WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature sensitive conditional

  1. Proteomic characterization of a temperature-sensitive conditional lethal in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Codrea, M.C; Vermeulen, Corneel

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation that is expressed only under specific environmental conditions can contribute to additional adverse effects of inbreeding if environmental conditions change. We present a proteomic characterization of a conditional lethal found in an inbred line of Drosophila melanogaster....... The lethal effect is apparent as a large increase in early mortality at the restrictive temperature (29 °C) as opposed to normal survival at the permissive temperature (20 °C). The increased mortality in response to the restrictive temperature is probably caused by a single recessive major locus....... A quantitative trait locus (QTL) region segregating variation affecting the lethal effect has been identified, allowing for a separation of primary/causal effects and secondary consequences in the proteome expression patterns observed. In this study, the proteomic response to the restrictive temperature...

  2. Organic particulate material levels in the atmosphere: conditions favoring sensitivity to varying relative humidity and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, James F

    2010-04-13

    This study examines the sensitivity in predicted levels of atmospheric organic particulate matter (M(o), microg m(-3)) as those levels may potentially be affected by changes in relative humidity and temperature. In a given system, for each partitioning compound, f(g) and f(p) represent the gaseous and particulate fractions (f(g) + f(p) = 1). Sensitivity in the M(o) levels becomes dampened as the compounds contributing significantly to M(o) are increasingly found in the particle phase (f(p) --> 1). Thus, although local maxima in sensitivity can be encountered as M(o) levels increase, because as M(o) increases each f(p) --> 1, then increasing M(o) levels generally tend to reduce sensitivity in M(o) levels to changes in relative humidity and temperature. Experiments designed to elucidate the potential magnitudes of the effects of relative humidity and temperature on M(o) levels must be carried out at M(o) levels that are relevant for the ambient atmosphere: The f(p) values for the important partitioning compounds must not be elevated above ambient-relevant values. Systems in which M(o) levels are low (e.g., 1-2 microg m(-3)) and/or composed of unaged secondary organic aerosol are the ones most likely to show sensitivity to changing relative humidity and temperature. Results from two published chamber studies are examined in the above regard: [Warren B, et al. (2009) Atmos Environ 43:1789-1795] and [Prisle NL, et al. (2010) Geophys Res Lett 37:L01802].

  3. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kyle Z.; Lipford, William E.; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-01-01

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  4. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Z. Goodman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  5. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. Sensitivity of nocturnal boundary layer temperature to tropospheric aerosol surface radiative forcing under clear-sky conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Udaysankar S.; McNider, Richard; Patadia, Falguni; Christopher, Sundar A.; Fuller, Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Since the middle of the last century, global surface air temperature exhibits an increasing trend, with nocturnal temperatures increasing at a much higher rate. Proposed causative mechanisms include the radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols on the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) where the temperature response is amplified due to shallow depth and its sensitivity to potential destabilization. A 1-D version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to examine the sensitivity of the nocturnal boundary layer temperature to the surface longwave radiative forcing (SLWRF) from urban aerosol loading and doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. The analysis is conducted for typical midlatitude nocturnal boundary layer case days from the CASES-99 field experiment and is further extended to urban sites in Pune and New Delhi, India. For the cases studied, locally, the nocturnal SLWRF from urban atmospheric aerosols (2.7-47 W m-2) is comparable or exceeds that caused by doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (3 W m-2), with the surface temperature response ranging from a compensation for daytime cooling to an increase in the nocturnal minimum temperature. The sensitivity of the NBL to radiative forcing is approximately 4 times higher compared to the daytime boundary layer. Nighttime warming or cooling may occur depending on the nature of diurnal variations in aerosol optical depth. Soil moisture also modulates the magnitude of SLWRF, decreasing from 3 to 1 W m-2 when soil saturation increases from 37% to 70%. These results show the importance of aerosols on the radiative balance of the climate system.

  7. Overview of low temperature sensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, M.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1983-12-01

    A review of the literature on low temperature sensitization (LTS) has been conducted to determine if LTS-related microstructural changes can occur in Type 304L stainless steel within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. It was found that Type 304L stainless steel is susceptible to sensitization and LTS, and that cold work plays an important role in determining the rate of LTS. Severely cold worked Type 304L stainless steel would clearly develop LTS-related microstructural changes within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. These changes could lead to increased susceptibility to corrosion. Significant improvements in the long-term resistance to sensitization, LTS and corrosion can be achieved by modest changes in alloy composition and fabrication practices. Therefore, Type 304L would not be the preferred alloy of construction for nuclear waste storage canisters. The final qualification of an alternate canister alloy should involve corrosion experiments on actual canisters. Suggestions for alternate canister alloys are 316L, 316LN, 316ELC, 347, and XM-19. 47 references, 4 figures.

  8. Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamner, M. P.; Popernack, T. G., Jr.; Owens, L. R.; Wahls, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    New facilities and test techniques afford research aerodynamicists many opportunities to investigate complex aerodynamic phenomena. For example, NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility (NTF) can hold Mach number, Reynolds number, dynamic pressure, stagnation temperature and stagnation pressure constant during testing. This is important because the wing twist associated with model construction may mask important Reynolds number effects associated with the flight vehicle. Beyond this, the NTF's ability to vary Reynolds number allows for important research into the study of boundary layer transition. The capabilities of facilities such as the NTF coupled with test techniques such as temperature sensitive paint yield data that can be applied not only to vehicle design but also to validation of computational methods. Development of Luminescent Paint Technology for acquiring pressure and temperature measurements began in the mid-1980s. While pressure sensitive luminescent paints (PSP) were being developed to acquire data for aerodynamic performance and loads, temperature sensitive luminescent paints (TSP) have been used for a much broader range of applications. For example, TSP has been used to acquire surface temperature data to determine the heating due to rotating parts in various types of mechanical systems. It has been used to determine the heating pattern(s) on circuit boards. And, it has been used in boundary layer analysis and applied to the validation of full-scale flight performance predictions. That is, data acquired on the same model can be used to develop trends from off design to full scale flight Reynolds number, e.g. to show the progression of boundary layer transition. A discussion of issues related to successfully setting-up TSP tests and using TSP systems for boundary layer studies is included in this paper, as well as results from a variety of TSP tests. TSP images included in this paper are all grey-scale so that similar to

  9. Junction temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters and their application to condition monitoring and active thermal control of power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Liserre, Marco; Dupont, L.

    2013-01-01

    implementation of active thermal control to reduce losses and increase lifetime can be performed given an accurate knowledge of temperature. Temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP) are one way to carry out immediate temperature readings on fully packaged devices. However......, successful implementation of these techniques during the actual operation of a device has not yet been achieved. This paper provides an overview of literature where the usage of TSEPs has been hypothesised or realised in realistic power electronic converter setups. Barriers and limitations preventing wider...

  10. Theoretical study on ignition compensating temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature sensitivity of the propellant has significant influence on the interior ballistic performance of guns. Many physical and chemical approaches are employed to decrease this temperature sensitivity of the propellant. In this article, it is proposed that the temperature sensitivity of the propellant is changed by altering the factors required to ignition. A one-dimensional two-phase flow interior ballistic model is established to analyze the relation between ignition factors and temperature sensitivity. The simulation results show that the propellant temperature sensitivity is changed by altering the ignition factors. That is, the interior ballistic performance is affected by altering the size of fire hole, breaking liner pressure, and ignition location. Based on the simulation results, the temperature sensitivity can be controlled by matching of charges and intelligent control ignition system.

  11. Melting in temperature sensitive suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    We describe two experimental studies about melting in colloidal systems. In particular we studied melting of 1-dimensional lamellar phases and 3-dimensional colloidal crystals. In the first set of experiments we prepared suspensions composed of rodlike fd virus and the thermosensitive polymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The phase diagram of this systems is temperature and concentration dependent. Using video microscopy, we directly observed melting of lamellar phases and single lamellae into nematic phase. We found that lamellar phases swell with increasing temperature before melting into the nematic phase. The highly swollen lamellae can be superheated as a result of topological nucleation barriers that slow the formation of the nematic phase. In another set of experiments we prepared colloidal crystals from thermally responsive microgel spheres. The crystals are equilibrium close-packed three-dimensional structures. Upon increasing the temperature slightly above room temperature, particle volume fraction decreased from 0.74 to less than 0.5. Using video microscopy, we observed premelting at grain boundaries and dislocations within bulk colloidal crystals. Premelting is the localized loss of crystalline order at surfaces and defects at sample volume fractions above the bulk melting transition. Particle tracking revealed increased disorder in crystalline regions bordering defects, the amount of which depends on the type of defect, distance from the defect, and particle volume fraction. In total these observations suggest that interfacial free energy is the crucial parameter for premelting in colloidal and in atomic scale crystals.

  12. Temperature variation makes ectotherms more sensitive to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paaijmans, Krijn P; Heinig, Rebecca L; Seliga, Rebecca A; Blanford, Justine I; Blanford, Simon; Murdock, Courtney C; Thomas, Matthew B

    2013-08-01

    Ectotherms are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate warming. Descriptions of habitat temperatures and predicted changes in climate usually consider mean monthly, seasonal or annual conditions. Ectotherms, however, do not simply experience mean conditions, but are exposed to daily fluctuations in habitat temperatures. Here, we highlight how temperature fluctuation can generate 'realized' thermal reaction (fitness) norms that differ from the 'fundamental' norms derived under standard constant temperatures. Using a mosquito as a model organism, we find that temperature fluctuation reduces rate processes such as development under warm conditions, increases processes under cool conditions, and reduces both the optimum and the critical maximum temperature. Generalizing these effects for a range of terrestrial insects reveals that prevailing daily fluctuations in temperature should alter the sensitivity of species to climate warming by reducing 'thermal safety margins'. Such effects of daily temperature dynamics have generally been ignored in the climate change literature. © 2013 The Authors. Global Change Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Persistent and non-persistent strains of Listeria monocytogenes: A focus on growth kinetics under different temperature, salt, and pH conditions and their sensitivity to sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, R; Ferreira, V; Brandão, T R S; Palencia, R Casquete; Almeida, G; Teixeira, P

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of different conditions, including temperature (37 °C, 22 °C, and 4 °C), NaCl concentrations (2.5%, 4%, and 8%), and acidity (pH = 5), on the growth response of persistent and non-persistent isolates of Listeria monocytogenes. The resistance to two common sanitizers (benzalkonium chloride and hydrogen peroxide) was also investigated. A selected group of 41 persistent and non-persistent L. monocytogenes isolates recovered from three cheese processing plants during a previous longitudinal study was assembled. Average lag time was similar for persistent and non-persistent isolates grown at 37 °C, 22 °C and 4 °C but significantly shorter (p < 0.05) for persistent isolates grown at 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. Average growth rates were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for persistent than for non-persistent isolates when grown at 22 °C, 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. These results suggest that persistent strains may be better adapted to grow under stressful conditions frequently encountered in food processing environments than non-persistent strains. No relation between persistence and resistance to the tested sanitizers was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Higher temperature variability reduces temperature sensitivity of vegetation growth in Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuchen; Liu, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoyan; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Guo, Weichao; Yin, Yi; Poulter, Ben; Peng, Changhui; Viovy, Nicolas; Vuichard, Nicolas; Wang, Pei; Huang, Yongmei

    2017-06-01

    Interannual air temperature variability has changed over some regions in Northern Hemisphere (NH), accompanying with climate warming. However, whether and to what extent it regulates the interannual sensitivity of vegetation growth to temperature variability (i.e., interannual temperature sensitivity)—one central issue in understanding and predicting the responses of vegetation growth to changing climate—still remains poorly quantified and understood. Here we quantify the relationships between the interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season (April-October) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and ecosystem model simulations of gross primary productivity (GPP), and variability in mean growing-season temperature for forest, shrub, and grass over NH. We find that higher interannual variability in mean growing-season temperature leads to consistent decrease in interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season NDVI among all vegetation types but not in model simulations of GPP. Drier condition associates with 130 ± 150% further decrease in interannual temperature sensitivity of mean growing-season NDVI by temperature variability in forest and shrub. These results illustrate that varying temperature variability can significantly regulate the interannual temperature sensitivity of vegetation growth over NH, interacted with drought variability and nonlinear responses of photosynthesis to temperature. Our findings call for an improved characterization of the nonlinear effects of temperature variability on vegetation growth within global ecosystem models.

  15. Temperature targets revisited under climate sensitivity uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubersch, Delf; Roth, Robert; Held, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    While the 2° target has become an official goal of the COP (Conference of the Parties) process recent work has shown that it requires re-interpretation if climate sensitivity uncertainty in combination with anticipated future learning is considered (Schmidt et al., 2011). A strict probabilistic limit as suggested by the Copenhagen diagnosis may lead to conceptual flaws in view of future learning such a negative expected value of information or even ill-posed policy recommendations. Instead Schmidt et al. suggest trading off the probabilistic transgression of a temperature target against mitigation-induced welfare losses and call this procedure cost risk analysis (CRA). Here we spell out CRA for the integrated assessment model MIND and derive necessary conditions for the exact nature of that trade-off. With CRA at hand it is for the first time that the expected value of climate information, for a given temperature target, can meaningfully be assessed. When focusing on a linear risk function as the most conservative of all possible risk functions, we find that 2° target-induced mitigation costs could be reduced by up to 1/3 if the climate response to carbon dioxide emissions were known with certainty, amounting to hundreds of billions of Euros per year (Neubersch et al., 2014). Further benefits of CRA over strictly formulated temperature targets are discussed. References: D. Neubersch, H. Held, A. Otto, Operationalizing climate targets under learning: An application of cost-risk analysis, Climatic Change, 126 (3), 305-318, DOI 10.1007/s10584-014-1223-z (2014). M. G. W. Schmidt, A. Lorenz, H. Held, E. Kriegler, Climate Targets under Uncertainty: Challenges and Remedies, Climatic Change Letters, 104 (3-4), 783-791, DOI 10.1007/s10584-010-9985-4 (2011).

  16. The experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Dekker, Kim; Te Lindert, Bart H. W.; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Moens, Sarah; Migliorati, Filippo; Aarts, Emmeke; van der Sluis, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Individuals differ in thermosensitivity, thermoregulation, and zones of thermoneutrality and thermal comfort. Whereas temperature sensing and -effectuating processes occur in part unconsciously and autonomic, awareness of temperature and thermal preferences can affect thermoregulatory behavior as well. Quantification of trait-like individual differences of thermal preferences and experienced temperature sensitivity and regulation is therefore relevant to obtain a complete understanding of human thermophysiology. Whereas several scales have been developed to assess instantaneous appreciation of heat and cold exposure, a comprehensive scale dedicated to assess subjectively experienced autonomic or behavioral thermoregulatory activity has been lacking so far. We constructed a survey that specifically approaches these domains from a trait-like perspective, sampled 240 volunteers across a wide age range, and analyzed the emergent component structure. Participants were asked to report their thermal experiences, captured in 102 questions, on a 7-point bi-directional Likert scale. In a second set of 32 questions, participants were asked to indicate the relative strength of experiences across different body locations. Principal component analyses extracted 21 meaningful dimensions, which were sensitive to sex-differences and age-related changes. The questions were also assessed in a matched sample of 240 people with probable insomnia to evaluate the sensitivity of these dimensions to detect group differences in a case-control design. The dimensions showed marked mean differences between cases and controls. The survey thus has discriminatory value. It can freely be used by anyone interested in studying individual or group differences in thermosensitivity and thermoregulation. PMID:27227080

  17. Temperature sensitivity of silica micro-resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Qiulin; Rossmann, Tobias; Guo Zhixiong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.edu

    2008-12-21

    Optical resonance shifts are measured against temperature changes for different silica beads ranging from 80 to 450 {mu}m in diameter. A micro-bead is fabricated by hydrogen flame fusing the tip of a single mode silica fibre/taper, and coupled to a fibre taper of submicrometre diameter. The coupling system in whispering-gallery modes is placed in an insulated cell. The air in the cell is slowly heated up from room temperature to about 10 K higher, and red shifts of a resonance wavelength during the heating process are recorded. Linear dependence of the wavelength shift versus the temperature rise is observed for all the tested micro-resonators. The measured sensitivity for beads greater than 200 {mu}m in size closely matches the analytical value based on bulk material properties of silica thermal expansion and the thermo-optic effect. For smaller micro-beads, however, the measured sensitivity increases with shrinking bead size. The ultra-high resolution of such a kind of temperature micro-sensor and its potential applications are addressed.

  18. Sensitivity of nickel cermet anodes to reduction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallon, Christian; Kendall, Kevin [Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-18

    The direct use of methane as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) without pre-reforming would reduce running costs and enable higher efficiencies. But methane generally causes carbon deposition on the nickel anode and subsequent power degradation. This paper shows that carbon deposition from methane is very sensitive to anode reduction conditions. The effect of direct methane on microtubular SOFC reduced at two different conditions was studied at temperatures above 800{sup o}C. Reducing the cells at high temperature gave good performance on hydrogen but the current degraded quickly on methane, suggesting that carbon was blocking the nickel surfaces. This was not recoverable by bringing in hydrogen to replace the methane. Cells reduced under low temperature conditions gave higher current on methane than on hydrogen, showing that carbon deposited from the methane improved nickel anode conductivity in this case. These cells also did not degrade on methane under certain conditions but lasted for a long period. Extracting the carbon by feeding the cell with hydrogen interrupted this newly formed linkage between the nickel particles, reducing the electrical conductivity, which could be recovered by reintroducing methane. The conclusion was that nickel cermet anodes are very sensitive to reduction conditions, with low temperature reduction being preferred if methane is to be used as the chosen fuel. (author)

  19. The relationship between virtual body ownership and temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Joan; Sanchez-Vives, M V; Slater, Mel

    2013-08-06

    In the rubber hand illusion, tactile stimulation seen on a rubber hand, that is synchronous with tactile stimulation felt on the hidden real hand, can lead to an illusion of ownership over the rubber hand. This illusion has been shown to produce a temperature decrease in the hidden hand, suggesting that such illusory ownership produces disownership of the real hand. Here, we apply immersive virtual reality (VR) to experimentally investigate this with respect to sensitivity to temperature change. Forty participants experienced immersion in a VR with a virtual body (VB) seen from a first-person perspective. For half the participants, the VB was consistent in posture and movement with their own body, and in the other half, there was inconsistency. Temperature sensitivity on the palm of the hand was measured before and during the virtual experience. The results show that temperature sensitivity decreased in the consistent compared with the inconsistent condition. Moreover, the change in sensitivity was significantly correlated with the subjective illusion of virtual arm ownership but modulated by the illusion of ownership over the full VB. This suggests that a full body ownership illusion results in a unification of the virtual and real bodies into one overall entity-with proprioception and tactile sensations on the real body integrated with the visual presence of the VB. The results are interpreted in the framework of a 'body matrix' recently introduced into the literature.

  20. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  1. Temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis in a thermokarst lake sediment core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, J. K.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Grosse, G.; Anthony, P.; Bondurant, A.

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about temperature sensitivity of permafrost organic carbon (OC) mineralization over time scales of years to centuries following thaw. Due to their formation and thaw histories, taliks (thaw bulbs) beneath thermokarst lakes provide a unique natural laboratory from which to examine how permafrost thawed in saturated anaerobic conditions responds to changes in temperature following long periods of time since thaw. We anaerobically incubated samples from a 590 cm thermokarst lake sediment core near Fairbanks, Alaska at four temperatures (0, 3, 10, and 25 ºC) bracketing observed talik temperatures. We show that since initial thaw 400 yr BP CH4 production shifts from being most sensitive to at lower (0-3 ºC; Q10-EC=1.15E7) temperatures to being most sensitive at higher (10-25 ºC; Q10-EC=67) temperatures. Frozen sediments collected from beneath the talik, thawed at the commencement of the incubation, had significant (p ≤ 0.05) increases in CH4 production rates at lower temperatures but did not show significant CH4 production rate increases at higher temperatures (10-25 ºC). We hypothesize the thawing of sediments removed a major barrier to C mineralization, leading to rapid initial permafrost C mineralization and preferential mineralization of the most biolabile OC compounds. In contrast, sediments which had been thawed beneath the lake for longer periods of time did not experience statistically significant increases in CH4 production at lower temperatures (0-10 ºC), but had high temperature sensitivities at higher temperatures (10-25 ºC). We believe these rate increases are due to warmer temperatures in the experimental incubations crossing activation energy thresholds, allowing previously recalcitrant fractions of OC to be utilized, and/or the presence of different microbial communities adapted to thawed sediments. Recently-deposited sediments at shallow depths in the lake core experienced increases in CH4 production across all incubation

  2. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J; Baas, Peter; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Johnson, Nels G; von Fischer, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT), which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate interpretation of

  3. Temperature Sensitivity as a Microbial Trait Using Parameters from Macromolecular Rate Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jean Alster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity of soil microbial extracellular enzymes is strongly controlled by temperature, yet the degree to which temperature sensitivity varies by microbe and enzyme type is unclear. Such information would allow soil microbial enzymes to be incorporated in a traits-based framework to improve prediction of ecosystem response to global change. If temperature sensitivity varies for specific soil enzymes, then determining the underlying causes of variation in temperature sensitivity of these enzymes will provide fundamental insights for predicting nutrient dynamics belowground. In this study, we characterized how both microbial taxonomic variation as well as substrate type affects temperature sensitivity. We measured β-glucosidase, leucine aminopeptidase, and phosphatase activities at six temperatures: 4, 11, 25, 35, 45, and 60°C, for seven different soil microbial isolates. To calculate temperature sensitivity, we employed two models, Arrhenius, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature, and Macromolecular Rate Theory (MMRT, which predicts rate to peak and then decline as temperature increases. We found MMRT provided a more accurate fit and allowed for more nuanced interpretation of temperature sensitivity in all of the enzyme × isolate combinations tested. Our results revealed that both the enzyme type and soil isolate type explain variation in parameters associated with temperature sensitivity. Because we found temperature sensitivity to be an inherent and variable property of an enzyme, we argue that it can be incorporated as a microbial functional trait, but only when using the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity. We show that the Arrhenius metrics of temperature sensitivity are overly sensitive to test conditions, with activation energy changing depending on the temperature range it was calculated within. Thus, we propose the use of the MMRT definition of temperature sensitivity for accurate

  4. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  5. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  6. Turbine blade temperature calculation and life estimation - a sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Rezazadeh Reyhani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The overall operating cost of the modern gas turbines is greatly influenced by the durability of hot section components operating at high temperatures. In turbine operating conditions, some defects may occur which can decrease hot section life. In the present paper, methods used for calculating blade temperature and life are demonstrated and validated. Using these methods, a set of sensitivity analyses on the parameters affecting temperature and life of a high pressure, high temperature turbine first stage blade is carried out. Investigated uncertainties are: (1 blade coating thickness, (2 coolant inlet pressure and temperature (as a result of secondary air system, and (3 gas turbine load variation. Results show that increasing thermal barrier coating thickness by 3 times, leads to rise in the blade life by 9 times. In addition, considering inlet cooling temperature and pressure, deviation in temperature has greater effect on blade life. One of the interesting points that can be realized from the results is that 300 hours operation at 70% load can be equal to one hour operation at base load.

  7. Engineering a temperature sensitive tobacco etch virus protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J; Chen, X; Truong, K

    2017-10-01

    Since tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) has a high specificity and efficiency in cleaving its target substrates, many groups have attempted to engineer conditional control of its activity. Temperature induction is widely used for modulating gene function because it has fast temporal response, good penetrability and applicability to many model organisms. Here, we engineered a temperature sensitive TEVp (tsTEVp) by using N-terminal truncations to TEVp that achieved efficient proteolysis on a timescale of 4 h after 30°C induction, while remaining relatively inactive at 37°C. As demonstration, tsTEVp was used to generate temperature-induced biological responses for protein translocation, protein degradation and Ca2+-mediated cellular blebbing. Lastly, tsTEVp and their engineered target substrates could find applications in engineered synthetic biological systems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  9. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  10. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  11. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  12. Upper Tropospheric Humidity And Its Sensitivity To Changes Of Local Air Temperature And Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, H. G. J.; Kley, D.; Nawrath, S.

    Whether upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) is under thermodynamic or dynamic control is still one of the unresolved questions regarding climate feedback, important for a better understanding and prediction of the global temperature changes. Interac- tion of UTH content with local air and sea surface temperature play an important role in climate feedback. We report on UTH-measurements over the Atlantic ocean as a function of seasonally varying upper tropospheric and sea surface temperature. We use a comprehensive five year climatology of data from the MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone and Water Va- por by Airbus In-Service Aircraft) project in which UTH and local temperature are measured since 1994 from board five Airbus A340 passenger aircraft during sched- uled flight operation. Corresponding sea surface temperature is taken from satellite observations. We will discuss the seasonal variations of UTH-content (relative and specific humid- ity) in combination with local air temperature and sea surface temperature under typi- cal mid-latitude, sub-tropical and tropical conditions, respectively. The discussion will focus on the temperature sensitivity of UTH-content in terms of dynamic or thermo- dynamic control and its implications for climate feedback.

  13. Sensitivity to initial conditions in stochastic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, K.; Balakrishnan, V.; Nicolis, G.

    1993-01-01

    The time evolution of the mean deviation of initially close trajectories in a stochastic dynamical system is investigated. It is shown both for additive and linearly coupled multiplicative noise that the mean deviation loses its dependence on initial conditions for long times. For shorter times a power law is found for certain types of additive noise processes, in sharp contrast to the exponential separation of initially nearby trajectories in deterministic chaotic systems. Exponential time evolution is obtained for linearly coupled multiplicative noise after an initial transient during which more complex regimes, including a superexponential stage, can take place.

  14. Temperature sensitivity of decomposition of soil organic carbon fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilasvuori, Emmi; Järvenpää, Marko; Akujärvi, Anu; Arppe, Laura; Christensen, Bent T.; Fritze, Hannu; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Karhu, Kristiina; Oinonen, Markku; Palonen, Vesa; Pitkänen, Juha-Matti; Repo, Anna; Vanhala, Pekka; Liski, Jari

    2015-04-01

    Knowing the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is important for estimating the release of carbon from soil to the atmosphere in response to global warming. This temperature sensitivity is known relatively well for the most labile SOM fractions but still quite poorly for more recalcitrant fractions that represent the great majority of SOM. We report results for the temperature sensitivity of various SOM fractions in two different experiments in which we utilized natural abundances of carbon isotopes 13C and 14C combined with Bayesian mathematical modelling. In one experiment, the different age fractions were distinguished based on depth in a peat profile. In the other experiment, the age fractions were separated based on a time series of conversion from C3 vegetation to C4 vegetation. In both experiments, the temperature sensitivity of the SOM fractions was estimated by measuring the carbon isotope composition of heterotrophic soil respiration at different temperatures in laboratory. The results from these experiments suggest that the temperature sensitivity of unprotected SOM fractions increases with age, but if an environmental factor, such as bonding to soil minerals, limits decomposition of a SOM fraction, the temperature sensitivity is reduced. Our results are in agreement with the theory that suggests that in soil without environmental, physical or chemical protection, temperature sensitivity of carbon compounds is mainly determined by its chemical structure. The more complex the structure is the higher activation energy is needed and the higher its temperature sensitivity. Since SOM enriches with more complicated carbon compounds with time, this leads to increase in temperature sensitivity as SOM ages. However, our results also indicate that if the soil carbon is associated with minerals it might exhibit lower temperature sensitivities than when the carbon is "free" in the soil. Since the mineral associated carbon can have high

  15. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  16. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  17. Ultrahigh sensitive temperature sensor based on graphene-semiconductor metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, A.; Zakery, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we theoretically describe a nanoscale THz metamaterial, consisting of a graphene H-shaped that is located on an indium antimonide (InSb) substrate. This metamaterial in its simulated transmission spectrum exhibits a filtering effect and at a specific frequency, the percentage of light passing through the metamaterial is greatly reduced. Since the optical properties of graphene and InSb strongly depend on temperature, as the temperature changes, the frequency of resonance is also shifted. Thus we can expect our structure is suitable for ultrahigh sensitive temperature sensors. The temperature sensor presented is very sensitive with a sensitivity of 1814 nm/{°C} which is very high compared to other designed structures. This THz temperature sensor can play an important role for high-accurate temperature measurements.

  18. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The magnetocaloric properties of three different temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids were studied. The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic properties like size, magnetization and Curie temperature. A theoretical model was ...

  19. Determination of temperature of moving surface by sensitivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Farhanieh, B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper sensitivity analysis in inverse problem solutions is employed to estimate the temperature of a moving surface. Moving finite element method is used for spatial discretization. Time derivatives are approximated using Crank-Nicklson method. The accuracy of the solution is assessed by simulation method. The convergence domain is investigated for the determination of the temperature of a solid fuel.

  20. Temperature variation makes ectotherms more sensitive to climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Heinig, Rebecca L; Seliga, Rebecca A; Blanford, Justine I.; Blanford, Simon; Murdock, Courtney C; Thomas, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Ectotherms are considered to be particularly vulnerable to climate warming. Descriptions of habitat temperatures and predicted changes in climate usually consider mean monthly, seasonal or annual conditions. Ectotherms, however, do not simply experience mean conditions, but are exposed to daily fluctuations in habitat temperatures. Here, we highlight how temperature fluctuation can generate ‘realized’ thermal reaction (fitness) norms that differ from the ‘fundamental’ norms derived under stan...

  1. Highly sensitive fiber loop ringdown strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Maheshwar; Wang, Chuji

    2017-10-01

    We report a highly sensitive strain sensor with low temperature sensitivity based on the fiber loop ringdown technique. An innovative approach that employs a micro air-gap as the strain sensor head is described. The sensor has demonstrated the static strain sensitivity of 0.26 µs/µɛ, corresponding to the detection limit of 65 nɛ with the low temperature cross sensitivity of 37 nɛ/°C. This is the highest static strain sensitivity achieved without using a combination of fiber optic sensing components, such as fiber Bragg gratings or Fabry-Perot interferometers. Moreover, the sensor design allows the strain sensitivity and measuring range to be adjusted by changing the length of the sensor.

  2. Greater temperature sensitivity of plant phenology at colder sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prevey, Janet; Vellend, Mark; Ruger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance...... at colder sites. To test this hypothesis, we examined up to 20 years of phenology data for 47 tundra plant species at 18 high-latitude sites along a climatic gradient. Across all species, the timing of leaf emergence and flowering was more sensitive to a given increase in summer temperature at colder than...... warmer high-latitude locations. A similar pattern was seen over time for the flowering phenology of a widespread species, Cassiope tetragona. These are among the first results highlighting differential phenological responses of plants across a climatic gradient and suggest the possibility of convergence...

  3. Carbon dynamics modelization and biological community sensitivity to temperature in an oligotrophic freshwater Antarctic lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonio Villaescusa, Juan; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Rochera, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    conditions. Despite this assumption, the model reveals that maritime Antarctic lakes are very sensitive to temperature changes. This response can be monitored using eco-exergy, which allows a description of the system complexity. Due to this temperature sensitivity, the warming occurring in this area would...... food web. This preliminary model aims to describe part of the carbon dynamics, especially for bacterioplankton and associated factors, in this maritime Antarctic lake highly affected by temperature increase linked to regional warming. To describe the system, the effects of the variation of different...... forcing functions influencing the carbon flow within the microbial community, like temperature and irradiance, were studied. Among the studied factors, the sensitivity analysis showed the strongest response of the model to temperature changes. Consumption rates of organic matter by bacterioplankton...

  4. Temperature sensitivity of organic compound destruction in SCWO process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaqin; Shen, Zhemin; Guo, Weimin; Ouyang, Chuang; Jia, Jinping; Jiang, Weili; Zhou, Haiyun

    2014-03-01

    To study the temperature sensitivity of the destruction of organic compounds in supercritical water oxidation process (SCWO), oxidation effects of twelve chemicals in supercritical water were investigated. The SCWO reaction rates of different compounds improved to varying degrees with the increase of temperature, so the highest slope of the temperature-effect curve (imax) was defined as the maximum ratio of removal ratio to working temperature. It is an important index to stand for the temperature sensitivity effect in SCWO. It was proven that the higher imax is, the more significant the effect of temperature on the SCWO effect is. Since the high-temperature area of SCWO equipment is subject to considerable damage from fatigue, the temperature is of great significance in SCWO equipment operation. Generally, most compounds (imax > 0.25) can be completely oxidized when the reactor temperature reaches 500°C. However, some compounds (imax > 0.25) need a higher temperature for complete oxidation, up to 560°C. To analyze the correlation coefficients between imax and various molecular descriptors, a quantum chemical method was used in this study. The structures of the twelve organic compounds were optimized by the Density Functional Theory B3LYP/6-311G method, as well as their quantum properties. It was shown that six molecular descriptors were negatively correlated to imax while other three descriptors were positively correlated to imax. Among them, dipole moment had the greatest effect on the oxidation thermodynamics of the twelve organic compounds. Once a correlation between molecular descriptors and imax is established, SCWO can be run at an appropriate temperature according to molecular structure. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Profile of children hospitalizations by primary care sensitive conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Rosana Gonçalves de Oliveira Toso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization for primary care sensitive conditions is a type of hospitalization that may be reduced or avoided if conditions are properly and effectively diagnosed and treated within Primary Health Care. To identify Brazilian rates of morbidity in 0 – 4 year-old children and hospitalization rates for primary care sensitive conditions rates in a pediatric unit of a public hospital in Cascavel, Paraná State, Brazil. Quantitative research whose data were retrieved from the Hospital Information System database - Datasus and from the records of the Medical and Statistical File Service of the hospital, with regard to hospital records of 220 children between January and December 2012, with an instrument specifically developed for research and analysis in descriptive statistics. National hospitalization rates for primary care sensitive conditions were predominant in children under one year and in the northern (657.56 and southern (621.18 regions, underscoring pneumonia. They accounted for 23.30% of hospitalizations, with 15.03% for respiratory diseases in the medical institution under analysis. Respiratory diseases were the main cause of hospitalization for primary care sensitive conditions and in children under one year old. Results suggest an increase in investment for prevention of these diseases in primary health care.

  6. Quantifying the bending of bilayer temperature-sensitive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chenling; Chen, Bin

    2017-04-01

    Stimuli-responsive hydrogels can serve as manipulators, including grippers, sensors, etc., where structures can undergo significant bending. Here, a finite-deformation theory is developed to quantify the evolution of the curvature of bilayer temperature-sensitive hydrogels when subjected to a temperature change. Analysis of the theory indicates that there is an optimal thickness ratio to acquire the largest curvature in the bilayer and also suggests that the sign or the magnitude of the curvature can be significantly affected by pre-stretches or small pores in the bilayer. This study may provide important guidelines in fabricating temperature-responsive bilayers with desirable mechanical performance.

  7. Escherichia coli mutants with a temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorowitz, W; CLARK, D.

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli resistant to allyl alcohol were selected. Such mutants were found to lack alcohol dehydrogenase. In addition, mutants with temperature-sensitive alcohol dehydrogenase activity were obtained. These mutations, designated adhE, are all located at the previously described adh regulatory locus. Most adhE mutants were also defective in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  8. Sensitivity of a Simulated Derecho Event to Model Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the MMM division at NCAR has been experimenting cloud-permitting scale weather forecasting using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Over the years, we've tested different model physics, and tried different initial and boundary conditions. Not surprisingly, we found that the model's forecasts are more sensitive to the initial conditions than model physics. In 2012 real-time experiment, WRF-DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) at 15 km was employed to produce initial conditions for twice-a-day forecast at 3 km. On June 29, this forecast system captured one of the most destructive derecho event on record. In this presentation, we will examine forecast sensitivity to different model initial conditions, and try to understand the important features that may contribute to the success of the forecast.

  9. Spectral interferometric fiber optic temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militky, J.; Kadulova, M.; Hlubina, P.

    2016-12-01

    Spectral interferometric techniques utilizing the interference of polarization modes in a highly birefringent (HB) elliptical-core fiber to measure temperature are analyzed experimentally. First, an experimental setup comprising a white-light source, a polarizer, a sensing birefringent fiber, an analyzer and a spectrometer is considered. Temperature sensing by this method is based on the wavelength interrogation. Second, the above setup is extended by a birefringent quartz crystal to increase the sensitivity of the temperature sensing. Third, the above setup is extended by an analyzer, and the combination of a polarizer, a birefringent quartz crystal and an analyzer represents another interferometer, which is used to increase the sensitivity of the temperature sensing. In this case the Vernier effect is present and the resultant spectrum is with an envelope, which is utilized in temperature sensing. We reached a sensitivity of 0.56 nm/K in the third setup, compared to -0.12 nm/K and -0.19 nm/K in the first and the second setup, respectively.

  10. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Model evaluation is often performed at few locations due to the lack of spatially distributed data. Since the quantification of model sensitivities and uncertainties can be performed independently from ground truth measurements, these analyses are suitable to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainties of a physically based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography. The setting consists of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by porosity and hydraulic properties. The analyses are performed for a combination of all factors, that allows for quantification of the variability of model sensitivities and uncertainties within a whole modeling domain. We found that model sensitivities and uncertainties vary strongly depending on different input factors such as topography or different soil types. The analysis shows that model evaluation performed at single locations may not be representative for the whole modeling domain. For example, the sensitivity of modeled mean annual ground temperature to ground albedo ranges between 0.5 and 4 °C depending on elevation, aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter duration of the snow cover. The sensitivity in the hydraulic properties changes considerably for different ground types: rock or clay, for instance, are not sensitive to uncertainties in the hydraulic properties, while for gravel or peat, accurate estimates of the hydraulic properties significantly improve modeled ground temperatures. The discretization of ground, snow and time have an impact on modeled mean annual ground temperature (MAGT that cannot be neglected (more than 1 °C for several

  11. [Hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Heller, G.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On the basis of the assumption that a significant proportion of hospitalisations for so-called ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are potentially avoidable by ambulatory care measures, hospitalisation rates for ACSCs are used internationally as population based indicators for

  12. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  13. Glucose- and temperature-sensitive nanoparticles for insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Zi; Williams, Gareth R; Li, He-Yu; Wang, Dongxiu; Wu, Huanling; Li, Shu-De; Zhu, Li-Min

    2017-01-01

    Glucose- and temperature-sensitive polymers of a phenylboronic acid derivative and diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (poly(3-acrylamidophenyl boronic acid-b-diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate); p(AAPBA-b-DEGMA)) were prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Successful polymerization was evidenced by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy, and the polymers were further explored in terms of their glass transition temperatures and by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The materials were found to be temperature sensitive, with lower critical solution temperatures in the region of 12°C-47°C depending on the monomer ratio used for reaction. The polymers could be self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs), and the zeta potential and size of these particles were determined as a function of temperature and glucose concentration. Subsequently, the optimum NP formulation was loaded with insulin, and the drug release was studied. We found that insulin was easily encapsulated into the p(AAPBA-b-DEGMA) NPs, with a loading capacity of ~15% and encapsulation efficiency of ~70%. Insulin release could be regulated by changes in temperature and glucose concentration. Furthermore, the NPs were non-toxic both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the efficacy of the formulations at managing blood glucose levels in a murine hyperglycemic diabetes model was studied. The insulin-loaded NPs could reduce blood glucose levels over an extended period of 48 h. Since they are both temperature and glucose sensitive and offer a sustained-release profile, these systems may comprise potent new formulations for insulin delivery.

  14. Dual fluorescence sensor for trace oxygen and temperature with unmatched range and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleizão, Carlos; Nagl, Stefan; Schäferling, Michael; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-08-15

    An optical dual sensor for oxygen and temperature is presented that is highly oxygen sensitive and covers a broad temperature range. Dual sensing is based on luminescence lifetime measurements. The novel sensor contains two luminescent compounds incorporated into polymer films. The temperature-sensitive dye (ruthenium tris-1,10-phenanthroline) has a highly temperature-dependent luminescence and is incorporated in poly(acrylonitrile) to avoid cross-sensitivity to oxygen. Fullerene C70 was used as the oxygen-sensitive probe owing to its strong thermally activated delayed fluorescence at elevated temperatures that is extremely oxygen sensitive. The cross-sensitivity of C70 to temperature is accounted for by means of the temperature sensor. C70 is incorporated into a highly oxygen-permeable polymer, either ethyl cellulose or organosilica. The two luminescent probes have different emission spectra and decay times, and their emissions can be discriminated using both parameters. Spatially resolved sensing is achieved by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. The response times of the sensor to oxygen are short. The dual sensor exhibits a temperature operation range between at least 0 and 120 degrees C, and detection limits for oxygen in the ppbv range, operating for oxygen concentrations up to at least 50 ppmv. These ranges outperform all dual oxygen and temperature sensors reported so far. The dual sensor presented in this study is especially appropriate for measurements under extreme conditions such as high temperatures and ultralow oxygen levels. This dual sensor is a key step forward in a number of scientifically or commercially important applications including food packaging, for monitoring of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, in space technology, and safety and security applications in terms of detection of oxygen leaks.

  15. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  16. Mechanisms of temperature sensitivity of attenuated Urabe mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel, Stephanie C Burke; Rubin, Steven; Wright, Kathryn E

    2017-01-02

    Temperature sensitivity is a phenotype often associated with attenuation of viruses. Previously, we purified several mumps variants from an incompletely attenuated Urabe strain live attenuated vaccine. Here we characterize one isolate that is sensitive to growth at high temperature. This virus was attenuated in a small animal model of mumps virulence, and we identified unique coding substitutions in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), the viral polymerase (L) gene, and a non-coding substitution close to the anti-genome promoter sequences. At the non-permissive temperature, transcription of viral mRNAs and production of the replication intermediate were reduced compared to events at the permissive temperature and to a non-ts virulent Urabe virus. As well, synthesis of viral proteins was also reduced at the higher temperature. While the actual sequence substitutions in the ts virus were unique, the pattern of substitutions in HN, L and genome end sequences is similar to another attenuated Urabe virus previously described by us. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sensitivity of LUCC on the Surface Temperature of Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W.; Deng, X.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has an important effect on the ecological security in China, even in Asia, which makes the region become the hot spot in recently research. Under the joint influence of global change and human activities, ecosystem destabilizing and the increasing pressure on resources and environment emerge on the Tibetan Plateau, but the potential spatial sensitivity of land use and land cover changes(LUCC) on surface temperature has not been quantitatively analyzed. This study analyzed the mainly types of LUCC, urbanization, grassland degradation, deforestation on Tibetan Plateau along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The LUCC in recent decades was first quantitatively analyzed in this study to give the basic fact with a significant increase in temperatures, reduced precipitation and increased evaporation. This study focused on the future spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the temperature and precipitation. Finally, the influencing factors with LUCC on Tibetan Plateau were simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the sensitivity of different land use types was spatially analyzed with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). The results indicate that the large-area alpine grassland plays a more important role in alleviating global warming than other vegetation types do. The changes of the landscape structure resulting from the urban expansion play a significant role in intensifying regional temperature increase. In addition, the effects of LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  18. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  19. File list: His.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: His.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: His.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Histone Adult Temperature sensitiv...barchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/His.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  3. [Hospital Costs of Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, D

    2016-03-01

    Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) are defined as conditions that lead to a hospital admission of which the onset could have been prevented through a more easily accessible ambulatory sector or one that provides better quality care. They are used by health-care systems as a quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. The definition for ACSC varies internationally. Sets of conditions have been defined and evaluated already in various countries, e. g., USA, England, New Zealand and Canada, but not yet for Germany. Therefore this study aims to evaluate the hospital costs of ACSC in Germany using the National Health Service's set of ACSC. In order to calculate these costs a model has been set up for the time period between 2003 and 2010. It is based on G-DRG browsers issued by the German Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System as required by German law. Within these browsers all relevant DRG-ICD combinations have been extracted. The number of cases per combination was then multiplied by their corresponding cost weights and the average effective base rates. The results were then aggregated into their corresponding ICD groups and then into their respective conditions which lead to the costs per condition and the total costs. The total number of cases and total costs were then compared to another second source. These calculations resulted in 11.7 million cases, of which 10.7% were defined as ambulatory care-sensitive. Within the analysed time period the number of ambulatory care-sensitive cases increased by 6% in total and had a 0.9% CAGR. The corresponding costs amounted to a total of EUR 37.6B and to EUR 3.3B for ACSC. 60% of the costs were caused by three of the 19 ACSC. These results validate that it is worthwhile to further investigate this quality indicator for the ambulatory sector. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Temperature-Sensitive Coating Sensor Based on Hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.

    2011-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive coating, based on hematite (iron III oxide), has been developed to measure surface temperature using spectral techniques. The hematite powder is added to a binder that allows the mixture to be painted on the surface of a test specimen. The coating dynamically changes its relative spectral makeup or color with changes in temperature. The color changes from a reddish-brown appearance at room temperature (25 C) to a black-gray appearance at temperatures around 600 C. The color change is reversible and repeatable with temperature cycling from low to high and back to low temperatures. Detection of the spectral changes can be recorded by different sensors, including spectrometers, photodiodes, and cameras. Using a-priori information obtained through calibration experiments in known thermal environments, the color change can then be calibrated to yield accurate quantitative temperature information. Temperature information can be obtained at a point, or over an entire surface, depending on the type of equipment used for data acquisition. Because this innovation uses spectrophotometry principles of operation, rather than the current methods, which use photoluminescence principles, white light can be used for illumination rather than high-intensity short wavelength excitation. The generation of high-intensity white (or potentially filtered long wavelength light) is much easier, and is used more prevalently for photography and video technologies. In outdoor tests, the Sun can be used for short durations as an illumination source as long as the amplitude remains relatively constant. The reflected light is also much higher in intensity than the emitted light from the inefficient current methods. Having a much brighter surface allows a wider array of detection schemes and devices. Because color change is the principle of operation, the development of high-quality, lower-cost digital cameras can be used for detection, as opposed to the high-cost imagers

  5. Spectral and Concentration Sensitivity of Multijunction Solar Cells at High Temperature: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.; Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John

    2017-06-14

    We model the performance of two-junction solar cells at very high temperatures of ~400 degrees C and beyond for applications such as hybrid PV/solar-thermal power production, and identify areas in which the design and performance characteristics behave significantly differently than at more conventional near-room-temperature operating conditions. We show that high-temperature operation reduces the sensitivity of the cell efficiency to spectral content, but increases the sensitivity to concentration, both of which have implications for energy yield in terrestrial PV applications. For other high-temperature applications such as near-sun space missions, our findings indicate that concentration may be a useful tool to enhance cell efficiency.

  6. Bhutan Rivers Runoff Sensitivity to Changes in Precipitation and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonessa, M. Y.; Richey, J. E.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    The Kingdom of Bhutan harnesses its water resources mostly for hydropower generation. Hydroelectricity represents 96% of the country's electricity generating capacity and 99.9% of its electricity generation. About 87% of the electricity generated within Bhutan is exported to India. Assessment of this crucial resource is vital for its proper usage and management especially in the light of potential land use and climate changes. A land surface hydrologic model, Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), was used to assess the hydrology of the country. The model was forced using data obtained from three sources: NCEP/NCAR, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and ERA Interim. The NCEP/NCAR forcing resulted in better flow simulation for most of the stations than WRF and ERA forcings. Thus, NCEP/NCAR forcing data was used to evaluate the runoff sensitivity to temperature and precipitation changes. In both steps, VIC was run at 1/24° latitude-longitude resolution. The modeled mean annual runoff elasticity which measures fractional change in annual runoff divided by fractional change in annual precipitation ranges from 1.08 to 2.16. The elasticity value is lower for higher reference precipitations and vice versa. The runoff sensitivity to temperature change computed as percentage change in annual runoff per 1°C change in temperature are all declines and ranges from -1.38 to -1.54. Spatially, both higher elasticity and sensitivity (big negatives) are towards the northern part the country where elevation is more than 5000 m above sea level.

  7. File list: DNS.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: DNS.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. Sensitivity of grapevine phenology to water availability, temperature and CO2 concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Martínez-Lüscher

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, mean global temperatures have increased in parallel with a sharp rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 levels, with apparent implications for precipitation patterns. The aim of the present work is to assess the sensitivity of different phenological stages of grapevine to temperature and to study the influence of other factors related to climate change (water availability and CO2 concentration on this relationship. Grapevine phenological records from 9 plantings between 42.75°N and 46.03°N consisting of dates for budburst, flowering and fruit maturity were used. In addition, we used phenological data collected from two years of experiments with grapevine fruit-bearing cuttings with two grapevine varieties under two levels of water availability, two temperature regimes and two levels of CO2. Dormancy breaking and flowering were strongly dependent on spring temperature, while neither variation in temperature during the chilling period nor precipitation significantly affected budburst date. The time needed to reach fruit maturity diminished with increasing temperature and decreasing precipitation. Experiments under semi-controlled conditions revealed great sensitivity of berry development to both temperature and CO2. Water availability had significant interactions with both temperature and CO2; however, in general, water deficit delayed maturity when combined with other factors. Sensitivities to temperature and CO2 varied widely, but higher sensitivities appeared in the coolest year, particularly for the late ripening variety, ‘White Tempranillo’. The knowledge gained in whole plant physiology and multi stress approaches is crucial to predict the effects of climate change and to design mitigation and adaptation strategies allowing viticulture to cope with climate change.

  11. Possible Economies in Air-Conditioning by Accepting Temperature Swings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, A. G.; Petherbridge, P.

    Public building air conditioning systems, which use constant and varying heat and cooling loads, are compared and investigated. Experiments indicated that constant temperature controls based on outside air temperature alone were inefficient. Ventilating a building with outside air and the methods of doing so are cited as being the most economical…

  12. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage’s sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  13. A novel high-sensitivity, low-power, liquid crystal temperature sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorri, José Francisco; Urruchi, Virginia; Bennis, Noureddine; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel

    2014-04-09

    A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC) sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from -6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from -40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage's sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  14. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algorri, José Francisco; Urruchi, Virginia; Bennis, Noureddine; Sánchez-Pena, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC) sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage's sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption. PMID:24721771

  15. Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint at 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Recently both Pressure- and Temperature-Sensitive Paint experiments were conducted at cryogenic conditions in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. This represented a re-introduction of the techniques to the facility after more than a decade, and provided a means to upgrade the measurements using newer technology as well as demonstrate that the techniques were still viable in the facility. Temperature-Sensitive Paint was employed on a laminar airfoil for transition detection and Pressure-Sensitive Paint was employed on a supercritical airfoil. This report will detail the techniques and their unique challenges that need to be overcome in cryogenic environments. In addition, several optimization strategies will also be discussed.

