 percent from -65 C to +125 C. This stability requires a careful selection of materials, components, and optical configuration with further compensation using an optical-fiber temperature sensor located near the sensing element. The sensor is a polarimetric design, based on the linear electro-optic effect in bulk Bi4Ge3O12. The temperature sensor is also polarimetric, based on the temperature dependence of the birefringence of bulk SiO2. The temperature sensor output is used to automatically adjust the calibration of the instrument.

  5. Fiber optic, Fabry-Perot high temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K.; Quick, B.

    1984-01-01

    A digital, fiber optic temperature sensor using a variable Fabry-Perot cavity as the sensor element was analyzed, designed, fabricated, and tested. The fiber transmitted cavity reflection spectra is dispersed then converted from an optical signal to electrical information by a charged coupled device (CCD). A microprocessor-based color demodulation system converts the wavelength information to temperature. This general sensor concept not only utilizes an all-optical means of parameter sensing and transmitting, but also exploits microprocessor technology for automated control, calibration, and enhanced performance. The complete temperature sensor system was evaluated in the laboratory. Results show that the Fabry-Perot temperature sensor has good resolution (0.5% of full seale), high accuracy, and potential high temperature ( 1000 C) applications.

  6. Flight Tests on a Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Sawatari, Takeo; Lin, Yuping; Elam, Kristie A.

    1998-01-01

    For aircraft engine control, one key parameter to detect on an airplane is the exhaust gas temperature (EGT). Presently, thermocouples are used to perform this measurement. These electrical sensors perform adequately; however, fully utilizing the benefits of optical sensors requires replacing electrical architectures with optical architectures. Part of this requires replacing electrical sensors with optical sensors, such as the EGT sensor chosen for these tests. The objective of the development and testing of this prototype sensor system was to determine the feasibility of operating an optical sensor in a hostile aircraft environment. The fiber optic sensor system was developed to measure temperatures from 20C to 600C in an aircraft environment and was utilized to monitor the EGT of an OV-10D aircraft engine. The sensor has successfully flown over 50 hours and proven to be immune to surface deterioration of the optical element (located inside the sensor head) and able to withstand and operate in normal and sustained severe flight conditions where forces on the airplane exceeded 4 g's. Potential commercial uses for this sensor include monitoring temperature for aeropropulsion system control, military vehicle and naval engine control, conventional and nuclear power plant monitoring and industrial plan monitoring where EMI issues are critical.

  7. Temperature Grid Sensor for the Measurement of Spatial Temperature Distributions at Object Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Hampel; Thomas Schäfer; Markus Schubert

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of the development and application of a new temperature grid sensor based on the wire-mesh sensor principle. The grid sensor consists of a matrix of 256 Pt1000 platinum chip resistors and an associated electronics that measures the grid resistances with a multiplexing scheme at high speed. The individual sensor elements can be spatially distributed on an object surface and measure transient temperature distributions in real time. The advantage compared with other t...

  8. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  9. Thin film diamond temperature sensor array for harsh aerospace environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R. J.; Tamor, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using polycrystalline CVD diamond films as temperature sensors in harsh aerospace environment associated with hypersonic flights was tested using patterned diamond resistors, fabricated on flat or curved oxidized Si surfaces, as temperature sensors at temperatures between 20 and 1000 C. In this temperature range, the measured resistance was found to vary over 3 orders of magnitude and the temperature coefficient of resistance to change from 0.017/K to 0.003/K. After an annealing treatment, the resistance change was reproducible within 1 percent on the entire temperature range for short measuring times.

  10. Multifunctional potentiometric gas sensor array with an integrated temperature control and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Bryan M; Wachsman, Eric D

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the subject invention relate to a gas sensor and method for sensing one or more gases. An embodiment incorporates an array of sensing electrodes maintained at similar or different temperatures, such that the sensitivity and species selectivity of the device can be fine tuned between different pairs of sensing electrodes. A specific embodiment pertains to a gas sensor array for monitoring combustion exhausts and/or chemical reaction byproducts. An embodiment of the subject device related to this invention operates at high temperatures and can withstand harsh chemical environments. Embodiments of the device are made on a single substrate. The devices can also be made on individual substrates and monitored individually as if they were part of an array on a single substrate. The device can incorporate sensing electrodes in the same environment, which allows the electrodes to be coplanar and, thus, keep manufacturing costs low. Embodiments of the device can provide improvements to sensitivity, selectivity, and signal interference via surface temperature control.

  11. SiC device development for high temperature sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, J. S.; Goldstein, David; Kurtz, A. D.; Osgood, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in the processing and characterization of 3C-SiC for high temperature sensor applications is reviewed. Piezoresistance properties of silicon carbide and the temperature coefficient of resistivity of n-type beta-SiC are presented. In addition, photoelectrical etching and dopant selective etch-stops in SiC and high temperature Ohmic contacts for n-type beta-SiC sensors are discussed.

  12. Increasing Precision Of Temperature Sensors Of Liquid H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Fabik, Richard H.

    1995-01-01

    Commercial silicon-diode temperature sensors intended for use in boiling or nearly boiling liquid hydrogen at temperatures near 37 degrees R recalibrated to greater precision by method involving careful attention to details of design, operation, and computation. Method based on fundamental electrical and thermodynamic principles and good engineering practice, also applicable to recalibration of other temperature sensors intended for use in other boiling or nearly boiling liquids.

  13. Pressure sensor based on distributed temperature sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2002-01-01

    A differential pressure sensor has been realized with thermal readout. The thermal readout allows simultaneous measurement of the membrane deflection due to a pressure difference and measurement of the absolute pressure by operating the structure as a Pirani pressure sensor. The measuring of the

  14. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  15. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  16. A Wide Range Temperature Sensor Using SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is becoming widely used in integrated circuit chips for its advantages over the conventional silicon counterpart. The decrease in leakage current combined with lower power consumption allows electronics to operate in a broader temperature range. This paper describes the performance of an SOIbased temperature sensor under extreme temperatures and thermal cycling. The sensor comprised of a temperature-to-frequency relaxation oscillator circuit utilizing an SOI precision timer chip. The circuit was evaluated under extreme temperature exposure and thermal cycling between -190 C and +210 C. The results indicate that the sensor performed well over the entire test temperature range and it was able to re-start at extreme temperatures.

  17. Fresnel-reflection-based fiber optic cryogenic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Umesh; Kim, Dae-gil; Kim, Hyunjin; Song, Minho

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, Fresnel reflection based fiber-optic sensor for the real-time monitoring of cryogenic temperature is presented. The proposed sensor system utilizes a linear thermo-optic coefficient of polymer and Fresnel reflection of the fiber end. Epoxy resin and poly methyl metha acrylate (PMMA) are used as sensor head material. The designed sensor head measures the temperature ranging from -180°C to 25°C with an average sensitivity of 0.039dB/°C for epoxy resin and 0.029dB/°C for PMMA. Experimental results have proven the stability and the effectiveness of the proposed sensor system to measure the applied cryogenic temperatures.

  18. Temperature effects on polymer-carbon composite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. R.; Homer, M. L.; Manatt, K.; Kisor, A.; Lara, L.; Jewell, A. D.; Shevade, A.; Ryan, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    At JPL we have investigated the effects of temperature on polymer-carbon black composite sensors. While the electrical properties of polymer composites have been studied, with mechanisms of conductivity described by connectivity and tunneling, it is not fully understood how these properties affect sensor characteristics and responses.

  19. Temperature-independent polymer optical fiber evanescent wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Zhao, Mingfu; Huang, Yun; Chen, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Although the numerous advantages of polymer optical fibers have been exploited in the fields of sensors and telecommunications, such fibers still experience a critical problem: the temperature dependency. Therefore, we explored the temperature-independent operation of a polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor immersed in distilled water. We investigated variations in the surface morphology, deformation trajectory, refractive index, and weight of the fiber-sensing region with varying water temperature. We also examined the spectral transmission and transmitted light intensity of fibers subjected to a heating-cooling treatment. We observed that the light-transmission modes and sensitivity of the sensor were affected by changes in the surface morphology, diameter, and refractive index of the sensing region caused by changes in temperature. The transmitted light intensity of the sensor was maintained at a constant level after five cycles of the heating-cooling treatment, after which the fibers exhibited a smooth surface, low refractive index, and large fiber diameter. Consequently, we utilized the heating-cooling-treated fiber to realize a temperature-independent, U-shaped polymer fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor. The temperature independence was evaluated using glucose solutions in the range of 10 to 70 °C. The fabricated sensor showed significant temperature independence and high degree of consistency in measuring solutions.

  20. Flexible temperature and flow sensor from laser-induced graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Marengo, Marco

    2017-12-25

    Herein we present a flexible temperature sensor and a flow speed sensor based on laser-induced graphene. The main benefits arise from peculiar electrical, thermal and mechanical performances of the material thus obtained, along with a cheap and simple fabrication process. The temperature sensor is a negative temperature coefficient thermistor with non-linear response typical of semi-metals. The thermistor shows a 4% decrease of the resistance in a temperature range of 20–60 °C. The flow sensor exploits the piezoresistive properties of laser-induced graphene and can be used both in gaseous and liquid media thanks to a protective polydimethylsiloxane coating. Main characteristics are ultra-fast response and versatility in design offered by the laser technology.

  1. Micromachined High-Temperature Sensors for Planet Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In phase I of the SBIR program, LEEOAT Company will develop, simulate, fabricate and test high-temperature piezoelectric miniature sensors (up to 800oC), for...

  2. Platinum sensors versus KTY and NTC in low temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienand, K. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite GmbH, Kleinostheim (Germany); Gerwen, P. van [Heraeus Sensor-Nite N.V., Leuven (Netherlands); Reinwald, H.J. [Heraeus Sensor-Nite Int., Freiberg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    On the automotive electronics market, negative temperature coefficient sensors (NTC) and silicon spreading resistance sensors (KTY) have increasingly been used above all in the temperature range between -40 and +150 C. The latest demands of the automotive industry show that these tight temperature limits will no longer meet the requirements in the future. Moreover, the automotive industry is more frequently expanding the temperature measuring range to between -55 C and 180 C, for example in engine oil. This trend can also be seen in the commercial vehicle field, for example with retarders which also heat the oil to a great extent. Due to these increasingly more demanding conditions, platinum (Pt) sensors are being used more and more, as they have a number of advantages compared with NTCs or KTYs. The pros and cons of using these three sensor types are explained in more detail in the following. (orig.)

  3. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  4. Fast Temperature Sensor for use in Atmospheric Sciences Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes a novel sensor to measure atmospheric temperature at high frequency (10 Hz) and with high precision and accuracy (0.1 degrees C)....

  5. Ultrahigh sensitive temperature sensor based on graphene-semiconductor metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, A.; Zakery, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we theoretically describe a nanoscale THz metamaterial, consisting of a graphene H-shaped that is located on an indium antimonide (InSb) substrate. This metamaterial in its simulated transmission spectrum exhibits a filtering effect and at a specific frequency, the percentage of light passing through the metamaterial is greatly reduced. Since the optical properties of graphene and InSb strongly depend on temperature, as the temperature changes, the frequency of resonance is also shifted. Thus we can expect our structure is suitable for ultrahigh sensitive temperature sensors. The temperature sensor presented is very sensitive with a sensitivity of 1814 nm/{°C} which is very high compared to other designed structures. This THz temperature sensor can play an important role for high-accurate temperature measurements.

  6. Photonic Crystal Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Quantum Dot Nanocoatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Larrión

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot nanocoatings have been deposited by means of the Layer-by-Layer technique on the inner holes of Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs for the fabrication of temperature sensors. The optical properties of these sensors including absorbance, intensity emission, wavelength of the emission band, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM have been experimentally studied for a temperature range from −40 to 70C°.

  7. Breathable and Stretchable Temperature Sensors Inspired by Skin

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Chen; Bingwei Lu; Yihao Chen; Xue Feng

    2015-01-01

    Flexible electronics attached to skin for healthcare, such as epidermal electronics, has to struggle with biocompatibility and adapt to specified environment of skin with respect to breath and perspiration. Here, we report a strategy for biocompatible flexible temperature sensors, inspired by skin, possessing the excellent permeability of air and high quality of water-proof by using semipermeable film with porous structures as substrate. We attach such temperature sensors to underarm and fore...

  8. A Wind Energy Powered Wireless Temperature Sensor Node

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A wireless temperature sensor node composed of a piezoelectric wind energy harvester, a temperature sensor, a microcontroller, a power management circuit and a wireless transmitting module was developed. The wind-induced vibration energy harvester with a cuboid chamber of 62 mm × 19.6 mm × 10 mm converts ambient wind energy into electrical energy to power the sensor node. A TMP102 temperature sensor and the MSP430 microcontroller are used to measure the temperature. The power management module consists of LTC3588-1 and LT3009 units. The measured temperature is transmitted by the nRF24l01 transceiver. Experimental results show that the critical wind speed of the harvester was about 5.4 m/s and the output power of the harvester was about 1.59 mW for the electrical load of 20 kΩ at wind speed of 11.2 m/s, which was sufficient to power the wireless sensor node to measure and transmit the temperature every 13 s. When the wind speed increased from 6 m/s to 11.5 m/s, the self-powered wireless sensor node worked normally.

  9. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-07-13

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  10. A wind energy powered wireless temperature sensor node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; He, Xue-Feng; Li, Si-Yu; Cheng, Yao-Qing; Rao, Yang

    2015-02-27

    A wireless temperature sensor node composed of a piezoelectric wind energy harvester, a temperature sensor, a microcontroller, a power management circuit and a wireless transmitting module was developed. The wind-induced vibration energy harvester with a cuboid chamber of 62 mm × 19.6 mm × 10 mm converts ambient wind energy into electrical energy to power the sensor node. A TMP102 temperature sensor and the MSP430 microcontroller are used to measure the temperature. The power management module consists of LTC3588-1 and LT3009 units. The measured temperature is transmitted by the nRF24l01 transceiver. Experimental results show that the critical wind speed of the harvester was about 5.4 m/s and the output power of the harvester was about 1.59 mW for the electrical load of 20 kΩ at wind speed of 11.2 m/s, which was sufficient to power the wireless sensor node to measure and transmit the temperature every 13 s. When the wind speed increased from 6 m/s to 11.5 m/s, the self-powered wireless sensor node worked normally.

  11. An Integrated-Circuit Temperature Sensor for Calorimetry and Differential Temperature Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyskens, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the application of an integrated-circuit (IC) chip which provides an easy-to-use, inexpensive, rugged, computer-interfaceable temperature sensor for calorimetry and differential temperature measurement. Discusses its design and advantages. (JRH)

  12. Temperature measurement method using temperature coefficient timing for resistive or capacitive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Ericson, M. Nance

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for temperature measurement especially suited for low cost, low power, moderate accuracy implementation. It uses a sensor whose resistance varies in a known manner, either linearly or nonlinearly, with temperature, and produces a digital output which is proportional to the temperature of the sensor. The method is based on performing a zero-crossing time measurement of a step input signal that is double differentiated using two differentiators functioning as respective first and second time constants; one temperature stable, and the other varying with the sensor temperature.

  13. Silica Bottle Resonator Sensor for Refractive Index and Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Nemova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and theoretically demonstrate a bottle resonator sensor with a nanoscale altitude and with alength several of hundreds of microns made on the top of the fiber with a radius of tens microns for refractive index and temperature sensor applications. The whispering gallery modes (WGMs in the resonators can be excited with a taper fiber placed on the top of the resonator. These sensors can be considered as an alternative to fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors.The sensitivity of TM-polarized modes is higher than the sensitivity of the TE-polarized modes, but these values are comparable and both polarizations are suitable for sensor applications. The sensitivity ~150 (nm/RIU can be reached with abottle resonator on the fiber with the radius 10 μm. It can be improved with theuse of a fiber with a smaller radius. The temperature sensitivity is found to be ~10 pm/K. The temperature sensitivity can decrease ~10% for a fiber with a radius rco = 10 μm instead of a fiber with a radius rco = 100 μm. These sensors have sensitivities comparable to FBG sensors. A bottle resonator sensor with a nanoscale altitude made on the top of the fiber can be easily integrated in any fiber scheme.

  14. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  15. Temperature and pH sensors based on graphenic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, P; Calisi, N; Melai, B; Cortigiani, B; Mannini, M; Caneschi, A; Lorenzetti, G; Paoletti, C; Lomonaco, T; Paolicchi, A; Scataglini, I; Dini, V; Romanelli, M; Fuoco, R; Di Francesco, F

    2017-05-15

    Point-of-care applications and patients' real-time monitoring outside a clinical setting would require disposable and durable sensors to provide better therapies and quality of life for patients. This paper describes the fabrication and performances of a temperature and a pH sensor on a biocompatible and wearable board for healthcare applications. The temperature sensor was based on a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) layer that changed its electrical resistivity with the temperature. When tested in a human serum sample between 25 and 43°C, the sensor had a sensitivity of 110±10Ω/°C and an error of 0.4±0.1°C compared with the reference value set in a thermostatic bath. The pH sensor, based on a graphene oxide (GO) sensitive layer, had a sensitivity of 40±4mV/pH in the pH range between 4 and 10. Five sensor prototypes were tested in a human serum sample over one week and the maximum deviation of the average response from reference values obtained by a glass electrode was 0.2pH units. For biological applications, the temperature and pH sensors were successfully tested for in vitro cytotoxicity with human fibroblast cells (MRC-5) over 24h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Platinum-Resistor Differential Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbly, R. B.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Platinum resistance elements used in bridge circuit for measuring temperature difference between two flowing liquids. Temperature errors with circuit are less than 0.01 degrees C over range of 100 degrees C.

  17. Breathable and Stretchable Temperature Sensors Inspired by Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Lu, Bingwei; Chen, Yihao; Feng, Xue

    2015-06-01

    Flexible electronics attached to skin for healthcare, such as epidermal electronics, has to struggle with biocompatibility and adapt to specified environment of skin with respect to breath and perspiration. Here, we report a strategy for biocompatible flexible temperature sensors, inspired by skin, possessing the excellent permeability of air and high quality of water-proof by using semipermeable film with porous structures as substrate. We attach such temperature sensors to underarm and forearm to measure the axillary temperature and body surface temperature respectively. The volunteer wears such sensors for 24 hours with two times of shower and the in vitro test shows no sign of maceration or stimulation to the skin. Especially, precise temperature changes on skin surface caused by flowing air and water dropping are also measured to validate the accuracy and dynamical response. The results show that the biocompatible temperature sensor is soft and breathable on the human skin and has the excellent accuracy compared to mercury thermometer. This demonstrates the possibility and feasibility of fully using the sensors in long term body temperature sensing for medical use as well as sensing function of artificial skin for robots or prosthesis.

  18. Breathable and Stretchable Temperature Sensors Inspired by Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Lu, Bingwei; Chen, Yihao; Feng, Xue

    2015-06-22

    Flexible electronics attached to skin for healthcare, such as epidermal electronics, has to struggle with biocompatibility and adapt to specified environment of skin with respect to breath and perspiration. Here, we report a strategy for biocompatible flexible temperature sensors, inspired by skin, possessing the excellent permeability of air and high quality of water-proof by using semipermeable film with porous structures as substrate. We attach such temperature sensors to underarm and forearm to measure the axillary temperature and body surface temperature respectively. The volunteer wears such sensors for 24 hours with two times of shower and the in vitro test shows no sign of maceration or stimulation to the skin. Especially, precise temperature changes on skin surface caused by flowing air and water dropping are also measured to validate the accuracy and dynamical response. The results show that the biocompatible temperature sensor is soft and breathable on the human skin and has the excellent accuracy compared to mercury thermometer. This demonstrates the possibility and feasibility of fully using the sensors in long term body temperature sensing for medical use as well as sensing function of artificial skin for robots or prosthesis.

  19. Ultrasensitive string-based temperature sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom; Schmid, Silvan; Gronberg, L.

    2011-01-01

    Resonant strings are a promising concept for ultra sensitive temperature detection. We present an analytical model for the sensitivity with which we optimize the temperature response of resonant strings by varying geometry and material. The temperature sensitivity of silicon nitride and aluminum ...

  20. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  1. Temperature-dependent piezoresistivity in an MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposite temperature sensor with ultrahigh performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamusi; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Wu, Liangke; Yuan, Weifeng; Peng, Xianghe; Gu, Bin; Chang, Christiana; Liu, Yaolu; Ning, Huiming; Li, Jinhua; Surina; Atobe, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2013-11-01

    A temperature sensor was fabricated from a polymer nanocomposite with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as nanofiller (i.e., MWCNT/epoxy). The electrical resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the temperature sensor were characterized experimentally. The effects of temperature (within the range 333-373 K) and MWCNT content (within the range 1-5 wt%) were investigated thoroughly. It was found that the resistance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing MWCNT content. However, the resistance change ratio related to the TCR increases with increasing temperature and MWCNT content. The highest value of TCR (0.021 K-1), which was observed in the case of 5 wt% MWCNT, is much higher than those of traditional metals and MWCNT-based temperature sensors. Moreover, the corresponding numerical simulation—conducted to explain the above temperature-dependent piezoresistivity of the nanocomposite temperature sensor—indicated the key role of a temperature-dependent tunneling effect.

  2. Extreme Temperature Pulse Injection Position Sensor for Venus Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jerri; Kumar, Nishant; Singh, Sase; Narine, Roop

    After developed two types of extreme temperature motors (Switched Reluctance Motor and Blushless DC Motor), Honeybee Robotics has successfully developed an Extreme Temperature Pulse Injection Position Sensor that can be used to commutate motors and provide positional information. This paper presents an insight into the challenges of designing extreme tempera-ture electro-mechanical system and provides results of the experiment performed in the Venus environment. The operational temperature range for existing commutation devices, include Hall Sensors, Resolvers and Encoders is limited to temperatures less than 180C. The Extreme Temperature Pulse Injection Position Sensor is capable of working continuously at 460C and at 92 atm. The design of this device involves a unique rotor design and an innovative phase pulsing algorithm implemented through a high speed DSP. The shape of the rotor provides a unique flow-path to the lines-of-flux through the poles of the stator. The pulsing algorithm makes it possible to nullify the effects of parametric changes (wire resistance, permeability, air gap, etc.) due to increase in temperature. The algorithm relies on the relative flux density between two stator poles rather than the absolute measurement of the flux density in each pole. Extreme temperature position sensor, along with scalable extreme temperature motor and gearhead allow for creation of robot arms and even mobility systems for future Venus missions to achieve their goals and objectives.

  3. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  4. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Based Cryogenic Temperature Sensor Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monea, Bogdan Florian; Ionete, Eusebiu Ilarian; Spiridon, Stefan Ionut; Leca, Aurel; Stanciu, Anda; Petre, Emil; Vaseashta, Ashok

    2017-09-10

    We present an investigation consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) based cryogenic temperature sensors, capable of measuring temperatures in the range of 2-77 K. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) due to their extremely small size, superior thermal and electrical properties have suggested that it is possible to create devices that will meet necessary requirements for miniaturization and better performance, by comparison to temperature sensors currently available on the market. Starting from SWCNTs, as starting material, a resistive structure was designed. Employing dropcast method, the carbon nanotubes were deposited over pairs of gold electrodes and in between the structure electrodes from a solution. The procedure was followed by an alignment process between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic method. Two sensor structures were tested in cryogenic field down to 2 K, and the resistance was measured using a standard four-point method. The measurement results suggest that, at temperatures below 20 K, the temperature coefficient of resistance average for sensor 1 is 1.473%/K and for sensor 2 is 0.365%/K. From the experimental data, it can be concluded that the dependence of electrical resistance versus temperature can be approximated by an exponential equation and, correspondingly, a set of coefficients are calculated. It is further concluded that the proposed approach described here offers several advantages, which can be employed in the fabrication of a microsensors for cryogenic applications.

  5. Wireless Sensor Networks Framework for Indoor Temperature Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojkoska, Biljana; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks take a major part in our everyday lives by enhancing systems for home automation, health-care, temperature control, energy consumption monitoring etc. In this paper we focus on a system used for temperature regulation for homes, educational, industrial, commercial premises...

  6. Silicon-Etalon Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus; Flatico, Joseph M.; Azar, Massood Tabib

    1993-01-01

    Developmental temperature sensor consists of silicon Fabry-Perot etalon attached to end of optical fiber. Features immunity to electrical interference, small size, light weight, safety, and chemical inertness. Output encoded in ration of intensities at two different wavelengths, rather than in overall intensity, with result that temperature readings not degraded much by changes in transmittance of fiber-optic link.

  7. Zro2 Thin-Film-Based Sapphire Fiber Temperature Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jiajun; Lally, Evan M; Wang, Xiaoping; Gong, Jianmin; Pickrell, Gary R.; Wang, Anbo

    2012-01-01

    A submicrometer-thick zirconium dioxide film was deposited on the tip of a polished C-plane sapphire fiber to fabricate a temperature sensor that can work to an extended temperature range. Zirconium dioxide was selected as the thin film material to fabricate the temperature sensor because it has relatively close thermal expansion to that of sapphire, but more importantly it does not react appreciably with sapphire up to 1800 degrees C. In order to study the properties of the deposited thin fi...

  8. Application of Wireless Sensor Networks for Indoor Temperature Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojkoska, Biljana Risteska; Popovska Avramova, Andrijana; Chatzimisios, Periklis

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks take a major part in our everyday lives by enhancing systems for home automation, healthcare, temperature control, energy consumption monitoring, and so forth. In this paper we focus on a system used for temperature regulation for residential, educational, industrial......, and commercial premises, and so forth. We propose a framework for indoor temperature regulation and optimization using wireless sensor networks based on ZigBee platform. This paper considers architectural design of the system, as well as implementation guidelines. The proposed system favors methods that provide...

  9. Platinum thin film resistors as accurate and stable temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement characteristics of thin-Pt-film temperature sensors fabricated using advanced methods are discussed. The limitations of wound-wire Pt temperature sensors and the history of Pt-film development are outlined, and the commonly used film-deposition, structuring, and trimming methods are presented in a table. The development of a family of sputtered film resistors is described in detail and illustrated with photographs of the different types. The most commonly used tolerances are reported as + or - 0.3 C + 0.5 percent of the temperature measured.

  10. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica De Miguel-Soto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  11. Additive printing of organic complementary circuits for temperature sensor tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tse Nga; Mei, Ping; Schwartz, David E.; Kor, Sivheng; Krusor, Brent; Veres, Janos; Bröms, Per; Eriksson, Torbjörn; Wang, Yong; Hagel, Olle; Karlsson, Christer

    2015-09-01

    With the recent improvements in printed devices, it is now possible to build integrated circuit systems out of printed devices. The combination of sensor, logic, and rewritable memory will greatly enhance the functionalities of printed electronics. We have demonstrated integrated sensor tags based on organic complementary circuits patterned by inkjet printing. One example is a temperature threshold sensor tag, wherein if the thermistor temperature exceeds a pre-set threshold, the control circuit generates a pulse to write into a nonvolatile ferroelectric memory cell. The trigger temperature is set by adjusting the bias voltage across the thermistor bridge to match the trigger voltage of the printed threshold circuit, and the threshold temperatures has been tuned between 8 °C and 45 °C with a bias voltage below 30V.

  12. Optical and mechanical response of high temperature optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Jim

    1991-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane (NASP) will experience temperatures as high as 2500 F at critical locations in its structure. Optical fiber sensors were proposed as a means of monitoring the temperature in these critical regions by either bonding the optical fiber to, or embedding the optical fiber in, metal matrix composite (MMC) components. Unfortunately, the anticipated NASP temperature ranges exceed the glass transition region of the optical fiber glass. The attempt is made to define the operating temperature range of optical fiber sensors from both optical and mechanical perspectives. A full non-linear optical analysis was performed by modeling the optical response of an isolated sensor cyclically driven through the glass transition region.

  13. Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Kristie L.; Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary R.

    2006-11-14

    This report summarizes technical progress during the program “Optical Fiber High Temperature Sensor Instrumentation for Energy Intensive Industries”, performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The objective of this program was to use technology recently invented at Virginia Tech to develop and demonstrate the application of self-calibrating optical fiber temperature and pressure sensors to several key energy-intensive industries where conventional, commercially available sensors exhibit greatly abbreviated lifetimes due primarily to environmental degradation. A number of significant technologies were developed under this program, including • a laser bonded silica high temperature fiber sensor with a high temperature capability up to 700°C and a frequency response up to 150 kHz, • the world’s smallest fiber Fabry-Perot high temperature pressure sensor (125 x 20 μm) with 700°C capability, • UV-induced intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors for distributed measurement, • a single crystal sapphire fiber-based sensor with a temperature capability up to 1600°C. These technologies have been well demonstrated and laboratory tested. Our work plan included conducting major field tests of these technologies at EPRI, Corning, Pratt & Whitney, and Global Energy; field validation of the technology is critical to ensuring its usefulness to U.S. industries. Unfortunately, due to budget cuts, DOE was unable to follow through with its funding commitment to support Energy Efficiency Science Initiative projects and this final phase was eliminated.

  14. Temperature Grid Sensor for the Measurement of Spatial Temperature Distributions at Object Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Hampel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of the development and application of a new temperature grid sensor based on the wire-mesh sensor principle. The grid sensor consists of a matrix of 256 Pt1000 platinum chip resistors and an associated electronics that measures the grid resistances with a multiplexing scheme at high speed. The individual sensor elements can be spatially distributed on an object surface and measure transient temperature distributions in real time. The advantage compared with other temperature field measurement approaches such as infrared cameras is that the object under investigation can be thermally insulated and the radiation properties of the surface do not affect the measurement accuracy. The sensor principle is therefore suited for various industrial monitoring applications. Its applicability for surface temperature monitoring has been demonstrated through heating and mixing experiments in a vessel.

  15. Temperature grid sensor for the measurement of spatial temperature distributions at object surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Thomas; Schubert, Markus; Hampel, Uwe

    2013-01-25

    This paper presents results of the development and application of a new temperature grid sensor based on the wire-mesh sensor principle. The grid sensor consists of a matrix of 256 Pt1000 platinum chip resistors and an associated electronics that measures the grid resistances with a multiplexing scheme at high speed. The individual sensor elements can be spatially distributed on an object surface and measure transient temperature distributions in real time. The advantage compared with other temperature field measurement approaches such as infrared cameras is that the object under investigation can be thermally insulated and the radiation properties of the surface do not affect the measurement accuracy. The sensor principle is therefore suited for various industrial monitoring applications. Its applicability for surface temperature monitoring has been demonstrated through heating and mixing experiments in a vessel.

  16. New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

    2006-09-30

    Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

  17. Low-temperature capacitive sensor based on perovskite oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, F.; Orio, G.; Serra, E.; Caprioli, F.; Pasquali, M.

    2015-06-01

    Energy, environmental and social issues drive towards the green political economy and the development of advanced technologies, promoting renewable energy sources, improving energy conversion efficiency and reducing exhaust gas emissions. The development of sustainable technologies requires strategic research in the area of gas sensors for monitoring air quality, controlling gas emissions and optimizing combustion processes. Solid state sensors are the most attractive one because of their simplicity in function, small size and low cost. The aim of this work is to synthetize and characterize strontium titanate and test its sensing performance. The prepared sensor device shows significant sensitivity and response rate at room-temperature. However, because of the low recovery rate, the regeneration of the sensor has to be made at high temperature for promoting the decomposition of the carbonates formed on the perovkite surface.

  18. A High Temperature Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on Mesoporous Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tiemann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C and high (up to 210 °C operating temperatures.

  19. A high temperature capacitive humidity sensor based on mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thorsten; Krotzky, Sören; Weiss, Alexander; Sauerwald, Tilman; Kohl, Claus-Dieter; Roggenbuck, Jan; Tiemann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C) and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C) and high (up to 210 °C) operating temperatures.

  20. A High Temperature Capacitive Humidity Sensor Based on Mesoporous Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Thorsten; Krotzky, Sören; Weiß, Alexander; Sauerwald, Tilman; Kohl, Claus-Dieter; Roggenbuck, Jan; Tiemann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive sensors are the most commonly used devices for the detection of humidity because they are inexpensive and the detection mechanism is very specific for humidity. However, especially for industrial processes, there is a lack of dielectrics that are stable at high temperature (>200 °C) and under harsh conditions. We present a capacitive sensor based on mesoporous silica as the dielectric in a simple sensor design based on pressed silica pellets. Investigation of the structural stability of the porous silica under simulated operating conditions as well as the influence of the pellet production will be shown. Impedance measurements demonstrate the utility of the sensor at both low (90 °C) and high (up to 210 °C) operating temperatures. PMID:22163790

  1. Optical sensor for measuring humidity, strain and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical sensor (100) adapted to measure at least three physical parameters, said optical sensor comprising a polymer-based optical waveguide structure comprising a first Bragg grating structure (101) being adapted to provide information about a first, a second...... relates to a method for measuring the first, the second and the third physical parameter. Preferably, the first, the second and the third physical parameter, are humidity, strain and temperature, respectively....

  2. A Temperature Sensor using a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Timer for Very Wide Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik; Culley, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    A temperature sensor based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Timer was designed for extreme temperature applications. The sensor can operate under a wide temperature range from hot jet engine compartments to cryogenic space exploration missions. For example, in Jet Engine Distributed Control Architecture, the sensor must be able to operate at temperatures exceeding 150 C. For space missions, extremely low cryogenic temperatures need to be measured. The output of the sensor, which consisted of a stream of digitized pulses whose period was proportional to the sensed temperature, can be interfaced with a controller or a computer. The data acquisition system would then give a direct readout of the temperature through the use of a look-up table, a built-in algorithm, or a mathematical model. Because of the wide range of temperature measurement and because the sensor is made of carefully selected COTS parts, this work is directly applicable to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics/Subsonic Fixed Wing Program--Jet Engine Distributed Engine Control Task and to the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. In the past, a temperature sensor was designed and built using an SOI operational amplifier, and a report was issued. This work used an SOI 555 timer as its core and is completely new work.

  3. Spintronic Memristor Based Temperature Sensor Design with CMOS Current Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    studied. BJT transistor is usually favored by designers. The most popular method is utilizing the difference between base-emitter voltages of a...substrate BJT transistor to detect temperature changes [18][20]. To make up the non-perfect linearity of BJT transistor , many curvature correction...the traditional temperature sensors, the key components for temperature detection are p-n junction diode [25] or transistor [17], which have been well

  4. Ultraflexible, large-area, physiological temperature sensors for multipoint measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Yusuke; Terakawa, Yuki; Reeder, Jonathan; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Ware, Taylor; Yang, Kejia; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Sekino, Masaki; Voit, Walter; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao

    2015-11-24

    We report a fabrication method for flexible and printable thermal sensors based on composites of semicrystalline acrylate polymers and graphite with a high sensitivity of 20 mK and a high-speed response time of less than 100 ms. These devices exhibit large resistance changes near body temperature under physiological conditions with high repeatability (1,800 times). Device performance is largely unaffected by bending to radii below 700 µm, which allows for conformal application to the surface of living tissue. The sensing temperature can be tuned between 25 °C and 50 °C, which covers all relevant physiological temperatures. Furthermore, we demonstrate flexible active-matrix thermal sensors which can resolve spatial temperature gradients over a large area. With this flexible ultrasensitive temperature sensor we succeeded in the in vivo measurement of cyclic temperatures changes of 0.1 °C in a rat lung during breathing, without interference from constant tissue motion. This result conclusively shows that the lung of a warm-blooded animal maintains surprising temperature stability despite the large difference between core temperature and inhaled air temperature.

  5. A CMOS smart temperature and humidity sensor with combined readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Clemens; Valente, Virgilio; Donaldson, Nick; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-09-16

    A fully-integrated complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor for combined temperature and humidity measurements is presented. The main purpose of the device is to monitor the hermeticity of micro-packages for implanted integrated circuits and to ensure their safe operation by monitoring the operating temperature and humidity on-chip. The smart sensor has two modes of operation, in which either the temperature or humidity is converted into a digital code representing a frequency ratio between two oscillators. This ratio is determined by the ratios of the timing capacitances and bias currents in both oscillators. The reference oscillator is biased by a current whose temperature dependency is complementary to the proportional to absolute temperature (PTAT) current. For the temperature measurement, this results in an exceptional normalized sensitivity of about 0.77%/°C at the accepted expense of reduced linearity. The humidity sensor is a capacitor, whose value varies linearly with relative humidity (RH) with a normalized sensitivity of 0.055%/% RH. For comparison, two versions of the humidity sensor with an area of either 0.2 mm2 or 1.2 mm2 were fabricated in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process. The on-chip readout electronics operate from a 5 V power supply and consume a current of approximately 85 µA.

  6. Optimized Feature Extraction for Temperature-Modulated Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vergara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious limitations to the practical utilization of solid-state gas sensors is the drift of their signal. Even if drift is rooted in the chemical and physical processes occurring in the sensor, improved signal processing is generally considered as a methodology to increase sensors stability. Several studies evidenced the augmented stability of time variable signals elicited by the modulation of either the gas concentration or the operating temperature. Furthermore, when time-variable signals are used, the extraction of features can be accomplished in shorter time with respect to the time necessary to calculate the usual features defined in steady-state conditions. In this paper, we discuss the stability properties of distinct dynamic features using an array of metal oxide semiconductors gas sensors whose working temperature is modulated with optimized multisinusoidal signals. Experiments were aimed at measuring the dispersion of sensors features in repeated sequences of a limited number of experimental conditions. Results evidenced that the features extracted during the temperature modulation reduce the multidimensional data dispersion among repeated measurements. In particular, the Energy Signal Vector provided an almost constant classification rate along the time with respect to the temperature modulation.

  7. Polymer substrate temperature sensor array for brain interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Insoo; Fok, Ho Him R; Li, Yuanyuan; Jackson, Thomas N; Gluckman, Bruce J

    2011-01-01

    We developed an implantable thin film transistor temperature sensor (TFT-TS) to measure temperature changes in the brain. These changes are assumed to be associated with cerebral metabolism and neuronal activity. Two prototype TFT-TSs were designed and tested in-vitro: one with 8 diode-connected single-ended sensors, and the other with 4 pairs of differential-ended sensors in an array configuration. The sensor elements are 25 ~ 100 pm in width and 5 μm in length. The TFT-TSs were fabricated based on high-speed ZnO TFT process technology on flexible polyimide substrates (50 μm thick, 500 μm width, 20 mm length). In order to interface external signal electronics, they were directly bonded to a prototype printed circuit board using anisotropic conductive films The prototypes were characterized between 23 ~ 38 °C using a commercial temperature sensor and custom-designed temperature controlled oven. The maximum sensitivity of 40 mV/°C was obtained from the TFT-TS.