  16. Effects of temperature, genetic variation and species competition on the sensitivity of algae populations to the antibiotic enrofloxacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Zhao, Wenkai; Gillissen, Frits; Lürling, Miquel; Brink, van den Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Primary producers are amongst the most sensitive organisms to antibiotic pollution in aquatic ecosystems. To date, there is little information on how different environmental conditions may affect their sensitivity to antibiotics. In this study we assessed how temperature, genetic variation and

  17. Foliar temperature acclimation reduces simulated carbon sensitivity to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G.; Malyshev, Sergey L.; Shevliakova, Elena; Kattge, Jens; Dukes, Jeffrey S.

    2016-04-01

    Plant photosynthesis and respiration are the largest carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, and their parameterizations represent large sources of uncertainty in projections of land carbon uptake in Earth system models (ESMs). The incorporation of temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and foliar respiration, commonly observed processes, into ESMs has been proposed as a way to reduce this uncertainty. Here we show that, across 15 flux tower sites spanning multiple biomes at various locations worldwide (10° S-67° N), acclimation parameterizations improve a model's ability to reproduce observed net ecosystem exchange of CO2. This improvement is most notable in tropical biomes, where photosynthetic acclimation increased model performance by 36%. The consequences of acclimation for simulated terrestrial carbon uptake depend on the process, region and time period evaluated. Globally, including acclimation has a net effect of increasing carbon assimilation and storage, an effect that diminishes with time, but persists well into the future. Our results suggest that land models omitting foliar temperature acclimation are likely to overestimate the temperature sensitivity of terrestrial carbon exchange, thus biasing projections of future carbon storage and estimates of policy indicators such as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions.

  18. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  19. Temperature sensitivity of surface tension-driven flows: Application to time-temperature integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John; Hunter, Lawrence; Boyle, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The effects of time-dependent temperature fluctuations on surface-tension driven fluid flow inside a capillary are modeled using classical hydrodynamics. To begin, we use Newton's second law to derive a non-dimensional equation of motion that describes capillary flow as a function of system geometry, fluid properties, and fluid temperature. We use this model to examine how temperature excursions affect the instantaneous and long-term position and velocity of the fluid front inside the capillary. Next, we examine the combined effects of orientation change and temperature change on fluid movement through the capillary. Using this data, we show how to design a non-powered time-temperature integration device for recording the cumulative temperature exposure history of an asset or local environment. By selecting an appropriate fluid and capillary geometry, we show how such devices can be designed to exhibit arbitrary temperature sensitivities, operate over arbitrary monitoring periods (months to decades), and operate in a manner that does not depend on orientation.

  20. File list: Unc.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Unc.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  13. Soil carbon storage and temperature sensitivity associated with shrub and graminoid vegetation in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Cook, J. I.; Petrenko, C. L.; Friedland, A. J.; Virginia, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic tundra is experiencing rapid change, including warming temperatures, shrub expansion and shifts in precipitation patterns. Environmental conditions and vegetation cover are strong controls on soil carbon storage, respiration, and temperature sensitivity of decomposition. Temperature control of soil organic matter processing is particularly important in permafrost soils, which contain more than two times the carbon in the atmosphere and exist at the freeze-thaw threshold. To investigate sensitivity of decomposition to abiotic controls in a heterogeneous landscape, we conducted a laboratory incubation experiment on mineral soils collected in shrub and graminoid vegetation types near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. We crossed temperature and moisture treatments and measured soil respiration rates over a seven-week incubation period. We measured soil carbon and nitrogen concentrations through elemental analysis and conducted sequential chemical extractions to measure carbon fractions and quantify soil carbon quality. Results show soils overlain by graminoids have higher carbon concentrations at shallow depth and respiration rates than soils overlain by shrub (mean ± 1 s.e. organic carbon concentration, 0-10 cm: graminoid = 68.7 ± 8.1 mg C * g soil-1, shrub = 48.8 ± 2.9 mg C * g soil-1). Temperature sensitivity was higher in graminoid soils, with no effect from soil moisture level. Carbon fractions and quality varied by vegetation type and profile depth. This study informs our understanding of the relationship between carbon quality and the temperature and moisture sensitivity of decomposition in western Greenland and demonstrates the importance of landscape heterogeneity in understanding soil carbon response to environmental drivers.

  14. A vegetation sensitivity approximation for gross primary production in water limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, Jonas; Nycander, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The most severe impact of climate change on vegetation growth and agriculture is likely to occur under water-limited conditions. Under such conditions the plants optimize the inward flux of CO2 and the outward flux of water vapor (the transpiration) by regulating the size of the stomata openings. Higher temperature increases water loss through transpiration, forcing the plants to diminish the stomata openings, which decreases photosynthesis. This is counteracted by higher CO2 concentration, which allows plants to maintain the inward flux of CO2 through the smaller openings. These two counteracting effects, combined with the change in precipitation, determine the net change of biological productivity in a changed climate. Here, a vegetation sensitivity approximation (VSA) is introduced, in order to understand and estimate the combined effect of changed temperature, CO2-concentration and precipitation on gross primary production (GPP) to first order. According to the VSA, we have: ( ) ?CO2atm ν GP P = ?0 P Here ?CO2atm is the atmospheric CO2 concentration, ?0 is the baseline for atmospheric CO2 concentration, P is precipitation and ν is defined by: -s- ν = 1 - 11°C where s is the climate sensitivity i.e. the increase in temperature when atmospheric CO2 is doubled. The VSA is based on the physical laws of gas flux through the stomata openings, and is only valid under water-limited conditions. It assumes that the temperature depends logarithmically on the CO2 concentration with a given climate sensitivity. Transpiration is assumed to be a constant fraction of precipitation, which is reasonable under water-limited conditions. The VSA is compared to simulations with the dynamic vegetation model LPJ. The agreement is reasonable, and the deviations can be understood by comparison with Köppen's definition of arid climate: in an arid climate growth increases more according to LPJ than according to the VSA, and in non-arid conditions the reverse is true. Both the VSA and

  15. Sensitive biomolecule detection in lateral flow assay with a portable temperature-humidity control device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have currently attracted broad interest for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, but their application has been restricted by poor quantification and limited sensitivity. While the former has been currently solved to some extent by the development of handheld or smartphone-based readers, the latter has not been addressed fully, particularly the potential influences of environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative humidity (RH)), which have not yet received serious attention. The present study reports the use of a portable temperature-humidity control device to provide an optimum environmental requirement for sensitivity improvement in LFAs, followed by quantification by using a smartphone. We found that a RH beyond 60% with temperatures of 55-60°C and 37-40°C produced optimum nucleic acid hybridization and antigen-antibody interaction in LFAs, respectively representing a 10-fold and 3-fold signal enhancement over ambient conditions (25°C, 60% RH). We envision that in the future the portable device could be coupled with a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for sensitive detection of various target analytes in POC settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cool Roofs in Guangzhou, China: Outdoor Air Temperature Reductions during Heat Waves and Typical Summer Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meichun; Rosado, Pablo; Lin, Zhaohui; Levinson, Ronnen; Millstein, Dev

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we simulate temperature reductions during heat-wave events and during typical summer conditions from the installation of highly reflective "cool" roofs in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou. We simulate temperature reductions during six of the strongest historical heat-wave events over the past decade, finding average urban midday temperature reductions of 1.2 °C. In comparison, we simulate 25 typical summer weeks between 2004 and 2008, finding average urban midday temperature reductions of 0.8 °C, indicating that air temperature sensitivity to urban albedo in Guangzhou varies with meteorological conditions. We find that roughly three-fourths of the variance in air temperature reductions across all episodes can be accounted for by a linear regression, including only three basic properties related to the meteorological conditions: mean daytime temperature, humidity, and ventilation to the greater Guangzhou urban area. While these results highlight the potential for cool roofs to mitigate peak temperatures during heat waves, the temperature reductions reported here are based on the upper bound case, which increases albedos of all roofs (but does not modify road albedo or wall albedo).

  17. Cost sharing and hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Alejandro; García-Prado, Ariadna

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, Chile's private health sector has experienced a dramatic increase in hospitalization rates, growing at four times the rate of ambulatory visits. Such evolution has raised concern among policy-makers. We studied the effect of ambulatory and hospital co-insurance rates on hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) among individuals with private insurance in Chile. We used a large administrative dataset of private insurance claims for the period 2007-8 and a final sample of 2,792,662 individuals to estimate a structural model of two equations. The first equation was for ambulatory visits and the second for future hospitalizations for ACSC. We estimated the system by Two Stage Least Squares (2SLS) corrected by heteroskedasticity via Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimation. Results show that increased ambulatory visits reduced the probability of future hospitalizations, and increased ambulatory co-insurance decreased ambulatory visits for the adult population (19-65 years-old). Both findings indicate the need to reduce ambulatory co-insurance as a way to reduce hospitalizations for ACSC. Results also showed that increasing hospital co-insurance does have a statistically significant reduction on hospitalizations for the adult group, while it does not seem to have a significant effect on hospitalizations for the children (1-18 years-old) group. This paper's contribution is twofold: first, it shows how the level of co-insurance can be a determinant in avoiding unnecessary hospitalizations for certain conditions; second, it highlights the relevance for policy-making of using data on ACSC to improve the efficiency of health systems by promoting ambulatory care as well as population health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Satellite bulk tropospheric temperatures as a metric for climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, John R.; McNider, Richard T.

    2017-11-01

    We identify and remove the main natural perturbations (e.g. volcanic activity, ENSOs) from the global mean lower tropospheric temperatures ( T LT ) over January 1979 - June 2017 to estimate the underlying, potentially human-forced trend. The unaltered value is +0.155 K dec-1 while the adjusted trend is +0.096 K dec-1, related primarily to the removal of volcanic cooling in the early part of the record. This is essentially the same value we determined in 1994 (+0.09 K dec-1, Christy and McNider, 1994) using only 15 years of data. If the warming rate of +0.096 K dec-1 represents the net T LT response to increasing greenhouse radiative forcings, this implies that the T LT tropospheric transient climate response (Δ T LT at the time CO2 doubles) is +1.10 ± 0.26 K which is about half of the average of the IPCC AR5 climate models of 2.31 ± 0.20 K. Assuming that the net remaining unknown internal and external natural forcing over this period is near zero, the mismatch since 1979 between observations and CMIP-5 model values suggests that excessive sensitivity to enhanced radiative forcing in the models can be appreciable. The tropical region is mainly responsible for this discrepancy suggesting processes that are the likely sources of the extra sensitivity are (a) the parameterized hydrology of the deep atmosphere, (b) the parameterized heat-partitioning at the oceanatmosphere interface and/or (c) unknown natural variations.

  19. Ambulatory care sensitive conditions: diagnostic reliability in southern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Antoniazzi Abaid

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC are illnesses that could be prevented with adjusted ambulatorial care. ACSC have been used as indicator in effectiveness of the primary healthcare attention, through the evaluation of hospital admissions. However, we do not have studies to certify the reliability of diagnosis of ACSC in our country. Objective: To determine if the classification of ACSC from the main diagnostic field of the authorization of hospital internment (AHI is reliable. Methods: Transversal study carried through February of 2010 to January of 2011, in the city of Santa Cruz of Sul (RS. A random sample of 389 medical records was selected and evaluated by two medical appraisers. The main diagnosis in the AHI was compared with the classification in ACSC or not ACSC given for the appraisers after the study of each medical record. Kappa ratio agreement was used to calculate the reliability of the ACSC diagnostic. Results: The ratio of agreement between diagnosis from the AIH and CSAP assessment contained in the records was 92%, with a kappa coefficient of 0,784. Conclusions: The diagnostic of ACSC found in main diagnostic field of AHI showed agreement ratios over expected by chance, with kappa value equal to 0.784 and the correlation rated between substantial and almost perfect.

  20. Engine Oil Condition Monitoring Using High Temperature Integrated Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Bird

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work contains two parts. In the first part, high temperature integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUTs made of thick piezoelectric composite films, were coated directly onto lubricant oil supply and sump lines of a modified CF700 turbojet engine. These piezoelectric films were fabricated using a sol-gel spray technology. By operating these IUTs in transmission mode, the amplitude and velocity of transmitted ultrasonic waves across the flow channel of the lubricant oil in supply and sump lines were measured during engine operation. Results have shown that the amplitude of the ultrasonic waves is sensitive to the presence of air bubbles in the oil and that the ultrasound velocity is linearly dependent on oil temperature. In the second part of the work, the sensitivity of ultrasound to engine lubricant oil degradation was investigated by using an ultrasonically equipped and thermally-controlled laboratory testing cell and lubricant oils of different grades. The results have shown that at a given temperature, ultrasound velocity decreases with a decrease in oil viscosity. Based on the results obtained in both parts of the study, ultrasound velocity measurement is proposed for monitoring oil degradation and transient oil temperature variation, whereas ultrasound amplitude measurement is proposed for monitoring air bubble content.

  1. Emergent constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity from global temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peter M.; Huntingford, Chris; Williamson, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) remains one of the most important unknowns in climate change science. ECS is defined as the global mean warming that would occur if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were instantly doubled and the climate were then brought to equilibrium with that new level of CO2. Despite its rather idealized definition, ECS has continuing relevance for international climate change agreements, which are often framed in terms of stabilization of global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate. However, the ‘likely’ range of ECS as stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has remained at 1.5–4.5 degrees Celsius for more than 25 years. The possibility of a value of ECS towards the upper end of this range reduces the feasibility of avoiding 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, as required by the Paris Agreement. Here we present a new emergent constraint on ECS that yields a central estimate of 2.8 degrees Celsius with 66 per cent confidence limits (equivalent to the IPCC ‘likely’ range) of 2.2–3.4 degrees Celsius. Our approach is to focus on the variability of temperature about long-term historical warming, rather than on the warming trend itself. We use an ensemble of climate models to define an emergent relationship between ECS and a theoretically informed metric of global temperature variability. This metric of variability can also be calculated from observational records of global warming, which enables tighter constraints to be placed on ECS, reducing the probability of ECS being less than 1.5 degrees Celsius to less than 3 per cent, and the probability of ECS exceeding 4.5 degrees Celsius to less than 1 per cent.

  2. Hypomorphic Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of NSDHL Cause CK Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W.; Severson, Tesa M.; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W.; Kratz, Lisa E.; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D.; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E.; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N.; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Merkens, Louise S.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Waters, Paula J.; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R.; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I.; Herman, Gail E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Steiner, Robert D.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Marra, Marco A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. PMID:21129721

  3. The validity of temperature-sensitive ingestible capsules for measuring core body temperature in laboratory protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwent, David; Zhou, Xuan; van den Heuvel, Cameron; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Greg D

    2011-10-01

    The human core body temperature (CBT) rhythm is tightly coupled to an endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus. The standard method for assessing the status of this pacemaker is by continuous sampling of CBT using rectal thermometry. This research sought to validate the use of ingestible, temperature-sensitive capsules to measure CBT as an alternative to rectal thermometry. Participants were 11 young adult males who had volunteered to complete a laboratory protocol that extended across 12 consecutive days. A total of 87 functional capsules were ingested and eliminated by participants during the laboratory internment. Core body temperature samples were collected in 1-min epochs and compared to paired samples collected concurrently via rectal thermistors. Agreement between samples that were collected using ingestible sensors and rectal thermistors was assessed using the gold-standard limits of agreement method. Across all valid paired samples collected during the study (n = 120,126), the mean difference was 0.06°C, whereas the 95% CI (confidence interval) for differences was less than ±0.35°C. Despite the overall acceptable limits of agreement, systematic measurement bias was noted across the initial 5 h of sensor-transit periods and attributed to temperature gradations across the alimentary canal.

  4. Temperature effect of natural organic extraction upon light absorbance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaimi, Suriati; Mohamed Siddick, Siti Zubaidah; Retnasamy, Vithyacharan; Abdul Wahid, Mohamad Halim; Ahmad Hambali, Nor Azura Malini; Mohamad Shahimin, Mukhzeer

    2017-02-01

    Natural organic dyes contain pigments which when safely extracted from plants have the potential to be used as a sensitizer while promising a low-cost fabrication, environmental friendly dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Harum Manis mango, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella showed different absorption peaks when the extraction process were carried out at different temperatures. Hence, these were used as the basis to determine the conversion efficiency against the dyes extracting temperature. In this study, all dyes extracted in water have shown the best performance at a temperature of 100°C except for Harum Manis mango, while in ethanol, the optimum temperature was obtained between the room temperature, 25°C and 50°C. The absorption spectrum in water showed a broader absorption wavelength vis-à-vis ethanol solvent that resulted in the absorption peak for Ardisia, Harum Manis mango and Rosella between 450 nm and 550 nm. The highest conversion efficiency is observed to be achieved by Oxalis Triangularis extracted in water solution at 100°C, which was approximately 0.96% which corresponds to the broader absorbance trends in the literature. Thus, the optimum condition for extracting temperature for dyes in water and ethanol is room temperature and boiling points of water. Hence, Ardisia, Bawang Sabrang, Harum Manis mango, Oxalis Triangularis and Rosella can be an as alternative source for photosensitizer, and the impacts of temperature upon the light absorbance can be further investigated to produce the ultimate natural dye based solar cells.

  5. Apomorphine conditioning and sensitization: the paired/unpaired treatment order as a new major determinant of drug conditioned and sensitization effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Liana Wermelinger; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2010-09-01

    Repeated treatments with psychostimulant drugs generate behavioral sensitization. In the present study we employed a paired/unpaired protocol to assess the effects of repeated apomorphine (2.0 mg/kg) treatments upon locomotion behavior. In the first experiment we assessed the effects of conditioning upon apomorphine sensitization. Neither the extinction of the conditioned response nor a counter-conditioning procedure in which we paired an inhibitory treatment (apomorphine 0.05 mg/kg) with the previously established conditioned stimulus modified the sensitization response. In the second experiment, we administered the paired/unpaired protocol in two phases. In the second phase, we reversed the paired/unpaired protocol. Following the first phase, the paired group alone exhibited conditioned locomotion in the vehicle test and a sensitization response. In the second phase, the initial unpaired group which received 5 paired apomorphine trials during the reversal phase did not develop a conditioned response but developed a potentiated sensitization response. This disassociation of the conditioned response from the sensitization response is attributed to an apomorphine anti-habituation effect that can generate a false positive Pavlovian conditioned response effect. The potentiated sensitization response induced by the treatment reversal protocol points to an important role for the sequential experience of the paired/unpaired protocol in behavioral sensitization. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Soil warming increases metabolic quotients of soil microorganisms without changes in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Soong, Jenniffer L.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Dauwe, Steven; Fransen, Erik; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures can accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and release large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, potentially inducing climate change feedbacks. Alterations to the temperature sensitivity and metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms in response to soil warming can play a key role in these soil carbon (C) losses. Here, we present results of an incubation experiment using soils from a geothermal gradient in Iceland that have been subjected to different intensities of soil warming (+0, +1, +3, +5, +10 and +20 °C above ambient) over seven years. We hypothesized that 7 years of soil warming would led to a depletion of labile organic substrates, with a subsequent decrease of the "apparent" temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Associated to this C limitation and more sub-optimal conditions for microbial growth, we also hypothesized increased microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), which is associated with increases in the relative amount of C invested into catabolic pathways along the warming gradient. Soil respiration and basal respiration rates decreased with soil warming intensity, in parallel with a decline in soil C availability. Contrasting to our first hypothesis, we did not detect changes in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration with soil warming or on the availability of nutrients and of labile C substrates at the time of incubation. However, in agreement to our second hypothesis, microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass) increased at warmer temperatures, while the C retained in biomass decreased as substrate became limiting. Long-term (7 years) temperature increases thus triggered a change in the metabolic functioning of the soil microbial communities towards increasing energy costs for maintenance or resource acquisition, thereby lowering the capacity of C retention and stabilization of warmed soils. These results highlight the need

  7. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  8. Sensitivity of River Runoff in Bhutan to Changes in Precipitation and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonessa, M. Y.; Nijssen, B.; Dorji, C.; Wangmo, D.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Richey, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades there has been increasing concern about the potential effects of climate change on runoff and water resources all over the world under different conditions. Various studies have indicated that climate change will have an impact on runoff and stream flow. Bhutan is one of the countries in the Hindu Kush-Himalayan region which shows more warming than the global average. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, a macroscale hydrological model, was used to assess the hydrology of the country and the potential impacts of climate change on water availability. Precipitation and temperature were perturbed to study the runoff sensitivity to temperature and precipitation changes. The VIC model was run at 1/24° latitude-longitude resolution. The modeled mean annual runoff elasticity which measures fractional change in annual runoff divided by fractional change in annual precipitation ranges from 1.08 to 2.16. The elasticity value is lower for higher reference precipitations and vice versa. The runoff sensitivity to temperature represents the percentage change in annual runoff per 1°C change in temperature. Runoff sensitivities are negative and range from -1.36%/°C to -1.70%/°C. Spatially, both greater elasticity and sensitivity occur towards the northern part of the country where elevation is more than 5000 m above sea level. Based on the coupled model inter-comparison project phase five (CMIP5) average model results, both precipitation and temperature are predicted to increase in Bhutan in the 21st century. Annually, P is expected to increase by 0.45 to 8.7% under RCP4.5 emission scenario and 1.95 to 14.26% under RCP8.5 emission. The mean annual temperature increment ranges from +1.1 to +2.6°C under RCP4.5 and +1.2 to +4.5°C under RCP8.5 emission scenario. These changes in precipitation and temperature are expected to result in runoff changes ranging from -1.0 to +14.3% and +2.2 to +23.1% increments under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios

  9. Shock Sensitivity of LX-04 Containing Delta Phase HMX at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Hsu, P C; Maienschein, J L

    2003-07-11

    LX-04 is a widely used HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, which contains 85 weight % HMX and 15 weight % Viton binder. The sensitivity of LX-04 to a single stimulus such as heat, impact, and shock has been previously studied. However, hazard scenarios can involve multiple stimuli, such as heating to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions followed by fragment impact, producing a shock in the hot explosive. The sensitivity of HMX at elevated temperatures is further complicated by the beta to delta solid-state phase transition, which occurs at approximately 165 C. This paper presents the results of shock initiation experiments conducted with LX-04 preheated to 190 C, as well as density measurements and small scale safety test results of the {delta} phase HMX at room temperature. This work shows that LX-04 at 190 C is more shock sensitive than LX-04 at 150 C or 170 C due to the volume increase during the {beta} to {delta} solid phase transition, which creates more hot spots, and the faster growth of reaction during shock compression.

  10. File list: ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811238 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...699108 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 All antigens Adult Temperature sen...811237 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/ALL.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  14. Influence of temperature on the formation and encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using a temperature-sensitive template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Peter Bengzon Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes the synthesis of temperature-sensitive and amine-rich microgel particle as a dual reductant and template to generate smart gold/polymer nanocomposite particle. TEM images illustrate the influence of reaction temperature on the formation and in-site encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using the temperature-sensitive microgel template. Thermal stability of the resultant gold/polymer composite particles was also examined.

  15. Sensitivity of cold acclimation to elevated autumn temperature in field-grown Pinus strobus seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Yao-Yun Chang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change will increase autumn air temperature, while photoperiod decrease will remain unaffected. We assessed the effect of increased autumn air temperature on timing and development of cold acclimation and freezing resistance in Eastern white pine (EWP, Pinus strobus under field conditions. For this purpose we simulated projected warmer temperatures for southern Ontario in a Temperature Free-Air-Controlled Enhancement (T-FACE experiment and exposed EWP seedlings to ambient (Control or elevated temperature (ET, +1.5°C/+3°C during day/night. Photosynthetic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photoprotective pigments, leaf non-structural carbohydrates (NSC, and cold hardiness were assessed over two consecutive autumns. Nighttime temperature below 10°C and photoperiod below 12h initiated downregulation of assimilation in both treatments. When temperature further decreased to 0°C and photoperiod became shorter than 10h, downregulation of the light reactions and upregulation of photoprotective mechanisms occurred in both treatments. While ET seedlings did not delay the timing of the downregulation of assimilation, stomatal conductance in ET seedlings was decreased by 20-30% between August and early October. In both treatments leaf NSC composition changed considerably during autumn but differences between Control and ET seedlings were not significant. Similarly, development of freezing resistance was induced by exposure to low temperature during autumn, but the timing was not delayed in ET seedlings compared to Control seedlings. Our results indicate that EWP is most sensitive to temperature changes during October and November when downregulation of photosynthesis , enhancement of photoprotection, synthesis of cold-associated NSCs and development of freezing resistance occur. However, we also conclude that the timing of the development of freezing resistance in EWP seedlings is not affected by moderate temperature increases used in our

  16. Interfacial crack behavior in the stationary temperature field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đoković Jelena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The brittle coatings, made of different materials, when subjected to elevated temperatures and in the heat exchange conditions, are susceptible to delamination. Those coatings, as well as thin films, can be used for various thermo insulating deposits, e.g. in turbines of thermal power plants., In layers made of different materials, due to the environmental temperature change, thermal stresses appear as a consequence of a difference in their thermal expansion coefficients. In this paper driving forces were analyzed causing delamination of one layer from the other, i.e. the interfacial fracture in the two-layered, bimaterial sample. This analysis was limited to considering the sample behavior when exposed to the stationary temperature field. The energy release rate G, which is the driving force for this interfacial fracture, is changing with temperature and that variation is increasing with increase of the temperature difference between the environment and the sample. Analysis of this relation can be used to predict the maximal temperature difference, which the two-layered sample can be subjected to, without appearance of delamination between layers.

  17. A two-fold increase of carbon cycle sensitivity to tropical temperature variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuhui; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Myneni, Ranga B; Cox, Peter; Heimann, Martin; Miller, John; Peng, Shushi; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hui; Chen, Anping

    2014-02-13

    Earth system models project that the tropical land carbon sink will decrease in size in response to an increase in warming and drought during this century, probably causing a positive climate feedback. But available data are too limited at present to test the predicted changes in the tropical carbon balance in response to climate change. Long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide data provide a global record that integrates the interannual variability of the global carbon balance. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that most of this variability originates in the terrestrial biosphere. In particular, the year-to-year variations in the atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate (CGR) are thought to be the result of fluctuations in the carbon fluxes of tropical land areas. Recently, the response of CGR to tropical climate interannual variability was used to put a constraint on the sensitivity of tropical land carbon to climate change. Here we use the long-term CGR record from Mauna Loa and the South Pole to show that the sensitivity of CGR to tropical temperature interannual variability has increased by a factor of 1.9 ± 0.3 in the past five decades. We find that this sensitivity was greater when tropical land regions experienced drier conditions. This suggests that the sensitivity of CGR to interannual temperature variations is regulated by moisture conditions, even though the direct correlation between CGR and tropical precipitation is weak. We also find that present terrestrial carbon cycle models do not capture the observed enhancement in CGR sensitivity in the past five decades. More realistic model predictions of future carbon cycle and climate feedbacks require a better understanding of the processes driving the response of tropical ecosystems to drought and warming.

  18. Eroding vs. Depositional Sites: Varying Sensitivity of CO2 Emissions to Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Du, Lanlan; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2017-04-01

    Erosion induced lateral transport of soil particles not only geographically redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) across landscapes, but also relocate them to different microclimate conditions, potentially experiencing distinctive biochemical processes. To fully understand the impacts of soil erosion to atmospheric CO2, it requires to identify individual contributions from different geographic positions. Apart from differentiated CO2 emission potentials on eroding and depositional sites, previous reports have also recognized that the extents of SOC mineralization during transport can shift erosion induced effects from net sink to net source. However, most of the research or modeling has been carried out under current climate conditions. With more variable temperature patterns in the future, it is essential to understand the varying sensitivity of CO2 emissions to temperature changes on eroding and depositional sites. To systematically investigate the potential effects of temperature changes to erosion-induced CO2 emissions, four erosion plots were set up on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Each of the four plots had an eroding slope (1 m * 5 m, inclined at 20) filled with dark loess soil, and a depositional site (water tank by 1 m * 1 m) at the lower end. Soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 emissions from surface at upper, middle and lower positions on each plot were continuously monitored from July 2014 to September 2015 under natural precipitation. Our results show that: 1) The depositional sites had up to 31% greater CO2 emission rates than the eroding slopes (1.38 vs. 1.05 µmol m-2 s-1 on average). This was probably because the mineralization of the enriched SOC at the depositional sites (6% greater than the original soil of 6.83 g kg-1 ) was enhanced by the more favorable soil moisture contents (0.25 m3 m-3 vs. 0.21 m3 m-3 at the eroding slopes). 2) The CO2 emissions from the depositional sites were much more sensitive to seasonal temperature changes

  19. Temperature Sensitive Nanocapsule of Complex Structural Form for Methane Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyetin MV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The processes of methane adsorption, storage and desorption by the nanocapsule are investigated with molecular-dynamic modeling method. The specific nanocapsule shape defines its functioning uniqueness: methane is adsorbed under 40 MPa and at normal temperature with further blocking of methane molecules the K@C601+ endohedral complex in the nanocapsule by external electric field, the storage is performed under normal external conditions, and methane desorption is performed at 350 K. The methane content in the nanocapsule during storage reaches 11.09 mass%. The nanocapsule consists of tree parts: storage chamber, junction and blocking chamber. The storage chamber comprises the nanotube (20,20. The blocking chamber is a short nanotube (20,20 with three holes. The junction consists of the nanotube (10,10 and nanotube (8,8; moreover, the nanotube (8,8 is connected with the storage chamber and nanotube (10,10 with the blocking chamber. The blocking chamber is opened and closed by the transfer of the K@C60 1+ endohedral complex under electrostatic field action.

  20. Temperature rise in plant reproductive organs under low gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Hiroaki

    Excess temperature rise in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmas could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds without adequately controlled environ-ments in closed plant growth facilities. There is a possibility such a situation could occur in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space because there will be little natural convective or thermal mixing. This study was conducted to determine the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by gravity levels of 0.01, 1.0 and 2.0 g for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights and to make an estimation of temperature increases in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities under mi-crogravity in space. Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and tomato were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 31.5C, a relative humidity of 11

  1. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  2. Variations in the temperature sensitivity of spring leaf phenology from 1978 to 2014 in Mudanjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Junhu; Xu, Yunjia; Wang, Huanjiong; Alatalo, Juha; Tao, Zexing; Ge, Quansheng

    2017-12-01

    Continuous long-term temperature sensitivity (ST) of leaf unfolding date (LUD) and main impacting factors in spring in the period 1978-2014 for 40 plant species in Mudanjiang, Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China, were analyzed by using observation data from the China Phenological Observation Network (CPON), together with the corresponding meteorological data from the China Meteorological Data Service Center. Temperature sensitivities, slopes of the regression between LUD and mean temperature during the optimum preseason (OP), were analyzed using 15-year moving window to determine their temporal trends. Major factors impacting ST were then chosen and evaluated by applying a random sampling method. The results showed that LUD was sensitive to mean temperature in a defined period before phenophase onset for all plant species analyzed. Over the period 1978-2014, the mean ST of LUD for all plant species was - 3.2 ± 0.49 days °C-1. The moving window analysis revealed that 75% of species displayed increasing ST of LUD, with 55% showing significant increases (P < 0.05). ST for the other 25% exhibited a decreasing trend, with 17% showing significant decreases (P < 0.05). On average, ST increased by 16%, from - 2.8 ± 0.83 days °C-1 during 1980-1994 to - 3.30 ± 0.65 days °C-1 during 2000-2014. For species with later LUD and longer OP, ST tended to increase more, while species with earlier LUD and shorter OP tended to display a decreasing ST. The standard deviation of preseason temperature impacted the temporal variation in ST. Chilling conditions influenced ST for some species, but photoperiod limitation did not have significant or coherent effects on changes in ST.

  3. Analysis of remineralisation, lability, temperature sensitivity and structural composition of organic matter from the upper ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Jørgen; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Richardson, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) synthesised by plankton is exported out of the surface layer as particulate (POC) and dissolved (DOC) organic carbon. This 'biological pump' constitutes a major pathway in the global marine carbon cycle, each year exporting about 10 Pg C into the ocean interior, where it is subsequently remineralised via biological decomposition. Remineralised inorganic nutrients and carbon are, ultimately, again brought to the surface by advection and turbulent mixing which closes the OC-cycle in the upper ocean. Thus, remineralisation rates of OC are a critical component of the biological pump. These rates are regulated by the lability of the material and the environmental conditions in the ambient water. Temperature is particularly important in regulating the rate of microbial respiration and, thus, remineralisation rates. A significant temperature dependence of the microbial metabolic activity in the ocean interior is expected, as this is a feature observed elsewhere in the biosphere. Such temperature dependence of microbial remineralisation of POC and DOC will alter the amount of material available for transport by the biological pump to the deep ocean. Very few studies on the lability of OC and temperature sensitivity of microbial degradation processes in the mesopelagic zone (∼100-1000 m) have, to date, been carried out. Here, we present a comprehensive new experimental data set from all major ocean basins and quantify remineralisation rates of OC and their temperature sensitivity in long-term incubations of water from the upper 350 m. Microbial respiration was measured by non-invasive oxygen optodes and oxygen consumption was used as a constraint for determining the remineralisation rates and temperature sensitivity by two complementary methods. First, we analysed the oxygen consumption from a multi-component OC-model where the concentration, remineralisation rates and temperature sensitivity of two bio-available (labile) pools of organic carbon were

  4. Differences in sensitivity of native and exotic fish species to changes in river temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.E.W. LEUVEN, A.J. HENDRIKS, M.A.J. HUIJBREGTS, H.J.R. LENDERS,J. MATTHEWS, G. VAN DER VELDE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effects that temperature changes in the Rhine river distributaries have on native and exotic fish diversity. Site-specific potentially affected fractions (PAFs of the regional fish species pool were derived using species sensitivity distributions (SSDs for water temperature. The number of fish species in the river distributaries has changed remarkably over the last century. The number of native rheophilous species declined up until 1980 due to anthropogenic disturbances such as commercial fishing, river regulation, migration barriers, habitat deterioration and water pollution. In spite of progress in river rehabilitation, the native rheophilous fish fauna has only partially recovered thus far. The total number of species has strongly increased due to the appearance of more exotic species. After the opening of the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway in 1992, many fish species originating from the Ponto-Caspian area colonized the Rhine basin. The yearly minimum and maximum river temperatures at Lobith have increased by circa 4 0C over the period 1908-2010. Exotic species show lower PAFs than native species at both ends of the temperature range. The interspecific variation in the temperature tolerance of exotic fish species was found to be large. Using temporal trends in river temperature allowed past predictions of PAFs to demonstrate that the increase in maximum river temperature negatively affected a higher percentage of native fish species than exotic species. Our results support the hypothesis that alterations of the river Rhine’s temperature regime caused by thermal pollution and global warming limit the full recovery of native fish fauna and facilitate the establishment of exotic species which thereby increases competition between native and exotic species. Thermal refuges are important for the survival of native fish species under extreme summer or winter temperature conditions [Current Zoology 57 (6: 852–862, 2011].

  5. Accuracy of critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients predicted by multilayered composite plate theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Burton, Scott

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is made of the accuracy of the critical-temperature sensitivity coefficients of multilayered plates predicted by different modeling approaches, based on two-dimensional shear-deformation theories. The sensitivity coefficients considered measure the sensitivity of the critical temperatures to variations in different lamination and material parameters of the plate. The standard of comparison is taken to be the sensitivity coefficients obtained by the three-dimensional theory of thermoelasticity. Numerical studies are presented showing the effects of variation in the geometric and lamination parameters of the plate on the accuracy of both the sensitivity coefficients and the critical temperatures predicted by the different modeling approaches.

  6. Differential Search Coils Based Magnetometers: Conditioning, Magnetic Sensitivity, Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timofeeva Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical and experimental comparison of optimized search coils based magnetometers, operating either in the Flux mode or in the classical Lenz-Faraday mode, is presented. The improvements provided by the Flux mode in terms of bandwidth and measuring range of the sensor are detailed. Theory, SPICE model and measurements are in good agreement. The spatial resolution of the sensor is studied which is an important parameter for applications in non destructive evaluation. A general expression of the magnetic sensitivity of search coils sensors is derived. Solutions are proposed to design magnetometers with reduced weight and volume without degrading the magnetic sensitivity. An original differential search coil based magnetometer, made of coupled coils, operating in flux mode and connected to a differential transimpedance amplifier is proposed. It is shown that this structure is better in terms of volume occupancy than magnetometers using two separated coils without any degradation in magnetic sensitivity. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations.

  7. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of a wireless multisensor system for NASA application to remote wireless sensing of temperature distributions in composite...

  8. Dentinal sensitivity, self-reported gingivo-dental conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental appearance satisfaction was expressed by 77.0% of the participants while 8.2% use or believe that they will use artificial teeth with ageing. Dentinal sensitivity was significantly associated with texture of toothbrush, receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing, dental appearance satisfaction and food packing.

  9. Heightened fire probability in Indonesia in non-drought conditions: the effect of increasing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kátia; Verchot, Louis; Baethgen, Walter; Gutierrez-Velez, Victor; Pinedo-Vasquez, Miguel; Martius, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    In Indonesia, drought driven fires occur typically during the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. This was the case of the events of 1997 and 2015 that resulted in months-long hazardous atmospheric pollution levels in Equatorial Asia and record greenhouse gas emissions. Nonetheless, anomalously active fire seasons have also been observed in non-drought years. In this work, we investigated the impact of temperature on fires and found that when the July-October (JASO) period is anomalously dry, the sensitivity of fires to temperature is modest. In contrast, under normal-to-wet conditions, fire probability increases sharply when JASO is anomalously warm. This describes a regime in which an active fire season is not limited to drought years. Greater susceptibility to fires in response to a warmer environment finds support in the high evapotranspiration rates observed in normal-to-wet and warm conditions in Indonesia. We also find that fire probability in wet JASOs would be considerably less sensitive to temperature were not for the added effect of recent positive trends. Near-term regional climate projections reveal that, despite negligible changes in precipitation, a continuing warming trend will heighten fire probability over the next few decades especially in non-drought years. Mild fire seasons currently observed in association with wet conditions and cool temperatures will become rare events in Indonesia.

  10. valuation of Germination Characteristics for Hedysarum Criniferum Boiss in Alternative Temperature and Drought Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahbazi

    2016-05-01

    24-26 °C day-night and four drought levels (0, -2, -4, and -6 bar with three replications. According to the results, different levels of drought stress and alternative temperature had significant effects on germination percentage and germination speed of the species seeds (α=5%. The study showed that increasing temperature and drought levels leads to reducing the germination percentage and germination speed of the species. Higher germination percentage of H. criniferum seeds in different drought levels compared to alternative temperature levels of 24-26 °C indicated that this species is more sensitive to higher temperature than high levels of drought condition. Therefore, it could partly be concluded that the H. criniferum is a relatively drought resistance species.

  11. High sensitive translational temperature measurement using characteristic curve of second harmonic signal in wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Makoto; Yamada, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    A high sensitive measurement system of translational temperature of plasma was developed. In this system, which is based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy, a peak value of second harmonic signal was measured as a function of modulation depth. The translational temperature was estimated by fitting the theoretically calculated curve to the measured characteristic curve. The performance of this system was examined using microwave discharge plasma. As a result of comparison with conventional laser absorption spectroscopy, both results show good agreement in the measurable region of the laser absorption spectroscopy. Next, the measurable limit of this system was investigated by decreasing the target number density. The detectable fractional absorption was as low as 3.7 × 10-5 in which condition the signal to noise ratio was the order of single digit at the averaging number of 40. This value is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the laser absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Analysis of vaccinia virus temperature-sensitive I7L mutants reveals two potential functional domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrd Chelsea M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an approach to initiating a structure-function analysis of the vaccinia virus I7L core protein proteinase, a collection of conditional-lethal mutants in which the mutation had been mapped to the I7L locus were subjected to genomic sequencing and phenotypic analyses. Mutations in six vaccinia virus I7L temperature sensitive mutants fall into two groups: changes at three positions at the N-terminal end between amino acids 29 and 37 and two different substitutions at amino acid 344, near the catalytic domain. Regardless of the position of the mutation, mutants at the non-permissive temperature failed to cleave core protein precursors and had their development arrested prior to core condensation. Thus it appears that the two clusters of mutations may affect two different functional domains required for proteinase activity.

  13. Conditioning temperature for inducing uniform ripening of 'Abate Fetel' pears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moises Zucoloto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the conditioning temperature period for inducing uniform ripening of 'Abate Fetel' pears as well as to determine the maximum storage period with no quality loss. Three harvests were carried out at weekly intervals and each harvest date was considered a factorial experiment (7x3, with seven storage periods at 0 ± 1 ºC and 90 ± 5% relative humidity (0; 20; 40; 60; 80; 100 and 120 days and three periods at room temperature (20 ± 1 ºC (zero, three and six days. The assessed quality attributes were flesh firmness, starch content, weight loss and soluble solids content. Acceptance and purchase intention sensory tests were carried out. Cold storage was efficient in inducing uniform ripening in 'Abate Fetel' pears after 20 days at low temperature followed by six days at room temperature for fruit from the three harvest dates. 'Abate Fetel' pears harvested at harvest maturity of 57 N can be stored for up to 120 days and commercialized within six days with no quality loss. However, fruit harvested at flesh firmness below 55 N can be stored for 80 days and commercialized within six days or stored for 100 days and commercialized within three days.

  14. A temperature sensitive VSV identifies L protein residues that affect transcription but not replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Summer E; Wertz, Gail W

    2009-06-05

    To investigate the polymerase components selectively involved in transcription versus replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we sequenced the polymerase gene of a conditionally RNA defective, temperature sensitive VSV: ts(G)114, which has a phenotype upon shift from permissive to non-permissive temperature of shut-down of mRNA transcription and unaffected genome replication. Sequence analysis of the ts(G)114 L gene identified three altered amino acid residues in the L protein. These three changes were specifically engineered individually and in combinations into a functional cDNA clone encoding the VSV genome and tested for association with the temperature sensitive and RNA defective phenotypes in the background of recovered engineered viruses. The data presented in this study show a specific amino acid substitution in domain II of the VSV L protein that significantly affects total RNA synthesis, but when in combination with two additional amino acid substitutions identified in the ts(G)114 L protein, leads to a specific reduction in mRNA transcription, but not replication.

  15. Sensitive Measures of Condition Change in EEG Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Gailey, P.C.; Protopopescu, V.

    1999-03-10

    We present a new, robust, model-independent technique for measuring condition change in nonlinear data. We define indicators of condition change by comparing distribution functions (DF) defined on the attractor for time windowed data sets via L{sub 1}-distance and {chi}{sup 2} statistics. The new measures are applied to EEG data with the objective of detecting the transition between non-seizure and epileptic brain activity in an accurate and timely manner. We find a clear superiority of the new metrics in comparison to traditional nonlinear measures as discriminators of condition change.

  16. Effects of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of soil heterotrophic respiration: a laboratory incubation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Zhou

    Full Text Available The temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity--WHC and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C. Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC, microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC than at higher moisture level (80% WHC during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming's impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration.

  17. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-13

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory 'easy' foraging environment and a 'hard' semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an 'easy' laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species.

  18. Fiber optic temperature sensing with enhanced sensitivity based on spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militky, J.; Kadulova, M.; Ciprian, D.; Hlubina, P.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature sensing with enhanced sensitivity based on the spectral interference of polarization modes in a highly birefringent (HB) fiber is proposed and demonstrated. A temperature sensor employs a tandem configuration of a birefringent quartz crystal and HB fiber placed between an analyzer and a polarizer. In the setup a modified channeled spectrum is generated, which shifts with the temperature change of the sensing part of the HB fiber. We analyze the measurement method theoretically and show that the sensitivity of the temperature sensing based on the wavelength interrogation is enhanced in comparison to a standard method with a fiber interferometer. We also demonstrate the enhancement of the temperature sensitivity for three HB fibers under test. Experimental results show that the temperature sensing can reach a sensitivity of -0.30 nm/K, which is enhanced in comparison to -0.10 nm/K reached for a standard measurement.

  19. Temperature-sensitive PSII: a novel approach for sustained photosynthetic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2016-12-01

    The need for energy and the associated burden are ever growing. It is crucial to develop new technologies for generating clean and efficient energy for society to avoid upcoming energetic and environmental crises. Sunlight is the most abundant source of energy on the planet. Consequently, it has captured our interest. Certain microalgae possess the ability to capture solar energy and transfer it to the energy carrier, H2. H2 is a valuable fuel, because its combustion produces only one by-product: water. However, the establishment of an efficient biophotolytic H2 production system is hindered by three main obstacles: (1) the hydrogen-evolving enzyme, [FeFe]-hydrogenase, is highly sensitive to oxygen; (2) energy conversion efficiencies are not economically viable; and (3) hydrogen-producing organisms are sensitive to stressful conditions in large-scale production systems. This study aimed to circumvent the oxygen sensitivity of this process with a cyclic hydrogen production system. This approach required a mutant that responded to high temperatures by reducing oxygen evolution. To that end, we randomly mutagenized the green microalgae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, to generate mutants that exhibited temperature-sensitive photoautotrophic growth. The selected mutants were further characterized by their ability to evolve oxygen and hydrogen at 25 and 37 °C. We identified four candidate mutants for this project. We characterized these mutants with PSII fluorescence, P700 absorbance, and immunoblotting analyses. Finally, we demonstrated that these mutants could function in a prototype hydrogen-producing bioreactor. These mutant microalgae represent a novel approach for sustained hydrogen production.

  20. Possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone by a radiosonde equipped with two temperature sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, T.; Sumi, T.

    1994-01-01

    The sensitiveness of white coated thermistor sensors and non-sensitiveness of the gold coated over white thermistor sensors (which have been manufactured by a vacuum evaporation process) to long wave radiation were ascertained by some simple experiments in-room and also by analyses of some results of experimental soundings. From results of analyses on the temperature discrepancies caused by long wave radiation, the possibility to sound the atmospheric ozone partial pressure by a radiosonde equipped with two kinds of sensors, sensitive and non-sensitive to the long wave radiation was suggested, and the test results of the newly developed software for the deduction of ozone partial pressure in upper layers was also shown. However, it was found that the following is the necessary condition to realize the purpose. The sounding should be made by a radiosonde equipped with three sensors, instead of two, one being non-sensitive to the long wave radiation perfectly, and the other two also non-sensitive partially to the downward one, with two different angles of exposure upward. It is essential for the realization of the purpose to get two different values of temperature discrepancies simultaneously observed by the three sensors mentioned above and to avoid the troublesome effects of the upward long wave radiation.

  1. Climate-signal changes in a temperature-sensitive dendroclimatic network: the influence of site aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonelli, Giovanni; Pelfini, Manuela; Battipaglia, Giovanna; Cherubini, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    especially for S- and W-facing site chronologies). On the other hand, trees from N-facing sites showed an increasing sensitivity to July temperatures, especially since the period 1911-1970. Our results underline that some climatic factors related to slope aspect (e.g. temperature regime, snow-cover persistence or growing season length) play a key role in limiting P. cembra tree-ring growth at high altitudes, especially in N-facing sites. Moreover, it is evident at all sites that at high altitudes, low temperatures at the beginning of the growing season no longer limit growth as they did in earlier decades. Stronger changes are involving especially the S- and W-facing sites that in the past were more limited by June temperature, whereas trees on N-facing slopes are generally less adapted to warmer conditions at the beginning of the growing season (June) and therefore respond less to an increasing air temperature. We point out the importance of testing growth-climate relationships over time to detect possible trends in climate sensitivity. In fact, wide variation in climate sensitivity over time could lead to over- or underestimations of past temperatures. Moreover, our findings showed that site ecology can affect dendroclimatic reconstructions.

  2. Temperature Sensitivity of Neural Tube Defects in Zoep Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Phyo; Swartz, Morgan R; Kindt, Lexy M; Kangas, Ashley M; Liang, Jennifer Ostrom

    2015-12-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) occur when the flat neural plate epithelium fails to fold into the neural tube, the precursor to the brain and spinal cord. Squint (Sqt/Ndr1), a Nodal ligand, and One-eyed pinhead (Oep), a component of the Nodal receptor, are required for anterior neural tube closure in zebrafish. The NTD in sqt and Zoep mutants are incompletely penetrant. The penetrance of several defects in sqt mutants increases upon heat or cold shock. In this project, undergraduate students tested whether temperature influences the Zoep open neural tube phenotype. Single pairs of adults were spawned at 28.5°C, the normal temperature for zebrafish, and one half of the resulting embryos were moved to 34°C at different developmental time points. Analysis of variance indicated temperature and clutch/genetic background significantly contributed to the penetrance of the open neural tube phenotype. Heat shock affected the embryos only at or before the midblastula stage. Many factors, including temperature changes in the mother, nutrition, and genetic background, contribute to NTD in humans. Thus, sqt and Zoep mutants may serve as valuable models for studying the interactions between genetics and the environment during neurulation.

  3. Temperature sensitivity of the oxygenation reaction of stripped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "'mne hody of water. This study exumines the oxygen affinities of haemoglobin solutions. stripped hy gel flitruton chromatography, of two. Orange River fishes. L C(f/Jell ds and C. gariepifHH, temperatures. Our results. presented here. l:onClir with the. Ami17(mian finJin!!~ of Johansen, Mangum & Lykkeboc.

  4. Magnetocaloric effect in temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The pyromagnetic coefficient for all the materials were obtained and it was found that this property depends on physical and magnetic ... Magnetic fluid; pyromagnetic coefficient; Curie temperature. 1. Introduction. A magnetic fluid .... fluid, the distribution of particle size generally follows the log-normal distribution function ...