  8. Temperature insensitive curvature sensor based on cascading photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guangwei; Li, Yunpu; Fu, Xinghu; Jin, Wa; Bi, Weihong

    2018-03-01

    A temperature insensitive curvature sensor is proposed based on cascading photonic crystal fiber. Using the arc fusion splicing method, this sensor is fabricated by cascading together a single-mode fiber (SMF), a three layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (3PCF), a five layers air holes structure of photonic crystal fiber (5PCF) and a SMF in turn. So the structure SMF-3PCF-5PCF-SMF can be obtained with a total length of 20 mm. During the process of fabrication, the splicing machine parameters and the length of each optical fiber are adjusted to obtain a high sensitivity curvature sensor. The experimental results show that the curvature sensitivity is -8.40 nm/m-1 in the curvature variation range of 0-1.09 m-1, which also show good linearity. In the range of 30-90 °C, the temperature sensitivity is only about 3.24 pm/°C, indicating that the sensor is not sensitive to temperature. The sensor not only has the advantages of easy fabricating, simple structure, high sensitivity but also can solve the problem of temperature measurement cross sensitivity, so it can be used for different areas including aerospace, large-scale bridge, architectural structure health monitoring and so on.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTELLIGENT PRESSURE SENSOR WITH TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAEGAE NAVEEN KUMAR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of an artificial neural network (ANN based intelligent pressure sensor to measure pressure in the range 0-100 psig with high accuracy and temperature compensation. A capacitive pressure sensor detects the applied pressure by means of elastic deflection of diaphragm. A Modified Schering Bridge Signal Conditioning Circuit (MSB-SCC converts the change in capacitance of the sensor into an equivalent voltage. The effect of change in environmental conditions, especially effect of ambient temperature on the pressure sensor and component drifts, stray effects associated with MSB-SCC introduce nonlinearity and cross-sensitivity errors in the output readout. The ANN trained with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm incorporates the intelligence into sensor signal conditioning circuit through a microcontroller unit to reduce the nonlinearity effects and compensate the cross-sensitivity errors.The LM algorithm shows better performance in terms of the linearity error in comparison with Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS and the Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithms. The proposed method is experimentally verified at various temperatures and it provides voltage readout within ±0.8% of full-scale reading over a range of temperature variations from 10 °C to 35°C.

  10. Research of temperature field measurement using a flexible temperature sensor array for robot sensing skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Siyu; Li, Ruiqi; Yang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Caixia

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a novel temperature sensor array by dispensing conductive composites on a flexible printed circuit board which is able to acquire the ambient temperature. The flexible temperature sensor array was fabricated by using carbon fiber-filled silicon rubber based composites on a flexible polyimide circuit board, which can both ensure their high flexibility. It found that CF with 12 wt% could be served as the best conductive filler for higher temperature sensitivity and better stability comparing with some other proportion for dynamic range from 30&° to 90°. The preparation of the temperature sensitive material has also been described in detail. Connecting the flexible sensor array with a data acquisition card and a personal computer (PC), some heat sources with different shapes were loaded on the sensor array; the detected results were shown in the interface by LabVIEW software. The measured temperature contours are in good agreement with the shapes and amplitudes of different heat sources. Furthermore, in consideration of the heat dissipation in the air, the relationship between the resistance and the distance of heat sources with sensor array was also detected to verify the accuracy of the sensor array, which is also a preparation for our future work. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the developed flexible sensor array, and it can be used as humanoid artificial skin for sensation system of robots.

  11. Properties of thin films for high temperature flow sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Sacharia

    1991-01-01

    Requirements of material parameters of high temperature flow sensors are identified. Refractory metal silicides offer high temperature sensitivity and high frequency response and are stable up to 1000 C. Intrinsic semiconductors of high band gap are also considered as sensor elements. SiC and diamond are identified. Combined with substrates of low thermal and electrical conductivity, such as quartz or Al2O3, these materials meet several requirements of high sensitivity and frequency response. Film deposition and patterning techniques suitable for these materials are identified.

  12. Instrumentation system for improvement of temperature sensor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result of some intensive research on improvement of the measurement and instrumentation techniques with thermistors, an electronic circuit is developed that is reducing considerably the thermistor non-linearity, its self-heating effect and is increasing its sensitivity in a wider temperature range of measurements and ...

  13. Pyroelectric Ceramics as Temperature Sensors for Energy System Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge Luis

    Temperature is continuously monitored in energy systems to ensure safe operation temperatures, increase efficiency and avoid high emissions. Most of energy systems operate at high temperature and harsh environments to achieve higher efficiencies, therefore temperature sensing devices that can operate under these conditions are highly desired. The interest has increased in temperature sensors capable to operate and in harsh environments and temperature sensors capable to transmit thermal information wirelessly. One of the solutions for developing harsh environment sensors is to use ceramic materials, especially functional ceramics such as pyroelectrics. Pyroelectric ceramics could be used to develop active sensors for both temperature and pressure due to their capabilities in coupling energy among mechanical, thermal, and electrical domains. In this study, two different pyroelectric materials were used to develop two different temperature sensors systems. First, a high temperature sensor was developed using a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) pyroelectric ceramic. With its Curie temperature of 1210 °C, lithium niobate is capable to maintain its pyroelectric properties at high temperature making it ideal for temperature sensing at high temperature applications. Lithium niobate has been studied previously in the attempt to use its pyroelectric current as the sensing mechanism to measure temperatures up to 500 °C. Pyroelectric coefficient of lithium niobate is a function of temperature as reported in a previous study, therefore a dynamic technique is utilized to measure the pyroelectric coefficient of the lithium niobate used in this study. The pyroelectric coefficient was successfully measured up to 500 °C with coefficients ranging from -8.5 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at room temperature to -23.70 x 10 -5 C/m2 °C at 500 °C. The lithium niobate sensor was then tested at higher temperatures: 220 °C, 280 °C, 410 °C and 500 °C with 4.31 %, 2.1 %, 0.4 % and 0.6 % deviation

  14. A Microring Temperature Sensor Based on the Surface Plasmon Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure of microring sensor suitable for temperature measurement based on the surface plasmon wave is put forward in this paper. The sensor uses surface plasmon multilayer waveguiding structure in the vertical direction and U-shaped microring structure in the horizontal direction and utilizes SOI as the thermal material. The transfer function derivation of the structure of surface plasmon microring sensor is according to the transfer matrix method. While the change of refractive index of Si is caused by the change of ambient temperature, the effective refractive index of the multilayer waveguiding structure is changed, resulting in the drifting of the sensor output spectrum. This paper focuses on the transmission characteristics of multilayer waveguide structure and the impact on the output spectrum caused by refractive index changes in temperature parts. According to the calculation and simulation, the transmission performance of the structure is stable and the sensitivity is good. The resonance wavelength shift can reach 0.007 μm when the temperature is increased by 100 k and FSR can reach about 60 nm. This structure achieves a high sensitivity in the temperature sense taking into account a wide range of filter frequency selections, providing a theoretical basis for the preparation of microoptics.

  15. Brain temperature measurement: A study of in vitro accuracy and stability of smart catheter temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Wu, Zhizhen; Ahn, Chong H; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A; Hartings, Jed A; Narayan, Raj K

    2012-02-01

    The injured brain is vulnerable to increases in temperature after severe head injury. Therefore, accurate and reliable measurement of brain temperature is important to optimize patient outcome. In this work, we have fabricated, optimized and characterized temperature sensors for use with a micromachined smart catheter for multimodal intracranial monitoring. Developed temperature sensors have resistance of 100.79 ± 1.19Ω and sensitivity of 67.95 mV/°C in the operating range from15-50°C, and time constant of 180 ms. Under the optimized excitation current of 500 μA, adequate signal-to-noise ratio was achieved without causing self-heating, and changes in immersion depth did not introduce clinically significant errors of measurements (temperature sensors in comparison to two types of commercial temperature probes (USB Reference Thermometer, NIST-traceable bulk probe with 0.05°C accuracy; and IT-21, type T type clinical microprobe with guaranteed 0.1°C accuracy) under controlled laboratory conditions. These in vitro experimental data showed that the temperature measurement performance of our sensors was accurate and reliable over the course of 5 days. The smart catheter temperature sensors provided accuracy and long-term stability comparable to those of commercial tissue-implantable microprobes, and therefore provide a means for temperature measurement in a microfabricated, multimodal cerebral monitoring device.

  16. Sensor manufacturer, temperature, and cyanobacteria morphology affect phycocyanin fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Caroline M; Wood, Susanna A; Puddick, Jonathan; McBride, Christopher G; Hamilton, David P

    2017-10-27

    Sensors to measure phycocyanin fluorescence in situ are becoming widely used as they may provide useful proxies for cyanobacterial biomass. In this study, we assessed five phycocyanin sensors from three different manufacturers. A combination of culture-based experiments and a 30-sample field study was used to examine the effect of temperature and cyanobacteria morphology on phycocyanin fluorescence. Phycocyanin fluorescence increased with decrease in temperature, although this varied with manufacturer and cyanobacterial density. Phycocyanin fluorescence and cyanobacterial biovolume were strongly correlated (R 2 > 0.83, P single-celled and filamentous species. The relationship was generally weak for a colonial strain of Microcystis aeruginosa. The colonial culture was divided into different colony size classes and phycocyanin measured before and after manual disaggregation. No differences were measured, and the observation that fluorescence spiked when large colonial aggregates drifted past the light source suggests that sample heterogeneity, rather than lack of light penetration into the colonies, was the main cause of the poor relationship. Analysis of field samples showed a strong relationship between in situ phycocyanin fluorescence and spectrophotometrically measured phycocyanin (R 2 > 0.7, P  0.4). The five sensors tested in our study differed in their output of phycocyanin fluorescence, upper working limits (1200 to > 12,000 μg/L), and responses to temperature, highlighting the need for comprehensive sensor calibration and knowledge on the limitations of specific sensors prior to deployment.

  17. Diaphragm Based Fiber Bragg Grating Acceleration Sensor with Temperature Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianliang; Tan, Yuegang; Han, Xue; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, Zude

    2017-01-23

    A novel fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing-based acceleration sensor has been proposed to simultaneously decouple and measure temperature and acceleration in real-time. This design applied a diaphragm structure and utilized the axial property of a tightly suspended optical fiber, enabling improvement in its sensitivity and resonant frequency and achieve a low cross-sensitivity. The theoretical vibrational model of the sensor has been built, and its design parameters and sensing properties have been analyzed through the numerical analysis. A decoupling method has been presented with consideration of the thermal expansion of the sensor structure to realize temperature compensation. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is 8.66 pm/°C within the range of 30-90 °C. The acceleration sensitivity is 20.189 pm/g with a linearity of 0.764% within the range of 5~65 m/s². The corresponding working bandwidth is 10~200 Hz and its resonant frequency is 600 Hz. This sensor possesses an excellent impact resistance for the cross direction, and the cross-axis sensitivity is below 3.31%. This implementation can avoid the FBG-pasting procedure and overcome its associated shortcomings. The performance of the proposed acceleration sensor can be easily adjusted by modifying their corresponding physical parameters to satisfy requirements from different vibration measurements.

  18. Small CO2 Sensors Operate at Lower Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.

    2009-01-01

    Solid-electrolyte-based amperometric sensors for measuring concentrations of CO2 in air are being developed for use in detection of fires, environmental monitoring, and other applications where liquid-based electrochemical cells are problematic. These sensors are small (sizes of the order of a millimeter), are robust, are amenable to batch fabrication at relatively low cost, and exhibit short response times (seconds) and wide detection ranges. A sensor of this type at a previous stage of development included a solid electrolyte of Na3Zr2Si2PO12 deposited mainly between interdigitated Pt electrodes on an alumina substrate, all overcoated with an auxiliary solid electrolyte of (Na2CO3:BaCO3 in a molar ratio of 1:1.7). It was necessary to heat this device to a temperature as high as 600 C to obtain the desired sensitivity and rapid response. Heating sensors increases the power consumption of the sensor system and complicates the use of the sensor in some applications. Thus, decreasing a sensor s power consumption while maintaining its performance is a technical goal of ongoing development.

  19. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  20. A Hot Buried Object Detection Technique Using a Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apik Rusdiarna Indra PRAJA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-construction of a hot object detection system has been prepared by using a commercialized temperature sensor (connected to the computer for data collection to monitor any temperature changes produced by an object buried in the medium (sand. The monitoring was carried out based on real time measurements. For this work, the sensor has been varied its depth (the distance from the sensor to the hot object. From the experimental result, it was found that the apparatus could perform appropriately for the detection. This apparatus set up is potentially to be developed for human rescues detection of any foreign object including survivors buried in the ground caused by natural disaster of earthquake and volcanic eruption.

  1. Core body temperature control by total liquid ventilation using a virtual lung temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Mathieu; Micheau, Philippe; Robert, Raymond; Avoine, Olivier; Tissier, Renaud; Germim, Pamela Samanta; Vandamme, Jonathan; Praud, Jean-Paul; Walti, Herve

    2014-12-01

    In total liquid ventilation (TLV), the lungs are filled with a breathable liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) while a liquid ventilator ensures proper gas exchange by renewal of a tidal volume of oxygenated and temperature-controlled PFC. Given the rapid changes in core body temperature generated by TLV using the lung has a heat exchanger, it is crucial to have accurate and reliable core body temperature monitoring and control. This study presents the design of a virtual lung temperature sensor to control core temperature. In the first step, the virtual sensor, using expired PFC to estimate lung temperature noninvasively, was validated both in vitro and in vivo. The virtual lung temperature was then used to rapidly and automatically control core temperature. Experimentations were performed using the Inolivent-5.0 liquid ventilator with a feedback controller to modulate inspired PFC temperature thereby controlling lung temperature. The in vivo experimental protocol was conducted on seven newborn lambs instrumented with temperature sensors at the femoral artery, pulmonary artery, oesophagus, right ear drum, and rectum. After stabilization in conventional mechanical ventilation, TLV was initiated with fast hypothermia induction, followed by slow posthypothermic rewarming for 1 h, then by fast rewarming to normothermia and finally a second fast hypothermia induction phase. Results showed that the virtual lung temperature was able to provide an accurate estimation of systemic arterial temperature. Results also demonstrate that TLV can precisely control core body temperature and can be favorably compared to extracorporeal circulation in terms of speed.

  2. Core-temperature sensor ingestion timing and measurement variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Joseph W; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2010-01-01

    Telemetric core-temperature monitoring is becoming more widely used as a noninvasive means of monitoring core temperature during athletic events. To determine the effects of sensor ingestion timing on serial measures of core temperature during continuous exercise. Crossover study. Outdoor dirt track at an average ambient temperature of 4.4°C ± 4.1°C and relative humidity of 74.1% ± 11.0%. Seven healthy, active participants (3 men, 4 women; age  =  27.0 ± 7.5 years, height  =  172.9 ± 6.8 cm, body mass  =  67.5 ± 6.1 kg, percentage body fat  =  12.7% ± 6.9%, peak oxygen uptake [Vo(2peak)]  =  54.4 ± 6.9 mL•kg⁻¹•min⁻¹) completed the study. Participants completed a 45-minute exercise trial at approximately 70% Vo(2peak). They consumed core-temperature sensors at 24 hours (P1) and 40 minutes (P2) before exercise. Core temperature was recorded continuously (1-minute intervals) using a wireless data logger worn by the participants. All data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (trial × time), Pearson product moment correlation, and Bland-Altman plot. Fifteen comparisons were made between P1 and P2. The main effect of time indicated an increase in core temperature compared with the initial temperature. However, we did not find a main effect for trial or a trial × time interaction, indicating no differences in core temperature between the sensors (P1  =  38.3°C ± 0.2°C, P2  =  38.3°C ± 0.4°C). We found no differences in the temperature recordings between the 2 sensors. These results suggest that assumed sensor location (upper or lower gastrointestinal tract) does not appreciably alter the transmission of reliable and repeatable measures of core temperature during continuous running in the cold.

  3. An Integrated-Circuit Temperature Sensor for Calorimetry and Differential Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyskens, Mark

    1997-07-01

    Our application of an integrated-circuit (IC) temperature sensor which is easy-to-use, inexpensive, rugged, easily computer-interfacable and has good precision is described. The design, based on the National Semiconductor LM35 IC chip, avoids some of the difficulties associated with conventional sensors (thermocouples, thermistors, and platinum resistance thermometers) and a previously described IC sensor. The sensor can be used with a variety of data-acquisition systems. Applications range from general chemistry to physical chemistry, particularly where computer interfaced, digital temperature measurement is desired. Included is a detailed description of our current design with suggestions for improvement and a performance evaluation of the precision in differential measurement and the time constant for responding to temperature change.

  4. Extreme Environment Silicon Carbide Hybrid Temperature & Pressure Optical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2010-09-01

    This final report contains the main results from a 3-year program to further investigate the merits of SiC-based hybrid sensor designs for extreme environment measurements in gas turbines. The study is divided in three parts. Part 1 studies the material properties of SiC such as temporal response, refractive index change with temperature, and material thermal response reversibility. Sensor data from a combustion rig-test using this SiC sensor technology is analyzed and a robust distributed sensor network design is proposed. Part 2 of the study focuses on introducing redundancy in the sensor signal processing to provide improved temperature measurement robustness. In this regard, two distinct measurement methods emerge. A first method uses laser wavelength sensitivity of the SiC refractive index behavior and a second method that engages the Black-Body (BB) radiation of the SiC package. Part 3 of the program investigates a new way to measure pressure via a distance measurement technique that applies to hot objects including corrosive fluids.

  5. Multiplexed Sensor for Synthesis Gas Compsition and Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Buckley; Reza Gharavi; Marco Leon

    2007-10-01

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop a highly sensitive, multiplexed TDL-based sensor for CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O (and temperature), CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}S, and NH{sub 3}. Such a sensor was designed with so-called 'plug-and-play' characteristics to accommodate additional sensors, and provided in situ path-integrated measurements indicative of average concentrations at speeds suitable for direct gasifier control. The project developed the sensor and culminated in a real-world test of the underlying technology behind the sensor. During the project, new underlying measurements of spectroscopic constants for all of the gases of interest performed, in custom cells built for the project. The envisioned instrument was built from scratch from component lasers, fiber optics, amplifier blocks, detectors, etc. The sensor was tested for nearly a week in an operational power plant. The products of this research are expected to have a direct impact on gasifier technology and the production of high-quality syngas, with substantial broader application to coal and other energy systems. This report is the final technical report on project DE-FG26-04NT42172. During the project we completed all of the milestones planned in the project, with a modification of milestone (7) required due to lack of funding and personnel.

  6. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Insert for High Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard James (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Zarnescu, Livia (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A thermal protection system (TPS) test plug has optical fibers with FBGs embedded in the optical fiber arranged in a helix, an axial fiber, and a combination of the two. Optionally, one of the optical fibers is a sapphire FBG for measurement of the highest temperatures in the TPS plug. The test plug may include an ablating surface and a non-ablating surface, with an engagement surface with threads formed, the threads having a groove for placement of the optical fiber. The test plug may also include an optical connector positioned at the non-ablating surface for protection of the optical fiber during insertion and removal.

  7. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  8. Wavelength encoded fiber sensor for extreme temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, D.; Finazzi, V.; Coviello, G.; Bueno, A.; Sales, S.; Pruneri, V.

    2010-09-01

    We have successfully created Chemical Composition Gratings (CCGs) into two different types of optical fiber: standard telecommunications Germanium doped fibers and photosensitive Germanium/Boron co-doped fibers. We have performed temperature cycles for analyzing the sensing properties and degradation or hysteresis with respect to the CCG sensors. The results show that CCG sensors based on Germanium/Boron co-doped photosensitive fiber have an almost linear response and negligible hysteresis effects, with a response of almost 100°C/s.

  9. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by the magnetic field sensors and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  10. Manufacturing temperature and turbidity sensor based on ATMega 8535 microcontroller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzula, Nike Ika; Sakinah, Wazirotus; Endarko

    2017-01-01

    The manufacturing of temperature and turbidity measurement system based on ATMega 8535 microcontroller has been done. To measure temperature, this system uses LM35 and photodiode to measure water turbidity. The principle of LM35 sensor is comparing temperature based on its resistance. Thus temperature that is converted to voltage can be detected. The Turbidity system in this experiment is using Nephelometer method with the light scattered by suspended particles in fluid, with LED and photodiode parallel to each other. This system can measure turbidity in 1 NTU - 200 NTU with a close distance (1 inch) and a maximum relative error of 3.09% for the temperature measurement and also 3,12 % for turbidity measurement.

  11. Active Wireless Temperature Sensors for Aerospace Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active wireless sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor sub-surface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuitry to enable acquisition and non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 2.54-cm square integrated circuit.

  12. An optical fiber expendable seawater temperature/depth profile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Chen, Shizhe; Zhang, Keke; Yan, Xingkui; Yang, Xianglong; Bai, Xuejiao; Liu, Shixuan

    2017-10-01

    Marine expendable temperature/depth profiler (XBT) is a disposable measuring instrument which can obtain temperature/depth profile data quickly in large area waters and mainly used for marine surveys, scientific research, military application. The temperature measuring device is a thermistor in the conventional XBT probe (CXBT)and the depth data is only a calculated value by speed and time depth calculation formula which is not an accurate measurement result. Firstly, an optical fiber expendable temperature/depth sensor based on the FBG-LPG cascaded structure is proposed to solve the problems of the CXBT, namely the use of LPG and FBG were used to detect the water temperature and depth, respectively. Secondly, the fiber end reflective mirror is used to simplify optical cascade structure and optimize the system performance. Finally, the optical path is designed and optimized using the reflective optical fiber end mirror. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of temperature and depth sensing based on FBG-LPG cascade structure is about 0.0030C and 0.1%F.S. respectively, which can meet the requirements of the sea water temperature/depth observation. The reflectivity of reflection mirror is in the range from 48.8% to 72.5%, the resonant peak of FBG and LPG are reasonable and the whole spectrum are suitable for demodulation. Through research on the optical fiber XBT (FXBT), the direct measurement of deep-sea temperature/depth profile data can be obtained simultaneously, quickly and accurately. The FXBT is a new all-optical seawater temperature/depth sensor, which has important academic value and broad application prospect and is expected to replace the CXBT in the future.

  13. A Novel Wireless and Temperature-Compensated SAW Vibration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel wireless and passive surface acoustic wave (SAW based temperature-compensated vibration sensor utilizing a flexible Y-cut quartz cantilever beam with a relatively substantial proof mass and two one-port resonators is developed. One resonator acts as the sensing device adjacent to the clamped end for maximum strain sensitivity, and the other one is used as the reference located on clamped end for temperature compensation for vibration sensor through the differential approach. Vibration directed to the proof mass flex the cantilever, inducing relative changes in the acoustic propagation characteristics of the SAW travelling along the sensing device, and generated output signal varies in frequency as a function of vibration.  A theoretical mode using the Rayleigh method was established to determine the optimal dimensions of the cantilever beam. Coupling of Modes (COM model was used to extract the optimal design parameters of the SAW devices prior to fabrication. The performance of the developed SAW sensor attached to an antenna towards applied vibration was evaluated wirelessly by using the precise vibration table, programmable incubator chamber, and reader unit.  High vibration sensitivity of ~10.4 kHz/g, good temperature stability, and excellent linearity were observed in the wireless measurements.

  14. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  15. Pressure and Temperature Sensors Using Two Spin Crossover Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin-Maricel Jureschi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of a new design concept for dual spin crossover based sensors for concomitant detection of both temperature and pressure is presented. It is conjectured from numerical results obtained by mean field approximation applied to a Ising-like model that using two different spin crossover compounds containing switching molecules with weak elastic interactions it is possible to simultaneously measure P and T. When the interaction parameters are optimized, the spin transition is gradual and for each spin crossover compounds, both temperature and pressure values being identified from their optical densities. This concept offers great perspectives for smart sensing devices.

  16. [Measurement Error Analysis and Calibration Technique of NTC - Based Body Temperature Sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chi; Hu, Wei; Diao, Shengxi; Lin, Fujiang; Qian, Dahong

    2015-11-01

    A NTC thermistor-based wearable body temperature sensor was designed. This paper described the design principles and realization method of the NTC-based body temperature sensor. In this paper the temperature measurement error sources of the body temperature sensor were analyzed in detail. The automatic measurement and calibration method of ADC error was given. The results showed that the measurement accuracy of calibrated body temperature sensor is better than ± 0.04 degrees C. The temperature sensor has high accuracy, small size and low power consumption advantages.

  17. Evaluation of Fiber Bragg Grating and Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCary, Kelly Marie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fiber optic temperature sensors were evaluated in the High Temperature Test Lab (HTTL) to determine the accuracy of the measurements at various temperatures. A distributed temperature sensor was evaluated up to 550C and a fiber Bragg grating sensor was evaluated up to 750C. HTTL measurements indicate that there is a drift in fiber Bragg sensor over time of approximately -10C with higher accuracy at temperatures above 300C. The distributed sensor produced some bad data points at and above 500C but produced measurements with less than 2% error at increasing temperatures up to 400C

  18. Whispering gallery mode temperature sensor of liquid microresonastor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihai; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Zongda; Zhang, Yu; Wei, Yong; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Enming; Zhang, Yaxun; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-10-15

    We propose and demonstrate a whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonance-based temperature sensor, where the microresonator is made of a DCM (2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl] ethenyl]-6-methyl-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-doped oil droplet (a liquid material) immersed in the water solution. The oil droplet is trapped, controlled, and located by a dual-fiber optical tweezers, which prevents the deformation of the liquid droplet. We excite the fluorescence and lasing in the oil droplet and measure the shifts of the resonance wavelength at different temperatures. The results show that the resonance wavelength redshifts when the temperature increases. The testing sensitivity is 0.377 nm/°C in the temperature range 25°C-45°C. The results of the photobleaching testing of the dye indicate that measured errors can be reduced by reducing the measured time. As far as we know, this is the first time a WGM temperature sensor with a liquid state microcavity has been proposed. Compared with the solid microresonator, the utilization of the liquid microresonator improves the thermal sensitivity and provides the possibility of sensing in liquid samples or integrating into the chemical analyzers and microfluidic systems.

  19. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA, notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  20. Strain-based multicore fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökbulut, Belkıs.; Inci, Mehmet Naci

    2017-05-01

    A four-core optical fiber is introduced as a strain based temperature sensor to investigate the phase shift based on the temperature variations. An interferometric fringe pattern is obtained by the coherent waveguides from the four cores. A small piece of a four-core fiber is winded around a solid stainless steel cylinder to form a tight circular loop, which is exposed to a temperature change from 50 °C to 92 °C. Shear strain due to the expansion of the steel rod at this temperature interval causes an optical path length difference between the inner and outer core pairs, resulting a total phase shift of 20.4+/-0.29 rad, which is monitored with a CMOS camera. Using the phase changes, two dimensional shear strain is determined.

  1. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  2. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  3. Development of Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems. Phase 2; Temperature Sensor Systems Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 'development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems' program is divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems. The results of this effort were previously published in NASA CR-182111. As a result of Phase 1, three approaches were recommended for further development: pyrometry, thin-film sensors, and thermographic phosphors. The objective of Phase 2 were to fabricate and conduct laboratory demonstration tests of these systems. Six materials, mutually agreed upon by NASA and Pratt & Whitney, were investigated under this program. This report summarizes the Phase 2 effort and provides conclusions and recommendations for each of the categories evaluated.

  4. Ultra-High Temperature Sensors Based on Optical Property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabeel Riza

    2008-09-30

    In this program, Nuonics, Inc. has studied the fundamentals of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials-based optical sensor technology suited for extreme environments of coal-fired engines in power production. The program explored how SiC could be used for sensing temperature, pressure, and potential gas species in a gas turbine environment. The program successfully demonstrated the optical designs, signal processing and experimental data for enabling both temperature and pressure sensing using SiC materials. The program via its sub-contractors also explored gas species sensing using SiC, in this case, no clear commercially deployable method was proven. Extensive temperature and pressure measurement data using the proposed SiC sensors was acquired to 1000 deg-C and 40 atms, respectively. Importantly, a first time packaged all-SiC probe design was successfully operated in a Siemens industrial turbine rig facility with the probe surviving the harsh chemical, pressure, and temperature environment during 28 days of test operations. The probe also survived a 1600 deg-C thermal shock test using an industrial flame.

  5. Error analysis for mesospheric temperature profiling by absorptive occultation sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rieder

    Full Text Available An error analysis for mesospheric profiles retrieved from absorptive occultation data has been performed, starting with realistic error assumptions as would apply to intensity data collected by available high-precision UV photodiode sensors. Propagation of statistical errors was investigated through the complete retrieval chain from measured intensity profiles to atmospheric density, pressure, and temperature profiles. We assumed unbiased errors as the occultation method is essentially self-calibrating and straight-line propagation of occulted signals as we focus on heights of 50–100 km, where refractive bending of the sensed radiation is negligible. Throughout the analysis the errors were characterized at each retrieval step by their mean profile, their covariance matrix and their probability density function (pdf. This furnishes, compared to a variance-only estimation, a much improved insight into the error propagation mechanism. We applied the procedure to a baseline analysis of the performance of a recently proposed solar UV occultation sensor (SMAS – Sun Monitor and Atmospheric Sounder and provide, using a reasonable exponential atmospheric model as background, results on error standard deviations and error correlation functions of density, pressure, and temperature profiles. Two different sensor photodiode assumptions are discussed, respectively, diamond diodes (DD with 0.03% and silicon diodes (SD with 0.1% (unattenuated intensity measurement noise at 10 Hz sampling rate. A factor-of-2 margin was applied to these noise values in order to roughly account for unmodeled cross section uncertainties. Within the entire height domain (50–100 km we find temperature to be retrieved to better than 0.3 K (DD / 1 K (SD accuracy, respectively, at 2 km height resolution. The results indicate that absorptive occultations acquired by a SMAS-type sensor could provide mesospheric profiles of fundamental variables such as temperature with

  6. Diamond thin film temperature and heat-flux sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M.; Yang, G. S.; Masood, A.; Fredricks, R.

    1995-01-01

    Diamond film temperature and heat-flux sensors are developed using a technology compatible with silicon integrated circuit processing. The technology involves diamond nucleation, patterning, doping, and metallization. Multi-sensor test chips were designed and fabricated to study the thermistor behavior. The minimum feature size (device width) for 1st and 2nd generation chips are 160 and 5 micron, respectively. The p-type diamond thermistors on the 1st generation test chip show temperature and response time ranges of 80-1270 K and 0.29-25 microseconds, respectively. An array of diamond thermistors, acting as heat flux sensors, was successfully fabricated on an oxidized Si rod with a diameter of 1 cm. Some problems were encountered in the patterning of the Pt/Ti ohmic contacts on the rod, due mainly to the surface roughness of the diamond film. The use of thermistors with a minimum width of 5 micron (to improve the spatial resolution of measurement) resulted in lithographic problems related to surface roughness of diamond films. We improved the mean surface roughness from 124 nm to 30 nm by using an ultra high nucleation density of 10(exp 11)/sq cm. To deposit thermistors with such small dimensions on a curved surface, a new 3-D diamond patterning technique is currently under development. This involves writing a diamond seed pattern directly on the curved surface by a computer-controlled nozzle.

  7. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS, an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  8. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  9. Embedded supervisory control and output reporting for the oscillating ultrasonic temperature sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hashmi, Anas; Malakoutikhah, Maryam; Light, Roger; Kalashnikov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic temperature sensors can potentially outperform conven-tional sensors because they are capable of very fast sensing across the complete ultrasound pathway, whilst conventional sensors only sense temperature at a single point and have substantial thermal inertia. We report recent develop-ments in electronic instrumentation for oscillating ultrasonic temperature sen-sors with the aim of achieving high accuracy and low scatter at a low cost.

  10. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monit...

  11. Temperature Effect on Capacitive Humidity Sensors and its Compensation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the study of the effect of temperature on different capacitive humidity sensors used in practice. Capacitance of the humidity sensor, which is a function of concentration of water vapor, also depends on ambient temperature. This variation of ambient temperature causes error in the performance of sensor outputs and its compensation is essential. In this paper, we have used an artificial neural network to compensate the effect of ambient temperature error. The proposed artificial neural network technique is based on inverse model of the sensor. The technique is applicable for compensation of linear or nonlinear temperature effect of humidity sensor. It can also compensate the nonlinearity of the capacitive humidity response which is an issue for all most all types of humidity sensor. Our simulation studies show the sensor output and artificial neural network model output matches closely. Even though sensor characteristics change with temperature, the proposed model performs well irrespective of any change in temperature. It can be extended for the temperature compensation of other sensors. The maximum error for nonlinearity using the ANN technique are 0.2 % and temperature error of 0.08 % for temperature range between 10 0C to 60 0C of Sensor 3 and 0.01 % for temperature range between 25 0C to 85 0C of Sensor 4 respectively.

  12. In situ measurement of the junction temperature of light emitting diodes using a flexible micro temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Su, Ay; Liu, Yin-Chieh; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Hsieh, Wei-Jung

    2009-01-01

    This investigation aimed to fabricate a flexible micro resistive temperature sensor to measure the junction temperature of a light emitting diode (LED). The junction temperature is typically measured using a thermal resistance measurement approach. This approach is limited in that no standard regulates the timing of data capture. This work presents a micro temperature sensor that can measure temperature stably and continuously, and has the advantages of being lightweight and able to monitor junction temperatures in real time. Micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technologies are employed to minimize the size of a temperature sensor that is constructed on a stainless steel foil substrate (SS-304 with 30 μm thickness). A flexible micro resistive temperature sensor can be fixed between the LED chip and the frame. The junction temperature of the LED can be measured from the linear relationship between the temperature and the resistance. The sensitivity of the micro temperature sensor is 0.059 ± 0.004 Ω/°C. The temperature of the commercial CREE(®) EZ1000 chip is 119.97 °C when it is thermally stable, as measured using the micro temperature sensor; however, it was 126.9 °C, when measured by thermal resistance measurement. The micro temperature sensor can be used to replace thermal resistance measurement and performs reliably.

  13. Study of robust thin film PT-1000 temperature sensors for cryogenic process control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, R.; Boguhn, D.; Fillinger, H.; Schlachter, S. I.; Süßer, M.

    2014-01-01

    In some cryogenic process measurement applications, for example, in hydrogen technology and in high temperature superconductor based generators, there is a need of robust temperature sensors. These sensors should be able to measure the large temperature range of 20 - 500 K with reasonable resolution and accuracy. Thin film PT 1000 sensors could be a choice to cover this large temperature range. Twenty one sensors selected from the same production batch were tested for their temperature sensitivity which was then compared with different batch sensors. Furthermore, the sensor's stability was studied by subjecting the sensors to repeated temperature cycles of 78-525 K. Deviations in the resistance were investigated using ice point calibration and water triple point calibration methods. Also the study of directional oriented intense static magnetic field effects up to 8 Oersted (Oe) were conducted to understand its magneto resistance behaviour in the cryogenic temperature range from 77 K - 15 K. This paper reports all investigation results in detail.

  14. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musin, Frédéric; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-07-28

    Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  15. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  16. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Musin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible.

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  18. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M. L.; Han, M.; Liu, G.; van Eden, G. G.; Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M.; Stratton, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry-Pérot cavity when broadband light, λo ˜ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ˜150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m2 when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  19. A sensor for combined temperature, pressure, and refractive index detection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Reinsch; Kort Bremer; Elfed Lewis; Gabriel Leen; Steffen Lochmann

    2013-01-01

    A sensor (1) has a light conductor (2) having a grating (FBG), a cavity (5), and a transparent cavity end wall (4), a light emitter for directing light through the conductor, and a light detector for detecting reflected light, and a processor. The processor is adapted to analyse light reflected due to the grating (FBG, 6) to determine an indication of temperature, light reflected from the end (7) of the cavity (5) to determine an indication of pressure, and also light reflected from the outer...

  20. Cryogenic fiber optic temperature sensor and method of manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochergin, Vladimir (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention teaches the fiber optic sensors temperature sensors for cryogenic temperature range with improved sensitivity and resolution, and method of making said sensors. In more detail, the present invention is related to enhancement of temperature sensitivity of fiber optic temperature sensors at cryogenic temperatures by utilizing nanomaterials with a thermal expansion coefficient that is smaller than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber but larger in absolute value than the thermal expansion coefficient of the optical fiber at least over a range of temperatures.

  1. Thermal sensor based zinc oxide diode for low temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaya, R.O. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (South Africa); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Farooq, W.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yakuphanoglu, F., E-mail: fyhan@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Firat University, Elazig, 23169 (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    The device parameters of Al/p-Si/Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O-NiO/Al Schottky diode for x = 0.005 were investigated over the 50 K–400 K temperature range using direct current–voltage (I–V) and impedance spectroscopy. The films were prepared using the sol–gel method followed by spin-coating on p-Si substrate. The ideality factor, barrier height, resistance and capacitance of the diode were found to depend on temperature. The calculated barrier height has a mean. Capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements show that the capacitance decreases with increasing frequency, suggesting a continuous distribution of interface states over the surveyed 100 kHz to 1 MHz frequency range. The interface state densities, N{sub ss}, of the diode were calculated and found to peak as functions of bias and temperature in two temperature regions of 50 K–300 K and 300 K–400 K. A peak value of approximately 10{sup 12}/eV cm{sup 2} was observed around 0.7 V bias for 350 K and at 3 × 10{sup 12}/eVcm{sup 2} around 2.2 V bias for 300 K. The relaxation time was found to average 4.7 μs over all the temperatures, but showing its lowest value of 1.58 μs at 300 K. It is seen that the interface states of the diode is controlled by the temperature. This suggests that Al/p-Si/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al diode can be used as a thermal sensors for low temperature applications. - Highlights: • Al/pSi/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al Schottky diode was fabricated by sol gel method. • The interface state density of the diode is controlled by the temperature. • Zinc oxide based diode can be used as a thermal sensor for low temperature applications.

  2. Development and Performance Evaluation of Optical Sensors for High Temperature Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Varga, D.; Floyd, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses fiber optic sensors designed and constructed to withstand extreme temperatures of aircraft engine. The paper describes development and performance evaluation of fiber optic Bragg grating based sensors. It also describes the design and presents test results of packaged sensors subjected to temperatures up to 1000 C for prolonged periods of time.

  3. Temperature compensated and self-calibrated current sensor using reference current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul [Seminole, FL; Brubaker, Michael Allen [Loveland, CO; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane [Seminole, FL

    2008-01-22

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference electrical current carried by a conductor positioned within the sensing window of the current sensor is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  4. Development and Performance Verification of Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in High Temperature Engine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kren, Lawrence A.; Floyd, Bertram M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Martinez, Martel

    2014-01-01

    A High Temperature Fiber Optic Sensor (HTFOS) has been developed at NASA Glenn Research Center for aircraft engine applications. After fabrication and preliminary in-house performance evaluation, the HTFOS was tested in an engine environment at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. The engine tests enabled the performance of the HTFOS in real engine environments to be evaluated along with the ability of the sensor to respond to changes in the engine's operating condition. Data were collected prior, during, and after each test in order to observe the change in temperature from ambient to each of the various test point levels. An adequate amount of data was collected and analyzed to satisfy the research team that HTFOS operates properly while the engine was running. Temperature measurements made by HTFOS while the engine was running agreed with those anticipated.

  5. Measurement error of surface-mounted fiber Bragg grating temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liu; Zude, Zhou; Erlong, Zhang; Jun, Zhang; Yuegang, Tan; Mingyao, Liu

    2014-06-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are extensively used to measure surface temperatures. However, the temperature gradient effect of a surface-mounted FBG sensor is often overlooked. A surface-type temperature standard setup was prepared in this study to investigate the measurement errors of FBG temperature sensors. Experimental results show that the measurement error of a bare fiber sensor has an obvious linear relationship with surface temperature, with the largest error achieved at 8.1 °C. Sensors packaged with heat conduction grease generate smaller measurement errors than do bare FBG sensors and commercial thermal resistors. Thus, high-quality packaged methods and proper modes of fixation can effectively improve the accuracy of FBG sensors in measuring surface temperatures.

  6. Uncertainty of a hybrid surface temperature sensor for silicon wafers and comparison with an embedded thermocouple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Tohru; Gogami, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a user-friendly hybrid surface temperature sensor. The uncertainties of temperature readings associated with this sensor and a thermocouple embedded in a silicon wafer are compared. The expanded uncertainties (k=2) of the hybrid temperature sensor and the embedded thermocouple are 2.11 and 2.37 K, respectively, in the temperature range between 600 and 1000 K. In the present paper, the uncertainty evaluation and the sources of uncertainty are described.

  7. Measurements of true polymer melt temperature in a circular cross-sectional duct by moving temperature sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patcharaphun,S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design and develop an experimental apparatus and a temperature sensor in order to measure true melt temperature rise due to the shear heating during the flow. The designed apparatus featured two different forms, one being the polymer melt flowing past the stationary sensor (so-called moving piston, and the other being the sensor moving along the stationary polymer melt (so-called moving sensor. By subtracting the temperature data obtained by moving sensor from those obtained by moving piston the true melt temperature rise could be yielded. The temperature data were collected using a high-speed data logger and a computer. The effects of melt/piston velocity, initial melts temperature and various types of polymer melts used were of interest in this work. It was found that the experimental apparatus designed and used in this work was very effective and gave reasonably accurate

  8. [Research on parameters of dynamic colorimetric temperature sensor and it's application to fuel air explosion temperature field detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Qing-ming; Wang, Jian-ping

    2013-09-01

    According to the theory of colorimetric thermometry,the influences of center wavelength, wavelength bandwidth and solid angle on response speed and the precision of the sensor was analyzed systematically, and the operating parameters for transient high temperature measurement system were determined. A calculation method based on photoelectric conversion coefficient, and higher and lower operating wavelength of the colorimetric temperature sensor was given. At the optimal operating temperature, calibration experiment was conducted in a high temperature blackbody furnace. Based on the experimental results, the operating parameters of the sensor were determined and the colorimetric temperature response was calculated. The results show that the errors between the calculated response and the experiment one are less than 1%. By using the colorimetric temperature sensor, the temperature response of fuel air explosion field was detected and the variations of temperature with time and space in detonation field were obtained.

  9. Temperature-Sensitive Coating Sensor Based on Hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive coating, based on hematite (iron III oxide), has been developed to measure surface temperature using spectral techniques. The hematite powder is added to a binder that allows the mixture to be painted on the surface of a test specimen. The coating dynamically changes its relative spectral makeup or color with changes in temperature. The color changes from a reddish-brown appearance at room temperature (25 C) to a black-gray appearance at temperatures around 600 C. The color change is reversible and repeatable with temperature cycling from low to high and back to low temperatures. Detection of the spectral changes can be recorded by different sensors, including spectrometers, photodiodes, and cameras. Using a-priori information obtained through calibration experiments in known thermal environments, the color change can then be calibrated to yield accurate quantitative temperature information. Temperature information can be obtained at a point, or over an entire surface, depending on the type of equipment used for data acquisition. Because this innovation uses spectrophotometry principles of operation, rather than the current methods, which use photoluminescence principles, white light can be used for illumination rather than high-intensity short wavelength excitation. The generation of high-intensity white (or potentially filtered long wavelength light) is much easier, and is used more prevalently for photography and video technologies. In outdoor tests, the Sun can be used for short durations as an illumination source as long as the amplitude remains relatively constant. The reflected light is also much higher in intensity than the emitted light from the inefficient current methods. Having a much brighter surface allows a wider array of detection schemes and devices. Because color change is the principle of operation, the development of high-quality, lower-cost digital cameras can be used for detection, as opposed to the high-cost imagers

  10. Investigation of the limits of a fibre optic sensor system for measurement of temperature distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Robert; Johnson, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an innovative temperature sensor system which is able to measure the temperature distribution along a fibre optical cable. This technique for temperature measurement is based on Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR).......The aim of this project is to develop an innovative temperature sensor system which is able to measure the temperature distribution along a fibre optical cable. This technique for temperature measurement is based on Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR)....

  11. Interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating temperature and strain sensors with a temperature-stabilized VCSEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunami, Toru; Yamada, Taichi; Tsuchiya, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The interrogation of fiber-Bragg-grating (FBG) sensors using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) is discussed. A long-wavelength (1.54 μm) VCSEL was used as a wavelength-tunable source by variation in the current. Temperature stabilization was performed with a thermoelectric device. Characteristics of temperature and strain sensing were investigated. FBGs with different reflectivities were compared. For temperature sensing, the root-mean-square error in the measurement was reduced to 1/3 that without temperature stabilization. The dependence of the measurement error on the reflectivities of the FBGs was investigated. The measurement error was larger for FBGs with lower reflectivities in both temperature and strain sensing. Improvement on the sensing with low-reflectivity FBGs is discussed.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotube films as small-sized temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolomeo, A.; Sarno, M.; Giubileo, F.; Altavilla, C.; Iemmo, L.; Piano, S.; Bobba, F.; Longobardi, M.; Scarfato, A.; Sannino, D.; Cucolo, A. M.; Ciambelli, P.

    2009-03-01

    We present the fabrication of thick and dense carbon nanotube networks in the form of freestanding films (CNTFs) and the study of their electric resistance as a function of the temperature, from 4 to 420 K. A nonmetallic behavior with a monotonic R(T ) and a temperature coefficient of resistance around -7×10-4 K-1 is generally observed. A behavioral accordance of the CNTF conductance with the temperature measured by a solid-state thermistor (ZnNO, Si, or Pt) is demonstrated, suggesting the possibility of using CNTFs as temperature small-sized (freely scalable) sensors, besides being confirmed by a wide range of sensitivity, fast response, and good stability and durability. Concerning electric behavior, we also underline that a transition from nonmetal to metal slightly below 273 K has been rarely observed. A model involving regions of highly anisotropic metallic conduction separated by tunneling barrier regions can explain the nonmetallic to metallic crossover based on the competing mechanisms of the metallic resistance rise and the barrier resistance lowering.

  13. Improved Blackbody Temperature Sensors for a Vacuum Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jeff; Coppens, Chris; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Schofield, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Some improvements have been made in the design and fabrication of blackbody sensors (BBSs) used to measure the temperature of a heater core in a vacuum furnace. Each BBS consists of a ring of thermally conductive, high-melting-temperature material with two tantalum-sheathed thermocouples attached at diametrically opposite points. The name "blackbody sensor" reflects the basic principle of operation. Heat is transferred between the ring and the furnace heater core primarily by blackbody radiation, heat is conducted through the ring to the thermocouples, and the temperature of the ring (and, hence, the temperature of the heater core) is measured by use of the thermocouples. Two main requirements have guided the development of these BBSs: (1) The rings should have as high an emissivity as possible in order to maximize the heat-transfer rate and thereby maximize temperature-monitoring performance and (2) the thermocouples must be joined to the rings in such a way as to ensure long-term, reliable intimate thermal contact. The problem of fabricating a BBS to satisfy these requirements is complicated by an application-specific prohibition against overheating and thereby damaging nearby instrumentation leads through the use of conventional furnace brazing or any other technique that involves heating the entire BBS and its surroundings. The problem is further complicated by another application-specific prohibition against damaging the thin tantalum thermocouple sheaths through the use of conventional welding to join the thermocouples to the ring. The first BBS rings were made of graphite. The tantalum-sheathed thermocouples were attached to the graphite rings by use of high-temperature graphite cements. The ring/thermocouple bonds thus formed were found to be weak and unreliable, and so graphite rings and graphite cements were abandoned. Now, each BBS ring is made from one of two materials: either tantalum or a molybdenum/titanium/zirconium alloy. The tantalum

  14. Temperature Sensor Using a Multiwavelength Erbium-Doped Fiber Ring Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor is presented based on a multiwavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser. The laser is comprised of fiber Bragg grating reflectors as the oscillation wavelength selecting filters. The performance of the temperature sensor in terms of both wavelength and laser output power was investigated, as well as the application of this system for remote temperature measurements.

  15. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  16. Deep-Ocean Bottom Pressure and Temperature Sensors Report: Methods and Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    N , T., and N used for conversion of’ :" temperatura a b ...... > temperature counts, N to emperature in c .......... 37 Table 8.2 Pressure sensor ...7 -A19 911 DEEP-OCEAN BOTTOM PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE SENSORS 1/2REPORT! METHODS AIND DA, (U) RHODE ISLAND UNIV NARRAGANSETT GRADUAT SCHOOL OF...11 ..,: 1 ., DIE FILE COPY -> DEEP-OCEAN BOTTOM PRESSURE Cn AND TEMPERATURE SENSORS REPORT: METHODS AND DATA by D. R. WATTS and H. KONTOYIANNIS ckis

  17. Influence of sensor ingestion timing on consistency of temperature measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-03-01

    The validity and the reliability of using intestinal temperature (T int) via ingestible temperature sensors (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and T int measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Eight volunteers (six men and two women) swallowed ITS 5 h (ITS-5) and 29 h (ITS-29) before 4 h of varying intensity activity. T int was measured simultaneously from both ITS, and T int differences between the ITS-5 and the ITS-29 over the 4 h of activity were plotted and compared relative to a meaningful threshold of acceptance (+/-0.25 degrees C). The percentage of time in which the differences between paired ITS (ITS-5 vs ITS-29) were greater than or less than the threshold of acceptance was calculated. T int values showed no systematic bias, were normally distributed, and ranged from 36.94 degrees C to 39.24 degrees C. The maximum T int difference between paired ITS was 0.83 degrees C with a minimum difference of 0.00 degrees C. The typical magnitude of the differences (SE of the estimate) was 0.24 degrees C, and these differences were uniform across the entire range of observed temperatures. Paired T int measures fell outside of the threshold of acceptance 43.8% of the time during the 4 h of activity. The differences between ITS-5 and ITS-29 were larger than the threshold of acceptance during a substantial portion of the observed 4-h activity period. Ingesting an ITS more than 5 h before activity will not completely eliminate confounding factors but may improve accuracy and consistency of core body temperature.

  18. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Ganhua; Chen Junhong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Ocola, Leonidas E, E-mail: jhchen@uwm.ed [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-11-04

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 {sup 0}C) or one-step heating (200 {sup 0}C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO{sub 2}/NH{sub 3}). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  19. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ganhua; Ocola, Leonidas E; Chen, Junhong

    2009-11-04

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 degrees C) or one-step heating (200 degrees C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO2 and NH3 gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO2/NH3). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  20. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ganhua; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Chen, Junhong

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 °C) or one-step heating (200 °C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO2 and NH3 gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO2/NH3). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  1. Characterization of measurement artefacts in fluoroptic temperature sensors: implications for laser thermal therapy at 810 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Vitkin, I Alex; Sherar, Michael D; Whelan, William M

    2005-04-01

    Fluoroptic sensors are used to measure interstitial temperatures but their utility for monitoring laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is unclear because these sensors exhibit a measurement artefact when exposed to the near-infrared (NIR) treatment light. This study investigates the cause of the artefact to determine whether fluoroptic sensors can provide reliable temperature measurements during LITT. The temperature rise measured by a fluoroptic sensor irradiated in non-absorbing media (air and water) was considered an artefact. Temperature rise was measured as a function of distance from a laser source. Two different sensor designs and several laser powers were investigated. A relationship between fluence rate and measurement artefact in water was determined and coupled with a numerical simulation of LITT in liver to estimate the error in temperature measurements made by fluoroptic sensors in tissue in proximity to the laser source. The effect of ambient light on the performance of sensors capped with a transparent material ("clear-capped sensors") was also investigated. The temperature rise recorded in air by both clear- and black-capped fluoroptic sensors decreased with distance from a laser source in a manner similar to fluence rate. Sensor cap material, laser power, and the thermal properties of the surrounding medium affected the magnitude of the artefact. Numerical simulations indicated that the accuracy of a clear-capped fluoroptic sensor used to monitor a typical LITT treatment in liver is > 1 degrees C provided the sensor is further than approximately 3 mm from the source. It was also shown that clear-capped fluoroptic sensors are affected by ambient light. The measurement artefact experienced by both black-capped and clear-capped fluoroptic sensors irradiated by NIR light scales with fluence rate and is due to direct absorption of the laser light, which results in sensor self-heating. Clear-capped fluoroptic sensors can be used to accurately

  2. Micro-LiDAR velocity, temperature, density, concentration sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M. (Inventor); Dorrington, Adrian A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A light scatter sensor includes a sensor body in which are positioned a plurality of optical fibers. The sensor body includes a surface, in one end of each of the optical fibers terminates at the surface of the sensor body. One of the optical fibers is an illumination fiber for emitting light. A plurality of second optical fibers are collection fibers for collecting scattered light signals. A light sensor processor is connected to the collection fibers to detect the scattered light signals.

  3. A Temperature Sensor Clustering Method for Thermal Error Modeling of Heavy Milling Machine Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengchun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A clustering method is an effective way to select the proper temperature sensor location for thermal error modeling of machine tools. In this paper, a new temperature sensor clustering method is proposed. By analyzing the characteristics of the temperature of the sensors in a heavy floor-type milling machine tool, an indicator involving both the Euclidean distance and the correlation coefficient was proposed to reflect the differences between temperature sensors, and the indicator was expressed by a distance matrix to be used for hierarchical clustering. Then, the weight coefficient in the distance matrix and the number of the clusters (groups were optimized by a genetic algorithm (GA, and the fitness function of the GA was also rebuilt by establishing the thermal error model at one rotation speed, then deriving its accuracy at two different rotation speeds with a temperature disturbance. Thus, the parameters for clustering, as well as the final selection of the temperature sensors, were derived. Finally, the method proposed in this paper was verified on a machine tool. According to the selected temperature sensors, a thermal error model of the machine tool was established and used to predict the thermal error. The results indicate that the selected temperature sensors can accurately predict thermal error at different rotation speeds, and the proposed temperature sensor clustering method for sensor selection is expected to be used for the thermal error modeling for other machine tools.

  4. Temperature measurement of geothermal wells by optical fiber sensor; Hikari fiber sensor wo mochiita chinetsusei no ondo bunpu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, N.; Sakaguchi, K. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Experiments of temperature measurement were conducted in high temperature and high pressure geothermal wells using optical fiber sensor. A temperature measurement system using optical fiber sensor was applied to geothermal wells. Working availability was confirmed under the condition up to the depth of 1,750 m and the temperature of 240 centigrade. Observed values agreed well with those observed by the conventional temperature logging. Durability of the optical fiber sensor was also sufficient. The maximum standard deviations of measured values were 1.3 centigrade at the depth of 1,750 m at 195 centigrade for the loop-type sensor, and 3.7 centigrade at the depth of 365 m at about 200 centigrade for the single-end sensor. Although the accuracy was inferior to the conventional measurement using a thermo couple, it was enough to be applied to usual temperature logging. Furthermore, for this system, the temperature profile in the whole well can be monitored, simultaneously. Through the experiments, the detailed successive change of temperature profile accompanied with the water injection can be clearly illustrated. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Wide-Range Temperature Sensors with High-Level Pulse Train Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of temperature sensors have been developed for wide-range temperature applications. The two sensors measure temperature in the range of -190 to +200 C and utilize a thin-film platinum RTD (resistance temperature detector) as the temperature-sensing element. Other parts used in the fabrication of these sensors include NPO (negative-positive- zero) type ceramic capacitors for timing, thermally-stable film or wirewound resistors, and high-temperature circuit boards and solder. The first type of temperature sensor is a relaxation oscillator circuit using an SOI (silicon-on-insulator) operational amplifier as a comparator. The output is a pulse train with a period that is roughly proportional to the temperature being measured. The voltage level of the pulse train is high-level, for example 10 V. The high-level output makes the sensor less sensitive to noise or electromagnetic interference. The output can be read by a frequency or period meter and then converted into a temperature reading. The second type of temperature sensor is made up of various types of multivibrator circuits using an SOI type 555 timer and the passive components mentioned above. Three configurations have been developed that were based on the technique of charging and discharging a capacitor through a resistive element to create a train of pulses governed by the capacitor-resistor time constant. Both types of sensors, which operated successfully over the wide temperature range, have potential use in extreme temperature environments including jet engines and space exploration missions.

  6. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 1; Bragg Grating Strain and Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors to infer integrity of the aircraft structure. Part 1 of this two part series describes sensors that will measure load and temperature signatures of these structures. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring these parameters. Part 2 will describe techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service integrity of composite structures using a single fiber optic sensor capable of measuring multiple chemical and physical parameters. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and the methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  7. Application of High-Temperature Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer Strain Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    In this presentation to the NASA Aeronautics Sensor Working Group the application of a strain sensor is outlined. The high-temperature extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) strain sensor was developed due to a need for robust strain sensors that operate accurately and reliably beyond 1800 F. Specifically, the new strain sensor would provide data for validating finite element models and thermal-structural analyses. Sensor attachment techniques were also developed to improve methods of handling and protecting the fragile sensors during the harsh installation process. It was determined that thermal sprayed attachments are preferable even though cements are simpler to apply as cements are more prone to bond failure and are often corrosive. Previous thermal/mechanical cantilever beam testing of EFPI yielded very little change to 1200 F, with excellent correlation with SG to 550 F. Current combined thermal/mechanical loading for sensitivity testing is accomplished by a furnace/cantilever beam loading system. Dilatometer testing has can also be used in sensor characterization to evaluate bond integrity, evaluate sensitivity and accuracy and to evaluate sensor-to-sensor scatter, repeatability, hysteresis and drift. Future fiber optic testing will examine single-mode silica EFPIs in a combined thermal/mechanical load fixture on C-C and C-SiC substrates, develop a multi-mode Sapphire strain-sensor, test and evaluate high-temperature fiber Bragg Gratings for use as strain and temperature sensors and attach and evaluate a high-temperature heat flux gauge.

  8. A Temperature Sensor Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber Macro-Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraleda, Alberto Tapetado; García, Carmen Vázquez; Zaballa, Joseba Zubia; Arrue, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The design and development of a plastic optical fiber (POF) macrobend temperature sensor is presented. The sensor has a linear response versus temperature at a fixed bend radius, with a sensitivity of 1.92·10−3 (°C)−1. The sensor system used a dummy fiber-optic sensor for reference purposes having a resolution below 0.3 °C. A comprehensive experimental analysis was carried out to provide insight into the effect of different surrounding media on practical macro-bend POF sensor implementation. Experimental results are successfully compared with bend loss calculations. PMID:24077323

  9. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes sensor for organic liquid detection at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as room temperature chemical sensor for the detection of organic liquids such as ethanol, propanol, methanol and toluene. MWCNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. The interdigitated electrodes were fabricated by conventional photolithography technique. The sensor was fabricated by drop depositing MWCNT suspension onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensing properties of MWCNTs sensor was studied for organic liquids detection. The resistance of sensor was found to increase upon exposure to these liquids. Sensor shows good reversibility and fast response at room temperature. Charge transfer between the organic liquid and sensing element is the dominant sensing mechanism.

  10. A Temperature Sensor Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber Macro-Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseba Zubia Zaballa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of a plastic optical fiber (POF macrobend temperature sensor is presented. The sensor has a linear response versus temperature at a fixed bend radius, with a sensitivity of . The sensor system used a dummy fiber-optic sensor for reference purposes having a resolution below 0.3 °C. A comprehensive experimental analysis was carried out to provide insight into the effect of different surrounding media on practical macro-bend POF sensor implementation. Experimental results are successfully compared with bend loss calculations.

  11. State of the art in high-temperature fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Robert S.; Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Palmer, Matthew E.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the work presented was to develop a suite of sensors for use in high-temperature aerospace environments, including turbine engine monitoring, hypersonic vehicle skin friction measurements, and support ground and flight test operations. A fiber optic sensor platform was used to construct the sensor suite. Successful laboratory demonstrations include calibration of pressure sensors to 500psi at a gas temperature of 800°C. Additionally, pressure sensors were demonstrated at 800°C in combination with a high-speed (1.0MHz) fiber optic readout system enabling previously unobtainable dynamic measurements at high-temperatures. Temperature sensors have been field tested up to 1400°C and as low as -195°C. The key advancement that enabled the operation of these novel harsh environment sensors was a fiber optic packaging methodology that allowed the coupling of alumina and sapphire transducer components, optical fiber, and high-temperature alloy housing materials. The basic operation of the sensors and early experimental results are presented. Each of the sensors described here represent a quantifiable advancement in the state of the art in high-temperature physical sensors and will have a significant impact on the aerospace propulsion instrumentation industry.

  12. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Man Lo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM, with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  13. Application of Flexible Micro Temperature Sensor in Oxidative Steam Reforming by a Methanol Micro Reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Shen, Chia-Chieh; Yeh, Chuin-Tih; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM), with the relevant parameters optimized as well. PMID:22319407

  14. Application of flexible micro temperature sensor in oxidative steam reforming by a methanol micro reformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Shen, Chia-Chieh; Yeh, Chuin-Tih; Chang, Chi-Chung; Lo, Yi-Man

    2011-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell applications reflect the ability of reformers to produce hydrogen. This work presents a flexible micro temperature sensor that is fabricated based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and integrated into a flat micro methanol reformer to observe the conditions inside that reformer. The micro temperature sensor has higher accuracy and sensitivity than a conventionally adopted thermocouple. Despite various micro temperature sensor applications, integrated micro reformers are still relatively new. This work proposes a novel method for integrating micro methanol reformers and micro temperature sensors, subsequently increasing the methanol conversion rate and the hydrogen production rate by varying the fuel supply rate and the water/methanol ratio. Importantly, the proposed micro temperature sensor adequately controls the interior temperature during oxidative steam reforming of methanol (OSRM), with the relevant parameters optimized as well.

  15. A frequency output ferroelectric phase PNZT capacitor-based temperature sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Naveed

    2016-09-05

    In this paper, a frequency output temperature sensor based on a 4% Niobium doped 20/80 Zr/Ti Lead Zirconate Titanate (PNZT) capacitor is proposed. The sensor capacitance vs temperature and capacitance vs voltage characteristics are experimentally measured below the Curie temperature of the ferroelectric capacitor. The capacitance of the 20/80 (Zr/Ti) composition PNZT capacitor changes by 29% for a temperature change from 10°C to 100°C, which translates to 0.32%/°C temperature sensitivity. The measured sensor characteristics show less than ∼0.7°C deviation from the ideal linear response. A Wien bridge oscillator based temperature sensor is demonstrated based on the PNZT capacitors. Mathematical analysis for the effect of the op-amp finite unity-gain frequency on the sensor circuit oscillation frequency is provided. The experimentally realized frequency output temperature sensor shows -17.6% relative frequency change for a temperature change from 10°C to 100°C. The proposed capacitive temperature sensor can be used in low-power smart sensor nodes without the need for extensive calibration. © 2015 IEEE.

  16. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Pawlak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common −65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications—superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor.

  17. A Fully Transparent Flexible Sensor for Cryogenic Temperatures Based on High Strength Metallurgical Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Lebioda, Marcin; Rymaszewski, Jacek; Szymanski, Witold; Kolodziejczyk, Lukasz; Kula, Piotr

    2016-12-28

    Low-temperature electronics operating in below zero temperatures or even below the lower limit of the common -65 to 125 °C temperature range are essential in medical diagnostics, in space exploration and aviation, in processing and storage of food and mainly in scientific research, like superconducting materials engineering and their applications-superconducting magnets, superconducting energy storage, and magnetic levitation systems. Such electronic devices demand special approach to the materials used in passive elements and sensors. The main goal of this work was the implementation of a fully transparent, flexible cryogenic temperature sensor with graphene structures as sensing element. Electrodes were made of transparent ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) or ITO/Ag/ITO conductive layers by laser ablation and finally encapsulated in a polymer coating. A helium closed-cycle cryostat has been used in measurements of the electrical properties of these graphene-based temperature sensors under cryogenic conditions. The sensors were repeatedly cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Graphene structures were characterized using Raman spectroscopy. The observation of the resistance changes as a function of temperature indicates the potential use of graphene layers in the construction of temperature sensors. The temperature characteristics of the analyzed graphene sensors exhibit no clear anomalies or strong non-linearity in the entire studied temperature range (as compared to the typical carbon sensor).

  18. Integrated passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a surface acoustic wave-based passive and wireless sensor that can measure magnetic field, temperature and humidity. A thin film giant magnetoimpedance sensor, a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate and a humidity sensitive hydrogel are integrated together with a surface acoustic wave transducer to realize the multifunctional sensor. The device is characterized using a network analyzer under sequentially changing humidity, temperature and magnetic field conditions. The first hand results show the sensor response to all three sensing parameters with small temperature interference on the magnetic signals. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Microcantilever heater-thermometer with integrated temperature-compensated strain sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William P [Champaign, IL; Lee, Jungchul [Champaign, IL; Goericke, Fabian T [Wolfsburg, DE

    2011-04-19

    The present invention provides microcantilever hotplate devices which incorporate temperature compensating strain sensors. The microcantilever hotplate devices of the present invention comprise microcantilevers having temperature compensating strain sensors and resistive heaters. The present invention also provides methods for using a microcantilever hotplate for temperature compensated surface stress measurements, chemical/biochemical sensing, measuring various properties of compounds adhered to the microcantilever hotplate surface, or for temperature compensated deflection measurements.

  20. A Miniature Integrated Multimodal Sensor for Measuring pH, EC and Temperature for Precision Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Murata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Making several simultaneous measurements with different kinds of sensors at the same location in a solution is difficult because of crosstalk between the sensors. In addition, because the conditions at different locations in plant beds differ, in situ measurements in agriculture need to be done in small localized areas. We have fabricated a multimodal sensor on a small Si chip in which a pH sensor was integrated with electrical conductivity (EC and temperature sensors. An ISFET with a Si3N4 membrane was used for the pH sensor. For the EC sensor, the electrical conductivity between platinum electrodes was measured, and the temperature sensor was a p-n junction diode. These are some of the most important measurements required for controlling the conditions in plant beds. The multimodal sensor can be inserted into a plant bed for in situ monitoring. To confirm the absence of crosstalk between the sensors, we made simultaneous measurements of pH, EC, and temperature of a pH buffer solution in a plant bed. When the solution was diluted with hot or cold water, the real time measurements showed changes to the EC and temperature, but no change in pH. We also demonstrated that our sensor was capable of simultaneous in situ measurements in rock wool without being affected by crosstalk.

  1. A miniature integrated multimodal sensor for measuring pH, EC and temperature for precision agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagawa, Masato; Iwasaki, Taichi; Murata, Hiroaki; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    Making several simultaneous measurements with different kinds of sensors at the same location in a solution is difficult because of crosstalk between the sensors. In addition, because the conditions at different locations in plant beds differ, in situ measurements in agriculture need to be done in small localized areas. We have fabricated a multimodal sensor on a small Si chip in which a pH sensor was integrated with electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature sensors. An ISFET with a Si(3)N(4) membrane was used for the pH sensor. For the EC sensor, the electrical conductivity between platinum electrodes was measured, and the temperature sensor was a p-n junction diode. These are some of the most important measurements required for controlling the conditions in plant beds. The multimodal sensor can be inserted into a plant bed for in situ monitoring. To confirm the absence of crosstalk between the sensors, we made simultaneous measurements of pH, EC, and temperature of a pH buffer solution in a plant bed. When the solution was diluted with hot or cold water, the real time measurements showed changes to the EC and temperature, but no change in pH. We also demonstrated that our sensor was capable of simultaneous in situ measurements in rock wool without being affected by crosstalk.

  2. High-temperature sapphire optical sensor fiber coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desu, Seshu B.; Claus, Richard O.; Raheem, Ruby; Murphy, Kent A.

    1990-10-01

    the filter. These modes may be attributed to a number of material degradation mechanisms, such as thermal shock, oxidation corrosion of the material, mechanical loads, or phase changes in the filter material. Development of high temperature optical fiber (sapphire) sensors embedded in the CXF filters would be very valuable for both monitoring the integrity of the filter during its use and understanding the mechanisms of degradation such that durable filter development will be facilitated. Since the filter operating environment is very harsh, the high temperature sapphire optical fibers need to be protected and for some sensing techniques the fiber must also be coated with low refractive index film (cladding). The objective of the present study is to identify materials and develop process technologies for the application of claddings and protective coatings that are stable and compatible with sapphire fibers at both high temperatures and pressures.

  3. Modeling and simulation of a wheatstone bridge pressure sensor in high temperature with VHDL-AMS

    OpenAIRE

    Baccar, Sahbi; Levi, Timothée; Dallet, Dominique; Barbara, François

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a model of a Wheatstone bridge sensor in VHDL-AMS. This model is useful to take into account the temperature effect on the sensor accuracy. The model is developed on the basis of a resistor model. Simulations are performed for three different combinations of parameters values. They confirm the resistors mismatch effect on the sensor accuracy in high temperature (HT).

  4. Neutron and gamma radiation tests of the Analog Devices TMP37 temperature sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Mockett, P M; Twomey, M S

    2004-01-01

    The Analog Devices TMP37 temperature sensor is used to monitor the temperature gradients in the US ATLAS End Cap Muon Chambers. It was chosen because of its stability, linearity, high output signal, and especially the low self-heating. We have irradiated samples of these sensors with neutrons and gamma rays. The results of these measurements are presented.

  5. Evaporator Superheat Control With One Temperature Sensor Using Qualitative System Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Kasper; Hillerup Lyhne, Casper; Baasch Sørensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method for superheat control using only a single temperature sensor at the outlet of the evaporator, while eliminating the need for a pressure sensor. An inner loop controls the outlet temperature and an outer control loop provides a reference set point, which is based...

  6. High-temperature pressure sensors with strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    OpenAIRE

    Druzhinin A. A.; Kutrakov A. P.; Maryamova I. I.

    2012-01-01

    Studies aimed at the creating of piezoresistive pressure sensors based on silicon whiskers, operating at high temperatures were carried out. Using the glass adhesive for strain gauges mounting on spring elements of covar alloy gave the possibility to elevate the sensor’s operating temperature range. Several modifications of pressure sensors based on the proposed strain-unit design were developed.

  7. High-temperature pressure sensors with strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies aimed at the creating of piezoresistive pressure sensors based on silicon whiskers, operating at high temperatures were carried out. Using the glass adhesive for strain gauges mounting on spring elements of covar alloy gave the possibility to elevate the sensor’s operating temperature range. Several modifications of pressure sensors based on the proposed strain-unit design were developed.

  8. On the importance of telemetric temperature sensor location during intraperitoneal implantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapon, P A; Bulla, J; Gauthier, A; Moussay, S

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to assess the thermal homogeneity of the intraperitoneal (IP) cavity and the relevance of using a fixed telemetric temperature sensor at a given location in studying rodents. Ten rats were intraperitoneally implanted with three Jonah® capsules each; after assessing the accuracy and reliability of the sensors. Two capsules were attached, one to the right iliac fossa (RIF) and the other to the left hypochondrium (LH), and another was placed between the intestines but not attached (Free). In the ex vivo condition, the differences between sensors and reference values remained in the range of ±0.1. In the in vivo condition, each sensor enabled the observation of temperature patterns. However, sensor location affected mean and median temperature values while the rats were moving freely. Indeed, temperature data collected in the LH were 0.1 significantly higher than those collected in the RIF and temperature data collected in the LH were 0.11 significantly higher than those collected with the Free capsules. In in vivo conditions, intra-sensor variability of temperature data was not affected by sensor location. Taking into account sensor accuracy, similar intra-sensor variability, and mean differences observed between the three locations, the impact of sensor location within the IP cavity could be considered negligible. In in vivo conditions, temperature differences between locations regularly exceeded ±0.2 and reached up to 2.5. These extreme values could be explained by behavioral factors such as food or water intake. Finally, considering the good thermal homogeneity of the IP cavity and possible adverse consequences of sensor attachment, it seems better to let sensors range free within the cavity.

  9. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    .... The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements...

  10. Thin Film Sensors for Minimally-Intrusive Measurements in Harsh High Temperature Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen; Will, Herbert A.; Martin, Lisa C.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced thin film sensors are being developed to provide accurate surface temperature, heat flux and strain measurements for components used in hostile propulsion environments. These sensors are sputter deposited and microfabricated directly onto the test articles with no additional bonding agent. The thickness of the sensors is only a few micrometers which creates minimal disturbance of the gas flow over the test surface. Thus thin film sensors have the advantage over conventional wire- based sensors by providing minimally intrusive measurement and having a faster response. These thin film sensors are being developed for characterization of advanced materials and structures in hostile, high-temperature environments, and for validation of design codes. This paper presents the advances of three high temperature thin film sensor technologies developed at NASA Lewis Research Center: thermocouples, heat-flux gages and strain gages. The fabrication techniques of these thin film sensors which include physical vapor deposition, photolithography patterning and lead Wire attachment are described. Sensors demonstrations on a variety of engine materials, including superalloys, ceramics and advanced ceramic matrix composites, in several hostile, high-temperature test environments are presented. The advantages and limitations of thin film sensor technology are also discussed.

  11. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  12. Thick-film force, slip and temperature sensors for a prosthetic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranny, A.; Cotton, D. P. J.; Chappell, P. H.; Beeby, S. P.; White, N. M.

    2005-04-01

    Thick-film static and dynamic force sensors have been investigated for their suitability to measure the grip forces exerted upon an object held by a prosthetic hand, and to detect and correspondingly react to the possible slip of a gripped item. The static force sensors exploit the piezoresistive characteristics of commercially available thick-film pastes whilst the dynamic slip sensors utilize the piezoelectric behaviour of proprietary PZT (lead zirconate titanate) pastes. The sensors are located upon stainless steel cantilever type structures that will be placed at the fingertips of each digit of the prosthetic hand. Temperature sensors are also included to provide temperature compensation for the force sensors and to prevent accidental thermal damage to the prosthesis. Results have shown that the static force sensor is capable of measuring fingertip forces in excess of 100 N, with an electrical half-bridge configuration sensitivity approaching 10 µV V-1 N-1 (with scope for improvement) and maximum hysteresis below 4% of full scale, depending on the manner in which the cantilever sensor array is attached to the finger. Failure in the bonding mechanism that secures the PZT layer to the stainless steel cantilever meant that the proposed dynamic force sensor could not be evaluated. However, investigations using the same sensor design fabricated on an alumina substrate have shown the potential of the PZT dynamic force sensor to measure the vibration and hence potentially operate as a slip sensor.

  13. Temperature field reconstruction for minimally invasive cryosurgery with application to wireless implantable temperature sensors and/or medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaokar, Chandrajit; Rabin, Yoed

    2012-12-01

    There is an undisputed need for temperature-field reconstruction during minimally invasive cryosurgery. The current line of research focuses on developing miniature, wireless, implantable, temperature sensors to enable temperature-field reconstruction in real time. This project combines two parallel efforts: (i) to develop the hardware necessary for implantable sensors, and (ii) to develop mathematical techniques for temperature-field reconstruction in real time-the subject matter of the current study. In particular, this study proposes an approach for temperature-field reconstruction combining data obtained from medical imaging, cryoprobe-embedded sensors, and miniature, wireless, implantable sensors, the development of which is currently underway. This study discusses possible strategies for laying out implantable sensors and approaches for data integration. In particular, prostate cryosurgery is presented as a developmental model and a two-dimensional proof-of-concept is discussed. It is demonstrated that the lethal temperature can be predicted to a significant degree of certainty with implantable sensors and the technique proposed in the current study, a capability that is yet unavailable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  15. New Bridge Temperature Sensor for Superconducting Magnets and other Cryogenic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudarev, Alexey; Bremer, J.; Mulder, T.; Mentink, M.; ter Harmsel, J.; ten Kate, H. H.J.

    A few hundred temperature sensors are used to monitor the temperature behavior of the gigantic ATLAS toroid superconducting magnet system during cool down and normal operation. In order to guarantee good sensitivity of temperature measurements in the range from liquid helium to room temperature, two

  16. Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor Realized on Multilayer HTCC Tapes for Harsh Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless passive temperature sensor is designed on the basis of a resonant circuit, fabricated on multilayer high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC tapes, and measured with an antenna in the wireless coupling way. Alumina ceramic used as the substrate of the sensor is fabricated by lamination and sintering techniques, and the passive resonant circuit composed of a planar spiral inductor and a parallel plate capacitor is printed and formed on the substrate by screen-printing and postfiring processes. Since the permittivity of the ceramic becomes higher as temperature rises, the resonant frequency of the sensor decreases due to the increasing capacitance of the circuit. Measurements on the input impedance versus the resonant frequency of the sensor are achieved based on the principle, and discussions are made according to the exacted relative permittivity of the ceramic and quality factor (Q of the sensor within the temperature range from 19°C (room temperature to 900°C. The results show that the sensor demonstrates good high-temperature characteristics and wide temperature range. The average sensitivity of the sensor with good repeatability and reliability is up to 5.22 KHz/°C. It can be applied to detect high temperature in harsh environment.