  5. Catchment sensitivity to changing climate conditions: the importance of landscape characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutschbein, C.; Karlsen, R.; Grabs, T.; Laudon, H.; Bishop, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The scientific literature is full of studies analyzing future climate change impacts on hydrology with focus on individual catchments. However, we recently found that hydrologic behavior and specific discharge vary considerably even in neighboring and rather similar catchments under current climate conditions and that these variations are related to landscape characteristics. Therefore we hypothesize that these landscape characteristics also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to changing climate conditions. We analyzed the hydrological response of 14 neighboring catchments in Northern Sweden with slightly different topography, land cover, size and geology. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV light model. Climate projections were based on 14 regional climate models (ENSEMBLES EU project) and bias-corrected with a distribution-mapping approach. Our simulations revealed that future spring flood peaks will occur much earlier and decrease by 13 to 32 %, whereas winter base flows will increase slightly. These changes are somewhat expected and mainly triggered by a projected increase in winter temperature, which leads to less snow accumulation on the ground. However, these values also highlight that there is a large variability amongst the catchments in their hydrological response to the same future climate conditions. For example, spring flood peaks in catchments without wetlands decrease by only 13 to 15 %, whereas catchments with wetlands show a spring flood peak reduction of 20 to 32 %. In addition to wetlands, we also identified lakes, peat soils and higher elevations as factors that seem to cause a stronger hydrological response to the climate change signal, whereas catchments dominated by forests, steeper slopes and till soils seem to be less strongly affected by a changing climate. Therefore, our results suggest that the sensitivity of catchments to future climate conditions is strongly linked to

  6. Catchment Sensitivity to Changing Climate Conditions: The Importance of Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutschbein, Claudia; Karlsen, Reinert; Grabs, Thomas; Laudon, Hjalmar; Bishop, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    The scientific literature is full of studies analyzing future climate change impacts on hydrology with focus on individual catchments. We recently found, however, that hydrologic behavior and specific discharge vary considerably even in neighboring and rather similar catchments under current climate conditions and that these variations are related to landscape characteristics. Therefore we hypothesize that these landscape characteristics also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to changing climate conditions. We analyzed the hydrological response of 14 partially nested catchments in Northern Sweden with slightly different topography, land cover, size and geology. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflows were simulated with the hydrological model HBV light based on 15 regional climate model projections that were bias-corrected with a distribution-mapping approach. Our simulations revealed that - in a future climate- the total annual streamflow will be higher, spring flood peaks will occur earlier and decrease considerably, whereas winter base flows will more than double. These changes are somewhat expected and mainly triggered by a projected increase in winter temperature, which leads to less snow accumulation on the ground. However, our results also show that there is a large variability amongst these catchments in their hydrological response to the same future climate conditions. We identified wetlands, lakes, peat soils and higher elevations as factors that had a stronger effect on spring floods, whereas catchments dominated by forests, steeper slopes and till soils showed stronger responses in winter base flows and total annual streamflow. Therefore, our results suggest that the sensitivity of catchments to future climate conditions is strongly linked to landscape characteristics and also depends on the streamflow characteristic as well as season analyzed.

  7. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    OpenAIRE

    V. S. Zarubin; A. V. Kotovich; G. N. Kuvyrkin

    2016-01-01

    The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption) processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the elect...

  8. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  9. Creep Behavior of ABS Polymer in Temperature-Humidity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Teagen; Selvaraj, Ramya; Hong, Seokmoo; Kim, Naksoo

    2017-04-01

    Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene (ABS), also known as a thermoplastic polymer, is extensively utilized for manufacturing home appliances products as it possess impressive mechanical properties, such as, resistance and toughness. However, the aforementioned properties are affected by operating temperature and atmosphere humidity due to the viscoelasticity property of an ABS polymer material. Moreover, the prediction of optimum working conditions are the little challenging task as it influences the final properties of product. This present study aims to develop the finite element (FE) models for predicting the creep behavior of an ABS polymeric material. In addition, the material constants, which represent the creep properties of an ABS polymer material, were predicted with the help of an interpolation function. Furthermore, a comparative study has been made with experiment and simulation results to verify the accuracy of developed FE model. The results showed that the predicted value from FE model could agree well with experimental data as well it can replicate the actual creep behavior flawlessly.

  10. The influence of temperature on ozone production under varying NOx conditions - a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jane; Mar, Kathleen A.; Ojha, Narendra; Butler, Tim M.

    2016-09-01

    Surface ozone is a secondary air pollutant produced during the atmospheric photochemical degradation of emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sunlight and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Temperature directly influences ozone production through speeding up the rates of chemical reactions and increasing the emissions of VOCs, such as isoprene, from vegetation. In this study, we used an idealised box model with different chemical mechanisms (Master Chemical Mechanism, MCMv3.2; Common Representative Intermediates, CRIv2; Model for OZone and Related Chemical Tracers, MOZART-4; Regional Acid Deposition Model, RADM2; Carbon Bond Mechanism, CB05) to examine the non-linear relationship between ozone, NOx and temperature, and we compared this to previous observational studies. Under high-NOx conditions, an increase in ozone from 20 to 40 °C of up to 20 ppbv was due to faster reaction rates, while increased isoprene emissions added up to a further 11 ppbv of ozone. The largest inter-mechanism differences were obtained at high temperatures and high-NOx emissions. CB05 and RADM2 simulated more NOx-sensitive chemistry than MCMv3.2, CRIv2 and MOZART-4, which could lead to different mitigation strategies being proposed depending on the chemical mechanism. The increased oxidation rate of emitted VOC with temperature controlled the rate of Ox production; the net influence of peroxy nitrates increased net Ox production per molecule of emitted VOC oxidised. The rate of increase in ozone mixing ratios with temperature from our box model simulations was about half the rate of increase in ozone with temperature observed over central Europe or simulated by a regional chemistry transport model. Modifying the box model set-up to approximate stagnant meteorological conditions increased the rate of increase of ozone with temperature as the accumulation of oxidants enhanced ozone production through the increased production of peroxy radicals from the secondary degradation of

  11. Temperature sensitivity of soil microbial communities: An application of macromolecular rate theory to microbial respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alster, Charlotte J.; Koyama, Akihiro; Johnson, Nels G.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; von Fischer, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    There is compelling evidence that microbial communities vary widely in their temperature sensitivity and may adapt to warming through time. To date, this sensitivity has been largely characterized using a range of models relying on versions of the Arrhenius equation, which predicts an exponential increase in reaction rate with temperature. However, there is growing evidence from laboratory and field studies that observe nonmonotonic responses of reaction rates to variation in temperature, indicating that Arrhenius is not an appropriate model for quantitatively characterizing temperature sensitivity. Recently, Hobbs et al. (2013) developed macromolecular rate theory (MMRT), which incorporates thermodynamic temperature optima as arising from heat capacity differences between isoenzymes. We applied MMRT to measurements of respiration from soils incubated at different temperatures. These soils were collected from three grassland sites across the U.S. Great Plains and reciprocally transplanted, allowing us to isolate the effects of microbial community type from edaphic factors. We found that microbial community type explained roughly 30% of the variation in the CO2 production rate from the labile C pool but that temperature and soil type were most important in explaining variation in labile and recalcitrant C pool size. For six out of the nine soil × inoculum combinations, MMRT was superior to Arrhenius. The MMRT analysis revealed that microbial communities have distinct heat capacity values and temperature sensitivities sometimes independent of soil type. These results challenge the current paradigm for modeling temperature sensitivity of soil C pools and understanding of microbial enzyme dynamics.

  12. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G.

    2013-09-01

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ɛeff) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ɛeff values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ɛeff values selected. The best fit ɛeff values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  13. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2013-09-11

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ε{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ε{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ε{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ε{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  14. Modulation of the sensitive temperature range of fluorescent molecular thermometers based on thermoresponsive polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Seiichi; Matsumura, Yuriko; de Silva, A Prasanna; Iwai, Kaoru

    2004-03-15

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers based on polymers showing a temperature-induced phase transition and labeled with polarity-sensitive fluorescent benzofurazans are the most sensitive known. Here we show a simple and effective method for modulating the sensitive temperature ranges of fluorescent molecular thermometers based on such temperature-responsive polymers. 4-N-(2-acryloyloxyethyl)-N-methylamino-7-N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole was adopted as a polarity-sensitive fluorescent benzofurazan, and nine copolymers of two kinds of acrylamide derivative (N-n-propylacrylamide, N-isopropylacrylamide, and/or N-isopropylmethacrylamide) with a small amount of DBD-AE were obtained. The fluorescence intensities of these copolymers in aqueous solution sharply increased with increasing temperature over a small range (6-7 degrees C). In contrast, these fluorescent molecular thermometers differed from one another in the sensitive temperature range (between 20 and 49 degrees C). Moreover, the sensitive temperature ranges were well related to the acrylamide ratios in feed. In addition, the responses from these fluorescent molecular thermometers to the change in temperature were reversible and exactly repeatable during 10 cycles of heating and cooling (relative standard deviation of the fluorescence intensity, 0.44-1.0%).

  15. Prediction of temperature distribution in sericite mica drying with variable temperature and airflow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, A. Mohd; Mat, S.; Roslan, M. H.; Salleh, E.

    2017-06-01

    To develop new drying facilities, it was important to know the impact of every input parameter to the drying process. Using a real prototype to carry out the experiment required high cost and time consuming especially for large scale drying. CFD simulation approached was one of the solution. Previous study of drying simulation only focuses on the fix value of the input parameter. This paper presents the result of CFD simulation to predict the heat distribution in sericite mica drying with variable temperature and airflow condition. Variable temperature and airflow was used because the only heat source for the dryer was from the solar energy therefore it’s only available in the day time. The analysis was carried out for 24 hours of drying time. The simulation result shows that the temperature inside the sericite mica increase 8 to 10°C when the solar energy is available and it is still increasing about 4 to 7°C for 5 hours after the solar energy is absent. The result also shows that during the drying time the temperature of sericite mica that is closer to the heat source was higher compared to the one that is further away with the maximum difference of 3.8°C.

  16. Piezoresistive sensitivity, linearity and resistance time drift of polysilicon nanofilms with different deposition temperatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shi, Changzhi; Liu, Xiaowei; Chuai, Rongyan

    2009-01-01

    ...) at the same doping levels. Therefore, in order to further analyze the influence of deposition temperature on the film structure and piezoresistance performance, the piezoresistive sensitivity, piezoresistive linearity (PRL...

  17. Modelling firn thickness evolution during the last deglaciation: constraints on sensitivity to temperature and impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bréant

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of snow into ice is a complex phenomenon that is difficult to model. Depending on surface temperature and accumulation rate, it may take several decades to millennia for air to be entrapped in ice. The air is thus always younger than the surrounding ice. The resulting gas–ice age difference is essential to documenting the phasing between CO2 and temperature changes, especially during deglaciations. The air trapping depth can be inferred in the past using a firn densification model, or using δ15N of air measured in ice cores. All firn densification models applied to deglaciations show a large disagreement with δ15N measurements at several sites in East Antarctica, predicting larger firn thickness during the Last Glacial Maximum, whereas δ15N suggests a reduced firn thickness compared to the Holocene. Here we present modifications of the LGGE firn densification model, which significantly reduce the model–data mismatch for the gas trapping depth evolution over the last deglaciation at the coldest sites in East Antarctica (Vostok, Dome C, while preserving the good agreement between measured and modelled modern firn density profiles. In particular, we introduce a dependency of the creep factor on temperature and impurities in the firn densification rate calculation. The temperature influence intends to reflect the dominance of different mechanisms for firn compaction at different temperatures. We show that both the new temperature parameterization and the influence of impurities contribute to the increased agreement between modelled and measured δ15N evolution during the last deglaciation at sites with low temperature and low accumulation rate, such as Dome C or Vostok. We find that a very low sensitivity of the densification rate to temperature has to be used in the coldest conditions. The inclusion of impurity effects improves the agreement between modelled and measured δ15N at cold East Antarctic sites during the last

  18. Evaluating Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity to Land and Soil Conditions Representative of Karst Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Fan, Xingang; Mahmood, Rezaul; Groves, Chris; Polk, Jason S.; Yan, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Due to their particular physiographic, geomorphic, soil cover, and complex surface-subsurface hydrologic conditions, karst regions produce distinct land-atmosphere interactions. It has been found that floods and droughts over karst regions can be more pronounced than those in non-karst regions following a given rainfall event. Five convective weather events are simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model to explore the potential impacts of land-surface conditions on weather simulations over karst regions. Since no existing weather or climate model has the ability to represent karst landscapes, simulation experiments in this exploratory study consist of a control (default land-cover/soil types) and three land-surface conditions, including barren ground, forest, and sandy soils over the karst areas, which mimic certain karst characteristics. Results from sensitivity experiments are compared with the control simulation, as well as with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction multi-sensor precipitation analysis Stage-IV data, and near-surface atmospheric observations. Mesoscale features of surface energy partition, surface water and energy exchange, the resulting surface-air temperature and humidity, and low-level instability and convective energy are analyzed to investigate the potential land-surface impact on weather over karst regions. We conclude that: (1) barren ground used over karst regions has a pronounced effect on the overall simulation of precipitation. Barren ground provides the overall lowest root-mean-square errors and bias scores in precipitation over the peak-rain periods. Contingency table-based equitable threat and frequency bias scores suggest that the barren and forest experiments are more successful in simulating light to moderate rainfall. Variables dependent on local surface conditions show stronger contrasts between karst and non-karst regions than variables dominated by large-scale synoptic systems; (2) significant

  19. Temperature-sensitive photoreactivation of cyclobutane thymine dimer in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Ayumi; Tanbir, Najrana; Hirouchi, Tokuhisa; Teranishi, Mika; Hidema, Jun; Morioka, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2008-03-01

    UV radiation induces the formation of two classes of photoproducts in DNA, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and the pyrimidine 6-4 pyrimidone photoproduct. CPDs in plants are repaired by class II CPD photolyase via a UV-A/blue light-dependent mechanism. The genes for the class II CPD photolyase have been cloned from higher plants such as Arabidopsis, Cucumis sativus (cucumber), Oryza sativa (rice) and Spinacia oleracea (spinach). Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) has been identified as a cofactor. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the CPD photolyase cDNA from soybean (Glycin max). The sequence of amino acids predicted from the cDNA sequence was highly homologous to sequences of higher plant class II CPD photolyases. When the cDNA was expressed in a photolyase-deficient Escherichia coli, photoreactivation activity was partially restored by illumination with a fluorescent light. The purified enzyme showed CPD binding and light-dependent photoreactivation activities in vitro. When soybean CPD photolyase was heat-treated in vitro from 25 degrees C to 45 degrees C for 3 min, thymine dimer-binding activity and photoreactivation activity were decreased, and FAD was released from the enzyme. On the other hand, when the enzyme-CPD complex was heat-treated, photoreactivation activity was stable. We argue that FAD in the soybean CPD photolyase is labile for temperature, but once the enzyme-CPD complex has formed, FAD becomes tightly bound to the enzyme or complex.

  20. Tuning the Sensitivity of Fluorescent Porphyrin Dimers to Viscosity and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyšniauskas, Aurimas; Ding, Dong; Qurashi, Maryam; Boczarow, Igor; Balaz, Milan; Anderson, Harry L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Conjugated porphyrin dimers have emerged as versatile viscosity‐sensitive fluorophores that are suitable for quantitative measurements of microscopic viscosity by ratiometric and fluorescence lifetime‐based methods, in a concentration‐independent manner. Here, we investigate the effect of extended conjugation in a porphyrin‐dimer structure on their ability to sense viscosity and temperature. We show that the sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime to temperature is a unique property of only a few porphyrin dimers. PMID:28480989

  1. Wheel-running mitigates psychomotor sensitization initiation but not post-sensitization conditioned activity and conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuzaine, Annabelle; Tirelli, Ezio

    2014-04-01

    Previous literature suggests that physical exercise allowed by an unlimited access to a running wheel for several weeks can mitigate chronic neurobehavioral responsiveness to several addictive drugs in rodents. Here, the potential preventive effects of unlimited wheel-running on the initiation of psychomotor sensitization and the acquisition and extinction of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by 10 mg/kg cocaine in C56BL/6J mice were assessed in two independent experiments. To this end, half of the mice were singly housed with a running wheel at 28 days of age for 10 weeks prior to psychopharmacological tests, during which housing conditions did not change, and the other half of mice were housed without running wheel. In Experiment 1, prior to initiating sensitization, psychomotor activity on the two first drug-free once-daily sessions was not affected by wheel-running. This was also found for the acute psychomotor-activating effect of cocaine on the first sensitization session. Psychomotor sensitization readily developed over the 9 following once-daily sessions in mice housed without wheel, whereas it was inhibited in mice housed with a wheel. However, that difference did not transfer to post-sensitization conditioned activity. In contrast with the sensitization results, mice housed with a wheel still expressed a clear-cut CPP which did not extinguish differently from that of the other group, a result in disaccord with previous studies reporting either an attenuating or an increasing effect of wheel-running on cocaine-induced conditioned reward. The available results together indicate that interactions between wheel-running and cocaine effects are far from being satisfactorily characterized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally valid...

  3. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  4. Sensitivity of summer stream temperatures to climate variability in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Luce; Brian Staab; Marc Kramer; Seth Wenger; Dan Isaak; Callie McConnell

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the thermal response of streams to a warming climate is important for prioritizing native fish conservation efforts. While there are plentiful estimates of air temperature responses to climate change, the sensitivity of streams, particularly small headwater streams, to warming temperatures is less well understood. A substantial body of literature correlates...

  5. The dependence of thermoluminescence sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation in meteorites and in terrestrial apatites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, S.A.; Al-Khalifa, I.J.M. (Birmingham Univ. (UK). School of Physics and Space Research)

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported on the TL sensitivity (i.e. TL glow output per unit {gamma} ray test dose) of meteoritic specimens as well as terrestrial fluor- and chlor-apatites, as a function of irradiation temperature (T{sub irr}). The irradiation temperatures ranged from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 - 293 K). A kilocurie {sup 60}Co {gamma} ray source was used to deliver test doses of 400 Gy (40 krad) and 40 (4 krad) to the various samples. A strong dependence of the TL sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation was noted in the case of Kirin meteorite: its TL sensitivity (for the 493 K readout peak) decreased by a factor of {similar to} 2 when T{sub irr} rose from liquid nitrogen (77 K) to dry ice in acetone (197 K) temperature, in the case of both 400 Gy and 40 Gy {gamma} ray doses. In the case of the Antarctic meteorite specimen (ALHA 77182.13), there was a smaller effect, viz. a fall of {similar to} 14% in the TL output corresponding to dry ice and higher irradiating temperatures as compared to the 77 K irradiation. For chlorapatite, the TL sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing temperature for both the 563 K and the 448 K glow peaks. For the fluorapatite, the effect of reduced response was observed only between -17{sup 0}C (256 K) and room temperature (293 K). Both the theoretical and the practical implications of these observations are discussed. (author).

  6. Conditioning of the membrane fatty acid profile of Escherichia coli during periodic temperature cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Tina; Vodovnik, Masa; Marinsek-Logar, Romana; Stopar, David

    2009-10-01

    The membrane fatty acid composition of Escherichia coli becomes conditioned during periodic temperature cycling between 37 and 8 degrees C. After several cycles of temperature change, the bacteria become locked into a low-temperature physiology. Even after a prolonged incubation at high temperature the membrane fatty acid composition of conditioned cells was similar to that of cold-stressed cells.

  7. Imaging heat transfer processes in a fluid with temperature sensitive paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Liu, Tianshu; Luo, Weili

    2014-03-01

    The temperature profile inside a fluid was imaged by temperature sensitive paint in a quasi one-dimensional cell, where temperature gradients were established by heating on one side of the sample and cooling on the other. Similar experiment was performed on colloids consisting nanoparticles suspended in solvent. The change of the profile for different heat-transfer processes as functions of time will be discussed.

  8. Phase sensitivity to temperature of the guiding mode in polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingming; Sun, Kang; Li, Shuai; Cai, Wei

    2015-08-20

    The propagating phase changing of a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) caused by temperature variation is theoretically studied, as well as compared with conventional PANDA fiber. As to verifying numerical analysis, a platform based on a Michelson interferometer for phase versus temperature measurement was built for both kinds of fiber. Experiments show that PM-PCF has similar temperature sensitivity with conventional polarization-maintaining fiber. With optimized PM-PCF design (thinner coating layer and coating material with smaller thermal expansion coefficient), the sensitivity could be further reduced to about 80% of the present level.

  9. Development and application of a species sensitivity distribution for temperature-induced mortality in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.; Tamis, J.E.; Murk, A.J.; Smit, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Current European legislation has static water quality objectives for temperature effects, based on the most sensitive species. In the present study a species sensitivity distribution (SSD) for elevated temperatures is developed on the basis of temperature sensitivity data (mortality) of 50 aquatic

  10. File list: InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.05.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 Input control Adult Temperature se...nsitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/InP.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.10.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.20.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells dm3 No description Adult Temperature s...ensitive cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/NoD.Adl.50.AllAg.Temperature_sensitive_cells.bed ...

  17. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures. © 2014 SETAC.

  18. Control of bacteriophage-induced enzyme synthesis in cells infected with a temperature-sensitive mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, C K; Kessin, R H

    1967-02-01

    The timing of "early" and "late" protein synthesis in Escherichia coli infected with T-even bacteriophage was studied with a temperature-sensitive phage mutant, T4 tsL13. This strain was completely unable to direct the synthesis of phage deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) at 44 C because it makes a deoxycytidylate hydroxymethylase which cannot act at that temperature. However, the mutant did multiply normally at 30 C. No detectable formation of the late protein, lysozyme, occurred at 44 C, in agreement with the idea, proposed by several workers, that DNA replication is necessary for activation of late genetic functions. However, the formation of an early enzyme, thymidylate synthetase, was shut off at about 10 min, as in normal infection. This implied that separate mechanisms were responsible for cessation of early functions and activation of late ones. That the infected cell at 44 C retained the capacity for synthesis of early enzymes was shown by the fact that DNA synthesis occurred after a culture was transferred from 44 to 30 C as late as 30 min after infection. This synthesis was inhibited by chloramphenicol, indicating that de novo synthesis of an early enzyme can take place at a late period in development. It is suggested that cells infected under normal conditions maintained an appreciable rate of early enzyme synthesis throughout the course of infection.

  19. Coupling behavior of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels for the inhomogeneous and homogeneous swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, H.; Baghani, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Sohrabpour, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a model is developed to continuously predict homogeneous and inhomogeneous swelling behavior of pH/temperature sensitive PNIPAM hydrogels. Employing the model, homogeneous swelling of the pH/temperature sensitive hydrogel is investigated for free and biaxial constrained swelling cases. Comparing the model results with the experimental data available in the literature, the validity of the model is confirmed. The model is then employed to investigate inhomogeneous swelling of a spherical shell on a hard core both analytically and numerically for pH or temperature variations. In this regard, numerical tools are developed via preparing a user defined subroutine in ABAQUS software. Then, the complicated problem of contact between the hydrogel shell and a micro-channel with rigid walls is also investigated. Considering the results, we can say that the model is applicable for solving engineering boundary value problem of pH/temperature sensitive hydrogels.

  20. Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction has been developed based on the studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of silicon and germanium microcrystals in the temperature range 4.2—70 K, strain ±1.5*10–3 rel.un. and magnetic fields of 0—14 T. The feature of the sensitive element is the using of the p- and n-type conductivity germanium microcrystals as mechanical and magnetic field sensors, respectively, and the p-type silicon microcrystal — as temperature sensor. That allows providing the compensation of temperature influence on piezoresistance and on sensitivity to the magnetic field.

  1. Classifying Multi-Model Wheat Yield Impact Response Surfaces Showing Sensitivity to Temperature and Precipitation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; hide

    2017-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in temperature (minus 2 to plus 9 degrees Centigrade) and precipitation (minus 50 to plus 50 percent). Model results were analysed by plotting them as impact response surfaces (IRSs), classifying the IRS patterns of individual model simulations, describing these classes and analysing factors that may explain the major differences in model responses. The model ensemble was used to simulate yields of winter and spring wheat at four sites in Finland, Germany and Spain. Results were plotted as IRSs that show changes in yields relative to the baseline with respect to temperature and precipitation. IRSs of 30-year means and selected extreme years were classified using two approaches describing their pattern. The expert diagnostic approach (EDA) combines two aspects of IRS patterns: location of the maximum yield (nine classes) and strength of the yield response with respect to climate (four classes), resulting in a total of 36 combined classes defined using criteria pre-specified by experts. The statistical diagnostic approach (SDA) groups IRSs by comparing their pattern and magnitude, without attempting to interpret these features. It applies a hierarchical clustering method, grouping response patterns using a distance metric that combines the spatial correlation and Euclidian distance between IRS pairs. The two approaches were used to investigate whether different patterns of yield response could be related to different properties of the crop models, specifically their genealogy, calibration and process description. Although no single model property across a large model ensemble was found to explain the integrated yield response to temperature and precipitation perturbations, the

  2. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  3. Preparation of dual-stimuli-responsive liposomes using methacrylate-based copolymers with pH and temperature sensitivities for precisely controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takumi; Yamazaki, Naoko; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yuba, Eiji; Harada, Atsushi; Kotaka, Aki; Shinde, Chiharu; Kumei, Takayuki; Sumida, Yasushi; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Munekata, Yuki; Maruyama, Keiichi; Kono, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    Dual-signal-sensitive copolymers were synthesized by copolymerization of methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate, methacrylic acid, and lauroxy tetraethylene glycol methacrylate, which respectively provide temperature sensitivity, pH sensitivity, and anchoring to liposome surfaces. These novel copolymers, with water solubility that differs depending on temperature and pH, are soluble in water under neutral pH and low-temperature conditions, but they become water-insoluble and form aggregates under acidic pH and high-temperature conditions. Liposomes modified with these copolymers exhibited enhanced content release at weakly acidic pH with increasing temperature, although no temperature-dependent content release was observed in neutral conditions. Interaction between the copolymers and the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface revealed that the copolymer chains penetrate more deeply into the monolayer with increasing temperature at acidic pH than at neutral pH, where the penetration of copolymer chains was moderate and temperature-independent at neutral pH. Interaction of the copolymer-modified liposomes with HeLa cells demonstrated that the copolymer-modified liposomes were adsorbed quickly and efficiently onto the cell surface and that they were internalized more gradually than the unmodified liposomes through endocytosis. Furthermore, the copolymer-modified liposomes enhanced the content release in endosomes with increasing temperature, but no such temperature-dependent enhancement of content release was observed for unmodified liposomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature sensitivity of organic substrate decay varies with pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in soils and globally ubiquitous. It serves as a primary carbon source for myriad microbes able to release cellulases which cleave the cellulose into smaller molecules. For example, β-glucosidase, one type of cellulase, breaks down a terminal β-glycosidic bond of cellulose. The carbon of the liberated glucose becomes available for microbial uptake, after which it can then be mineralized and returned to the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. Thus, exoenzymes play an important role in the global cycling of carbon. Numerous studies suggest that global warming potentially increases the rate at which β-glucosidase breaks down cellulose, but it is not known how pH of the soil solution influences the effect of temperature on cellulose decomposition rates; this is important given the globally wide range of soil pH. Using fluorescence enzyme assay techniques, we studied the effect of temperature and pH on the reaction rate at which purified β-Glucosidase decays β-D-cellobioside (a compound often employed to simulate cellulose). We evaluated the temperature sensitivity of this reaction at five temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) and six pH values (3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5)encompassing the naturally occurring range in soils, in a full-factorial design. First, we determined Vmax at 25°C and pH 6.5, standard conditions for measuring enzyme activities in many studies. The Vmax was 858.65 μmol h-1mg-1and was achieved at substrate concentration of 270 μM. At all pH values, the reaction rate slowed down at lower temperatures; at a pH of 3.5, no enzymatic activity was detected. The enzyme activity was significantly different between pH 4.5 and higher pHs. For example, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was significantly lower than that at 7.5 at 20 and 25°C (Bonferroni-corrected P =0.0006, 0.0004, respectively), but not at lower temperatures. Similarly, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was lower than that at pH 8.5 at 10, 15

  5. Simulation of temperature conditions on APT of HMA mixes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJVDM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this paper is to provide guidance on the practical management of temperature (pavement and loading tires) in Heavy Vehicle Simulator (HVS) tests, the potential effects of these temperatures on the outcomes of the test and the links...

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Heavy Fuel Oil Spray and Combustion under Low-Speed Marine Engine-Like Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available On account of their high power, thermal efficiency, good reliability, safety, and durability, low-speed two-stroke marine diesel engines are used as the main drive devices for large fuel and cargo ships. Most marine engines use heavy fuel oil (HFO as the primary fuel, however, the physical and chemical characteristics of HFO are not clear because of its complex thermophysical properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of fuel properties on the spray and combustion characteristics under two-stroke marine engine-like conditions via a sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis of fuel properties for non-reacting and reacting simulations are conducted by comparing two fuels having different physical properties, such as fuel density, dynamic viscosity, critical temperature, and surface tension. The performances of the fuels are comprehensively studied under different ambient pressures, ambient temperatures, fuel temperatures, and swirl flow conditions. From the results of non-reacting simulations of HFO and diesel fuel properties in a constant volume combustion chamber, it can be found that the increase of the ambient pressure promotes fuel evaporation, resulting in a reduction in the steady liquid penetration of both diesel and HFO; however, the difference in the vapor penetrations of HFO and diesel reduces. Increasing the swirl flow significantly influences the atomization of both HFO and diesel, especially the liquid distribution of diesel. It is also found that the ambient temperature and fuel temperature have the negative effects on Sauter mean diameter (SMD distribution. For low-speed marine engines, the combustion performance of HFO is not sensitive to activation energy in a certain range of activation energy. At higher engine speed, the difference in the effects of different activation energies on the in-cylinder pressure increases. The swirl flow in the cylinder can significantly promote fuel evaporation and

  7. Seasonal evolution of snow permeability under equi-temperature and temperature-gradient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Domine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The permeability (K of snow to air flow affects the transfer of energy, water vapor and chemical species between the snow and the atmosphere. Yet today little is known about the temporal evolution of snow permeability as a function of metamorphic regime. Furthermore, our ability to simulate snow permeability over the seasonal evolution of a snowpack has not been tested. Here we have measured the evolution of snow permeability in a subarctic snowpack subject to high temperature-gradient (TG metamorphism. We have also measured the evolution of the same snowpack deposited over tables so that it evolved in the equi-temperature (ET regime. Permeability varies in the range 31 × 10−10 (ET regime to 650 × 10−10 m2 (TG regime. Permeability increases over time in TG conditions and decreases under ET conditions. Using measurements of density ρ and of specific surface area (SSA, from which the equivalent sphere radius r is determined, we show that the equation linking SSA, density ρ and permeability, K = 3.0 r2 e(−0.013 ρ (with K in m2, r in m and ρ in kg m−3 obtained in a previous study adequately predicts permeability values. The detailed snowpack model Crocus is used to simulate the physical properties of the TG and ET snowpacks. For the most part, all variables are well reproduced. Simulated permeabilities are up to a factor of two greater than measurements for depth hoar layers, which we attribute to snow microstructure and its aerodynamic properties. Finally, the large difference in permeabilities between ET and TG metamorphic regimes will impact atmosphere-snow energy and mass exchanges. These effects deserve consideration in predicting the effect of climate change on snow properties and snow–atmosphere interactions.

  8. Reversing the temperature dependence of the sensitized Er3+ luminescence intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, F.; Hryciw, A.; DeCorby, R.; Meldrum, A.

    2009-08-01

    The temperature-induced quenching of the Er3+ luminescence is a significant problem in silicon-based materials systems ultimately designed for room-temperature applications. Here, we show that amorphous silicon-rich oxide, moderately annealed in order to avoid growth of Si nanocrystals, exhibits a reversed temperature dependence in which the integrated Er3+ luminescence increases in intensity upon heating from 77 up to 300 K. This behavior is attributed to a unique spectrum of interacting defects that efficiently sensitize the Er3+ levels, even in the absence of nanocrystals. The effect could have ramifications in fiber-optic emitters or amplifiers to be operated at noncryogenic temperatures.

  9. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam; Steffensen, John F.; Rummer, Jodie L.

    2015-12-01

    As global temperatures increase, fish populations at low latitudes are thought to be at risk as they are adapted to narrow temperature ranges and live at temperatures close to their thermal tolerance limits. Behavioural movements, based on a preference for a specific temperature ( T pref), may provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. T pref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish to behaviourally manipulate their thermal environment. Regardless of treatment temperature, fish preferred 29.5 ± 0.25 °C, approximating summer average temperatures in the wild. However, 32 °C fish moved more frequently to correct their thermal environment than 28 °C fish, and daytime movements were more frequent than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns.

  10. Method development for compensating temperature effects in pressure sensitive paint measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demandante, Carlo Greg N.

    1994-01-01

    Pressure sensitive luminescent paints (PSP) have recently emerged as a viable technique for aerodynamic pressure measurements. The technique uses a surface coating which contains probe molecules that luminesce when excited by light of an appropriate wavelength. The photoluminescence of these materials is known to be quenched by the presence of molecular oxygen. Since oxygen is a fixed mole fraction of the air, the coating's luminescence intensity varies inversely with air pressure. Digital imaging of the luminescence varying across a coated surface produces a pressure distribution map over that surface. One difficulty encountered with this technique is the temperature effect on the luminescence intensity. Present PSP formulations have significant sensitivity to temperature. At the moment, the most practical way of correcting for temperature effects is to calibrate the paint in place at the operating temperatures by using a few well-placed pressure taps. This study is looking at development of temperature indicating coatings that can be applied and measured concurrently with PSP, and use the temperature measurement to compute the correct pressure. Two methods for this dual paint formulation are proposed. One method will use a coating that consists of temperature sensitive phosphors in a polymer matrix. This is similar in construction to PSP, except that the probe molecules used are selected primarily for their temperature sensitivity. Both organic phosphors (e.g., europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, bioprobes) and inorganic phosphors (e.g., Mg4(F)GeO6:Mn, La2O2S:Eu, Radelin Type phosphors, Sylvania Type phosphors) will be evaluated for their temperature sensing potential. The next method will involve a novel coating composing of five membered heterocyclic conducting polymers which are known to show temperature dependent luminescence (e.g., poly(3-alkylthiopene), poly(3-alkylselenophene), poly(3-alkylfuran)). Both methods will involve applying a bottom layer of

  11. Hospitalizations of children due to primary health care sensitive conditions in Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Suzana Costa; Mota, Eduardo; Dourado, Inês; Aquino, Rosana; Teles, Carlos; Medina, Maria Guadalupe

    2015-04-01

    Admissions due to primary health care sensitive conditions from 1999 to 2009 among children Health System's Hospital Information System, a negative binomial regression was applied to estimate rate ratio (RR) and 95%CI for the effect on primary health care sensitive condition rates (admissions/10,000 inhabitants) of the Family Health Program (FHP) coverage (%), some demographic variables and living conditions. Hospitalizations due to primary health care sensitive conditions represented 44.1% of 861,628 admissions and the rate declined from 557.6 to 318.9 (-42.8%), a reduction three times greater than the rate due to all other causes. Increased FHP coverage was protective against primary health care sensitive conditions (RR = 0.94; 95%CI: 0.89-0.99). A decline in hospitalizations due to primary health care sensitive conditions indicated improvements in health status and may be associated with the consolidation of primary health care. Studies on access and quality of primary health care in relation to child morbidity and hospitalizations are needed.

  12. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  13. Effects of Changes in Meteorological Conditions on Lake Evaporation, Water Temperature, and Heat Budget in a Deep Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Momii, Kazuro

    To reveal effects of changes in meteorological conditions on lake evaporation, water temperature, and heat budget in a deep lake, sensitivity analyses have been performed for Lake Ikeda, Kagoshima prefecture. In the study, the sensitivities of three aspects to the 10%-increased solar radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed were estimated based on numerical calculations for 1981-2005 with the verified one-dimensional mathematical model that computes thermal transfer in the lake. The results demonstrated that the meteorological component which gives the largest evaporation-promoting effect was solar radiation and the component which brings the largest lake-heating was air temperature. When solar radiation was increased, the vapor pressure difference between lake-surface and atmosphere was increased and the atmospheric stability was decreased, which present the desirable condition for evaporation. Air temperature being higher, the lake-surface was intensively heated by increased atmospheric radiation. As for the humidity case, lake evaporation was decreased in any season due to decrease in vapor pressure difference. Although rise in water temperature was caused by decrease in latent heat, it was inhibited with cooling by sensible heat. Wind being up, water temperature was fallen at the lake-surface and risen around the 20 m depth by vertical thermal mixing effect. The mixing effect prevented from releasing heat to atmosphere, resulting in the secondary large lake-heating but smaller than air temperature case.

  14. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-25

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are not annealed or annealed at low humidity level will have a low and highly temperature dependent sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more than 230 nm without loss in the grating strength.

  15. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C...... and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are not annealed or annealed at low humidity level will have a low and highly temperature dependent...... sensitivity and a high hysteresis in the humidity response, in particular when operated at high temperature. PMMA mPOFBGs annealed at high humidity show higher and more linear humidity sensitivity with negligible hysteresis. We also report how annealing at high humidity can blue-shift the FBG wavelength more...

  16. Soil organic matter mineralization of permafrost peat lands and sensitivity to temperature and lack of oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Richard E.; Diáková, Kateřina; Voigt, Carolina; Šantrůčková, Hana; Martikainen, Pertti; Biasi, Christina

    2017-04-01

    Globally, a significant pool of soil organic carbon (SOC) (Tarnocai et al. 2009) is stored in arctic peatlands where extensive permafrost prevents the decomposition of old soil organic matter (SOM). Vulnerability of ancient organic depositions in changing environment becomes a considerable issue in future climate models. Palsa mires, a typical cryogenic peatland type in subarctic tundra, are not only an important SOC pool but also have been reported as a source of nitrous oxide (N2O) (Marushchak et al. 2011). Microbial SOM mineralization and its sensitivity to changing environmental conditions are crucial to understand future C losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in this abundant landform of subarctic region. The purpose of this experiment was to determine potential SOM mineralization in different layers of deep soil cores from an Arctic peatland. First, we aimed to define a response of C losses and GHG exchange rates to temperature and aerobic/anaerobic conditions in different peat layers down to the permafrost and beyond. Secondly, we sought for relations among SOM mineralization, nutrient availability and parameters of indigenous microbial community. Finally, we attempted to link the potential SOM mineralization of the different peat layers with surface GHG fluxes from a proceeding study conducted with the same, intact soil cores. Five deep peat soil cores were separated into five layers (0 20, 20 40, 40 60 cm, permafrost interface and permafrost layer). Homogenized peat was incubated in a factorial set-up of three temperatures (4, 10, and 16 °C) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. At the beginning and the end of the total 5.5-months incubation period, we determined C and N availability, microbial biomass and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Heterotrophic respiration (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were monitored weekly at the initial phase and biweekly later during the incubation. First results show that C-loss from

  17. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  18. Influence of Temperature Variation on Optical Receiver Sensitivity and its Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the influence of temperature variation on the sensitivity of an avalanche-photodiode-based optical receiver applied in the free space optical communication link is discussed. Communication systems of this type are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, which markedly affect many photodiode and preamplifier parameters. The paper presents a receiver sensitivity calculation, taking into consideration the temperature dependence of avalanche photodiode gain, excess noise factor, dark current and thermal noise of preamplifier resistances, and describes the compensation of temperature effects on photodiode gain based on a corresponding change in the reverse voltage applied to the diode. The calculations are demonstrated on the connection of a small-area silicon APD operating in the wavelength range from 820 to 1150 nm with a transimpedance preamplifier using a bipolar junction transistor.

  19. Performance of solar collectors under low temperature conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunea, Mircea; Eicher, Sara; Hildbrand, Catherine

    evaluated and results compared to experimental measurements. A mathematical model is also under development to include, in addition to the condensation phenomena, the frost, the rain and the long-wave radiation gains/losses on the rear of the solar collector. While the potential gain from rain was estimated......The performance of four solar thermal collectors (flat plate, evacuated tube, unglazed with rear insulation and unglazed without rear insulation) was experimentally measured and simulated for temperatures below ambient. The influence of several parameters (e.g. collector inlet temperature, air...

  20. Using Reanalyses to quantify sensitivities in the simulation of Microwave Sounding Unit temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilo, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    Considerable scientific attention has been devoted to comparisons of observed and simulated Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) temperatures. When simulating synthetic MSU temperatures, most studies apply a single static weighting function to the profiles of temperature. A variant of this procedure relies on different weighting functions for land and ocean regions to account for differences in surface emissivity values. A small number of investigations have also used full radiative transfer codes to derive synthetic MSU temperatures from model and/or reanalysis data. To date, few studies have rigorously quantified the sensitivity of simulated MSU temperatures to the choice of simulation method. Here, we apply both the static weighting function and full radiative transfer code approaches to atmospheric temperature data from multiple reanalyses. Our motivation is to document the sensitivity of estimated synthetic MSU temperatures to a variety of different processing options. The static weighting function approach is applied directly to monthly-mean pressure level data. Surface pressure is used to mask values that reside below the material surface. In addition to pressure level temperatures, the view-angle resolving radiative transfer code also utilizes skin temperatures and profiles of specific humidity. Regions of high topography are masked with surface pressure data, and there is explicit treatment of surface temperature data when surface pressure exceeds the lowest standard pressure level output (e.g., 1000hPa). Additionally, a land/sea mask is used to specify differing surface emissivity values. Further processing choices relate to the vertical resolution of the input temperature data and the treatment of upper-level moisture. Results shown will highlight observed and simulated temperatures from the NCEP/NCAR, NCEP/DOE and ERA40 reanalyses data for MSU 2, MSU2LT and MSU4. This work is supported under the auspices of the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy at

  1. High temperature integrated ultrasonic transducers for engine condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, M.; Jen, C.K. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, PQ (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.; Wu, K.T. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Bird, J.; Galeote, B. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Aerospace Research; Mrad, N. [Department of National Defence, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Air Vehicles Research Station

    2009-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers (UTs) are used for real-time, in-situ or off-line nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of large metallic structures such as airplanes, automobiles, ships, pressure vessels and pipelines because of their subsurface inspection capability, fast inspection speed, simplicity and cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate effective integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUT) technology to perform non-intrusive engine NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM). High temperature IUTs made of bismuth titanate piezoelectric film greater than 50 {mu}m in thickness were coated directly onto a modified CF700 turbojet engine outer casing, oil sump and supply lines and gaskets using sol-gel spray technology. The assessment was limited to temperatures up to 500 degrees C. The center frequencies of the IUTs were approximately 10 to 17 MHz. Ultrasonic signals obtained in pulse/echo measurements were excellent. High temperature ultrasonic performance will likely be obtained in the transmission mode as well. The potential applications of the developed IUTs include non-intrusive real-time temperature, lubricant oil quality and metal debris monitoring within a turbojet engine environment. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Clusterin and chemotherapy sensitivity under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that clusterin modulates treatment sensitivity in a number of human cancers; however, the interaction between clusterin expression and hypoxia in controlling treatment response in CRC has not previously been examined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clusterin overexpression in CRC cells on sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and FOLFOX treatment under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions.

  3. Shifts in microbial trophic strategy explain different temperature sensitivity of CO2 flux under constant and diurnally varying temperature regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhen; Xie, Hongtu; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny; Chen, Baodong; Shao, Pengshuai; Liang, Chao

    2017-05-01

    Understanding soil CO2 flux temperature sensitivity (Q10) is critical for predicting ecosystem-level responses to climate change. Yet, the effects of warming on microbial CO2 respiration still remain poorly understood under current Earth system models, partly as a result of thermal acclimation of organic matter decomposition. We conducted a 117-day incubation experiment under constant and diurnally varying temperature treatments based on four forest soils varying in vegetation stand and soil horizon. Our results showed that Q10 was greater under varying than constant temperature regimes. This distinction was most likely attributed to differences in the depletion of available carbon between constant high and varying high-temperature treatments, resulting in significantly higher rates of heterotrophic respiration in the varying high-temperature regime. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing data using Illumina, the varying high-temperature regime harbored higher prokaryotic alpha-diversity, was more dominated by the copiotrophic strategists and sustained a distinct community composition, in comparison to the constant-high treatment. We found a tightly coupled relationship between Q10 and microbial trophic guilds: the copiotrophic prokaryotes responded positively with high Q10 values, while the oligotrophs showed a negative response. Effects of vegetation stand and soil horizon consistently supported that the copiotrophic vs oligotrophic strategists determine the thermal sensitivity of CO2 flux. Our observations suggest that incorporating prokaryotic functional traits, such as shifts between copiotrophy and oligotrophy, is fundamental to our understanding of thermal acclimation of microbially mediated soil organic carbon cycling. Inclusion of microbial functional shifts may provide the potential to improve our projections of responses in microbial community and CO2 efflux to a changing environment in forest ecosystems. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions

  4. Temperature and humidity independent control (THIC) of air-conditioning system

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaohua; Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the main components of the Temperature and Humidity Independent Control (THIC) of air-conditioning systems, including dehumidification devices, high-temperature cooling devices and indoor terminal devices.

  5. Response of different lines and cultivars of rice subjected to low temperatures under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra H Díaz Solís

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is the most important food crop in the world and primary source of food for more than a third of the population. The low temperatures are among the main abiotic stresses that affect the yield of this cereal. The objective of this work was to determinate the response of different lines and cultivars of rice in seedling state to low temperature stress under controlled conditions. 172 lines and cultivars were studied. It were subjected to 5 0C for 24 hours, when the plants were about three to four leaves. The evaluations were conducted by measured of chlorophyll fluorescence and visually. A wide range of response was obtained, which indicated a high allelic diversity for the low temperatures sensitivity in the studied germplasm. A group of 30 cultivars responded more favorably to the cold and the most prominent cultivars showed Fv/Fm values between 0.80 and 0.89. A significant relationship between visual evaluation and chlorophyll fluorescence was found. The correlation coefficient revealed a moderately strong relationship between both variables. Tolerant plant materials were more consistently identified. However, the dispersion between methods increased to more susceptible cultivars.   Keywords: cold tolerance, chlorophyll fluorescence, Oryza sativa, visual evaluation

  6. Storm track sensitivity to sea surface temperature resolution in a regional atmosphere model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woollings, Tim; Blackburn, Mike [University of Reading, Department of Meteorology, Walker Institute, Earley Gate, PO Box 243, Reading (United Kingdom); National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Reading (United Kingdom); Hoskins, Brian [University of Reading, Department of Meteorology, Walker Institute, Earley Gate, PO Box 243, Reading (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Grantham Institute, London (United Kingdom); Hassell, David [University of Reading, Met Office, Hadley Centre (Reading Unit) Meteorology Building, PO Box 243, Reading, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Hodges, Kevin [University of Reading, Environmental Systems Science Center, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    A high resolution regional atmosphere model is used to investigate the sensitivity of the North Atlantic storm track to the spatial and temporal resolution of the sea surface temperature (SST) data used as a lower boundary condition. The model is run over an unusually large domain covering all of the North Atlantic and Europe, and is shown to produce a very good simulation of the observed storm track structure. The model is forced at the lateral boundaries with 15-20 years of data from the ERA-40 reanalysis, and at the lower boundary by SST data of differing resolution. The impacts of increasing spatial and temporal resolution are assessed separately, and in both cases increasing the resolution leads to subtle, but significant changes in the storm track. In some, but not all cases these changes act to reduce the small storm track biases seen in the model when it is forced with low-resolution SSTs. In addition there are several clear mesoscale responses to increased spatial SST resolution, with surface heat fluxes and convective precipitation increasing by 10-20% along the Gulf Stream SST gradient. (orig.)

  7. Sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Trumbore, Susan; Davidson, Eric; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter decomposition depends on multiple factors that are being altered simultaneously as a result of global environmental change. For this reason it is important to study the overall sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to multiple and interacting drivers. Here we present an analysis of the potential response of decomposition rates to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture. To address this problem, we first present a theoretical framework to study the sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition when multiple driving factors change simultaneously. We then apply this framework to models and data at different levels of abstraction: 1) to a mechanistic model that addresses the limitation of enzyme activity by simultaneous effects of temperature and soil water content, the latter controlling substrate supply and oxygen concentration for microbial activity; 2) to different mathematical functions used to represent temperature and moisture effects on decomposition in biogeochemical models. To contrast model predictions at these two levels of organization, we compiled different datasets of observed responses in field and laboratory studies. Then we applied our conceptual framework to: 3) observations of soil respiration at the ecosystem level; 4) laboratory experiments looking at the response of heterotrophic respiration to independent changes in moisture and temperature; and 5) ecosystem-level experiments manipulating soil temperature and water content simultaneously. The combined theoretical and empirical evidence reviewed suggests: first, large uncertainties still remain regarding the combined controls of temperature and moisture on decomposition rates, particularly at high temperatures and the extremes of the soil moisture range; second, the highest sensitivities of decomposition rates are likely in systems where temperature and moisture are high such as tropical peatlands, and at temperatures near the freezing point

  8. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutants of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triman, K; Becker, E; Dammel, C

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants have been isolated following hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a plasmid containing Escherichia coli rRNA genes carrying selectable markers for spectinomycin resistance (U1192 in 16 S rRNA) and erythromycin resistance (G2058 in 23 S rRNA). These antibiotic resistance...

  9. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  10. Investigation of Temperature Sensitivity of a Polymer-Overlaid Microfiber Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Geun

    2017-10-21

    The temperature sensitivity of the free spectral range (FSR) for a polymer-overlaid microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The waist diameter of the optical microfiber can be controlled to alter the thermal expansion and optic properties of the polymer-coated MZI. Inserting an optical microfiber with a strong evanescent field into the MZI, a low index polymer with high thermal characteristics is deposited on the surface of the microfibers to realize a polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI. It was found that the thermal expansion factor in the proposed MZI plays an important role in the temperature sensitivity of the FSR. The temperature sensitivity of the polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI is improved, which is measured to be -8.29 nm/°C at 25 °C. The optical transmission spectrum of the polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI is converted to the spatial frequency spectrum via fast Fourier transform. The temperature sensitivity of the spatial frequency in the proposed polymer-overlaid MZI is estimated to be 18.31 pm(-1) °C(-1), which is 17 times higher than that of the microfiber MZI without polymer coating (1.04 pm(-1) °C(-1)).

  11. Investigation of Temperature Sensitivity of a Polymer-Overlaid Microfiber Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Geun Han

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The temperature sensitivity of the free spectral range (FSR for a polymer-overlaid microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The waist diameter of the optical microfiber can be controlled to alter the thermal expansion and optic properties of the polymer-coated MZI. Inserting an optical microfiber with a strong evanescent field into the MZI, a low index polymer with high thermal characteristics is deposited on the surface of the microfibers to realize a polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI. It was found that the thermal expansion factor in the proposed MZI plays an important role in the temperature sensitivity of the FSR. The temperature sensitivity of the polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI is improved, which is measured to be −8.29 nm/°C at 25 °C. The optical transmission spectrum of the polymer-overlaid microfiber MZI is converted to the spatial frequency spectrum via fast Fourier transform. The temperature sensitivity of the spatial frequency in the proposed polymer-overlaid MZI is estimated to be 18.31 pm−1 °C−1, which is 17 times higher than that of the microfiber MZI without polymer coating (1.04 pm−1 °C−1.