  17. FISH & CHIPS: Single Chip Silicon MEMS CTDL Salinity, Temperature, Pressure and Light sensor for use in fisheries research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldgård, Anders; Hansen, Ole; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2005-01-01

    A single-chip silicon MEMS CTDL multi sensor for use in aqueous environments is presented. The new sensor chip consists of a conductivity sensor based on platinum electrodes (C), an ion-implanted thermistor temperature sensor (T), a piezoresistive pressure sensor (D for depth/pressure) and an ion...

  18. Quasidistributed temperature sensor based on dense wavelength-division multiplexing optical fiber delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jun; Yang, Ning; Fan, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Qi

    2017-10-01

    We report on a fiber-optic delay-based quasidistributed temperature sensor with high precision. The device works by detecting the delay induced by the temperature instead of the spectrum. To analyze the working principle of this sensor, the thermal dependence of the fiber-optic delay was theoretically investigated and the delay-temperature coefficient was measured to be 42.2 ps/km°C. In this sensor, quasidistributed measurement of temperature could be easily realized by dense wavelength-division multiplexing and wavelength addressing. We built and tested a prototype quasidistributed temperature sensor with eight testing points equally distributed along a 32.61-km-long fiber. The experimental results demonstrate an average error of economic temperature measurements.

  19. Monitoring and modeling temperature variations inside silage stacks using novel wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, O.; Nadimi, E.S.; Blanes-Vidal, V.

    2009-01-01

    By monitoring silage temperature at different locations inside silage stacks, it is possible to detect any significant increases in temperature occurring during silage decomposition. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop novel noninvasive wireless sensor nodes for measuring...... the temperature inside silage stacks; (2) to design a suitable sensor protection housing that prevents physical and chemical damage to the sensor: and (3) to mathematically model temperature variations inside a silage stack, using system identification techniques. The designed wireless nodes were used to monitor...... temperatures in a full-sized silage stack over 53 days. Results showed that the wireless sensor nodes accurately monitored the temperature inside the silage stack at depths of 25 and 50cm and reliably transmitted the measured data through the network; between 98.9% and 99.4% of the packets disseminated from...

  20. An Annular Mechanical Temperature Compensation Structure for Gas-Sealed Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiuchun; Jiang, Yonggang; Takao, Hidekuni; Maenaka, Kazusuke; Higuchi, Kohei

    2012-01-01

    A novel gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor with a temperature compensation structure is reported. The pressure sensor is sealed by Au-Au diffusion bonding under a nitrogen ambient with a pressure of 100 kPa and integrated with a platinum resistor-based temperature sensor for human activity monitoring applications. The capacitance-pressure and capacitance-temperature characteristics of the gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor without temperature compensation structure are calculated. It is found by simulation that a ring-shaped structure on the diaphragm of the pressure sensor can mechanically suppress the thermal expansion effect of the sealed gas in the cavity. Pressure sensors without/with temperature compensation structures are fabricated and measured. Through measured results, it is verified that the calculation model is accurate. Using the compensation structures with a 900 μm inner radius, the measured temperature coefficient is much reduced as compared to that of the pressure sensor without compensation. The sensitivities of the pressure sensor before and after compensation are almost the same in the pressure range from 80 kPa to 100 kPa. PMID:22969385

  1. Application of a one-wire digital temperature sensor in the monitoring system of a granary's temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2009-07-01

    A temperature monitoring system with characteristics of bus topology structure is made up of computer, interface adapter, bus driver, bus converter, transmission line and especially 1-wire digital temperature sensor DS18B20. Category 5 twisted-pair is used to form a tree-like or star-like network, in which more than 500 digital temperature sensors can be connected. Bus drivers and converters in network are composed of low-cost 74HC series logic ICs which has a very low static power consumption and high performance, so they can be powered through the sensor bus and make installation, maintenance, and expansion of system very convenient. Because of hardware fault-tolerant technology used by bus driver and converter circuits, the fault sensor branch or branch bus can automatically detach from the main bus and will not affect normal working of other sensors in network, so to solve the problem of a certain sensor or branch's damage causing the paralysis of entire bus. The length of sensor bus can extend to more than 1000 meters. It is very suitable for the multi-point temperature monitoring sites where the detected points are relative concentrated such as food storage, vegetables greenhouses and so on.

  2. An All-Elastomeric Transparent and Stretchable Temperature Sensor for Body-Attachable Wearable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung, Tran Quang; Ramasundaram, Subramaniyan; Hwang, Byeong-Ung; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2016-01-20

    A transparent stretchable (TS) gated sensor array with high optical transparency, conformality, and high stretchability of up to 70% is demonstrated. The TS-gated sensor array has high responsivity to temperature changes in objects and human skin. This unprecedented TS-gated sensor array, as well as the integrated platform of the TS-gated sensor with a transparent and stretchable strain sensor, show great potential for application to wearable skin electronics for recognition of human activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors in TPS: Arc Jet Model Design & Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard; Feldman, Jay; Ellerby, Donald; Monk, Joshua; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Switzer, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Techniques for using fiber optics with Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) have been developed by IFOS Corp. for use in thermal protection systems (TPS) on spacecraft heat shield materials through NASA Phase 1 and 2 SBIR efforts and have been further improved in a recent collaboration between IFOS and NASA that will be described here. Fiber optic temperature sensors offer several potential advantages over traditional thermocouple sensors including a) multiplexing many sensors in a single fiber to increase sensor density in a given array or to provide spatial resolution, b) improved thermal property match between sensor and TPS to reduce heat flow disruption, c) lack of electrical conductivity.

  4. Fiber-optic temperature sensor using a spectrum-modulating semiconductor etalon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus; Anthan, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a fiber-optic temperature sensor that uses a spectrum modulating SiC etalon. The spectral output of this type of sensor may be analyzed to obtain a temperature measurement which is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's fiber-optic link. A highly precise laboratory spectrometer is described in detail, and this instrument is used to study the properties of this type of sensor. Also described are a number of different spectrum analyzers that are more suitable for use in a practical thermometer.

  5. Comparison between core temperatures measured telemetrically using the CorTemp® ingestible temperature sensor and rectal temperature in healthy Labrador retrievers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinchuk, Stephanie; Taylor, Susan M; Shmon, Cindy L; Pharr, John; Campbell, John

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the CorTemp(®) ingestible telemetric core body temperature sensor in dogs, to establish the relationship between rectal temperature and telemetrically measured core body temperature at rest and during exercise, and to examine the effect of sensor location in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract on measured core temperature. CorTemp(®) sensors were administered orally to fasted Labrador retriever dogs and radiographs were taken to document sensor location. Core and rectal temperatures were monitored throughout the day in 6 resting dogs and during a 10-minute strenuous retrieving exercise in 6 dogs. Time required for the sensor to leave the stomach (120 to 610 min) was variable. Measured core temperature was consistently higher than rectal temperature across all GI locations but temperature differences based on GI location were not significant (P = 0.5218). Resting dogs had a core temperature that was on average 0.4°C above their rectal temperature with 95% limits of agreement (LoA) between 1.2°C and -0.5°C. Core temperature in exercising dogs was on average 0.3°C higher than their concurrent rectal temperature, with LoA of +1.6°C and -1.1°C.

  6. The Systematic Bias of Ingestible Core Temperature Sensors Requires a Correction by Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Hunt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate measure of core body temperature is critical for monitoring individuals, groups and teams undertaking physical activity in situations of high heat stress or prolonged cold exposure. This study examined the range in systematic bias of ingestible temperature sensors compared to a certified and traceable reference thermometer. A total of 119 ingestible temperature sensors were immersed in a circulated water bath at five water temperatures (TEMP A: 35.12 ± 0.60°C, TEMP B: 37.33 ± 0.56°C, TEMP C: 39.48 ± 0.73°C, TEMP D: 41.58 ± 0.97°C, and TEMP E: 43.47 ± 1.07°C along with a certified traceable reference thermometer. Thirteen sensors (10.9% demonstrated a systematic bias > ±0.1°C, of which 4 (3.3% were > ± 0.5°C. Limits of agreement (95% indicated that systematic bias would likely fall in the range of −0.14 to 0.26°C, highlighting that it is possible for temperatures measured between sensors to differ by more than 0.4°C. The proportion of sensors with systematic bias > ±0.1°C (10.9% confirms that ingestible temperature sensors require correction to ensure their accuracy. An individualized linear correction achieved a mean systematic bias of 0.00°C, and limits of agreement (95% to 0.00–0.00°C, with 100% of sensors achieving ±0.1°C accuracy. Alternatively, a generalized linear function (Corrected Temperature (°C = 1.00375 × Sensor Temperature (°C − 0.205549, produced as the average slope and intercept of a sub-set of 51 sensors and excluding sensors with accuracy outside ±0.5°C, reduced the systematic bias to < ±0.1°C in 98.4% of the remaining sensors (n = 64. In conclusion, these data show that using an uncalibrated ingestible temperature sensor may provide inaccurate data that still appears to be statistically, physiologically, and clinically meaningful. Correction of sensor temperature to a reference thermometer by linear function eliminates this systematic bias (individualized functions or ensures

  7. The Systematic Bias of Ingestible Core Temperature Sensors Requires a Correction by Linear Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew P; Bach, Aaron J E; Borg, David N; Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Ian B

    2017-01-01

    An accurate measure of core body temperature is critical for monitoring individuals, groups and teams undertaking physical activity in situations of high heat stress or prolonged cold exposure. This study examined the range in systematic bias of ingestible temperature sensors compared to a certified and traceable reference thermometer. A total of 119 ingestible temperature sensors were immersed in a circulated water bath at five water temperatures (TEMP A: 35.12 ± 0.60°C, TEMP B: 37.33 ± 0.56°C, TEMP C: 39.48 ± 0.73°C, TEMP D: 41.58 ± 0.97°C, and TEMP E: 43.47 ± 1.07°C) along with a certified traceable reference thermometer. Thirteen sensors (10.9%) demonstrated a systematic bias > ±0.1°C, of which 4 (3.3%) were > ± 0.5°C. Limits of agreement (95%) indicated that systematic bias would likely fall in the range of -0.14 to 0.26°C, highlighting that it is possible for temperatures measured between sensors to differ by more than 0.4°C. The proportion of sensors with systematic bias > ±0.1°C (10.9%) confirms that ingestible temperature sensors require correction to ensure their accuracy. An individualized linear correction achieved a mean systematic bias of 0.00°C, and limits of agreement (95%) to 0.00-0.00°C, with 100% of sensors achieving ±0.1°C accuracy. Alternatively, a generalized linear function (Corrected Temperature (°C) = 1.00375 × Sensor Temperature (°C) - 0.205549), produced as the average slope and intercept of a sub-set of 51 sensors and excluding sensors with accuracy outside ±0.5°C, reduced the systematic bias to sensors (n = 64). In conclusion, these data show that using an uncalibrated ingestible temperature sensor may provide inaccurate data that still appears to be statistically, physiologically, and clinically meaningful. Correction of sensor temperature to a reference thermometer by linear function eliminates this systematic bias (individualized functions) or ensures systematic bias is within ±0.1°C in 98% of the sensors

  8. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-zinc oxide nanocomposites as low temperature toluene gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septiani, Ni Luh Wulan; Yuliarto, Brian; Nugraha; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno

    2017-03-01

    The performance of nanocomposite MWCNT-ZnO thin films was investigated as toluene gas sensor. The nanocomposites MWCNT-ZnO thin films were synthesized by reflux method with the variation of MWCNT:ZnO ratio on 1:0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 0:1. Crystallinity and morphology characterization show that the crystal structure was not influenced by the presence of MWCNT, and the presence of MWCNTs could prevent the agglomeration of ZnO nanostructure. The dynamic response curve of nanocomposites MWCNT-ZnO thin films shows two different patterns at low temperature region and high temperature region. At low temperature region, the sensor response decreases as the increasing operating temperature and increasing the concentration of ZnO. On the other hand, at high temperature region, the sensor response increases as the increasing operating temperature and increasing the concentration of ZnO. Moreover, the variation concentration of MWCNT and ZnO can decrease the operating temperature of the sensors. The sensor with the ratio of MWCNT:ZnO at 1:3 show highest sensor response that reaches 17% at 150 °C of operating temperature, while the pure MWCNTs and pure ZnO show no response at that temperature.

  9. Monitoring of a steel incrementally launched bridge construction with strain and temperature FBGs sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Antonio; Torres, Benjamín; Barrera, David; Calderón, Pedro; Sales, Salvador

    2010-04-01

    We present in this paper the results of monitoring the construction process of a steel incrementally launched bridge located at the Kadagua Valley in Bilbao (Spain) with FBG sensors. The installation of FBG strain and temperature sensors was done in order to obtain deformation and temperature variations during the launching operation. The deflection recovery process was also monitored. The setup carried out in the sensors installation process consists of five optical channels (one for each cross section monitored) and a multiplexed structure of nine strain sensor in each optical channel. Temperature sensors were also installed in order to measure temperature variation of the steel structure but also for thermal compensation for the FBG strain sensors. The installation of the optical sensors is explained in detail including cleaning, bonding and connection of the almost fifty sensors installed in this structure. We also are going to explain the behaviour of the steel structure by presenting several figures showing the strain values for each sensor taken in real time during the launching of the bridge.

  10. Effect of diluent chain length on the performance of the electrochemical DNA sensor at elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiwei; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2011-01-07

    Here we report the effect of passivating diluent chain length and sensor interrogation temperature on the electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor's mismatch discrimination capability. Both stem-loop and linear probe-based E-DNA sensors were constructed with various diluents, including 6-mercapto-1-hexanol and longer chain hydroxyl-terminated alkanethiols. Contrary to previously reported results, we find that the E-DNA sensors work optimally in the presence of the longer chain diluents, signified by the enhanced % signal suppression observed upon target hybridization. Of note, the sensors' signaling efficiency maintains even when interrogated at an elevated temperature, permitting the use of stringent temperature conditions to improve sensor specificity. For example, a stem-loop E-DNA sensor fabricated with 8-mercapto-1-octanol, when employed at 47 °C, produces signal suppression of 79%, 35% and 1.6% for the perfect match, single-base mismatch, and 2-base mismatch DNA targets, respectively. In addition to the significant enhancement in sensor discrimination capacity, high temperature operation also improves hybridization kinetics. Our results also suggest that the stem-loop E-DNA sensors demonstrate better mismatch discrimination capability when compared to the linear probe system under the same experimental condition.

  11. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  12. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... in the specimen material with a certain angle between them. It is demonstrated that, during temperature variation, both FBG sensors show the same signal response. However, for any applied load the signal response is different, which is caused by the different levels of strain acting in each sensor. Equations...... calibration procedure (temperature and strain) was performed to this material-sensor pair, where a calibration error temperature test case, where multiple two loading/strain stages of ε = 0.30% and ε = 0.50% were applied during a continuous variation...

  13. A novel method of temperature compensation for piezoresistive microcantilever-based sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Yan, Tianhong; Li, Yan; Song, Meixuan

    2012-03-01

    Microcantilever with integrated piezoresistor has been applied to in situ surface stress measurement in the field of biochemical sensors. It is well known that piezoresistive cantilever-based sensors are sensitive to ambient temperature changing due to highly temperature-dependent piezoresistive effect and mismatch in thermal expansion of composite materials. This paper proposes a novel method of temperature drift compensation for microcantilever-based sensors with a piezoresistive full Wheatstone bridge integrated at the clamped ends by subtracting the amplified output voltage of the reference cantilever from the output voltage of the sensing cantilever through a simple temperature compensating circuit. Experiments show that the temperature drift of microcantilever sensors can be significantly reduced by the method.

  14. An Overview of the Development of High Temperature Wireless Smart Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    The harsh environment inherent in propulsion systems is especially challenging for Smart Sensor Systems; this paper addresses technology development for such applications. A basic sensing system for high temperature wireless pressure monitoring composed of a sensor, electronics, and wireless communication with scavenged power developed for health monitoring of aircraft engines and other high temperature applications has been demonstrated at 475 C. Other efforts will be discussed including a brief overview of the status of high temperature electronics and sensors, as well as their use and applications.

  15. A novel fiber optic distributed temperature and strain sensor for building applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregubov, A. V.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Berintsev, A. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    A novel fiber optic distributed sensor for temperature and strain measurements in building constructions has been developed and studied which is a composite optical element in the form of a reinforced single-mode optical fiber placed directly in the body of a fiberglass armature. The sensor has a reasonably high sensitivity to changes in external temperature and strain and a good spatial resolution. Besides, it is characterized by a high mechanical strength as compared to conventional fiber sensor elements. The experimental results obtained on a prototype show the value of the temperature sensitivity of 0.1 MHz/deg and the sensitivity to strain of 2.7 MHz/mm.

  16. Qualification of Bonding Process of Temperature Sensors to Extreme Temperature Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Kitiyakara, Amarit; Redick, Richard; Sunada, Eric T.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been explored based on the state-of-the-art technology to bond the platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) on to potential aerospace material such as a flat aluminum surface and a flexible copper tube to simulate coaxial cable for the flight applications. Primarily, PRTs were inserted into a metal plated copper braid to avoid stresses on the sensor while attaching the sensor with braid to the base material for long duration deep space missions. Appropriate pretreatment has been implemented in this study to enhance the adhesion of the PRTs to the base material. NuSil product has been chosen in this research to attach PRT to the base materials. The resistance (approx.1.1 k(Omega)) of PRTs has been electrically monitored continuously during the qualification thermal cycling testing from -150 C to +120 C and -100 C to -35 C. The test hardware has been thermal cycled three times the mission life per JPL design principles for JUNO project. No PRT failures were observed during and after the PRT thermal cycling qualification test for extreme temperature environments. However, there were some failures associated with staking of the PRT pig tails as a result of thermal cycling qualification test.

  17. Dual fluorescence sensor for trace oxygen and temperature with unmatched range and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Nagl, Stefan; Schäferling, Michael; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-08-15

    An optical dual sensor for oxygen and temperature is presented that is highly oxygen sensitive and covers a broad temperature range. Dual sensing is based on luminescence lifetime measurements. The novel sensor contains two luminescent compounds incorporated into polymer films. The temperature-sensitive dye (ruthenium tris-1,10-phenanthroline) has a highly temperature-dependent luminescence and is incorporated in poly(acrylonitrile) to avoid cross-sensitivity to oxygen. Fullerene C70 was used as the oxygen-sensitive probe owing to its strong thermally activated delayed fluorescence at elevated temperatures that is extremely oxygen sensitive. The cross-sensitivity of C70 to temperature is accounted for by means of the temperature sensor. C70 is incorporated into a highly oxygen-permeable polymer, either ethyl cellulose or organosilica. The two luminescent probes have different emission spectra and decay times, and their emissions can be discriminated using both parameters. Spatially resolved sensing is achieved by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. The response times of the sensor to oxygen are short. The dual sensor exhibits a temperature operation range between at least 0 and 120 degrees C, and detection limits for oxygen in the ppbv range, operating for oxygen concentrations up to at least 50 ppmv. These ranges outperform all dual oxygen and temperature sensors reported so far. The dual sensor presented in this study is especially appropriate for measurements under extreme conditions such as high temperatures and ultralow oxygen levels. This dual sensor is a key step forward in a number of scientifically or commercially important applications including food packaging, for monitoring of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, in space technology, and safety and security applications in terms of detection of oxygen leaks.

  18. Temperature dependence of a refractive index sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the temperature dependence of a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a macrobending micro-plastic optical fiber (m-POF) both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the RI sensor at different temperatures (10°C-70°C) is measured and simulated over an RI range from 1.33 to 1.45. It is found that the temperature dependent bending loss and RI measurement deviation monotonically change with temperature, and the RI deviation has a higher gradient with temperature variation for a higher measured RI. Because of the linear trend of temperature dependence of the sensor, it is feasible to correct for changes in ambient temperature.

  19. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor Using a Thin-Film Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn

    1997-01-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor was developed that is rugged, compact, stable, and can be inexpensively fabricated. This thin-film interferometric temperature sensor was shown to be capable of providing a +/- 2 C accuracy over the range of -55 to 275 C, throughout a 5000 hr operating life. A temperature-sensitive thin-film Fabry-Perot interferometer can be deposited directly onto the end of a multimode optical fiber. This batch-fabricatable sensor can be manufactured at a much lower cost than can a presently available sensor, which requires the mechanical attachment of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to a fiber. The principal disadvantage of the thin-film sensor is its inherent instability, due to the low processing temperatures that must be used to prevent degradation of the optical fiber's buffer coating. The design of the stable thin-film temperature sensor considered the potential sources of both short and long term drifts. The temperature- sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometer was a silicon film with a thickness of approx. 2 microns. A laser-annealing process was developed which crystallized the silicon film without damaging the optical fiber. The silicon film was encapsulated with a thin layer of Si3N4 over coated with aluminum. Crystallization of the silicon and its encapsulation with a highly stable, impermeable thin-film structure were essential steps in producing a sensor with the required long-term stability.

  20. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Neonatal Brain Temperature Using a Zero-Heat-Flux Sensor Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Louis; Bongers, Edwin; Lamichhane, Bishal; Bambang-Oetomo, Sidarto

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of preterm neonates must be maintained within a narrow window to ensure their survival. Continuously measuring their core temperature provides an optimal means of monitoring their thermoregulation and their response to environmental changes. However, existing methods of measuring core temperature can be very obtrusive, such as rectal probes, or inaccurate/lagging, such as skin temperature sensors and spot-checks using tympanic temperature sensors. This study investigates an unobtrusive method of measuring brain temperature continuously using an embedded zero-heat-flux (ZHF) sensor matrix placed under the head of the neonate. The measured temperature profile is used to segment areas of motion and incorrect positioning, where the neonate's head is not above the sensors. We compare our measurements during low motion/stable periods to esophageal temperatures for 12 preterm neonates, measured for an average of 5 h per neonate. The method we propose shows good correlation with the reference temperature for most of the neonates. The unobtrusive embedding of the matrix in the neonate's environment poses no harm or disturbance to the care work-flow, while measuring core temperature. To address the effect of motion on the ZHF measurements in the current embodiment, we recommend a more ergonomic embedding ensuring the sensors are continuously placed under the neonate's head.

  1. A Solution-Based Temperature Sensor Using the Organic Compound CuTsPc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahino Mah Abdullah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical cell using an organic compound, copper (II phthalocyanine-tetrasulfonic acid tetrasodium salt (CuTsPc, has been fabricated and investigated as a solution-based temperature sensor. The capacitance and resistance of the ITO/CuTsPc solution/ITO chemical cell has been characterized as a function of temperature in the temperature range of 25–80 °C. A linear response with minimal hysteresis is observed. The fabricated temperature sensor has shown high consistency and sensitive response towards a specific range of temperature values.

  2. Thin film molybdenum silicide as potential temperature sensors for turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. H.; Prakash, S.; Deshpandey, C. V.; Doerr, H. J.; Bunshah, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature measurements of Mo-Si-based thin-film resistance thermometers were studied. Annealing in an argon ambient at a temperature above 1000 C for at least 1 h is required to form the stable tetragonal MoSi2 phase. With a crack-free 2-micron-thick AlN barrier layer on top, a sensor was tested up to 1200 C. The resistivity vs temperature characteristic shows the room temperature resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) of the sensor to be approximately 350 microohm and 0.01195 K, respectively. No film adhesion problems were observed for at least four testing cycles.

  3. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for real-time...

  4. Heat-conduction error of temperature sensors in a fluid flow with nonuniform and unsteady temperature distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khine, Soe Minn; Houra, Tomoya; Tagawa, Masato

    2013-04-01

    In temperature measurement of non-isothermal fluid flows by a contact-type temperature sensor, heat conduction along the sensor body can cause significant measurement error which is called "heat-conduction error." The conventional formula for estimating the heat-conduction error was derived under the condition that the fluid temperature to be measured is uniform. Thus, if we apply the conventional formula to a thermal field with temperature gradient, the heat-conduction error will be underestimated. In the present study, we have newly introduced a universal physical model of a temperature-measurement system to estimate accurately the heat-conduction error even if a temperature gradient exists in non-isothermal fluid flows. Accordingly, we have been able to successfully derive a widely applicable estimation and/or evaluation formula of the heat-conduction error. Then, we have verified experimentally the effectiveness of the proposed formula using the two non-isothermal fields-a wake flow formed behind a heated cylinder and a candle flame-whose fluid-dynamical characteristics should be quite different. As a result, it is confirmed that the proposed formula can represent accurately the experimental behaviors of the heat-conduction error which cannot be explained appropriately by the existing formula. In addition, we have analyzed theoretically the effects of the heat-conduction error on the fluctuating temperature measurement of a non-isothermal unsteady fluid flow to derive the frequency response of the temperature sensor to be used. The analysis result shows that the heat-conduction error in temperature-fluctuation measurement appears only in a low-frequency range. Therefore, if the power-spectrum distribution of temperature fluctuations to be measured is sufficiently away from the low-frequency range, the heat-conduction error has virtually no effect on the temperature-fluctuation measurements even by the temperature sensor accompanying the heat-conduction error in

  5. Thermoelectric harvesting for an autonomous self-powered temperature sensor in small satellites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machin Llanos (student Delft), Jorge; Bouwmeester, J.

    2017-01-01

    There are several benefits of using autonomous sensors in spacecraft. Avoidance of wired connections reduces cost, mass, and increases the flexibility and reliability of the system. The impact of wire reduction can be significant, especially for small satellites with many sensors, like temperature

  6. Mechanical robustness of cryogenic temperature sensors packaged in a flat, hermetically-sealed package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courts, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Much of the work to develop internationally recognized temperature scales over the past 50 years was performed with thermometers whose sensing elements were constructed from platinum wire, rhodium-iron wire, or doped germanium elements. For high stability, the best results were obtained when the sensing element was strain-free mounted which reduced the effects of temperature-induced mechanical stress and deformation. Unfortunately, the devices were still highly susceptible to mechanical damage, and, barring a catastrophic mechanical shock, damage to the temperature sensors could go unnoticed as it could continue to operate with degraded accuracy. While not at the same level of stability as standards grade thermometers, many of the most commonly used cryogenic thermometers today are far more resistant to mechanical handling. This work examines the calibration offsets on three models of cryogenic temperature sensors resulting from mechanical shock and vibration. The models tested in this work were all obtained from Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc., and included Cemox™ resistance thermometer models CX-1050-SD and CX-1050-AA, and a diode temperature sensor model DT-670-SD. Mechanical treatments were performed via a simple drop test (heights 20 cm, 50 cm, 1 m, and 4 m), random vibration per MIL-STD-202, Method 214, Table 2, Condition H, and mechanical shock per MIL-STD-883, Method 2002, Condition B. Each sensor was calibrated pre- and post-mechanical treatment and the effect of the treatment on each test sensor was quantified in terms of the equivalent temperature calibration shift. This work details the calibration shift of each sensor type following each treatment type over the 1.4 K to 325 K temperature range. No effects from the testing were discemable for Cemox and diode sensors packaged in the -SD package, a flat, hermetically sealed package, while small calibration offsets of less than 0.15% of temperature at higher temperatures were observed for Cemox sensors

  7. Silicon-photonic PTAT temperature sensor for micro-ring resonator thermal stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Saman; Emami, Azita

    2015-08-24

    We present a scheme for thermal stabilization of micro-ring resonator modulators through direct measurement of ring temperature using a monolithic PTAT temperature sensor. The measured temperature is used in a feedback loop to adjust the thermal tuner of the ring. The closed-loop feedback system is demonstrated to operate in presence of thermal perturbations at 20Gb/s.

  8. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  9. An evaluation of underwater epoxies to permanently install temperature sensors in mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Isaak; Dona L. Horan

    2011-01-01

    Stream temperature regimes are of fundamental importance in understanding the patterns and processes in aquatic ecosystems, and inexpensive digital sensors provide accurate and repeated measurements of temperature. Most temperature measurements in mountain streams are made only during summer months because of logistical constraints associated with stream access and...

  10. The development of titanium silicide - boron doped polysilicon resistive temperature sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereshchagina, E.; Vereshchagina, E.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of titanium silicide (TiSi2) formed on heavily boron-doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si/B+) were applied for the first time for resistive temperature sensing. The temperature sensors exhibited a high-temperature coefficient of resistance of 3.8 × 10−3 ◦C−1, a linear dependence of

  11. Nanometric Integrated Temperature and Thermal Sensors in CMOS-SOI Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malits, Maria; Nemirovsky, Yael

    2017-07-29

    This paper reviews and compares the thermal and noise characterization of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) SOI (Silicon on insulator) transistors and lateral diodes used as temperature and thermal sensors. DC analysis of the measured sensors and the experimental results in a broad (300 K up to 550 K) temperature range are presented. It is shown that both sensors require small chip area, have low power consumption, and exhibit linearity and high sensitivity over the entire temperature range. However, the diode's sensitivity to temperature variations in CMOS-SOI technology is highly dependent on the diode's perimeter; hence, a careful calibration for each fabrication process is needed. In contrast, the short thermal time constant of the electrons in the transistor's channel enables measuring the instantaneous heating of the channel and to determine the local true temperature of the transistor. This allows accurate "on-line" temperature sensing while no additional calibration is needed. In addition, the noise measurements indicate that the diode's small area and perimeter causes a high 1/f noise in all measured bias currents. This is a severe drawback for the sensor accuracy when using the sensor as a thermal sensor; hence, CMOS-SOI transistors are a better choice for temperature sensing.

  12. Sensing Properties of a Novel Temperature Sensor Based on Field Assisted Thermal Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhigang; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Zhenzhen; Tong, Jiaming; Chen, Qiyu; Zhang, Jianpeng; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Li, Xin; Li, Yunjia

    2017-02-27

    The existing temperature sensors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are limited by low sensitivity, complicated processes, or dependence on microscopy to observe the experimental results. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of an ionization temperature sensor featuring non-self-sustaining discharge. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering the work function of electrons emitted by CNTs, and thereby enabling the safe operation of such sensors. Due to the temperature effect on the electron emission of CNTs, the collecting current exhibited an exponential increase with temperature rising from 20 °C to 100 °C. Additionally, a higher temperature coefficient of 0.04 K-1 was obtained at 24 V voltage applied on the extracting electrode, higher than the values of other reported CNT-based temperature sensors. The triple-electrode ionization temperature sensor is easy to fabricate and converts the temperature change directly into an electrical signal. It shows a high temperature coefficient and good application potential.

  13. Sensing Properties of a Novel Temperature Sensor Based on Field Assisted Thermal Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The existing temperature sensors using carbon nanotubes (CNTs are limited by low sensitivity, complicated processes, or dependence on microscopy to observe the experimental results. Here we report the fabrication and successful testing of an ionization temperature sensor featuring non-self-sustaining discharge. The sharp tips of nanotubes generate high electric fields at relatively low voltages, lowering the work function of electrons emitted by CNTs, and thereby enabling the safe operation of such sensors. Due to the temperature effect on the electron emission of CNTs, the collecting current exhibited an exponential increase with temperature rising from 20 °C to 100 °C. Additionally, a higher temperature coefficient of 0.04 K−1 was obtained at 24 V voltage applied on the extracting electrode, higher than the values of other reported CNT-based temperature sensors. The triple-electrode ionization temperature sensor is easy to fabricate and converts the temperature change directly into an electrical signal. It shows a high temperature coefficient and good application potential.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of gas concentration and temperature by the ball surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kazushi; Akao, Shingo; Takeda, Nobuo; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Tsukahara, Yusuke

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) trace moisture sensor with an amorphous silica sensitive film and realized wide-range measurement from 0.017 ppmv [a frost point (FP) of -99 °C] to 6.0 × 103 ppmv (0 °C FP). However, since the sensitivity of the sensor depends on the temperature, measurement results are disturbed when the temperature largely changes. To overcome this problem, we developed a method to simultaneously measure temperature and gas concentration using a ball SAW sensor. Temperature and concentration is derived by solving equations for the delay time change at two frequencies. When the temperature had a large jump, the delay time change was significantly disturbed, but the water concentration was almost correctly measured, by compensating the sensitivity change using measured temperature. The temperature measured by a ball SAW sensor will also be used to control the ball temperature. This method will make a ball SAW sensor reliable in environments of varying temperatures.

  15. High Temperature, Through the Case Eddy Current Sensor for Blade Vibration Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Preliminary results have shown that low temperature eddy current sensors can provide excellent resolution for blade tip timing, and have the ability to see ?through...

  16. Analysis of optical pulse coding in spontaneous Brillouin-based distributed temperature sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcelo A. Soto; Gabriele Bolognini; Fabrizio Di Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of optical pulse coding techniques applied to distributed optical fiber temperature sensors based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering using the Landau-Placzek ratio (LPR...

  17. A High-Performance LC Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor Fabricated Using Low-Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC) Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Li; Qiulin Tan; Chenyang Xue; Wendong Zhang; Yunzhi Li; Jijun Xiong

    2014-01-01

    An LC resonant pressure sensor with improved performance is presented in this paper. The sensor is designed with a buried structure, which protects the electrical components from contact with harsh environments and reduces the resonant-frequency drift of the sensor in high-temperature environments. The pressure-sensitive membrane of the sensor is optimized according to small-deflection-plate theory, which allows the sensor to operate in high-pressure environments. The sensor is fabricated usi...

  18. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  19. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-10-09

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  20. Study on the temperature characteristics of LPFG magnetic field sensor based on magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaocheng; Wang, Haitong; Xin, Zhao

    2015-02-01

    This paper carries out theoretical research and numerical simulation on the temperature characteristics of LPFG magnetic field sensor based on magnetic fluids. The simulation results show that the change of ambient temperature can make coupling resonance wavelength of the long period fiber grating drift, change the refractive index of magnetic fluids, which affects the measurement precision of the magnetic field. Our research has a certain significance for the practical application of LPFG magnetic field sensor based on magnetic fluids.

  1. Fiber Optic Distributed Sensors for High-resolution Temperature Field Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomperski, Stephen; Gerardi, Craig; Lisowski, Darius

    2016-11-07

    The reliability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes is checked by comparing simulations with experimental data. A typical data set consists chiefly of velocity and temperature readings, both ideally having high spatial and temporal resolution to facilitate rigorous code validation. While high resolution velocity data is readily obtained through optical measurement techniques such as particle image velocimetry, it has proven difficult to obtain temperature data with similar resolution. Traditional sensors such as thermocouples cannot fill this role, but the recent development of distributed sensing based on Rayleigh scattering and swept-wave interferometry offers resolution suitable for CFD code validation work. Thousands of temperature measurements can be generated along a single thin optical fiber at hundreds of Hertz. Sensors function over large temperature ranges and within opaque fluids where optical techniques are unsuitable. But this type of sensor is sensitive to strain and humidity as well as temperature and so accuracy is affected by handling, vibration, and shifts in relative humidity. Such behavior is quite unlike traditional sensors and so unconventional installation and operating procedures are necessary to ensure accurate measurements. This paper demonstrates implementation of a Rayleigh scattering-type distributed temperature sensor in a thermal mixing experiment involving two air jets at 25 and 45 °C. We present criteria to guide selection of optical fiber for the sensor and describe installation setup for a jet mixing experiment. We illustrate sensor baselining, which links readings to an absolute temperature standard, and discuss practical issues such as errors due to flow-induced vibration. This material can aid those interested in temperature measurements having high data density and bandwidth for fluid dynamics experiments and similar applications. We highlight pitfalls specific to these sensors for consideration in experiment design

  2. Single Temperature Sensor Superheat Control Using a Novel Maximum Slope-seeking Method

    OpenAIRE

    Vinther, Kasper; Rasmussen, Henrik,; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Superheating of refrigerant in the evaporator is an important aspect of safe operation of refrigeration systems. The level of superheat is typically controlled by adjusting the flow of refrigerant using an electronic expansion valve, where the superheat is calculated using measurements from a pressure and a temperature sensor. In this paper we show, through extensive testing, that the superheat or filling of the evaporator can actually be controlled using only a single temperature sensor. Thi...

  3. Low-cost compact thermal imaging sensors for body temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Myung-Soo; Han, Seok Man; Kim, Hyo Jin; Shin, Jae Chul; Ahn, Mi Sook; Kim, Hyung Won; Han, Yong Hee

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a 32x32 microbolometer thermal imaging sensor for human body temperature measurement. Waferlevel vacuum packaging technology allows us to get a low cost and compact imaging sensor chip. The microbolometer uses V-W-O film as sensing material and ROIC has been designed 0.35-um CMOS process in UMC. A thermal image of a human face and a hand using f/1 lens convinces that it has a potential of human body temperature for commercial use.

  4. Temperature sensor for micro-electromechanical systems and method for the production thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez Villalabeitia, Manuel; Kolesar, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a temperature sensor having a cylindrical structure and formed by a composite material, comprising a metal core and at least one coating on said metal core, characterised by having a radial asymmetry in any cross-section of the structure. The invention also relates to a method for producing the temperature sensor based on the quick hardening of the metal core inside the first coating, and subsequent steps of depositing other metal coatings.

  5. High-temperature Fabry-Perot-based strain sensor for ceramic barrier filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Shmuel J.; Vuppala, Veerendra B.; Gunther, Michael F.; Wang, Anbo; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1994-02-01

    We report results from a program to develop fiber-optic sensor-based instrumentation methods to allow the in-situ analysis of ceramic barrier filters. The sensor used was an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity created between the ends of two longitudinally aligned fibers. Filters instrumented with these fiber sensors were tested in a combustor simulator at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. These tests were performed using silica optical fibers capable of withstanding the high temperature and harsh chemical environment of the combustor. The single-ended approach of the reflective Fabry-Perot sensors is well suited for high thermal strain measurements. The results from several tests are presented.

  6. Single superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer for arrays of low-temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M. J.; Richards, P. L.; Skidmore, J. T.

    2001-01-15

    We present the design and experimental evaluation of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer for an array of low-temperature sensors. Each sensor is inductively coupled to a superconducting summing loop which, in turn, is inductively coupled to the readout SQUID. The flux-locked loop of the SQUID is used to null the current in the summing loop and thus cancel crosstalk. The sensors are biased with an alternating current, each with a separate frequency, and the individual sensor signals are separated by lock-in detection at the SQUID output. We have fabricated a prototype 8 channel multiplexer and discuss the application to a larger array.

  7. A high-temperature shape memory alloy sensor for combustion monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Greg S.; Snyder, Joseph T.; Prince, Troy S.; Willett, Michael C.

    2005-05-01

    Innovations in the use of thin film SMA materials have enabled the development of a harsh environment pressure sensor useful for combustion monitoring and control. Development of such active combustion control has been driven by rising fuel costs and environmental pressures. Active combustion control, whether in diesel, spark ignited or turbine engines requires feedback to the engine control system in order to adjust the quantity, timing, and placement of fuel charges. To be fully effective, sensors must be integrated into each engine in a manner that will allow continuous combustion monitoring (turbine engines) or monitoring of each discrete combustion event (diesel and SI engines). To date, the sensors available for detection of combustion events and processes have suffered from one or more of three problems: 1) Low sensitivity: The sensors are unable to provide and adequate signal-to-noise ratio in the high temperature and electrically noisy environment of the engine compartment. Attempts to overcome this difficulty have focused on heat removal and/or temperature compensation or more challenging high temperature electronics. 2) Low reliability: Sensors and/or sensor packages have been unable to withstand the engine environment for extended periods of time. Issues have included gross degradation and more subtle issues such as migration of dopants in semiconductor sensor materials. 3) High cost: The materials that have been used, the package concepts employed, and the required support electronics have all contributed to the high cost of the few sensor systems available. Prices have remained high due to the limited demand associated with the poor reliability and the high price itself. Ternary titanium nickel alloys, with platinum group metal substitution for the nickel, are deposited as thin films on MEMS-based diaphragms and patterned to form strain gages of a standard metal film configuration. The strain induced phase transformation of the SMA is used as a

  8. Surface temperature sensor TIRS/Landsat-8: methodology and applications/Temperatura de superficie celsius do sensor TIRS/Landsat-8: metodologia e aplicacoes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coelho, Andre Luiz Nascentes; Correa, Wesley de Souza Campos

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to the dissemination and operationalization of geotechnologies presenting a formula for obtaining horizontal surface temperature Celsius of the thermal infrared sensor...

  9. Ultra-sensitive wide dynamic range temperature sensor based on in-fiber Lyot interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, Hamed; Poorghdiri Isfahani, Mohamad Hosein; Latifi, Hamid

    2017-04-01

    An in-fiber Lyot interferometer for temperature measurement is presented. The sensor utilizes high temperature-dependence of the birefringence in Panda polarization maintaining fibers to achieve high resolution in temperature measurements. Temperature variation modulates the phase difference between the polarization modes propagating in different modes of the Panda fiber. The Lyot interferometer produces a spectrum which varies with the phase difference. Therefore, by monitoring this spectrum a high resolution of 0.003°C was achieved. A fiber Bragg grating is added to the setup to expand its dynamic range. This sensor does not need complicated fabrication process and can be implemented in many applications.

  10. Fibre Tip Sensors for Localised Temperature Sensing Based on Rare Earth-Doped Glass Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik P. Schartner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a point temperature sensor, based on monitoring upconversion emission from erbium:ytterbium-doped tellurite coatings on the tips of optical fibres. The dip coating technique allows multiple sensors to be fabricated simultaneously, while confining the temperature-sensitive region to a localised region on the end-face of the fibre. The strong response of the rare earth ions to changing temperature allows a resolution of 0.1–0.3 °C to be recorded over the biologically relevant range of temperatures from 23–39 °C.

  11. Imbedded fiber optic pressure and temperature sensors enable cure monitoring of pultruded composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, David

    1990-05-01

    The application of fiberoptic multifunction sensing system for the measurement of temperature and pressure during the curing of fiberglass/epoxy composite structure is described. The system employs interferometric principles to measure temperature, pressure, and refractive index of liquids as well as other physical parameters. Fiberoptic pressure and temperature sensors have been employed in monitoring composites pultrusion and molding. The system is ideally suited for monitoring a variety of composite curing processes because of the sensor's microminiature size, tolerance of moderately high temperatures, non-metallic construction, and inherent immunity to electromagnetic and radio frequency signals.

  12. Miniature all-silica fiber-optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevec, Simon; Donlagic, Denis

    2015-12-01

    This Letter presents a miniature fiber-optic sensor created at the tip of an optical fiber suitable for simultaneous measurement of relative humidity and temperature. The proposed sensor is based on two cascaded Fabry-Perot interferometers, the first configured as a relative humidity sensing element made from silica micro-wire coated with thin porous SiO2 layer, and the second as a temperature sensing element made from a segment of a standard single-mode fiber. The sensor has linear characteristics for both measurement parameters and a sensitivity of 0.48 deg/%RH and 3.7 deg/°C.

  13. Single Temperature Sensor Superheat Control Using a Novel Maximum Slope-seeking Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Kasper; Rasmussen, Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2013-01-01

    Superheating of refrigerant in the evaporator is an important aspect of safe operation of refrigeration systems. The level of superheat is typically controlled by adjusting the flow of refrigerant using an electronic expansion valve, where the superheat is calculated using measurements from...... a pressure and a temperature sensor. In this paper we show, through extensive testing, that the superheat or filling of the evaporator can actually be controlled using only a single temperature sensor. This can either reduce commissioning costs by lowering the necessary amount of sensors or add fault...... tolerance in existing systems if a sensor fails (e.g. pressure sensor). The solution is based on a novel maximum slope-seeking control method, where a perturbation signal is added to the valve opening degree, which gives additional information about the system for control purposes. Furthermore, the method...

  14. Highly sensitive fiber loop ringdown strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Maheshwar; Wang, Chuji

    2017-10-01

    We report a highly sensitive strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity based on the fiber loop ringdown technique. An innovative approach that employs a micro air-gap as the strain sensor head is described. The sensor has demonstrated the static strain sensitivity of 0.26 µs/µɛ, corresponding to the detection limit of 65 nɛ with the low temperature cross sensitivity of 37 nɛ/°C. This is the highest static strain sensitivity achieved without using a combination of fiber optic sensing components, such as fiber Bragg gratings or Fabry-Perot interferometers. Moreover, the sensor design allows the strain sensitivity and measuring range to be adjusted by changing the length of the sensor.

  15. Neural Probes with Integrated Temperature Sensors for Monitoring Retina and Brain Implantation and Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqi; Xie, Hui; Chung, Tsing; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Pang, Stella W

    2017-09-01

    Gold (Au) resistive temperature sensors were integrated on flexible polyimide-based neural probes to monitor temperature changes during neural probe implantation and stimulation. Temperature changes were measured as neural probes were implanted to infer the positions of the neural probes, and as the retina or the deep brain region was stimulated electrically. The temperature sensor consisted of a serpentine Au resistor and surrounded by four Au electrodes with 200 and [Formula: see text] diameter (dia.). The Au temperature sensors had temperature coefficient of 0.32%, and they were biocompatible and small in size. In vivo measurements of temperature changes during implantation and stimulation were carried out in the retina and deep brain region in rats. The desired implantation position was reached when temperature measured by the sensor increased to the calibrated level and became stable. There was no temperature increase when low level stimulation current of 8 and [Formula: see text] each for the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, were applied. When higher level stimulation current of 100 and [Formula: see text] each were applied to the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, maximum temperature increases of 1.2 °C in retina and 1 °C in deep brain region were found.

  16. 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; Moser, Russell; Zbib, Hussein M.; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Realization of high temperature physical measurement sensors, which are needed in many of the current and emerging technologies, is challenging due to the degradation of their electrical stability by drift currents, material oxidation, thermal strain, and creep. In this paper, for the first time, we demonstrate that 3D printed sensors show a metamaterial-like behavior, resulting in superior performance such as high sensitivity, low thermal strain, and enhanced thermal stability. The sensors were fabricated using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs), using an advanced Aerosol Jet based additive printing method followed by thermal sintering. The sensors were tested under cyclic strain up to a temperature of 500 °C and showed a gauge factor of 3.15 ± 0.086, which is about 57% higher than that of those available commercially. The sensor thermal strain was also an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial gages for operation up to a temperature of 500 °C. An analytical model was developed to account for the enhanced performance of such printed sensors based on enhanced lateral contraction of the NP films due to the porosity, a behavior akin to cellular metamaterials. The results demonstrate the potential of 3D printing technology as a pathway to realize highly stable and high-performance sensors for high temperature applications.

  17. Development of a Temperature Sensor for Jet Engine and Space Mission Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik; Culley, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Electronics for Distributed Turbine Engine Control and Space Exploration Missions are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings. In particular, circuits deployed in a jet engine compartment are likely to be exposed to temperatures well exceeding 150 C. To meet this requirement, efforts exist at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), in support of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program/Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, to develop temperature sensors geared for use in high temperature environments. The sensor and associated circuitry need to be located in the engine compartment under distributed control architecture to simplify system design, improve reliability, and ease signal multiplexing. Several circuits were designed using commercial-off-the-shelf as well as newly-developed components to perform temperature sensing at high temperatures. The temperature-sensing circuits will be described along with the results pertaining to their performance under extreme temperature.

  18. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  19. Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metal coolants: Calibration and assessment of the minimum reading temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassini, S.; Antonelli, A.; Di Piazza, I.; Tarantino, M.

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metals (HLMs) such as lead and LBE (lead-bismuth eutectic) will be essential devices in future Lead Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Potentiometric sensors based on solid electrolytes were developed in recent years to this purpose. Internal reference electrodes such as Pt-air and Bi/Bi2O3 liquid metal/metal-oxide are among the most used but they both have a weak point: Pt-air sensor has a high minimum reading temperature around 400 °C whereas Bi/Bi2O3 suffers from internal stresses induced by Bi volume variations with temperature, which may lead to the sensor failure in the long-term. The present work describes the performance of standard Pt-air and Bi/Bi2O3 sensors and compares them with recent Cu/Cu2O sensor. Sensors with Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) electrolyte were calibrated in oxygen-saturated HLM between 160 and 550 °C and the electric potential compared to the theoretical one to define the accuracy and the minimum reading temperature. Standard Pt-air sensor were also tested using Yttria Totally Stabilized Zirconia (YTSZ) to assess the effect of a different electrolyte on the minimum reading temperature. The performance of Pt-air and Cu/Cu2O sensors with YPSZ electrolyte were then tested together in low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C. The results showed that Pt-air, Bi/Bi2O3 and Cu/Cu2O sensors with YPSZ measured oxygen in HLMs down to 400 °C, 290 °C and 200 °C respectively. When the YTSZ electrolyte was used in place of the YPSZ, the Pt-air sensor measured correctly down to at least 350 °C thanks to the superior ionic conductivity of the YTSZ. When Cu/Cu2O and Pt-air sensors were tested together in the same low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C, Cu/Cu2O sensor worked predictably in the whole temperature range whereas Pt-air sensor exhibited a correct output only above 400 °C.

  20. Temperature Effects on the Wind Direction Measurement of 2D Solid Thermal Wind Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei; Zhu, Yan-Qing; Yi, Zhenxiang; Qin, Ming; Huang, Qing-An

    2015-01-01

    For a two-dimensional solid silicon thermal wind sensor with symmetrical structure, the wind speed and direction information can be derived from the output voltages in two orthogonal directions, i.e., the north-south and east-west. However, the output voltages in these two directions will vary linearly with the ambient temperature. Therefore, in this paper, a temperature model to study the temperature effect on the wind direction measurement has been developed. A theoretical analysis has been presented first, and then Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations have been performed. It is found that due to symmetrical structure of the thermal wind sensor, the temperature effects on the output signals in the north-south and east-west directions are highly similar. As a result, the wind direction measurement of the thermal wind sensor is approximately independent of the ambient temperature. The experimental results fit the theoretical analysis and simulation results very well. PMID:26633398

  1. A Deployment of Fine-Grained Sensor Network and Empirical Analysis of Urban Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshito Tobe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature in an urban area exhibits a complicated pattern due to complexity of infrastructure. Despite geographical proximity, structures of a group of buildings and streets affect changes in temperature. To investigate the pattern of fine-grained distribution of temperature, we installed a densely distributed sensor network called UScan. In this paper, we describe the system architecture of UScan as well as experience learned from installing 200 sensors in downtown Tokyo. The field experiment of UScan system operated for two months to collect long-term urban temperature data. To analyze the collected data in an efficient manner, we propose a lightweight clustering methodology to study the correlation between the pattern of temperature and various environmental factors including the amount of sunshine, the width of streets, and the existence of trees. The analysis reveals meaningful results and asserts the necessity of fine-grained deployment of sensors in an urban area.

  2. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Sebastian

    2006-03-31

    The objective of the program was to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. Improvements were aimed primarily at extending the useful temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and investigating ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures and tailoring high temperature coupling for use with the sensor. During the project, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Film adhesion under thermal cycling was found to be poor, and additional substrate materials and surface preparations were evaluated. A new, porous SiC substrate improved the performance but not to the point of making the films useful for sensors. Near the end of the program, a new family of high temperature piezoelectric materials came to the attention of the program. Samples of langasite, the most promising member of this family, were obtained and experimental data showed promise for use up to the 1000 C target temperature. In parallel, research successfully determined that metal foil under moderate pressure provided a practical method of coupling ultrasound at high temperature. A conceptual sensor was designed based upon these methods and was tested in the laboratory.

  3. Miniature fiber-optic temperature sensors based on silica/polymer microfiber knot resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Rao, Yun-Jiang; Chen, Yi-Huai; Gong, Yuan

    2009-09-28

    In this paper, we report two fiber-optic temperature sensors based on silica/polymer microfiber knot resonators (SMKR/PMKR). The structures of these sensors are composed of three layers, MgF(2) crystal plate is adopted as the substrate, and the sensing knots are covered by a thin MgF(2) slab to keep it steady and immunity to the environment fluctuations. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity of SMKR is approximately 52 pm/ degrees C within 30 degrees C approximately 700 degrees C, while the sensitivity of PMKR is approximately 266 pm/ degrees C within 20 degrees C approximately 80 degrees C. The temporal response of SMKR and PMKR sensors are less than 1 ms and 5 ms, respectively. These microfiber knot resonators can be used as miniature high temperature sensors with fast response. Higher resolution can be anticipated with further improvement of the Q factor of the microfiber knot resonators.

  4. Polymer-based blood vessel models with micro-temperature sensors in EVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Ito, Yasuaki; Hayakawa, Takeshi; Maruyama, Hisataka; Sakurai, Junpei; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito; Hata, Seiichi

    2017-04-01

    Cu-based micro-temperature sensors were directly fabricated on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) blood vessel models in EVE using a combined process of spray coating and femtosecond laser reduction of CuO nanoparticles. CuO nanoparticle solution coated on a PDMS blood vessel model are thermally reduced and sintered by focused femtosecond laser pulses in atmosphere to write the sensors. After removing the non-irradiated CuO nanoparticles, Cu-based microtemperature sensors are formed. The sensors are thermistor-type ones whose temperature dependences of the resistance are used for measuring temperature inside the blood vessel model. This fabrication technique is useful for direct-writing of Cu-based microsensors and actuators on arbitrary nonplanar substrates.

  5. Pemanfaatan Sensor Suhu LM 35 Berbasis Microcontroller ATmega 8535 Pada Sistem Pengontrolan Temperatur Air Laut Skala Kecil

    OpenAIRE

    Indriani, Anizar; Johan, Johan; Witanto, Yovan; Hendra, Hendra

    2014-01-01

    System of temperature control are used in many facility such as room temperature control, quality control of food and drink, electronic equipment control and etc. control of temperature can be done by using microcontroller as a media processing and process the changes of temperature that occured to the voltage. One of supporting component on the microcontroller to detect the change of temperature is temperature sensor LM 35 which in this study we will focus on the temperature sensor LM 35 fo...

  6. Multi-sensor esophageal temperature probe used during radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation is associated with increased intraluminal temperature detection and increased risk of esophageal injury compared to single-sensor probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brett J; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Heist, E Kevin; Barrett, Conor D; Danik, Stephan B; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Mansour, Moussa

    2013-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the posterior left atrium has risk of thermal injury to the adjacent esophagus. Increased intraluminal esophageal temperature has been correlated with risk of esophageal injury. The objective of this study was to compare esophageal temperature monitoring (ETM) using a multi-sensor temperature probe with 12 sensors to a single-sensor probe during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). We compared the detection of intraluminal esophageal temperature rises in 543 patients undergoing RF ablation for AF with ETM. Esophageal endoscopy (EGD) was performed on all patients with maximum esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C. Esophageal lesions were classified by severity as mild or severe ulcerations. Four hundred fifty-five patients underwent RF ablation with single-sensor ETM and 88 patients with multi-sensor ETM. Thirty-nine percent of patients with single-sensor versus 75% with multi-sensor ETM reached a maximum detected esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C (P temperature ≥ 39°C by single-sensor versus 46% of patients with multi-sensor ETM (P = 0.021). Thirty-nine percent of patients with lesions in the single-sensor probe group had severe ulcerations compared to 33% of patients in the multi-sensor probe group (P = 0.641). Intraluminal esophageal temperature ≥ 39°C is detected more frequently by the multi-sensor temperature probe versus the single-sensor probe, with more frequent esophageal injury and with comparable severity of injury. Despite detecting esophageal temperature rises in more patients, the multi-sensor probe may not have any measurable benefit compared to a single-sensor probe. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Fabrikasi Sistem Alat Ukur Temperatur Lapisan Buah Mangga dengan Menggunakan Sensor Waterproof LM35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sarif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Telah dibuat sistem alat ukur untuk memonitoring secara real time pada temperatur lapisan buah mangga dan temperatur lingkungan lemari pendingin. Ada tiga lapisan buah mangga yang dimonitoring dengan menggunakan sensor waterproof LM35. ketiga lapisan buah mangga yang dimaksud adalah lapisan 1 lapisan dekat dengan biji buah, lapisan 2 merupakan lapisan daging buah, dan lapisan 3 adalah lapisan di sekitar kulit buah mangga. Sinyal tegangan keluaran probe sensor LM35 dikondisikan dengan penguat tak mebalik yang mengaplikasikan IC OP07. Keluaran dari penguat tak membalik yang berupa data analog selanjutnya diolah menjadi data digital dengan modul mikrokontroler ATMega8535. Data digital hasil pengolahan mikrokontroler ATMega8535 di tampilkan ke unit penampil berupa liquid crystal display (LCD 20x4 karakter. Persamaan karakteristik yang diperoleh dari kalibrasi probe sensor LM35 menunjukkan performa yang sangat baik terlihat dari hasil karakterisasi yang memiliki linieritas tinggi. Persamaan karakteristik yang diperoleh dari masing masing probe sensor LM35 adalah probe sensor 1 dengan V = (9,663T – 6,054 milivolt, probe sensor 2 dengan V = (9,656 T – 2,517 milivolt, probe sensor 3 dengan V = (9,771T – 9,826 milivolt, dan probe sensor 4 dengan V = (9,782T – 8,092 milivolt.

  8. Assessment of humidity and temperature sensors and their application to seating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P W; Liu, Z; Heusch, A I; Cascioli, V

    2009-01-01

    Humidity and temperature are considered to be important factors in designing comfortable seat surfaces. A small number of studies have attempted to address this;however the methods used were limited regarding the placement of their sensors. This study aimed to design a sensor array system to investigate changes in humidity and temperature for eventual use in the study of factors affecting sitting comfort and incontinence detection. The system was subjected to three types of experiments: sensor response verification, thermal radiation testing and in situ trials. The variance in output within each type of sensor was small (+3.5% and +0.38 degrees C) and there was no apparent change to the variance in output of the sensors, when used in air or on a foam cushion loaded with a 50 kg sand bag (p > 0.1). In the human sitting experiments, although the profile from sensors under the thighs and ischial tuberosities were similar, the magnitude of change could be affected by position and body mass of the subject. This was especially noticeable with the sensors under the coccyx. These results support the use of multiple sites for sensor placement over the use of a single site when studying these parameters at the interface between subject and seating material at the seat base.

  9. Measuring Torque and Temperature in a Rotating Shaft Using Commercial SAW Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diogo; Pereira, António B.; Gégot, François

    2017-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of torque in a rotating shaft is not easy to implement with technologies such as optic fiber sensors or strain gages. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are wireless and passive and can be used to monitor strain in moving parts. Commercial solutions (sensors, antennas and interrogation unit) can easily be purchased from some companies; however, they are not customized and may not meet the specificity of the measurements. In order to evaluate the adequacy of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions, temperature and strain sensors fabricated by SENSeOR (Besançon, France) were mounted on a load cell. The sensors were calibrated using a thermal chamber and a universal testing machine. The load cell was then assembled together with a steel shaft that rotated at different speeds inside an oven. The commercial antennas were replaced with an RF (radio frequency) coupler and the sensors were interrogated with the commercial interrogation unit. The influence of rotation in the accuracy on the measurements, as well as the adequacy of the sensors structure, was evaluated. It can be concluded that SAW sensors can be used to measure temperature or torque in a rotating environment; however, some customization of the components is required in order to overcome the limitations posed by COTS sensing solutions. PMID:28671594

  10. Measuring Torque and Temperature in a Rotating Shaft Using Commercial SAW Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diogo; Mendes, Joana C; Pereira, António B; Gégot, François; Alves, Luís N

    2017-07-02

    Real-time monitoring of torque in a rotating shaft is not easy to implement with technologies such as optic fiber sensors or strain gages. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors are wireless and passive and can be used to monitor strain in moving parts. Commercial solutions (sensors, antennas and interrogation unit) can easily be purchased from some companies; however, they are not customized and may not meet the specificity of the measurements. In order to evaluate the adequacy of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions, temperature and strain sensors fabricated by SENSeOR (Besançon, France) were mounted on a load cell. The sensors were calibrated using a thermal chamber and a universal testing machine. The load cell was then assembled together with a steel shaft that rotated at different speeds inside an oven. The commercial antennas were replaced with an RF (radio frequency) coupler and the sensors were interrogated with the commercial interrogation unit. The influence of rotation in the accuracy on the measurements, as well as the adequacy of the sensors structure, was evaluated. It can be concluded that SAW sensors can be used to measure temperature or torque in a rotating environment; however, some customization of the components is required in order to overcome the limitations posed by COTS sensing solutions.

  11. Ferromagnetic particles as magnetic resonance imaging temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankiewicz, J H; Celinski, Z; Stupic, K F; Anderson, N R; Camley, R E

    2016-08-09

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an important technique for identifying different types of tissues in a body or spatial information about composite materials. Because temperature is a fundamental parameter reflecting the biological status of the body and individual tissues, it would be helpful to have temperature maps superimposed on spatial maps. Here we show that small ferromagnetic particles with a strong temperature-dependent magnetization, can be used to produce temperature-dependent images in magnetic resonance imaging with an accuracy of about 1 °C. This technique, when further developed, could be used to identify inflammation or tumours, or to obtain spatial maps of temperature in various medical interventional procedures such as hyperthermia and thermal ablation. This method could also be used to determine temperature profiles inside nonmetallic composite materials.

  12. INTELLIGENT MONITORING SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTED FIBEROPTIC SENSOR FOR POWER PLANT COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2004-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, improvement was made on the performance of in-fiber grating fabricated in single crystal sapphire fibers, test was performed on the grating performance of single crystal sapphire fiber with new fabrication methods, and the fabricated grating was applied to high temperature sensor. Under Task 2, models obtained from 3-D modeling of the Demonstration Boiler were used to study relationships between temperature and NOx, as the multi-dimensionality of such systems are most comparable with real-life boiler systems. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic

  13. TopSPICE Simulations for Temperature Compensation of ISFET/MEMFET Micro-Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsen AZZOUZI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an ISFET (Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor/MEMFET (Membrane Field Effect Transistor interface circuit with temperature compensation has been successfully designed and simulated. In each interface, we used the macro-model of ISFET/MEMFET based chemical sensors simulated in TopSPICE. The simulation results of the different sensing circuits of ISFET/MEMFETs for temperature compensation show that the readout configuration for ISFET/MEMFET sensors based on Wheatstone-Bridge connection is the most effective with a temperature drift 5´10-6 mV/°C.

  14. High-temperature fiber-optic Fabry-Perot interferometric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenhui; Jiang, Yi; Gao, Ran; Liu, Yuewu

    2015-05-01

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based high-temperature fiber-optic sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The sensor head is a Fabry-Perot cavity manufactured with a short section of endless single-mode photonic crystal fiber (ESM PCF). The interferometric spectrum of the Fabry-Perot interferometer is collected by a charge coupled device linear array based micro spectrometer. A high-resolution demodulation algorithm is used to interrogate the peak wavelengths. Experimental results show that the temperature range of 1200 °C and the temperature resolution of 1 °C are achieved.

  15. Temperature effects in exchange-biased planar Hall sensors for bioapplications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Freitas, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange biased planar Hall effect sensors is investigated between T = −10 and 70 °C. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well and that the temperature coefficient of the low-field sensitivity at T = 25 °C is 0.32%/°C. A procedure...... for temperature correction by use of a reference sensor is demonstrated. Consequences for magnetic biosensing are exemplified with calculations on M-280 Dynabeads®....

  16. Wireless Temperature Sensor Having No Electrical Connections and Sensing Method for Use Therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Marie (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A wireless temperature sensor includes an electrical conductor and a dielectric material on the conductor. The conductor is electrically unconnected and is shaped for storage of an electric field and a magnetic field. In the presence of a time-varying magnetic field, the conductor resonates to generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses, each of which has a frequency associated therewith. The material is selected such that it experiences changes in either dielectric or magnetic permeability attributes in the presence of a temperature change. Shifts from the sensor's baseline frequency response indicate that the material has experienced a temperature change.

  17. How to Use the DHT22 Sensor for Measuring Temperature and Humidity with the Arduino Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to achieve a functional system in terms of hardware and software, to measure temperature and humidity. Also, this system will allow to monitoring the time. In this, we use an Arduino board with interfacing a sensor placed in local environment to measure temperature and humidity. The paper aims to achieve the following goals: achieving a functional system in terms of hardware and software that allows measuring and monitoring temperature, humidity and the time; using a development board for the communication with the sensor and clock; implementation a program that allows requirements.

  18. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of a wireless multisensor system for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of temperature distributions in composite...

  19. Online Decorrelation of Humidity and Temperature in Chemical Sensors for Continuous Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, Ramon; Fonollosa, Jordi; Rulkov, Nikolai F; Rodriguez-Lujan, Irene

    2016-01-01

    A method for online decorrelation of chemical sensor readings from the effects of environmental humidity and temperature variations is proposed. The goal is to improve the accuracy of electronic nose measurements for continuous monitoring by processing data from simultaneous readings of environmental humidity and temperature. The electronic nose setup built for this study included eight different metal-oxide sensors, temperature and humidity sensors with a wireless communication link to PC. This wireless electronic nose was used to monitor air for two years in the residence of one of the authors and collected data continuously during 510 full days with a sampling rate of 2 samples per second. To estimate the effects of variations in air humidity and temperature on the chemical sensors readings, we used a standard energy band model for an n-type metal-oxide sensor. The main assumption of the model is that variations in sensor conductivity can be expressed as a nonlinear function of changes in the semiconductor...

  20. Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction has been developed based on the studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of silicon and germanium microcrystals in the temperature range 4.2—70 K, strain ±1.5*10–3 rel.un. and magnetic fields of 0—14 T. The feature of the sensitive element is the using of the p- and n-type conductivity germanium microcrystals as mechanical and magnetic field sensors, respectively, and the p-type silicon microcrystal — as temperature sensor. That allows providing the compensation of temperature influence on piezoresistance and on sensitivity to the magnetic field.

  1. Wearable sensors in intelligent clothing for measuring human body temperature based on optical fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiang; Yang, Haijing; Li, Enbang; Liu, Zhihui; Wei, Kejia

    2012-05-21

    Measuring body temperature is considerably important to physiological studies as well as clinical investigations. In recent years, numerous observations have been reported and various methods of measurement have been employed. The present paper introduces a novel wearable sensor in intelligent clothing for human body temperature measurement. The objective is the integration of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensors into functional textiles to extend the capabilities of wearable solutions for body temperature monitoring. In addition, the temperature sensitivity is 150 pm/°C, which is almost 15 times higher than that of a bare FBG. This study combines large and small pipes during fabrication to implant FBG sensors into the fabric. The law of energy conservation of the human body is considered in determining heat transfer between the body and its clothing. The mathematical model of heat transmission between the body and clothed FBG sensors is studied, and the steady-state thermal analysis is presented. The simulation results show the capability of the material to correct the actual body temperature. Based on the skin temperature obtained by the weighted average method, this paper presents the five points weighted coefficients model using both sides of the chest, armpits, and the upper back for the intelligent clothing. The weighted coefficients of 0.0826 for the left chest, 0.3706 for the left armpit, 0.3706 for the right armpit, 0.0936 for the upper back, and 0.0826 for the right chest were obtained using Cramer's Rule. Using the weighting coefficient, the deviation of the experimental result was ± 0.18 °C, which favors the use for clinical armpit temperature monitoring. Moreover, in special cases when several FBG sensors are broken, the weighted coefficients of the other sensors could be changed to obtain accurate body temperature.

  2. METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF THE CHARACTERISTIC CURVE OF THE THERMAL INERTIA OF AIRCRAFT GAS TEMPERATURE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Sabitov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of correction of the dynamic characteristics of gas temperature sensors in automatic control systems for the operation of aircraft gas turbine engines depends on the accuracy of the time constants of the sensors used from heat exchange conditions. The aim of this work was to develop a new method for determining the characteristic curves of the thermal inertia of gas temperature sensors.The new technique does not require finding the time constants of gas temperature sensors on the experimental transient characteristics. Characteristic curves for each time constant are defined as hyperbolic dependencies on the heat transfer coefficient of the gas temperature sensors sensing element with the gas flow. Parameters of hyperbolic dependencies are proposed to be established using two-dimensional regression analysis. For this purpose, special software has been developed in the Mathcad 14 and Mathcad 15. The software allows inputting the original data from the transient characteristics to the corresponding vectors or from tables in Excel format. It is shown that the transient characteristics in three-dimensional coordinates«time – heat transfer coefficient – the value of the transition characteristic» form a surface whose parameters are parameters of the desired hyperbolic dependencies.For a specific application of the technique, the regression functions for the dynamic characteristics of gas temperature sensors corresponding to the first and second orders are given. Analysis of the characteristic dependencies suggests that the proposed method more accurately establishes the dependence of the dynamic characteristics of aircraft gas temperature sensors on heat exchange conditions.It is shown that the algorithm of two-dimensional regression analysis realizes finding more accurate values of the parameters of the characteristic dependencies. The found parameters of the characteristic dependencies in a best way reach the surface of the

  3. High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Employing a SiC Based Ring Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Roger D.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Ponchak, George E.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Spry, David J.; Krawowski, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop harsh environment electronic and sensor technologies for aircraft engine safety and monitoring, we have used capacitive-based pressure sensors to shift the frequency of a SiC-electronics-based oscillator to produce a pressure-indicating signal that can be readily transmitted, e.g. wirelessly, to a receiver located in a more benign environment. Our efforts target 500 C, a temperature well above normal operating conditions of commercial circuits but within areas of interest in aerospace engines, deep mining applications and for future missions to the Venus atmosphere. This paper reports for the first time a ring oscillator circuit integrated with a capacitive pressure sensor, both operating at 500 C. This demonstration represents a significant step towards a wireless pressure sensor that can operate at 500 C and confirms the viability of 500 C electronic sensor systems.

  4. Temperature Sensor Feasibility Study of Wireless Sensor Network Applications for Heating Efficiency Maintenance in High-Rise Apartment Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freliha B.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cities are responsible for 60%-80% of the world’s energy use and for approximately the same percentage of greenhouse gas emissions. The existing multi-apartment buildings of multifamily housing sector are often energy inefficient, and the heating system does not ensure optimization of heat distribution of individual apartments. Heat distribution, heating system balancing, heat loss detection and calculation, individual heat energy accounting are difficult tasks to accomplish. This article deals with the temperature monitoring system designed to retrieve temperature differences necessary for overall building heat monitoring and individual apartment monitoring. The sensor testing case study process and its measurements are analysed.

  5. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Brian Jenkins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg grating (FBG temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  6. Localized Temperature Variations in Laser-Irradiated Composites with Embedded Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R Brian; Joyce, Peter; Mechtel, Deborah

    2017-01-27

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensors are embedded in composites to detect localized temperature gradients resulting from high energy infrared laser radiation. The goal is to detect the presence of radiation on a composite structure as rapidly as possible and to identify its location, much the same way human skin senses heat. A secondary goal is to determine how a network of sensors can be optimized to detect thermal damage in laser-irradiated composite materials or structures. Initial tests are conducted on polymer matrix composites reinforced with either carbon or glass fiber with a single optical fiber embedded into each specimen. As many as three sensors in each optical fiber measure the temporal and spatial thermal response of the composite to high energy radiation incident on the surface. Additional tests use a 2 × 2 × 3 array of 12 sensors embedded in a carbon fiber/epoxy composite to simultaneously measure temperature variations at locations on the composite surface and through the thickness. Results indicate that FBGs can be used to rapidly detect temperature gradients in a composite and their location, even for a direct strike of laser radiation on a sensor, when high temperatures can cause a non-uniform thermal response and FBG decay.

  7. Two-dimensional salt and temperature DNA denaturation analysis using a magnetoresistive sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Dufva, Martin; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2017-01-01

    We present a microfluidic system and its use to measure DNA denaturation curves by varying the temperature or salt (Na+) concentration. The readout is based on real-time measurements of DNA hybridization using magnetoresistive sensors and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as labels. We report the first...... melting curves of DNA hybrids measured as a function of continuously decreasing salt concentration at fixed temperature and compare them to the corresponding curves obtained vs. temperature at fixed salt concentration. The magnetoresistive sensor platform provided reliable results under varying...... temperature as well as salt concentration. The salt concentration melting curves were found to be more reliable than temperature melting curves. We performed a two-dimensional mapping of the melting profiles of a target to probes targeting its wild type (WT) and mutant type (MT) variants in the temperature...

  8. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Liu; Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical an...

  9. Study on the Temperature Measurement of High-Power Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Based on Fiber Optic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofei Wu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure high-power PMSM normal operation and monitor its fault online, its stator and rotor temperature is need to in real time high accuracy measurement. The temperature measurement principle of fiber optic sensor has been briefly introduced. The high- power PMSM rotor’s temperature measurement adopted semiconductor absorption optical fiber sensor, and its stator temperature measurement adopted optical fiber grating temperature sensor. The temperature measurement systems were designed respectively. The characteristics of the two temperature measurement systems are summarized. When they were applied to actual industrial field, the problems that needed to resolve were pointed.

  10. Graphical Interface for Measuring and Recording Temperature with the DS18B20 Digital Output Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Viorel POPA; Elena POPA

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the authors’ two originalgraphical interfaces made in Borland Delphi anddesigned to measure and record (with the DS18B20sensor) a wide range of negative and positivetemperatures. The first interface allows the readingof a sensor’s unique code and then themeasurement and recording of temperature. Thesecond interface can work with a variable numberof such sensors once their unique code has beenentered.The interfaces have been conceived for thestudy of the slow variations of...

  11. Preparation and measurement of FBG-based length, temperature, and vibration sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel, Bretislav; Helan, Radek; Buchta, Zdenek; Jelinek, Michal; Cip, Ondrej

    2016-12-01

    We present system of structure health measurement by optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings. Our system is focused to additionally install to existing buildings. We prepared first set-up of the system to monitoring of the nuclear power plant containment shape deformation. The presented system can measure up to several tens of sensors simultaneously. Each sensor contains optical fiber grating to measurement of change of length and the other independed fiber grating to monitor the temperature and the other ineligible effects.

  12. [Microstrip antenna design and system research of radio frequency identification temperature sensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Yang, Xiaohe; Chen, Yuquan; Pan, Min

    2008-12-01

    Radio frequency identification sensor network, which is a product of integrating radio frequency identification (RFID) with wireless sensor network (WSN), is introduced in this paper. The principle of radio frequency identification sensor is analyzed, and the importance of the antenna is emphasized. Then three kinds of common antennae, namely coil antenna, dipole antenna and microstrip antenna, are discussed. Subsequently, according to requirement, we have designed a microstrip antenna in a wireless temperature-monitoring and controlling system. The measurement of factual effect showed the requirement was fulfilled.

  13. TiO2 Nanotubes Membrane Flexible Sensor for Low-Temperature H2S Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia María Perillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a flexible gas sensor based on TiO2 nanotubes membrane, onto which array interdigitated gold electrodes in one side and a common heater in the backside were obtained using conventional microfabrication techniques. This was used to detect hydrogen sulphide within a concentration range of 6–38 ppm. The response to low concentrations of H2S at low temperature and good stability make the sensor a promising candidate for practical applications. These results support the proposal that the TiO2 nanotubes membrane flexible sensors are promising in portable on-site detection based on low cost nanomaterials.

  14. Development of a multispectral sensor for crop canopy temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying spatial and temporal variability in plant stress has precision agriculture applications in controlling variable rate irrigation and variable rate nutrient application. One approach to plant stress detection is crop canopy temperature measurement by the use of thermographic or radiometric...

  15. In-motion, non-contact rail temperature measurement sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Preventing track buckling incidents (Figure 1) is important to the railroad industry. Track materials, rail steel, for example, experience thermal expansion, which refers to the increase in a materials volume as its temperature rises. Thermal expa...

  16. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  17. Inverse determination of heat flux into a gun barrel using temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Jonathan A.; Jablonski, Melissa N.

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the thermal response of a temperature sensor located within a gun barrel, which accounts for the time-constant of the sensor and a measurement bias. The model is inversely solved to estimate the total heat flux applied to the bore surface as well as the transient history of the applied heat flux for a given thermal response of a temperature sensor. A parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of sensor time-constant, sensor location within the gun barrel, and measurement bias on the accuracy of the estimated heat flux as applied to a 155mm gun barrel. It is found that the accuracy of the estimated heat flux improves as the time-constant of the sensor decreases, the sensor is located closer to the bore surface, and the measurement bias decreases. A regression model is provided to estimate that accuracy and it is shown how a typical thermocouple would perform at various locations through the thickness of the gun barrel.

  18. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensor mapping of a jet-mixing flow field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomperski, S.; Gerardi, C. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Pointer, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces the use of a Rayleigh backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensor to map the temperature field in air flow for a thermal fatigue application. The experiment involves a pair of air jets at 22 and 70 C discharging from 136 mm hexagonal channels into a 1 x 1 x 1.7 m tank at atmospheric pressure. A 40 m-long, φ155 μm fiber optic sensor was wound back and forth across the tank midplane to form 16 horizontal measurement sections with a vertical spacing of 51 mm. This configuration generated a 2D temperature map with 2800 data points over a 0.76 x 1.7 m plane. Fiber optic sensor readings were combined with PIV and infrared measurements to relate flow field characteristics to the thermal signature of the tank lid. The paper includes sensor stability data and notes issues encountered using the distributed temperature sensor in a flow field. Sensors are sensitive to strain and humidity, and so accuracy relies upon strict control of both. (orig.)