  12. Preparation and anti-bacterial properties of a temperature sensitive gel containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel temperature-sensitive spray gel containing silver nanoparticles and investigate its anti-bacterial properties in vitro. Methods: The aqueous complex gel was prepared by Pluronic F127 (18-22%) and Pluronic F68 (3-9%) through a cold method to obtain a p...

  13. High-sensitivity Cryogenic Temperature Sensors using Pressurized Fiber Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensing was studied using a pressurized fiber Bragg grating (PFBG). The PFBG was obtained by simply applying a small diametric load to a regular fiber Bragg grating (FBG), which was coated with polyimide of a thickness of 11 micrometers. The Bragg wavelength of the PFBG was measured at temperatures from 295 to 4.2 K. A pressure-induced transition occurred at 200 K during the cooling cycle. As a result the temperature sensitivity of the PFBG was found to be nonlinear but reach 24 pm/K below 200 K, more than three times the regular FBG. For the temperature change from 80 K to 10 K, the PFBG has a total Bragg wavelength shift of about 470 pm, 10 times more than the regular FBG. From room temperature to liquid helium temperature the PFBG gives a total wavelength shift of 3.78 nm, compared to the FBG of 1.51 nm. The effect of the coating thickness on the temperature sensitivity of the gratings is also discussed.

  14. THERMOGRAPHIC APPLICATIONS OF TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE FLUORESCENCE OF SrS:Cu PHOSPHORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. PUROHIT

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at investigating the temperature sensitive fluoro-optic behaviour of Cu-activated strontium sulphide (SrS phosphors and its possible application in thermography. Accordingly, SrS (Cu phosphors have been synthesized and painted with the help of adhesive on silica substrate. The excitation and emission spectra of such phosphor coatings have been recorded at room temperature (25C. The temperature dependence of fluorescence intensity and the lifetime of phosphorescence have also been studied. From the systematic variation of these two parameters with temperature, it appears that these phosphors are good candidates for thermographic application, at least, in the temperature range of investigation (25-150C.

  15. Factors influencing the temperature sensitivity of PMMA based optical fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Webb, David J.

    2014-05-01

    The Bragg wavelength of a PMMA based fiber grating is determined by the effective core index and the grating pitch, which, in temperature sensing, depend on the thermo-optic and thermal expansion coefficients of PMMA. These two coefficients are a function of surrounding temperature and humidity. Amorphous polymers including PMMA exhibit a certain degree of anisotropic thermal expansion. The anisotropic nature of expansion mainly depends on the polymer processing history. The expansion coefficient is believed to be lower in the direction of the molecular orientation than in the direction perpendicular to the draw direction. Such anisotropic behavior of polymers can be expected in drawn PMMA based optical fiber, and will lead to a reduced thermal expansion coefficient and larger temperature sensitivity than would be the case were the fiber to be isotropic. Extensive work has been carried out to identify these factors. The temperature responses of gratings have been measured at different relative humidity. Gratings fabricated on annealed and non-annealed PMMA optical fibers are used to compare the sensitivity performance as annealing is considered to be able to mitigate the anisotropic effect in PMMA optical fiber. Furthermore an experiment has been designed to eliminate the thermal expansion contribution to the grating wavelength change, leading to increased temperature sensitivity and improved response linearity.

  16. Nonwoven supported temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)/polyurethane copolymer hydrogel with antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohua; Hu, Jinlian; Meng, Qinghao

    2009-04-01

    This article is focused on the study of the antibacterial activity of temperature sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide/polyurethane (PNIPAAm/PU) hydrogel grafted nonwoven fabrics with chitosan modification. A series of temperature sensitive hydrogel grafted nonwoven fabrics with different N-isopropylacrylamide/polyurethane (NIPAAm/PU) feeding ratios have been synthesized by using ammonium persulfate (APS) as initiator and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-ethane-1,2-diamine (TEMED) as accelerator. FTIR and XPS were used to examine the surface modification of chitosan. The phase transition temperature of hydrogel grafted nonwoven fabrics was about 32 degrees C by DSC. S. aureus and E. coli were used to evaluate the antibacterial efficiency of the fabric composite. After chitosan modification, the hydrogel grafted nonwoven cellulose fabrics demonstrates an antibacterial activity to S. aureus. and E. coli and the antibacterial efficiency is about 80%.

  17. Sensitivity-enhanced temperature sensor with cascaded fiber optic Sagnac interferometers based on Vernier-effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Yang; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Xihua; Luo, Bin; Pan, Wei; Yan, Lianshan

    2015-02-01

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated with ~9 times sensitivity enhancement by using two cascaded Sagnac interferometers. These two Sagnac interferometers consist of the same type of polarization maintaining fibers with slightly different lengths. The working principle is analogous to a Vernier scale. One interferometer acts as filter, while the other is for temperature sensing. The envelope of the cascaded sensor shifts much more than single one with a certain enhancement factor, which related to the free space range difference between the filter and sensor interferometers. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced from -1.46 nm/°C based on single Sagnac configuration to -13.36 nm/°C.

  18. pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on novel cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymeric vaginal delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Kaoxiang; Mu, Hongjie; Tang, Mingtan; Liang, Rongcai; Wang, Aiping; Zhou, Shasha; Sun, Haijun; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Jianwen; Liu, Wanhui

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on a novel cleavable hydrazone-based pH-sensitive methoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-hydrazone-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (mPEG-Hz-CHEMS) polymer was used for vaginal administration. Methods The pH-sensitive, cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS was designed as a modified pH-sensitive liposome that would selectively degrade under locally acidic vaginal conditions. The novel pH-sensitive liposome was engineered to form a thermogel at body temperature and to degrade in an acidic environment. Results A dual-sensitive liposome gel with a high encapsulation efficiency of arctigenin was formed and improved the solubility of arctigenin characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The dual-sensitive liposome gel with a sol-gel transition at body temperature was degraded in a pH-dependent manner, and was stable for a long period of time at neutral and basic pH, but cleavable under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Arctigenin encapsulated in a dual-sensitive liposome gel was more stable and less toxic than arctigenin loaded into pH-sensitive liposomes. In vitro drug release results indicated that dual-sensitive liposome gels showed constant release of arctigenin over 3 days, but showed sustained release of arctigenin in buffers at pH 7.4 and pH 9.0. Conclusion This research has shed some light on a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel using a cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer for vaginal delivery. PMID:22679372

  19. Adaptation of Paramecium caudatum to variable conditions of temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Alison B; Fellous, Simon; Quillery, Elsa; Kaltz, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    The environment is rarely constant and organisms are exposed to spatial and temporal variation that will impact life-histories. It is important to understand how such variation affects the adaptation of organisms to their local environment. We compare the adaptation of populations of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum exposed to constant (23 °C or 35 °C) and temporally variable temperature environments (random daily fluctuations between 23 °C or 35 °C). Consistent with theory, our experiment shows the evolution of specialists when evolution proceeds in constant environments and generalists when the environment is temporally variable. In addition, we demonstrate costs for specialists of being locally adapted through reduced fitness in novel environments. Conversely, we do not find any costs for generalists, as all populations from variable environments had equal or superior performance to specialists in their own environment. The lack of a cost for generalists is emphasised by the presence of a super generalist that has the highest performance at both assay temperatures. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    of inbreeding effects in specific traits, such as age-specific mortality and life span, provide a good starting point, as a limited set of genes is expected to be involved. Results Here we report on a QTL mapping study on inbreeding related and temperature sensitive lethality in male Drosophila melanogaster...... simple, being due mainly to a single recessive QTL on the left arm of chromosome 2. This locus colocalised with a QTL that conditioned variation in female life span, acting as an overdominant locus for this trait. Male life span was additionally affected by variation at the X-chromosome. Conclusion...

  1. Numerical Analysis of Exergy for Air-Conditioning Influenced by Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Nang Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents numerical analysis of exergy for air-conditioning influenced by ambient temperature. The model of numerical simulation uses an integrated air conditioning system exposed in varied ambient temperature to observe change of the four main devices, the compressor, the condenser, the capillary, and the evaporator in correspondence to ambient temperature. The analysis devices of the four devices’s exergy influenced by the varied ambient temperature and found that the capillary has unusual increasing exergy loss vs. increasing ambient temperature in comparison to the other devices. The result shows that reducing exergy loss of the capillary influenced by the ambient temperature is the key for improving working efficiency of an air-conditioning system when influence of the ambient temperature is considered. The higher ambient temperature causes the larger pressure drop of capillary and more exergy loss.

  2. Enhanced H2 sensitivity at room temperature of ZnO nanowires functionalized by Pd nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shoutian; Fan, Guanghua; Qu, Shiliang; Wang, Qiang

    2011-10-01

    For sensitive detection of H2, ZnO nanowires networks decorated with photo-decomposed Pd nanoparticles were fabricated between femtosecond laser-writing interdigitated electrodes by chemical vapor deposition method. When H2 concentration is increased from 20 to 4000 ppm at room temperature, sensitivity of the sample is increased from 3.7% to 1017.9%. The high sensitivity can be explained by considering the reaction between the adsorbed O2- and the disassociated H atoms facilitated by Pd nanoparticles. This mechanism is further supported by the H2 response results under UV light illumination, which can reduce the amount of O2- on the ZnO surface, leading to depressed sensitivity. The sensor also shows high selectivity, long-term stability, and ultra-low power consumption of nanowatt level, due to the novel fabrication process.

  3. Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions in Persons with an Intellectual Disability--Development of a Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Robert S.; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene; Brownell, Marni; Colantonio, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is evidence that the primary care provided for persons with an intellectual disability living in the community has been inadequate. Hospitalization rates for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are considered an indicator for access to, and quality of, primary care. The objective of this research was to identify ACS…

  4. Strategies for reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freund, T.; Campbell, S.M.; Geissler, S.; Kunz, C.U.; Mahler, C.; Peters-Klimm, F.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex

  5. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A luminescent Lanthanide-free MOF nanohybrid for highly sensitive ratiometric temperature sensing in physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Zhang, Denan; Zeng, Jin; Gan, Ning; Cuan, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Luminescent MOF materials with tunable emissions and energy/charge transfer processes have been extensively explored as ratiometric temperature sensors. However, most of the ratiometric MOF thermometers reported thus far are based on the MOFs containing photoactive lanthanides, which are potentially facing cost issue and serious supply shortage. Here, we present a ratiometric luminescent thermometer based on a dual-emitting lanthanide-free MOF hybrid, which is developed by encapsulation of a fluorescent dye into a robust nanocrystalline zirconium-based MOF through a one-pot synthesis approach. The structure and morphology of the hybrid product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pore confinement effect well isolates the guest dye molecules and therefore suppresses the nonradiative energy transfer process between dye molecules. The incorporated dye emission is mainly sensitized by the organic linkers within MOF through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The ratiometric luminescence of the MOF hybrid shows a significant response to temperature due to the thermal-related back energy transfer process from dye molecules and organic linkers, thus can be exploited for self-calibrated temperature sensing. The maximum thermometric sensitivity is 1.19% °C -1 in the physiological temperature range, which is among the highest for the ratiomtric MOF thermometers that operating in 25-45°C. The temperature resolution is better than 0.1°C over the entire operative range (20-60°C). By integrating the advantages of excellent stability, nanoscale nature, and high sensitivity and precision in the physiological temperature range, this dye@MOF hybrid might have potential application in biomedical diagnosis. What' more, this work has expanded the possibility of non-lanthanide luminescent MOF materials for the development of ratiometric temperature sensors. Copyright © 2018

  7. Greater phenological sensitivity to temperature on higher Scottish mountains: new insights from remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Daniel S

    2013-11-01

    Mountain plants are considered among the species most vulnerable to climate change, especially at high latitudes where there is little potential for poleward or uphill dispersal. Satellite monitoring can reveal spatiotemporal variation in vegetation activity, offering a largely unexploited potential for studying responses of montane ecosystems to temperature and predicting phenological shifts driven by climate change. Here, a novel remote-sensing phenology approach is developed that advances existing techniques by considering variation in vegetation activity across the whole year, rather than just focusing on event dates (e.g. start and end of season). Time series of two vegetation indices (VI), normalized difference VI (NDVI) and enhanced VI (EVI) were obtained from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer MODIS satellite for 2786 Scottish mountain summits (600-1344 m elevation) in the years 2000-2011. NDVI and EVI time series were temporally interpolated to derive values on the first day of each month, for comparison with gridded monthly temperatures from the preceding period. These were regressed against temperature in the previous months, elevation and their interaction, showing significant variation in temperature sensitivity between months. Warm years were associated with high NDVI and EVI in spring and summer, whereas there was little effect of temperature in autumn and a negative effect in winter. Elevation was shown to mediate phenological change via a magnification of temperature responses on the highest mountains. Together, these predict that climate change will drive substantial changes in mountain summit phenology, especially by advancing spring growth at high elevations. The phenological plasticity underlying these temperature responses may allow long-lived alpine plants to acclimate to warmer temperatures. Conversely, longer growing seasons may facilitate colonization and competitive exclusion by species currently restricted to lower

  8. What are emergency-sensitive conditions? A survey of Canadian emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Simon; Lang, Eddy S; Quan, Hude; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-03-01

    In a previous study, we assembled a multidisciplinary Canadian panel and identified 37 International Classification of Diseases-10-Canada Diagnosis Groups (DGs) for which emergency department (ED) management may potentially reduce mortality (emergency-sensitive conditions). Before using these 37 DGs to calculate a hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) specific to emergency care, we aimed to test their face validity with ED care providers. We conducted a self-administered web survey among Canadian emergency physicians and nurses between November 22 and December 31, 2012. All members (N=2,507) of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians and the National Emergency Nurses Association were surveyed. They were asked to agree or disagree (binary response) with the panel classification for each of the 37 DG emergency-sensitive conditions identified and provide free text responses to identify missing entities. A total of 719 ED providers (719 of 2,507, 29%) completed the survey, of whom 470 were physicians (470 of 1,407, 33%) and 232 were nurses (232 of 1,100, 21%). Information on professional status was not provided for 17 respondents. Of 37 DGs, 32 (e.g., A41 sepsis) were rated by more than 80% of respondents to be emergency-sensitive conditions. The remaining five DGs (e.g., E11 type 2 diabetes mellitus) were rated by 68.5 to 79.7% of the respondents to be emergency-sensitive conditions. Respondents suggested an additional 31 emergency-sensitive diagnoses. We identified 37 emergency-sensitive DGs that had high face validity with emergency physicians and nurses, which will enable the calculation of an ED-HSMR.

  9. Mars Thermospheric Temperature Sensitivity to Solar EUV Forcing from the MAVEN EUV Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Ed; Eparvier, Francis; Andersson, Laila; Pilinski, Marcin; Chamberlin, Phillip; Fowler, Christopher; MAVEN Extreme Ultraviolet Monitor Team, MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves Team

    2017-10-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is the primary heat source for the Mars thermosphere, and the primary source of long-term temperature variability. The Mars obliquity, dust cycle, tides and waves also drive thermospheric temperature variability; and it is important to quantify the role of each in order to understand processes in the upper atmosphere today and, ultimately, the evolution of Mars climate over time. Although EUV radiation is the dominant heating mechanism, accurately measuring the thermospheric temperature sensitivity to EUV forcing has remained elusive, in part, because Mars thermospheric temperature varies dramatically with latitude and local time (LT), ranging from 150K on the nightside to 300K on the dayside. It follows that studies of thermospheric variability must control for location.Instruments onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) orbiter have begun to characterize thermospheric temperature sensitivity to EUV forcing. Bougher et al. [2017] used measurements from the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) and the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) to characterize solar activity trends in the thermosphere with some success. However, aside from restricting measurements to solar zenith angles (SZAs) below 75 degrees, they were unable to control for latitude and LT because repeat-track observations from either instrument were limited or unavailable.The MAVEN EUV Monitor (EUVM) has recently demonstrated the capability to measure thermospheric density from 100 to 200 km with solar occultations of its 17-22 nm channel. These new density measurements are ideal for tracking the long-term thermospheric temperature variability because they are inherently constrained to either 06:00 or 18:00 LT, and the orbit has precessed to include a range of ecliptic latitudes, a number of which have been revisited multiple times over 2.5 years. In this study we present, for the first-time, measurements of thermospheric

  10. Predicting plant performance under simultaneously changing environmental conditions – the interplay between temperature, light and internode growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eKahlen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant performance is significantly influenced by prevailing light and temperature conditions during plant growth and development. For plants exposed to natural fluctuations in abiotic environmental conditions it is however laborious and cumbersome to experimentally assign any contribution of individual environmental factors to plant responses. This study aimed at analyzing the interplay between light, temperature and internode growth based on model approaches. We extended the light-sensitive virtual plant model L-Cucumber by implementing a common Arrhenius function for appearance rates, growth rates and growth durations. For two greenhouse experiments, the temperature-sensitive model approach resulted in a precise prediction of cucumber mean internode lengths and number of internodes, as well as in accurately predicted patterns of individual internode lengths along the main stem. In addition, a system’s analysis revealed that environmental data averaged over the experimental period were not necessarily related to internode performance. Finally, the need for a species-specific parameterization of the temperature response function and related aspects in modelling temperature effects on plant development and growth is discussed.

  11. Higher climatological temperature sensitivity of soil carbon in cold than warm climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koven, Charles D.; Hugelius, Gustaf; Lawrence, David M.; Wieder, William R.

    2017-11-01

    The projected loss of soil carbon to the atmosphere resulting from climate change is a potentially large but highly uncertain feedback to warming. The magnitude of this feedback is poorly constrained by observations and theory, and is disparately represented in Earth system models (ESMs). To assess the climatological temperature sensitivity of soil carbon, we calculate apparent soil carbon turnover times that reflect long-term and broad-scale rates of decomposition. Here, we show that the climatological temperature control on carbon turnover in the top metre of global soils is more sensitive in cold climates than in warm climates and argue that it is critical to capture this emergent ecosystem property in global-scale models. We present a simplified model that explains the observed high cold-climate sensitivity using only the physical scaling of soil freeze-thaw state across climate gradients. Current ESMs fail to capture this pattern, except in an ESM that explicitly resolves vertical gradients in soil climate and carbon turnover. An observed weak tropical temperature sensitivity emerges in a different model that explicitly resolves mineralogical control on decomposition. These results support projections of strong carbon-climate feedbacks from northern soils and demonstrate a method for ESMs to capture this emergent behaviour.

  12. Sensitivity of extreme precipitation to temperature: the variability of scaling factors from a regional to local perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2017-09-01

    Potential increases in extreme rainfall induced hazards in a warming climate have motivated studies to link precipitation intensities to temperature. Increases exceeding the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) rate of 6-7%/°C-1 are seen in short-duration, convective, high-percentile rainfall at mid latitudes, but the rates of change cease or revert at regionally variable threshold temperatures due to moisture limitations. It is unclear, however, what these findings mean in term of the actual risk of extreme precipitation on a regional to local scale. When conditioning precipitation intensities on local temperatures, key influences on the scaling relationship such as from the annual cycle and regional weather patterns need better understanding. Here we analyze these influences, using sub-hourly to daily precipitation data from a dense network of 189 stations in south-eastern Austria. We find that the temperature sensitivities in the mountainous western region are lower than in the eastern lowlands. This is due to the different weather patterns that cause extreme precipitation in these regions. Sub-hourly and hourly intensities intensify at super-CC and CC-rates, respectively, up to temperatures of about 17 °C. However, we also find that, because of the regional and seasonal variability of the precipitation intensities, a smaller scaling factor can imply a larger absolute change in intensity. Our insights underline that temperature precipitation scaling requires careful interpretation of the intent and setting of the study. When this is considered, conditional scaling factors can help to better understand which influences control the intensification of rainfall with temperature on a regional scale.

  13. Sensitive room-temperature terahertz detection via the photothermoelectric effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinghan; Sushkov, Andrei B.; Suess, Ryan J.; Jadidi, Mohammad M.; Jenkins, Gregory S.; Nyakiti, Luke O.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Li, Shanshan; Yan, Jun; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Murphy, Thomas E.; Drew, H. Dennis; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2014-10-01

    Terahertz radiation has uses in applications ranging from security to medicine. However, sensitive room-temperature detection of terahertz radiation is notoriously difficult. The hot-electron photothermoelectric effect in graphene is a promising detection mechanism; photoexcited carriers rapidly thermalize due to strong electron-electron interactions, but lose energy to the lattice more slowly. The electron temperature gradient drives electron diffusion, and asymmetry due to local gating or dissimilar contact metals produces a net current via the thermoelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate a graphene thermoelectric terahertz photodetector with sensitivity exceeding 10 V W-1 (700 V W-1) at room temperature and noise-equivalent power less than 1,100 pW Hz-1/2 (20 pW Hz-1/2), referenced to the incident (absorbed) power. This implies a performance that is competitive with the best room-temperature terahertz detectors for an optimally coupled device, and time-resolved measurements indicate that our graphene detector is eight to nine orders of magnitude faster than those. A simple model of the response, including contact asymmetries (resistance, work function and Fermi-energy pinning) reproduces the qualitative features of the data, and indicates that orders-of-magnitude sensitivity improvements are possible.

  14. Soil organic matter decomposition and temperature sensitivity after forest fire in permafrost regions in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, Heidi; Palviainen, Marjo; Köster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    On the Northern Hemisphere, 24% of soils are underlain by permafrost. These soils contain 50% of the global soil carbon pool. The Northern Hemisphere is also the region which is predicted to be most affected by climate warming and this causes uncertainties over the future of the permafrost. It has been estimated that 25% of permafrost might thaw by 2100, exposing previously frozen carbon pools to decomposition. In addition, global warming is expected to cause increase in the frequency of wild fires, which further increase permafrost melting by removing the insulating organic surface layer. The amount of released soil carbon from permafrost soils after forest fire is affected by degradability and temperature sensitivity of the soil organic matter, as well as soil depth and the stage of succession. Yet the common effect of these factors remains unclear. We studied how soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity (Q10) vary in different depths and within time by taking soil samples from different fire chronosequence areas (burned 3, 25, 46 and 100 years ago) from permafrost region in Northern Canada (Yukon and Northwest Territories, along Dempster Highway). The samples from three different depths (5, 10 and 30 cm) were incubated in four different temperatures (1, 7, 13 and 19°C) over 24h. Our results showed that the CO2 fluxes followed the stages of succession, with recently burned sites having lowest rates. The organic matter at 5 cm depth proved to be more labile and temperature sensitive than in deeper depths. The Q10 values, however, did not differ between sites, excluding 30 cm at the most recently burned site that had a significantly higher Q10 value than the other sites. The results implicate that heterotrophic soil respiration decreases on permafrost regions during the first stages after forest fire. At the same time the temperature sensitivity in deeper soil layers may increase.

  15. Synoptic conditions leading to extremely high temperatures in Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Prieto, L.; Hernandez, E.; Teso, T. del [Dept. Fisica de la Tierra II, Fac. CC. Fisicas, Univ. Camplutense de Madrid (Spain); Diaz, J. [Centro Universitario de Salud Publica, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-02-01

    Extremely hot days (EHD) in Madrid have been analysed to determine the synoptic patterns that produce EHDs during the period of 1955-1998. An EHD is defined as a day with maximum temperature higher than 36.5 C, a value which is the threshold for the intense effects on mortatility and it coincides with the 95 percentile of the series. Two different situations have been detected as being responsible for an EHD occurrence, one more dynamical, produced by southern fluxes, and another associated with a stagnation situation over Iberia of a longer duration. Both account for 92% of the total number of days, thus providing an efficient classification framework. A circulation index has been derived to characterise and forecast an EHD occurrence. This paper shows that EHD occur in Madrid during short duration events, and no long heat waves, like those recorded in other cities, are present. Additionally, no clear pattern can be detected in the EHD frequency; the occurrence is tied to changes in the summer location of the Azores high. (orig.)

  16. Winter temperature conditions (1670-2010) reconstructed from varved sediments, western Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Boreux, Maxime P.

    2017-09-01

    Advances in paleoclimatology from the Arctic have provided insights into long-term climate conditions. However, while past annual and summer temperature have received considerable research attention, comparatively little is known about winter paleoclimate. Arctic winter is of special interest as it is the season with the highest sensitivity to climate change, and because it differs substantially from summer and annual measures. Therefore, information about past changes in winter climate is key to improve our knowledge of past forced climate variability and to reduce uncertainty in climate projections. In this context, Arctic lakes with snowmelt-fed catchments are excellent potential winter climate archives. They respond strongly to snowmelt-induced runoff, and indirectly to winter temperature and snowfall conditions. To date, only a few well-calibrated lake sediment records exist, which appear to reflect site-specific responses with differing reconstructions. This limits the possibility to resolve large-scale winter climate change prior the instrumental period. Here, we present a well-calibrated quantitative temperature and snowfall record for the extended winter season (November through March; NDJFM) from Chevalier Bay (Melville Island, NWT, Canadian Arctic) back to CE 1670. The coastal embayment has a large catchment influenced by nival terrestrial processes, which leads to high sedimentation rates and annual sedimentary structures (varves). Using detailed microstratigraphic analysis from two sediment cores and supported by μ-XRF data, we separated the nival sedimentary units (spring snowmelt) from the rainfall units (summer) and identified subaqueous slumps. Statistical correlation analysis between the proxy data and monthly climate variables reveals that the thickness of the nival units can be used to predict winter temperature (r = 0.71, pc < 0.01, 5-yr filter) and snowfall (r = 0.65, pc < 0.01, 5-yr filter) for the western Canadian High Arctic over the last

  17. A sensitive time-resolved radiation pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements above 1500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, Mark B.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The general design, calibration, and performance of a new high-sensitivity radiation pyrometer are described. The pyrometer can determine time-resolved temperatures (as low as 1500 K) in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of light emitted from shocked solid samples in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (0.5-1.0 micron). The high sensitivity of the radiation pyrometer is attributed to the large angular aperture (0.06 sr), the large bandwidth per channel (up to 0.1 micron), the large photodiode detection areas (1.0 sq cm), and the small number of calibrated channels (4) among which light is divided.

  18. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  19. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Pil-Mun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Seok [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Min [Atomic Energy Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Gwacheon 427-715 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Jin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D{sub 10} value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  20. Sensitivity of frost occurrence to temperature variability in the European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Ingeborg; Matulla, Christoph; Böhm, Reinhard; Ungersböck, Markus; Maugeri, Maurizio; Nanni, Teresa; Pastorelli, Rossella

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we set out to investigate the linkage of frost frequency to monthly mean temperature and its sensitivity to temperature changes. According to other related studies, the linkage between frost frequency and monthly mean temperature is approximated month per month via hyperbolic tangent functions. These models are validated using three validation experiments including split sample tests and temporal cross-validation. As there are quality-checked station data in Austria, whose temporal resolution and length allow for such a validation procedure, the validation experiments are conducted there.After the performance of the empirical models is evaluated and found adequate, the hyperbolic tangent approach is applied to about 500 stations within the so called Greater Alpine region (GAR), which extends from about 4 °E to 18 °E and from 44 °N to 49 °N. Using these models, it is possible to derive the sensitivity of frost frequency for any location for which the annual temperature cycle is known. This strategy is explicitly demonstrated for the Po Plain, where vertical temperature profiles on a monthly base are on hand as well as in Austria, where spatially high resolved maps of monthly mean temperature are available. Moreover, at stations for which long-term homogenised series of monthly mean temperature are available, reconstructions of frost frequency via the empirical models are done, returning to historical periods where no measurements of minimum temperature exist.On the basis of these findings, the impact of a possible future warming can be assessed, which is essential with regard to glaciers, permafrost and avalanches. Reduction in frost might bring positive economic aspects for agriculture, but negative consequences for low level skiing areas. Copyright

  1. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  2. Sea-ice cover in the Nordic Seas and the sensitivity to Atlantic water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Spall, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the sea-ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. However, with its proximity to the warm Atlantic water, how a sea-ice cover can persist in the Nordic Seas is not well understood. In this study, we apply an eddy-resolving configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with an idealized topography to study the presence of sea ice in a Nordic Seas-like domain. We assume an infinite amount of warm Atlantic water present in the south by restoring the southern area to constant temperatures. The sea-surface temperatures are restored toward cold, atmospheric temperatures, and as a result, sea ice is present in the interior of the domain. However, the sea-ice cover in the margins of the Nordic Seas, an area with a warm, cyclonic boundary current, is sensitive to the amount of heat entering the domain, i.e., the restoring temperature in the south. When the temperature of the warm, cyclonic boundary current is high, the margins are free of sea ice and heat is released to the atmosphere. We show that with a small reduction in the temperature of the incoming Atlantic water, the Nordic Seas-like domain is fully covered in sea ice. Warm water is still entering the Nordic Seas, however, this happens at depths below a cold, fresh surface layer produced by melted sea ice. Consequently, the heat release to the atmosphere is reduced along with the eddy heat fluxes. Results suggest a threshold value in the amount of heat entering the Nordic Seas before the sea-ice cover disappears in the margins. We study the sensitivity of this threshold to changes in atmospheric temperatures and vertical diffusivity.

  3. [Soil Microbial Respiration Under Different Soil Temperature Conditions and Its Relationship to Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Invertase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Shu-tao; Hu, Zheng-hua; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the soil microbial respiration under different temperature conditions and its relationship to soil dissolved organic carbon ( DOC) and invertase, an indoor incubation experiment was performed. The soil samples used for the experiment were taken from Laoshan, Zijinshan, and Baohuashan. The responses of soil microbial respiration to the increasing temperature were studied. The soil DOC content and invertase activity were also measured at the end of incubation. Results showed that relationships between cumulative microbial respiration of different soils and soil temperature could be explained by exponential functions, which had P values lower than 0.001. The coefficient of temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) varied from 1.762 to 1.895. The Q10 value of cumulative microbial respiration decreased with the increase of soil temperature for all soils. The Q10 value of microbial respiration on 27 days after incubation was close to that of 1 day after incubation, indicating that the temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant organic carbon may be similar to that of labile organic carbon. For all soils, a highly significant ( P = 0.003 ) linear relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and soil DOC content could be observed. Soil DOC content could explain 31.6% variances of cumulative soil microbial respiration. For the individual soil and all soils, the relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and invertase activity could be explained by a highly significant (P invertase was a good indicator of the magnitude of soil microbial respiration.

  4. Temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of fine root litter in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Makita

    Full Text Available The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59-3.31 and 1.28-6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36-6.31 and 1.65-5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter.

  5. Temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of fine root litter in a temperate broad-leaved forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Kawamura, Ayumi

    2015-01-01

    The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm) of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59-3.31 and 1.28-6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36-6.31 and 1.65-5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0-0.5 and 0.5-2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter.

  6. Identifying emergency-sensitive conditions for the calculation of an emergency care inhospital standardized mortality ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Simon; Lang, Eddy S; Quan, Hude; Stelfox, Henry T

    2014-04-01

    Hospital standardized mortality ratios are used for hospital performance assessment. As a first step to develop a ratio variant sensitive to the outcome of patients admitted from the emergency department (ED), we identified International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Canada diagnosis groups in which high-quality ED care would be expected to reduce inhospital mortality (emergency-sensitive conditions). To identify emergency-sensitive conditions, we assembled a multidisciplinary panel of emergency care providers and managers (n=14). Using a modified RAND/University of California, Los Angeles Appropriateness Method, 3 rounds of independent ratings including a teleconference were conducted from May to October 2012. Panelists serially rated diagnosis groups included in the Canadian hospital standardized mortality ratio (n=72) according to the extent ED management influences mortality. The panel rated ED care as potentially reducing patient mortality for 37 diagnosis groups (eg, sepsis) and morbidity for 43 diagnosis groups (eg, atrial fibrillation) and rated timely ED care as critical for 40 diagnosis groups (eg, stroke). Panelists also identified 47 diagnosis groups (eg, asthma) not included in the Canadian hospital standardized mortality ratio in which mortality could potentially be decreased by ED care. We identified 37 diagnosis groups representing emergency-sensitive conditions that will enable the calculation of a hospital standardized mortality ratio relevant to emergency care. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  8. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Haiyan; Hu Yuzhu [Department of Analytical Chemistry, School of Basic Science, 24 Shennong Road, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Jian; Liu Fei; Chen Xinyang; Gu Yueqing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, 24 Shennong Road, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qian Zhiyu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 21009 (China)], E-mail: njhuyuzu@126.com, E-mail: guyueqing@hotmail.com

    2008-05-07

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 deg. C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment.

  9. Destruction of low-temperature insulation under the condition of periodic duty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovnikov Vyacheslav Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical investigation of thermal stresses within low-temperature insulation covering cryogenic pipelines and the numerical probability analysis of low-temperature insulation destruction under the condition of periodic duty were carried out. The minimal longevity values for foamed polyurethane and mineral cotton were established. The results of longevity analysis for foamed polyurethane and mineral cotton under the condition of environment temperature variation were obtained.

  10. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  11. Piezoresistive Sensitivity, Linearity and Resistance Time Drift of Polysilicon Nanofilms with Different Deposition Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhi Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous research work indicated that highly boron doped polysilicon nanofilms (≤100 nm in thickness have higher gauge factor (the maximum is ~34 for 80 nm-thick films and better temperature stability than common polysilicon films (≥ 200nm in thickness at the same doping levels. Therefore, in order to further analyze the influence of deposition temperature on the film structure and piezoresistance performance, the piezoresistive sensitivity, piezoresistive linearity (PRL and resistance time drift (RTD of 80 nm-thick highly boron doped polysilicon nanofilms (PSNFs with different deposition temperatures were studied here. The tunneling piezoresistive model was established to explain the relationship between the measured gauge factors (GFs and deposition temperature. It was seen that the piezoresistance coefficient (PRC of composite grain boundaries is higher than that of grains and the magnitude of GF is dependent on the resistivity of grain boundary (GB barriers and the weight of the resistivity of composite GBs in the film resistivity. In the investigations on PRL and RTD, the interstitial-vacancy (IV model was established to model GBs as the accumulation of IV pairs. And the recrystallization of metastable IV pairs caused by material deformation or current excitation is considered as the prime reason for piezoresistive nonlinearity (PRNL and RTD. Finally, the optimal deposition temperature for the improvement of film performance and reliability is about 620 °C and the high temperature annealing is not very effective in improving the piezoresistive performance of PSNFs deposited at lower temperatures.

  12. Design of temperature-independent zero-birefringence pressure sensitive adhesives (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Kaoru; Shafiee, Houran; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Oda, Sumihisa; Tagaya, Akihiro; Koike, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystal displays (LCDs) are composed of two glass substrates, two polarizers and some optical films. These components are laminated by pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs). When a polarizer shrinks by humidity or the heat from a backlight of LCDs, stress appears and deforms PSAs. PSAs tend to exhibit birefringence due to applied stress and temperature change, which causes light leakage degrading image quality of LCDs. PSAs are consisted of main chain polymers and cross-linkers. To evaluate birefringence of PSAs at room temperature is difficult because PSAs easily plastically deform at the temperature. The purpose of this article is to design temperature-independent zero-birefringence PSAs (TIZBPSAs) exhibiting almost no birefringence even during stress-induced deformation over a wide temperature range. Butyl acrylate (BA) and phenoxyethyl acrylate (PHEA) were selected as the monomers of main chain polymers and an isocyanate-type cross-linker was added. Trilaminar films were prepared in which PSAs were sandwiched between two supporting films. We successfully evaluated birefringence and temperature dependence of birefringence of PSAs for the first time by using temperature-independent zero-birefringence polymers (TIZBPs) as the supporting films. TIZBPs, designed in our group, show almost no orientational birefringence even when the polymer main chain is in an oriented state and almost no temperature dependence of orientational birefringence over a wide temperature range. We have proposed a novel method to design PSAs having desirable the birefringence properties by determining the contributions of BA, PHEA and the cross-linker to birefringence and temperature dependence of PSAs quantitatively. Furthermore, we have designed TIZBPSAs by the proposed method.

  13. Role of temperature in the recombination reaction on dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçaira, J; Mesquita, I; Andrade, L; Mendes, A

    2015-09-21

    The performance of photovoltaic (PV) devices as a function of temperature is crucial for technical development and for accurate commercial information. Along with solar irradiance, temperature is the most important operating factor of the PV device performance. Normally, it is widely accepted that dye sensitized solar cells (DSC) show minimal energy efficiency dependence with temperature (20-60 °C). The energy efficiency in DSCs depends on the light absorption, charge transport (ohmic resistances) and recombination rates. In this study, the recombination reaction kinetics was studied within a wide temperature range. A unique laser assisted sealing technique that allows studying the temperature effect between -5 °C and 105 °C without electrolyte leakage or external contamination was used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest operating temperature ever considered in kinetic studies of liquid state DSCs. The electrochemical reaction between electrons and triiodide/iodide ions was shown to be the most important factor for determining the energy efficiency of DSCs as a function of temperature. It was concluded that the activation energy of the recombination reactions depends on the interface where it happens - TiO2/electrolyte and SnO2-F/electrolyte - and on the temperature. It was found that in addition to temperature having a deep influence on the recombination reaction rate, the energy of the injecting electron is also critical. These conclusions should provide solid ground for further developments in the DSCs and perovskite solar cells, and allow a better comparison of the energy efficiency of different PV technologies over a range of operating temperatures.

  14. Classifying multi-model wheat yield impact response surfaces showing sensitivity to temperature and precipitation change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; Asseng, Senthold; Baranowski, Piotr; Basso, Bruno; Bodin, Per; Buis, Samuel; Cammarano, Davide; Deligios, Paola; Destain, Marie France; Dumont, Benjamin; Ewert, Frank; Ferrise, Roberto; François, Louis; Gaiser, Thomas; Hlavinka, Petr; Jacquemin, Ingrid; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Kollas, Chris; Krzyszczak, Jaromir; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Minet, Julien; Minguez, M.I.; Montesino, Manuel; Moriondo, Marco; Müller, Christoph; Nendel, Claas; Öztürk, Isik; Perego, Alessia; Rodríguez, Alfredo; Ruane, Alex C.; Ruget, Françoise; Sanna, Mattia; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Slawinski, Cezary; Stratonovitch, Pierre; Supit, Iwan; Waha, Katharina; Wang, Enli; Wu, Lianhai; Zhao, Zhigan; Rötter, Reimund P.

    2017-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in

  15. Study of the nonuniform behavior of temperature sensitivity in bare and embedded fiber Bragg gratings: experimental results and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakud, R; Kumar, J; Prakash, O; Dixit, S K

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an experiment and analysis on the factors affecting nonlinear evolution of Bragg wavelength with change in temperature in typical bare and embedded fiber Bragg grating-based (FBG) temperature sensors. The purpose of the study was to find the constants in the function required to evaluate temperature from Bragg wavelength shift. The temperature sensitivity of bare FBGs was found to increase with temperature elevation, and is different for FBGs written in different fiber types. The average temperature sensitivity increased by about 20% when the bare FBG temperature was elevated from 25°C to 525°C. The average temperature sensitivity of the embedded FBG sensor, investigated in the temperature range of 30°C-90°C, was a factor of 2-3 times larger than for bare FBG, depending on its fastened length with the substrate. Analytically, it is shown that the nonuniform behavior of temperature sensitivity in bare FBGs is the result of both the thermal expansion effect of the fiber and the temperature derivatives of the effective refractive index. The strain transfer and temperature coefficients of thermal expansion of the substrate affect the nonuniform behavior of temperature sensitivity in embedded FBG sensors.

  16. Temperature distribution in the human body under various conditions of induced hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, O. V.; Perelman, T. L.; Fradkin, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model based on heat balance equations was developed for studying temperature distribution in the human body under deep hyperthermia which is often induced in the treatment of malignant tumors. The model yields results which are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The distribution of temperature under various conditions of induced hyperthermia, i.e. as a function of water temperature and supply rate, is examined on the basis of temperature distribution curves in various body zones.

  17. Extreme Sensitivity of Room-Temperature Photoelectric Effect for Terahertz Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhou, Wei; Tong, Jinchao; Huang, Jingguo; Ouyang, Cheng; Qu, Yue; Wu, Jing; Gao, Yanqing; Chu, Junhao

    2016-01-06

    Extreme sensitivity of room-temperature photoelectric effect for terahertz (THz) detection is demonstrated by generating extra carriers in an electromagnetic induced well located at the semiconductor, using a wrapped metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The excellent performance achieved with THz detectors shows great potential to open avenues for THz detection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Allele-specific suppression of the temperature sensitivity of fitA/fitB ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature sensitive transcription defective mutant of Escherichia coli originally called fitA76 has been shown to harbour two missense mutations namely pheS5 and fit95. In order to obtain a suppressor of fitA76, possibly mapping in rpoD locus, a Ts+ derivative (JV4) was isolated from a fitA76 mutant. It was found that ...

  19. Temperature insensitive hysteresis free highly sensitive polymer optical fiber Bragg grating humidity sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Woyessa, Getinet; Nielsen, Kristian; Stefani, Alessio; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The effect of humidity on annealing of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) and the resulting humidity responsivity are investigated. Typically annealing of PMMA POFs is done in an oven without humidity control around 80°C and therefore at low humidity. We demonstrate that annealing at high humidity and high temperature improves the performances of mPOFBGs in terms of stability and sensitivity to humidity. PMMA POFBGs that are ...

  20. Temperature sensitivity of cardiac function in pelagic fishes with different vertical mobilities: yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus), and swordfish (Xiphias gladius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Gina L J; Shiels, Holly A; Brill, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    We measured the temperature sensitivity, adrenergic sensitivity, and dependence on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) of ventricular muscle from pelagic fishes with different vertical mobility patterns: bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), and mahimahi (Coryphaena hippurus) and a single specimen from swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Ventricular muscle from the bigeye tuna and mahimahi exhibited a biphasic response to an acute decrease in temperature (from 26 degrees to 7 degrees C); twitch force and kinetic parameters initially increased and then declined. The magnitude of this response was larger in the bigeye tuna than in the mahimahi. Under steady state conditions at 26 degrees C, inhibition of SR Ca(2+) release and reuptake with ryanodine and thapsigargin decreased twitch force and kinetic parameters, respectively, in the bigeye tuna only. However, the initial inotropy associated with decreasing temperature was abolished by SR inhibition in both the bigeye tuna and the mahimahi. Application of adrenaline completely reversed the effects of ryanodine and thapsigargin, but this effect was diminished at cold temperatures. In the yellowfin tuna, temperature and SR inhibition had minor effects on twitch force and kinetics, while adrenaline significantly increased these parameters. Limited data suggest that swordfish ventricular muscle responds to acute temperature reduction, SR inhibition, and adrenergic stimulation in a manner similar to that of bigeye tuna ventricular muscle. In aggregate, our results show that the temperature sensitivity, SR dependence, and adrenergic sensitivity of pelagic fish hearts are species specific and that these differences reflect species-specific vertical mobility patterns.

  1. Temperature-Sensitive Plant Cells with Shunted Indole-3-Acetic Acid Conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetiker, J. H.; Aeschbacher, G.

    1997-01-01

    Cells of henbane (Hyoscyamus muticus L.) grow indefinitely in culture without exogenous auxin. Cells of its temperature-sensitive variant XIIB2 grow like the wild type at 26[deg]C but die rapidly at 33[deg]C unless auxin is added to the medium. Despite this temperature-sensitive auxin auxotrophy, XIIB2 produces wild-type amounts of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA is the predominant auxin and is important for plant growth and development. Since the IAA production of the variant is functional, we investigated whether the synthesis or degradation of IAA metabolites, possibly active auxins themselves, is altered. The IAA metabolites were IAA-aspartate (IAAsp) and IAA-glucose. The wild type converted IAA mainly to IAAsp, whereas the variant produced mainly IAA-glucose. Exogenous auxin corrected the shunted IAA metabolism of the variant. The half-life of labeled IAAsp in the variant was reduced 21-fold, but in the presence of exogenous auxin it was not different from the wild type. The temperature sensitivity of XIIB2 was also corrected by supplying IAAsp. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that henbane rapidly metabolizes IAAsp to compounds not identical to IAA. The data show that the variant XIIB2 is a useful tool to study the function of IAA conjugates to challenge the popular hypothesis that IAA conjugates are merely slow-release storage forms of IAA. PMID:12223777

  2. Limits to global and Australian temperature change this century based on expert judgment of climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Michael R.; Colman, Robert; Bhend, Jonas; Moise, Aurel F.

    2017-05-01

    The projected warming of surface air temperature at the global and regional scale by the end of the century is directly related to emissions and Earth's climate sensitivity. Projections are typically produced using an ensemble of climate models such as CMIP5, however the range of climate sensitivity in models doesn't cover the entire range considered plausible by expert judgment. Of particular interest from a risk-management perspective is the lower impact outcome associated with low climate sensitivity and the low-probability, high-impact outcomes associated with the top of the range. Here we scale climate model output to the limits of expert judgment of climate sensitivity to explore these limits. This scaling indicates an expanded range of projected change for each emissions pathway, including a much higher upper bound for both the globe and Australia. We find the possibility of exceeding a warming of 2 °C since pre-industrial is projected under high emissions for every model even scaled to the lowest estimate of sensitivity, and is possible under low emissions under most estimates of sensitivity. Although these are not quantitative projections, the results may be useful to inform thinking about the limits to change until the sensitivity can be more reliably constrained, or this expanded range of possibilities can be explored in a more formal way. When viewing climate projections, accounting for these low-probability but high-impact outcomes in a risk management approach can complement the focus on the likely range of projections. They can also highlight the scale of the potential reduction in range of projections, should tight constraints on climate sensitivity be established by future research.

  3. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  4. Sensitivity of Asian and African climate to variations in seasonal insolation, glacial ice cover, sea surface temperature, and Asian orography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenocal, Peter B.; Rind, David

    1993-01-01

    A general circulation model was used to investigate the sensitivity of Asian and African climate to prescribed changes in boundary conditions with the objective of identifying the relative importance of individual high-latitude glacial boundary conditions on seasonal climate and providing a physical basis for interpreting the paleoclimate record. The circulation model is described and results are presented. Insolation forcing increased summer Asian monsoon winds, while increased high-latitude ice cover strengthened winter Asian trade winds causing decreased precipitation. These factors had little effect on African climate. Cooler North Atlantic sea surface temperatures enhanced winter trade winds over North Africa, southern Asian climate was relatively unaffected. Reducing Asian orography enhanced Asian winter circulation while decreasing the summer monsoon. These model results suggest that African and southern Asian climate respond differently to separate elements of high-latitude climate variability.

  5. Overview of hospitalizations by ambulatory care sensitive conditions in the municipality of Cotia, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Torres,Renata Laszlo; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the profile of Hospitalizations by Amulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (HACSC), in the Municipality of Cotia, from 2008 to 2012. Method ecological, exploratory, longitudinal study with a quantitative approach. Data on HACSC, by age group and sex, were obtained from the Department of the Unified Health System. For data analysis descriptive statistics were used. Results During the period, there were 46,676 admissions, excluding deliveries, 7,753 (16.61%) by HACSC. The ...

  6. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  7. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris M van Beest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer. We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in

  8. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel design of an on-chip optical temperature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration where the two arms consist of hybrid waveguides providing opposite temperature-dependent phase changes to enhance the temperature sensitivity of the sensor. The sensitivity...... of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (∼80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high...

  9. Heat pump air conditioning system for pure electric vehicle at ultra-low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When the ordinary heat pump air conditioning system of a pure electric vehicle runs at ultra-low temperature, the discharge temperature of compressor will be too high and the heating capacity of the system will decay seriously, it will lead to inactivity of the heating system. In order to solve this problem, a modification is put forward, and an experiment is also designed. The experimental results show that in the same conditions, this new heating system increases more than 20% of the heating capacity; when the outside environment temperature is negative 20 degrees, the discharge temperature of compressor is below 60 degrees.

  10. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  11. Sensitivity to change of mobility measures in musculoskeletal conditions on lower extremities in outpatient rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Pujalte, Esther; Gacto-Sánchez, Mariano; Montilla-Herrador, Joaquina; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Ángeles Franco-Sierra, María; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc

    2018-01-12

    Prospective longitudinal study. To examine the sensitivity of the Mobility Activities Measure for lower extremities and to compare it to the sensitivity of the Physical Functioning Scale (PF-10) and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) at week 4 and week 8 post-hospitalization in outpatient rehabilitation settings. Mobility Activities Measure is a set of short mobility measures to track outpatient rehabilitation progress: its scales have shown good properties but its sensitivity to change has not been reported. Patients with musculoskeletal conditions were recruited at admission in three outpatient rehabilitation settings in Spain. Data were collected at admission, week 4 and week 8 from an initial sample of 236 patients (mean age ± SD = 36.7 ± 11.1). Mobility Activities Measure scales for lower extremity; PF-10; and PSFS. All the Mobility Activities Measure scales were sensitive to both positive and negative changes (the Standardized Response Means (SRMs) ranged between 1.05 and 1.53 at week 4, and between 0.63 and 1.47 at week 8). The summary measure encompassing the three Mobility Activities Measure scales detected a higher proportion of participants who had improved beyond the minimal detectable change (MDC) than detected by the PSFS and the PF-10 both at week 4 (86.64% vs. 69.81% and 42.23%, respectively) and week 8 (71.14% vs. 55.65% and 60.81%, respectively). The three Mobility Activities Measure scales assessing the lower extremity can be used across outpatient rehabilitation settings to provide consistent and sensitive measures of changes in patients' mobility. Implications for rehabilitation All the scales of the Mobility Activities Measure for the lower extremity were sensitive to both positive and negative change across the follow-up periods. Overall, the summary measure encompassing the three Mobility Activities Measure scales for the lower extremity appeared more sensitive to positive changes than the Physical Functioning Scale

  12. Regional variation in the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in China's forests and grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; He, Nianpeng

    2017-04-01

    How to assess the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and its regional variation with high accuracy is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the intensity and direction of the global carbon (C) cycle in response to climate change. In this study, we collected a series of soils from 22 forest sites and 30 grassland sites across China to explore regional variation in Q10 and its underlying mechanisms. We conducted a novel incubation experiment with periodically changing temperature (5-30 °C), while continuously measuring soil microbial respiration rates. The results showed that Q10 varied significantly across different ecosystems, ranging from 1.16 to 3.19 (mean 1.63). Q10 was ordered as follows: alpine grasslands (2.01) > temperate grasslands (1.81) > tropical forests (1.59) > temperate forests (1.55) > subtropical forests (1.52). The Q10 of grasslands (1.90) was significantly higher than that of forests (1.54). Furthermore, Q10 significantly increased with increasing altitude and decreased with increasing longitude. Environmental variables and substrate properties together explained 52% of total variation in Q10 across all sites. Overall, pH and soil electrical conductivity primarily explained spatial variation in Q10. The general negative relationships between Q10 and substrate quality among all ecosystem types supported the C quality temperature (CQT) hypothesis at a large scale, which indicated that soils with low quality should have higher temperature sensitivity. Furthermore, alpine grasslands, which had the highest Q10, were predicted to be more sensitive to climate change under the scenario of global warming.