  19. High Precision Temperature Insensitive Strain Sensor Based on Fiber-Optic Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A fiber-optic delay based strain sensor with high precision and temperature insensitivity was reported, which works on detecting the delay induced by strain instead of spectrum. In order to analyze the working principle of this sensor, the elastic property of fiber-optic delay was theoretically researched and the elastic coefficient was measured as 3.78 ps/km·με. In this sensor, an extra reference path was introduced to simplify the measurement of delay and resist the cross-effect of environmental temperature. Utilizing an optical fiber stretcher driven by piezoelectric ceramics, the performance of this strain sensor was tested. The experimental results demonstrate that temperature fluctuations contribute little to the strain error and that the calculated strain sensitivity is as high as 4.75 με in the range of 350 με. As a result, this strain sensor is proved to be feasible and practical, which is appropriate for strain measurement in a simple and economical way. Furthermore, on basis of this sensor, the quasi-distributed measurement could be also easily realized by wavelength division multiplexing and wavelength addressing for long-distance structure health and security monitoring.

  20. Plasmonic nanocomposite thin film enabled fiber optic sensors for simultaneous gas and temperature sensing at extreme temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohodnicki, Paul R; Buric, Michael P; Brown, Thomas D; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjun; Baltrus, John; Andio, Mark

    2013-10-07

    Embedded sensors capable of operation in extreme environments including high temperatures, high pressures, and highly reducing, oxidizing and/or corrosive environments can make a significant impact on enhanced efficiencies and reduced greenhouse gas emissions of current and future fossil-based power generation systems. Relevant technologies can also be leveraged in a wide range of other applications with similar needs including nuclear power generation, industrial process monitoring and control, and aviation/aerospace. Here we describe a novel approach to embedded sensing under extreme temperature conditions by integration of Au-nanoparticle based plasmonic nanocomposite thin films with optical fibers in an evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy configuration. Such sensors can potentially enable simultaneous temperature and gas sensing at temperatures approaching 900-1000 °C in a manner compatible with embedded and distributed sensing approaches. The approach is demonstrated using the Au/SiO2 system deposited on silica-based optical fibers. Stability of optical fibers under relevant high temperature conditions and interactions with changing ambient gas atmospheres is an area requiring additional investigation and development but the simplicity of the sensor design makes it potentially cost-effective and may offer a potential for widespread deployment.

  1. Measurement of Temperature Field for the Spindle of Machine Tool Based on Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyao Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The change of spindle temperature field is an important factor which influences machining precision. Many methods of spindle temperature field measurement have been proposed. However, most of the methods are based on the electric temperature sensors. There exist some defects (e.g., anti-interference, multiplexing, and stability capacity are poor. To increase the temperature sensitivity and reduce strain sensitivity of the bare Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensor, a cassette packaged FBG sensor is proposed to measure spindle temperature field. The temperature characteristics of the packaged FBG sensor are studied by comparative experiment with traditional thermal resistor sensor. The experimental results show that the packaged FBG sensor has the same capacity of temperature measurement with the thermal resistor sensor but with more remarkable antiinterference. In the further measurement experiment of the temperature field, a spindle nonuniform temperature field is acquired by the calibrated FBG sensors. It indicates that the packaged FBG sensor can be used to measure the temperature field for the spindle of machine tool.

  2. Development of a Temperature Sensor for Jet Engine and Space Missions Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Culley, Dennis E.; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electronic systems in aerospace and in space exploration missions are expected to encounter extreme temperatures and wide thermal swings. To address the needs for extreme temperature electronics, research efforts exist at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to develop and evaluate electronics for extreme temperature operations, and to establish their reliability under extreme temperature operation and thermal cycling; conditions that are typical of both the aerospace and space environments. These efforts are supported by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics/Subsonic Fixed Wing Program and by the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. This work reports on the results obtained on the development of a temperature sensor geared for use in harsh environments.

  3. YAG:Yb3+ crystal as a potential material for optical temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkhanyan, H. G.; Demirkhanyan, G. G.; Kostanyan, R. B.

    2018-02-01

    The possibilities are discussed of Y3Al5O12:Yb3+ crystal as a material for an optical temperature sensor (OTS) based on the temperature dependences of the more intense spectral emission lines and on the ratio of the absorption coefficients from the ground and first excited Stark sublevels. The operating temperature and average sensitivity for OTSs are determined. It is shown that the former is an effective method for an OTS in a cryogenic temperature range (40–130 K) and the latter in a high temperature range (500–1000 K).

  4. A High-Performance LC Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor Fabricated Using Low-Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An LC resonant pressure sensor with improved performance is presented in this paper. The sensor is designed with a buried structure, which protects the electrical components from contact with harsh environments and reduces the resonant-frequency drift of the sensor in high-temperature environments. The pressure-sensitive membrane of the sensor is optimized according to small-deflection-plate theory, which allows the sensor to operate in high-pressure environments. The sensor is fabricated using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC technology, and a fugitive film is used to create a completed sealed embedded cavity without an evacuation channel. The experimental results show that the frequency drift of the sensor versus the temperature is approximately 0.75 kHz/°C, and the responsivity of the sensor can be up to 31 kHz/bar within the pressure range from atmospheric pressure to 60 bar.

  5. Proposal to negotiate, without competitive tendering, a contract for the supply of 6000 cryogenic temperature sensors

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the supply of 6000 cryogenic temperature sensors for the Large Hadron Collider. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with LAKE SHORE CRYOTRONICS, INC. (USA), without competitive tendering, for the supply of 6000 cryogenic temperature sensors for a total amount of 694 860 US dollars (1 081 500 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The above amount in Swiss francs has been calculated using the rate of exchange stipulated in the tender. LAKE SHORE CRYOTRONICS, INC. has declared the following origin of the equipment relating to this adjudication proposal: USA-100%. The expenditure for the cryogenic temperature sensors will be reimbursed to CERN by the Department of Energy of the Government of the United States of America within the framework of the Accelerator Protocol to the Co-operation Agreement with the USA concerning their contribution towards the LHC machine.

  6. Influence of temperature and humidity on the detection of benzene vapor by piezoelectric crystal sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Chan-Hyon; Yun, Jong-Ho; Sin, Kye-Ryong

    2016-01-01

    The effects of temperature and humidity on the estimation of air pollution by benzene by using the piezoelectric crystal gas sensor were studied. Polyvinylchloride films were used as substrate for the immobilization of polymethylphenylsiloxane onto the electrode surface of the piezoelectric crystal. The sensing layer consisting of polymethylphenylsiloxane and polyvinylchloride was used for real-time monitoring of benzene, one of the atmospheric pollutants. According to the humidity from 35% to 75%, the upper limit of detection by this sensor was decreased and the response time and frequency recovery time for detecting benzene were long. On the other hand, as increasing the temperature, the response time and the frequency recovery time of the sensor were short, but its sensitivity got worse. The models for the correlation between the benzene concentration and temperature (or humidity) were presented.

  7. Sensitivity-enhanced temperature sensor with cascaded fiber optic Sagnac interferometers based on Vernier-effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Yang; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Xihua; Luo, Bin; Pan, Wei; Yan, Lianshan

    2015-02-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated with ~9 times sensitivity enhancement by using two cascaded Sagnac interferometers. These two Sagnac interferometers consist of the same type of polarization maintaining fibers with slightly different lengths. The working principle is analogous to a Vernier scale. One interferometer acts as filter, while the other is for temperature sensing. The envelope of the cascaded sensor shifts much more than single one with a certain enhancement factor, which related to the free space range difference between the filter and sensor interferometers. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced from -1.46 nm/°C based on single Sagnac configuration to -13.36 nm/°C.

  8. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage’s sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  9. A novel high-sensitivity, low-power, liquid crystal temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorri, José Francisco; Urruchi, Virginia; Bennis, Noureddine; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel

    2014-04-09

    A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC) sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from -6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from -40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage's sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  10. Room Temperature Detection of Acetone by a PANI/Cellulose/WO3 Electrochemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eider Aparicio-Martínez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical sensing based on semiconducting metal oxides has been largely proposed for acetone sensing, although some major technical challenges such as high operating temperature still remain unsolved. This work presents the development of an electrochemical sensor based on nanostructured PANI/cellulose/WO3 composite for acetone detection at room temperature. The synthesized materials for sensor preparation were polyaniline (PANI with a conductivity of 13.9 S/cm and tungsten trioxide (WO3 in monoclinic phase doped with cellulose as carbon source. The synthesized materials were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, cyclic voltammetry (CV, and Raman spectroscopy. The composite was applied for acetone detection in the range of 0 to 100 ppmv at room temperature with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS for monitoring resistance changes proportional to acetone concentration. The developed sensor achieved a calculated limit of detection of 10 ppm and R2 of 0.99415 with a RSD of 5% (n=3 at room temperature. According to these results, the developed sensor is suitable for acetone sensing at room temperatures without the major shortcomings of larger systems required by high operating temperatures.

  11. Optical fiber sensors-based temperature distribution measurement in ex vivo radiofrequency ablation with submillimeter resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Tosi, Daniele; Braschi, Giovanni; Gallati, Mario; Cigada, Alfredo; Busca, Giorgio; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-11-01

    Radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFTA) induces a high-temperature field in a biological tissue having steep spatial (up to 6°C/mm) and temporal (up to 1°C/s) gradients. Applied in cancer care, RFTA produces a localized heating, cytotoxic for tumor cells, and is able to treat tumors with sizes up to 3 to 5 cm in diameter. The online measurement of temperature distribution at the RFTA point of care has been previously carried out with miniature thermocouples and optical fiber sensors, which exhibit problems of size, alteration of RFTA pattern, hysteresis, and sensor density worse than 1 sensor/cm. In this work, we apply a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) with a submillimeter spatial resolution for the monitoring of RFTA in porcine liver tissue. The DTS demodulates the chaotic Rayleigh backscattering pattern with an interferometric setup to obtain the real-time temperature distribution. A measurement chamber has been set up with the fiber crossing the tissue along different diameters. Several experiments have been carried out measuring the space-time evolution of temperature during RFTA. The present work showcases the temperature monitoring in RFTA with an unprecedented spatial resolution and is exportable to in vivo measurement; the acquired data can be particularly useful for the validation of RFTA computational models.

  12. A fiber Bragg grating--bimetal temperature sensor for solar panel inverters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Afiq; Tamchek, Nizam; Hassan, Muhammad Rosdi Abu; Dambul, Katrina D; Selvaraj, Jeyrai; Rahim, Nasrudin Abd; Sandoghchi, Reza; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the design, characterization and implementation of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based temperature sensor for an insulted-gate Bipolar transistor (IGBT) in a solar panel inverter. The FBG is bonded to the higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) side of a bimetallic strip to increase its sensitivity. Characterization results show a linear relationship between increasing temperature and the wavelength shift. It is found that the sensitivity of the sensor can be categorized into three characterization temperature regions between 26 °C and 90 °C. The region from 41 °C to 90 °C shows the highest sensitivity, with a value of 14 pm/°C. A new empirical model that considers both temperature and strain effects has been developed for the sensor. Finally, the FBG-bimetal temperature sensor is placed in a solar panel inverter and results confirm that it can be used for real-time monitoring of the IGBT temperature.

  13. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorri, José Francisco; Urruchi, Virginia; Bennis, Noureddine; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC) sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage's sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption. PMID:24721771

  14. Spectral interferometric fiber optic temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militky, J.; Kadulova, M.; Hlubina, P.

    2016-12-01

    Spectral interferometric techniques utilizing the interference of polarization modes in a highly birefringent (HB) elliptical-core fiber to measure temperature are analyzed experimentally. First, an experimental setup comprising a white-light source, a polarizer, a sensing birefringent fiber, an analyzer and a spectrometer is considered. Temperature sensing by this method is based on the wavelength interrogation. Second, the above setup is extended by a birefringent quartz crystal to increase the sensitivity of the temperature sensing. Third, the above setup is extended by an analyzer, and the combination of a polarizer, a birefringent quartz crystal and an analyzer represents another interferometer, which is used to increase the sensitivity of the temperature sensing. In this case the Vernier effect is present and the resultant spectrum is with an envelope, which is utilized in temperature sensing. We reached a sensitivity of 0.56 nm/K in the third setup, compared to -0.12 nm/K and -0.19 nm/K in the first and the second setup, respectively.

  15. A surface acoustic wave passive and wireless sensor for magnetic fields, temperature, and humidity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report an integrated single-chip surface acoustic wave sensor with the capability of measuring magnetic field, temperature, and humidity. The sensor is fabricated using a thermally sensitive LiNbO3 substrate, a humidity sensitive hydrogel coating, and a magnetic field sensitive impedance load. The sensor response to individually and simultaneously changing magnetic field, temperature and humidity is characterized by connecting a network analyzer directly to the sensor. Analytical models for each measurand are derived and used to compensate noise due to cross sensitivities. The results show that all three measurands can be monitored in parallel with sensitivities of 75 ppm/°C, 0.13 dB/%R.H. (at 50%R.H.), 0.18 dB/Oe and resolutions of 0.1 °C, 0.4%R.H., 1 Oe for temperature, humidity and magnetic field, respectively. A passive wireless measurement is also conducted on a current line using, which shows the sensors capability to measure both temperature and current signals simultaneously.

  16. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Liang, Zhen; Zhou, Shuangxi

    2017-01-01

    This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF) communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL)-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple. PMID:28640188

  17. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Liang, Zhen; Zhou, Shuangxi

    2017-06-22

    This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF) communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL)-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple.

  18. Dielectrically-Loaded Cylindrical Resonator-Based Wireless Passive High-Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijun Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The temperature sensor presented in this paper is based on a microwave dielectric resonator, which uses alumina ceramic as a substrate to survive in harsh environments. The resonant frequency of the resonator is determined by the relative permittivity of the alumina ceramic, which monotonically changes with temperature. A rectangular aperture etched on the surface of the resonator works as both an incentive and a coupling device. A broadband slot antenna fed by a coplanar waveguide is utilized as an interrogation antenna to wirelessly detect the sensor signal using a radio-frequency backscattering technique. Theoretical analysis, software simulation, and experiments verified the feasibility of this temperature-sensing system. The sensor was tested in a metal-enclosed environment, which severely interferes with the extraction of the sensor signal. Therefore, frequency-domain compensation was introduced to filter the background noise and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensor signal. The extracted peak frequency was found to monotonically shift from 2.441 to 2.291 GHz when the temperature was varied from 27 to 800 °C, leading to an average absolute sensitivity of 0.19 MHz/°C.

  19. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple.

  20. Research of a Novel Ultra-High Pressure Sensor with High-Temperature Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Dong Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high pressure measurement has significant applications in various fields such as high pressure synthesis of new materials and ultra-high pressure vessel monitoring. This paper proposes a novel ultra-high pressure sensor combining a truncated-cone structure and a silicon-on-insulator (SOI piezoresistive element for measuring the pressure up to 1.6 GPa. The truncated-cone structure attenuates the measured pressure to a level that can be detected by the SOI piezoresistive element. Four piezoresistors of the SOI piezoresistive element are placed along specific crystal orientation and configured as a Wheatstone bridge to obtain voltage signals. The sensor has an advantage of high-temperature resistance, in that the structure of the piezoresistive element can avoid the leakage current at high temperature and the truncated-cone structure separates the piezoresistive element from the heat environment. Furthermore, the upper surface diameter of the truncated-cone structure is designed to be 2 mm for the application of small scale. The results of static calibration show that the sensor exhibits a good performance in hysteresis and repeatability. The temperature experiment indicates that the sensor can work steadily at high temperature. This study would provide a better insight to the research of ultra-high pressure sensors with larger range and smaller size.

  1. Temperature characteristics research of SOI pressure sensor based on asymmetric base region transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Li, Dandan; Yu, Yang; Wen, Dianzhong

    2017-07-01

    Based on the asymmetric base region transistor, a pressure sensor with temperature compensation circuit is proposed in this paper. The pressure sensitive structure of the proposed sensor is constructed by a C-type silicon cup and a Wheatstone bridge with four piezoresistors ({R}1, {R}2, {R}3 and {R}4) locating on the edge of a square silicon membrane. The chip was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology and bipolar transistor process. When the supply voltage is 5.0 V, the corresponding temperature coefficient of the sensitivity (TCS) for the sensor before and after temperature compensation are -1862 and -1067 ppm/°C, respectively. Through varying the ratio of the base region resistances {r}1 and {r}2, the TCS for the sensor with the compensation circuit is -127 ppm/°C. It is possible to use this compensation circuit to improve the temperature characteristics of the pressure sensor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61471159), the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province (No. F201433), the University Nursing Program for Young Scholars with Creative Talents in Heilongjiang Province (No. 2015018), and the Special Funds for Science and Technology Innovation Talents of Harbin in China (No. 2016RAXXJ016).

  2. Low-cost and high-resolution interrogation scheme for LPG-based temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Reddy, M.; Srimannarayana, K.; Venkatappa Rao, T.; Vengal Rao, P.

    2015-09-01

    A low-cost and high-resolution interrogation scheme for a long-period fiber grating (LPG) temperature sensor with adjustable temperature range has been designed, developed and tested. In general LPGs are widely used as optical sensors and can be used as optical edge filters to interrogate the wavelength encoded signal from sensors such as fiber Bragg grating (FBG) by converting it into intensity modulated signal. But the interrogation of LPG sensors using FBG is a bit novel and it is to be studied experimentally. The sensor works based on measurement of shift in attenuation band of LPG corresponding to the applied temperature. The wavelength shift of LPG attenuation band is monitored using an optical spectrum analyser (OSA). Further the bulk and expensive OSA is replaced with a low-cost interrogation system that employ an FBG, photodiode and a transimpedance amplifier (TIA). The designed interrogation scheme makes the system low-cost, fast in response, and also enhances its resolution up to 0.1°C. The measurable temperature range using the proposed scheme is limited to 120 °C. However this range can be shifted within 15-450 °C by means of adjusting the Bragg wavelength of FBG.

  3. Monitoring and Modeling Temperature Variations Inside Silage Stack Using Novel Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    of withstanding the high loads that occurred during ensiling, storage, and feed-out. Mathematical models estimating the relations between the silage temperatures (at depths of 25 and 50 cm) and air and soil temperatures were obtained. Black-box modeling using the prediction error method (PEM) was selected...... the temperature inside silage stacks; (2) to design a suitable sensor protection housing that prevents physical and chemical damage to the sensor; and (3) to mathematically model temperature variations inside a silage stack, using system identification techniques. The designed wireless nodes were used to monitor...... as the identification method. Among different black-box models such as ARX, ARMAX, Output Error (OE), and Box-Jenkins (BJ), with different model orders, a third-order Box-Jenkins model structure gave the best performance in terms of prediction accuracy. The success rate of the models proposed for silage temperature...

  4. Compact on-Chip Temperature Sensors Based on Dielectric-Loaded Plasmonic Waveguide-Ring Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of a waveguide-ring resonator based on dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguides as a temperature sensor is demonstrated in this paper and the influence of temperature change to the transmission through the waveguide-ring resonator system is comprehensively analyzed. The results show that the roundtrip phase change in the ring resonator due to the temperature change is the major reason for the transmission variation. The performance of the temperature sensor is also discussed and it is shown that for a waveguide-ring resonator with the resonator radius around 5 mm and waveguide-ring gap of 500 nm which gives a footprint around 140 µm2, the temperature sensitivity at the order of 10−2 K can be achieved with the input power of 100 mW within the measurement sensitivity limit of a practical optical detector.

  5. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  6. Development of a TDLAS sensor for temperature and concentration of H2 O in high speed and high temperature flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehe, Suzanne; O'Byrne, Sean

    2017-06-01

    The development of a sensor for simultaneous temperature concentration of H2 O and temperature in high speed flows is presented. H2 O is a desirable target sensing species because it is a primary product in combustion systems; both temperature and concentration profiles can be used to assess both the extent of the combustion and the flow field characteristics. Accurate measurements are therefore highly desirable. The sensor uses a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) scanned at 50 kHz from 7172 to 7186 cm-1. Temperatures and concentrations are extracted from the spectra by fitting theoretical spectra to the experimental data. The theoretical spectra are generated using GENSPECT in conjunction with line parameters from the HITRAN 2012 database. To validate the theoretical spectra, experimental spectra of H2 O were obtained at known temperatures (290-550 K) and pressures (30 torr) in a heated static gas cell. The results show that some theoretical lines deviate from the experimental lines. New line-strengths are calculated assuming that the line assignments and broadening parameters in HITRAN are correct. This data is essential for accurate H2 O concentration and temperature measurements at low pressure and high temperature conditions. US Air Force Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development Grant FA2386-16-1-4092.

  7. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel design of an on-chip optical temperature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration where the two arms consist of hybrid waveguides providing opposite temperature-dependent phase changes to enhance the temperature sensitivity of the sensor. The sensitivity...... of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (∼80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high...

  8. Precision temperature monitoring (PTM) and Humidity monitoring (HM) sensors of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A major aspect for the ECAL detector control is the monitoring of the system temperature and the verification that the required temperature stability of the crystal volume and the APDs, expected to be (18 ± 0.05)C, is achieved. The PTM is designed to read out thermistors, placed on both the front and back of the crystals, with a relative precision better than 0.01 C. In total there are ten sensors per supermodule. The humidity level in the electronics compartment is monitored by the HM system and consists of one humidity sensor per module.

  9. Temperature sensor with improved thermal barrier and gas seal between the probe and housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, David Peter; Sumner, Randall Christian

    1998-01-01

    A temperature sensor comprising: a hollow tube with a first end and a second end, wherein the second end is closed sealing a cavity within the tube from an environment outside of the tube and wherein the first end has an exterior cylindrical surface; a temperature responsive sensing element within the tube proximate to the second end; a glass cylinder having an inner cylindrical surface in sealing engagement with the exterior cylindrical surface of the first end of the tube; and a sensor housing having an inner cylindrical cavity bounded by an inner cylindrical wall, wherein an outer cylindrical surface of the glass cylinder is sealingly engaged with the inner cylindrical wall.

  10. Dual-core fiber based strain sensor for application in extremely high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolowicz, Anna; Szostkiewicz, Lukasz; Kolakowska, Agnieszka; Bienkowska, Beata; Budnicki, Dawid; Ostrowski, Lukasz; Wysokinski, Karol; Stanczyk, Tomasz; Fidelus, Janusz; Nasilowski, Piotr; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Napierala, Marek; Mergo, Pawel; Nasilowski, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    This paper focuses on the utilization of crosstalk phenomenon to construct an innovative strain sensor. In our experiments, we take advantage of special fiber design and technology of fiber post-processing in order to receive strain sensing areas. We present results, which indicate possibility of achieving strain sensitivity at level of several mɛ/nm with negligible temperature cross-sensitivity at the same time. Furthermore after coating the sensor with the developed copper and gold coatings, it can be easily applied in extremely high temperature (e.g. 500 - 800 °C) and/or aggressive media applications.

  11. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    occurred in ambient temperatures of 38–46-C and was designed to elicit elevations in Tint, which were recorded approximately every min on a portable data...is sufficient to eliminate the effects of fluid ingestion for the majority of volunteers (31), although 10 h of in- gestion timing before activity

  12. Advanced LED package with temperature sensors and microfluidic cooling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Zeijl, H. van; Sokolovskij, R.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2013-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are revolutionizing the illumination with energy savings and enhanced functionality. However, around 80% of the input power will be still transferred to heat. As the elevated temperature negatively affects the maximum light output, efficiency, quality, reliability and

  13. using energy efficient using energy efficient temperature sensor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    the world economy and in daily experience this is why automatic systems are being preferred over manual system [1] .... for Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC) the resolution will be poor as the input voltage will only drive up to ... Therefore temperature (C) = Vin/0.01 = Digital. Reading x 0.4883 [7]. 3.3 Design Analysis of the ...

  14. Study for optimizing the design of optical temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panpan; Sun, Zhen; Shi, Ruixin; Liu, Guofeng; Fu, Zuoling; Wei, Yanling

    2017-12-01

    The correlations between temperature sensitivity (relative sensitivity Sr and absolute sensitivity Sa) and thermally coupled level gaps (ΔE) are vital but less-studied for potential applications in scientific research, industrial production, clinical medicine, and so on. We take YbPO4:Ln3+ (Ln = Tm3+, Ho3+, and Er3+) up-conversion phosphors as a case to study the relationships between temperature sensitivity (Sr, Sa) and ΔE. The results of various discussions, including the experimental data of temperature sensitivity based on YbPO4:Ln3+ (Ln = Tm3+, Ho3+, and Er3+) and theoretical derivation from original formulas, show that Sr and ΔE are linearly positive correlation, which is invalid for Sa. Noticeably, YbPO4:Tm3+ nanoparticles display intense near infrared red emission within the biological window, leading to great potential application in biological sensing and biological imaging. All the research studies would benefit the design of optical temperature sensing.

  15. Operating temperature measuring method for SnO2 gas-sensing materials using infra-red sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Sun, Yongquan; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Jing

    2017-10-01

    Operating temperature was crucial for SnO2 gas sensor considering the serious impacts on sensors' selectivity and reliability. While, it was difficult to measure this operating temperature because the size of the sensitive body was small, as well as its heat capacity. In this paper, the temperature signal was acquired by the non-contact infrared temperature sensor and processed by the signal conditioning circuit and single-chip, and then the measured temperature were displayed by the single-chip. The method of subsection calibration was adopted to improve the accuracy of temperature measurement. Finally, the uncertainty of system measurement was estimated.

  16. The Software Design of SiBCN Temperature Sensor Wireless Sweep Signal Receiving and Dispatching System Based on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chengzhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available SiBCN (silicon boron carbon nitrogen wireless passive microwave resonant cavity temperature sensor is a new type of sensor under the development trend of radio frequency microwave technology. Based on the working principle of the sensor, the software design of SiBCN temperature sensor wireless sweep transceiver system based on FPGA is carried out on the basis of the existing wireless sweep signal transceiver system hardware. Let the signal source send the 11.0GHz ~ 11.6GHz range sweep signal to the sensor. The feedback signal of the sensor is filtered and the resonant frequency is obtained. The detection of temperature is based on the correspondence between the resonant frequency and the temperature.Through the analysis of the measured results, the system software design meets the requirements, and the temperature and frequency change rate is about 421.2KHz / °C.

  17. Pure and Au nanoparticles doped higher alkanes for an optical fiber temperature threshold sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, Natalia; Marć, Paweł; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Grobelny, Jarosław; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    2017-05-01

    Development of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) technology has created new research fields for optical sensors and telecommunication. The cross section geometry modifications of this type of fibers allow to influence their optical parameters. These modifications are not limited to change sizes and arrangements of an air holes' lattice, but also replacing air with another material. In the paper we have shown how to change thermo-optical properties of a large mode area commercially available LMA-10 PCF by filling it with different chemical substances. Our previous research has led us to develop a class of optical fiber temperature threshold sensor transducers based on a partially filled PCF with higher alkanes. The principle of work of such a sensor transducer is to use a temperature bi-stability of a filling material because when the higher alkane is in the solid state light cannot pass through the transducer, and when it is in the liquid state light can be transmitted. One of the most important advantages of higher alkanes we used in the experiments are their different melting points, but the most important disadvantage is discrepancy between melting and crystallization temperatures and the sensor switches on and off for different temperatures. This effect called supercoiling appears due to the lack of nucleation centers. To reduce this effect the gold nanoparticels (NPs) in hexane colloid were used. We have prepared samples with three higher alkanes doped with 1% of Au NPs and we have shown their temperature and time responses. The proper selection of melting points of higher alkanes allows to design the multilevel temperature threshold sensor which can cover the temperature range from -20°C up to 70°C, and can be applied in chemical, oil, gas and energy industry.

  18. ZrO2 thin-film-based sapphire fiber temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajun; Lally, Evan M; Wang, Xiaoping; Gong, Jianmin; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo

    2012-04-20

    A submicrometer-thick zirconium dioxide film was deposited on the tip of a polished C-plane sapphire fiber to fabricate a temperature sensor that can work to an extended temperature range. Zirconium dioxide was selected as the thin film material to fabricate the temperature sensor because it has relatively close thermal expansion to that of sapphire, but more importantly it does not react appreciably with sapphire up to 1800 °C. In order to study the properties of the deposited thin film, ZrO2 was also deposited on C-plane sapphire substrates and characterized by x-ray diffraction for phase analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy for analysis of surface morphology. Using low-coherence optical interferometry, the fabricated thin-film-based sapphire fiber sensor was tested in the lab up to 1200 °C and calibrated from 200° to 1000 °C. The temperature resolution is determined to be 5.8 °C when using an Ocean Optics USB4000 spectrometer to detect the reflection spectra from the ZrO2 thin-film temperature sensor.

  19. Integrated pressure and temperature sensor with high immunity against external disturbance for flexible endoscope operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yusaku; Maeda, Kohei; Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Takao, Hidekuni

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an integrated pressure and temperature sensor device for a flexible endoscope with long-term stability in in vivo environments was developed and demonstrated. The sensor, which is embedded in the thin wall of the disposable endoscope hood, is intended for use in endoscopic surgery. The device surface is coated with a Cr layer to prevent photoelectronic generation induced by the strong light of the endoscope. The integrated temperature sensor allows compensation for the effect of the temperature drift on a pressure signal. The fabricated device pressure resolution is 0.4 mmHg; the corresponding pressure error is 3.2 mmHg. The packaged device was used in a surgical simulation in an animal experiment. Pressure and temperature monitoring was achieved even in a pH 1 acid solution. The device enables intraluminal pressure and temperature measurements of the stomach, which facilitate the maintenance of internal stomach conditions. The applicability of the sensor was successfully demonstrated in animal experiments.

  20. Temperature and strain measurements in concrete using micro-structure optical fiber sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areias, Lou [EURIDICE/SCK - CEN, Mol (Belgium); Vrije Univ. Brussels (Belgium); Geernaert, Thomas; Sulejmani, Sanne [Vrije Univ. Brussels (Belgium); and others

    2015-07-01

    A recent test carried out to evaluate the construction feasibility of the Belgian supercontainer concept incorporated several types of state-of-the-art sensors and innovative monitoring techniques, including the use of different types of optical fiber sensors. One of these is a relatively new type of sensor developed by the Brussels Photonics Team (B-PHOT) of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The sensor uses highly birefringent microstructured optical fibers equipped with fiber Bragg gratings (MOFBGs) sensors. They were embedded in a carbon-fiber reinforced composite plate to provide protection against the concrete's highly alkaline environment, facilitate installation in the concrete mould and allow the transfer of strain onto the fiber. The double reflection spectrum of the MOFBGs allows monitoring strain and temperature simultaneously. This paper presents results of temperature and strain measurements obtained with MOFBG sensors during a {sup 1}/{sub 2}-scale test performed in 2013. The results compare well with similar measurements obtained using conventional thermocouples and vibrating wire strain gauges.

  1. Temperature monitoring with FBG sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngot T.; Lee, Seul Lee; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-02-01

    Temperature variations are often monitored by using sensors operating at the site of treatment during Laser-induced Interstitial Thermotherapy (LITT). Currently, temperature measurements during LITT have been performed with thermocouples (TCs). However, TCs could directly absorb laser light and lead to self-heating (resulting in an over-estimation). Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can instead overcome this limitation of the TCs due to its insensitivity to electromagnetic interference. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively evaluate the FBG temperature sensor with a K-type thermocouple to real-time monitor temperature increase in ex vivo tissue during diffuser-assisted LITT. A 4-W 980-nm laser was employed to deliver optical energy in continuous mode through a 600-µm core-diameter diffusing applicator. A goniometric measurement validated the uniform light distribution in polar and longitudinal directions. The FBG sensor showed a linear relationship (R2 = 0.995) between wavelength shift and temperature change in air and tissue along with a sensitivity of 0.0114 nm/˚C. Regardless of sensor type, the measured temperature increased with irradiation time and applied power but decreased with increasing distance from the diffuser surface. The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT (4.0±0.3-mm at 99˚C after 120-s). The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT s irradiation). The FBG-integrated diffuser was able to monitor the interstitial temperature in tubular tissue (porcine urethra) real-time during laser treatment. However, the thermal coagulation thickness of the porcine urethra was measured to be 1.5 mm that was slightly thicker ( 20%) than that of the bovine liver after 4-W 980-nm laser for 48 s. The FBG temperature sensor can be a feasible tool to real-time monitor the temporal development of the temperature during the diffuser-assisted LITT to

  2. Intelligent Monitoring System With High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor For Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2005-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first develop an analytic description and then extend that model along a single axis. Extrapolation

  3. Graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor for nanometer-size on-chip temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadaki, Yaser M.; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharifi, Safura

    2016-04-01

    Graphene has been extensively investigated as a promising material for various types of high performance sensors due to its large surface-to-volume ratio, remarkably high carrier mobility, high carrier density, high thermal conductivity, extremely high mechanical strength and high signal-to-noise ratio. The power density and the corresponding die temperature can be tremendously high in scaled emerging technology designs, urging the on-chip sensing and controlling of the generated heat in nanometer dimensions. In this paper, we have explored the feasibility of a thin oxide graphene nanoribbon (GNR) as nanometer-size temperature sensor for detecting local on-chip temperature at scaled bias voltages of emerging technology. We have introduced an analytical model for GNR FET for 22nm technology node, which incorporates both thermionic emission of high-energy carriers and band-to-band-tunneling (BTBT) of carriers from drain to channel regions together with different scattering mechanisms due to intrinsic acoustic phonons and optical phonons and line-edge roughness in narrow GNRs. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) of GNR FET-based temperature sensor shows approximately an order of magnitude higher TCR than large-area graphene FET temperature sensor by accurately choosing of GNR width and bias condition for a temperature set point. At gate bias VGS = 0.55 V, TCR maximizes at room temperature to 2.1×10-2 /K, which is also independent of GNR width, allowing the design of width-free GNR FET for room temperature sensing applications.

  4. Low density lipoproteins as circulating fast temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassl, Ruth; Pregetter, Magdalena; Amenitsch, Heinz; Kriechbaum, Manfred; Schwarzenbacher, Robert; Chapman, John M; Laggner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The potential physiological significance of the nanophase transition of neutral lipids in the core of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is dependent on whether the rate is fast enough to integrate small (+/-2 degrees C) temperature changes in the blood circulation. Using sub-second, time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technology with synchrotron radiation, we have monitored the dynamics of structural changes within LDL, which were triggered by temperature-jumps and -drops, respectively. Our findings reveal that the melting transition is complete within less than 10 milliseconds. The freezing transition proceeds slowly with a half-time of approximately two seconds. Thus, the time period over which LDL particles reside in cooler regions of the body readily facilitates structural reorientation of the apolar core lipids. Low density lipoproteins, the biological nanoparticles responsible for the transport of cholesterol in blood, are shown to act as intrinsic nano-thermometers, which can follow the periodic temperature changes during blood circulation. Our results demonstrate that the lipid core in LDL changes from a liquid crystalline to an oily state within fractions of seconds. This may, through the coupling to the protein structure of LDL, have important repercussions on current theories of the role of LDL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  5. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  6. Research on Diagnostics and Regulation of Temperature in the Hive Confined Space With the Use of Mobile Array Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troshkov Aleksandr Mikhaylovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests the diagnostics of air circulation in the hive. The ventilation of enclosed space is achieved by the constant movement of the worker bees’ wings with variable intensity, and hence with a modified air flow. The main place of air flow is notches on which the bees are located, and their flapping wings intensify pressure air circulation. Thus, the air pressure allows creating ventilation in the hive. The possibilities of controlling the temperature in the enclosed space are investigated. The theoretical studies and the analysis of scientific papers, as well as confirmations by practicing beekeepers of the Karachay-Cherkess Republic and Stavropol Territory have proved the correlation between the temperature regime of the hive confined space and the presence of carbon dioxide during winter. In the second half of winter, the correlation coefficient is reduced. This is due to the change in the physiological state of bee colonies, the appearance of larvae and, as a consequence, of oxygen consumption. Hence, there is need in hive ventilation and maintaining the stable temperature, especially in the areas of brood. The authors synthesized the sensor array device of temperature regulation. The use of this sensor improves the quality of sectoral diagnostics of the hive, and the evaluative zone allows to specify displacement estimation characteristics. The temperature control zone was determined. The possibility of temperature monitoring with the construction of the graphic measurements was realized.

  7. A Reflective Photonic Crystal Fiber Temperature Sensor Probe Based on Infiltration with Liquid Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congjing Hao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a reflective photonic crystal fiber (PCF sensor probe for temperature measurement has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The performance of the device depends on the intensity modulation of the optical signal by liquid mixtures infiltrated into the air holes of commercial LMA-8 PCFs. The effective mode field area and the confinement loss of the probe are both proved highly temperature-dependent based on the finite element method (FEM. The experimental results show that the reflected power exhibits a linear response with a temperature sensitivity of about 1 dB/°C. The sensor probe presents a tunable temperature sensitive range due to the concentration of the mixture components. Further research illustrates that with appropriate mixtures of liquids, the probe could be developed as a cryogenic temperature sensor. The temperature sensitivity is about 0.75 dB/°C. Such a configuration is promising for a portable, low-power and all-in-fiber device for temperature or refractive index monitoring in chemical or biosensing applications.

  8. Analysis of temperature influence on the informative parameters of single-coil eddy current sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovik, S. Yu.; Kuteynikova, M. M.; Sekisov, Yu. N.; Skobelev, O. P.

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the study of temperature in the flowing part of a turbine on the informative parameters (equivalent inductances of primary windings of matching transformers) of single-coil eddy-current sensors with a sensitive element in the form of a conductor section, which are used as part of automation systems for testing gas-turbine engines. In this case, the objects of temperature influences are both sensors and controlled turbine blades. The existing model of electromagnetic interaction of a sensitive element with the end part of a controlled blade is used to obtain quantitative estimates of temperature changes of equivalent inductances of sensitive elements and primary windings of matching transformers. This model is also used to determine the corresponding changes of the informative parameter of the sensor in the process of experimental studies of temperature influences on it (in the absence of blades in the sensitive region). This paper also presents transformations in the form of relationships of informative parameters with radial and axial displacements at normal (20 °C) and nominal (1000 °C) temperatures, and their difference is used to determine the families of dominant functions of temperature, which characterize possible temperature errors for any radial and axial displacements in the ranges of their variation.

  9. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Sensors Based on Silver-Decorated Nitrogen-Doped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gracia-Espino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor sensors are easily fabricated onto alumina substrates using foils of silver-decorated nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNX-MWNTs-Ag as active sensing material. The vapor sensors are tested using carbon disulfide, acetone, ethanol, and chloroform vapors. The CNX-MWNTs are produced by chemical vapor deposition process and then decorated with 14 nm Ag nanoparticles (Ag-NPs. The samples are characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Our results demonstrate that Ag-decorated CNX-MWNTs exhibit a better response and sensitivity when compared with pristine CNX-MWNTs based sensors, making them promising candidates for air-pollutants environmental monitoring. The temperature effect on the sensor performance is also studied; we found that the detection mechanism could be tuned from physisorption, at room temperature, to chemisorption at higher working temperature. Finally, first-principles density functional calculations are carried out to understand the interactions between the systems involved in the sensors, finding good agreement between experimental results and the theoretical approach.

  11. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  12. MWCNT-polymer composites as highly sensitive and selective room temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangu, Raghu; Rajaputra, Suresh; Singh, Vijay P.

    2011-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-polymer composite-based hybrid sensors were fabricated and integrated into a resistive sensor design for gas sensing applications. Thin films of MWCNTs were grown onto Si/SiO2 substrates via xylene pyrolysis using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Polymers like PEDOT:PSS and polyaniline (PANI) mixed with various solvents like DMSO, DMF, 2-propanol and ethylene glycol were used to synthesize the composite films. These sensors exhibited excellent response and selectivity at room temperature when exposed to low concentrations (100 ppm) of analyte gases like NH3 and NO2. The effect of various solvents on the sensor response imparting selectivity to CNT-polymer nanocomposites was investigated extensively. Sensitivities as high as 28% were observed for an MWCNT-PEDOT:PSS composite sensor when exposed to 100 ppm of NH3 and - 29.8% sensitivity for an MWCNT-PANI composite sensor to 100 ppm of NO2 when DMSO was used as a solvent. Additionally, the sensors exhibited good reversibility.

  13. Single temperature sensor based evaporator filling control using excitation signal harmonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Kasper; Rasmussen, Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of efficient and safe operation of refrigeration and air conditioning systems is superheat control for evaporators. This is conventionally controlled with a pressure sensor, a temperature sensor, an expansion valve and Proportional-Integral (PI) controllers or more advanced...... model based control. In this paper we show that superheat can be controlled without a pressure sensor and without a model of the system. This is achieved by continuous excitation of the system and by applying Fourier analysis, which gives an error signal that can be used together with standard PI...... a large operating range with only one sensor. It is believed that the method in general is applicable to a wide variety of nonlinear systems for which the desired operating points are close to points of zero mean curvature of system nonlinearities....

  14. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... of temperature, from 40 C to -10 C. The consistency of the expected theoretical results with the calibration procedure and the experimental validation shows that this proposed method is applicable to measure accurate strain and temperature in polymers during static or fatigue tensile testing. Two different...

  15. CO2 laser-grooved long period fiber grating temperature sensor system based on intensity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Dong Ning; Jin, Wei

    2006-11-01

    A long period fiber grating (LPFG) temperature sensor system based on intensity modulation is developed. The LPFG employed is fabricated by the use of a focused CO2 laser beam to carve periodic grooves on the fiber. The temperature measurement resolution of up to 0.1 degrees C has been obtained within the temperature range between 20 degrees C and 100 degrees C. The system uses a simple intensity measurement method and exhibits the advantages of convenient intensity measurement, double temperature sensitivity, high resolution, simple configuration, and low cost.

  16. Packaging Technology Developed for High-Temperature SiC Sensors and Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic- and thick-film-materials-based prototype electronic package designed for silicon carbide (SiC) high-temperature sensors and electronics has been successfully tested at 500 C in an oxygen-containing air environment for 500 hours. This package was designed, fabricated, assembled, and electronically evaluated at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field with an in-house-fabricated SiC semiconductor test chip. High-temperature electronics and sensors are necessary for harsh-environment space and aeronautical applications, such as space missions to the inner solar system or the emission control electronics and sensors in aeronautical engines. Single-crystal SiC has such excellent physical and chemical material properties that SiC-based semiconductor electronics can operate at temperatures over 600 C, which is significantly higher than the limit for Si-based semiconductor devices. SiC semiconductor chips were recently demonstrated to be operable at temperatures as high as 600 C, but only in the probe station environment because suitable packaging technology for sensors and electronics at temperatures of 500 C and beyond did not exist. Thus, packaging technology for SiC-based sensors and electronics is immediately needed for both application and commercialization of high-temperature SiC sensors and electronics. In response to this need, researchers at Glenn designed, fabricated, and assembled a prototype electronic package for high-temperature electronics, sensors, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate and gold (Au) thick-film materials. This prototype package successfully survived a soak test at 500 C in air for 500 hours. Packaging components tested included thick-film high-temperature metallization, internal wire bonds, external lead bonds, and a SiC diode chip die-attachment. Each test loop, which was composed of thick-film printed wire, wire bond, and lead bond was subjected to a 50-mA direct current for 250

  17. Low frequency Raman scattering for high resolution low temperature optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, M. K.; Jurdyc, A.-M.; Le Brusq, J.; Champagnon, B.; Vouagner, D.

    2017-09-01

    Raman distributed optical fiber temperature sensors are based on the intensity ratio of the anti-Stokes to the Stokes Raman band at 440 cm-1 of silica. In this paper we predict that the sensitivity of the Raman measurements for low temperatures can be improved by considering the Boson peak in the low frequency Raman scattering domain at 60 cm-1. In this way Raman temperature sensors can be performed down to cryogenic temperatures. It is further shown that the Boson peak is less dependent than the 440 cm-1 band to the polarization of light. For the usual excitation at 1550 nm the anti-Stokes Boson peak at 1536 nm is in the low loss transmission window of the silica fibers.

  18. Alumina-based monopropellant microthruster with integrated heater, catalytic bed and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaji, Zahra; Klintberg, Lena; Barbade, Dhananjay; Palmer, Kristoffer; Thornell, Greger

    2016-10-01

    A liquid propellant alumina microthruster with an integrated heater, catalytic bed and two temperature sensors has been developed and tested using 30 wt.% hydrogen peroxide. The temperature sensors and the catalytic bed were screen-printed using platinum paste on tapes of alumina that was stacked and laminated before sintering. In order to increase the surface of the catalytic bed, the platinum paste was mixed with a sacrificial paste that disappeared during sintering, leaving behind a porous and rough layer. Complete evaporation and combustion, resulting in only gas coming from the outlet, was achieved with powers above 3.7 W for a propellant flow of 50 μl/min. At this power, the catalytic bed reached a maximum temperature of 147°C. The component was successfully operated up to a temperature of 307°C, where it cracked.

  19. A fast high-spatial-resolution Raman distributed temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hartog, A. H.; Marsh, R. J.; Hilton, I. M.; Hadley, M. R.; Ross, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Conventional high-spatial-resolution Raman distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems are based on photoncounting techniques, which result in slow measurements over short sensing fibers. We describe an alternative approach that uses a high-power, short-pulse-width laser and provides fast measurements over fibers longer than 1 km. We demonstrate measurements with 1-s update times over fiber lengths greater than 1 km with better than 0.4-m spatial resolution. We introduce a figure of merit for DTS and we show a substantial improvement (x 100) over earlier results.

  20. Respiration detection chip with integrated temperature-insensitive MEMS sensors and CMOS signal processing circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yu-Chen; Chen, Tse-An; Lin, Ren-Yi; Liu, Tin-Hao

    2015-02-01

    An airflow sensing chip, which integrates MEMS sensors with their CMOS signal processing circuits into a single chip, is proposed for respiration detection. Three micro-cantilever-based airflow sensors were designed and fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS/MEMS 2P4M mixed-signal polycide process. Two main differences were present among these three designs: they were either metal-covered or metal-free structures, and had either bridge-type or fixed-type reference resistors. The performances of these sensors were measured and compared, including temperature sensitivity and airflow sensitivity. Based on the measured results, the metal-free structure with fixed-type reference resistors is recommended for use, because it has the highest airflow sensitivity and also can effectively reduce the output voltage drift caused by temperature change.

  1. Phase Interrogation Used for a Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor in an 800 °C High-Temperature Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless passive pressure measurement system for an 800 °C high-temperature environment is proposed and the impedance variation caused by the mutual coupling between a read antenna and a LC resonant sensor is analyzed. The system consists of a ceramic-based LC resonant sensor, a readout device for impedance phase interrogation, heat insulating material, and a composite temperature-pressure test platform. Performances of the pressure sensor are measured by the measurement system sufficiently, including pressure sensitivity at room temperature, zero drift from room temperature to 800 °C, and the pressure sensitivity under the 800 °C high temperature environment. The results show that the linearity of sensor is 0.93%, the repeatability is 6.6%, the hysteretic error is 1.67%, and the sensor sensitivity is 374 KHz/bar. The proposed measurement system, with high engineering value, demonstrates good pressure sensing performance in a high temperature environment.

  2. A method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient (KdPAR)from paired temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Emily K.

    2015-01-01

    A new method for estimating the diffuse attenuation coefficient for photosynthetically active radiation (KdPAR) from paired temperature sensors was derived. We show that during cases where the attenuation of penetrating shortwave solar radiation is the dominant source of temperature changes, time series measurements of water temperatures at multiple depths (z1 and z2) are related to one another by a linear scaling factor (a). KdPAR can then be estimated by the simple equation KdPAR ln(a)/(z2/z1). A suggested workflow is presented that outlines procedures for calculating KdPAR according to this paired temperature sensor (PTS) method. This method is best suited for conditions when radiative temperature gains are large relative to physical noise. These conditions occur frequently on water bodies with low wind and/or high KdPARs but can be used for other types of lakes during time periods of low wind and/or where spatially redundant measurements of temperatures are available. The optimal vertical placement of temperature sensors according to a priori knowledge of KdPAR is also described. This information can be used to inform the design of future sensor deployments using the PTS method or for campaigns where characterizing sub-daily changes in temperatures is important. The PTS method provides a novel method to characterize light attenuation in aquatic ecosystems without expensive radiometric equipment or the user subjectivity inherent in Secchi depth measurements. This method also can enable the estimation of KdPAR at higher frequencies than many manual monitoring programs allow.

  3. Intelligent Monitoring System with High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor for Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boehman

    2006-09-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we have set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors have been completed. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we have investigated a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first developed an analytic description and then extended that model along a single axis.

  4. Temperature monitoring using fibre optic sensors in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pauw, B., E-mail: bdepauw@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Lamberti, A.; Ertveldt, J.; Rezayat, A.; Vanlanduit, S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Van Tichelen, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Berghmans, F. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors in lead-bismuth cooled installations. • In this first of a kind experiment, we focus on temperature measurements of fuel rods • We acquire the surface temperature with a resolution of 30 mK. • We asses the condition of the installation during different steps of the operation. - Abstract: In-core temperature measurements are crucial to assess the condition of nuclear reactor components. The sensors that measure temperature must respond adequately in order, for example, to actuate safety systems that will mitigate the consequences of an undesired temperature excursion and to prevent component failure. This issue is exacerbated in new reactor designs that use liquid metals, such as for example a molten lead-bismuth eutectic, as coolant. Unlike water cooled reactors that need to operate at high pressure to raise the boiling point of water, liquid metal cooled reactors can operate at high temperatures whilst keeping the pressure at lower levels. In this paper we demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors to measure the temperature distribution in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation and we derive functional input e.g. the temperature control system or other systems that rely on accurate temperature actuation. This first-of-a-kind experiment demonstrates the potential of optical fibre based instrumentation in these environments. We focus on measuring the surface temperature of the individual fuel rods in the fuel assembly, but the technique can also be applied to other components or sections of the installation. We show that these surface temperatures can be experimentally measured with limited intervention on the fuel pin owing to the small geometry and fundamental properties of the optical fibres. The unique properties of the fibre sensors allowed acquiring the surface temperatures with a resolution of 30 mK. With these sensors, we assess the condition of the test section containing the fuel

  5. Integration of multiple satellite sensor resources for soil moisture and land surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based passive microwave sensors have been available for thirty years and provide the basis for both soil moisture and land surface temperature monitoring and mapping. Both of these variables are important in hydrologic and weather forecasts as well as climate analyses requiring longer peri...

  6. Internal and External Temperature Monitoring of a Li-Ion Battery with Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Novais

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The integration of fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors in lithium-ion cells for in-situ and in-operando temperature monitoring is presented herein. The measuring of internal and external temperature variations was performed through four FBG sensors during galvanostatic cycling at C-rates ranging from 1C to 8C. The FBG sensors were placed both outside and inside the cell, located in the center of the electrochemically active area and at the tab-electrode connection. The internal sensors recorded temperature variations of 4.0 ± 0.1 °C at 5C and 4.7 ± 0.1 °C at 8C at the center of the active area, and 3.9 ± 0.1 °C at 5C and 4.0 ± 0.1 °C at 8C at the tab-electrode connection, respectively. This study is intended to contribute to detection of a temperature gradient in real time inside a cell, which can determine possible damage in the battery performance when it operates under normal and abnormal operating conditions, as well as to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integration of in-operando microsensors inside Li-ion cells.

  7. Fiber ring laser sensor based on Fabry–Perot cavity interferometer for temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hui; Ma, Lei; Xiong, Hui; Zhang, Yunshan; Li, Yong Tao

    2018-01-01

    A ring laser temperature sensor based on a novel reflective fiber Fabry–Perot (F–P) interferometer air cavity is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The reflective F–P air cavity, which consists of a segment of glass capillary inserted between two single–mode fibers, is utilized as a sensing element as well as as a filter in the fiber ring cavity. As temperature increases, the reflection spectra of the F–P sensor move towards the longer wavelength, and then cause lasing wavelength shifts. By monitoring the variation of lasing wavelength, we obtain a temperature sensor system with a high temperature sensitivity of 0.249 nm °C‑1, a narrow 3 dB bandwidth of 0.1514 nm, and a high signal-to-noise ratio of 52 dB. Moreover, it is convenient to fabricate the sensor head, and the stability is very good, giving it a wide range of applications.

  8. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  9. High-temperature acoustic emission sensing tests using a yttrium calcium oxyborate sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Wu, Di; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-05-01

    Piezoelectric materials have been broadly utilized in acoustic emission sensors, but are often hindered by the loss of piezoelectric properties at temperatures in the 500°C to 700°C range or higher. In this paper, a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor was designed and fabricated using yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) single crystals, followed by Hsu-Nielsen tests for high-temperature (>700°C) applications. The sensitivity of the YCOB sensor was found to have minimal degradation with increasing temperature up to 1000°C. During Hsu-Nielsen tests with a steel bar, this YCOB acoustic sensor showed the ability to detect zero-order symmetric and antisymmetric modes at 30 and 120 kHz, respectively, as well as distinguish a first-order antisymmetric mode at 240 kHz at elevated temperatures up to 1000°C. The frequency characteristics of the signal were verified using a finite-element model and wavelet transformation analysis.

  10. Development of a FBG vortex flow sensor for high-temperature applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Schiferli, W.; Nieuwland, R.A.; Franzen, A.; Boer, J.J. den; Jansen, T.H.

    2011-01-01

    A robust fibre optic flow sensor has been developed to measure liquid or gas flows at ambient temperatures up to 300°C and pressures up to 100 bar. While such environmental conditions are typical in pressurized steam systems in the oil and gas industry (downhole and surface), wider applications are

  11. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally valid...

  12. An IR Sensor Based Smart System to Approximate Core Body Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Partha Pratim

    2017-08-01

    Herein demonstrated experiment studies two methods, namely convection and body resistance, to approximate human core body temperature. The proposed system is highly energy efficient that consumes only 165 mW power and runs on 5 VDC source. The implemented solution employs an IR thermographic sensor of industry grade along with AT Mega 328 breakout board. Ordinarily, the IR sensor is placed 1.5-30 cm away from human forehead (i.e., non-invasive) and measured the raw data in terms of skin and ambient temperature which is then converted using appropriate approximation formula to find out core body temperature. The raw data is plotted, visualized, and stored instantaneously in a local machine by means of two tools such as Makerplot, and JAVA-JAR. The test is performed when human object is in complete rest and after 10 min of walk. Achieved results are compared with the CoreTemp CM-210 sensor (by Terumo, Japan) which is calculated to be 0.7 °F different from the average value of BCT, obtained by the proposed IR sensor system. Upon a slight modification, the presented model can be connected with a remotely placed Internet of Things cloud service, which may be useful to inform and predict the user's core body temperature through a probabilistic view. It is also comprehended that such system can be useful as wearable device to be worn on at the hat attachable way.

  13. Continuous Water Vapor Mass Flux and Temperature Measurements in a Model Scramjet Combustor Using a Diode Laser Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Upschulte, B. L; Miller, M. F; Allen, M. G; Jackson, K; Gruber, M; Mathur, T

    1998-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneous measurements of water vapor density, temperature and velocity has been developed based on absorption techniques using room temperature diode lasers (InGaAsP) operating at 1.31 micrometers...

  14. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L; Morello, Scott L; Mislan, K A S; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J; Burrows, Michael T; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D G; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M; Richmond, Erin L; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R; Denny, Mark W; Mach, Katharine J; Miller, Luke P; O'Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J A; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E; McQuaid, Christopher D; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J; Nicastro, Katy R; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-10-11

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10-30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0-2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°-20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on 'habitat-level' measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature.

  15. Long-term, high frequency in situ measurements of intertidal mussel bed temperatures using biomimetic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmuth, Brian; Choi, Francis; Matzelle, Allison; Torossian, Jessica L.; Morello, Scott L.; Mislan, K. A. S.; Yamane, Lauren; Strickland, Denise; Szathmary, P. Lauren; Gilman, Sarah E.; Tockstein, Alyson; Hilbish, Thomas J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Power, Anne Marie; Gosling, Elizabeth; Mieszkowska, Nova; Harley, Christopher D. G.; Nishizaki, Michael; Carrington, Emily; Menge, Bruce; Petes, Laura; Foley, Melissa M.; Johnson, Angela; Poole, Megan; Noble, Mae M.; Richmond, Erin L.; Robart, Matt; Robinson, Jonathan; Sapp, Jerod; Sones, Jackie; Broitman, Bernardo R.; Denny, Mark W.; Mach, Katharine J.; Miller, Luke P.; O'Donnell, Michael; Ross, Philip; Hofmann, Gretchen E.; Zippay, Mackenzie; Blanchette, Carol; Macfarlan, J. A.; Carpizo-Ituarte, Eugenio; Ruttenberg, Benjamin; Peña Mejía, Carlos E.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; Lathlean, Justin; Monaco, Cristián J.; Nicastro, Katy R.; Zardi, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    At a proximal level, the physiological impacts of global climate change on ectothermic organisms are manifest as changes in body temperatures. Especially for plants and animals exposed to direct solar radiation, body temperatures can be substantially different from air temperatures. We deployed biomimetic sensors that approximate the thermal characteristics of intertidal mussels at 71 sites worldwide, from 1998-present. Loggers recorded temperatures at 10-30 min intervals nearly continuously at multiple intertidal elevations. Comparisons against direct measurements of mussel tissue temperature indicated errors of ~2.0-2.5 °C, during daily fluctuations that often exceeded 15°-20 °C. Geographic patterns in thermal stress based on biomimetic logger measurements were generally far more complex than anticipated based only on ‘habitat-level’ measurements of air or sea surface temperature. This unique data set provides an opportunity to link physiological measurements with spatially- and temporally-explicit field observations of body temperature.

  16. Packaging process of fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for use in high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Alexis; Wnuk, Vincent P.; Fokine, Michael; Claesson, Åsa; Nilsson, Lars-Erik; Ferguson, Steve; Graver, Tom

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we report the development of a new bonding agent and method for the surface mounting of optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain and temperature sensors for use in high temperature environments--where there is a presence of water, moisture, dust, susceptibility to corrosion and/or elevated temperatures up to 800°C. To ensure a stable reflectivity response of FBGs and their survival at elevated temperatures, we are using chemical composition gratings (CCGs). The refractive index modulation in these gratings is caused by a chemical change, which results in a higher activation energy and stable behavior up to 1000°C. Samples of CCGs were successfully encapsulated and mounted onto metal shims. The packaged sensors were tested for strain (+/- 1000μɛ) and temperature (to +400 °C) response. The encapsulated sensors display a linear response with an increase in the temperature sensitivity of the FBG, with a factor of ~ 28.34pm/°C, and a strain gauge factor of 1.7pm/μɛ.

  17. A micro S-shaped optical fiber temperature sensor based on dislocation fiber splice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haitao; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Haojie; Shen, Xiaoyue; Wang, Yongzhen

    2017-12-01

    We fabricated a simple, compact, and stable temperature sensor based on an S-shaped dislocated optical fiber. The dislocation optical fiber has two splice points, and we obtained the optimal parameters based on the theory and our experiment, such as the dislocation amount and length of the dislocation optical fiber. According to the relationship between the temperature and the peak wavelength shift, the temperature of the environment can be obtained. Then, we made this fiber a micro bending as S-shape between the two dislocation points, and the S-shaped micro bending part could release stress with the change in temperature and reduce the effect of stress on the temperature measurement. This structure could solve the problem of sensor distortion caused by the cross response of temperature and stress. We measured the S-shaped dislocation fiber sensor and the dislocation fiber without S-shape under the same environment and conditions, and the S-shaped dislocation fiber had the advantages of the stable reliability and good linearity.

  18. Development of a Wireless Network of Temperature Sensors for Yellowstone National Park (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, D. A.; Hutter, T.; Minolli, M.; Obraczka, K.; Manduchi, R.; Petersen, S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.

    2007-12-01

    Temperature sensors deployed at Yellowstone clearly document that thermal features can vary in temperature on a variety of timescales and show regional correlations unrelated to meteorological variables such as air temperature. Yellowstone National Park (YNP) staff currently measures temperatures at over 40 thermal features and streams within the park, utilizing USGS stream gaging stations and portable data loggers deployed in geyser basins. The latter measure temperature every 1 to 15 minutes, and the data are physically downloaded after about 30 days. Installation of a wireless sensor network would: 1) save considerable time and effort in data retrieval, 2) minimize lost data due to equipment failure, and 3) provide a means to monitor thermal perturbations in near-real time. To meet this need, we developed a wireless sensor network capable of in-situ monitoring of air and water temperature. Temperature sensors are dispersed as nodes that communicate among themselves and through relays to a single base-station linked to the Internet. The small, weatherproof sensors operate unattended for over six months at temperatures as low as -40°C. Each uses an ultra-low-power Texas Instruments' MSP430 microcontroller and an SD card as mass storage. They are powered by 15Ah, 3.6 v, inert Li-ion batteries and transmit data via 900MHz radio modules with a 1-km range. The initial prototype consists of 4 nodes, and is designed to scale with additional nodes for finer spatial resolution and broader coverage. Temperature measurements are asynchronous from node to node, with intervals as frequent as 30 seconds. Data are stored internally to withstand temporary communication failures; underlying intelligent software is capable of re-routing data through alternative nodes to the base station and a MySQL data archiving system. We also developed a Google-Maps-based, front-end that displays the data, recent trends and sensor locations. The system was tested in the Santa Cruz Mountains

  19. Understanding the low temperature electrical properties of nanocrystalline tin oxide for gas sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Christina Hartsell

    Nanocrystalline metal/metal oxide is an important class of transparent and electronic materials due to its potential use in many applications, including gas sensors. At the nanoscale, many of the phenomena observed that give nanocrystalline semiconducting oxide enhanced performance as a gas sensor material over other conventional engineering materials is still poorly understood. This study is aimed at understanding the low temperature electrical and chemical properties of nanocrystalline SnO2 that makes it suitable for room temperature gas detectors. Studies were carried out in order to understand how various synthesis methods affect the surfaces on the nano-oxides, interactions of a target gas (in this study hydrogen) with different surface species, and changes in the electrical properties as a function of dopants and grain size. A correlation between the surface reactions and the electrical response of doped nanocrystalline metal-oxide-semiconductors exposed to a reducing gas is established using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy attached to a specially built custom designed catalytic cell. First principle calculations of oxygen vacancy concentrations from absorbance spectra are presented. FTIR is used for effectively screening of these nanostructures for gas sensing applications. The effect of processing temperature on the microstructural evolution and on the electronic properties of nanocrystalline trivalent doped-SnO 2 is also presented. This study includes the effect of dopants (In and Ce) on the growth of nano-SnO2, as well as their effects on the electronic properties and gas sensor behavior of the nanomaterial at room temperature. Band bending affects are also investigated for this system and are related to enhanced low temperature gas sensing. The role and importance of oxygen vacancies in the electronic and chemical behavior of surface modified nanocrystalline SnO2 are explored in this study. A generalized explanation for the low temperature

  20. La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 Thin Films for Magnetic and Temperature Sensors at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the potentialities of the manganese oxide La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO for the realization of sensitive room temperature thermometers and magnetic sensors are discussed. LSMO exhibits both a large change of the resistance versus temperature at its metal-to-insulator transition (about 330 K and low field magnetoresistive effects at room temperature. The sensor performances are described in terms of signal-to-noise ratio in the 1 Hz - 100 kHz frequency range. It is shown that due to the very low 1/f noise level, LSMO based sensors can exhibit competitive performances at room temperature.

  1. Research and development for the high-temperature helium-leak detection system (Joint research). Part 2. Development of temperature sensors using optical fibre for the HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Nakazawa, Toshio; Kawasaki, Kozo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment; Urakami, Masao; Saisyu, Sadanori [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    In the second stage of the research and development for a high-temperature helium-leak detection system, the temperature sensor using optical fibres was studied. The sensor detects the helium leakage by the temperature increase surrounded optical fibre with or without heat insulator. Moreover, the applicability of high temperature equipments as the HTTR system was studied. With the sensor we detected 5.0-20.0 cm{sup 3}/s helium leakages within 60 minutes. Also it was possible to detect earlier when the leakage level is at 20.0 cm {sup 3}/s. (author)

  2. Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition in High-Temperature Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Ronald [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Whitty, Kevin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) when combined with carbon capture and storage can be one of the cleanest methods of extracting energy from coal. Control of coal and biomass gasification processes to accommodate the changing character of input-fuel streams is required for practical implementation of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies. Therefore a fast time-response sensor is needed for real-time monitoring of the composition and ideally the heating value of the synthesis gas (here called syngas) as it exits the gasifier. The goal of this project was the design, construction, and demonstration an in situ laserabsorption sensor to monitor multiple species in the syngas output from practical-scale coal gasifiers. This project investigated the hypothesis of using laser absorption sensing in particulateladen syngas. Absorption transitions were selected with design rules to optimize signal strength while minimizing interference from other species. Successful in situ measurements in the dusty, high-pressure syngas flow were enabled by Stanford’s normalized and scanned wavelength modulation strategy. A prototype sensor for CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O was refined with experiments conducted in the laboratory at Stanford University, a pilot-scale at the University of Utah, and an engineering-scale gasifier at DoE’s National Center for Carbon Capture with the demonstration of a prototype sensor with technical readiness level 6 in the 2014 measurement campaign.

  3. A concept of wireless and passive very-high temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolay, P.; Matloub, R.; Bardong, J.; Mazzalai, A.; Muralt, P.

    2017-05-01

    There is a need for sensors capable operating at temperatures above 1000 °C. We describe an innovative sensor that might achieve this goal. The sensor comprises two main elements: a thermocouple and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) strain sensor. The cold junction of the thermocouple is electrically connected to a highly piezoelectric thin layer, deposited on top of a SAW substrate. In operation, the voltage generated by the temperature gradient between the hot (>1000 °C) and cold junction (layer, which is mechanically transmitted to the substrate. This modifies the SAW propagation conditions and therefore the sensors' radiofrequency response. The change depends on the applied voltage and thus on the hot junction temperature. As SAW devices are passive elements that can be remotely interrogated, it becomes possible to infer the hot junction temperature from the radiofrequency response, i.e., to remotely read temperatures above 1000 °C, without embedded electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, using AlN layers deposited on Y-Z Lithium Niobate (LN). The achieved sensitivity of 80 Hz/V at 400 MHz is constant over a wide voltage range. Numerical simulations were performed to compute the main properties of the demonstrators and suggest optimization strategies. Improvements are expected from the use of stronger piezoelectric layers, such as AlScN or Pb(Ti,Zr)O3 (PZT), which could increase the sensitivity by factors of 3 and 20, as estimated from their transverse piezoelectric coefficients. As a first step in this direction, thin PZT layers have been deposited on Y-Z LN.

  4. The Benefits of Using Dense Temperature Sensor Networks to Monitor Urban Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Kucharik, C. J.; Schatz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience temperatures that are elevated relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in the fraction of gray and green infrastructure. Studies have shown that communities most at risk for impacts from climate-related disasters (i.e., lower median incomes, higher poverty, lower education, and minorities) tend to live in the hottest areas of cities. Development of adequate climate adaptation tools for cities relies on knowledge of how temperature varies across space and time. Traditionally, a city's urban heat island has been quantified using near-surface air temperature measurements from a few sites. This methodology assumes (1) that the UHI can be characterized by the difference in air temperature from a small number of points, and (2) that these few points represent the urban and rural signatures of the region. This methodology ignores the rich information that could be gained from measurements across the urban to rural transect. This transect could traverse elevations, water bodies, vegetation fraction, and other land surface properties. Two temperature sensor networks were designed and implemented in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul, MN and Madison, WI metropolitan areas beginning in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Both networks use the same model sensor and record temperature every 15 minutes from ~150 sensors. Data from each network has produced new knowledge of how temperature varies diurnally and seasonally across the cities and how the UHI magnitude is influenced by weather phenomena (e.g., wind, snow cover, heat waves) and land surface characteristics such as proximity to inland lakes. However, the two metropolitan areas differ in size, population, structure, and orientation to water bodies. In addition, the sensor networks were established in very different manners. We describe these differences and present lessons learned from the design and ongoing efforts of these two dense networks

  5. Oxygen sensor development and low temperature corrosion study in lead-alloy coolant loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Il Soon; Bahn, Chi Bum; Lee, Seung Gi; Jeong, Seung Ho; Nam, Hyo On; Lim, Jun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-15

    Oxygen sensor to measure dissolved oxygen concentration at liquid lead-bismuth eutectic environments have been developed. Developed oxygen sensor for application in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) system was based on the oxygen ion conductor made of YSZ ceramic having Bi/Bi2O3 reference joined by electro-magnetic swaging. Leakage problem, which was major problem of existing sensors, can be solved by using electro-magnetic swaging method. A new calibration strategy combining the oxygen titration with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was performed to increase the reliability of sensor. Another calibration was also conducted by controlling the oxygen concentration using OCS (oxygen control system). Materials corrosion tests of various metals (SS316, EP823, T91 and HT9) were conducted for up to 1,000 hours with specimen inspection after every 333hours at 450 .deg. C in HELIOS. Oxygen concentration was controlled at 10{sup -6} wt% by using the direct gas bubbling of Ar+4%H{sub 2}, Ar+5%O{sub 2} and pure Ar. The dissolved oxygen concentration in LBE was also monitored by two calibrated YSZ oxygen sensors located at different places under different temperatures within HELIOS. It shows a good performance during 1000 hours. Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) test of SS316L specimen in the LBE was performed at various temperature and strain rate. The result shows that the liquid metal embrittlement effect is not crucial at tested conditions.

  6. Efficient room temperature hydrogen sensor based on UV-activated ZnO nano-network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohit; Kumar, Rahul; Rajamani, Saravanan; Ranwa, Sapana; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz; Kumar, Mahesh

    2017-09-01

    Room temperature hydrogen sensors were fabricated from Au embedded ZnO nano-networks using a 30 mW GaN ultraviolet LED. The Au-decorated ZnO nano-networks were deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate by a chemical vapour deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum analysis revealed a hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and presence of Au. The ZnO nanoparticles were interconnected, forming nano-network structures. Au nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on ZnO surfaces, as confirmed by FESEM imaging. Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) were fabricated on the ZnO nano-networks using optical lithography. Sensor performances were measured with and without UV illumination, at room temperate, with concentrations of hydrogen varying from 5 ppm to 1%. The sensor response was found to be ˜21.5% under UV illumination and 0% without UV at room temperature for low hydrogen concentration of 5 ppm. The UV-photoactivated mode enhanced the adsorption of photo-induced O- and O2- ions, and the d-band electron transition from the Au nanoparticles to ZnO—which increased the chemisorbed reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. The sensor response was also measured at 150 °C (without UV illumination) and found to be ˜18% at 5 ppm. Energy efficient low cost hydrogen sensors can be designed and fabricated with the combination of GaN UV LEDs and ZnO nanostructures.

  7. Flexible room-temperature resistive humidity sensor based on silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traiwatcharanon, Pranlekha; Timsorn, Kriengkri; Wongchoosuk, Chatchawal

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a low-cost and flexible room-temperature humidity sensor was developed from pure resistive silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized through a simple green route using Pistia stratiotes extract as a reducing agent for AgNO3 under light illuminations. UV-Vis spectroscopic results showed that various synthesis parameters including AgNO3 concentration, reaction time, pH value and light irradiation strongly affected on the formation of AgNPs. AgNPs were also confirmed to exhibit spherical shapes with different sizes depending on pH by transmission electron microscopy. To fabricate the sensor, AgNPs were deposited on a transparent polyethylene substrate with pre-patterned Ag interdigitated electrodes via a drop coating method. From humidity-sensing results, the flexible pure AgNPs sensor exhibited high sensitivity to relative humidity (RH) with high repeatability and stability at room temperature. Moreover, the sensor electrical resistance and sensor response showed linear relationships to RH in the range of 20-85% with short response and recovery times of 10 s and 11 s, respectively.

  8. Suspended GaN nanowires as NO2 sensor for high temperature applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jaesam; Kim, Kwanoh; Song, Soonho; Kim, Jongbaeg

    2013-04-21

    We propose a gas sensor operable over a wide temperature range and using suspended GaN nanowires functionalized with Pt-Pd. The sensor is batch-fabricated by directly integrating the GaN nanowires onto batch-processed silicon microelectrodes in parallel. The high thermal stability of the sensor originates from a large band gap of GaN nanowires that enables the detection of NO2 gas at an elevated temperature of up to 350 °C without a decrease in responsiveness. Exposed to NO2 at 100-1000 ppm at 350 °C, the sensor shows a linear increment in relative response with respect to the change in gas concentration. The sensor results in a two- to four-fold increase in responsiveness to NO2 at 100 ppm compared to NH3 at 100 ppm and CO2 at 1000 ppm. The nanowires suspended over a substrate provide increased surface area that could interact with gas molecules for enhanced responsiveness, and prevent any unnecessary interactions between the nanowires and the substrate.

  9. Temperature and salinity data from moored seacat sensors of the Multi-disciplinary Ocean Sensors for Environmental Analyses and Networks (MOSEAN) project 2004-2007 (NODC Accession 0115703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected by seacat sensors from seven deployments within 2004-2007 on the HALE-ALOHA mooring, a location about 100 km north of...

  10. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kevin P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100°C have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800°C. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700°C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest

  11. Highly sensitive room temperature ammonia gas sensor based on Ir-doped Pt porous ceramic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenlong [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China); Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Yu [Department of chemical and materials engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Do, Jing-Shan, E-mail: jsdo@ncut.edu.tw [Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@cdu.edu.cn [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the Pt and Pt-Ir porous ceramic electrodes. • The gas sensors based on the Pt and Pt-Ir alloy electrodes possess good sensing performances. • The reaction path of the ammonia on platinum has been discussed. - Abstract: Room temperature NH{sub 3} gas sensors based on Pt and Pt-Ir (Ir doping Pt) porous ceramic electrodes have been fabricated by both electroplating and sputtering methods. The properties of the gaseous ammonia sensors have been examined by polarization and chronoamperometry techniques. The influence of humidity on the features of the resulting sensors in the system has also been discussed, and the working potential was optimized. Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the electrode. With increasing the relative humidity, the response of the Pt-Ir(E)/Pt(S)/PCP sensor to NH{sub 3} gas could be enhanced remarkably, and the sensitivity increases from 1.14 to 12.06 μA ppm{sup −1} cm{sup −2} .Then we have also discussed the sensing mechanism of the Pt-Ir sensor and the result has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the electrode surface before and after reaction in the end.

  12. Microbial fuel cells as power supply of a low-power temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Firas; Ondel, Olivier; Allard, Bruno

    2016-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) show great promise as a concomitant process for water treatment and as renewable energy sources for environmental sensors. The small energy produced by MFCs and the low output voltage limit the applications of MFCs. Specific converter topologies are required to step-up the output voltage of a MFC. A Power Management Unit (PMU) is proposed for operation at low input voltage and at very low power in a completely autonomous way to capture energy from MFCs with the highest possible efficiency. The application of sensors for monitoring systems in remote locations is an important approach. MFCs could be an alternative energy source in this case. Powering a sensor with MFCs may prove the fact that wastewater may be partly turned into renewable energy for realistic applications. The Power Management Unit is demonstrated for 3.6 V output voltage at 1 mW continuous power, based on a low-cost 0.7-L MFC. A temperature sensor may operate continuously on 2-MFCs in continuous flow mode. A flyback converter under discontinuous conduction mode is also tested to power the sensor. One continuously fed MFC was able to efficiently and continuously power the sensor.

  13. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  14. Surface Plasmon Resonance Temperature Sensor Based on Photonic Crystal Fibers Randomly Filled with Silver Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Luan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a temperature sensor design based on surface plasmon resonances (SPRs supported by filling the holes of a six-hole photonic crystal fiber (PCF with a silver nanowire. A liquid mixture (ethanol and chloroform with a large thermo-optic coefficient is filled into the PCF holes as sensing medium. The filled silver nanowires can support resonance peaks and the peak will shift when temperature variations induce changes in the refractive indices of the mixture. By measuring the peak shift, the temperature change can be detected. The resonance peak is extremely sensitive to temperature because the refractive index of the filled mixture is close to that of the PCF material. Our numerical results indicate that a temperature sensitivity as high as 4 nm/K can be achieved and that the most sensitive range of the sensor can be tuned by changing the volume ratios of ethanol and chloroform. Moreover, the maximal sensitivity is relatively stable with random filled nanowires, which will be very convenient for the sensor fabrication.

  15. Interior Temperature Measurement Using Curved Mercury Capillary Sensor Based on X-ray Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyue; Jiang, Xing; Lu, Guirong

    2017-07-01

    A method was presented for measuring the interior temperature of objects using a curved mercury capillary sensor based on X-ray radiography. The sensor is composed of a mercury bubble, a capillary and a fixed support. X-ray digital radiography was employed to capture image of the mercury column in the capillary, and a temperature control system was designed for the sensor calibration. We adopted livewire algorithms and mathematical morphology to calculate the mercury length. A measurement model relating mercury length to temperature was established, and the measurement uncertainty associated with the mercury column length and the linear model fitted by least-square method were analyzed. To verify the system, the interior temperature measurement of an autoclave, which is totally closed, was taken from 29.53°C to 67.34°C. The experiment results show that the response of the system is approximately linear with an uncertainty of maximum 0.79°C. This technique provides a new approach to measure interior temperature of objects.

  16. Microwave Synthesized ZnO Nanorod Arrays for UV Sensors: A Seed Layer Annealing Temperature Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pimentel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work reports the influence of zinc oxide (ZnO seed layer annealing temperature on structural, optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanorod arrays, synthesized by hydrothermal method assisted by microwave radiation, to be used as UV sensors. The ZnO seed layer was produced using the spin-coating method and several annealing temperatures, ranging from 100 to 500 °C, have been tested. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and spectrophotometry measurements have been used to investigate the structure, morphology, and optical properties variations of the produced ZnO nanorod arrays regarding the seed layer annealing temperatures employed. After the growth of ZnO nanorod arrays, the whole structure was tested as UV sensors, showing an increase in the sensitivity with the increase of seed layer annealing temperature. The UV sensor response of ZnO nanorod arrays produced with the seed layer annealed temperature of 500 °C was 50 times superior to the ones produced with a seed layer annealed at 100 °C.

  17. High temperature ultrasonic sensor for fission gas characterization in MTR harsh environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gatsa O.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present NBT thick film fabrication by screen printing, characterization of piezoelectric, dielectric properties and material parameters studies in dependence of temperature. Relatively high resistivity in the range of 1.1013 Ohm.cm for fabricated thick film is explained by Aurivillius structure in which a-and b-layers form perovskite structure between oxides of c-layer. Main results of this study are presented and discussed in terms of feasibility for an application to a new sensor device operating at high temperature level (400°. Piezoelectric parameters enhancement and loss reduction at elevated temperatures are envisaged to be optimized. Further sensor development and test in MTR are expected to be realized in the near future.

  18. Comparison of three temperature control systems applications for a special homemade shortwave infrared spatial remote sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Wei, Jun; Li, Jianwei; Zhou, Qianting

    2010-11-01

    An image spectrometer of a spatial remote sensing satellite requires shortwave band ranging from 2.1μm to 3μm which is one of the most important bands in remote sensing. We designed an infrared sub-system of the image spectrometer using a homemade 640x1 InGaAs shortwave infrared sensor working on FPA system which requires high uniformity and low level of dark current. The working temperature should be -15+/-0.2 Degree Celsius. This paper compares three different kinds of methods to control temperature of the sensor. First design uses a temperature control chip Max1978 from Maxim Company. Second design uses ADN8830 from ANALOG Company. Third design is based on FPGA device APA300. Experiment shows that MAX1978 has driving mosfet inside its chip which makes the stability is not appropriate for this homemade shortwave sensor. While the ADN8830 the supply power is limited to 5V, which also limits the driving power of the chip, experiments show that ADN8830 works very well when the voltage is below 5V, but the result is not acceptable when sensor demand more driving current. The FPGA design covers all the disadvantages above, but it introduced a new problem, the electrical circuit takes much more board resources than MAX1978 and ADN8830.

  19. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C, sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings, and frequency response (hundreds of kHz, are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  20. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-07-22

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C(-1) for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  1. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures. PMID:27455273

  2. Wireless Capacitive Pressure Sensor With Directional RF Chip Antenna for High Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, M. C.; Jordan, J. L.; Ponchak, G. E.; Zorman, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a wireless capacitive pressure sensor with directional RF chip antenna that is envisioned for the health monitoring of aircraft engines operating in harsh environments. The sensing system is characterized from room temperature (25 C) to 300 C for a pressure range from 0 to 100 psi. The wireless pressure system consists of a Clapp-type oscillator design with a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor located in the LC-tank circuit of the oscillator. Therefore, as the pressure of the aircraft engine changes, so does the output resonant frequency of the sensing system. A chip antenna is integrated to transmit the system output to a receive antenna 10 m away.The design frequency of the wireless pressure sensor is 127 MHz and a 2 increase in resonant frequency over the temperature range of 25 to 300 C from 0 to 100 psi is observed. The phase noise is less than minus 30 dBcHz at the 1 kHz offset and decreases to less than minus 80 dBcHz at 10 kHz over the entire temperature range. The RF radiation patterns for two cuts of the wireless system have been measured and show that the system is highly directional and the MEMS pressure sensor is extremely linear from 0 to 100 psi.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis and experimental study of a low measurement error temperature sensor used in climate observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qingquan; Dai, Wei

    2017-02-01

    To improve the air temperature observation accuracy, a low measurement error temperature sensor is proposed. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is implemented to obtain temperature errors under various environmental conditions. Then, a temperature error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using a genetic algorithm method. The low measurement error temperature sensor, a naturally ventilated radiation shield, a thermometer screen, and an aspirated temperature measurement platform are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The aspirated platform served as an air temperature reference. The mean temperature errors of the naturally ventilated radiation shield and the thermometer screen are 0.74 °C and 0.37 °C, respectively. In contrast, the mean temperature error of the low measurement error temperature sensor is 0.11 °C. The mean absolute error and the root mean square error between the corrected results and the measured results are 0.008 °C and 0.01 °C, respectively. The correction equation allows the temperature error of the low measurement error temperature sensor to be reduced by approximately 93.8%. The low measurement error temperature sensor proposed in this research may be helpful to provide a relatively accurate air temperature result.

  4. Magnetocardiography and magnetoencephalography measurements at room temperature using tunnel magneto-resistance sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Kosuke; Oogane, Mikihiko; Kanno, Akitake; Imada, Masahiro; Jono, Junichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Okuno, Tetsuo; Aritomi, Yuuji; Morikawa, Masahiro; Tsuchida, Masaaki; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Ando, Yasuo

    2018-02-01

    Magnetocardiography (MCG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals were detected at room temperature using tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) sensors. TMR sensors developed with low-noise amplifier circuits detected the MCG R wave without averaging, and the QRS complex was clearly observed with averaging at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Spatial mapping of the MCG was also achieved. Averaging of MEG signals triggered by electroencephalography (EEG) clearly observed the phase inversion of the alpha rhythm with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.7 between EEG and MEG.

  5. Piezoresistive pressure sensors in CVD diamond for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterbach, Ralf; Hilleringmann, Ulrich

    2003-09-01

    The fabrication of piezo-resistive pressure sensors for high temperature applications by the selective removal of CVD-diamond is limited due to the jutting physical properties of this material, which result in insufficient etching rates. A novel technique with distinctly increased etching rates due to a modified sample arrangement inside of a commercially available reactive ion etching (RIE) reactor overcomes this limitation by a restricted plasma volume. Rates up to 334 nm/min imply an increase of more than one order of magnitude in comparison with additional measurements utilizing a standard etching technique. Furthermore, the electrical response of a fabricated sensor on pressure is demonstrated.

  6. Design, Fabrication and Temperature Sensitivity Testing of a Miniature Piezoelectric-Based Sensor for Current Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B. Lao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Grid capacity, reliability, and efficient distribution of power have been major challenges for traditional power grids in the past few years. Reliable and efficient distribution within these power grids will continue to depend on the development of lighter and more efficient sensing units with lower costs in order to measure current and detect failures across the grid. The objective of this paper is to present the development of a miniature piezoelectric-based sensor for AC current measurements in single conductors, which are used in power transmission lines. Additionally presented in this paper are the thermal testing results for the sensor to assess its robustness for various operating temperatures.

  7. A smart high accuracy silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor temperature compensation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guanwu; Zhao, Yulong; Guo, Fangfang; Xu, Wenju

    2014-07-08

    Theoretical analysis in this paper indicates that the accuracy of a silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is mainly affected by thermal drift, and varies nonlinearly with the temperature. Here, a smart temperature compensation system to reduce its effect on accuracy is proposed. Firstly, an effective conditioning circuit for signal processing and data acquisition is designed. The hardware to implement the system is fabricated. Then, a program is developed on LabVIEW which incorporates an extreme learning machine (ELM) as the calibration algorithm for the pressure drift. The implementation of the algorithm was ported to a micro-control unit (MCU) after calibration in the computer. Practical pressure measurement experiments are carried out to verify the system's performance. The temperature compensation is solved in the interval from -40 to 85 °C. The compensated sensor is aimed at providing pressure measurement in oil-gas pipelines. Compared with other algorithms, ELM acquires higher accuracy and is more suitable for batch compensation because of its higher generalization and faster learning speed. The accuracy, linearity, zero temperature coefficient and sensitivity temperature coefficient of the tested sensor are 2.57% FS, 2.49% FS, 8.1 × 10(-5)/°C and 29.5 × 10(-5)/°C before compensation, and are improved to 0.13%FS, 0.15%FS, 1.17 × 10(-5)/°C and 2.1 × 10(-5)/°C respectively, after compensation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system is valid for the temperature compensation and high accuracy requirement of the sensor.

  8. A Smart High Accuracy Silicon Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor Temperature Compensation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanwu Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis in this paper indicates that the accuracy of a silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is mainly affected by thermal drift, and varies nonlinearly with the temperature. Here, a smart temperature compensation system to reduce its effect on accuracy is proposed. Firstly, an effective conditioning circuit for signal processing and data acquisition is designed. The hardware to implement the system is fabricated. Then, a program is developed on LabVIEW which incorporates an extreme learning machine (ELM as the calibration algorithm for the pressure drift. The implementation of the algorithm was ported to a micro-control unit (MCU after calibration in the computer. Practical pressure measurement experiments are carried out to verify the system’s performance. The temperature compensation is solved in the interval from −40 to 85 °C. The compensated sensor is aimed at providing pressure measurement in oil-gas pipelines. Compared with other algorithms, ELM acquires higher accuracy and is more suitable for batch compensation because of its higher generalization and faster learning speed. The accuracy, linearity, zero temperature coefficient and sensitivity temperature coefficient of the tested sensor are 2.57% FS, 2.49% FS, 8.1 × 10−5/°C and 29.5 × 10−5/°C before compensation, and are improved to 0.13%FS, 0.15%FS, 1.17 × 10−5/°C and 2.1 × 10−5/°C respectively, after compensation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system is valid for the temperature compensation and high accuracy requirement of the sensor.

  9. Temperature Compensation in Determining of Remazol Black B Concentrations Using Plastic Optical Fiber Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Sin Chong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the construction and test of tapered plastic optical fiber (POF sensors, based on an intensity modulation approach are described. Tapered fiber sensors with different diameters of 0.65 mm, 0.45 mm, and 0.35 mm, were used to measure various concentrations of Remazol black B (RBB dye aqueous solutions at room temperature. The concentrations of the RBB solutions were varied from 0 ppm to 70 ppm. In addition, the effect of varying the temperature of the RBB solution was also investigated. In this case, the output of the sensor was measured at four different temperatures of 27 °C, 30 °C, 35 °C, and 40 °C, while its concentration was fixed at 50 ppm and 100 ppm. The experimental results show that the tapered POF with d = 0.45 mm achieves the best performance with a reasonably good sensitivity of 61 × 10−4 and a linearity of more than 99%. It also maintains a sufficient and stable signal when heat was applied to the solution with a linearity of more than 97%. Since the transmitted intensity is dependent on both the concentration and temperature of the analyte, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to combine the two independent variables into a single equation. The resulting equation was then validated experimentally and the best agreement between the calculated and experimental results was achieved by the sensor with d = 0.45 mm, where the minimum discrepancy is less than 5%. The authors conclude that POF-based sensors are suitable for RBB dye concentration sensing and, with refinement in fabrication, better results could be achieved. Their low fabrication cost, simple configuration, accuracy, and high sensitivity would attract many potential applications in chemical and biological sensing.

  10. Temperature and humidity dependent performance of FBG-strain sensors embedded in carbon/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frövel, Malte; Carrión, Gabriel; Gutiérrez, César; Moravec, Carolina; Pintado, José María

    2009-03-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors, FBGSs, are very promising for Structural Health Monitoring, SHM, of aerospace vehicles due to their capacity to measure strain and temperature, their lightweight harnesses, their multiplexing capacities and their immunity to electromagnetic interferences, within others. They can be embedded in composite materials that are increasingly forming an important part of aerospace structures. The use of embedded FBGSs for SHM purposes is advantageous, but their response under all operative environmental conditions of an aerospace structure must be well understood for the necessary flight certification of these sensors. This paper describes the first steps ahead for a possible in future flight certification of FBGSs embedded in carbon fiber reinforced plastics, CFRP. The investigation work was focused on the validation of the dependence of the FBGS's strain sensitivity in tensile and compression load, in dry and humid condition and in a temperature range from -150°C to 120°C. The test conditions try to simulate the in service temperature and humidity range and static load condition of military aircraft. FBGSs with acrylic and with polyimide coating have been tested. The FBGSs are embedded in both, unidirectional and quasi isotropic carbon/epoxy composite material namely M21/T800 and also MTM-45-1/IM7. Conventional extensometers and strain gages have been used as reference strain sensors. The performed tests show an influence of the testing temperatures, the dry or wet specimen condition, the load direction and the coating material on the sensor strain sensitivity that should be taken into account when using these sensors.

  11. SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP). Volume 8: Aerothermodynamics Automation and Robotics (A/R) systems sensors, high-temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs of briefings presented at the SSTAC/ARTS review of the draft Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) on aerothermodynamics, automation and robotics systems, sensors, and high-temperature superconductivity are included. Topics covered include: aerothermodynamics; aerobraking; aeroassist flight experiment; entry technology for probes and penetrators; automation and robotics; artificial intelligence; NASA telerobotics program; planetary rover program; science sensor technology; direct detector; submillimeter sensors; laser sensors; passive microwave sensing; active microwave sensing; sensor electronics; sensor optics; coolers and cryogenics; and high temperature superconductivity.

  12. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  13. Validation of MR thermometry: method for temperature probe sensor registration accuracy in head and neck phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Pellicer, Ruben; Hofstetter, Lorne W; Numan, Wouter C M; Bakker, Jurriaan F; Kotek, Gyula; Togni, Paolo; Verhaart, René F; Fiveland, Eric W; Houston, Gavin C; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Paulides, Margarethus Marius; Yeo, Desmond Teck Beng

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT) is an attractive means to non-invasively monitor in vivo temperature during head and neck hyperthermia treatments because it can provide multi-dimensional temperature information with high spatial resolution over large regions of interest. However, validation of MRT measurements in a head and neck clinical set-up is crucial to ensure the temperature maps are accurate. Here we demonstrate a unique approach for temperature probe sensor localisation in head and neck hyperthermia test phantoms. We characterise the proton resonance frequency shift temperature coefficient and validate MRT measurements in an oil-gel phantom by applying a combination of MR imaging and 3D spline fitting for accurate probe localisation. We also investigate how uncertainties in both the probe localisation and the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal coefficient affect the registration of fibre-optic reference temperature probe and MRT readings. The method provides a two-fold advantage of sensor localisation and PRFS thermal coefficient calibration. We provide experimental data for two distinct head and neck phantoms showing the significance of this method as it mitigates temperature probe localisation errors and thereby increases accuracy of MRT validation results. The techniques presented here may be used to simplify calibration experiments that use an interstitial heating device, or any heating method that provides rapid and spatially localised heat distributions. Overall, the experimental verification of the data registration and PRFS thermal coefficient calibration technique provides a useful benchmarking method to maximise MRT accuracy in any similar context.

  14. Room temperature CO2 gas sensors of AuNPs/mesoPSi hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Alwan M.; Dheyab, Amer B.

    2017-10-01

    Mesoporous silicon (mesoPSi) layer prepared by a laser-assisted etching process in HF acid has been employed as CO2 gas sensors. The surface morphology of mesoPSi was modified by embedding gold nanoparticles AuNPs by simple and quick dipping process in different gold salts concentrations to form mesoPSi/AuNPs hybrid structures. Morphology of hybrid structures was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrical characteristics of the prepared gas sensor were carried out at room temperature. It was found that the nanoparticles size, shape and the specific surface area of the nanoparticle strongly influence the current-voltage characteristics. Considerable improvement was noticed in sensitivity, response and recovery times of gas sensor with decreasing incorporated AuNPs into the mesoPSi matrix.

  15. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  16. Real time monitoring of water level and temperature in storage fuel pools through optical fibre sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, S; Périsse, J; Boukenter, A; Ouerdane, Y; Marin, E; Macé, J-R; Cannas, M; Girard, S

    2017-08-18

    We present an innovative architecture of a Rayleigh-based optical fibre sensor for the monitoring of water level and temperature inside storage nuclear fuel pools. This sensor, able to withstand the harsh constraints encountered under accidental conditions such as those pointed-out during the Fukushima-Daiichi event (temperature up to 100 °C and radiation dose level up to ~20 kGy), exploits the Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry technique to remotely monitor a radiation resistant silica-based optical fibre i.e. its sensing probe. We validate the efficiency and the robustness of water level measurements, which are extrapolated from the temperature profile along the fibre length, in a dedicated test bench allowing the simulation of the environmental operating and accidental conditions. The conceived prototype ensures an easy, practical and no invasive integration into existing nuclear facilities. The obtained results represent a significant breakthrough and comfort the ability of the developed system to overcome both operating and accidental constraints providing the distributed profiles of the water level (0-to-5 m) and temperature (20-to-100 °C) with a resolution that in accidental condition is better than 3 cm and of ~0.5 °C respectively. These new sensors will be able, as safeguards, to contribute and reinforce the safety in existing and future nuclear power plants.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2016-01-07

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. High-temperature sensor instrumentation with a thin-film-based sapphire fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuqing; Xia, Wei; Hu, Zhangzhong; Wang, Ming

    2017-03-10

    A novel sapphire fiber-optic high-temperature sensor has been designed and fabricated based on blackbody radiation theory. Metallic molybdenum has been used as the film material to develop the blackbody cavity, owing to its relatively high melting point compared to that of sapphire. More importantly, the fabrication process for the blackbody cavity is simple, efficient, and economical. Thermal radiation emitted from such a blackbody cavity is transmitted via optical fiber to a remote place for detection. The operating principle, the sensor structure, and the fabrication process are described here in detail. The developed high-temperature sensor was calibrated through a calibration blackbody furnace at temperatures from 900°C to 1200°C and tested by a sapphire crystal growth furnace up to 1880°C. The experimental results of our system agree well with those from a commercial Rayteck MR1SCCF infrared pyrometer, and the maximum residual is approximately 5°C, paving the way for high-accuracy temperature measurement especially for extremely harsh environments.

  19. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  20. PROTOTIPE SISTEM JARINGAN SENSOR UNTUK MONITORING TEMPERATUR-KELEMBABAN PERMUKAAN DAN BAWAH LAHAN GAMBUT BERBASIS DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Rosada Nasution

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK. Lahan gambut adalah jenis tanah yang terbentuk dari sisa-sisa tumbuhan yang terpendam dalam jangka  waktu yang sangat lama. Lahan gambut memiliki  karakteristik mudah terbakar  pada kondisi panas tertentu yang membentuk bara api di bawah permukaan dan menjalar ke atas permukaan hingga menyebabkan terbakarnya semak belukar atau hutan yang berada di atasnya, sehingga perlu dilakukan monitoring temperatur dan kelembaban permukaan dan bawah lahan gambut. Prototipe yang dibuat terdiri dari dua perangkat transmitter yang dilengkapi dengan sensor sebagai pengukur parameter dan satu perangkat receiver sebagai penerima data kedua transmitter. Pengukuran temperatur tanah di bawah permukaan digunakan sensor LM35 berbentuk probe, kemudian pengukuran temperatur dan kelembaban udara di permukaan digunakan sensor SHT11. pengiriman data dilakukan secara nirkabel menggunakan nRF24L01 dengan jarak maksimal 450 meter dengan jarak yang baik 200 meter. Perangkat receiver dilengkapi sistem interface PC berbasis database pada server  localhost/phpmyadmin. Hasil karakterisasi sensor LM35 dalam bentuk probe menunjukan linieritasnya adalah 0,9994 dan 0,9996; deviasi error 0,380C dan 0,400C; sensitivitas 0,960C dan 0,810C. Hasil lima kali pengukuran pada dua titik pengujian setiap transmitter menunjukkan temperatur tanah memiliki nilai 30,200C - 38,100C dan 24,800C - 38,600C, temperatur udara 25,000C - 38,860C dan 24,850C - 40,150C, kelembaban udara 51,65% - 96,51% dan 43,03% - 96,17%.   Kata kunci : Prototipe, Database, Lahan Gambut, LM35, nRF24L01, SHT11

  1. Pseudo-orthogonal frequency coded wireless SAW RFID temperature sensor tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Nancy; Malocha, Donald C

    2012-08-01

    SAW sensors are ideal for various wireless, passive multi-sensor applications because they are small, rugged, radiation hard, and offer a wide range of material choices for operation over broad temperature ranges. The readable distance of a tag in a multi-sensor environment is dependent on the insertion loss of the device and the processing gain of the system. Single-frequency code division multiple access (CDMA) tags that are used in high-volume commercial applications must have universal coding schemes and large numbers of codes. The use of a large number of bits at the common center frequency to achieve sufficient code diversity in CDMA tags necessitates reflector banks with >30 dB loss. Orthogonal frequency coding is a spread-spectrum approach that employs frequency and time diversity to achieve enhanced tag properties. The use of orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) SAW tags reduces adjacent reflector interactions for low insertion loss, increased range, complex coding, and system processing gain. This work describes a SAW tag-sensor platform that reduces device loss by implementing long reflector banks with optimized spectral coding. This new pseudo-OFC (POFC) coding is defined and contrasted with the previously defined OFC coding scheme. Auto- and cross-correlation properties of the chips and their relation to reflectivity per strip and reflector length are discussed. Results at 250 MHz of 8-chip OFC and POFC SAW tags will be compared. The key parameters of insertion loss, cross-correlation, and autocorrelation of the two types of frequency-coded tags will be analyzed, contrasted, and discussed. It is shown that coded reflector banks can be achieved with near-zero loss and still maintain good coding properties. Experimental results and results predicted by the coupling of modes model are presented for varying reflector designs and codes. A prototype 915-MHz POFC sensor tag is used as a wireless temperature sensor and the results are shown.

  2. Respiration and heartbeat signal detection from airflow at airway in rat by catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Kawaoka, H.; Yamada, T.; Matsushima, M.; Kawabe, T.; Shikida, M.

    2017-12-01

    We previously proposed an evaluation method for detecting both respiration and heartbeat signals from the airflow at the mouth (Kawaoka et al 201518th Int. Conf. on Solid-State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems; Kawaoka et al 2015 IEEE Sensors; Kawaoka et al 2016 Technical Digest IEEE Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Conf.). In the current study, we developed a catheter flow sensor with temperature compensation that uses MEMS technologies and used it to directly detect the breathing airflow in the airway of a rat. The temperature sensors were integrated with the catheter flow sensor. Heaters working as airflow and temperature sensors were produced on polymer film by using the same fabrication process so that the temperature coefficients of their resistances would coincide. As a result, the variation in sensor outputs due to the airflow temperature changes ranging from 20 °C to 34 °C was suppressed to less than 2.5%. The developed catheter flow sensor was inserted into the airway of a rat to detect both respiration and heartbeat signals. The accuracy of the breathing airflow measurements was improved thanks to the temperature compensation. The tidal volume variations between the expired and inspired air were suppressed to within 5%. Heartbeat signal information was extracted from the measured breathing waveforms by applying a discrete Fourier transform.

  3. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the "gradient effect". This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the "substrate effect". This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an important role in the FBG sensor

  4. Model Study of the Influence of Ambient Temperature and Installation Types on Surface Temperature Measurement by Using a Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is an important parameter in clinical diagnosis, equipment state control, and environmental monitoring fields. The Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG temperature sensor possesses numerous significant advantages over conventional electrical sensors, thus it is an ideal choice to achieve high-accuracy surface temperature measurements. However, the effects of the ambient temperature and installation types on the measurement of surface temperature are often overlooked. A theoretical analysis is implemented and a thermal transfer model of a surface FBG sensor is established. The theoretical and simulated analysis shows that both substrate strain and the temperature difference between the fiber core and hot surface are the most important factors which affect measurement accuracy. A surface-type temperature standard setup is proposed to study the measurement error of the FBG temperature sensor. Experimental results show that there are two effects influencing measurement results. One is the “gradient effect”. This results in a positive linear error with increasing surface temperature. Another is the “substrate effect”. This results in a negative non-linear error with increasing surface temperature. The measurement error of the FBG sensor with single-ended fixation are determined by the gradient effect and is a linear error. It is not influenced by substrate expansion. Thus, it can be compensated easily. The measurement errors of the FBG sensor with double-ended fixation are determined by the two effects and the substrate effect is dominant. The measurement error change trend of the FBG sensor with fully-adhered fixation is similar to that with double-ended fixation. The adhesive layer can reduce the two effects and measurement error. The fully-adhered fixation has lower error, however, it is easily affected by substrate strain. Due to its linear error and strain-resistant characteristics, the single-ended fixation will play an

  5. Measurement of sound pressure and temperature in tissue-mimicking material using an optical fiber Bragg grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imade, Keisuke; Kageyama, Takashi; Koyama, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Kentaro; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2016-10-01

    The experimental investigation of an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for biomedical application is described. The FBG sensor can be used to measure sound pressure and temperature rise simultaneously in biological tissues exposed to ultrasound. The theoretical maximum values that can be measured with the FBG sensor are 73.0 MPa and 30 °C. In this study, measurement of sound pressure up to 5 MPa was performed at an ultrasound frequency of 2 MHz. A maximum temperature change of 6 °C was measured in a tissue-mimicking material. Values yielded by the FBG sensor agreed with those measured using a thermocouple and a hydrophone. Since this sensor is used to monitor the sound pressure and temperature simultaneously, it can also be used for industrial applications, such as ultrasonic cleaning of semiconductors under controlled temperatures.

  6. Wide Range Temperature Sensors Based on One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal with a Single Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transmission characteristics of one-dimensional photonic crystal structure with a defect have been studied. Transfer matrix method has been employed to find the transmission spectra of the proposed structure. We consider a Si/air multilayer system and refractive index of Si layer has been taken as temperature dependent. As the refractive index of Si layer is a function of temperature of medium, so the central wavelength of the defect mode is a function of temperature. Variation in temperature causes the shifting of defect modes. It is found that the average change or shift in central wavelength of defect modes is 0.064 nm/K. This property can be exploited in the design of a temperature sensor.

  7. Miniaturized implantable sensors for in vivo localized temperature measurements in mice during cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, R; Lehnert, T; Cettour-Rose, P; Doenlen, R; Auwerx, J; Gijs, M A M

    2016-02-01

    We report on in vivo temperature measurements performed in mice at two specific sites of interest in the animal body over a period of several hours. In particular, the aim of this work was to monitor mouse metabolism during cold exposure, and to record possible temperature differences between the body temperature measured in the abdomen and the temperature of the brown adipose tissue (BAT) situated in the interscapular area. This approach is of biological interest as it may help unravelling the question whether biochemical activation of BAT is associated with local increase in metabolic heat production. For that purpose, miniaturized thermistor sensors have been accurately calibrated and implanted in the BAT and in the abdominal tissue of mice. After 1 week of recovery from surgery, mice were exposed to cold (6 °C) for a maximum duration of 6 h and the temperature was acquired continuously from the two sensors. Control measurements with a conventional rectal probe confirmed good performance of both sensors. Moreover, two different mouse phenotypes could be identified, distinguishable in terms of their metabolic resistance to cold exposure. This difference was analyzed from the thermal point of view by computational simulations. Our simple physical model of the mouse body allowed to reproduce the global evolution of hypothermia and also to explain qualitatively the temperature difference between abdomen and BAT locations. While with our approach, we have demonstrated the importance and feasibility of localized temperature measurements on mice, further optimization of this technique may help better identify local metabolism variations.

  8. A study of temperature sensor location based on fractal analysis for cascade control schemes in tubular reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eduardo Ramirez-Castelan, Carlos; Moguel-Castañeda, Jazael; Puebla, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Temperature sensor location for cascade control schemes in tubular reactors is still an open research problem. Several studies have pointed out that most temperature sensitive zones along the length of the reactor are suitable to this end. In this work, we have studied the problem of sensor...... location in a cascade control configuration using fractal analysis of time series obtained by random forcing of the jacket rector. A benchmark dispersion axial model displaying different temperature profiles is used to illustrate our findings....

  9. An alternative geometry for bolometer sensors for use at high operating temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, H., E-mail: meister@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Langer, H. [KRP-Mechatec Engineering GbR, Lichtenbergstr. 8, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Schmitt, S. [Fraunhofer ICT-IMM, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 18-20, D-55129 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Alternative design for bolometer sensors based on flexure hinges is proposed. • FE analysis confirms mechanical stability at high temperatures. • First prototypes successfully pass thermal cycling tests. • Expected bolometer calibration constants are estimated. • Tests using fully functional prototypes have to confirm applicability of design. - Abstract: Bolometer sensors are a key component to determine the total radiation and the radiation profile in fusion devices. For future devices like ITER the need arose to develop new sensors in order to adapt to loads, in particular neutron irradiation and enhanced thermal loads. The method proposed here to deal effectively with the stresses in the absorber and its supporting membrane is to support the absorber by flexure hinges, thus allowing deformations in all dimensions and reducing stresses. First, a design for the flexure hinges is proposed. Then finite-element analyses (FEA) have been carried out to investigate expected deformations due to residual stresses from the manufacturing process as well as due to additional thermal loads at 450 °C. The results showed stress levels below the expected tensile strength of Si. In addition, calculations show that the proposed design is expected to provide acceptable cooling time constants. Thus, prototypes based on the proposed design have been manufactured. Measurements of their deformation at room temperature are in agreement with predictions from FEA. Also, all prototypes were successfully subjected to thermal cycling up to 450 °C without any failures, thus demonstrating a successful development. However, for future application as bolometer sensor, a change in calibration parameters is expected: a factor of five for the heat capacity and a factor of two for the cooling time constant. Further prototypes including meanders and electrical contacts need to be developed and tested to finally validate if flexure hinges are a viable means for bolometer

  10. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  11. Temperature, stress, and corrosive sensing apparatus utilizing harmonic response of magnetically soft sensor element (s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Ong, Keat Ghee (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A temperature sensing apparatus including a sensor element made of a magnetically soft material operatively arranged within a first and second time-varying interrogation magnetic field, the first time-varying magnetic field being generated at a frequency higher than that for the second magnetic field. A receiver, remote from the sensor element, is engaged to measure intensity of electromagnetic emissions from the sensor element to identify a relative maximum amplitude value for each of a plurality of higher-order harmonic frequency amplitudes so measured. A unit then determines a value for temperature (or other parameter of interst) using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. In other aspects of the invention, the focus is on an apparatus and technique for determining a value for of stress condition of a solid analyte and for determining a value for corrosion, using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. A magnetically hard element supporting a biasing field adjacent the magnetically soft sensor element can be included.

  12. Graphical Interface for Measuring and Recording Temperature with the DS18B20 Digital Output Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel POPA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the authors’ two originalgraphical interfaces made in Borland Delphi anddesigned to measure and record (with the DS18B20sensor a wide range of negative and positivetemperatures. The first interface allows the readingof a sensor’s unique code and then themeasurement and recording of temperature. Thesecond interface can work with a variable numberof such sensors once their unique code has beenentered.The interfaces have been conceived for thestudy of the slow variations of air temperatureinside chambers or wood, in timber freezing,heating or drying processes.To achieve the purpose we have alsoexperimented on other variants of temperaturesensors, but finally we have adopted the variantthat uses the DS18B20 digital output sensormanufactured by Dallas Company. This sensor hasthe following advantages:- a small size (it can be easily inserted into a 4mm diameter hole made in the wood piece;- it measures temperatures between -55°Cand +125°C;- it can relatively easily connect to the RS232serial port of a computer;- with only two wires one can ensure datainsertion and transmission from a numberof 4 ÷ 10 sensors of this type.

  13. Ratiometric Optical Temperature Sensor Using Two Fluorescent Dyes Dissolved in an Ionic Liquid Encapsulated by Parylene Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Shimoyama

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A temperature sensor that uses temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes is developed. The droplet sensor has a diameter of 40 µm and uses 1 g/L of Rhodamine B (RhB and 0.5 g/L of Rhodamine 110 (Rh110, which are fluorescent dyes that are dissolved in an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate to function as temperature indicators. This ionic liquid is encapsulated using vacuum Parylene film deposition (which is known as the Parylene-on-liquid-deposition (PoLD method. The droplet is sealed by the chemically stable and impermeable Parylene film, which prevents the dye from interacting with the molecules in the solution and keeps the volume and concentration of the fluorescent material fixed. The two fluorescent dyes enable the temperature to be measured ratiometrically such that the droplet sensor can be used in various applications, such as the wireless temperature measurement of microregions. The sensor can measure the temperature of such microregions with an accuracy of 1.9 °C, a precision of 3.7 °C, and a fluorescence intensity change sensitivity of 1.0%/K. The sensor can measure temperatures at different sensor depths in water, ranging from 0 to 850 µm. The droplet sensor is fabricated using microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology and is highly applicable to lab-on-a-chip devices.

  14. A survey on temperature-aware routing protocols in wireless body sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oey, Christian Henry Wijaya; Moh, Sangman

    2013-08-02

    The rapid growth of the elderly population in the world and the rising cost of healthcare impose big issues for healthcare and medical monitoring. A Wireless Body Sensor Network (WBSN) is comprised of small sensor nodes attached inside, on or around a human body, the main purpose of which is to monitor the functions and surroundings of the human body. However, the heat generated by the node's circuitry and antenna could cause damage to the human tissue. Therefore, in designing a routing protocol for WBSNs, it is important to reduce the heat by incorporating temperature into the routing metric. The main contribution of this paper is to survey existing temperature-aware routing protocols that have been proposed for WBSNs. In this paper, we present a brief overview of WBSNs, review the existing routing protocols comparatively and discuss challenging open issues in the design of routing protocols.

  15. Utilizing the response patterns of a temperature modulated chemoresistive gas sensor for gas diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Amir [Jannatabad College, Sama Organization, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafarinia, Vahid, E-mail: amir.amini.elec@gmail.com, E-mail: ghafarinia@ee.kntu.ac.ir [Electrical Engineering Department, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The observed features in the temporal response patterns of a temperature-modulated chemoresistive gas sensor were used for gas diagnosis. The patterns were recorded for clean air and air contaminated with different levels of some volatile organic compounds while a staircase heating voltage waveform had been applied to the microheater of a tin oxide gas sensor that modulated its operating temperature. Combining the steady-state and transient parameters of the recorded responses in the 50-400 deg. C range resulted in discriminatory feature vectors which were utilized for contaminant classification. The information content of these feature vectors was proved sufficient for discrimination of methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, and acetone contaminations in a wide concentration range.

  16. Simultaneous and quasi-independent strain and temperature sensor based on microstructured optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for simultaneous and quasi-independent strain and temperature measurements is presented. The interrogation of the sensing head has been carried out by monitoring the FFT phase variations of two of the microstructured optical fiber (MOF) cavity interference frequencies. This method is independent of the signal amplitude and also avoids the need to track the wavelength evolution in the spectrum, which can be a handicap when there are multiple interference frequency components with different sensitivities. The sensor is operated within a range of temperature of 30°C-75°C, and 380μɛ of maximum strain were applied; being the sensitivities achieved of 127.5pm/°C and -19.1pm/μɛ respectively. Because the system uses an optical interrogator as unique active element, the system presents a cost-effective feature.

  17. Room temperature ammonia sensor based on copper nanoparticle intercalated polyaniline nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, U. V.; Ramgir, Niranjan S.; Karmakar, N.; Bhogale, A.; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2015-06-01

    Thin films of copper nanoparticles intercalated-polyaniline nanocomposites (NC) have been deposited at room temperatures by in situ oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different concentrations of Cu nanoparticles. The response characteristics of the NC thin films toward different gases namely NH3, CO, CO2, NO and CH4 were examined at room temperature. Both pure polyaniline (PANI) and NC films exhibited a selective response toward NH3. Incorporation of Cu nanoparticles resulted in an improvement of the sensors response and response kinetics. The response and the recovery times of composite film toward 50 ppm of NH3 were 7 and 160 s, respectively. Additionally, the NC sensor film could reversibly detect as low as 1 ppm of NH3 concentrations. The enhanced response of NC films toward NH3 is attributed to the deprotonation and reprotonation processes as also supported by Raman investigations.

  18. High-resolution fiber optic temperature sensors using nonlinear spectral curve fitting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Z H; Gan, J; Yu, Q K; Zhang, Q H; Liu, Z H; Bao, J M

    2013-04-01

    A generic new data processing method is developed to accurately calculate the absolute optical path difference of a low-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity from its broadband interference fringes. The method combines Fast Fourier Transformation with nonlinear curve fitting of the entire spectrum. Modular functions of LabVIEW are employed for fast implementation of the data processing algorithm. The advantages of this technique are demonstrated through high performance fiber optic temperature sensors consisting of an infrared superluminescent diode and an infrared spectrometer. A high resolution of 0.01 °C is achieved over a large dynamic range from room temperature to 800 °C, limited only by the silica fiber used for the sensor.

  19. Use of temperature and humidity sensors to determine moisture content of oolong tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Chiachung

    2014-08-22

    The measurement of tea moisture content is important for processing and storing tea. The moisture content of tea affects the quality and durability of the product. Some electrical devices have been proposed to measure the moisture content of tea leaves but are not practical. Their performance is influenced by material density and packing. The official oven method is time-consuming. In this study, the moisture content of Oolong tea was measured by the equilibrium relative humidity technique. The equilibrium relative humidity, and temperature, of tea materials were measured by using temperature and relative humidity sensors. Sensors were calibrated, and calibration equations were established to improve accuracy. The moisture content was calculated by using an equilibrium moisture content model. The error of the moisture content determined with this method was within 0.5% w.b. at moisture moisture determination.

  20. A Survey on Temperature-Aware Routing Protocols in Wireless Body Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangman Moh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth of the elderly population in the world and the rising cost of healthcare impose big issues for healthcare and medical monitoring. A Wireless Body Sensor Network (WBSN is comprised of small sensor nodes attached inside, on or around a human body, the main purpose of which is to monitor the functions and surroundings of the human body. However, the heat generated by the node’s circuitry and antenna could cause damage to the human tissue. Therefore, in designing a routing protocol for WBSNs, it is important to reduce the heat by incorporating temperature into the routing metric. The main contribution of this paper is to survey existing temperature-aware routing protocols that have been proposed for WBSNs. In this paper, we present a brief overview of WBSNs, review the existing routing protocols comparatively and discuss challenging open issues in the design of routing protocols.