  13. Global synthesis of the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter breakdown in streams and rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follstad Shah, Jennifer J; Kominoski, John S; Ardón, Marcelo; Dodds, Walter K; Gessner, Mark O; Griffiths, Natalie A; Hawkins, Charles P; Johnson, Sherri L; Lecerf, Antoine; LeRoy, Carri J; Manning, David W P; Rosemond, Amy D; Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Swan, Christopher M; Webster, Jackson R; Zeglin, Lydia H

    2017-08-01

    Streams and rivers are important conduits of terrestrially derived carbon (C) to atmospheric and marine reservoirs. Leaf litter breakdown rates are expected to increase as water temperatures rise in response to climate change. The magnitude of increase in breakdown rates is uncertain, given differences in litter quality and microbial and detritivore community responses to temperature, factors that can influence the apparent temperature sensitivity of breakdown and the relative proportion of C lost to the atmosphere vs. stored or transported downstream. Here, we synthesized 1025 records of litter breakdown in streams and rivers to quantify its temperature sensitivity, as measured by the activation energy (Ea , in eV). Temperature sensitivity of litter breakdown varied among twelve plant genera for which Ea could be calculated. Higher values of Ea were correlated with lower-quality litter, but these correlations were influenced by a single, N-fixing genus (Alnus). Ea values converged when genera were classified into three breakdown rate categories, potentially due to continual water availability in streams and rivers modulating the influence of leaf chemistry on breakdown. Across all data representing 85 plant genera, the Ea was 0.34 ± 0.04 eV, or approximately half the value (0.65 eV) predicted by metabolic theory. Our results indicate that average breakdown rates may increase by 5-21% with a 1-4 °C rise in water temperature, rather than a 10-45% increase expected, according to metabolic theory. Differential warming of tropical and temperate biomes could result in a similar proportional increase in breakdown rates, despite variation in Ea values for these regions (0.75 ± 0.13 eV and 0.27 ± 0.05 eV, respectively). The relative proportions of gaseous C loss and organic matter transport downstream should not change with rising temperature given that Ea values for breakdown mediated by microbes alone and microbes plus detritivores were similar at the global

  14. A method to account for the temperature sensitivity of TCCON total column measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebling, Sabrina G.; Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Feist, Dietrich G.

    2014-05-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) consists of ground-based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems all around the world. It achieves better than 0.25% precision and accuracy for total column measurements of CO2 [Wunch et al. (2011)]. In recent years, the TCCON data processing and retrieval software (GGG) has been improved to achieve better and better results (e. g. ghost correction, improved a priori profiles, more accurate spectroscopy). However, a small error is also introduced by the insufficent knowledge of the true temperature profile in the atmosphere above the individual instruments. This knowledge is crucial to retrieve highly precise gas concentrations. In the current version of the retrieval software, we use six-hourly NCEP reanalysis data to produce one temperature profile at local noon for each measurement day. For sites in the mid latitudes which can have a large diurnal variation of the temperature in the lowermost kilometers of the atmosphere, this approach can lead to small errors in the final gas concentration of the total column. Here, we present and describe a method to account for the temperature sensitivity of the total column measurements. We exploit the fact that H2O is most abundant in the lowermost kilometers of the atmosphere where the largest diurnal temperature variations occur. We use single H2O absorption lines with different temperature sensitivities to gain information about the temperature variations over the course of the day. This information is used to apply a posteriori correction of the retrieved gas concentration of total column. In addition, we show that the a posteriori temperature correction is effective by applying it to data from Lamont, Oklahoma, USA (36,6°N and 97,5°W). We chose this site because regular radiosonde launches with a time resolution of six hours provide detailed information of the real temperature in the atmosphere and allow us to test the effectiveness of our correction. References

  15. Droughts and broad-scale climate variability reflected by temperature-sensitive tree growth in the Qinling Mountains, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Qi; Bao, Guang

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between temperature and drought was investigated using the temperature-sensitive growth of Larix chinensis Beissn in the Qinling Mountains, central China. Extremely high tree-ring width index values (TRWI) agreed well with dry conditions defined by the dryness-wetness index (DWI) obtained from data in Chinese historical documents and climate-related papers between 1814 and 1956 (before the short of instrumental measurements); the reverse applied to extremely low TRWI values. The main severe drought epochs occurred from the late 1850s to the 1870s, the 1920s to 1930s and in the 2000s, whereas wet spells occurred from 1817-1827 and 1881-1886. The droughts in the 2000s exhibited a similar pattern as the ones from the 1920s to 1930s, with obviously an increasing temperature. The variation of tree growth agreed well with other reconstructed temperature series from nearby and remote regions, suggesting that Larix chinensis could respond to broad-scale climate variability. The longest cold interval, 1817-1827, could be associated with the influence of the Tambora eruption in 1815.

  16. Phytoplankton responses to temperature increases are constrained by abiotic conditions and community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striebel, Maren; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Hodapp, Dorothee; Hingsamer, Peter; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    Effects of temperature changes on phytoplankton communities seem to be highly context-specific, but few studies have analyzed whether this context specificity depends on differences in the abiotic conditions or in species composition between studies. We present an experiment that allows disentangling the contribution of abiotic and biotic differences in shaping the response to two aspects of temperature change: permanent increase of mean temperature versus pulse disturbance in form of a heat wave. We used natural communities from six different sites of a floodplain system as well as artificially mixed communities from laboratory cultures and grew both, artificial and natural communities, in water from the six different floodplain lakes (sites). All 12 contexts (2 communities × 6 sites) were first exposed to three different temperature levels (12, 18, 24 °C, respectively) and afterward to temperature pulses (4 °C increase for 7 h day(-1)). Temperature-dependent changes in biomass and community composition depended on the initial composition of phytoplankton communities. Abiotic conditions had a major effect on biomass of phytoplankton communities exposed to different temperature conditions, however, the effect of biotic and abiotic conditions together was even more pronounced. Additionally, phytoplankton community responses to pulse temperature effects depended on the warming history. By disentangling abiotic and biotic effects, our study shows that temperature-dependent effects on phytoplankton communities depend on both, biotic and abiotic constraints.

  17. The microbial temperature sensitivity to warming is controlled by thermal adaptation and is independent of C-quality across a pan-continental survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Eva; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Climate models predict that warming will result in an increased loss of soil organic matter (SOM). However, field experiments suggest that although warming results in an immediate increase in SOM turnover, the effect diminishes over time. Although the use and subsequent turnover of SOM is dominated by the soil microbial community, the underlying physiology underpinning warming responses are not considered in current climate models. It has been suggested that a reduction in the perceived quality of SOM to the microbial community, and changes in the microbial thermal adaptation, could be important feed-backs to soil warming. Thus, studies distinguishing between temperature relationships and how substrate quality influences microbial decomposition are a priority. We examined microbial communities and temperature sensitivities along a natural climate gradient including 56 independent samples from across Europe. The gradient included mean annual temperatures (MAT) from ca -4 to 18 ˚ C, along with wide spans of environmental factors known to influence microbial communities, such as pH (4.0 to 8.8), nutrients (C/N from 7 to 50), SOM (from 4 to 94%), and plant communities, etc. The extensive ranges of environmental conditions resulted in wide ranges of substrate quality, indexed as microbial respiration per unit SOM, from 5-150 μg CO2g-1 SOM g-1 h-1. We hypothesised microbial communities to (1) be adapted to the temperature of their climate, leading to warm adapted bacterial communities that were more temperature sensitive (higher Q10s) at higher MAT; (2) have temperature sensitivities affected by the quality of SOM, with higher Q10s for lower quality SOM. To determine the microbial use of SOM and its dependence on temperature, we characterized microbial temperature dependences of bacterial growth (leu inc), fungal growth (ac-in-erg) and soil respiration in all 56 sites. Temperature dependences were determined using brief (ca. 1-2 h at 25˚ C) laboratory incubation

  18. CFD Sensitivity Analysis of a Modern Civil Transport Near Buffet-Onset Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Allison, Dennis O.; Biedron, Robert T.; Buning, Pieter G.; Gainer, Thomas G.; Morrison, Joseph H.; Rivers, S. Melissa; Mysko, Stephen J.; Witkowski, David P.

    2001-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) sensitivity analysis is conducted for a modern civil transport at several conditions ranging from mostly attached flow to flow with substantial separation. Two different Navier-Stokes computer codes and four different turbulence models are utilized, and results are compared both to wind tunnel data at flight Reynolds number and flight data. In-depth CFD sensitivities to grid, code, spatial differencing method, aeroelastic shape, and turbulence model are described for conditions near buffet onset (a condition at which significant separation exists). In summary, given a grid of sufficient density for a given aeroelastic wing shape, the combined approximate error band in CFD at conditions near buffet onset due to code, spatial differencing method, and turbulence model is: 6% in lift, 7% in drag, and 16% in moment. The biggest two contributers to this uncertainty are turbulence model and code. Computed results agree well with wind tunnel surface pressure measurements both for an overspeed 'cruise' case as well as a case with small trailing edge separation. At and beyond buffet onset, computed results agree well over the inner half of the wing, but shock location is predicted too far aft at some of the outboard stations. Lift, drag, and moment curves are predicted in good agreement with experimental results from the wind tunnel.

  19. Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and unplanned readmissions among Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jung; Zhong, Yue; Fillit, Howard M; Cohen, Joshua T; Neumann, Peter J

    2017-10-01

    Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRDs) may have more potentially avoidable hospitalizations and readmissions than people without dementia. These hospitalizations may be indicative of access barriers, problems in continuity of care, inefficient resource use, and poor patient outcomes. We examined national frequency and costs of ambulatory care sensitive condition hospitalizations and unplanned, all-cause, and condition-specific 30-day readmissions in >2.7 million fee-for-service ADRD patients using 2013 Medicare claims data. In 2013, 410,000 Medicare ADRD patients had ambulatory care sensitive condition hospitalizations or unplanned 30-day readmissions costing $4.7 billion. One in 10 ADRD patients were hospitalized for a potentially avoidable condition. Almost one in five hospitalized ADRD patients had an unplanned 30-day readmission. Readmission rates were highest among ADRD patients initially hospitalized for heart failure (22%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (21%). Our findings may suggest potential deficiencies in ambulatory care and postdischarge care related to managing comorbidities among Medicare fee-for-service ADRD patients. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric ambulatory care sensitive conditions: Birth cohorts and the socio-economic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Leslie L; Dragan, Roxana; Schroth, Robert J

    2017-09-14

    This study examines the socio-economic gradient in utilization and the risk factors associated with hospitalization for four pediatric ambulatory care sensitive conditions (dental conditions, asthma, gastroenteritis, and bacterial pneumonia). Dental conditions, where much care is provided by dentists and insurance coverage varies among different population segments, present special issues. A population registry, provider registry, physician ambulatory claims, and hospital discharge abstracts from 28 398 children born in 2003-2006 in urban centres in Manitoba, Canada were the main data sources. Physician visits and hospitalizations were compared across neighbourhood income groupings using rank correlations and logistic regressions. Very strong relationships between neighbourhood income and utilization were highlighted. Additional variables - family on income assistance, mother's age at first birth, breastfeeding - helped predict the probability of hospitalization. Despite the complete insurance coverage (including visits to dentists and physicians and for hospitalizations) provided, receiving income assistance was associated with higher probabilities of hospitalization. We found a socio-economic gradient in utilization for pediatric ambulatory care sensitive conditions, with higher rates of ambulatory visits and hospitalizations in the poorest neighbourhoods. Insurance coverage which varies between different segments of the population complicates matters. Providing funding for dental care for Manitobans on income assistance has not prevented physician visits or intensive treatment in high-cost facilities, specifically treatment under general anesthesia. When services from one type of provider (dentist) are not universally insured but those from another type (physician) are, using rates of hospitalization to indicate problems in the organization of care seems particularly difficult.

  1. Vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3)-based semiconducting temperature sensitive resistors for uncooled microbolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed; Alduraibi, Mohammad; Zia, Muhammad Fakhar; Bahidra, Esme; Alasaad, Amr

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports on a semiconducting resistor material based on vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) with electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) appropriate for microbolometer applications. In this work, V2O3-based semiconducting resistor material was synthesized and electrically characterized. The developed material was prepared by annealing, in O2 and N2 atmospheres, a cascaded multilayer structure composed of V2O3 (10 nm) and V (5 nm) room temperature sputter coated thin films. The developed 55 nm thin film microbolometer resistor material possessed high temperature sensitivity from 20∘C to 45∘C with a TCR of -3.68%/∘C and room temperature resistivity of 0.57 Ω ṡcm for O2 annealed samples and a TCR of -3.72%/∘C and room temperature resistivity of 0.72 Ω ṡcm for N2 annealed samples. The surface morphologies of the synthesized thin films were studied using atomic force microscopy showing no significant post-growth annealing effect on the smoothness of the samples surfaces.

  2. Geotropic sensitivity exhibited by single hornets: The influence of caste, age, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishay, Jacob S.; Rosenzweig, Eyal; Abir, Irit

    Hornet (Vespa orientalis, Hymenoptera: Vespinae) workers, queens and males, aged 0-24 hours (i.e. juveniles) and 24 hours and more (i.e. adults) were tested for their responses to changes in the direction of the gravitational force while placed on a flat surface gradually tilted between 0.5° and 180°. The tests were run on non-blind and blind hornets, at temperatures ranging between 18°C and 35°C, in daylight as well as in the dark. Up to 18 hours of age, negative phototaxis prevailed among the hornets, which displayed a clear preference for remaining in the dark regardless of the geotropic position. Between 18-24 hours of age, there was gradual appearance of a sensitivity to change in the geotropic position. Above 24 hr of age, the hornets became sensitive to changes in their declinations, with workers becoming sensitive at a 3-5° declination, queens at 4-5° and males at a declination of 8-19° from the horizontal. Hornet response takes the form of an upward climb, to the highest point of the test surface. Such response required a temperature exceeding 24.8-25°C for workers, 23.2°C for queens and 20.8-21°C for males.

  3. Effect of antecedent growth conditions on sensitivity of Escherichia coli to chlorine dioxide.

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, J D; Matin, A; Roberts, P V

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to inactivation by antibacterial agents that is induced by the growth environment was studied. Escherichia coli was grown in batch culture and in a chemostat, and the following parameters were varied: type of substrate, growth rate, temperature, and cell density during growth. Low doses (0.75 mg/liter) of chlorine dioxide were used to inactivate the cultures. The results demonstrated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximated natural aquatic en...

  4. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system. PMID:25250390

  5. Modeling validation and control analysis for controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14 °C, 0006 kg(w)/kg(da) in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  6. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Nang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  7. Effect of drink temperature on core temperature and endurance cycling performance in warm, humid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, Catriona; O'Connor, Helen; Gifford, Janelle; Shirreffs, Susan; Chapman, Phillip; Johnson, Nathan

    2010-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of cold (4 °C) and thermoneutral (37 °C) beverages on thermoregulation and performance in the heat and to explore sensory factors associated with ingesting a cold stimulus. Seven males (age 32.8 ± 6.1 years, [V(.)]O(2peak) 59.4 ± 6.6 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) completed cold, thermoneutral, and thermoneutral + ice trials in randomized order. Participants cycled for 90 min at 65%[V(.)]O(2peak) followed by a 15-min performance test at 28 °C and 70% relative humidity. They ingested 2.3 ml x kg(-1) of a 7.4% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution every 10 min during the 90-min steady-state exercise including 30 ml ice puree every 5 min in the ice trial. Absolute changes in skin temperature (0.22 ± 1.1 °C vs. 1.14 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.02), mean body temperature (1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 °C; P = 0.03), and heat storage were lower across the 90-min exercise bout for the cold compared with the thermoneutral trial. Significant improvements (4.9 ± 2.4%, P cold but no significant differences were detected with ice. Consumption of cold beverages during prolonged exercise in the heat improves body temperature measures and performance. Consumption of ice did not reveal a sensory response, but requires further study. Beverages consumed by athletes exercising in the heat should perhaps be cold for performance and safety reasons.

  8. Evidence that higher [CO2] increases tree growth sensitivity to temperature: a comparison of modern and paleo oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven L. Voelker; Michael C. Stambaugh; J. Renée Brooks; Frederick C. Meinzer; Barbara Lachenbruch; Richard P. Guyette

    2017-01-01

    To test tree growth-sensitivity to temperature under different ambient CO2 concentrations, we determined stem radial growth rates as they relate to variation in temperature during the last deglacial period, and compare these to modern tree growth rates as they relate to spatial variation in temperature across the modern species distributional...

  9. Determination of metal foam flow conditions at a temperature higher than the liquidus temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As it is known a foam made of composite with aluminium alloy matrix and SiC particles reinforcement does not reach the liquid state evenat a temperature over 1000°C. The causes of such behaviour of foam have been examined. It has been found that it is due to two phenomena. One is connected with the creation of continuous layer of oxides at the boundary of gaseous pores and liquid metal lic phase. The other is an increase of the apparent viscosity of solids suspended in liquid metal along with an increased content of these inclusions to the point where the suspension loses its continuity.

  10. Referenced dual pressure- and temperature-sensitive paint for digital color camera read out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lorenz H; Karakus, Cüneyt; Meier, Robert J; Risch, Nikolaus; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Holder, Elisabeth; Schäferling, Michael

    2012-12-03

    The first fluorescent material for the referenced simultaneous RGB (red green blue) imaging of barometric pressure (oxygen partial pressure) and temperature is presented. This sensitive coating consists of two platinum(II) complexes as indicators and a reference dye, each of which is incorporated in appropriate polymer nanoparticles. These particles are dispersed in a polyurethane hydrogel and spread onto a solid support. The emission of the (oxygen) pressure indicator, PtTFPP, matches the red channel of a RGB color camera, whilst the emission of the temperature indicator [Pt(II) (Br-thq)(acac)] matches the green channel. The reference dye, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, emits in the blue channel. In contrast to other dual-sensitive materials, this new coating allows for the simultaneous imaging of both indicator signals, as well as the reference signal, in one RGB color picture without having to separate the signals with additional optical filters. All of these dyes are excitable with a 405 nm light-emitting diode (LED). With this new composite material, barometric pressure can be determined with a resolution of 22 mbar; the temperature can be determined with a resolution of 4.3 °C. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Rendering poly(amidoamine) or poly(propylenimine) dendrimers temperature sensitive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Yasuhiro; Harada, Atsushi; Takagishi, Toru; Kono, Kenji

    2004-10-13

    The poly(amidoamine) dendrimers having terminal isobutyramide (IBAM) groups were prepared by the reaction of isobutyric acid and the amine-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers with generations (G) of 2 to 5 by using a condensing agent, 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. 1H and 13C NMR revealed that an IBAM group was attached to essentially every chain end of the dendrimers. While the IBAM-terminated G2 dendrimer was soluble in water, the IBAM-terminated G3, G4, and G5 dendrimers exhibited the lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) at 75, 61, and 43 degrees C, respectively. Because the density of the terminal IBAM groups in the periphery of the dendrimer progressively increases with increasing dendrimer generation, the interaction of the IBAM groups might take place more efficiently, resulting in a remarkable decrease in the LCST. In addition, attachment of IBAM groups to poly(propylenimine) dendrimers could give the temperature-sensitive property, indicating that this is an efficient method to render dendrimers temperature sensitive.

  12. Sensitivity studies of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor postulated accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Syd [Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6010 (United States)]. E-mail: sjb@ornl.gov

    2006-03-15

    The results of various accident scenario simulations for the two major modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) variants (prismatic and pebble bed cores) are presented. Sensitivity studies can help to quantify the uncertainty ranges of the predicted outcomes for variations in some of the more crucial system parameters, as well as for occurrences of equipment and/or operator failures or errors. In addition, sensitivity studies can guide further efforts in improving the design and determining where more (or less) R and D is appropriate. Both of the modular HTGR designs studied - the 400-MW(t) pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR, pebble) and the 600-MW(t) gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR, prismatic) - show excellent accident prevention and mitigation capabilities because of their inherent passive safety features. The large thermal margins between operating and 'potential damage' temperatures, along with the typically very slow accident response times (approximate days to reach peak temperatures), tend to reduce concerns about uncertainties in the simulation models, the initiating events, and the equipment and operator responses.

  13. Temperature-sensitive SV40-immortalized rat middle ear epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Katsuhiro; Kim, Youngki; Paparella, Michael M; Lin, Jizhen

    2004-12-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of middle ear epithelial cells are essential in both normal and diseased middle ears. The normal situation involves physiologic growth and renewal of the epithelium, and the diseased situation involves pathological changes of the epithelium such as mucous cell metaplasia and ciliated cell proliferation in otitis media. In this study, we used a temperature-sensitive large T antigen (the SV40 mutant) to transduce and immortalize the primary culture of middle ear epithelial cells. SV40-immortalized middle ear epithelial cells have been cultured for more than 50 passages and are stable morphologically. Their nonimmortalized parent cells died at the second passage. Immortalized middle ear epithelial cells carrying the SV40 mutant show a monolayer, cobblestonelike morphology. The cell line expresses characteristic middle ear mucosal molecules such as mucins, keratins, and collagens. It also responds to temperature changes; namely, cells proliferate at 33 degrees C, when the SV40 antigen is active, and differentiate at 39 degrees C, when the SV40 antigen is inactive. Therefore, we conclude that a temperature-sensitive middle ear epithelial cell line has successfully been established.

  14. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Conditioned Pain Modulation and Pressure Pain Sensitivity in the Adult Danish General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Jørgensen, Torben; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Increased pressure pain sensitivity and impaired descending pain control have been associated with chronic pain, but knowledge on the variability in the adult general population is lacking. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and descending pain control assessed using conditioned pain modulation (CPM......) were recorded in a randomly selected sample (n = 2,199, 53% female) of the Danish adult general population aged 18 to 70 years. PPTs were recorded over the tibialis anterior muscle and the upper trapezius muscle. CPM was defined as the difference between PPT assessments before and during conditioning...... with cold pressor pain (hand) for 2 minutes. Conditioning pain intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale and questionnaire data were collected. Female sex (P

  17. Sensitivity of an idealized subtropical gyre to the eastern boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Láiz

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The flow pattern of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre (NASG is simulated using a highly idealised one-layer quasi-geostrophic wind-driven model. The novel feature of the model is the specification of the eastern boundary conditions. This is an upwelling favourable region with a quasi-permanent southward flowing coastal jet, which is fed by the eastern branch of the Canary Current. The corresponding boundary conditions are non-zero normal flux and constant potential vorticity, the latter being consistent with the generation of anticyclonic vorticity by the coastal jet. We examine the sensitivity of the model to the eastern boundary conditions and compare the results with recent observations for the region.

  18. An Efficient Method of Reweighting and Reconstructing Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation Data for Extrapolation to Different Temperature and Density Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces an efficient technique to generate new molecular simulation Markov chains for different temperature and density conditions, which allow for rapid extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages at a range of temperatures and densities different from the original conditions where a single simulation is conducted. Obtained information from the original simulation are reweighted and even reconstructed in order to extrapolate our knowledge to the new conditions. Our technique allows not only the extrapolation to a new temperature or density, but also the double extrapolation to both new temperature and density. The method was implemented for Lennard-Jones fluid with structureless particles in single-gas phase region. Extrapolation behaviors as functions of extrapolation ranges were studied. Limits of extrapolation ranges showed a remarkable capability especially along isochors where only reweighting is required. Various factors that could affect the limits of extrapolation ranges were investigated and compared. In particular, these limits were shown to be sensitive to the number of particles used and starting point where the simulation was originally conducted.

  19. The effects of amphetamine sensitization on conditioned inhibition during a Pavlovian-instrumental transfer task in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiflett, Michael W.; Riccie, Meaghan; DiMatteo, RoseMarie

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Psychostimulant sensitization heightens behavioral and motivational responses to reward-associated stimuli; however, its effects on stimuli associated with reward absence are less understood. Objectives We examined whether amphetamine sensitization alters performance during Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT) to conditioned excitors and inhibitors. We further sought to characterize the effects of amphetamine sensitization on learning versus performance by exposing rats to amphetamine prior to Pavlovian training or between training and test. Methods Adult male Long Evans rats were given conditioned inhibition (A+/AX−) and Pavlovian (B+) training, followed by variable-interval instrumental conditioning. Rats were sensitized to d-amphetamine (2 mg/kg daily injections for seven days), or served as non-exposed controls. Rats were given a PIT test, in which they were presented with stimulus B alone or in compound with the conditioned inhibitor (BX). Results During the PIT test, control rats significantly reduced instrumental responding on BX trials (to approximately 50% of responding to B). Amphetamine sensitization prior to Pavlovian conditioning increased lever-pressing on BX trials and reduced lever-pressing on B trials compared to controls. Amphetamine sensitization between training and test increased lever-pressing on B and BX trials compared to controls. No effects of sensitization were observed on conditioned food-cup approach. Conclusions Amphetamine sensitization increases instrumental responding during PIT to a conditioned inhibitor, by enhancing excitation of conditioned stimuli and reducing inhibition of conditioned inhibitors. PMID:23715640

  20. Temperature Sensitivity of Microbial Respiration of Fine Root Litter in a Temperate Broad-Leaved Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makita, Naoki; Kawamura, Ayumi

    2015-01-01

    The microbial decomposition respiration of plant litter generates a major CO2 efflux from terrestrial ecosystems that plays a critical role in the regulation of carbon cycling on regional and global scales. However, the respiration from root litter decomposition and its sensitivity to temperature changes are unclear in current models of carbon turnover in forest soils. Thus, we examined seasonal changes in the temperature sensitivity and decomposition rates of fine root litter of two diameter classes (0–0.5 and 0.5–2.0 mm) of Quercus serrata and Ilex pedunculosa in a deciduous broad-leaved forest. During the study period, fine root litter of both diameter classes and species decreased approximately exponentially over time. The Q10 values of microbial respiration rates of root litter for the two classes were 1.59–3.31 and 1.28–6.27 for Q. serrata and 1.36–6.31 and 1.65–5.86 for I. pedunculosa. A significant difference in Q10 was observed between the diameter classes, indicating that root diameter represents the initial substrate quality, which may determine the magnitude of Q10 value of microbial respiration. Changes in these Q10 values were related to seasonal soil temperature patterns; the values were higher in winter than in summer. Moreover, seasonal variations in Q10 were larger during the 2-year decomposition period than the 1-year period. These results showed that the Q10 values of fine root litter of 0–0.5 and 0.5–2.0 mm have been shown to increase with lower temperatures and with the higher recalcitrance pool of the decomposed substrate during 2 years of decomposition. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in root litter showed distinct patterns according to the decay period and season because of the temperature acclimation and adaptation of the microbial decomposer communities in root litter. PMID:25658106

  1. Photoinduced Interfacial Electron Injection Dynamics in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells under Photovoltaic Operating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuscher, Joël; Décoppet, Jean-David; Punzi, Angela; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Moser, Jacques-E; Grätzel, Michael

    2012-12-20

    We report a pump-probe spectroscopy study of electron injection rates in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices. We examine the case of working devices employing an N719 ruthenium sensitizer and an iodide electrolyte. Electron injection is found to occur mainly on a sub-100 fs time scale, followed by a slower component with a lifetime of 26.9 ps, in accordance with previous reports on model samples. The amplitude of this latter component varies with electrolyte composition from 25 to 9%. The appearance of slower components in the electron injection dynamics may be attributed to an aggregated or weakly bound state of the surface-adsorbed N719 sensitizer. Further measurements are reported varying the cell light bias and load conditions, revealing no influence on electron injection dynamics. No other electron injection event is found to occur up to 1 ns. These results show no evidence for a slowdown of electron injection under working conditions compared to model systems for the electrolytes examined in this study.

  2. Fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective CH4 room temperature gas sensing of TiO2nanorods: Detailed study on the annealing temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Applications of ultra-highly sensitive and selective methane (CH(sub4)) room temperature gas sensors are important for various operations especially in underground mining environment. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate the effect...

  3. Effects of temperature, genetic variation and species competition on the sensitivity of algae populations to the antibiotic enrofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Andreu; Zhao, Wenkai; Gillissen, Frits; Lürling, Miquel; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2018-02-01

    Primary producers are amongst the most sensitive organisms to antibiotic pollution in aquatic ecosystems. To date, there is little information on how different environmental conditions may affect their sensitivity to antibiotics. In this study we assessed how temperature, genetic variation and species competition may affect the sensitivity of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and the green-algae Scenedesmus obliquus to the antibiotic enrofloxacin. First, we performed single-species tests to assess the toxicity of enrofloxacin under different temperature conditions (20°C and 30°C) and to assess the sensitivity of different species strains using a standard temperature (20°C). Next, we investigated how enrofloxacin contamination may affect the competition between M. aeruginosa and S. obliquus. A competition experiment was performed following a full factorial design with different competition treatments, defined as density ratios (i.e. initial bio-volume of 25/75%, 10/90% and 1/99% of S. obliquus/M. aeruginosa, respectively), one 100% S. obliquus treatment and one 100% M. aeruginosa treatment, and four different enrofloxacin concentrations (i.e. control, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.10mg/L). Growth inhibition based on cell number, bio-volume, chlorophyll-a concentration as well as photosynthetic activity were used as evaluation endpoints in the single-species tests, while growth inhibition based on measured chlorophyll-a was primarily used in the competition experiment. M. aeruginosa photosynthetic activity was found to be the most sensitive endpoint to enrofloxacin (EC50-72h =0.02mg/L), followed by growth inhibition based on cell number. S. obliquus was found to be slightly more sensitive at 20°C than at 30°C (EC50-72h cell number growth inhibition of 38 and 41mg/L, respectively), whereas an opposite trend was observed for M. aeruginosa (0.047 and 0.037mg/L, respectively). Differences in EC50-72h values between algal strains of the same species were within a factor

  4. Investigation of operational temperature conditions of steam generating surfaces with critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remizov, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of reliable once-through steam generators requires a knowledge of temperature conditions along the entire length of the steam generating surface including regions affected by deteriorated heat transfer and dryout. Experimental and calculated data on temperatures in these regions are presented and compared. (LCL)

  5. A high sensitivity ultralow temperature RF conductance and noise measurement setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Mahé, A.; Denis, A.; Berroir, J.-M.; Glattli, D. C.; Plaçais, B.; Fève, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the realization of a high sensitivity RF noise measurement scheme to study small current fluctuations of mesoscopic systems at milli-Kelvin temperatures. The setup relies on the combination of an interferometric amplification scheme and a quarter-wave impedance transformer, allowing the measurement of noise power spectral densities with gigahertz bandwidth up to five orders of magnitude below the amplifier noise floor. We simultaneously measure the high frequency conductance of the sample by derivating a portion of the signal to a microwave homodyne detection. We describe the principle of the setup, as well as its implementation and calibration. Finally, we show that our setup allows to fully characterize a subnanosecond on-demand single electron source. More generally, its sensitivity and bandwidth make it suitable for applications manipulating single charges at GHz frequencies.

  6. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  7. Purpose in Life and Hospitalization for Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert S; Capuano, Ana W; James, Bryan D; Amofa, Priscilla; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Shah, Raj; Bennett, David A; Boyle, Patricia A

    2017-06-30

    To test the hypothesis that higher level of purpose in life is associated with lower subsequent odds of hospitalization. Longitudinal cohort study. Participants' residences in the Chicago metropolitan area. A total of 805 older persons who completed uniform annual clinical evaluations. Participants annually completed a standard self-report measure of purpose in life, a component of well-being. Hospitalization data were obtained from Part A Medicare claims records. Based on previous research, ICD-9 codes were used to identify ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) for which hospitalization is potentially preventable. The relation of purpose (baseline and follow-up) to hospitalization was assessed in proportional odds mixed models. During a mean of 4.5 years of observation, there was a total of 2,043 hospitalizations (442 with a primary ACSC diagnosis; 1,322 with a secondary ACSC diagnosis; 279 with no ACSCs). In initial analyses, higher purpose at baseline and follow-up were each associated with lower odds of more hospitalizations involving ACSCs but not hospitalizations for non-ACSCs. Results were comparable when those with low cognitive function at baseline were excluded. Adjustment for chronic medical conditions and socioeconomic status reduced but did not eliminate the association of purpose with hospitalizations involving ACSCs. In old age, higher level of purpose in life is associated with lower odds of subsequent hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions in the Federal District, Brazil, 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Rozania Maria Pereira; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2012-10-01

    To analyze hospitalization rates due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. The study used data from the Hospital Database of the Brazilian National Health System corresponding to the Federal District in the year of 2008. The main diagnosis for hospitalization was analyzed based on the International Classification of Diseases, and absolute frequency, proportion and coefficient were calculated according to causes, age groups and sex. The ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) represented approximately 20% of the hospital admissions in the National Health System. The most frequent conditions were: gastroenteritis (2.4%), heart failure (2.3%), and kidney and urinary tract infection (2.1%). The following aspects were verified: significant hospitalization rates due to ACSC in the infant group (< 1 year of age), an important reduction in the following age groups (1 to 29 years), and a gradual increase until the more advanced ages. Compared to men, hospitalization rates were slightly higher among young women (20 to 29 years) and lower among women older than 49 years. Hospitalizations due to ACSC represented 19.5% of all hospital admissions in the Federal District (2008), and the main causes of hospitalizations were gastroenteritis, heart failure and kidney and urinary tract infection. The effectiveness of primary health care in preventing these events in the Federal District is discussed.

  9. Nanostructured Ferrite Based Electronic Nose Sensitive to Ammonia at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. B. GAWAS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Manganese and Nickel doped Zinc Ferrite powder (Mn0.3Ni0.3Zn0.4Fe2O4 was synthesized by autocatalytic thermal decomposition technique. The average crystallite size in the material powder was found to be of 10 – 13 nm. Characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction studies, Transmission electron microscopy, Infra-Red spectroscopy, etc, were employed to study the average particle size, phase and composition of the ferrite. Thick films of Mn0.3Ni0.3Zn0.4Fe2O4 were prepared by screen printing technique. These films were observed to be sensitive to 10 ppm NH3 at room temperature. The effects of surface microstructure, operating temperature, gas concentrations, etc., on the gas response, selectivity, response and recovery times of the sensor in the presence of NH3 and other gases were studied and discussed.

  10. The use of laboratory scale reactors to predict sensitivity to changes in operating conditions for full-scale anaerobic digestion treating municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, James D; Othman, Maazuza Z; Beale, David J; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is highly complex and prone to inhibition, which can cause major issues for digester operators. The result is that there have been numerous investigations into changes in operational conditions, however to date all have focused on the qualitative sensitivities, neglecting the quantitative. This study therefore aimed to determine the quantitative sensitivities by using factorial design of experiments and small semi continuous reactors. Analysis showed total and volatile solids removals are chiefly influenced by retention time, with 79% and 59% of the observed results being attributed to retention time respectively, whereas biogas was mainly influenced by loading rate, 38%, and temperature, 22%. Notably the regression model fitted to the experimental data predicted full-scale performance with a high level of precision, indicating that small reactors are subject to the same sensitivity of full-scale digesters and thus can be used to predict changes loading, retention time, and temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intelligent Detector of Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder Pressure and Sensitivity Temperature Coefficient Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detecting device based on mechanical mechanism is far from the measurement of internal combustion engine cylinder explosion and compression pressure. This pressure detection is under the environment of pulsed gas (over 500 times per one minute and mechanical impactive vibration. Piezoresistive detection with silicon on insulator (SOI strain gauges to pressure seems to be a good solution to meet such special applications. In this work, separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX wafer was used to fabricate the high temperature pressure sensor chip. For high accuracy and wide temperature range application, this paper also presents a novel pressure sensitivity temperature coefficient (TCS compensation method, using integrated constant current network. A quantitative compensation formula is introduced in mathematics. During experiments, the absolute value of the compensated TCS is easy to be 10 × 10−6/°C~100 × 10−6/°C by individual adjustment and calibration of each device’s temperature compensation. Therefore, the feasibility and practicability of this technology are tested. Again, the disadvantages are discussed after the research of the experiment data and the improvement methods are also given in the designing period. This technology exhibits the great potential practical value of internal combustion engine cylinder pressure with volume manufacturing.

  12. Engineering Rubisco activase from thermophilic cyanobacteria into high-temperature sensitive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbaga, Chukwuma C; Stepien, Piotr; Athar, Habib-Ur-Rehman; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2017-09-22

    In the past decade, various strategies to improve photosynthesis and crop yield, such as leaf morphology, light interception and use efficiency, biochemistry of light reactions, stomatal conductance, carboxylation efficiency, and source to sink regulation, have been discussed at length. Leaf morphology and physiology are tightly coupled to light capturing efficiency, gas exchange capacity, and temperature regulation. However, apart from the photoprotective mechanism of photosystem-II (PSII), i.e. non-photochemical quenching, very low genetic variation in the components of light reactions has been observed in plants. In the last decade, biochemistry-based enhancement of carboxylation efficiency that improves photosynthesis in plants was one of the potential strategies for improving plant biomass production. Enhancement of activation of the ubiquitous enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) by Rubisco activase may be another potential strategy for improving a photosynthesis-driven increase in crop yield. Rubisco activase modifies the conformation of the active center in Rubisco by removing tightly bound inhibitors, thereby contributing to enzyme activation and rapid carboxylation. Thermophilic cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria that thrive in high-temperature environments. This critical review discusses the prospects for and the potential of engineering Rubisco activase from thermophilic cyanobacteria into temperature-sensitive plants, to increase the threshold temperature and survival of these plants in arid regions.

  13. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, A. L.; Gaughan, J. B.; Lisle, A. T.; Beard, L.; Collins, C. W.; Johnston, S. D.

    2017-07-01

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT ( r > 0.94, P 0.80, P surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  14. Flux Balance Analysis of Escherichia coli under Temperature and pH Stress Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-05-12

    An interesting discovery in biology is that most genes in an organism are dispensable. That means these genes have minor effects on survival of the organism in standard laboratory conditions. One explanation of this discovery is that some genes play important roles in specific conditions and are essential genes under those conditions. E. coli is a model organism, which is widely used. It can adapt to many stress conditions, including temperature, pH, osmotic, antibiotic, etc. Underlying mechanisms and associated genes of each stress condition responses are usually different. In our analysis, we combined protein abundance data and mutant conditional fitness data into E. coli constraint-based metabolic models to study conditionally essential metabolic genes under temperature and pH stress conditions. Flux Balance Analysis was employed as the modeling method to analysis these data. We discovered lists of metabolic genes, which are E. coli dispensable genes, but conditionally essential under some stress conditions. Among these conditionally essential genes, atpA in low pH stress and nhaA in high pH stress found experimental evidences from previous studies. Our study provides new conditionally essential gene candidates for biologists to explore stress condition mechanisms.

  15. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  16. Model Forecast Skill and Sensitivity to Initial Conditions in the Seasonal Sea Ice Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Cullather, R. I.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the skill of predictions of September Arctic sea ice extent from dynamical models participating in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). Forecasts submitted in August, at roughly 2 month lead times, are skillful. However, skill is lower in forecasts submitted to SIO, which began in 2008, than in hindcasts (retrospective forecasts) of the last few decades. The multimodel mean SIO predictions offer slightly higher skill than the single-model SIO predictions, but neither beats a damped persistence forecast at longer than 2 month lead times. The models are largely unsuccessful at predicting each other, indicating a large difference in model physics and/or initial conditions. Motivated by this, we perform an initial condition sensitivity experiment with four SIO models, applying a fixed -1 m perturbation to the initial sea ice thickness. The significant range of the response among the models suggests that different model physics make a significant contribution to forecast uncertainty.

  17. Model forecast skill and sensitivity to initial conditions in the seasonal Sea Ice Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Cullather, R. I.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    We explore the skill of predictions of September Arctic sea ice extent from dynamical models participating in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). Forecasts submitted in August, at roughly 2 month lead times, are skillful. However, skill is lower in forecasts submitted to SIO, which began in 2008, than in hindcasts (retrospective forecasts) of the last few decades. The multimodel mean SIO predictions offer slightly higher skill than the single-model SIO predictions, but neither beats a damped persistence forecast at longer than 2 month lead times. The models are largely unsuccessful at predicting each other, indicating a large difference in model physics and/or initial conditions. Motivated by this, we perform an initial condition sensitivity experiment with four SIO models, applying a fixed -1 m perturbation to the initial sea ice thickness. The significant range of the response among the models suggests that different model physics make a significant contribution to forecast uncertainty.

  18. Changes in spring arrival dates and temperature sensitivity of migratory birds over two centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolářová, Eva; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette; Nekovář, Jiří; Lumpe, Petr; Adamík, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Long-term phenological data have been crucial at documenting the effects of climate change in organisms. However, in most animal taxa, time series length seldom exceeds 35 years. Therefore, we have limited evidence on animal responses to climate prior to the recent warm period. To fill in this gap, we present time series of mean first arrival dates to Central Europe for 13 bird species spanning 183 years (1828-2010). We found a uniform trend of arrival dates advancing in the most recent decades (since the late 1970s). Interestingly, birds were arriving earlier during the cooler early part of the nineteenth century than in the recent warm period. Temperature sensitivity was slightly stronger in the warmest 30-year period (-1.70 ± SD 0.47 day °C-1) than in the coldest period (-1.42 ± SD 0.89 day °C-1); however, the difference was not statistically significant. In the most recent decades, the temperature sensitivity of both short- and long-distance migrants significantly increased. Our results demonstrate how centennial time series can provide a much more comprehensive perspective on avian responses to climate change.

  19. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  20. Exploring viscosity, polarity and temperature sensitivity of BODIPY-based molecular rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyšniauskas, Aurimas; López-Duarte, Ismael; Duchemin, Nicolas; Vu, Thanh-Truc; Wu, Yilei; Budynina, Ekaterina M; Volkova, Yulia A; Peña Cabrera, Eduardo; Ramírez-Ornelas, Diana E; Kuimova, Marina K

    2017-09-27

    Microviscosity is a key parameter controlling the rate of diffusion and reactions on the microscale. One of the most convenient tools for measuring microviscosity is by fluorescent viscosity sensors termed 'molecular rotors'. BODIPY-based molecular rotors in particular proved extremely useful in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, for providing quantitative viscosity maps of living cells as well as measuring dynamic changes in viscosity over time. In this work, we investigate several new BODIPY-based molecular rotors with the aim of improving on the current viscosity sensing capabilities and understanding how the structure of the fluorophore is related to its function. We demonstrate that due to subtle structural changes, BODIPY-based molecular rotors may become sensitive to temperature and polarity of their environment, as well as to viscosity, and provide a photophysical model explaining the nature of this sensitivity. Our data suggests that a thorough understanding of the photophysics of any new molecular rotor, in environments of different viscosity, temperature and polarity, is a must before moving on to applications in viscosity sensing.

  1. Differential chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in temperature-sensitive mutants of Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.

    1977-01-01

    The amount and type of residual DNA synthesis was determined in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of the smut fungus Ustilago maydis after incubation at the restrictive temperature (32/sup 0/C) for eight hours. Mutants ts-220, ts-207, ts-432 and ts-346 were found to have an overall reduction in the synthesis of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in comparison to the wild-type. In mutants ts-20, tsd 1-1, ts-84 and pol 1-1 nuclear DNA synthesis was depressed relative to mitochondrial synthesis. The DNA-polymerase mutant pol 1-1 had persistent nuclear synthesis at about 50% of the rate of synthesis of mitochondrial DNA and similar behavior was observed in a diploid homozygous strain. Mutant ts-84 had an initial burst of DNA synthesis which was reduced for nuclear but not mitochondrial synthesis after three hours preincubation at 32/sup 0/C. tsd 1-1 and ts-20 had nuclear residual synthesis amounting to about 25% of the relative rate of mitochondrial synthesis which correlates to increasing UV sensitivity of these strains on incubation at 32/sup 0/C. A pol 1-1 ts-84 double mutant had an additive loss of nuclear DNA synthesis which indicates that the steps of replication involved may be sequential.

  2. A numerical study of the windstorm Klaus: sensitivity to sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazario Tartaglione

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the role of sea surface temperature (SST as well as the effects of evaporation and moisture convergence on the evolution of cyclone Klaus, which occurred on January 23 and 24, 2009. To elucidate the role of sea surface temperature (SST and air–sea fluxes in the dynamics of the cyclone, ten hydrostatic mesoscale simulations were performed by Bologna Limited Area Model (BOLAM. The first one was a control experiment with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF SST analysis. The nine following simulations are sensitivity experiments where the SST are obtained by adding a constant value by 1 to 9 K to the ECMWF field. Results show that a warmer sea increases the surface latent heat fluxes and the moisture convergence, favoring the development of convection in the storm. Convection is affected immediately by the increased SST. Later on, drop of mean sea level pressure (MSLP occurs together with increasing of surface winds. The cyclone trajectory is not sensitive to change in SST differently from MSLP and convective precipitation.

  3. Physical robustness of canopy temperature models for crop heat stress simulation across environments and production conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webber, Heidi; White, Jeffrey W; Kimball, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Despite widespread application in studying climate change impacts, most crop models ignore complex interactions among air temperature, crop and soil water status, CO2 concentration and atmospheric conditions that influence crop canopy temperature. The current study extended previous studies...... to simulate Tc. Model performance in predicting Tc was evaluated for two experiments in continental North America with various water, nitrogen and CO2 treatments. An empirical model fit to one dataset had the best performance, followed by the EBSC models. Stability conditions explained much of the differences...... between modeling approaches. More accurate simulation of heat stress will likely require use of energy balance approaches that consider atmospheric stability conditions....

  4. Engineering 'cell robots' for parallel and highly sensitive screening of biomolecules under in vivo conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lifu; Zeng, An-Ping

    2017-11-09

    Cells are capable of rapid replication and performing tasks adaptively and ultra-sensitively and can be considered as cheap "biological-robots". Here we propose to engineer cells for screening biomolecules in parallel and with high sensitivity. Specifically, we place the biomolecule variants (library) on the bacterial phage M13. We then design cells to screen the library based on cell-phage interactions mediated by a specific intracellular signal change caused by the biomolecule of interest. For proof of concept, we used intracellular lysine concentration in E. coli as a signal to successfully screen variants of functional aspartate kinase III (AK-III) under in vivo conditions, a key enzyme in L-lysine biosynthesis which is strictly inhibited by L-lysine. Comparative studies with flow cytometry method failed to distinguish the wild-type from lysine resistance variants of AK-III, confirming a higher sensitivity of the method. It opens up a new and effective way of in vivo high-throughput screening for functional molecules and can be easily implemented at low costs.

  5. [Non-celiac gluten sensitivity: Another condition that responds to gluten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Elizabeth; Araya, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Remission of gastrointestinal and general symptoms after gluten withdrawal has been described in some non-celiac individuals for nearly 30 years. Only recently, efforts have been made to define this entity, now referred to as "non-celiac gluten sensitivity". It includes patients that clinically respond to gluten free diet without exhibiting allergic or autoimmune features to explain such response. Wheat allergy, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome and symptoms induced by high FODMAPs (Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides And Polyols) consumption are the main differential diagnoses. The relationship with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism has not been demonstrated, but currently it gives ground to great hope in families with affected children. Epidemiology of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is not clear. It is described as more common among women and less common in children. Genetic and immune factors, changes in intestinal microbiota and non-gluten components present in wheat grains are main factors postulated in the pathogenesis of this condition. To date, there are no specific biomarkers for non-celiac gluten sensitivity and diagnosis is reached by excluding other causes of disease. A trial with gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge is the methodology most frequently used to confirm diagnosis.

  6. Low temperature induces different cold sensitivity in two poplar clones (Populus x canadensis Monch 'I-214' and P. deltoides Marsh. 'Dvina').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocozza, Claudia; Lasserre, Bruno; Giovannelli, Alessio; Castro, Gaetano; Fragnelli, Giuseppe; Tognetti, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Changes of stem diameter were continuously monitored during winter in two field-grown poplar clones, using automatic point dendrometers. The objective of this study was to find an analytical solution to seasonal synchronization of stem diameter oscillations and low air temperatures. The study identified to what extent and with what frequency low air temperature induced stem diameter variation in 'Dvina' (P. deltoides) and 'I-214' (Populus x canadensis) poplar clones, after exposure to summer drought. The patterns of reversible stem shrinkage were related to the cycles of low air temperature. Hourly and daily evidence showed that 'I-214' was more sensitive to low air temperatures than 'Dvina'. The analysis of raw data and graphic details implemented with the study of derivative tests allowed an increase in the general sensitivity of the investigation applied to describe the response of poplar clones to environmental conditions. Given these diameter fluctuation patterns, automatic point dendrometers were confirmed to be a reliable non-invasive method for testing the sensitivity of diameter variation to cold temperature. Variation in rate and duration of daily stem shrinkage in response to low air temperature in winter appeared to occur independently of the effects of water deficit suffered by plants the previous summer.

  7. High temperature gradient nanogap-Pirani micro-sensor with maximum sensitivity around atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouila-Houri, C.; Talbi, A.; Viard, R.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Elmazria, O.; Gallas, Q.; Garnier, E.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2017-09-01

    This letter describes and discusses the design and testing of an efficient nanogap Pirani micro-sensor for pressure measurements in a wide range with a maximum sensitivity around atmospheric pressure. The structure combines a substrate-free heated wire and a mechanical support made of silicon oxide micro-bridges allowing both a constant nanoscale gap between the wire and the substrate and a 1 mm long and 3 μm wide wire. The high aspect ratio of the wire provides a uniform heating profile along the wire and contributes to low pressure detection. On the contrary, both the nanoscale gap and the short wire length between two micro-bridges contribute to shift the high limit of the pressure range. When tested between 10 kPa and 800 kPa, the sensor presents a wide measurement range, not fully reached by the experiments, with a maximum of sensitivity close to the atmospheric pressure and performances with up to 38%/dec sensitivity when operating in a constant temperature mode with an overheat of 20 °C.

  8. Plant Temperature and Its Simulation Model of Thermo-Sensitive Genic Male Sterile Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-gen LU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant temperature (Tp and its relations to the microclimate of rice colony and irrigation water were studied using a thermo-sensitive genic male sterile (TGMS rice line, Pei'ai 64S. Significant differences in the daily change of temperature were detected between Tpand air temperature at the height of 150 cm (TA. From 8:00 to 20:00, Tp was lower than TA, but they were similar during 21:00 to next 7:00. The maximum Tp occurred one hour earlier than the maximum TA, though they both reached the minimum at 6:00. Tp fluctuated less than TA. At the same height, during 6:00–13:00, Tp was higher than air temperature (Ta, and Tp reached the maximum one hour earlier than Ta. During the rest time on sunny day, Tpwas close to or even a little lower than Ta. On overcast day, Tpwas higher than Ta in the whole day, and both maximized at the same time. In addition, Tpwas regulated by solar radiation, cloudage and wind speed in daytime, and by irrigation water at night. The present study indicated that a TA of 29.6°C was the critical point, at which Tpwas increased or decreased by irrigation water. Tp and the difference between water and air temperatures showed a conic relation. Tp fluctuation was also regulated by the absorption or reflection of solar radiation by leaves during daytime and release of heat energy during nighttime. By analysis on correlation and regression simulation, two models of Tp were established.

  9. Hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and the role of primary care in Italian regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Rosano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract
    Background: Hospitalization may often be prevented by timely and effective outpatient care either by preventing the onset of an illness, controlling an acute illness or managing a chronic disease with an appropriate follow-up. The objective of the study is to examine the variability of hospital admissions within Italian regions for Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs, and their relationship with primary care supply.
    Methods: Hospital discharge data aggregated at a regional level collected in 2005 were analysed by type of ACS conditions. Main outcome measures were regional hospital admission rates for ACSCs. Negative binomial models were used to analyse the association with individual risk factors (age and gender and regional risk factors (propensity to hospitalisation and prevalence of specific conditions.
    Non-parametric correlation indexes between standardised hospital admission rates and quantitative measures of primary care services were calculated.
    Results: ACSC admissions accounted for 6.6% of total admissions, 35.7% were classified as acute conditions and 64.3% as chronic conditions. Admission rates for ACSCs varied widely across Italian regions with different patterns for chronic and acute conditions. Southern regions showed significantly higher rates for chronic conditions and North-eastern regions for acute conditions. We found a significant negative association between the provision of ambulatory specialist services and standardised hospitalization rates
    (SHR for ACS chronic conditions (r=-0.50; p=0.02 and an inverse correlation among SHR for ACS acute conditions and the rate of GPs per 1,000 residents, although the latter was not statistically significant.
    Conclusions: In Italy, about 480,000 inpatient hospital admissions in 2005 were attributable to ACSCs. Even
    adjusting for potential confounders

  10. Cabin air temperature of parked vehicles in summer conditions: life-threatening environment for children and pets calculated by a dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Johannes; Schmerold, Ivo; Wimmer, Kurt; Schauberger, Günther

    2017-10-01

    In vehicles that are parked, no ventilation and/or air conditioning takes place. If a vehicle is exposed to direct solar radiation, an immediate temperature rise occurs. The high cabin air temperature can threaten children and animals that are left unattended in vehicles. In the USA, lethal heat strokes cause a mean death rate of 37 children per year. In addition, temperature-sensitive goods (e.g. drugs in ambulances and veterinary vehicles) can be adversely affected by high temperatures. To calculate the rise of the cabin air temperature, a dynamic model was developed that is driven by only three parameters, available at standard meteorological stations: air temperature, global radiation and wind velocity. The transition from the initial temperature to the constant equilibrium temperature depends strongly on the configuration of the vehicle, more specifically on insulation, window area and transmission of the glass, as well as on the meteorological conditions. The comparison of the model with empirical data showed good agreement. The model output can be applied to assess the heat load of children and animals as well as temperature-sensitive goods, which are transported and/or stored in a vehicle.

  11. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of a Semi-Transparent Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Module under Real Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cornaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cell technology is having an important role in renewable energy research due to its features and low-cost manufacturing processes. Devices based on this technology appear very well suited for integration into glazing systems due to their characteristics of transparency, color tuning and manufacturing directly on glass substrates. Field data of thermal and electrical characteristics of dye-sensitized solar modules (DSM are important since they can be used as input of building simulation models for the evaluation of their energy saving potential when integrated into buildings. However, still few studies in the literature provide this information. The study presented here aims to contribute to fill this lack providing a thermal and electrical characterization of a DSM in real operating conditions using a method developed in house. This method uses experimental data coming from test boxes exposed outdoor and dynamic simulation to provide thermal transmittance (U-value and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC of a DSM prototype. The device exhibits a U-value of 3.6 W/m2·K, confirmed by an additional measurement carried on in the lab using a heat flux meter, and a SHGC of 0.2, value compliant with literature results. Electrical characterization shows an increase of module power with respect to temperature resulting DSM being suitable for integration in building facades.

  12. On the quench sensitivity of 7010 aluminum alloy forgings in the overaged condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryakioğlu, Murat, E-mail: m.tiryakioglu@unf.edu [School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Robinson, Jeremy S. [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Eason, Paul D. [School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    The quench sensitivity of an overaged 7010 alloy forging was characterized by tensile and Vickers hardness tests, as well as scanning electron microscopy. Longitudinal tensile specimens, excised from a rectilinear open die forging were cooled from the solution treatment temperature following thirty-two different cooling paths including interrupted and delayed quenches. SEM analysis of the microstructure showed that quench precipitates were (i) Al{sub 2}CuMg (S) which nucleated heterogeneously on grain boundaries and (ii) Mg(Zn,Cu,Al){sub 2} (η) on grain boundaries, dispersoid bands, subgrain boundaries as well as in the aluminum matrix. The quench sensitivity of the alloy's yield strength and Vickers hardness was modeled simultaneously by quadruple-C curves, using an improved methodology for Quench Factor Analysis. The four C-curves used in the model represented loss of solute by (i) precipitation of S on grain boundaries, and precipitation of η (ii) on grain boundaries and dispersoid bands, (iii) on subgrain boundaries and (iv) in the matrix. The model yielded coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) values of 0.967 and 0.974 for yield strength and Vickers hardness, respectively. The model and the implications of the results are discussed in this paper.

  13. Evaporation and Ignition Characteristics of Water Emulsified Diesel under Conventional and Low Temperature Combustion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of emulsified diesel and low temperature combustion (LTC technology has great potential in reducing engine emissions. A visualization study on the spray and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel was conducted experimentally in a constant volume chamber under conventional and LTC conditions. The effects of ambient temperature on the evaporation, ignition and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel were studied under cold, evaporating and combustion conditions. Experimental results showed that the ambient temperature had little effect on the spray structures, in terms of the liquid core length, the spray shape and the spray area. However, higher ambient temperature slightly reduced the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD of the spray droplets. The auto-ignition delay time increased significantly with the decrease of the ambient temperature. The ignition process always occurred at the entrainment region near the front periphery of the liquid core. This entrainment region was evolved from the early injected fuel droplets which were heated and mixed by the continuous entrainment until the local temperature and equivalence ratio reached the ignition condition. The maximum value of integrated natural flame luminosity (INFL reduced by 60% when the ambient temperature dropped from 1000 to 800 K, indicating a significant decrease of the soot emissions could be achieved by LTC combustion mode than the conventional diesel engines.

  14. Targeting behavior of hepatic artery injected temperature sensitive liposomal adriamycin on tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y Y; Ueno, M; Yamagishi, M; Horikoshi, I; Yamashita, I; Tazawa, K; Gu, X Q

    1990-01-01

    Temperature sensitive liposomal Adriamycin (LADM) was injected into the hepatic artery of rats bearing implanted hepatic tumors. Two hours after the injection, the liver was heated at 42 degrees C and maintained for six minutes at that temperature using local hyperthermia. Blood samples were taken at regular intervals until 8 hours after injection, at which time the animals were sacrificed and the drug distribution in the tissues was examined. Results indicate that the Adriamycin was released from the liposome, with the drug concentration in circulation peaking at 30 minutes after heating. High drug levels (25.2 micrograms/g of wet tissue) in the tumor and high tumor/liver Adriamycin level ratios (TLAR; 4.1) were found. The drug levels and the TLAR of the liposomal Adriamycin injection combined with heating (LADM H) were significantly different from those of the same dose of aqueous Adriamycin with heating (ADM H) or aqueous Adriamycin (ADM) and LADM without heating. The experiment shows that the LADM is cleared from the liver slowly, and when hyperthermia treatment at phase-transition temperature of the liposome is performed, the drug level in an implanted hepatic tumor is increased, and in the parenchyma is decreased. The results imply that targeting the hepatic tumor in this way may be an effective therapeutic method, and the drug release from the liposome may be controlled externally. This method appears promising for clinical practice.

  15. Low temperature plasma vapor treatment of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Tang, X. L.; Chen, B. T.; Qiu, G.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the novel methods of depositing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings on the surface of glass slides and PS petri dish by plasma polymerization are provided. PNIPAAm can be obtained by plasma polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide by using the self-made equipment of plasma vapor treatment. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle. SEM analysis has revealed that the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) coatings were formed on the surface of the smooth glass slides. Further evaluation by using XPS, it has shown the presence of PNIPAAm. The wettability can be significantly modified by changing of the temperatures at above and below of the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) from the data of the contact angle test. These results have advantage for further application on the thermo-sensitive textile materials. On the deposition of PNIPAAm onto Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens in atmospheric pressure plasma, water permeability was significantly modified at around LCST. Due to the LCST is close to the temperature of human body, it has advantage on application of PBT melt-blown nonwovens.

  16. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  17. Effect of antecedent growth conditions on sensitivity of Escherichia coli to chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J D; Matin, A; Roberts, P V

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to inactivation by antibacterial agents that is induced by the growth environment was studied. Escherichia coli was grown in batch culture and in a chemostat, and the following parameters were varied: type of substrate, growth rate, temperature, and cell density during growth. Low doses (0.75 mg/liter) of chlorine dioxide were used to inactivate the cultures. The results demonstrated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximated natural aquatic environments were more resistant than those grown under commonly employed batch culture conditions. In particular, bacteria grown at submaximal rates were more resistant than their counterparts grown at mumax. The most resistant populations encountered in this study were those grown at D values of 0.02 h-1 and 0.06 h-1 at 25 degrees C. Growth at 15 degrees C led to greater resistance than did growth at 37 degrees C. The conditions that produced relatively resistant phenotypes were much closer to those found in most natural environments than are the typical conditions of batch culture methods. The importance of major physiological changes that can be induced by the antecedent growth environment is discussed in light of the possible modes of action of several disinfectants. PMID:6756305

  18. Effect of antecedent growth conditions on sensitivity of Escherichia coli to chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J D; Matin, A; Roberts, P V

    1982-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to inactivation by antibacterial agents that is induced by the growth environment was studied. Escherichia coli was grown in batch culture and in a chemostat, and the following parameters were varied: type of substrate, growth rate, temperature, and cell density during growth. Low doses (0.75 mg/liter) of chlorine dioxide were used to inactivate the cultures. The results demonstrated that populations grown under conditions that more closely approximated natural aquatic environments were more resistant than those grown under commonly employed batch culture conditions. In particular, bacteria grown at submaximal rates were more resistant than their counterparts grown at mumax. The most resistant populations encountered in this study were those grown at D values of 0.02 h-1 and 0.06 h-1 at 25 degrees C. Growth at 15 degrees C led to greater resistance than did growth at 37 degrees C. The conditions that produced relatively resistant phenotypes were much closer to those found in most natural environments than are the typical conditions of batch culture methods. The importance of major physiological changes that can be induced by the antecedent growth environment is discussed in light of the possible modes of action of several disinfectants.

  19. Enhancement of NH3 Gas Sensitivity at Room Temperature by Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor Coated with Co Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Lich Quang Nguyen; Pho Quoc Phan; Chien Duc Nguyen; Huyen Ngoc Duong; Lam Huu Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH3 gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH3 gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The...

  20. Elimination of bus voltage impact on temperature sensitive electrical parameter during turn-on transition for junction temperature estimation of high-power IGBT modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Junction temperature is of great importance to safe operating area of IGBT modules. Various information of the IGBT operating state is reflected on electrical characteristics during turn-on transient. A unified extraction method for internal junction temperature via dynamic thermo-sensitive elect......Junction temperature is of great importance to safe operating area of IGBT modules. Various information of the IGBT operating state is reflected on electrical characteristics during turn-on transient. A unified extraction method for internal junction temperature via dynamic thermo......-sensitive electrical parameters (DTSEP) during turn-on transient is proposed. Two DTSEP, turn-on delay time (tdon) and the maximum increasing rate of collector current dic/dt(max), are combined to eliminate the bus voltage impact. Using the inherent emitter-auxiliary inductor LeE in high-power modules, the temperature...

  1. Sensory profiling of Dalmatian dry-cured ham under different temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Janječić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of the Dalmatian ham processing conditions on weight loss and sensory characteristics, 20 hams were processed following different temperature conditions during salting and ripening. For that purpose, hams were evaluated using quantitative descriptive analysis. The weight loss was higher and all sensory traits except presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine crystals were higher rated for hams processed at higher temperatures. The most significant (P<0.0001 influence of temperature was established on subcutaneous fat color, muscle color and presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine, whereas no influence was established on appearance, marbling, flavor and melting. This concludes that there is overall significant effect of higher temperature on sensory characteristics most likely due to the more intense proteolysis and lipolysis.

  2. Extreme temperatures increase the deleterious consequences of inbreeding under laboratory and semi-natural conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Barker, J. Stuart F.; Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie

    2008-01-01

    The majority of experimental studies of the effects of population bottlenecks on fitness are performed under laboratory conditions, which do not account for the environmental complexity that populations face in nature. In this study, we test inbreeding depression in multiple replicates of inbred...... show inbreeding depression for egg-to-adult viability. The level of inbreeding depression is highly dependent on test temperature and is observed only at low and high temperatures. Inbreeding did not affect the developmental time or the sex ratio of emerging adults. However, temperature affected...... increases at stressful temperatures. Our results contribute to knowledge on the environmental dependency of inbreeding under different environmental conditions and emphasize that climate change may impact negatively on fitness through synergistic interactions with the genotype....

  3. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  4. Sensitivity to Speaker Control in the Online Comprehension of Conditional Tips and Promises: An Eye-Tracking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew J.; Haigh, Matthew; Ferguson, Heather J.

    2013-01-01

    Statements of the form if… then… can be used to communicate conditional speech acts such as tips and promises. Conditional promises require the speaker to have perceived control over the outcome event, whereas conditional tips do not. In an eye-tracking study, we examined whether readers are sensitive to information about perceived speaker control…

  5. A highly sensitive in vivo footprinting technique for condition-dependent identification of cis elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsche, Rita; Jovanovic, Birgit; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2014-01-01

    Knowing which regions of a gene are targeted by transcription factors during induction or repression is essential for understanding the mechanisms responsible for regulation. Therefore, we re-designed the traditional in vivo footprinting method to obtain a highly sensitive technique, which allows identification of the cis elements involved in condition-dependent gene regulation. Data obtained through DMS methylation, HCl DNA cleavage and optimized ligation-mediated PCR using fluorescent labelling followed by capillary gel electrophoresis are analysed by ivFAST. In this work we have developed this command line-based program, which is designed to ensure automated and fast data processing and visualization. The new method facilitates a quantitative, high-throughput approach because it enables the comparison of any number of in vivo footprinting results from different conditions (e.g. inducing, repressing, de-repressing) to one another by employing an internal standard. For validation of the method the well-studied upstream regulatory region of the Trichoderma reesei xyn1 (endoxylanase 1) gene was used. Applying the new method we could identify the motives involved in condition-dependent regulation of the cbh2 (cellobiohydrolase 2) and xyn2 (endoxylanase 2) genes.

  6. Evidence that higher CO2 increases tree growth sensitivity to temperature: a comparison of modern and paleo oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aim: To test the growth-sensitivity to temperature under different ambient CO2 concentrations, we determined paleo tree growth rates as they relate to variation in temperature during the last deglacial period, and compare these to modern tree growth rates as they relate to spatia...

  7. Thermal responses and perceptions under distinct ambient temperature and wind conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yamamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Wind conditions are widely recognized to influence the thermal states of humans. In this study, we investigated the relationship between wind conditions and thermal perception and energy balance in humans. The study participants were exposed for 20 min to 3 distinct ambient temperatures, wind speeds, and wind angles. During the exposure, the skin temperatures as a physiological reaction and mental reactions of the human body were measured and the energy balance was calculated based on the human thermal-load method. The results indicate that the human thermal load is an accurate indicator of human thermal states under all wind conditions. Furthermore, wind speed and direction by themselves do not account for the human thermal experience. Because of the thermoregulation that occurs to prevent heat loss and protect the core of the body, a low skin temperature was maintained and regional differences in skin temperature were detected under cool ambient conditions. Thus, the human thermal load, which represents physiological parameters such as skin-temperature change, adequately describes the mixed sensation of the human thermal experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical Investigation on Heat and Flow Characteristics of Temperature-Sensitive Ferrofluid in a Square Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is numerically to study the heat and flow characteristics of temperature-sensitive ferrofluid in the square cavity with and without the magnetic intensity. The numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of the ferrofluid using finite element method (FEM and showed good agreement with the existing data within 5% at all Rayleigh number ranges from 103 to 106. Natural convection and heat transfer characteristics of the ferrofluids within the tested cavity were found to depend on both magnetic intensity and magnetic volume fractions of magnetite. In addition, the mean Nusselt numbers and mean velocity of the ferrofluid in a square cavity were increased with the rise of the magnetic intensities and increased by 23.2% and 143.7%, respectively, at both magnetic intensity of H = 10000 A/m and the elapsed time of t = 30000 seconds.

  9. Perceived Stress, Multimorbidity, and Risk for Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care-sensitive Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens; Davydow, Dimitry S

    2016-01-01

    Dette studie undersøger, om personer med stress og kroniske lidelser har flere potentialet forebyggelige hospitalsindlæggelser for udvalgte sygdomme (såkaldte ambulatory-care sensitive conditions). Disse indlæggelser burde kunne undgås, hvis patienten får tilbudt optimal behandling i almen praksis...... % øget risiko for at dø inden for 30 dage efter indlæggelse. Studiet er baseret på en kohorte fra Den Nationale Sundhedsprofil og bygger på data om selvrapporteret stress og livsstilsfaktorer. Undersøgelsens resultater, som tager højde for køn, alder og prædisponerede sygdomme, tyder på, at stress koblet...

  10. Overview of hospitalizations by ambulatory care sensitive conditions in the municipality of Cotia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Laszlo Torres

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the profile of Hospitalizations by Amulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (HACSC, in the Municipality of Cotia, from 2008 to 2012. Method ecological, exploratory, longitudinal study with a quantitative approach. Data on HACSC, by age group and sex, were obtained from the Department of the Unified Health System. For data analysis descriptive statistics were used. Results During the period, there were 46,676 admissions, excluding deliveries, 7,753 (16.61% by HACSC. The main causes were cerebrovascular diseases, 16.96%, heart failure, 15.50%, hypertension, 10.80% and infection of the kidney and urinary tract, 10.51%. Regarding gender, HACSC occurred predominantly in males. There was a greater number of HACSC at extreme age ranges, especially in the elderly. Conclusion Chronic diseases predominate among the leading causes of HACSC and there was no significant difference between sex.

  11. Sensitivity of volcanic aerosol dispersion to meteorological conditions: A Pinatubo case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Using a global climate model (Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2-Carbon Cycle Stratosphere ) with a well-resolved stratosphere, we test the sensitivity of volcanic aerosol plume dispersion to meteorological conditions by simulating 1 day Mount Pinatubo-like eruptions on 10 consecutive days. The dispersion of the volcanic aerosol is found to be highly sensitive to the ambient meteorology for low-altitude eruptions (16-18 km), with this variability related to anomalous anticyclonic activity along the subtropical jet, which affects the permeability of the tropical pipe and controls the amount of aerosol that is retained by the tropical reservoir. Conversely, a high-altitude eruption scenario (19-29 km) exhibits low meteorological variability. Overcoming day-to-day meteorological variability by spreading the emission over 10 days is shown to produce insufficient radiative heating to loft the aerosol into the stratospheric tropical aerosol reservoir for the low eruption scenario. This results in limited penetration of aerosol into the southern hemisphere (SH) in contrast to the SH transport observed after the Pinatubo eruption. Our results have direct implications for the accurate simulation of past/future volcanic eruptions and volcanically forced climate changes, such as Intertropical Convergence Zone displacement.

  12. Immunolocalization and distribution of functional temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhan, Ubaidus; Sato, Masaki; Shinomiya, Takashi; Okubo, Migiwa; Tsumura, Maki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are unique cellular sensors involved in multiple cellular functions. Their role in salivary secretion remains to be elucidated. The expression and localization of temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary (submandibular, sublingual and parotid) glands were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The effects of various TRP channel agonists on carbachol (CCh)-induced salivary secretion in the submandibular gland and on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in a submandibular epithelial cell line were also investigated. Immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of TRP-melastatin subfamily member 8 (TRPM8) and TRP-ankyrin subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in the sublingual, submandibular and parotid glands. In addition, TRP-vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), TRPV3 and TRPV4 were also expressed in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in all three types of gland. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR results demonstrated the mRNA expression of TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1 in acinar and ductal cells in these salivary glands. Perfusion of the entire submandibular gland with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (1 μM) via the submandibular artery significantly increased CCh-induced salivation, whereas perfusion with TRPM8 and TRPA1 agonists (0.5 μM WS12 and 100 μM allyl isothiocyanate) decreased it. Application of agonists for each of the thermosensitive TRP channels increased [Ca(2+)]i in a submandibular epithelial cell line. These results indicate that temperature-sensitive TRP channels are localized and distributed in acinar, ductal and myoepithelial cells in salivary glands and that they play a functional role in the regulation and/or modulation of salivary secretion.

  13. On the effects of subvirial initial conditions and the birth temperature of R136

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Daniel P.; de Vries, Nathan; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effect of different initial virial temperatures, Q, on the dynamics of star clusters. We find that the virial temperature has a strong effect on many aspects of the resulting system, including among others: the fraction of bodies escaping from the system, the depth of the collapse of the system, and the strength of the mass segregation. These differences deem the practice of using `cold' initial conditions no longer a simple choice of convenience. The choice of initial virial temperature must be carefully considered as its impact on the remainder of the simulation can be profound. We discuss the pitfalls and aim to describe the general behaviour of the collapse and the resultant system as a function of the virial temperature so that a well-reasoned choice of initial virial temperature can be made. We make a correction to the previous theoretical estimate for the minimum radius, Rmin, of the cluster at the deepest moment of collapse to include a Q dependency, Rmin ≈ Q + N(-1/3), where N is the number of particles. We use our numerical results to infer more about the initial conditions of the young cluster R136. Based on our analysis, we find that R136 was likely formed with a rather cool, but not cold, initial virial temperature (Q ≈ 0.13). Using the same analysis method, we examined 15 other young clusters and found the most common initial virial temperature to be between 0.18 and 0.25.

  14. Acquiring variation in an artificial language: Children and adults are sensitive to socially conditioned linguistic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Anna; Smith, Kenny; Brown, Helen; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    demonstrate that children and adults are sensitive to speaker identity cues, an ability which is fundamental to tracking sociolinguistic variation, and that children's well-established tendency to regularize does not prevent them from learning sociolinguistically conditioned variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL SCHEME FOR ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE DAMS BASED ON FINITE ELEMENT AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving an effective combination of various temperature control measures is critical for temperature control and crack prevention of concrete dams. This paper presents a procedure for optimizing the temperature control scheme of roller compacted concrete (RCC dams that couples the finite element method (FEM with a sensitivity analysis method. In this study, seven temperature control schemes are defined according to variations in three temperature control measures: concrete placement temperature, water-pipe cooling time, and thermal insulation layer thickness. FEM is employed to simulate the equivalent temperature field and temperature stress field obtained under each of the seven designed temperature control schemes for a typical overflow dam monolith based on the actual characteristics of a RCC dam located in southwestern China. A sensitivity analysis is subsequently conducted to investigate the degree of influence each of the three temperature control measures has on the temperature field and temperature tensile stress field of the dam. Results show that the placement temperature has a substantial influence on the maximum temperature and tensile stress of the dam, and that the placement temperature cannot exceed 15 °C. The water-pipe cooling time and thermal insulation layer thickness have little influence on the maximum temperature, but both demonstrate a substantial influence on the maximum tensile stress of the dam. The thermal insulation thickness is significant for reducing the probability of cracking as a result of high thermal stress, and the maximum tensile stress can be controlled under the specification limit with a thermal insulation layer thickness of 10 cm. Finally, an optimized temperature control scheme for crack prevention is obtained based on the analysis results.

  16. Temperature dependent growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Quinn P; Simon, Cedric J; Smith, Gregory G; Carter, Chris G; Battaglene, Stephen C

    2017-05-01

    We examined the effects of temperature on the growth, feeding, nutritional condition and aerobic metabolism of juvenile spiny lobster, Sagmariasus verreauxi, in order to determine if temperature acclimated aerobic scope correlates with optimum for growth and to establish the thermal tolerance window for this emerging aquaculture species. Juvenile lobsters (initial weight=10.95±0.47g) were reared (n=7) at temperatures from 11.0 to 28.5°C for 145days. All lobsters survived from 14.5 to 25.0°C while survival was reduced at 11.0°C (86%) and all lobsters died at 28.5°C. Lobster specific growth rate and specific feed consumption displayed a unimodal response with temperature, peaking at 21.5°C. Lobster standard, routine and maximum metabolic rates, and aerobic scope all increased exponentially up to maximum non-lethal temperature. Optimum temperature for growth did not correspond to that for maximum aerobic scope suggesting that aerobic scope is not an effective predictor of the thermal optimum of spiny lobsters. Plateauing of specific feed consumption beyond 21.5°C suggests that temperature dependent growth of lobsters is limited by capacity to ingest or digest sufficient food to meet increasing maintenance metabolic demands at high temperatures. The nutritional condition of lobsters was not influenced by temperature and feed conversion ratio was improved at lower temperatures. These findings add to a growing body of evidence questioning the generality of aerobic scope to describe the physiological thermal boundaries of aquatic ectotherms and suggest that feed intake plays a crucial role in regulating performance at thermal extremes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Advantages of Hybrid 4DEnVar in the Context of the Forecast Sensitivity to Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyo-Jong; Shin, Seoleun; Ha, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Sujeong

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid four-dimensional ensemble variational data assimilation (hybrid 4DEnVar) is a prospective successor to three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVar) in operational weather prediction centers currently developing a new weather prediction model and those that do not operate adjoint models. In experiments using real observations, hybrid 4DEnVar improved Northern Hemisphere (NH; 20°N-90°N) 500 hPa geopotential height forecasts up to 5 days in a NH summer month compared to 3DVar, with statistical significance. This result is verified against ERA-Interim through a Monte Carlo test. By a regression analysis, the sensitivity of 5 day forecast is associated with the quality of the initial condition. The increased analysis skill for midtropospheric midlatitude temperature and subtropical moisture has the most apparent effect on forecast skill in the NH including a typhoon prediction case. Through attributing the analysis improvements by hybrid 4DEnVar separately to the ensemble background error covariance (BEC), its four-dimensional (4-D) extension, and climatological BEC, it is revealed that the ensemble BEC contributes to the subtropical moisture analysis, whereas the 4-D extension does to the midtropospheric midlatitude temperature. This result implies that hourly wind-mass correlation in 6 h analysis window is required to extract the potential of hybrid 4DEnVar for the midlatitude temperature analysis to the maximum. However, the temporal ensemble correlation, in hourly time scale, between moisture and another variable is invalid so that it could not work for improving the hybrid 4DEnVar analysis.

  18. Measurement of distributed strain and temperature based on higher order and higher mode Bragg conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, James S. (Inventor); Sivanesan, Ponniah (Inventor); Venkat, Venki S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A Bragg grating sensor for measuring distributed strain and temperature at the same time comprises an optical fiber having a single mode operating wavelength region and below a cutoff wavelength of the fiber having a multimode operating wavelength region. A saturated, higher order Bragg grating having first and second order Bragg conditions is fabricated in the optical fiber. The first order of Bragg resonance wavelength of the Bragg grating is within the single mode operating wavelength region of the optical fiber and the second order of Bragg resonance wavelength is below the cutoff wavelength of the fiber within the multimode operating wavelength region. The reflectivities of the saturated Bragg grating at the first and second order Bragg conditions are less than two orders of magnitude of one another. In use, the first and second order Bragg conditions are simultaneously created in the sensor at the respective wavelengths and a signal from the sensor is demodulated with respect to each of the wavelengths corresponding to the first and second order Bragg conditions. Two Bragg conditions have different responsivities to strain and temperature, thus allowing two equations for axial strain and temperature to be found in terms of the measure shifts in the primary and second order Bragg wavelengths. This system of equations can be solved for strain and temperature.

  19. MWCNT-polymer composites as highly sensitive and selective room temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangu, Raghu; Rajaputra, Suresh; Singh, Vijay P.

    2011-05-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-polymer composite-based hybrid sensors were fabricated and integrated into a resistive sensor design for gas sensing applications. Thin films of MWCNTs were grown onto Si/SiO2 substrates via xylene pyrolysis using the chemical vapor deposition technique. Polymers like PEDOT:PSS and polyaniline (PANI) mixed with various solvents like DMSO, DMF, 2-propanol and ethylene glycol were used to synthesize the composite films. These sensors exhibited excellent response and selectivity at room temperature when exposed to low concentrations (100 ppm) of analyte gases like NH3 and NO2. The effect of various solvents on the sensor response imparting selectivity to CNT-polymer nanocomposites was investigated extensively. Sensitivities as high as 28% were observed for an MWCNT-PEDOT:PSS composite sensor when exposed to 100 ppm of NH3 and - 29.8% sensitivity for an MWCNT-PANI composite sensor to 100 ppm of NO2 when DMSO was used as a solvent. Additionally, the sensors exhibited good reversibility.

  20. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Brian R; Tong, Jonathan K; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions several orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional sensors such as thermocouples, semiconductor diodes, as well as resistance and infrared thermometers. The use of traditional cantilevers, however, entails a series of important measurement limitations, because their interactions with the sample and surroundings often create parasitic deflection forces and the typical metal layer degrades the thermal sensitivity of the cantilever. The paper introduces a design to address these issues by decoupling the sample and detector section of the cantilever, along with a thermomechanical model, the fabrication, system integration, and characterization. The custom-designed bi-arm cantilever is over one order of magnitude more sensitive than current commercial cantilevers due to the significantly reduced thermal conductance of the cantilever sample arm. The rigid and immobile sample section offers measurement versatility ranging from photothermal absorption, near-field thermal radiation down to contact, conduction, and material thermal characterization measurements in nearly identical configurations.

  1. Vibration Sensitivity of a Wide-Temperature Electronically Scanned Pressure Measurement (ESP) Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Garza, Frederico R.

    2001-01-01

    A vibration sensitivity test was conducted on a Wide-Temperature ESP module. The test object was Module "M4," a 16-channel, 4 psi unit scheduled for installation in the Arc Sector of NTF. The module was installed on a vibration exciter and loaded to positive then negative full-scale pressures (+/-2.5 psid). Test variables were the following: Vibration frequencies: 20, 55, 75 Hz. Vibration level: 1 g. Vibration axes: X, Y, Z. The pressure response was measured on each channel, first without and then with the vibration turned on, and the difference analyzed by means of the statistical t-test. The results show that the vibration sensitivity does not exceed 0.01% Full Scale Output per g (with the exception of one channel on one axis) to a 95 percent confidence level. This specification, limited by the resolution of the pressure source, lies well below the total uncertainty specification of 0.1 percent Full Scale Output.

  2. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: Implications from other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko eNishiyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts phenotype and does not replicate at 41oC. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  3. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars H

    2016-07-25

    We report on a novel design of an on-chip optical temperature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration where the two arms consist of hybrid waveguides providing opposite temperature-dependent phase changes to enhance the temperature sensitivity of the sensor. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (~80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high as 775 pm/°C. The proposed design is found to be design-flexible and robust to fabrication errors.

  4. Cluster analysis of midlatitude oceanic cloud regimes: mean properties and temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Gordon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play an important role in the climate system by reducing the amount of shortwave radiation reaching the surface and the amount of longwave radiation escaping to space. Accurate simulation of clouds in computer models remains elusive, however, pointing to a lack of understanding of the connection between large-scale dynamics and cloud properties. This study uses a k-means clustering algorithm to group 21 years of satellite cloud data over midlatitude oceans into seven clusters, and demonstrates that the cloud clusters are associated with distinct large-scale dynamical conditions. Three clusters correspond to low-level cloud regimes with different cloud fraction and cumuliform or stratiform characteristics, but all occur under large-scale descent and a relatively dry free troposphere. Three clusters correspond to vertically extensive cloud regimes with tops in the middle or upper troposphere, and they differ according to the strength of large-scale ascent and enhancement of tropospheric temperature and humidity. The final cluster is associated with a lower troposphere that is dry and an upper troposphere that is moist and experiencing weak ascent and horizontal moist advection.

    Since the present balance of reflection of shortwave and absorption of longwave radiation by clouds could change as the atmosphere warms from increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gases, we must also better understand how increasing temperature modifies cloud and radiative properties. We therefore undertake an observational analysis of how midlatitude oceanic clouds change with temperature when dynamical processes are held constant (i.e., partial derivative with respect to temperature. For each of the seven cloud regimes, we examine the difference in cloud and radiative properties between warm and cold subsets. To avoid misinterpreting a cloud response to large-scale dynamical forcing as a cloud response to temperature, we require horizontal and vertical

  5. Sensitivity of historical orographically enhanced extreme precipitation events to idealized temperature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Mari Ingeborg; Sorteberg, Asgeir; Rasmussen, Roy

    2017-03-01

    Using high resolution convective permitting simulations, we have investigated the sensitivity of historical orographically enhanced extreme precipitation events to idealized temperature perturbations. Our simulations were typical autumn and winter synoptic scale extreme precipitation events on the west coast of Norway. The response in daily mean precipitation was around 5%/K for a 2 °C temperature perturbation with a clear topographical pattern. Low lying coastal regions experienced relative changes that were only about 1/3 of the changes at higher elevations. The largest changes were seen in the highest elevations of the near coastal mountain regions where the change was in order of +7.5%/K. With a response around 5%/K, our simulations had a precipitation response that was around 2%/K lower than Clausius-Clapeyron scaling and 3%/K lower than the water vapor change. The below Clausius-Clapeyron scaling in precipitation could not be explained by changes in vertical velocities, stability or relative humidity. We suggest that the lower response in precipitation is a result of a shift from the more efficient ice-phase precipitation growth to less effective rain production in a warmer atmosphere. A considerable change in precipitation phase was seen with a mean increase in rainfall of 16%/K which was partly compensated by a reduction in snowfall of around 23%/K. This change may have serious implications for flooding and geohazards.

  6. Herceptin-conjugated temperature-sensitive immunoliposomes encapsulating gemcitabine for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dae Hwan; Koo, Min-Ji; Kim, Jung Seok; Kim, Jin-Seok

    2016-03-01

    Gemcitabine (2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine, GCT) is an analog of deoxycytidine with cytotoxicity for breast cancer cells. However, because of its hepatotoxicity and other side effects, an efficient drug delivery system is needed for better therapeutic outcomes. A temperature-sensitive PEGylated immunoliposome (TSL) with trastuzumab (or Herceptin) attached encapsulating GCT (Her-PEG-TSL-GCT) was prepared. The mean diameter of the liposome was about 200 nm and the prepared immunoliposome showed the capacity to deliver the payload to the hyperthermic environment. The actual number of antibody molecules attached to one single liposome is about 19, with the GCT encapsulation efficiency of 54.6 ± 3.50 %. This immunoliposome shows a temperature-dependent drug release at around 41-43 °C. Anticancer activity of Her-PEG-TSL-GCT was determined using HER-2 expressing breast cancer cells, SK-BR-3, in vitro and resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared to free GCT (IC20 11.7 nM) or conventional liposome lacking the targeting antibody. In conclusion, these data show that improved delivery of GCT to breast cancer cells can be achieved by Her-PEG-TSL-GCT in vitro, and this strategy could be used for breast cancer therapy with further studies.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of resistance to two pathotypes of Plasmodiophora brassicae in Brassica oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Gabrielson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several methods were evaluated in an attempt to develop a greenhouse screening procedure that would predict field resistance of brassica breeding lines to clubroot disease caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae. Several Brassica oleracea cultivars and breeding lines bred for resistance to Plasmodiophora brassicae and a susceptible Chinese cabbage cultivar were exposed to high levels of inoculum of both pathotypes PB 6, PB 7 at 12, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C. No infection occurred on any host at 12°C. Chinese cabbage was heavily diseased from 15-30°C. Bagder Shipper cabbage, a cauliflower deriving resistance from this variety, and Oregon CR-1 broccoli were resistant to pathotype PB 6 at 15 and 20°C and partially resistant at 25 and 30°C. They were resistant to pathotype PB 7 and 15°C and almost totally susceptible at 20, 25° and 30°C. Oregon cabbage line OR 123 was resistant to pathotype PB 6 at 15°C at almost completely susceptible at 20, 25 and 30°C. It was resistant to pathotype PB 7 at all temperatures. Temperature sensitivity of resistance can partially explain why breeding lines are resistant in field trials and susceptible in greenhouse tests.

  8. Sensitivity of historical orographically enhanced extreme precipitation events to idealized temperature perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Mari Ingeborg; Sorteberg, Asgeir; Rasmussen, Roy

    2018-01-01

    Using high resolution convective permitting simulations, we have investigated the sensitivity of historical orographically enhanced extreme precipitation events to idealized temperature perturbations. Our simulations were typical autumn and winter synoptic scale extreme precipitation events on the west coast of Norway. The response in daily mean precipitation was around 5%/K for a 2 °C temperature perturbation with a clear topographical pattern. Low lying coastal regions experienced relative changes that were only about 1/3 of the changes at higher elevations. The largest changes were seen in the highest elevations of the near coastal mountain regions where the change was in order of +7.5%/K. With a response around 5%/K, our simulations had a precipitation response that was around 2%/K lower than Clausius-Clapeyron scaling and 3%/K lower than the water vapor change. The below Clausius-Clapeyron scaling in precipitation could not be explained by changes in vertical velocities, stability or relative humidity. We suggest that the lower response in precipitation is a result of a shift from the more efficient ice-phase precipitation growth to less effective rain production in a warmer atmosphere. A considerable change in precipitation phase was seen with a mean increase in rainfall of 16%/K which was partly compensated by a reduction in snowfall of around 23%/K. This change may have serious implications for flooding and geohazards.

  9. Geometry dependence of temperature coefficient of resonant frequency in highly sensitive resonant thermal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Naoki; Ono, Takahito

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the geometry dependence of the temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (TCRF) is investigated and compared with a theoretical thermal stress change using Si mechanical microresonators. The used resonators have Y, T, I (conventional double-supported type) and arrow shapes, and in each shape the resonant frequency change of the resonator is measured in relation to changes in the amount of heat input to the resonator. The change trend in the experimental resonant frequency and the theoretical thermal stress in changing the temperature are consist. The TCRF in each resonator is Y: -653, T: -162, I: -417, and the arrow is 174 ppm/K. These absolute values are much higher than those of conventional cantilevered Si resonators (-34.9 ppm/K). In addition, the frequency fluctuations based on Allan deviation are experimentally evaluated considering the theoretical thermal fluctuation noise. It is considered that use of this technique to improve the TCRF of resonators by changing the geometry has the possibility of creating a sensor with highly sensitive thermal detection.

  10. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  11. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavarache, Ionel; Maraloiu, Valentin Adrian; Negrila, Catalin; Prepelita, Petronela; Gruia, Ion; Iordache, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. This article reports on a significant progress given by structuring Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films by heating the substrate at 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency with peak value reaching 850% at -1 V and about 1000 nm. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the effort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  12. Low global sensitivity of metabolic rate to temperature in calcified marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Morley, Simon A; Bates, Amanda E; Clark, Melody S; Day, Robert W; Lamare, Miles; Martin, Stephanie M; Southgate, Paul C; Tan, Koh Siang; Tyler, Paul A; Peck, Lloyd S

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic rate is a key component of energy budgets that scales with body size and varies with large-scale environmental geographical patterns. Here we conduct an analysis of standard metabolic rates (SMR) of marine ectotherms across a 70° latitudinal gradient in both hemispheres that spanned collection temperatures of 0-30 °C. To account for latitudinal differences in the size and skeletal composition between species, SMR was mass normalized to that of a standard-sized (223 mg) ash-free dry mass individual. SMR was measured for 17 species of calcified invertebrates (bivalves, gastropods, urchins and brachiopods), using a single consistent methodology, including 11 species whose SMR was described for the first time. SMR of 15 out of 17 species had a mass-scaling exponent between 2/3 and 1, with no greater support for a 3/4 rather than a 2/3 scaling exponent. After accounting for taxonomy and variability in parameter estimates among species using variance-weighted linear mixed effects modelling, temperature sensitivity of SMR had an activation energy (Ea) of 0.16 for both Northern and Southern Hemisphere species which was lower than predicted under the metabolic theory of ecology (Ea 0.2-1.2 eV). Northern Hemisphere species, however, had a higher SMR at each habitat temperature, but a lower mass-scaling exponent relative to SMR. Evolutionary trade-offs that may be driving differences in metabolic rate (such as metabolic cold adaptation of Northern Hemisphere species) will have important impacts on species abilities to respond to changing environments.

  13. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  14. Retail colour display life of chilled lamb as affected by processing conditions and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenvold, Katja; Wiklund, Eva

    2011-07-01

    This study explored the impact of i) processing conditions (electrical stimulation and pre rigor temperatures), and ii) storage temperature prior to retail display on the colour stability of lamb which had been vacuum-packaged for seven weeks before retail packaging in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (80% O(2)/20% CO(2)). A high pre rigor temperature (42°C) reduced colour stability while differences in colour stability between pre rigor temperatures of 5°C, 15°C and 25°C were limited. It was not affected by electrical stimulation, and did not interact with pre rigor temperature. In contrast, an increase in the storage temperature from the ideal temperature of -1.5°C to 2°C significantly decreased the colour stability of lamb loins. Even one week at 2°C at the end of the storage period had a substantial negative impact on the retail colour display life. The variability in colour increased over time, and the variability increased more for the temperature abuse treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature Trends in Coal Char Combustion under Oxy-fuel Conditions for the Determination of Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Samira [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hecht, Ethan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion technology with carbon capture and storage could significantly reduce global CO2 emissions, a greenhouse gas. Implementation can be aided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, which require an accurate understanding of coal particle kinetics as they go through combustion in a range of environments. To understand the kinetics of pulverized coal char combustion, a heated flow reactor was operated under a wide range of experimental conditions. We varied the environment for combustion by modifying the diluent gas, oxygen concentration, gas flow rate, and temperature of the reactor/reacting gases. Measurements of reacting particle temperatures were made for a sub-bituminous and bituminous coal char, in environments with CO2 or N2 as the diluent gas, with 12, 24, and 36 vol-% oxygen concentration, at 50, 80, 100, and 200 standard liters per minute flowing through the reactor, reactor temperatures of 1200, 1400 K, at pressures slightly above atmospheric. The data shows consistent increasing particle temperature with increased oxygen concentration, reactor temperature and higher particle temperatures for N2 diluent than CO2. We also see the effects of CO2 gasification when different ranks of coal are used, and how the reduction in the temperature due to the CO2 diluent is greater for the coal char that has higher reactivity. Quantitative measurements for temperature are not yet complete due to ongoing calibration of detection systems.

  16. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  17. The sensitivity of US wildfire occurrence to pre-season soil moisture conditions across ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Daniel; Reager, John T.; Zajic, Brittany; Rousseau, Nick; Rodell, Matthew; Hinkley, Everett

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that year-to-year variability in moisture conditions and drought are linked with increased wildfire occurrence. However, quantifying the sensitivity of wildfire to surface moisture state at seasonal lead-times has been challenging due to the absence of a long soil moisture record with the appropriate coverage and spatial resolution for continental-scale analysis. Here we apply model simulations of surface soil moisture that numerically assimilate observations from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission with the USDA Forest Service’s historical Fire-Occurrence Database over the contiguous United States. We quantify the relationships between pre-fire-season soil moisture and subsequent-year wildfire occurrence by land-cover type and produce annual probable wildfire occurrence and burned area maps at 0.25 degree resolution. Cross-validated results generally indicate a higher occurrence of smaller fires when months preceding fire season are wet, while larger fires are more frequent when soils are dry. This is consistent with the concept of increased fuel accumulation under wet conditions in the pre-season. These results demonstrate the fundamental strength of the relationship between soil moisture and fire activity at long lead-times and are indicative of that relationship’s utility for the future development of national-scale predictive capability.

  18. Sensitivity of Pliocene climate simulations in MRI-CGCM2.3 to respective boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamae, Youichi; Yoshida, Kohei; Ueda, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    Accumulations of global proxy data are essential steps for improving reliability of climate model simulations for the Pliocene warming climate. In the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project phase 2 (PlioMIP2), a part project of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 4, boundary forcing data have been updated from the PlioMIP phase 1 due to recent advances in understanding of oceanic, terrestrial and cryospheric aspects of the Pliocene palaeoenvironment. In this study, sensitivities of Pliocene climate simulations to the newly archived boundary conditions are evaluated by a set of simulations using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model, MRI-CGCM2.3. The simulated Pliocene climate is warmer than pre-industrial conditions for 2.4 °C in global mean, corresponding to 0.6 °C warmer than the PlioMIP1 simulation by the identical climate model. Revised orography, lakes, and shrunk ice sheets compared with the PlioMIP1 lead to local and remote influences including snow and sea ice albedo feedback, and poleward heat transport due to the atmosphere and ocean that result in additional warming over middle and high latitudes. The amplified higher-latitude warming is supported qualitatively by the proxy evidences, but is still underestimated quantitatively. Physical processes responsible for the global and regional climate changes should be further addressed in future studies under systematic intermodel and data-model comparison frameworks.

  19. Sensitivity of human embryonic stem cells to different conditions during cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Jiandong; Wei, Yuping; Xu, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Low cell recovery rate of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) resulting from cryopreservation damages leads to the difficulty in their successful commercialization of clinical applications. Hence in this study, sensitivity of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to different cooling rates, ice seeding and cryoprotective agent (CPA) types was compared and cell viability and recovery after cryopreservation under different cooling conditions were assessed. Both extracellular and intracellular ice formation were observed. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) accumulation of hESCs was determined. Cryopreservation of hESCs at 1 °C/min with the ice seeding and at the theoretically predicted optimal cooling rate (TPOCR) led to lower level of intracellular ROS, and prevented irregular and big ice clump formation compared with cryopreservation at 1 °C/min. This strategy further resulted in a significant increase in the hESC recovery when glycerol and 1,2-propanediol were used as the CPAs, but no increase for Me2SO. hESCs after cryopreservation under all the tested conditions still maintained their pluripotency. Our results provide guidance for improving the hESC cryopreservation recovery through the combination of CPA type, cooling rate and ice seeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of mild temperature conditions during dehydration procedures on saffron quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, C Priscila; Carmona, Manuel; Maggi, Luana; Kanakis, Charalabos D; Anastasaki, Eirini G; Tarantilis, Petros A; Polissiou, Moschos G; Alonso, Gonzalo L

    2010-03-15

    The dehydration procedure is responsible for saffron sensorial properties: colour, taste and aroma. Changes in the compounds responsible for these characteristics have been studied when dehydration processes at high and low temperature are employed. However, the evolution of these changes at mild temperatures is not available in the current bibliography. In this paper the effect of different mild conditions (18-20 degrees C for 24 h, 40-50 degrees C for 75 min and 55 degrees C for 75 min) applied to 45 saffron samples with the same origin was investigated. Crocetin esters, the compounds responsible for saffron colour, increased their content with no significant differences from other processes when high temperatures (55 degrees C) were used, thus producing a noticeable increment in saffron colouring capability. Similar behaviour was obtained for picrocrocin, the compound responsible for saffron taste, with higher average content at the highest temperature (55 degrees C) but without significant differences with the inferior conditions (40-50 degrees C). However, more volatile compounds were generated, especially safranal,at higher temperatures, e.g. 55 degrees C, during the dehydration procedure. The results found support the idea for employing mild to high temperatures during the dehydration process of saffron.

  1. Review of in-service moisture and temperature conditions in wood-frame buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel V. Glass; Anton TenWolde

    2007-01-01

    This literature review reports in-service moisture and temperature conditions of floor, wall, and roof members of wood-frame buildings and exposed wood decks and permanent wood foundations. A wide variation exists in reported wood moisture content, spanning a range from as low as 2% to well above 30%. Relevant studies are summarized, and measured values of wood...

  2. The pigment composition of Phaeocystis antarctica (Haptophyceae) under varius conditions of light, temperature, salinity, and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Stefels, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The pigment composition of Phaeocystis antarctica was monitored under various conditions of light, temperature, salinity, and iron. 19'-Hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin (Hex-fuco) always constituted the major light-harvesting pigment, with remarkably stable ratios of Hex-fuco-to-chl a under the various

  3. Effects of temperature, light conditions and gibberellic acid on the in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor and inconsistent germination of Protea cynaroides seeds are often observed in soil. A protocol based on embryo culture was developed for efficient in vitro propagation of P. cynaroides. The effects of temperature, light conditions and gibberellic acid (GA3) on the in vitro germination of P. cynaroides embryos were ...

  4. Thermal comfort index and infrared temperatures for lambs subjected to different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago do Prado Paim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an abundance of thermal indices with different input parameters and applicabilities. Infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating the response of animals to the environment and differentiating between genetic groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate superficial body temperatures of lambs from three genetic groups under different environmental conditions, correlating these with thermal comfort indices. Forty lambs (18 males and 22 females from three genetic groups (Santa Inês, Ile de France × Santa Inês and Dorper × Santa Inês were exposed to three climatic conditions: open air, housed and artificial heating. Infrared thermal images were taken weekly at 6h, 12h and 21h at the neck, front flank, rear flank, rump, nose, skull, trunk and eye. Four thermal comfort indices were calculated using environmental measurements including black globe temperature, air humidity and wind speed. Artificial warming, provided by infrared lamps and wind protection, conserved and increased the superficial body temperature of the lambs, thus providing lower daily thermal ranges. Artificial warming did not influence daily weight gain or mortality. Skin temperatures increased along with increases in climatic indices. Again, infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating thermal stress conditions and differentiating environments. However, the use of thermal imaging for understanding animal responses to environmental conditions requires further study.

  5. Hospitalisations and costs relating to ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2012-03-08

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions for which the provision of timely and effective outpatient care can reduce the risks of hospitalisation by preventing, controlling or managing a chronic disease or condition. AIMS: The aims of this study were to report on ACSCs in Ireland, and to provide a baseline for future reference. METHODS: Using HIPE, via Health Atlas Ireland, inpatient discharges classified as ACSCs using definitions from the Victorian ACSC study were extracted for the years 2005-2008. Direct methods of standardisation allowed comparison of rates using the EU standard population as a comparison for national data, and national population as comparison for county data. Costs were estimated using diagnosis-related groups. RESULTS: The directly age-standardised discharge rate for ACSC-related discharges increased slightly, but non-significantly, from 15.40 per 1,000 population in 2005 to 15.75 per 1,000 population in 2008. The number of discharges increased (9.5%) from 63,619 in 2005 to 69,664 in 2008, with the estimated associated hospital costs increasing (31.5%) from 267.8 million in 2005 to 352.2 million in 2008. Across the country, there was considerable variation in the discharge rates for the Top-10 ACSCs for the years 2005-2008. Significantly lower rates of hospitalisation were observed in more urban areas including Cork, Dublin and Galway. The most common ACSC in 2008 was diabetes with complications (29.8%). CONCLUSIONS: The variation in rates observed indicates the scope of reducing hospitalisations and associated costs for ACSCs, across both adult\\'s and children\\'s services and particularly in relation to diabetes complications.

  6. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  7. Sensitivity-Improved Strain Sensor over a Large Range of Temperatures Using an Etched and Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A sensitivity-improved fiber-optic strain sensor using an etched and regenerated fiber Bragg grating (ER-FBG suitable for a large range of temperature measurements has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The process of chemical etching (from 125 µm to 60 µm provides regenerated gratings (at a temperature of 680 °C with a stronger reflective intensity (from 43.7% to 69.8%, together with an improved and linear strain sensitivity (from 0.9 pm/με to 4.5 pm/με over a large temperature range (from room temperature to 800 °C, making it a useful strain sensor for high temperature environments.

  8. Developing a heatwave early warning system for Sweden: evaluating sensitivity of different epidemiological modelling approaches to forecast temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, Christofer; Ebi, Kristie L; Langner, Joakim; Forsberg, Bertil

    2014-12-23

    Over the last two decades a number of heatwaves have brought the need for heatwave early warning systems (HEWS) to the attention of many European governments. The HEWS in Europe are operating under the assumption that there is a high correlation between observed and forecasted temperatures. We investigated the sensitivity of different temperature mortality relationships when using forecast temperatures. We modelled mortality in Stockholm using observed temperatures and made predictions using forecast temperatures from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts to assess the sensitivity. We found that the forecast will alter the expected future risk differently for different temperature mortality relationships. The more complex models seemed more sensitive to inaccurate forecasts. Despite the difference between models, there was a high agreement between models when identifying risk-days. We find that considerations of the accuracy in temperature forecasts should be part of the design of a HEWS. Currently operating HEWS do evaluate their predictive performance; this information should also be part of the evaluation of the epidemiological models that are the foundation in the HEWS. The most accurate description of the relationship between high temperature and mortality might not be the most suitable or practical when incorporated into a HEWS.

  9. Thermo-optical characterization of fluorescent rhodamine B based temperature-sensitive nanosensors using a CMOS MEMS micro-hotplate☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Veeren M.; Hopper, Richard H.; Ali, Syed Z.; King, Emma M.; Udrea, Florin; Oxley, Chris H.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    A custom designed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micro-hotplate, capable of operating at high temperatures (up to 700 °C), was used to thermo-optically characterize fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors, 550 nm in diameter, are composed of temperature-sensitive rhodamine B (RhB) fluorophore which was conjugated to an inert silica sol–gel matrix. Temperature-sensitive nanosensors were dispersed and dried across the surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, which was mounted in the slide holder of a fluorescence confocal microscope. Through electrical control of the MEMS micro-hotplate, temperature induced changes in fluorescence intensity of the nanosensors was measured over a wide temperature range. The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C. The fluorescence response of all dispersed nanosensors across the whole surface of the MEMS device and individual nanosensors, using line profile analysis, were not statistically different (p nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems. PMID:25844025

  10. Thermo-optical characterization of fluorescent rhodamine B based temperature-sensitive nanosensors using a CMOS MEMS micro-hotplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Veeren M; Hopper, Richard H; Ali, Syed Z; King, Emma M; Udrea, Florin; Oxley, Chris H; Aylott, Jonathan W

    2014-03-01

    A custom designed microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micro-hotplate, capable of operating at high temperatures (up to 700 °C), was used to thermo-optically characterize fluorescent temperature-sensitive nanosensors. The nanosensors, 550 nm in diameter, are composed of temperature-sensitive rhodamine B (RhB) fluorophore which was conjugated to an inert silica sol-gel matrix. Temperature-sensitive nanosensors were dispersed and dried across the surface of the MEMS micro-hotplate, which was mounted in the slide holder of a fluorescence confocal microscope. Through electrical control of the MEMS micro-hotplate, temperature induced changes in fluorescence intensity of the nanosensors was measured over a wide temperature range. The fluorescence response of all nanosensors dispersed across the surface of the MEMS device was found to decrease in an exponential manner by 94%, when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 145 °C. The fluorescence response of all dispersed nanosensors across the whole surface of the MEMS device and individual nanosensors, using line profile analysis, were not statistically different (p nanosensors could find potential application in the measurement of temperature in biological and micro-electrical systems.

  11. Conditions for lowering the flue gas temperature; Foerutsaettning foer saenkning av roekgastemperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus

    2012-02-15

    In heat and power production, the efficiency of the power plant increases the larger share of heat from the flue gas that is converted to power. However, this also implies that the temperature of the heat exchanging surfaces is lowered. If the temperature is lowered to a temperature below the dew point of the flue gas, this would result in condensation of the gas, which in turn elevates the risk of serious corrosion attack on the surfaces where condensation occurs. Thus, it is important to determine the dew point temperature. One way of determining the dew point temperature is to use data on composition of the fuel together with operation parameters of the plant, thus calculating the dew point temperature. However, this calculation of the dew point is not so reliable, especially if hygroscopic salts are present. Therefore, for safety reasons, the temperature of the flue gas is kept well above the dew point temperature. This results in lowered over-all efficiency of the plant. It could also be expected that for a certain plant, some construction materials under certain operation conditions would have corrosion characteristics that may allow condensation on the surface without severe and unpredictable corrosion attack. However, by only using operation parameters and fuel composition, it is even harder to predict the composition of the condensate at different operation temperatures than to calculate the dew point temperature. If the dew point temperature was known with a greater certainty, the temperature of the flue gas could be kept lower, just above the estimated value of the dew point, without any increased risk for condensation. If, in addition, also the resulting composition of the condensate at different temperatures below the dew point is known, it can be predicted if the construction materials of the flue gas channel were compatible with the formed condensate. If they are compatible, the flue gas temperature can be further lowered from the dew point

  12. Sensitivity Analysis of RCW Temperature on the Moderator Subcooling Margin for the LBLOCA of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Si Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Choi, Sung Soo [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Min [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Moderator subcooling margin has been analyzed using the MODTURC{sub C}LAS code in the Large LOCA FSAR PARTs C and F. Performance of moderator heat exchangers depends on RCW (Raw reCirculated Water) temperature. And also the temperature is affected by sea water temperature. Unfortunately, sea water temperature is gradually increasing by global warming. So it will cause increase of RCW temperature inevitably. There is no assessment result of moderator subcooling with increasing RCW temperature even if it is important problem. Therefore, sensitivity analysis is performed to give information about the relation between RCW temperature and moderator subcooling in the present study. The moderator subcooling margin has to be ensured to establish the moderator heat removal when Large LOCA with LOECI and Loss of Class IV Power occurs. However, sea water temperature is increasing gradually due to global warming. So it is necessary that sensitivity analysis of RCW temperature on the moderator subcooling margin to estimate the availability of the moderator heat removal. In the present paper, the moderator subcooling analysis is performed using the same methodology and assumptions except for RCW temperature used in FSAR Large LOCA PART F.

  13. Preparation of a Paeonol-Containing Temperature-Sensitive In Situ Gel and Its Preliminary Efficacy on Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zheng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the optimal composition of a paeonol temperature-sensitive in situ gel composed of poloxamer 407 (P407 was determined, and a preliminary study of its effect on allergic rhinitis was performed. The optimal composition of the paeonol temperature-sensitive in situ gel included 2% paeonol inclusion, 22% P407, 2% poloxamer 188 (P188 and 2% PEG6000, as assessed by thermodynamic and rheological studies. The toad palate model was employed to study the toxicity of the paeonol temperature-sensitive in situ gel on the nasal mucosa. The result of this experiment showed low toxicity to cilia, which allows the gel to be used for nasal administration. The Franz diffusion cell method was used to study the in vitro release of paeonol and suggested that the in vitro release was in line with the Higuchi equation. This result suggests that the paeonol could be absorbed into the body through mucous membranes and had some characteristics of a sustained effect. Finally, the guinea pig model of ovalbumin sensitized allergic rhinitis was used to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of the gel, with the paeonol temperature-sensitive in situ gel showing a significant effect on the guinea pig model of sensitized allergic rhinitis (AR.

  14. Responses of soil respiration and its temperature/moisture sensitivity to precipitation in three subtropical forests in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H.; Deng, Q.; Zhou, G.; Hui, D.; Zhang, D.; Liu, S.; Chu, G.; Li, J.

    2013-06-01

    Both long-term observation data and model simulations suggest an increasing chance of serious drought in the dry season and extreme flood in the wet season in southern China, yet little is known about how changes in precipitation pattern will affect soil respiration in the region. We conducted a field experiment to study the responses of soil respiration to precipitation manipulations - precipitation exclusion to mimic drought, double precipitation to simulate flood, and ambient precipitation as control (abbr. EP, DP and AP, respectively) - in three subtropical forests in southern China. The three forest sites include Masson pine forest (PF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (BF). Our observations showed that altered precipitation strongly influenced soil respiration, not only through the well-known direct effects of soil moisture on plant and microbial activities, but also by modification of both moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. In the dry season, soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity, as well as fine root and soil microbial biomass, showed rising trends with precipitation increases in the three forest sites. Contrarily, the moisture sensitivity of soil respiration decreased with precipitation increases. In the wet season, different treatments showed different effects in three forest sites. The EP treatment decreased fine root biomass, soil microbial biomass, soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity, but enhanced soil moisture sensitivity in all three forest sites. The DP treatment significantly increased soil respiration, fine root and soil microbial biomass in the PF only, and no significant change was found for the soil temperature sensitivity. However, the DP treatment in the MF and BF reduced soil temperature sensitivity significantly in the wet season. Our results indicated that soil respiration would decrease in the three subtropical forests if soil moisture

  15. Low temperature conditioning of garlic (Allium sativum L. "seed" cloves induces alterations in sprouts proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel David Dufoo-Hurtado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves substitutes the initial climatic requirements of the crop and accelerates the cycle. We have reported that seed bulbs from ‘Coreano’ variety conditioned at 5 °C for five weeks reduces growth and plant weight as well as the crop yields and increases the synthesis of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. Therefore, this treatment suggests a cold stress. Plant acclimation to stress is associated with deep changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. The aim of this work was to study the changes in the protein profiles of garlic seed cloves subjected to conditioning at low-temperature using proteomics approach. Two sets of garlic bulbs were used, one set was stored at room temperature (23 °C, and the other was conditioned at low temperature (5 °C for five weeks. Total soluble proteins were extracted from sprouts of cloves and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots showing statistically significant changes in abundance were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS and identified by database search analysis using the Mascot search engine. The results revealed that low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves causes alterations in the accumulation of proteins involved in different physiological processes such as cellular growth, antioxidative/oxidative state, macromolecules transport, protein folding and transcription regulation process. The metabolic pathways affected include protein biosynthesis and quality control system, photosynthesis, photorespiration, energy production, and carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolism. These processes can work cooperatively to establish a new cellular homeostasis that might be related with the physiological and biochemical changes observed in previous

  16. Coffee roasting and aroma formation: application of different time-temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggenstoss, Juerg; Poisson, Luigi; Kaegi, Ruth; Perren, Rainer; Escher, Felix

    2008-07-23

    The impact of time-temperature combinations of roasting processes on the kinetics of aroma formation in coffee was investigated. The development of 16 aroma compounds and the physical properties of coffee beans was followed in a commercial horizontal drum roasting process and in laboratory scale fluidizing-bed roasting processes at high temperature-short time and low temperature-long time conditions. All trials were run to an equal roast end point as defined by the lightness of coffee beans. In addition, the effect of excessive roasting on aroma composition was studied. Compared to low temperature-long time roasting, high temperature-short time roasting resulted in considerable differences in the physical properties and kinetics of aroma formation. Excessive roasting generally led to decreasing or stable amounts of volatile substances, except for hexanal, pyridine, and dimethyl trisulfide, whose concentrations continued to increase during over-roasting. When the drum roaster and the fluidizing bed roaster were operated in the so-called temperature profile mode, that is, along the identical development of coffee bean temperature over roasting time, the kinetics of aroma generation were similar in both processes.

  17. A High Temperature Experimental Characterization Procedure for Oxide-Based Thermoelectric Generator Modules under Transient Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Anamaria Man

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze the steady-state and transient behavior of the electrical and thermal parameters of thermoelectric generators (TEGs. The focus is on the required wait-time between measurements in order to reduce measurement errors which may appear until the system reaches steady-state. By knowing this waiting time, the total characterization time can also be reduced. The experimental characterization process is performed on a test rig known as TEGeta, which can be used to assess the output characteristics of TEG modules under different load values and temperature conditions. The setup offers the possibility to control the hot side temperature up to 1000 °C with a load variation range value between 0.22–8.13 Ω. A total of ten thermocouples are placed in the setup with the purpose of measuring the temperature in specific points between the heater and the heat sink. Based on the readings, the temperature on the hot and cold side of the modules can be extrapolated. This study provides quantitative data on the minimum waiting time of the temperatures in the surrounding system to reach equilibrium. Laboratory tests are performed on a calcium-manganese oxide module at temperatures between 400 and 800 °C to explore the high temperatures features of the setup.

  18. Soot measurements for diesel and biodiesel spray combustion under high temperature highly diluted ambient conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel, namely fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and diesel fuel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. The KL factor is a parameter for soot concentration, where K is an absorption coefficient and proportional to the number density of soot particles, L is the geometric thickness of the flame along the optical detection axis, and KL factor is proportional to soot volume fraction. The main objective is to explore a combustion regime called high-temperature and highly-diluted combustion (HTHDC) and compare it with the conventional and low-temperature combustion (LTC) modes. The three different combustion regimes are implemented under different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1400 K) and ambient oxygen concentrations (10%, 15%, and 21%). Results are presented in terms of soot temperature and KL factor images, time-resolved pixel-averaged soot temperature, KL factor, and spatially integrated KL factor over the soot area. The time-averaged results for these three regimes are compared for both diesel and biodiesel fuels. Results show complex combined effects of the ambient temperature and oxygen concentration, and that two-color temperature for the HTHDC mode at the 10% oxygen level can actually be lower than the conventional mode. Increasing ambient oxygen and temperature increases soot temperature. Diesel fuel results in higher soot temperature than biodiesel for all three regimes. Results also show that diesel and biodiesel fuels have very different burning and sooting behavior under the three different combustion regimes. For diesel fuel, the HTHDC regime offers better results in terms of lower soot than the conventional and LTC regimes, and the 10% O2, 1400 K ambient condition shows the lowest soot concentration while maintaining a moderate two-color temperature. For biodiesel, the 15% O2, 800 K ambient condition shows some advantages in terms of reducing soot

  19. Sensitivity of regional ensemble data assimilation spread to perturbations of lateral boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachida El Ouaraini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a regional ensemble data assimilation and forecasting system requires the specification of appropriate perturbations of lateral boundary conditions (LBCs, in order to simulate associated errors. The sensitivity of analysis and 6-h forecast ensemble spread to these perturbations is studied here formally and experimentally by comparing three different LBC configurations for the ensemble data assimilation system of the ALADIN-France limited-area model (LAM. While perturbed initial LBCs are provided by the perturbed LAM analyses in each ensemble, the three ensemble configurations differ with respect to LBCs used at 3- and 6-h forecast ranges, which respectively correspond to: (1 perturbed LBCs provided by the operational global ensemble data assimilation system (GLBC, which is considered as a reference configuration; (2 unperturbed LBCs (ULBC obtained from the global deterministic model; (3 perturbed LBCs obtained by adding random draws of an error covariance model (PLBC to the global deterministic system. A formal analysis of error and perturbation equations is first carried out, in order to provide an insight of the relative effects of observation perturbations and of LBC perturbations at different ranges, in the various ensemble configurations. Horizontal variations of time-averaged ensemble spread are then examined for 6-h forecasts. Despite the use of perturbed initial LBCs, the regional ensemble ULBC is underdispersive not only near the lateral boundaries, but also in approximately one-third of the inner area, due to advection during the data assimilation cycle. This artefact is avoided in PLBC through the additional use of non-zero LBC perturbations at 3- and 6-h ranges, and the sensitivity to the amplitude scaling of the covariance model is illustrated for this configuration. Some aspects of the temporal variation of ensemble spread and associated sensitivities to LBC perturbations are also studied. These results

  20. Arctic RCM simulations of temperature and precipitation derived indices relevant to future frozen ground conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinke, A.; Matthes, H.; Christensen, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    in simulated air temperature and derived indices at the end of the century indicate that significant impacts on permafrost conditions should be expected. But the magnitude of the change is regionally conditioned beyond what is obvious: Warm permafrost in the sporadic to discontinuous zone is threatened and may...... degrade or even complete thaw before the end of the century. A decrease in freezing and increase in thawing degree-days is interpreted as potential decrease in seasonal freeze depth and increase in active layer thickness (ALT). We show that for some regions increasing maximum summer temperature...... for classification. Taken together this implies a regionally varying exposure to significant change in permafrost conditions. In addition to these aspects of the general warming trend that would promote an increase in ALT and a northward shift of the southern permafrost boundary, an analysis of the occurrence...

  1. Sensitivity Experiments on the Impact of Vb-Cyclones to Ocean Temperature and Soil Moisture Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmer, Martina; José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; Raible, Christoph C.

    2016-04-01

    Cyclones developing over the western Mediterranean and move northeastward are a major source of extreme weather and responsible for heavy precipitation over Central Europe. Gaining insight into these processes is crucial to improve the projection of changes in frequency and severity of these so-called Vb-cyclones under future climate change scenarios. This study explores the impact of climate change on Vb-events through a number of idealized sensitivity experiments that assess the role of the sea surface temperature (SST) and soil moisture and their contribution to the moisture content in the atmosphere in recent Vb-events. To achieve this task, we use the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) to dynamically downscale the ERA Interim reanalysis, simulating five prominent Vb-events that led to extreme precipitation in Central Europe. WRF allows simulating a physical consistent response of Vb-cyclones to different SSTs and soil water volumes. The changes in SSTs are designed to follow the expected temperature changes in a future climate scenario. Additionally the corresponding uncertainty in such projections is considered. Results indicate that although an increase of the Mediterranean SSTs leads to increased precipitation over Central Europe, e.g. 136% greater precipitation in the +5 K experiment compared to the control simulation, a change in the high-impact region of Vb-events at the northern side of the Alps is not found. This counter-intuitive behavior seems to be related to the increase of atmospheric instability over the artificially heated SSTs. Thereby, precipitation notably increases over the east Adriatic coast in response to warmer SSTs, which corresponds to the first location where the air is lifted. However, Vb-events become less destructive in their high-impact region, due to high loss of atmospheric water. Further experiments demonstrate that changing the SSTs of the Atlantic invokes almost no reaction (around 1% change) with respect to

  2. Wheat seed weight and quality differ temporally in sensitivity to warm or cool conditions during seed development and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehzadeh, M; Ellis, R H

    2017-09-01

    Short periods of extreme temperature may affect wheat (Triticum aestivum) seed weight, but also quality. Temporal sensitivity to extreme temperature during seed development and maturation was investigated. Plants of 'Tybalt' grown at ambient temperature were moved to growth cabinets at 29/20°C or 34/20°C (2010), or 15/10°C or 34/20°C (2011), for successive 7-d periods from 7 DAA (days after anthesis) onwards, and also 7-65 DAA in 2011. Seed samples were harvested serially and moisture content, weight, ability to germinate, subsequent longevity in air-dry storage and bread-making quality were determined. High temperature (34/20°C) reduced final seed weight, with greatest temporal sensitivity at 7-14 or 14-21 DAA. Several aspects of bread-making quality were also most sensitive to high temperature then, but whereas protein quality decreased protein and sulphur concentrations improved. Early exposure to high temperature provided earlier development of ability to germinate and tolerate desiccation, but had little effect on maximum germination capacity. All treatments at 15/10°C resulted in ability to germinate declining between 58 and 65 DAA. Early exposure to high temperature hastened improvement in seed storage longevity, but the subsequent decline in late maturation preceded that in the control. Long (7-65 DAA) exposure to 15/10°C disrupted the development of seed longevity, with no improvement after seed filling ended. Longevity improved during maturation drying in other treatments. Early (7-14 DAA) exposure to high temperature reduced and low temperature increased subsequent longevity at harvest maturity, whereas late (35 or 42-49 DAA) exposure to high temperature increased and low temperature reduced it. Temporal sensitivity to extreme temperature was detected. It varied considerably amongst the contrasting seed variables investigated. Subsequent seed longevity at harvest maturity responded negatively to temperature early in development, but positively

  3. [Hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions: selection of diagnostic codes for Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminal, J; Mundet, X; Ponsà, J; Sánchez, E; Casanova, C

    2001-01-01

    Hospitalisations due to Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSC) are considered an indicator to measure the use of hospital services because of health conditions that could have been prevented and controlled by primary health care. The objective of this study is to select the list of diagnostic codes to assess the performance of primary health care in Spain. The five criteria proposed by Weissman and Solberg, to select an appropriate indicator, were applied to a first list of 87 ACSC diagnostic codes identified through bibliographic search. Information on two main criteria-whether care for a health condition was a primary health care role and whether hospitalisation was needed once the health problem occurred was obtained by means of the Delphi technique. A group of 44 experts gathered together for the study. For the remaining criteria, information came from the results of the Pilot study on hospitalisations due to ACSC in Catalonia, Spain. Meeting the five criteria was the criterion selected to evaluate the solving ability of primary health care. a) from the Delphi group: 42 (95.4%) participants completed the three rounds. The question on whether the care of the selected health conditions was responsibility of primary health care reached a high level of consensus (between 86.1 and 100%). The consensus on the need for hospitalisation was lower, from 75.7 to 88.6%, moreover, 5 diagnostic codes did not reach the established consensus, and b) from the ACSC selection process: five diagnostic codes did not meet the criteria and were excluded. Out of the remaining 82, all them were considered as health problems to be cared for at primary level and in 37 cases hospitalisation was considered always as necessary. Thirty-five diagnostic codes, that met the five criteria, represented the set of ACSC diagnostic codes in our setting. A set of 35 diagnostic codes of ACSC, adapted to our setting, is proposed to evaluate primary health care performance. The selected codes

  4. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Anne; Wehrl, Markus; Paul, Birgit; Hochmuth, Thomas; Schumacher, Matthias; Schütz, Kathleen; Gelinsky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The development of bio-resorbable implant materials is rapidly going on. Sterilization of those materials is inevitable to assure the hygienic requirements for critical medical devices according to the medical device directive (MDD, 93/42/EG). Biopolymer-containing biomaterials are often highly sensitive towards classical sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO₂ (scCO₂) treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature. In combination with low amounts of additives scCO₂ treatment effectively inactivates microorganisms including bacterial spores. We established a scCO₂ sterilization procedure under addition of 0.25% water, 0.15% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% acetic anhydride. The procedure was successfully tested for the inactivation of a wide panel of microorganisms including endospores of different bacterial species, vegetative cells of gram positive and negative bacteria including mycobacteria, fungi including yeast, and bacteriophages. For robust testing of the sterilization effect with regard to later application of implant materials sterilization all microorganisms were embedded in alginate/agarose cylinders that were used as Process Challenge Devices (PCD). These PCD served as surrogate models for bioresorbable 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the impact of scCO₂ sterilization on mechanical properties of polysaccharide-based hydrogels and collagen-based scaffolds was analyzed. The procedure was shown to be less compromising on mechanical and rheological properties compared to established low-temperature sterilization methods like gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide exposure as well as conventional steam sterilization. Cytocompatibility of alginate gels and scaffolds from mineralized collagen was compared after sterilization with ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation, steam sterilization and scCO₂ treatment. Human mesenchymal stem cell

  5. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bernhardt

    Full Text Available The development of bio-resorbable implant materials is rapidly going on. Sterilization of those materials is inevitable to assure the hygienic requirements for critical medical devices according to the medical device directive (MDD, 93/42/EG. Biopolymer-containing biomaterials are often highly sensitive towards classical sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO₂ (scCO₂ treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature. In combination with low amounts of additives scCO₂ treatment effectively inactivates microorganisms including bacterial spores. We established a scCO₂ sterilization procedure under addition of 0.25% water, 0.15% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% acetic anhydride. The procedure was successfully tested for the inactivation of a wide panel of microorganisms including endospores of different bacterial species, vegetative cells of gram positive and negative bacteria including mycobacteria, fungi including yeast, and bacteriophages. For robust testing of the sterilization effect with regard to later application of implant materials sterilization all microorganisms were embedded in alginate/agarose cylinders that were used as Process Challenge Devices (PCD. These PCD served as surrogate models for bioresorbable 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the impact of scCO₂ sterilization on mechanical properties of polysaccharide-based hydrogels and collagen-based scaffolds was analyzed. The procedure was shown to be less compromising on mechanical and rheological properties compared to established low-temperature sterilization methods like gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide exposure as well as conventional steam sterilization. Cytocompatibility of alginate gels and scaffolds from mineralized collagen was compared after sterilization with ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation, steam sterilization and scCO₂ treatment. Human

  6. Testing the Metabolic Theory of Ecology with marine bacteria: Different temperature sensitivity of major phylogenetic groups during the spring phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2017-08-24

    Although temperature is a key driver of bacterioplankton metabolism, the effect of ocean warming on different bacterial phylogenetic groups remains unclear. Here, we conducted monthly short-term incubations with natural coastal bacterial communities over an annual cycle to test the effect of experimental temperature on the growth rates and carrying capacities of four phylogenetic groups: SAR11, Rhodobacteraceae, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. SAR11 was the most abundant group year-round as analysed by CARD-FISH, with maximum abundances in summer, while the other taxa peaked in spring. All groups, including SAR11, showed high temperature-sensitivity of growth rates and/or carrying capacities in spring, under phytoplankton bloom or post-bloom conditions. In that season, Rhodobacteraceae showed the strongest temperature response in growth rates, estimated here as activation energy (E, 1.43 eV), suggesting an advantage to outcompete other groups under warmer conditions. In summer E values were in general lower than 0.65 eV, the value predicted by the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE). Contrary to MTE predictions, carrying capacity tended to increase with warming for all bacterial groups. Our analysis confirms that resource availability is key when addressing the temperature response of heterotrophic bacterioplankton. We further show that even under nutrient-sufficient conditions, warming differentially affected distinct bacterioplankton taxa. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Accurate prediction of vaccine stability under real storage conditions and during temperature excursions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clénet, Didier

    2018-01-13

    Due to their thermosensitivity, most vaccines must be kept refrigerated from production to use. To successfully carry out global immunization programs, ensuring the stability of vaccines is crucial. In this context, two important issues are critical, namely: (i) predicting vaccine stability and (ii) preventing product damage due to excessive temperature excursions outside of the recommended storage conditions (cold chain break). We applied a combination of advanced kinetics and statistical analyses on vaccine forced degradation data to accurately describe the loss of antigenicity for a multivalent freeze-dried inactivated virus vaccine containing three variants. The screening of large amounts of kinetic models combined with a statistical model selection approach resulted in the identification of two-step kinetic models. Predictions based on kinetic analysis and experimental stability data were in agreement, with approximately five percentage points difference from real values for long-term stability storage conditions, after excursions of temperature and during experimental shipments of freeze-dried products. Results showed that modeling a few months of forced degradation can be used to predict various time and temperature profiles endured by vaccines, i.e. long-term stability, short time excursions outside the labeled storage conditions or shipments at ambient temperature, with high accuracy. Pharmaceutical applications of the presented kinetics-based approach are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of T91 Steel in Dry and Humid Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghao Leong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature oxidation behavior of T91 ferritic/martensitic steel was examined over the temperature range of 500 to 700°C in dry and humid environments.  The weight gain result revealed that oxidation occurs at all range of temperatures and its rate is accelerated by increasing the temperature. The weight gain of the oxidized steel at 700°C in steam condition was six times bigger than the dry oxidation.. SEM/EDX of the cross-sectional image showed that under dry condition, a protective and steady growth of the chromium oxide (Cr2O3 layer was formed on the steel with the thickness of 2.39±0.34 µm. Meanwhile for the humid environment, it is found that the iron oxide layer, which consists of the hematite (Fe2O3 and magnetite (Fe3O4 was formed as the outer scale, and spinnel as inner scale. This result indicated that the oxidation behavior of T91 steel was affected by its oxidation environment. The existence of water vapor in steam condition may prevent the formation of chromium oxide as protective layer.

  9. The adaptation of nitrifying microorganisms to inhibiting substances at meso- and psychrophilic temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Conrad; Ahnert, Markus; Krebs, Peter; Kühn, Volker

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with adaption capacity of nitrifiers to allylthiourea (ATU) as a model inhibitor at two temperature levels. Nitrifying communities were developed at 15 (BM15) and 30 °C (BM30). The activity of the nitrifiers was determined by using short-time respiration (STR) tests, oxygen monitoring and in-situ measurements. The oxygen monitoring provided information about the temperature-dependent time delay between the dosage of NH4(+)-N or ATU and reaching its characteristic level of effect. The greatly scattered results from the STR tests for BM15 were thus explained by the time delay, which was two to three times higher than for BM30. Furthermore, combining the results of oxygen-monitoring and in-situ measurements it can be stated that an adaption to ATU at psychrophilic temperature conditions was not achieved, whereby up to 40% of nitrification was sustained for BM30 at an ATU-concentration over 7 mg/l. The nitrification by BM15 did not start until ATU was degraded to 1-2 mg/l, the typical inhibition concentration for ATU. Hence, the results indicate a population drift to adapted nitrifiers at mesophilic conditions and ATU-degrading microorganisms at psychrophilic temperature conditions, which can have a considerable influence on domestic wastewater treatment in cold climates receiving industrial effluents.

  10. Highly sensitive temperature sensor based on cascaded polymer-microbubble cavities by employing a subtraction between reciprocal thermal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kunjian; Liu, Yi; Qu, Shiliang

    2016-09-05

    A miniature, robust, and highly sensitive optical fiber temperature sensor based on cascaded polymer-microbubble cavities was fabricated by polymer-filling and subsequent heat-curing process. The expansion of polymer cavity results in the compression of microbubble cavity when the sensor is heated. We demodulated the interference spectrum by means of the fast-Fourier transform (FFT) and signal filtering. Since the thermal response of the polymer cavity is positive and that of the microbubble cavity is negative, a high sensitivity of the temperature sensor is achieved by a subtraction between the two reciprocal thermal responses. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the temperature sensor is as high as 5.013 nm/°C in the measurement range between 20 °C and 55 °C. Meanwhile, such a sensor has potential for mass production, owing to the simple, nontoxic, and cost-effective process of fabrication.

  11. Semi-open cavity in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer for temperature measurement with ultra-high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ai; Zhang, Yaxun; Xu, Quan; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2014-04-20

    We demonstrate a semi-open cavity in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on optical fiber tube (OFT) for temperature measurement with high sensitivity. The interferometer is composed of an OFT sandwiched between two multimode fibers, with lateral offset. The air hole of the OFT was not completely sealed and liquid is poured into the air hole through the unsealed gap. Light from the multimode fiber is split into two beams: one beam transmits directly through the silica tube while the other travels along the liquid-filled cavity. The device has ultra-high temperature sensitivity due to the much larger thermo-optic coefficient of the liquid compared with that of silica. Experimental results show that the temperature sensitivity is 6.35 nm/°C for an ethanol-filled structure.

  12. The impact of the Brazilian family health on selected primary care sensitive conditions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Mayara Lisboa; Menzies, Dick; Hone, Thomas; Dehghani, Kianoush; Trajman, Anete

    2017-01-01

    Brazil has the largest public health-system in the world, with 120 million people covered by its free primary care services. The Family Health Strategy (FHS) is the main primary care model, but there is no consensus on its impact on health outcomes. We systematically reviewed published evidence regarding the impact of the Brazilian FHS on selective primary care sensitive conditions (PCSC). We searched Medline, Web of Science and Lilacs in May 2016 using key words in Portuguese and English, without language restriction. We included studies if intervention was the FHS; comparison was either different levels of FHS coverage or other primary health care service models; outcomes were the selected PCSC; and results were adjusted for relevant sanitary and socioeconomic variables, including the national conditional cash transfer program (Bolsa Familia). Due to differences in methods and outcomes reported, pooling of results was not possible. Of 1831 records found, 31 met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 25 were ecological studies. Twenty-one employed longitudinal quasi-experimental methods, 27 compared different levels the FHS coverage, whilst four compared the FHS versus other models of primary care. Fourteen studies found an association between higher FHS coverage and lower post-neonatal and child mortality. When the effect of Bolsa Familia was accounted for, the effect of the FHS on child mortality was greater. In 13 studies about hospitalizations due to PCSC, no clear pattern of association was found. In four studies, there was no effect on child and elderly vaccination or low-birth weight. No included studies addressed breast-feeding, dengue, HIV/AIDS and other neglected infectious diseases. Among these ecological studies with limited quality evidence, increasing coverage by the FHS was consistently associated with improvements in child mortality. Scarce evidence on other health outcomes, hospitalization and synergies with cash transfer was found.

  13. The sensitivity of new laboratory-based heterogeneous freezing schemes for dust and biological particles to time and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeier, D.; Ervens, B.; Hartmann, S.; Wex, H.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation has been recently described by means of the Soccer ball model that takes into account multiple nucleation sites on individual particles [Niedermeier et al., 2011]. In order to study sensitivities of the implied contact angle distributions, a modified version of the Soccer ball model is implemented into a parcel model that describes in detail heterogeneous ice formation and ice /liquid water partitioning [Ervens and Feingold, 2012]. Soccer ball model parameters (number of surface sites, mean and width of the contact angle distribution) are determined from immersion freezing measurements of mineral dust particles and bacteria performed with the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator [LACIS, Hartmann et al., 2011]. While biological particles (e.g., bacteria) are much less frequent in the atmosphere, they can induce droplet freezing already at about -5°C as opposed to dust that shows efficient freezing only at lower temperatures (below -15°C). We will identify updraft regimes, temperature and IN concentration ranges where dust or biological particles, respectively, might dominate the number concentration of frozen droplets in mixed phase clouds. Additional model studies will focus on the importance of time versus temperature dependence and explore the usefulness of alternative descriptions of the freezing behavior that can be derived based on the respective laboratory studies using LACIS. These descriptions include the choice of a single contact angle as opposed to contact angle distributions or time-independent expressions. These results reveal that under selected conditions, it might be a satisfactory approximation to assume singular freezing behavior. Our sensitivity studies will help to refine time-independent freezing parameterizations using laboratory data and help bridging the current divergence between deterministic approaches [e.g., Hoose and Möhler, 2012] and physically-based approaches (classical nucleation theory) that

  14. Simulations of Superrotation on Slowly Rotating Planets: Sensitivity to Rotation and Initial Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony D.; Zhou, Wei

    1996-04-01

    We use a simplified terrestrial general circulation model as a nonlinear process model to investigate factors that influence the extent of equatorial superrotation in statically stable atmospheres on slowly rotating planets such as Titan and Venus. The possibility of multiple equilibria is tested by running the same model to equilibrium from vastly different initial conditions. The final state is effectively independent of initial state, reinforcing the impression that equatorial superrotation is inevitable on slowly rotating planets with stable radiative equilibrium structures. Of particular interest is the fact that at Titan rotation, the model equilibrates with strong prograde winds even when initialized with strong retrograde winds. This suggests that reliable remote sensing inferences of latitudinal temperature gradients on Titan can unambiguously be interpreted as evidence for superrotation. We also demonstrate for the first time that significant equatorial superrotation can be produced at Venus' rotation rate in such models, given sufficient numerical precision. The strength of superrotating zonal winds increases with rotation rate in the slowly rotating regime when other parameters are held fixed. However, the efficiency of superrotation relative to the angular momentum of an atmosphere corotating with the solid planet increases with decreasing rotation rate instead, because the Hadley cell strengthens and expands poleward. This allows for the formation of stronger high latitude jets, which ultimately serve as the source for equatorial superrotation via barotropic instability. Estimates of relevant parameter settings for Triton and Pluto tentatively imply that their atmospheres may marginally be in the superrotating regime, but only if temperature decreases with height near the surface.

  15. Effect of Conditioning Treatments on the Survival of Radopholus similis at High Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcinas, A; Sipes, B S; Hara, A H; Tsang, M M C

    2005-09-01

    Heat treatments are an environmentally safe method for eliminating quarantine pests from tropical foliage. Conditioning heat treatments can induce thermotolerance against subsequent and otherwise phytotoxic temperatures in tropical foliage, allowing heat treatments to be even more effective. However, if thermotolerance is also induced in nematodes of quarantine significance like Radopholus similis, heat treatments would be rendered ineffective. A lethal thermal death point (LT(99.9)) was established for R. similis by recording mortality at 25 (control temperature), 43 degrees C, 45 degrees C, 47 degrees C, or 49 degrees C after a 0, 1-, 2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, or 15-minute exposure. In a second experiment, nematodes were conditioned at 35, 40, or 45 degrees C for 0, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes, allowed to rest for 3 hours, and then challenged at 47 degrees C for 5 minutes. No nematodes survived the challenge heat treatment; rather, nematode mortality was hastened by the conditioning treatment itself. In a third experiment, R. similis inside anthurium roots were conditioned at 25 degrees C or 40 degrees C for 15 minutes and then treated at 45 degrees C for up to 8 minutes. Mortality of conditioned and unconditioned nematodes was similar (P > 0.1). Conditioning treatments increase plant thermotolerance but do not induce thermotolerance in R. similis. Heat treatments have promise as disinfection protocols for quarantines.

  16. Upconverting PAAm/PNIPAM/NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er hydrogel with enhanced luminescence temperature sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jiachang; He, Benzhao; Cheng, Zehong; Zhou, Li, E-mail: zhouli@glut.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    We present a one-step approach to combine the functional features of upconverting NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er nanoparticles and thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) for luminescence thermometry. Dual-functional hydrogel that simultaneously possesses strong upconversion luminescence (UL) and temperature responsibility was fabricated based on the crosslinking of poly(acrylamide) in the presence of PNIPAM and NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er nanoparticles. The obtained hydrogel exhibited reversibly temperature-dependent UL and highly enhanced sensibility. The luminescence temperature sensitivity reached 1.9% per °C and 0.7% per °C in the range of 27–33 °C and 35–45 °C, respectively. The maximum sensitivity could even reach 26.5% per °C in the range of 33–35 °C. Considering the facile fabrication process and fine luminescence thermometry performance, this study thus opens up new opportunities for preparing highly sensitive temperature sensors. - Highlights: • One-step fabrication of upconverting and thermosensitve PAAm/PNIPAM/NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er hydrogel is reported. • The combination of functional features of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb:Er upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and thermosensitve PNIPAM can efficiently enhance the luminescence temperature sensitivity of UCNPs. • The luminescence temperature sensitivity of hydrogel can respectively reach 1.9% per °C and 0.7% per °C in the range of 27–33 °C and 35–45 °C. • The maximum sensitivity can even reach 26.5% per °C in range of 33–35 °C.

  17. Erosion processes in molassic cliffs: the role of the rock surface temperature and atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Guerin, Antoine; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Voumard, Jérémie

    2014-05-01

    The morphology of the Swiss Plateau is modeled by numerous steep cliffs of Molasse. These cliffs are mainly composed of sub-horizontal alternated layers of sandstone, shale and conglomerates deposed in the Alps foreland basin during the Tertiary period. These Molasse cliffs are affected by erosion processes inducing numerous rockfall events. Thus, it is relevant to understand how different external factors influence Molasse erosion rates. In this study, we focus on analyzing temperature variation during a winter season. As pilot study area we selected a cliff which is formed by a sub-horizontal alternation of outcropping sandstone and shale. The westward facing test site (La Cornalle, Vaud, Switzerland), which is a lateral scarp of a slow moving landslide area, is currently affected by intense erosion. Regarding data acquisition, we monitored both in-situ rock and air temperatures at 15 minutes time-step since October 2013: (1) on the one hand we measured Ground Surface Temperature (GST) at near-surface (0.1 meter depth) using a GST mini-datalogger M-Log5W-Rock model; (2) On the other hand we monitored atmospheric conditions using a weather station (Davis Vantage pro2 plus) collecting numerous parameters (i.e. temperature, irradiation, rain, wind speed, etc.). Furthermore, the area was also seasonally monitored by Ground-Based (GB) LiDAR since 2010 and monthly monitored since September 2013. In order to understand how atmospheric conditions (such as freeze and thaw effect) influence the erosion of the cliff, we modeled the temperature diffusion through the rock mass. To this end, we applied heat diffusion and radiation equation using a 1D temperature profile, obtaining as a result both temperature variations at different depths together with the location of the 0°C isotherm. Our model was calibrated during a given training set using both in-situ rock temperatures and atmospheric conditions. We then carried out a comparison with the rockfall events derived from the

  18. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy......-dispersive XAS technique available on the ID24 beamline at the ESRF synchrotron. The examples chosen concern the melting and the liquid structure of 3d metals and alloys under high pressures (HPs) and the observation of temperature-induced spin crossover in FeCO3 at HP....

  19. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Saito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  20. Shear sensitivity of digested sludge: comparison of methods and application in conditioning and dewatering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentel, Steven K; Dursun, Derya

    2009-10-01

    Shear sensitivity of digested sludge was evaluated by two methods: a CST shear test and a strain sweep rheological method of measuring yield stress. Sludge pretreatment by an enzyme formulation was used to alter the sludge's response to shear and, potentially, to improve dewaterability. Also varied were the polymer conditioning dose and the amount of shear applied by mixing. A bench-scale device was then used to simulate dewatering by belt press in order to assess the CST shear tests and the rheological test. CST-based shear tests showed that the optimum chemical conditioner doses with low shear levels became sub-optimal with increasing mixing times. For all three polymer conditioners, longer shear times increased the dose requirements. When the polymer dose was held constant, and the extent of mixing varied, the CST test was a poor indicator of effects on dewaterability. The benefits of enzyme treatment, apparent by actual dewatering, were not predicted by the CST results. In contrast, yield stress values were significantly correlated with cake solids values, and inversely correlated with filtrate solids. Yield stress is not adequate by itself to predict final cake solids after dewatering, because enzyme pretreatment gave higher solids concentrations when both shear extent and initial yield stress were held constant.

  1. Structure and work process in primary care and hospitalizations for sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Waleska Regina Machado; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; Silva, Núbia Cristina da; Thumé, Elaine; Tomasi, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto; Thomaz, Erika Barbara Abreu Fonseca

    2017-08-17

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the characteristics of the structure of primary health units and the work process of primary care teams are associated with the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. In this ecological study, we have analyzed data of Brazilian municipalities related to sociodemographic characteristics, coverage of care programs, structure of primary health units, and work process of primary care teams. We have obtained the data from the first cycle of the Brazilian Program for Improving Access and Quality of the Primary Care, of the Department of Information Technology of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and the United Nations Development Programme. The associations have been estimated using negative binomial regression coefficients (β) and respective 95% confidence intervals, with a hierarchical approach in three levels (alpha = 5%). In the adjusted analysis for the outcome in 2013, in the distal level, the coverage of the Bolsa Família Program (β = -0.001) and private insurance (β = -0.01) had a negative association, and the human development index (β = 1.13), the proportion of older adults (β = 0.05) and children under the age of five (β = 0.05), and the coverage of the Community Health Agent Strategy (β = 0.002) showed positive association with hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions. In the intermediate level, minimum hours (β = -0.14) and availability of vaccines (β = -0.16) showed a negative association, and availability of medications showed a positive association (β = 0.16). In the proximal level, only the variable of matrix support (β = 0.10) showed a positive association. The variables in the adjusted analysis of the number of hospitalizations for primary care sensitive conditions in 2014 presented the same association as in 2013. The characteristics of the structure of primary health units and the work

  2. Sensitivity of neoplastic cells to senescence unveiled under standard cell culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieba, Jolanta; Ksiazkiewcz, Magdalena; Janik, Karolina; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Peciak, Joanna; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Lipinski, Marek; Olczak, Michal; Stoczynska-Fidelus, Ewelina; Rieske, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    Cancer cells are typically defined as infinitely proliferating, whereas normal cells (except stem cells) are considered as being programmed to become senescent. Our data show that this characterization is misleading. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification, TP53 sequencing, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for MUC1 and SCGB2A2 and immunocytochemistry, together with senescence detection assay and real-time microscopic observations were used to analyze primary neoplastic cells isolated from prostate, breast and colorectal tumors, as well as stable cancer cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB-468, SW962, SK-MEL28, NCI-H1975 and NCI-H469). In all cases of primary cancer cell cultures, in vitro conditions rapidly revealed senescence in the majority of cells. Two out of six stable cancer cell lines did not exhibit any senescence-associated-β-Galactosidase-positive cells. Interestingly, four cell lines had small sub-populations of senescent cells (single SA-β-Gal-positive cells). Primary neoplastic cells from different types of cancer (prostate, breast, colon cancer) appear to be senescent in vitro. Apparently, cancer cell lines that have been used for many years in drug-testing analyses have constantly been misleading researchers in terms of the general sensitivity of cancer cells to senescence. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. [Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions: an international overview with conclusions for a German catalogue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisst, C; Sundmacher, L

    2015-03-01

    Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSC) foster to quality measurement in the ambulatory sector. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of existing catalogues of ACSC and to derive insights that support the plan-ned development of an ACSC catalogue for Germany. This article attempts to systemise the discussion on ACSC by delimiting the term from the related concepts of avoidable hospitalisations and avoidable diseases. Based on that, this article develops a definition of ACSC that is valid for the German context, makes a suggestion for the compilation of adequate diagnoses, and proposes how to apply an ACSC catalogue that is specific to Germany. An overview of nine central -articles describing the elaboration of ACSC catalogues in other countries and a first view of the diagnoses they comprise serve as a guidance. The composition of an ACSC catalogue, that is adapted to the German context, is required to account for the local specifics of the German health-care system in order to ensure validity of the quality indicator. Such an outcome indicator for the ambulatory sector may mean a step towards a more outcome-oriented provision of care and may help ensure the quality of the German health-care system. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The effects of multiple chronic conditions on hospitalization costs and utilization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in the United States: a nationally representative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Halcyon G; Coffey, Rosanna; Jones, Jenna; Heslin, Kevin C; Moy, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    The presence of multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) complicates inpatient hospital care, leading to higher costs and utilization. Multimorbidity also complicates primary care, increasing the likelihood of hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how MCCs relate to inpatient hospitalization costs and utilization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. The 2012 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID) provided data to carry out a cross-sectional analysis of 1.43 million claims related to potentially preventable hospitalizations classified by the AHRQ Prevention Quality Indicator (PQI) composites. Categories of MCCs (0-1, 2-3, 4-5, and 6+) were examined in sets of acute, chronic, and overall PQIs. Multivariate models determined associations between categories of MCCs and 1) inpatient costs per stay, 2) inpatient costs per day, and 3) length of inpatient hospitalization. Negative binomial was used to model costs per stay and costs per day. The most common category observed was 2 or 3 chronic conditions (37.8 % of patients), followed by 4 or 5 chronic conditions (30.1 % of patients) and by 6+ chronic conditions (10.1 %). Compared with costs for patients with 0 or 1 chronic condition, hospitalization costs per stay for overall ambulatory care sensitive conditions were 19 % higher for those with 2 or 3 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.20), 32 % higher for those with 4 or 5 (95 % CI 1.31-1.32), and 31 % higher (95 % CI 1.30-3.32) for those with 6+ conditions. Acute condition stays were 11 % longer when 2 or 3 chronic conditions were present (95 % CI 1.11-1.12), 21 % longer when 4 or 5 were present (95 % CI 1.20-1.22), and 27 % longer when 6+ were present (95 % CI 1.26-1.28) compared with those with 0 or 1 chronic condition. Similar results were seen within chronic conditions. Associations between MCCs and

  5. SWCNT/graphite nanoplatelet hybrid thin films for self-temperature-compensated, highly sensitive, and extensible piezoresistive sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sida; Liu, Tao

    2013-10-18

    Highly sensitive single-wall carbon nanotube/graphite nanoplatelet (SWCNT/GNP) hybrid thin-film sensors are developed, which possess the unique capability for self-temperature compensation. This unique property in combination with their high gauge sensitivity and large reversible extensibility promises the SWCNT/GNP hybrid thin film piezoresistive sensors for a wide range applications, such as in man-machine interaction and body monitoring. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The effectiveness of cooling conditions on temperature of canine EDTA whole blood samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Preanalytic factors such as time and temperature can have significant effects on laboratory test results. For example, ammonium concentration will increase 31% in blood samples stored at room temperature for 30 min before centrifugation. To reduce preanalytic error, blood samples may be placed in precooled tubes and chilled on ice or in ice water baths; however, the effectiveness of these modalities in cooling blood samples has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various cooling modalities on reducing temperature of EDTA whole blood samples. Methods Pooled samples of canine EDTA whole blood were divided into two aliquots. Saline was added to one aliquot to produce a packed cell volume (PCV of 40% and to the second aliquot to produce a PCV of 20% (simulated anemia. Thirty samples from each aliquot were warmed to 37.7 °C and cooled in 2 ml allotments under one of three conditions: in ice, in ice after transfer to a precooled tube, or in an ice water bath. Temperature of each sample was recorded at one minute intervals for 15 min. Results Within treatment conditions, sample PCV had no significant effect on cooling. Cooling in ice water was significantly faster than cooling in ice only or transferring the sample to a precooled tube and cooling it on ice. Mean temperature of samples cooled in ice water was significantly lower at 15 min than mean temperatures of those cooled in ice, whether or not the tube was precooled. By 4 min, samples cooled in an ice water bath had reached mean temperatures less than 4 °C (refrigeration temperature, while samples cooled in other conditions remained above 4.0 °C for at least 11 min. For samples with a PCV of 40%, precooling the tube had no significant effect on rate of cooling on ice. For samples with a PCV of 20%, transfer to a precooled tube resulted in a significantly faster rate of cooling than direct placement of the warmed tube onto ice

  7. Relationships between Irritable Bowel Syndrome Pain, Skin Temperature Indices of Autonomic Dysregulation, and Sensitivity to Thermal Cutaneous Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Wong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated relationships between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS pain, sympathetic dysregulation, and thermal pain sensitivity. Eight female patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS and ten healthy female controls were tested for sensitivity to thermal stimulation of the left palm. A new method of response-dependent thermal stimulation was used to maintain pain intensity at a predetermined level (35% by adjusting thermal stimulus intensity as a function of pain ratings. Clinical pain levels were assessed prior to each testing session. Skin temperatures were recorded before and after pain sensitivity testing. The temperature of palmar skin dropped (1.5∘C when the corresponding location on the opposite hand of control subjects was subjected to prolonged thermal stimulation, but this response was absent for IBS pain patients. The patients also required significantly lower stimulus temperatures than controls to maintain a 35% pain rating. Baseline skin temperatures of patients were significantly correlated with thermode temperatures required to maintain 35% pain ratings. IBS pain intensity was not significantly correlated with skin temperature or pain sensitivity. The method of response-dependent stimulation revealed thermal hyperalgesia and increased sympathetic tone for chronic pain patients, relative to controls. Similarly, a significant correlation between resting skin temperatures and thermal pain sensitivity for IBS but not control subjects indicates that tonic sympathetic activation and a thermal hyperalgesia were generated by the chronic presence of visceral pain. However, lack of a significant relationship between sympathetic tone and ratings of IBS pain casts doubt on propositions that the magnitude of IBS pain is determined by psychological stress.

  8. Highly sensitive room temperature ammonia gas sensor based on Ir-doped Pt porous ceramic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenlong [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China); Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Yu [Department of chemical and materials engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Do, Jing-Shan, E-mail: jsdo@ncut.edu.tw [Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@cdu.edu.cn [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the Pt and Pt-Ir porous ceramic electrodes. • The gas sensors based on the Pt and Pt-Ir alloy electrodes possess good sensing performances. • The reaction path of the ammonia on platinum has been discussed. - Abstract: Room temperature NH{sub 3} gas sensors based on Pt and Pt-Ir (Ir doping Pt) porous ceramic electrodes have been fabricated by both electroplating and sputtering methods. The properties of the gaseous ammonia sensors have been examined by polarization and chronoamperometry techniques. The influence of humidity on the features of the resulting sensors in the system has also been discussed, and the working potential was optimized. Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the electrode. With increasing the relative humidity, the response of the Pt-Ir(E)/Pt(S)/PCP sensor to NH{sub 3} gas could be enhanced remarkably, and the sensitivity increases from 1.14 to 12.06 μA ppm{sup −1} cm{sup −2} .Then we have also discussed the sensing mechanism of the Pt-Ir sensor and the result has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the electrode surface before and after reaction in the end.

  9. Expression of temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8 in sperm cells correlates with vertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Majhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily Melastatin, member 8 (TRPM8 is involved in detection of cold temperature, different noxious compounds and in execution of thermo- as well as chemo-sensitive responses at cellular levels. Here we explored the molecular evolution of TRPM8 by analyzing sequences from various species. We elucidate that several regions of TRPM8 had different levels of selection pressure but the 4th–5th transmembrane regions remain highly conserved. Analysis of synteny suggests that since vertebrate origin, TRPM8 gene is linked with SPP2, a bone morphogen. TRPM8, especially the N-terminal region of it, seems to be highly variable in human population. We found 16,656 TRPM8 variants in 1092 human genomes with top variations being SNPs, insertions and deletions. A total of 692 missense mutations are also mapped to human TRPM8 protein of which 509 seem to be delateroiours in nature as supported by Polyphen V2, SIFT and Grantham deviation score. Using a highly specific antibody, we demonstrate that TRPM8 is expressed endogenously in the testis of rat and sperm cells of different vertebrates ranging from fish to higher mammals. We hypothesize that TRPM8 had emerged during vertebrate evolution (ca 450 MYA. We propose that expression of TRPM8 in sperm cell and its role in regulating sperm function are important factors that have guided its molecular evolution, and that these understandings may have medical importance.

  10. Mass Rearing of Temperature Sensitive Genetic Sexing Strains in the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis Capitata)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caceres, C. [FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Entomology Unit, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)]. E-mail: c.caceres@iaea.org

    2002-09-15

    Genetic sexing strains (GSS) based on the temperature sensitive lethal(tsl) mutation are being used to produce sterile male medflies for large scale sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes for this pest. The use of male-only strains increases the overall efficiency of the technique. Currently more than 1.4 billion sterile male-only pupae are produced per week in different facilities around the world. Due to the mutations used to construct these strains, that is, translocations and selectable markers, they require different and more careful mass rearing procedures than do bisexual strains (BSS). The basic rearing technology has been developed and can be used to produce only males on a predictable basis to a level of 99.9% accuracy. If specific rearing procedures are followed, then tsl-based GSS has a rearing efficiency that is equal to that of a BSS and it is already know that males produced by the tsl-based GSS are of equal quality to males produced by BSS. Based on current rearing technology the cost of production of male pupae is about the same for both types of strain. This is due to the large colony that is required for the tsl-based GSS. This paper discusses the considerations that need to be taken into account during mass rearing of GSS and identifies the most efficient production processes that are currently available. (author)

  11. Effect of surface condition to temperature distribution in living tissue during cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, M.; Hatakeyama, S.; Sugimoto, Y.; Sasaki, H.

    2017-12-01

    The temperature distribution of the simulated living tissue is measured for the improvement of the cooling rate during cryopreservation when the surface condition of the test sample is changed by covering the stainless steel mesh. Agar is used as a simulated living tissue and is filled inside the test sample. The variation of the transient temperature with mesh by the directly immersion in the liquid nitrogen is measured. The temperatures on the sample surface and the inside of the sample are measured by use of type T thermocouples. It is confirmed that on the sample surface there is the slightly temperature increase than that in the saturated liquid nitrogen at the atmospheric pressure. It is found by the comparison of the degree of superheat with or without the mesh that the surface temperature of the test sample with the mesh is lower than that without the mesh. On the other hand, the time series variations of the temperature located in the center of the sample does not change with or without the mesh. It is considered that the center of the sample used is too deep from the surface to respond to the boiling state on the sample surface.

  12. Sensitivity of the NEON Imaging Spectrometer Data Products to Cloud Conditions and Solar Illumination Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisso, N.

    2016-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network is a continental-scale ecological observatory funded by the NSF to collect and disseminate ecological data. NEON consists of standardized terrestrial, instrumental, and aquatic observation systems in addition to an airborne remote sensing component. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) group operates a payload of sensors including a waveform LiDAR, imaging spectrometer (NIS) and an RGB camera. To support the NEON project, three payloads are intended to annually acquire data over sites distributed throughout the United States in 20 individual eco-climatic regions during periods of vegetative peak greenness. The NIS is a push-broom visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) spectrometer (380 to 2500 nm) designed by NASA JPL for ecological applications. The NIS collects data at 5 nm spectral intervals with approximately 600 spatial pixels covering a 34-degree Field-of View. At the nominal operational flight altitude of 1000 m, the 1 mRad IFOV allows development of surface reflectance and higher-level data products at 1 m spatial resolution. Two of the primary operational constraints prohibiting accurate surface reflectance retrievals from the NIS, are 1) sufficiently clear cloud conditions and 2) sufficiently high solar zenith angles. To understand the limitations of the NIS and the quality of the derived data products under these constraints, a sensitivity analysis was undertaken which consisted of repeated NIS acquisitions with North-South and East-West flight lines over a consistent vegetated target area at Table Mountain, Colorado. Several flights were conducted as solar zenith angles varied from 20° to 70° and during clear and varying cloud conditions. During the acquisition, validation data in the form of field spectrometer measurements were acquired over two tarps of nominal 3% and 48% spectral reflectance, as well as of vegetation and gravel roadways within the target collection area. Results from the analysis showed

  13. Lipid compositional changes during low-temperature pre-conditioning against SO sub 2 in coleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, H.A.; Krizek, D.T.; Mirecki, R.M. (Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Short periods of temperature preconditioning at 13{degrees}C. were found to provide protection against SO{sub 2} injury in coleus. The present study was conducted to determine whether changes in lipid metabolism and membrane fluidity might contribute to this phytoprotection. After 5 days of hardening at 13{degrees}C, there were significant differences in polar lipid composition and free fatty acid (FA) levels between SO{sub 2}-sensitive cultivar Buckley Supreme and SO{sub 2}-insensitive Marty. Molecular species of chloroplast lipids in Marty contained increased levels of linolenic acid. Differences were also found in total FA pools. At 20{degrees}C, palmitic acid and stearic acid were the major components. After temperature hardening at 13{degrees}C, total FA levels decreased in Marty but increased in Buckley Supreme. These modifications in lipid composition suggest a possible mechanism for cultivar differences in response in SO{sub 2}.

  14. Neutral lipid accumulation at elevated temperature in conditional mutants of two microalgae species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Brandt, Anders Bøving; Egsgaard, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Triacylglycerols, an energy storage compound in microalgae, are known to be accumulated after nitrogen starvation of microalgae cells. Microalgae could be of importance for future biodiesel production due to their fast growth rate and high oil content. In collections of temperature sensitive...... showed enlarged cellular volume compared with the wild type. The C. reinhardtii mutants were analyzed further and one type of mutants displayed a shift in lipid composition from polar membrane lipids to neutral lipids after a temperature up-shift, while the second type of mutants accumulated more total...... accumulation in microalgae and suggest possibilities for biodiesel production by specific induction of lipid accumulation in miroalgal cultures by cell-cycle inhibition....

  15. Simulated sensitivity of the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle to the ambient temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xulin; He, Jie; Ge, Xuyang

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the impacts of the environmental temperature profile on the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle are examined using idealized numerical simulations. It is found that the environmental thermal condition can greatly affect the formation and structure of a secondary eyewall and the intensity change during the eyewall replacement cycle. Simulation with a warmer thermal profile produces a larger moat and a prolonged eyewall replacement cycle. It is revealed that the enhanced static stability greatly suppresses convection, and thus causes slow secondary eyewall formation. The possible processes influencing the decay of inner eyewall convection are investigated. It is revealed that the demise of the inner eyewall is related to a choking effect associated with outer eyewall convection, the radial distribution of moist entropy fluxes within the moat region, the enhanced static stability in the inner-core region, and the interaction between the inner and outer eyewalls due to the barotropic instability. This study motivates further research into how environmental conditions influence tropical cyclone dynamics and thermodynamics.

  16. Room-temperature chemical integration of ZnO nanoarchitectures on plastic substrates for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-Jia; Lin, Shou-Yen; Wu, Jih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    ZnO nanoarchitectured anodes composed of the ZnO nanocactus array and the top ZnO particle layer are chemically integrated on ITO-PET substrates using a facile room-temperature chemical bath deposition method for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). In the absence of high-temperature post-treatment and mechanical compression, a notable efficiency of 5.24% is simply achieved in the flexible ZnO DSSC.

  17. Temperature and rate of dehydration of major constituents of carbonaceous chondrites under vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Leos; Britt, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Some sub-types of carbonaceous chondrites contain a significant amount of hydrated minerals which produce specific absorption lines, typically due to the presence of hydroxyls. However, if these asteroids have come close enough to the Sun during their history, the high temperatures might have resulted in mineral decomposition and consequent loss of hydroxyl (or water) molecules in the surface layer and even to certain depths. Determination of the hydration state of phyllosilicates typically found on asteroids as well as the relative quantities of hydrated to desiccated phyllosilicates relies on experimental data - the temperature and rate of dehydration. Both dehydration temperature and rate depend on pressure. The rate also depends on the temperature. Experimentally determined phase curves for serpentine, that show for example decomposition of antigorite to forsterite and enstatite or talc and water, exist for GPa pressure levels. For antigorite, these temperatures span the range 500-750°C for pressures between 0.1 GPa and 8 GPa. However, these data are not suitable for vacuum environment found on asteroids; further, at lower pressures, the available data suggest a monotonically decreasing dehydration temperature with decreasing pressure. Also, the available data suggest dependence of both dehydration temperature and rate on the grain size distribution of the mineral. We have determined the temperature and rate of dehydration of the serpentine polymorphs antigorite, lizardite, cronstedtite, under high vacuum conditions and for various grain size distributions. The grain size distributions have been determined by particle analyzer and each sample source was also analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction.

  18. A Model for the Determination of Diffusion Capacity Under Non-Standard Temperature and Pressure Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitzinger Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion capacity of cigarette paper has been reported to be an important parameter in relation to the self-extinguishment of cigarettes and also in relation to carbon monoxide yields. Although the diffusion capacity is routinely measured and instruments for this measurement have been available for several years, differences between measured values obtained on the same paper sample but on different instruments or in different laboratories may be substantial and may make it difficult to use these values, for example, as a basis for paper specifications. Among several reasons, deviations of temperature and pressure from standard conditions, especially within the measurement chamber of the instrument, may contribute to the high variation in diffusion capacity data. Deviations of temperature and pressure will have an influence on the gas flow rates, the diffusion processes inside the measurement chamber and consequently the measured CO2 concentration. Generally, the diffusion capacity is determined from a mathematical model, which describes the diffusion processes inside the measurement chamber. Such models provide the CO2 concentration in the outflow gas for a given diffusion capacity. For practical applications the inverse model is needed, that is, the diffusion capacity shall be determined from a measured CO2 concentration. Often such an inverse model is approximated by a polynomial, which, however, is only valid for standard temperature and pressure. It is shown that relative approximation errors from such polynomials, even without temperature and pressure deviations, cannot always be neglected and it is proposed to eliminate such errors by direct inversion of the model with a comparably simple iterative method. A model which includes temperature and pressure effects is described and the effects of temperature and pressure deviations on the diffusion capacity are theoretically estimated by comparing the output of a model with and without

  19. Enhancement of NH3 Gas Sensitivity at Room Temperature by Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor Coated with Co Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lich Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH3 gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH3 gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH3, compared with alcohol and LPG.

  20. Enhancement of NH3 gas sensitivity at room temperature by carbon nanotube-based sensor coated with Co nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lich Quang; Phan, Pho Quoc; Duong, Huyen Ngoc; Nguyen, Chien Duc; Nguyen, Lam Huu

    2013-01-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH(3) gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH(3) gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH(3), compared with alcohol and LPG.

  1. Research of thermal conditions over high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaev Anton N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study results of the thermal conditions in the area above high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitter. A number of bench tests and experiments were made on the basis of production facilities to control the distribution of temperatures above emitter in different heating system operating modes. Impact of the thermal characteristics in the area above high-temperature gas-fired infrared emitter on the heating system performance was estimated. Comparison of the bench tests results with existing experimental data has shown a good result convergence for both efficiency and accuracy. The obtained results can be used in the emitter development phase and in the construction phase of modern gas-fired radiant heating systems.

  2. Optimization of microwave-enhanced methanolysis of algal biomass to biodiesel under temperature controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prafulla; Reddy, Harvind; Muppaneni, Tapaswy; Ponnusamy, Sundaravadivelnathan; Sun, Yingqiang; Dailey, Peter; Cooke, Peter; Patil, Ulkarani; Deng, Shuguang

    2013-06-01

    The effect of a "controlled temperature" approach was investigated in the microwave-enhanced simultaneous extraction and transesterification of dry algae. Experimental runs were designed using a response surface methodology (RSM). The process parameters such as dry algae to methanol ratio, reaction time, and catalyst concentrations were optimized to evaluate their effects on the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield under the "controlled temperature" conditions. Thermal energy associated with the microwave transesterification process was calculated at various temperature levels using the optimized process parameters. Algal biomass characterization and algal biodiesel analysis were carried out using various analytical instruments such as FTIR, TEM, GC-MS and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis under both nitrogen and oxygen environments was performed to examine the thermal and oxidative stability of the algal fatty acid methyl esters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  4. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  5. AVHRR-based vegetation and temperature condition indices for drought detection in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R. A.; Kogan, F.; Sullivan, J.

    The AVHRR-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and Temperature Condition Index (TCI) have been developed and successfully used for monitoring drought in the USA., the Former Soviet Union, Zimbabwe, and China. This research was designed to apply and validate those indices for drought detection and impact assessment on agricultural yields in Cordoba province of Argentina. Seventy one percent of corn yield variability was explained by the spectral indices averaged over January and February. The VCI and TCI were useful to assess the spatial characteristics, the duration and severity of drought, and were in a good agreement with precipitation patterns.

  6. Temperature-insensitive torsion sensor with sensitivity-enhanced by processing a polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-jun; Shen, Xiang; Luo, Xin; Hu, Xiong-wei; Peng, Jing-gang; Yang, Lv-yun; Li, Jing-yan; Dai, Neng-li

    2017-10-01

    We propose an optical fiber twist sensor by employing a Sagnac interferometer based on polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF). To enhance the torsion sensitivity, a short length of PM-PCF is processed by heating-torsion using carbon dioxide laser. It is demonstrated experimentally that the birefringence of PM-PCF is decreased after processed, and the torsion sensitivity is improved in varying degrees for different lengths of heating-torsion. The maximum sensitivity can achieve 7.09 nm/(rad/m) after post-processing, which is two times higher than that of unprocessed one (3.75 nm/(rad/m)). In addition, the temperature sensitivity of twist sensor drops significantly after post-processing. The result shows that heating-torsion is a novel method to improve the torsion sensitivity of PM-PCF.

  7. A new room temperature gas sensor based on pigment-sensitized TiO2 thin film for amines determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanxiao, Li; Xiao-bo, Zou; Xiao-wei, Huang; Ji-yong, Shi; Jie-wen, Zhao; Holmes, Mel; Hao, Limin

    2015-05-15

    A new room temperature gas sensor was fabricated with pigment-sensitized TiO2 thin film as the sensing layer. Four natural pigments were extracted from spinach (Spinacia oleracea), red radish (Raphanus sativus L), winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum), and black rice (Oryza sativa L. indica) by ethanol. Natural pigment-sensitized TiO2 sensor was prepared by immersing porous TiO2 films in an ethanol solution containing a natural pigment for 24h. The hybrid organic-inorganic formed films here were firstly exposed to atmospheres containing methylamine vapours with concentrations over the range 2-10 ppm at room temperature. The films sensitized by the pigments from black-rice showed an excellent gas-sensitivity to methylamine among the four natural pigments sensitized films due to the anthocyanins. The relative change resistance, S, of the films increased almost linearly with increasing concentrations of methylamine (r=0.931). At last, the black rice pigment sensitized TiO2 thin film was used to determine the biogenic amines generated by pork during storage. The developed films had good sensitivity to analogous gases such as putrscine, and cadaverine that will increase during storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Global river temperatures and sensitivity to atmospheric warming and changes in river flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van M.T.H.; Ludwig, F.; Zwolsman, J.J.G.; Weedon, G.P.; Kabat, P.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of both air temperature and river discharge changes on daily water temperatures for river stations globally. A nonlinear water temperature regression model was adapted to include discharge as a variable in addition to air temperature, and a time lag was

  9. Lamb waves propagation along 3C-SiC/AlN membranes for application in temperature-compensated, high-sensitivity gravimetric sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Lo Castro, Fabio

    2013-01-02

    The propagation of the fundamental quasi-symmetric Lamb mode S(0) travelling along 3C-SiC/c-AlN composite plates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN and SiC film thickness, the acoustic wave propagation direction and the electrical boundary conditions. The temperature effects on the phase velocity have been considered for four AlN/SiC-based electroacoustic coupling configurations, specifically addressing the design of temperature-compensated, enhanced-coupling, GHz-range electroacoustic devices. The gravimetric sensitivity and resolution of the four temperature-stable SiC/AlN composite structures are theoretically investigated with respect to both the AlN and SiC sensing surface. The SiC/AlN-based sensor performances are compared to those of surface acoustic waves and Lamb S(0) mode mass sensors implemented on bulk conventional piezoelectric materials and on thin suspended membranes.

  10. Lamb Waves Propagation along 3C-SiC/AlN Membranes for Application in Temperature-Compensated, High-Sensitivity Gravimetric Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Cinzia; D'Amico, Arnaldo; Castro, Fabio Lo

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of the fundamental quasi-symmetric Lamb mode S0 travelling along 3C-SiC/c-AlN composite plates is theoretically studied with respect to the AlN and SiC film thickness, the acoustic wave propagation direction and the electrical boundary conditions. The temperature effects on the phase velocity have been considered for four AlN/SiC-based electroacoustic coupling configurations, specifically addressing the design of temperature-compensated, enhanced-coupling, GHz-range electroacoustic devices. The gravimetric sensitivity and resolution of the four temperature-stable SiC/AlN composite structures are theoretically investigated with respect to both the AlN and SiC sensing surface. The SiC/AlN-based sensor performances are compared to those of surface acoustic waves and Lamb S0 mode mass sensors implemented on bulk conventional piezoelectric materials and on thin suspended membranes. PMID:23282585

  11. Growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions occurring during cooling of reconstituted powdered infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandhai, M C; Breeuwer, P; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H; Reij, M W

    2009-12-01

    Reconstituted infant formulae are excellent growth media for Cronobacter spp. (formerly Enterobacter sakazakii) and other microorganisms that may be present in such products. Immediate consumption or rapid cooling and storage at a low temperature are therefore recommended as control measures to prevent microbial growth. Placing a container filled with reconstituted liquid formula in the refrigerator, however, does not mean that the temperature of the liquid is directly the same as the set-point of the refrigerator. This study describes the temperature profiles and methods to predict lag time and possible growth of Cronobacter spp. during the cooling process in three types of containers. The overall heat transfer coefficients (alpha) were determined and were shown to have a very large variability in both household refrigerators and an air-ventilated refrigerator equipped with a fan. A mathematical model was built to predict the growth of Cronobacter spp. under dynamic temperature conditions using three models for the lag time. The various estimations for the lag time had a remarkably strong impact on the predicted growth. The assumption of a constant k-value (k = lag time x specific growth rate = lambda x micro = 2.88) fitted the experimental data best. Predictions taking into account the large variability in heat transfer showed that proliferation of Cronobacter spp. during cooling may be prevented by limiting the volume to be cooled to portion size only, or by reconstituting at temperatures of 25 degrees C or lower. The model may also be used to predict growth in other situations where dynamic temperature conditions exist.

  12. Single site suppressors of a fission yeast temperature-sensitive mutant in cdc48 identified by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, Irina N; Engelbrecht, Jacob; Ewald, Adrian; Langholm, Lasse L; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Gordon, Colin; Nielsen, Olaf; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The protein called p97 in mammals and Cdc48 in budding and fission yeast is a homo-hexameric, ring-shaped, ubiquitin-dependent ATPase complex involved in a range of cellular functions, including protein degradation, vesicle fusion, DNA repair, and cell division. The cdc48+ gene is essential for viability in fission yeast, and point mutations in the human orthologue have been linked to disease. To analyze the function of p97/Cdc48 further, we performed a screen for cold-sensitive suppressors of the temperature-sensitive cdc48-353 fission yeast strain. In total, 29 independent pseudo revertants that had lost the temperature-sensitive growth defect of the cdc48-353 strain were isolated. Of these, 28 had instead acquired a cold-sensitive phenotype. Since the suppressors were all spontaneous mutants, and not the result of mutagenesis induced by chemicals or UV irradiation, we reasoned that the genome sequences of the 29 independent cdc48-353 suppressors were most likely identical with the exception of the acquired suppressor mutations. This prompted us to test if a whole genome sequencing approach would allow us to map the mutations. Indeed genome sequencing unambiguously revealed that the cold-sensitive suppressors were all second site intragenic cdc48 mutants. Projecting these onto the Cdc48 structure revealed that while the original temperature-sensitive G338D mutation is positioned near the central pore in the hexameric ring, the suppressor mutations locate to subunit-subunit and inter-domain boundaries. This suggests that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but re-established in the suppressor mutants. The last suppressor was an extragenic frame shift mutation in the ufd1 gene, which encodes a known Cdc48 co-factor. In conclusion, we show, using a novel whole genome sequencing approach, that Cdc48-353 is structurally compromized at the restrictive temperature, but stabilized in the suppressors.

  13. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Tiago; Guégan, Régis; Thiebault, Thomas; Le Milbeau, Claude; Muller, Fabrice; Teixeira, Vinicius; Giovanela, Marcelo; Boussafir, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Accepted Manuscript; International audience; Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental d...

  14. High-temperature Oxidation of Fe-Cr Steels in Steam Condition – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedi Kurniawan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of supercritical (SC and ultra-supercritical (USC power plants requires materials with better corrosion properties. Deep understanding on the oxidation mechanism in the boiler environment is one of the important factors to support this development. In this work, high temperature oxidation of Fe-Cr steels in steam condition is reviewed.  Several mechanisms that explain the effect of water vapor in the oxidation behavior the steel were presented.

  15. High temperature corrosion under conditions simulating biomass firing: depth-resolved phase identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okoro, Sunday Chukwudi; Montgomery, Melanie; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Both cross-sectional and plan view, ‘top-down’ characterization methods were employed , for a depth-resolved characterization of corrosion products resulting from high temperature corrosion under laboratory conditions simulating biomass firing. Samples of an austenitic stainless steel (TP 347H FG...... of the corrosion product. Results from this comprehensive characterization revealed more details on the morphology and composition of the corrosion product....

  16. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-05-31

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  17. Rapid and sensitive microbial analysis by capillary isotachophoresis with continuous electrokinetic injection under field amplified conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Sui Ching; Nai, Yi Heng; Powell, Shane M; Macka, Mirek; Breadmore, Michael C

    2013-06-01

    A highly sensitive capillary isotachophoresis method with LIF detection for microbial analysis was developed. This allowed the reliable analysis of Escherichia coli bacteria with a LOD of 14 cells in a sample volume of 100 μL, or 1.35 × 10(2) cell/mL, which is 47 times lower than reported by CE-LIF and 148 times lower than CE-UV with on-line concentration. A leading electrolyte of 50 mM Tris-HCl was used while the cells were diluted in 5 mM Tris HEPES as the terminator. To facilitate detection, cells were stained with the universal nucleic acid fluorophore SYTO 9. Continuous electrokinetic injection of the cells from the terminator under field amplified conditions concentrated cells into a single peak at the leader/terminator boundary allowing quantitation by measurement of peak height. The method was applied to water collected from two local streams, with only filtration through a 5-μm syringe filter to remove large particulate matter followed by a ten times dilution in terminator, with total analysis time approximately 40 min. The detected cell numbers in the water samples by the isotachophoresis method were 3.70 × 10(5) cell/mL and 2.62 × 10(4) cell/mL, which were slightly higher than the 9.50 × 10(4) cell/mL and 1.96 × 10(4) cell/mL obtained by conventional microbiological plate counting. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessment of primary health care from the perspective of patients hospitalized for ambulatory care sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos de Sá, Francisco; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Cláudia; de Moura Fernandino, Débora; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane A; Cardoso, Clareci Silva

    2016-06-01

    The hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) has been used to assess the effectiveness of primary health care (PHC). Due to the existence of different models of organization of PHC in Brazil, it is important to develop indicators and tools for their assessment. Assessment PHC from the perspective of patients hospitalized for ACSC. A cross-sectional study was carried out. The patients were interviewed for assessment of PHC quality using the primary care assessment tool and a questionnaire. Descriptive analyses were performed and the Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) was calculated according to the health service modality, either the traditional primary health care (TPHC) or the Family Health Program (FHP). The PHCI of the two health care models were compared. A total of 314 ACSC patients were interviewed 26.4% from the FHP and 73.6% from the TPHC. In general, the PHCI dimension with the lowest score was health service access. There was no significant difference in the general PHCI for the two modalities of services (P = 0.16); however, comprehensiveness was better assessed in the TPHC, while longitudinality, family focus and community orientation were better evaluated by FHP users (P ≤ 0.05). The FHP was found to be better qualified to establish longitudinality in the community, an important dimension for continued care. However, promoting access to and consolidating a proactive care model focussed on family shows to be a great challenge for the implementation of a quality and resolutive PHC in large urban centres. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Hospitalizations for primary care-sensitive conditions in a Southern Brazilian municipality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Bastos, Rita Maria; Campos, Estela Márcia Saraiva; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio; Firmino, Róberti Uili Rodrigues; Bustamante-Teixeira, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    To study the most frequent causes of hospitalizations for primary care-sensitive conditions (HPCSC) in the city of Juiz de Fora, MG, Brazil, by age group and gender, over the periods of 2002 to 2005 and of 2006 to 2009. This was a descriptive study, with data collected from the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System (Sistema de Informação Hospitalar do Sistema Único de Saúde - SIH-SUS) and from population projections by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística - IBGE). HPCSC rates were calculated for 1,000 inhabitants, and the most frequent causes were studied by gender and age group, comparing both periods. HPCSP showed rates of 7.74/1,000 between 2002 and 2005 and 8.81/1,000 between 2006 and 2009. The main causes were heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, angina pectoris, pulmonary diseases, and kidney and urinary tract infections, which together represented 4.9/1,000 in the first period and 5.6/1,000 in the second period. The evolution of the rates between both periods occurred differently by age group and gender. The study did not exhibit any remarkable differences in HPCSC rates between the periods. Regarding the most frequent causes, reduced hospitalization rates for gastroenteritis, asthma, high blood pressure, and cerebrovascular diseases were observed, as well as increased hospitalizations for heart failure, pulmonary diseases, epilepsies, and kidney and urinary tract infections; these hospitalizations occurred differently by gender and age group. The results showed that a deep reflection regarding the determinants of hospitalizations for avoidable causes is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Strategies for reducing potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Tobias; Campbell, Stephen M; Geissler, Stefan; Kunz, Cornelia U; Mahler, Cornelia; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex causality of such hospitalizations from the perspective of primary care physicians. We conducted semistructured interviews with 12 primary care physicians from 10 primary care clinics in Germany regarding 104 hospitalizations of 81 patients with ACSCs at high risk of rehospitalization. Participating physicians rated 43 (41%) of the 104 hospitalizations to be potentially avoidable. During the interviews the cause of hospitalization fell into 5 principal categories: system related (eg, unavailability of ambulatory services), physician related (eg, suboptimal monitoring), medical (eg, medication side effects), patient related (eg, delayed help-seeking), and social (eg, lack of social support). Subcategories frequently associated with physicians' rating of hospitalizations for ACSCs as potentially avoidable were after-hours absence of the treating physician, failure to use ambulatory services, suboptimal monitoring, patients' fearfulness, cultural background and insufficient language skills of patients, medication errors, medication nonadherence, and overprotective caregivers. Comorbidities and medical emergencies were frequent causes attributed to ACSC-based hospitalizations that were rated as being unavoidable. Primary care physicians rated a significant proportion of hospitalizations for ACSCs to be potentially avoidable. Strategies to avoid these hospitalizations may target after-hours care, optimal use of ambulatory services, intensified monitoring of high-risk patients, and initiatives to improve patients' willingness and ability to seek timely help, as well as patients' medication adherence.

  1. Strategies for Reducing Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Tobias; Campbell, Stephen M.; Geissler, Stefan; Kunz, Cornelia U.; Mahler, Cornelia; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Hospitalizations for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are seen as potentially avoidable with optimal primary care. Little is known, however, about how primary care physicians rate these hospitalizations and whether and how they could be avoided. This study explores the complex causality of such hospitalizations from the perspective of primary care physicians. METHODS We conducted semistructured interviews with 12 primary care physicians from 10 primary care clinics in Germany regarding 104 hospitalizations of 81 patients with ACSCs at high risk of rehospitalization. RESULTS Participating physicians rated 43 (41%) of the 104 hospitalizations to be potentially avoidable. During the interviews the cause of hospitalization fell into 5 principal categories: system related (eg, unavailability of ambulatory services), physician related (eg, suboptimal monitoring), medical (eg, medication side effects), patient related (eg, delayed help-seeking), and social (eg, lack of social support). Subcategories frequently associated with physicians’ rating of hospitalizations for ACSCs as potentially avoidable were after-hours absence of the treating physician, failure to use ambulatory services, suboptimal monitoring, patients’ fearfulness, cultural background and insufficient language skills of patients, medication errors, medication nonadherence, and overprotective caregivers. Comorbidities and medical emergencies were frequent causes attributed to ACSC-based hospitalizations that were rated as being unavoidable. CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians rated a significant proportion of hospitalizations for ACSCs to be potentially avoidable. Strategies to avoid these hospitalizations may target after-hours care, optimal use of ambulatory services, intensified monitoring of high-risk patients, and initiatives to improve patients’ willingness and ability to seek timely help, as well as patients’ medication adherence. PMID:23835823

  2. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  3. Home Health Agency Characteristics and Quality Outcomes for Medicare Beneficiaries With Rehabilitation-Sensitive Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Tracy M; Meadow, Ann; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Wolff, Jennifer L

    2017-09-21

    To examine associations between organizational characteristics of home health agencies (eg, profit status, rehabilitation therapy staffing model, size, and rurality) and quality outcomes in Medicare beneficiaries with rehabilitation-sensitive conditions, conditions for which occupational, physical, and/or speech therapy have the potential to improve functioning, prevent or slow substantial decline in functioning, or increase ability to remain at home safely. Retrospective analysis. Home health agencies. Fee-for-service beneficiaries (N=1,006,562) admitted to 9250 Medicare-certified home health agencies in 2009. Not applicable. Institutional admission during home health care, community discharge, and institutional admission within 30 days of discharge. Nonprofit (vs for-profit) home health agencies were more likely to discharge beneficiaries to the community (odds ratio [OR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.33) and less likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions within 30 days of discharge (OR, .93; 95% CI, .88-.97). Agencies in rural (vs urban) counties were less likely to discharge patients to the community (OR, .83; 95% CI, .77-.90) and more likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions during home health (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.18-1.30) and within 30 days of discharge (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22). Agencies with contract (vs in-house) therapy staff were less likely to discharge beneficiaries to the community (OR, .79, 95% CI, .70-.91) and more likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions during home health (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15) and within 30 days of discharge (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07-1.28). As payers continue to test and implement reimbursement mechanisms that seek to reward value over volume of services, greater attention should be paid to organizational factors that facilitate better coordinated, higher quality home health care for beneficiaries who may benefit from rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017

  4. Sensitive determination of cadmium in water samples by room temperature ionic liquid-based preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinis, Estefania M. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina); Altamirano, Jorgelina C. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)], E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gov.ar

    2008-10-17

    A sensitive preconcentration methodology for Cd determination at trace levels in water samples was developed in this work. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}MIM][PF{sub 6}]) room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was successfully used for Cd preconcentration, as cadmium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex [Cd-5-Br-PADAP]. Subsequently, Cd was back-extracted from the RTIL phase with 500 {mu}L of 0.5 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). A preconcentration factor of 40 was achieved with 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under optimum conditions was 3 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 10 replicates at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} Cd{sup 2+} concentration level was 3.5%, calculated at peak heights. The calibration graph was linear from concentration levels near the detection limits up to at least 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. A correlation coefficient of 0.9997 was achieved. Validation of the methodology was performed by standard addition method and analysis of certified reference material (CRM). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Cd in river and tap water samples.

  5. Effect of ethylene and temperature conditioning on sensory attributes and chemical composition of 'Comice' pears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkumrai, Warangkana; Sivertsen, Hanne; Sugar, David; Ebeler, Susan E; Negre-Zakharov, Florence; Mitcham, Elizabeth J

    2014-06-04

    'Comice' is among the pear varieties most difficult to ripen after harvest. Ethylene, cold temperature, and intermediate (10 °C) temperature conditioning have been successfully used to stimulate the ability of 'Comice' pears to ripen. However, the sensory quality of pears stimulated to ripen by different conditioning treatments has not been evaluated. In this study, a descriptive sensory analysis of 'Comice' pears conditioned to soften to 27, 18, and 9 N firmness with ethylene exposure for 3 or 1 days, storage at 0 °C for 25 or 15 days, or storage at 10 °C for 10 days was performed. Sensory attributes were then related to changes in chemical composition, including volatile components, water-soluble polyuronides, soluble solids content (SSC), and titratable acidity (TA). The sensory profile of fruit conditioned with ethylene was predominant in fibrous texture and low in fruity and pear aroma. Fruit conditioned at 0 °C was described as crunchy at 27 and 18 N firmness and became juicy at 9 N firmness. Fruit conditioned at 0 °C produced the highest quantity of alcohols and fewer esters than fruit conditioned at 10 °C, and they had higher fruity and pear aroma than fruit conditioned with ethylene, but lower than fruit conditioned at 10 °C. Fruit held at 10 °C were predominant in fruity and pear aroma and had the highest concentration of esters. Water-soluble polyuronides were strongly, positively correlated (r > 0.9) with sensory attributes generally associated with ripeness, including juiciness, butteriness, and sweetness and negatively correlated (r > -0.9) with sensory attributes generally associated with the unripe stage, such as firmness and crunchiness. However, water-soluble polyuronides were not significantly different among conditioning treatments. Sensory sweetness was not significantly correlated with SSC, but TA and SSC/TA were significantly correlated with sensory tartness. However, there were no significant differences among the conditioning

  6. Interactions between modafinil and cocaine during the induction of conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization in mice: Implications for addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Tristan; Cai, Denise J.; Sage, Jennifer R.; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.

    2013-01-01

    Modafinil is a wake-promoting drug effective at enhancing alertness and attention with a variety of approved and off-label applications. The mechanism of modafinil is not well understood but initial studies indicated a limited abuse potential. A number of recent publications, however, have shown that modafinil can be rewarding under certain conditions. The present study assessed the reinforcing properties of modafinil using conditioned place preference and locomotor sensitization in mice. Experiment 1 examined a high dose of modafinil (75 mg/kg) as well as its interactions with cocaine (15 mg/kg). Cocaine alone and modafinil co-administered with cocaine induced sensitization of locomotor activity; modafinil alone showed little or no locomotor sensitization. Animals given modafinil alone, cocaine alone, and modafinil plus cocaine exhibited a strong and roughly equivalent place preference. When tested for sensitization using a low challenge dose of modafinil, cross-sensitization was observed in all cocaine-pretreated mice. Experiment 2 examined a low dose of modafinil that is similar to the dose administered to humans and has been shown to produce cognitive enhancements in mice. Low dose modafinil (0.75 mg/kg) did not produce conditioned place preference or locomotor sensitization. Together, these results suggest that modafinil has the potential to produce reward, particularly in cocaine addicts, and should be used with caution. However, the typical low dose administered likely moderates these effects and may account for lack of addiction seen in humans. PMID:22963989

  7. Sensitivity analysis of helicopter IMC decelerating steep approach and landing performance to navigation system parameters. [Instrument Meteorological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.; Bull, J. S.; Peach, L. L.; Demko, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a sensitivity analysis of the Decelerated Steep Approach and Landing (DSAL) maneuver to on-board and ground-based navigation system parameters. The Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) DSAL maneuver involves decelerating to zero range rate while tracking the localizer and glideslope. The considered study investigated the performance of the navigation systems using Constant Deceleration Profile (CDP) guidance and a six degrees glideslope trajectory. A closed-loop computer simulation of the UH1H helicopter DSAL system was developed for the sensitivity analysis. Conclusions on system performance parameter sensitivity are discussed.

  8. Filament Formation in Clostridium acidiurici Under Conditions of Elevated Temperatures1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, David R.; Gaffar, Abdul; Sagers, Richard D.

    1966-01-01

    Terry, David R. (Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah), Abdul Gaffar, and Richard D. Sagers. Filament formation in Clostridium acidiurici under conditions of elevated temperatures. J. Bacteriol. 91:1625–1634. 1966.—Vegetative cells of Clostridium acidiurici, when grown at temperatures up to 42 C, are straight rods varying from 2.5 to 4 μ in length. When grown at 43 C, the cells show a definite tendency to elongate, and, when grown at 44 C, filaments are formed, often exceeding 500 μ in length. Only an occasional cross wall is apparent in the heat-induced long forms, but as the temperature is lowered they readily form cross walls and fragment into short, single cells. Chromatin material is distributed in evenly spaced clusters throughout the length of the filaments. The filaments grown at 44 C are gram-negative, whereas cells grown at 37 C are gram-positive. However, filament formation and gram-negativity apparently are not due to magnesium deficiency, since the gram-negative filaments are formed in concentrations of magnesium ranging from 10−6 to 10−2m. The rapid transition from filaments to single cells upon lowering the temperature from 44 to 37 C suggests that the temperature-related repression of the cross wall-forming system is a phenotypic response rather than the selection of specific mutants which produce the observed phenomena. Images PMID:5929781

  9. A new heating stage for high Temperature/low fO2 conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissandier, L.; Florentin, L.; Lequin, D.; Baillot, P.; Faure, F.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the processes involved in the formation of intracrystalline inclusions can be valuable for both geological studies and industrial production. In view of this, we developed a new heating stage that can operate in extreme conditions. The use of tungsten as the heating material allows temperatures of over 2000 °C to be reached and also requires that experiments are run under reducing atmospheres. Small samples of metal are needed to calibrate the temperature for each experiment and the fO2 is achieved by a flow of mixed gases (CO, Ar, He). The first experiments run on this device highlight the good agreement between the different ways of estimating the temperature (by the amount of power delivered, the use of a thermocouple or by chemical composition), and a precision of ±20 °C is obtained for temperature determinations. As well as the homogenization of magmatic inclusions in ultramafic rocks, processes such as whisker crystal formation or transcrystalline migration of inclusions can be investigated using the new stage thanks to its very high maximum temperature and to the thermal gradients observed close to the heating wires. This new device looks to be a very promising tool that could easily be adapted for a range of studies by changing the nature and shape of the heating filaments.

  10. Rate of warming affects temperature sensitivity of anaerobic peat decomposition and greenhouse gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihi, Debjani; Inglett, Patrick W; Gerber, Stefan; Inglett, Kanika S

    2018-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of anaerobic carbon mineralization in wetlands remains poorly represented in most climate models and is especially unconstrained for warmer subtropical and tropical systems which account for a large proportion of global methane emissions. Several studies of experimental warming have documented thermal acclimation of soil respiration involving adjustments in microbial physiology or carbon use efficiency (CUE), with an initial decline in CUE with warming followed by a partial recovery in CUE at a later stage. The variable CUE implies that the rate of warming may impact microbial acclimation and the rate of carbon-dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) production. Here, we assessed the effects of warming rate on the decomposition of subtropical peats, by applying either a large single-step (10°C within a day) or a slow ramping (0.1°C/day for 100 days) temperature increase. The extent of thermal acclimation was tested by monitoring CO2 and CH4 production, CUE, and microbial biomass. Total gaseous C loss, CUE, and MBC were greater in the slow (ramp) warming treatment. However, greater values of CH4 -C:CO2 -C ratios lead to a greater global warming potential in the fast (step) warming treatment. The effect of gradual warming on decomposition was more pronounced in recalcitrant and nutrient-limited soils. Stable carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2 further indicated the possibility of different carbon processing pathways under the contrasting warming rates. Different responses in fast vs. slow warming treatment combined with different endpoints may indicate alternate pathways with long-term consequences. Incorporations of experimental results into organic matter decomposition models suggest that parameter uncertainties in CUE and CH4 -C:CO2 -C ratios have a larger impact on long-term soil organic carbon and global warming potential than uncertainty in model structure, and shows that particular rates of warming are central to understand the response of

  11. Temperature-Sensitive Live-Attenuated Canine Influenza Virus H3N8 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Rodriguez, Laura; Chauché, Caroline; Huang, Kai; Reilly, Emma C; Topham, David J; Murcia, Pablo R; Parrish, Colin R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-02-15

    Canine influenza is a respiratory disease of dogs caused by canine influenza virus (CIV). CIV subtypes responsible for influenza in dogs include H3N8, which originated from the transfer of H3N8 equine influenza virus to dogs; and the H3N2 CIV, which is an avian-origin virus that adapted to infect dogs. Influenza infections are most effectively prevented through vaccination to reduce transmission and future infection. Currently, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available for the prevention of CIV in dogs. However, the efficacy of IIVs is suboptimal, and novel approaches are necessary for the prevention of disease caused by this canine respiratory pathogen. Using reverse genetics techniques, we have developed a live-attenuated CIV vaccine (LACIV) for the prevention of H3N8 CIV. The H3N8 LACIV replicates efficiently in canine cells at 33°C but is impaired at temperatures of 37 to 39°C and was attenuated compared to wild-type H3N8 CIV in vivo and ex vivo The LACIV was able to induce protection against H3N8 CIV challenge with a single intranasal inoculation in mice. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy were better than that observed with a commercial CIV H3N8 IIV but provided limited cross-reactive immunity and heterologous protection against H3N2 CIV. These results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a LAIV approach for the prevention and control of H3N8 CIV in dogs and suggest the need for a new LAIV for the control of H3N2 CIV. Two influenza A virus subtypes has been reported in dogs in the last 16 years: the canine influenza viruses (CIV) H3N8 and H3N2 of equine and avian origins, respectively. To date, only inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) are available to prevent CIV infections. Here, we report the generation of a recombinant, temperature-sensitive H3N8 CIV as a live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), which was attenuated in mice and dog tracheal, explants compared to CIV H3N8 wild type. A single dose of H3N8 LACIV showed

  12. Effect of post-exercise hydrotherapy water temperature on subsequent exhaustive running performance in normothermic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Alan; Crampton, David; Egaña, Mikel

    2013-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of cold water immersion (CWI) in normothermic conditions, little data is available on its effect on subsequent endurance performance. This study examined the effect of CWI as a recovery strategy on subsequent running performance in normothermic ambient conditions (∼22°C). Nine endurance-trained men completed two submaximal exhaustive running bouts on three separate occasions. The running bouts (Ex1 and Ex2) were separated by 15min of un-immersed seated rest (CON), hip-level CWI at 8°C (CWI-8) or hip-level CWI at 15°C (CWI-15). Intestinal temperature, blood lactate and heart rate were recorded throughout and V˙O2, running economy and exercise times were recorded during the running sessions. Running time to failure (min) during Ex2 was significantly (p<0.05, ES=0.7) longer following CWI-8 (27.7±6.3) than CON (23.3±5) but not different between CWI-15 (26.3±3.4) and CON (p=0.06, ES=0.7) or CWI-8 and CWI-15 (p=0.4, ES=0.2). Qualitative analyses showed a 95% and 89% likely beneficial effect of CWI-8 and CWI-15 during Ex2 compared with CON, respectively. Time to failure during Ex2 was significantly shorter than Ex1 only during the CON condition. Intestinal temperature and HR were significantly lower for most of Ex2 during CWI-8 and CWI-15 compared with CON but they were similar at failure for the three conditions. Blood lactate, running economy and V˙O2 were not altered by CWI. These data indicate that a 15min period of cold water immersion applied between repeated exhaustive exercise bouts significantly reduces intestinal temperature and enhances post-immersion running performance in normothermic conditions. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, JuYoun; Choi, Jeongwha

    2013-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (Pclothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl and Mtotal, but Llower did not. Subjects hardly changed Llower under environmental comfort conditions between March and October. This indicates that each

  14. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (Pclothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl and Mtotal, but Llower did not. Subjects hardly changed Llower under environmental comfort conditions between March and October. This indicates that each

  15. Towards a Kieselguhr- and PVPP-Free Clarification and Stabilization Process of Rough Beer at Room-Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Alessio; Moresi, Mauro

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the main constraint (that is, beer chilling and chill haze removing) of the current beer conditioning techniques using Kieselguhr filtration and Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) treatment was overcome by developing a novel higher-throughput conditioning process, operating at room temperatures with no use of filter aids. The effect of filtration temperature (T F ) in the range of 0 to 40 °C on the hydraulic permeability of ceramic hollow-fiber (HF) membranes with nominal pore size of 0.2 to 1.4 μm, as well as on their limiting permeation flux (J * ) when feeding precentrifuged rough beer, was preliminarily assessed. When using the 1.4-μm HF membrane operating at T F ≥ 20 °C, it was possible to enhance the average permeation flux at values (676 to 1844 L/m 2 /h), noticeably higher than those (250 to 500 L/m 2 /h) characteristics of conventional powder filtration. Despite its acceptable permanent haze, the resulting beer permeate still exhibited colloidal instability. By resorting to the commercial enzyme preparation Brewers Clarex® before beer clarification, it was possible to significantly improve its colloidal stability as measured using a number of European Brewing Convention forcing tests, especially with respect to that of precentrifuged rough beer by itself. By combining the above enzymatic treatment with membrane clarification at 30 °C across the ceramic 1.4-μm HF membrane module, it was possible to limit the haze development due to chilling, sensitive proteins, and alcohol addition to as low as 0.78, 4.1, and 4.0 EBC-U, respectively, the enzymatic treatment being by far more effective than that using PVPP. A novel Kieselguhr- and PVPP-free rough beer conditioning process at room temperatures was set up. By submitting precentrifuged rough beer to commercial preparation Brewers Clarex ® and then to membrane clarification at 30 °C across a ceramic 1.4-μm hollow-fiber membrane module, it was possible to obtain a clear and stable beer with

  16. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes