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Sample records for temperature sensitive conditional

  1. Temperature sensitivity of extracellular enzyme kinetics in subtropical wetland soils under different nutrient and water level conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Inglett, K.; Inglett, P.

    2012-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes play an important role in the initial steps of soil organic matter decomposition and are involved in regulating nutrient cycle processes. Moreover, with the recent concern of climate change, microbial extracellular enzymes may affect the functioning (C losses, C sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, vegetation changes) of different ecosystems. Hence, it is imperative to understand the biogeochemical processes that may be climate change sensitive. Here, we have measured the Michaelis Menten Kinetics [maximal rate of velocity (Vmax) and half-saturation constant (Km)] of 6 enzymes involved in soil organic matter decomposition (phosphatase, phosphodiesterase, β-D-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, leucine aminopeptidase, N-Acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase) in different nutrient(P) concentration both aerobically and anaerobically in Everglade water conservation area 2A (F1, F4-slough and U3-slough). Temperature sensitivity of different enzymes is assessed within soil of different P concentrations. We hypothesized that the temperature sensitivity of the enzyme changes with the biogeochemical conditions including water level and nutrient condition. Furthermore, we have tested specific hypothesis that higher P concentration will initiate more C demand for microbes leading to higher Vmax value for carbon processing enzymes in high P site. We found temperature sensitivity of all enzymes for Vmax and Km under both aerobic and anaerobic condition ranges from 0.6 to 3.2 for Vmax and 0.5 to 2.5 for Km. Q10 values of Km for glucosidase indicate more temperature sensitivity under anaerobic condition. Under aerobic condition higher temperature showed significant effect on Vmax for bisphosphatase between high P and low P site. Decreasing P concentration from F1 site to U3-S site had showed significant effect in all temperature on carbon processing enzyme. This suggests that in high P site, microbes will use more carbon-processing enzyme to get more carbon

  2. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kyle Z.; Lipford, William E.; Watkins, Anthony Neal

    2016-01-01

    Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  3. Boundary-Layer Detection at Cryogenic Conditions Using Temperature Sensitive Paint Coupled with a Carbon Nanotube Heating Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Z. Goodman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of flow transition on aircraft surfaces and models can be vital to the development of future vehicles and computational methods for evaluating vehicle concepts. In testing at ambient conditions, IR thermography is ideal for this measurement. However, for higher Reynolds number testing, cryogenic facilities are often used, in which IR thermography is difficult to employ. In these facilities, temperature sensitive paint is an alternative with a temperature step introduced to enhance the natural temperature change from transition. Traditional methods for inducing the temperature step by changing the liquid nitrogen injection rate often change the tunnel conditions. Recent work has shown that adding a layer consisting of carbon nanotubes to the surface can be used to impart a temperature step on the model surface with little change in the operating conditions. Unfortunately, this system physically degraded at 130 K and lost heating capability. This paper describes a modification of this technique enabling operation down to at least 77 K, well below the temperature reached in cryogenic facilities. This is possible because the CNT layer is in a polyurethane binder. This was tested on a Natural Laminar Flow model in a cryogenic facility and transition detection was successfully visualized at conditions from 200 K to 110 K. Results were also compared with the traditional temperature step method.

  4. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n  = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n  = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  5. Proteomic characterization of a temperature-sensitive conditional lethal in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie; Codrea, M.C; Vermeulen, Corneel

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation that is expressed only under specific environmental conditions can contribute to additional adverse effects of inbreeding if environmental conditions change. We present a proteomic characterization of a conditional lethal found in an inbred line of Drosophila melanogaster. The l...

  6. Characterization of conditionally expressed mutants affecting age-specific Drosophila melanogaster : Lethal conditions and temperature-sensitive periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, CJ; Bijlsma, R

    The specific genetic basis of inbreeding depression is poorly understood. To address this question, two conditionally expressed lethal effects that were found to cause line-specific life span reductions in two separate inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster. were characterized phenotypically and

  7. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold‐sensitive young trained females

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki‐Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P.; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise‐induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold‐sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty‐eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold‐sensitive (Cold‐sensitive, n = 7) and non‐cold‐sensitive (Control, n = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then...

  8. West-WRF Sensitivity to Sea Surface Temperature Boundary Condition in California Precipitation Forecasts of AR Related Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Cornuelle, B. D.; Martin, A.; Weihs, R. R.; Ralph, M.

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the merit in coastal precipitation forecasts by inclusion of high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) from blended satellite and in situ observations as a boundary condition (BC) to the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model through simple perturbation tests. Our sensitivity analyses shows that the limited improvement of watershed scale precipitation forecast is credible. When only SST BC is changed, there is an uncertainty introduced because of artificial model state equilibrium and the nonlinear nature of the WRF model system. With the change of SST on the order of a fraction of a degree centigrade, we found that the part of random perturbation forecast response is saturated after 48 hours when it reaches to the order magnitude of the linear response. It is important to update the SST at a shorter time period, so that the independent excited nonlinear modes can cancel each other. The uncertainty in our SST configuration is quantitatively equivalent to adding to a spatially uncorrelated Guasian noise of zero mean and 0.05 degree of standard deviation to the SST. At this random noise perturbation magnitude, the ensemble average behaves well within a convergent range. It is also found that the sensitivity of forecast changes in response to SST changes. This is measured by the ratio of the spatial variability of mean of the ensemble perturbations over the spatial variability of the corresponding forecast. The ratio is about 10% for surface latent heat flux, 5 % for IWV, and less than 1% for surface pressure.

  9. Junction temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters and their application to condition monitoring and active thermal control of power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Liserre, Marco; Dupont, L.

    2013-01-01

    implementation of active thermal control to reduce losses and increase lifetime can be performed given an accurate knowledge of temperature. Temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP) are one way to carry out immediate temperature readings on fully packaged devices. However...... scale implementation of these methods are discussed. Their potential use in the aforementioned goals in condition monitoring and active thermal control is also described....

  10. Comparative transcriptome profiling of a thermal resistant vs. sensitive silkworm strain in response to high temperature under stressful humidity condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfu Xiao

    Full Text Available Thermotolerance is important particularly for poikilotherms such as insects. Understanding the mechanisms by which insects respond to high temperatures can provide insights into their adaptation to the environment. Therefore, in this study, we performed a transcriptome analysis of two silkworm strains with significantly different resistance to heat as well as humidity; the thermo-resistant strain 7532 and the thermos-sensitive strain Knobbed. We identified in total 4,944 differentially expressed genes (DEGs using RNA-Seq. Among these, 4,390 were annotated and 554 were novel. Gene Ontology (GO analysis of 747 DEGs identified between RT_48h (Resistant strain with high-temperature Treatment for 48 hours and ST_48h (Sensitive strain with high-temperature Treatment for 48 hours showed significant enrichment of 12 GO terms including metabolic process, extracellular region and serine-type peptidase activity. Moreover, we discovered 12 DEGs that may contribute to the heat-humidity stress response in the silkworm. Our data clearly showed that 48h post-exposure may be a critical time point for silkworm to respond to high temperature and humidity. These results provide insights into the genes and biological processes involved in high temperature and humidity tolerance in the silkworm, and advance our understanding of thermal tolerance in insects.

  11. Electrocutaneous sensitivity: effects of skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, W D; Reilly, J P

    1986-01-01

    The effect of human skin temperature on electrocutaneous sensitivity was examined using brief capacitive discharges. Stimuli were designed to ensure that sensory effects would be independent of skin resistance and would reflect underlying neural excitability as closely as possible. Skin temperature was manipulated by immersing the forearm in circulating hot or cold air. Detection thresholds on the arm and fingertip were raised by cooling, but were not altered by heating. Temperature-related sensitivity shifts were described by the same multiplicative factors for both threshold and suprathreshold levels. The temperature coefficient (Q10) for cutaneous sensitivity under these conditions was approximately 1.3.

  12. Temperature sensitivity of nitrogen productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ladanai, Svetlana; Ågren, Göran

    2002-01-01

    Environmental conditions control physiological processes in plants and thus their growth. The predicted global warming is expected to accelerate tree growth. However, the growth response is a complex function of several processes. To circumvent this problem we have used the nitrogen productivity (dry matter production per unit of nitrogen in the plant), which is an aggregate parameter. Data on needle dry matter, production, and nitrogen content in needles of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) from...

  13. Persistent and non-persistent strains of Listeria monocytogenes: A focus on growth kinetics under different temperature, salt, and pH conditions and their sensitivity to sanitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, R; Ferreira, V; Brandão, T R S; Palencia, R Casquete; Almeida, G; Teixeira, P

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of different conditions, including temperature (37 °C, 22 °C, and 4 °C), NaCl concentrations (2.5%, 4%, and 8%), and acidity (pH = 5), on the growth response of persistent and non-persistent isolates of Listeria monocytogenes. The resistance to two common sanitizers (benzalkonium chloride and hydrogen peroxide) was also investigated. A selected group of 41 persistent and non-persistent L. monocytogenes isolates recovered from three cheese processing plants during a previous longitudinal study was assembled. Average lag time was similar for persistent and non-persistent isolates grown at 37 °C, 22 °C and 4 °C but significantly shorter (p < 0.05) for persistent isolates grown at 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. Average growth rates were significantly higher (p < 0.05) for persistent than for non-persistent isolates when grown at 22 °C, 2.5%, 4% and 8% NaCl, and at pH 5. These results suggest that persistent strains may be better adapted to grow under stressful conditions frequently encountered in food processing environments than non-persistent strains. No relation between persistence and resistance to the tested sanitizers was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Snow Patterns in Swiss Ski Resorts to Shifts in Temperature, Precipitation and Humidity Under Condition of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, B.; Goyette, S.; Beniston, M.

    2008-12-01

    The value of snow as a resource has considerably increased in Swiss mountain regions, in particular in the context of winter tourism. In the perspective of a warming climate, it is thus important to quantify the potential changes in snow amount and duration that could have large repercussions on the economy of ski resorts. Because of the fine spatial variability of snow, the use of a Surface Energy Balance Model (SEBM) is adequate to simulate local snow cover evolution. A perturbation method has been developed to generate plausible future meteorological input data required for SEBM simulations in order to assess the changes in snow cover patterns. Current and future snow depths have also been simulated within the ski areas themselves. The results show a large decrease of the snow depths and duration, even at high elevation in a warmer climate and emphasize the sensitivity of snow to topographical characteristics of the resorts. The study highlights the fact that not only the altitude of a domain but also its exposure, localization inland and slope gradients need to be taken into account when evaluating current and future snow depths. This method enables a precise assessment of the snow pattern over a small area.

  15. Enhanced olfactory sensitivity in autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Chris; Chapman, Emma; Howells, Jessica; Rhydderch, Danielle; Walker, Ian; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) report heightened olfaction. Previous sensory experiments in people with ASC have reported hypersensitivity across visual, tactile, and auditory domains, but not olfaction. The aims of the present study were to investigate olfactory sensitivity in ASC, and to test the association of sensitivity to autistic traits. We recruited 17 adult males diagnosed with ASC and 17 typical adult male controls and tested their olfactory sensitivity using the Alcohol Sniff Test (AST), a standardised clinical evaluation of olfactory detection. The AST involves varying the distance between subject and stimulus until an odour is barely detected. Participants with ASC also completed the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) as a measure of autism traits. The ASC group detected the odour at a mean distance of 24.1 cm (SD =11.5) from the nose, compared to the control group, who detected it at a significantly shorter mean distance of 14.4 cm (SD =5.9). Detection distance was independent of age and IQ for both groups, but showed a significant positive correlation with autistic traits in the ASC group (r =0.522). This is the first experimental demonstration, as far as the authors are aware, of superior olfactory perception in ASC and showing that greater olfactory sensitivity is correlated with a higher number of autistic traits. This is consistent with results from previous findings showing hypersensitivity in other sensory domains and may help explain anecdotal and questionnaire accounts of heightened olfactory sensitivity in ASC. Results are discussed in terms of possible underlying neurophysiology.

  16. The relationship between virtual body ownership and temperature sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobera, Joan; Sanchez-Vives, M. V.; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    In the rubber hand illusion, tactile stimulation seen on a rubber hand, that is synchronous with tactile stimulation felt on the hidden real hand, can lead to an illusion of ownership over the rubber hand. This illusion has been shown to produce a temperature decrease in the hidden hand, suggesting that such illusory ownership produces disownership of the real hand. Here, we apply immersive virtual reality (VR) to experimentally investigate this with respect to sensitivity to temperature change. Forty participants experienced immersion in a VR with a virtual body (VB) seen from a first-person perspective. For half the participants, the VB was consistent in posture and movement with their own body, and in the other half, there was inconsistency. Temperature sensitivity on the palm of the hand was measured before and during the virtual experience. The results show that temperature sensitivity decreased in the consistent compared with the inconsistent condition. Moreover, the change in sensitivity was significantly correlated with the subjective illusion of virtual arm ownership but modulated by the illusion of ownership over the full VB. This suggests that a full body ownership illusion results in a unification of the virtual and real bodies into one overall entity—with proprioception and tactile sensations on the real body integrated with the visual presence of the VB. The results are interpreted in the framework of a ‘body matrix’ recently introduced into the literature. PMID:23720537

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on the sensitivities of escherichia coli at deep frozen conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Machiko; Ito, Hitoshi

    1996-01-01

    Phosphate buffer suspensions of three strains of Escherichia coli were irradiated with gamma-rays at room temperature and deep frozen conditions. They were inoculated on MacConkey agar plates to see the comparative sensitivities to the irradiation. Compared to the irradiation at room temperature, the sensitivities of the strains decreased by irradiation at deep frozen conditions. Addition of glycerol to the E. coli suspensions decreased the sensitivities of E. coli to gamma-rays not only at room temperature but also at deep frozen conditions. These phenomena were elucidated by the decrease of production and mobility of OH radicals at deep frozen conditions. (author)

  18. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  19. Temperature sheets and aspect sensitive radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available here have been years of discussion and controversy about the existence of very thin and stable temperature sheets and their relationship to the VHF radar aspect sensitivity. It is only recently that very high-resolution in situ temperature observations have brought credence to the reality and ubiquity of these structures in the free atmosphere and to their contribution to radar echo enhancements along the vertical. Indeed, measurements with very high-resolution sensors are still extremely rare and rather difficult to obtain outside of the planetary boundary layer. They have only been carried out up to the lower stratosphere by Service d’A´ eronomie (CNRS, France for about 10 years. The controversy also persisted due to the volume resolution of the (Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere VHF radars which is coarse with respect to sheet thickness, although widely sufficient for meteorological or mesoscale investigations. The contribution within the range gate of many of these structures, which are advected by the wind, and decay and grow at different instants and could be distorted either by internal gravity waves or turbulence fields, could lead to radar echoes with statistical properties similar to those produced by anisotropic turbulence. Some questions thus remain regarding the manner in which temperature sheets contribute to VHF radar echoes. In particular, the zenithal and azimuthal angular dependence of the echo power may not only be produced by diffuse reflection on stable distorted or corrugated sheets, but also by extra contributions from anisotropic turbulence occurring in the stratified atmosphere. Thus, for several years, efforts have been put forth to improve the radar height resolution in order to better describe thin structures. Frequency interferometric techniques are widely used and have been recently further developed with the implementation of high-resolution data processings. We begin by reviewing briefly some characteristics

  20. Accelerated Testing with Multiple Failure Modes under Several Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyue Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A complicated device may have multiple failure modes, and some of the failure modes are sensitive to low temperatures. To assess the reliability of a product with multiple failure modes, this paper presents an accelerated testing in which both of the high temperatures and the low temperatures are applied. Firstly, an acceleration model based on the Arrhenius model but accounting for the influence of both the high temperatures and low temperatures is proposed. Accordingly, an accelerated testing plan including both the high temperatures and low temperatures is designed, and a statistical analysis method is developed. The reliability function of the product with multiple failure modes under variable working conditions is given by the proposed statistical analysis method. Finally, a numerical example is studied to illustrate the proposed accelerated testing. The results show that the proposed accelerated testing is rather efficient.

  1. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  2. NEPHROTIC SYNDROME steroid sensitive renal condition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrotic syndrome is primarily a paediatric disorder and is 15 times more common in children than adults. The incidence is 2–3/100,000 children per year, and the majority of affected children will have steroid- sensitive minimal change disease. The characteristic features of nephrotic syndrome are heavy proteinuria.

  3. Temperature dependence of heat sensitization and thermotolerance induction with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henle, K.J.; Nagle, W.A.; Moss, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Cytoxicity of 1 M ethanol was strongly temperature dependent; survival curves between 34 0 and 39 0 C were similar to heat survival curves between 40 and 45 0 without ethanol. Ethanol was non-toxic at 22 0 ; at 34.5 0 and 35.5 0 ethanol survival curves were biphasic. The major effect of 1 M ethanol was an effective temperature shift of 6.4 Celsius degrees, although temperatures between 34 0 and 36 0 caused additional sensitization reminiscent of the stepdown heating phenomenon. Induction of thermotolerance with equitoxic ethanol exposures at 35.5 0 and 37 0 or with heat alone (10 min, 45 0 ) resulted in tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 22 0 did not induce any tolerance to hyperthermia. These data provide a rationale for conflicting reports in the literature regarding thermotolerance induction by ethanol and suggest that ethanol causes ''heat'' stress at temperatures that are generally considered to be physiological. This interpretation predicts that the use of ethanol and other organic solvents in high concentrations will cause effects at 37 0 that normally occur only at hyperthermic temperatures, including membrane perturbations and HSP synthesis, and that ''physiological'' temperatures must be precisely controlled under those conditions

  4. Sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitalas, R.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity to temperature of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning is discussed. The complexity of the sensitivity is due to the different equilibration time-scales of the constituents of the p-p chain and CN cycle and the dependence of their abundances and time-scales on temperature. The time-scale of the temperature perturbation, compared to the equilibrium time-scale of a constituent, determines whether the constituent is in equilibrium and affects the sensitivity. The temperature sensitivity of the p-p chain for different values of hydrogen abundance, when different constituents come into equilibrium is presented, as well as its variation with 3 He abundance. The temperature sensitivity is drastically different from n 11 , the temperature sensitivity of the proton-proton reaction, unless the time-scale of temperature perturbation is long enough for 3 He to remain in equilibrium. Even in this case the sensitivity of the p-p chain differs significantly from n 11 , unless the temperature is so low that PP II and PP III chains can be neglected. The variation of the sensitivity of CN energy generation is small for different time-scales of temperature variation, because the temperature sensitivities of individual reactions are so similar. The combined sensitivity to temperature of energy generation by hydrogen burning is presented and shown to have a maximum of 16.4 at T 6 = 24.5. For T 6 > 25 the temperature sensitivity is given by the sensitivity of 14 N + p reaction. (author)

  5. Time-temperature-sensitization and time-temperature-precipitation behavior of alloy 625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.

    1996-01-01

    Time-Temperature-Sensitization diagrams have been established for a low-carbon version of alloy 625 (UNS N06625). Sensitization in terms of a 50 microm (2 mils) intergranular penetration criterion starts after about 3 h aging time at 750 C (soft annealed condition) or after less than 1 h aging time at 800 C (solution annealed condition) when tested according to ASTM-G 28 method A. Grain boundary precipitation of carbides occurs during aging of both the soft annealed and the solution annealed material, but the soft annealed material exhibits a more pronounced general precipitation of Ni 3 (Nb,Mo) phase giving rise to more distinct loss of ductility. Sensitization of alloy 625 may be retarded by lowering its iron content

  6. Temperature jump boundary conditions in radiation diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.T.

    1976-12-01

    The radiation diffusion approximation greatly simplifies radiation transport problems. Yet the application of this method has often been unnecessarily restricted to optically thick regions, or has been extended through the use of such ad hoc devices as flux limiters. The purpose of this paper is to review and draw attention to the use of the more physically appropriate temperature jump boundary conditions for extending the range of validity of the diffusion approximation. Pioneering work has shown that temperature jump boundary conditions remove the singularity in flux that occurs in ordinary diffusion at small optical thicknesses. In this review paper Deissler's equations for frequency-dependent jump boundary conditions are presented and specific geometric examples are calculated analytically for steady state radiation transfer. When jump boundary conditions are applied to radiation diffusion, they yield exact solutions which are naturally flux- limited and geometry-corrected. We believe that the presence of temperature jumps on source boundaries is probably responsible in some cases for the past need for imposing ad hoc flux-limiting constraints on pure diffusion solutions. The solution for transfer between plane slabs, which is exact to all orders of optical thickness, also provides a useful tool for studying the accuracy of computer codes

  7. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The apparatus, described in detail, accurately infers the average coolant temperature exiting from the reactor core in a liquid metal cooled reactor and rapidly and reliably actuates a safety rod release mechanism on the occurrence of a critical temperature. The output temperature is inferred from the cooperative effect of the flow rate through a coolant flow path within the safety assembly and the heat generated by sensor fuel pins. The inferred temperature is sensed by a confined fluid having a high expansion coefficient; the expansion is transferred to a linear force used to actuate the release mechanism. The system may be contained within the safety assembly and does not interfere with the operation of the plant protection system scram mode. It is resetable after a scram. The time interval between the overtemperature and the insertion of the safety rods is short enough to preclude fuel damage. (U.K.)

  8. Divergent apparent temperature sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing Song; Shuli Niu; Ruise Luo; Yiqi Luo; Jiquan Chen; Guirui Yu; Janusz Olejnik; Georg Wohlfahrt; Gerard Kiely; Ako Noormets; Leonardo Montagnani; Alessandro Cescatti; Vincenzo Magliulo; Beverly Elizabeth Law; Magnus Lund; Andrej Varlagin; Antonio Raschi; Matthias Peichl; Mats B. Nilsson; Lutz Merbold

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies revealed convergent temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Re) within aquatic ecosystems and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. We do not know yet whether various terrestrial ecosystems have consistent or divergent temperature sensitivity. Here, we synthesized 163 eddy covariance flux sites across the world and...

  9. Ultrahigh temperature-sensitive silicon MZI with titania cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Moo eLee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a possibility of intensifying temperature sensitivity of a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI by using a highly negative thermo-optic property of titania (TiO2. Temperature sensitivity of an asymmetric silicon MZI with a titania cladding is experimentally measured from +18pm/C to -340 pm/C depending on design parameters of MZI.

  10. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  11. Sensitivity of a soil-plant-atmosphere model to changes in air temperature, dew point temperature, and solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luxmoore, R.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab.,TN); Stolzy, J.L.; Holdeman, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Air temperature, dew point temperature and solar radiation were independently varied in an hourly soil-plant-atmosphere model in a sensitivity analysis of these parameters. Results suggested that evapotranspiration in eastern Tennessee is limited more by meteorological conditions that determine the vapor-pressure gradient than by the necessary energy to vaporize water within foliage. Transpiration and soil water drainage were very sensitive to changes in air and dew point temperature and to solar radiation under low atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit conditions associated with reduced air temperature. Leaf water potential and stomatal conductance were reduced under conditions having high evapotranspiration. Representative air and dew point temperature input data for a particular application are necessary for satisfactory results, whereas irradiation may be less well characterized for applications with high atmospheric vapor-pressure deficit. The effects of a general rise in atmospheric temperature on forest water budgets are discussed.

  12. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuggio, N.; Noyes, R.C.; Zaman, S.U.

    1982-01-01

    This invention provides a mechanism for rapidly dropping a neutron absorbing poison material into the core of an LMFBR type reactor, and in particular a mechanism that is self-actuated when the reactor coolant temperature reaches a critical value. A safety duct located in the reactor core and extending above the core contains an inner column that provides a vertical coolant flow path through the duct. One or more fuel pins are located in the duct, with a temperature-responsive actuator near their upper ends. A poison bundle surrounds the inner column within the duct, held in position by a release mechanism connected to the actuator. The inferred core temperature is sensed by a fluid confined within the actuator, and the expansion of the fluid is translated into a linear force used to activate the release mechanism

  13. Temperature sensitive self-actuated scram mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuggio, N.; Noyes, R.C.; Zaman, S.U.

    1980-01-01

    A self-actuated mechanism within a safety assembly in a liquid metal nuclear reactor comprising sensor fuel pins located in a reactor coolant flow path, a sensor bulb containing NaK located near the upper end of the sensor fuel pins and in the reactor coolant flow path, and a sensor tube connecting the sensor bulb to a metal bellows and push rod. The motion of the push rod resulting from the temperature dependent change in the NaK volume actuates a safety rod release mechanism when a predetermined coolant temperature is reached

  14. Fear Conditioning Effects on Sensitivity to Drug Reward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    motivational responses and self-administration behaviors (Robbins et al., 2008). Pavlovian conditioning mechanisms link unconditioned drug responses...model. Induction of fear conditioning is followed by measurement of sensitivity to drug reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) model to...morphine. Conditioned drug reward is a relevant model in addiction because environmental cues (e.g. a barroom) induce craving and persistent

  15. Greater temperature sensitivity of plant phenology at colder sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prevey, Janet; Vellend, Mark; Ruger, Nadja

    2017-01-01

    Warmer temperatures are accelerating the phenology of organisms around the world. Temperature sensitivity of phenology might be greater in colder, higher latitude sites than in warmer regions, in part because small changes in temperature constitute greater relative changes in thermal balance...

  16. Dopamine modulates metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ueno

    Full Text Available Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shi(ts induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine, which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation.

  17. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  18. Temperature sensitivity of respiration scales with organic matter recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, J. M.; Fierer, N.; McLauchlan, K. K.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is a key process in determining the carbon sequestration potential of ecosystems and carbon fluxes to the atmosphere. Since microbial decomposition is highly sensitive to short-term changes in temperature, predicting the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition is critical to predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and feedbacks to anthropogenic warming. Fundamental principles of enzyme kinetics, embodied in the carbon-quality temperature hypothesis, predict that the temperature sensitivity of microbial decomposition should increase with increasing biochemical recalcitrance of a substrate. To test the generality of this principle, we measured the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration of soil organic matter with serial short-term temperature manipulations over 365 days for 28 North American soils. When joined with data from similar studies that represent a wide variety of contrasts, we show that the temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition scales with biochemical recalcitrance. With physico-chemical protection likely an important covariate for relating plant and soil organic matter decomposition scalars, biochemically recalcitrant organic matter is highly susceptible to short-term increases in temperature, a key link in predicting the effects of warming on carbon cycling.

  19. Fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with controllable temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinpu; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yang

    2015-12-01

    We proposed a fiber taper based on the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer structure with controllable temperature sensitivity. The FP interferometer is formed by inserting a segment of tapered fiber tip into the capillary and subsequently splicing the other end of the capillary to a single-mode fiber (SMF), the tapered fiber endface, and the spliced face form the FP cavity. Through controlling the inserted tapered fiber length, a series of FP interferometers were made. Because the inserted taper tip has the degree of freedom along the fiber axial, when the FP interferometer is subjected to temperature variation, the thermal expansion of the fiber taper tip will resist the FP cavity length change caused by the evolution of capillary length, and we can control the temperature sensitivity by adjusting the inserted taper length. In this structure, the equivalent thermal expansion coefficient of the FP interferometer can be defined; it was used to evaluate the temperature sensitivity of the FP interferometer, which provides an effective method to eliminate the temperature effect and to enhance other measurement accuracy. We fabricated the FP interferometers and calibrated their temperature characters by measuring the wavelength shift of the resonance dips in the reflection spectrum. In a temperature range of 50°C to 150°C, the corresponding temperature sensitivities can be controlled between 0 and 1.97 pm/°C when the inserted taper is between 75 and 160 μm. Because of its controllable temperature sensitivity, ease of fabrication, and low cost, this FP interferometer can meet different temperature sensitivity requirements in various application areas, especially in the fields which need temperature insensitivity.

  20. Western Arctic Temperature Sensitivity Varies under Different Mean States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, W.; Russell, J. M.; Morrill, C.; Longo, W. M.; Giblin, A. E.; Holland-Stergar, P.; Hu, A.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic is warming faster than anywhere on earth. Predictions of future change, however, are hindered by uncertainty in the mechanisms that underpin Arctic amplification. Data from Beringia (Alaska and Eastern Siberia) are particularly inconclusive with regards to both glacial-interglacial climate change as well as the presence or absence of abrupt climate change events such as the Younger Dryas. Here we investigate temperature change in Beringia from the last glacial maximum (LGM) to present using a unique 30 kyr lacustrine record of leaf wax hydrogen isotope ratios (δDwax) from Northern Alaska. We evaluate our results in the context of PMIP3 climate simulations as well as sensitivity tests of the effects of sea level and Bering Strait closure on Arctic Alaskan climate. The amplitude of LGM cooling in Alaska (-3.2 °C relative to pre-industrial) is smaller than other parts of North America and areas proximal to LGM ice sheets, but similar to Arctic Asia and Europe. This suggests that the local feedbacks (vegetation, etc.) had limited impacts on regional temperatures during the last ice-age, and suggests most of the Arctic exhibited similar responses to global climate boundary conditions. Deglacial warming was superimposed by a series of rapid warming events that encompass most of the temperature increase. These events are largely synchronous with abrupt events in the North Atlantic, but are amplified, muted, or even reversed in comparison depending on the mean climate state. For example, we observe warming during Heinrich 1 and during the submergence of the Bering Land Bridge, which are associated with cooling in the North Atlantic. Climate modeling suggests that opening of the Bering Strait controlled the amplitude and sign of millennial-scale temperature changes across the glacial termination.

  1. Targeted drug delivery using temperature-sensitive liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, R.L.; Niesman, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Liposomes are receiving considerable attention as vehicles for selective drug delivery. One method of targeting liposomal contents involves the combination of local hyperthermia with temperature-sensitive liposomes. Such liposomes have been used to increase the uptake of methotrexate and cis-platinum into locally heated mouse tumors. However, additional information is needed on the mechanism of liposome drug release and the physiologic deposition of liposomes in vivo before clinical trails are begun. Current research is directed at studying the encapsulation and release of water soluble drugs from temperature-sensitive liposomes. The influence of liposome size, structure, and composition on the rapid release in plasma of cytosine arabinoside, cis-platinum, and the radiation sensitizer SR-2508 are described. These results demonstrate potential applications for temperature-sensitive liposomes in selective drug delivery

  2. Sensitivity calculation of the coolant temperature regarding the thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de; Silva, F.C. da; Thome Filho, Z.D.; Alvim, A.C.M.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de.

    1985-01-01

    It's studied the application of the Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the sensitivity calculation of thermalhydraulic problems, aiming at verifying the viability of the extension of the method. For this, the axial distribution, transient, of the coolant temperature in a PWR channel are considered. Perturbation expressions are developed using the GPT formalism, and a computer code (Tempera) is written, to calculate the channel temperature distribution and the associated importance function, as well as the effect of the thermalhydraulic parameters variations in the coolant temperature (sensitivity calculation). The results are compared with those from the direct calculation. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is dependent on readily decomposable C substrate concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.

    2007-06-01

    Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux by the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax) and half- saturation constant (Ks) cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of the data obtained in the incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data confirm the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate as glucose equivalent is an important factor controlling temperature sensitivity. The highest temperature sensitivity was observed when C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, explaining this phenomenon by changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate. It is worth noting that this pattern works regardless of the origin of C substrate: production by SOM decomposition, release into the soil by rhizodeposition, litter fall or drying-rewetting events.

  4. Temperature Crosstalk Sensitivity of the Kummerow Rainfall Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Petrenko, Boris

    1999-01-01

    Even though the signal source for passive microwave retrievals is thermal emission, retrievals of non-temperature geophysical parameters typically do not explicitly take into account the effects of temperature change on the retrievals. For global change research, changes in geophysical parameters (e.g. water vapor, rainfall, etc.) are referenced to the accompanying changes in temperature. If the retrieval of a certain parameter has a cross-talk response from temperature change alone, the retrievals might not be very useful for climate research. We investigated the sensitivity of the Kummerow rainfall retrieval algorithm to changes in air temperature. It was found that there was little net change in total rainfall with air temperature change. However, there were non-negligible changes within individual rain rate categories.

  5. Calculation of coolant temperature sensitivity related to thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C. da; Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1985-01-01

    It is verified the viability to apply the generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the calculation of sensitivity for thermal-hydraulic problems. It was developed the TEMPERA code in FORTRAN-IV to transient calculations in the axial temperature distribution in a channel of PWR reactor and the associated importance function, as well as effects of variations of thermalhydraulic parameters in the coolant temperature. The results are compared with one which were obtained by direct calculation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Temperature-sensitive leaf color mutation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu Qingyao; Liu Guifu; Xia Yingwu

    1996-01-01

    Studies on the leaf color appearance of 4 chlorophyll-deficient mutation lines both in field and in phytotron were carried out. The mutation lines were induced by 60 Co gamma rays, and showed that white or yellow leaves at seedling stage were quite different from their-parent 2177 S, a thermal sensitive genie male sterile line and any other rice materials. The temperature had great influence on the expression of leaf color at seedling stage in the mutation lines. the leaf color was white at 30∼35 degree C for the lines W 4 and W 11 . The chlorophyll content of 1.5-leaf-age seedlings was 0.0219 and 0.0536 mg/g FW respectively for W 4 and W 11 at 35 degree C. When the temperature dropped to 20∼25 degree C, the seedlings showed yellow or yellowish and the chlorophyll content reached to 0.2410 and 0.3431 mg/g FW at 25 degree C, respectively. However, the responses to temperature for W 17 and W 25 were just the opposite. They were white at 20∼25 degree C, but appeared greenish at 30∼35 degree C. The chlorophyll content increased from 0.0813 and 0.0172 mg/g FW at 25 degree C to 1.0570 and 1.1367 mg/g FW at 35 degree C for the lines W 1 -7 and W 25 , respectively. The parent line 2177 S showed normal green and the chlorophyll content was between 2.108 and 2.118 mg/g FW. The W 11 is exception, which showed yellow to light green in lifetime, and all the mutation lines could convert to normal green after the extension of the fourth leaf. The chlorophyll content of 3.5-leaf-age W 4 and W 17 seedlings grown under 25 degree C reached to 2.2190 and 1.993 mg/g FW, which was about 86. 6% and 81.1% of that of 2177 S at the same stage. When grown at the temperature bellow 20 degree C, W 25 maintained white and could not changed into green after the 4th leaf extension, and showed a conditional lethal status

  7. Accelerated Testing with Multiple Failure Modes under Several Temperature Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zongyue Yu; Zhiqian Ren; Junyong Tao; Xun Chen

    2014-01-01

    A complicated device may have multiple failure modes, and some of the failure modes are sensitive to low temperatures. To assess the reliability of a product with multiple failure modes, this paper presents an accelerated testing in which both of the high temperatures and the low temperatures are applied. Firstly, an acceleration model based on the Arrhenius model but accounting for the influence of both the high temperatures and low temperatures is proposed. Accordingly, an accelerated testi...

  8. Sensitivity of a Simulated Derecho Event to Model Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the MMM division at NCAR has been experimenting cloud-permitting scale weather forecasting using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Over the years, we've tested different model physics, and tried different initial and boundary conditions. Not surprisingly, we found that the model's forecasts are more sensitive to the initial conditions than model physics. In 2012 real-time experiment, WRF-DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) at 15 km was employed to produce initial conditions for twice-a-day forecast at 3 km. On June 29, this forecast system captured one of the most destructive derecho event on record. In this presentation, we will examine forecast sensitivity to different model initial conditions, and try to understand the important features that may contribute to the success of the forecast.

  9. Sensitivities and uncertainties of modeled ground temperatures in mountain environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Model evaluation is often performed at few locations due to the lack of spatially distributed data. Since the quantification of model sensitivities and uncertainties can be performed independently from ground truth measurements, these analyses are suitable to test the influence of environmental variability on model evaluation. In this study, the sensitivities and uncertainties of a physically based mountain permafrost model are quantified within an artificial topography. The setting consists of different elevations and exposures combined with six ground types characterized by porosity and hydraulic properties. The analyses are performed for a combination of all factors, that allows for quantification of the variability of model sensitivities and uncertainties within a whole modeling domain. We found that model sensitivities and uncertainties vary strongly depending on different input factors such as topography or different soil types. The analysis shows that model evaluation performed at single locations may not be representative for the whole modeling domain. For example, the sensitivity of modeled mean annual ground temperature to ground albedo ranges between 0.5 and 4 °C depending on elevation, aspect and the ground type. South-exposed inclined locations are more sensitive to changes in ground albedo than north-exposed slopes since they receive more solar radiation. The sensitivity to ground albedo increases with decreasing elevation due to shorter duration of the snow cover. The sensitivity in the hydraulic properties changes considerably for different ground types: rock or clay, for instance, are not sensitive to uncertainties in the hydraulic properties, while for gravel or peat, accurate estimates of the hydraulic properties significantly improve modeled ground temperatures. The discretization of ground, snow and time have an impact on modeled mean annual ground temperature (MAGT that cannot be neglected (more than 1 °C for several

  10. Temperature sensitive riboflavin mutants of Penicillium vermiculatum Dangeard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, J.; Chaudhari, K.L.

    1974-01-01

    Two temperature sensitive UV induced riboflavin mutants rib 1 and rib 6 have been physiologically and genetically characterized. The two mutants behave differently with regard to their temperature sensitivity. The rib 1 mutant exhibits a leaky growth in minimal medium between 15 0 C and 30 0 C but grows well when the medium is supplemented with riboflavin. At 35 0 C the growth response of the mutant is at its max. and at 40 0 C and below 15 0 C it ceases to grow. The rib 6 mutant which is red brown in colour shows wild type character at temp. below 25 0 C in minimal medium but requires riboflavin at 30 0 C and above. Heterokaryotic analysis revealed the nonallelic nature of the two temperature mutants. Genetic tests of allelic relationship between riboflavin markers by crossing were also done. (author)

  11. On the sensitivity of annual streamflow to air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milly, Paul C.D.; Kam, Jonghun; Dunne, Krista A.

    2018-01-01

    Although interannual streamflow variability is primarily a result of precipitation variability, temperature also plays a role. The relative weakness of the temperature effect at the annual time scale hinders understanding, but may belie substantial importance on climatic time scales. Here we develop and evaluate a simple theory relating variations of streamflow and evapotranspiration (E) to those of precipitation (P) and temperature. The theory is based on extensions of the Budyko water‐balance hypothesis, the Priestley‐Taylor theory for potential evapotranspiration ( ), and a linear model of interannual basin storage. The theory implies that the temperature affects streamflow by modifying evapotranspiration through a Clausius‐Clapeyron‐like relation and through the sensitivity of net radiation to temperature. We apply and test (1) a previously introduced “strong” extension of the Budyko hypothesis, which requires that the function linking temporal variations of the evapotranspiration ratio (E/P) and the index of dryness ( /P) at an annual time scale is identical to that linking interbasin variations of the corresponding long‐term means, and (2) a “weak” extension, which requires only that the annual evapotranspiration ratio depends uniquely on the annual index of dryness, and that the form of that dependence need not be known a priori nor be identical across basins. In application of the weak extension, the readily observed sensitivity of streamflow to precipitation contains crucial information about the sensitivity to potential evapotranspiration and, thence, to temperature. Implementation of the strong extension is problematic, whereas the weak extension appears to capture essential controls of the temperature effect efficiently.

  12. Two mutations which confer temperature-sensitive radiation sensitivity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.S.Y.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    X-ray survival curves for two mutations, rad54 and rad55, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are presented. These mutations confer temperature sensitive X-ray sensitivity; that is, rad54 and rad55 strains display a wild type X-ray survival response at permissive temperatures and a radiosensitive X-ray survival response at restrictive temperatures. The survival response of cells which were shifted from a permissive to a restrictive temperature or vice versa at various post-irradiation times indicates that repair and fixation of X-ray induced lesions is largely complete three hours after X-irradiation. Experiments to determine the utilization sequence of the rad54 and rad55 gene products in the repair of X-ray induced damage suggest that the two products are required in an interdependent manner

  13. Characterization of sensitization and stress corrosion cracking behavior of stabilized stainless steels under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, R.; Ilg, U.; Meier, V.; Teichmann, H.; Wachter, O.

    1995-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking occurs if the three parameters -- material condition, tensile stress and water chemistry -- are in a critical range. In this study the material conditions especially of Ti- and Nb-stabilized steels are considered. The purpose of this work is to show the influence of the degree of sensitization of Ti- and Nb-stabilized stainless steels on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility in BWR water chemistry. This is an on-going research program. Preliminary results will be presented. Different types of stabilized, and for comparison unstabilized, stainless steels are examined in various heat treatment conditions with regard to their sensitization behavior by EPR tests (double loop) and TEM. The results are plotted in sensitization diagrams. The sensitization behavior depends on many parameters such as carbon content, stabilization element, stabilization ratio and materials history, e.g. solution heat treatment or cold working. The obtained EPR sensitization diagrams are compared with the well known sensitization diagrams from the literature, which were determined by standard IC test according to e.g. German standard DIN 50914 (equivalent to ASTM A 262, Pract. E). Based on the obtained EPR sensitization diagrams material conditions for SSRT tests were selected. The EPR values (Ir/Ia x 100%) of the tested Ti-stabilized stainless steel are in the range of ∼ 0.1--20%. The SSRT tests are carried out in high-temperature water with 0.4 ppm O 2 , a conductivity of 0.5 microS/cm and a strain rate of 1x10 -6-1 . The test temperature is 280 C. Ti-stabilized stainless steel with Ir/Ia x 100% > 1% suffered intergranular stress corrosion cracking under these conditions. The SCC tests for Nb-stabilized stainless steel are still in progress. The correlation between EPR value, chromium depletion and SSRT result will be shown for a selected material condition of sensitized Ti-stabilized stainless steel

  14. Validation of temperature-sensitive radio transmitters for measurement of body temperature in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Joseph B.; Tieleman, B. I.; Shobrak, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    As part of a study on the core body temperature (T(b)) of desert birds, we purposed to use temperature-sensitive implantable radio transmitters. Because of the difficulty in recapturing these birds, we needed to know if these electronic devices held their calibration over the duration of normal

  15. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  16. Sensitivity of LUCC on the Surface Temperature of Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, W.; Deng, X.; Wu, F.

    2016-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has an important effect on the ecological security in China, even in Asia, which makes the region become the hot spot in recently research. Under the joint influence of global change and human activities, ecosystem destabilizing and the increasing pressure on resources and environment emerge on the Tibetan Plateau, but the potential spatial sensitivity of land use and land cover changes(LUCC) on surface temperature has not been quantitatively analyzed. This study analyzed the mainly types of LUCC, urbanization, grassland degradation, deforestation on Tibetan Plateau along with Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The LUCC in recent decades was first quantitatively analyzed in this study to give the basic fact with a significant increase in temperatures, reduced precipitation and increased evaporation. This study focused on the future spatio-temporal heterogeneity of the temperature and precipitation. Finally, the influencing factors with LUCC on Tibetan Plateau were simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and the sensitivity of different land use types was spatially analyzed with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD). The results indicate that the large-area alpine grassland plays a more important role in alleviating global warming than other vegetation types do. The changes of the landscape structure resulting from the urban expansion play a significant role in intensifying regional temperature increase. In addition, the effects of LUCC on monthly average temperature change would vary from month to month with obviously spatial heterogeneity.

  17. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  18. Some tests of flat plate photovoltaic module cell temperatures in simulated field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.; Rathod, M. S.; Paslaski, J.

    1981-01-01

    The nominal operating cell temperature (NOCT) of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules is an important characteristic. Typically, the power output of a PV module decreases 0.5% per deg C rise in cell temperature. Several tests were run with artificial sun and wind to study the parametric dependencies of cell temperature on wind speed and direction and ambient temperature. It was found that the cell temperature is extremely sensitive to wind speed, moderately so to wind direction and rather insensitive to ambient temperature. Several suggestions are made to obtain data more typical of field conditions.

  19. Maximum vehicle cabin temperatures under different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundstein, Andrew; Meentemeyer, Vernon; Dowd, John

    2009-05-01

    A variety of studies have documented the dangerously high temperatures that may occur within the passenger compartment (cabin) of cars under clear sky conditions, even at relatively low ambient air temperatures. Our study, however, is the first to examine cabin temperatures under variable weather conditions. It uses a unique maximum vehicle cabin temperature dataset in conjunction with directly comparable ambient air temperature, solar radiation, and cloud cover data collected from April through August 2007 in Athens, GA. Maximum cabin temperatures, ranging from 41-76°C, varied considerably depending on the weather conditions and the time of year. Clear days had the highest cabin temperatures, with average values of 68°C in the summer and 61°C in the spring. Cloudy days in both the spring and summer were on average approximately 10°C cooler. Our findings indicate that even on cloudy days with lower ambient air temperatures, vehicle cabin temperatures may reach deadly levels. Additionally, two predictive models of maximum daily vehicle cabin temperatures were developed using commonly available meteorological data. One model uses maximum ambient air temperature and average daily solar radiation while the other uses cloud cover percentage as a surrogate for solar radiation. From these models, two maximum vehicle cabin temperature indices were developed to assess the level of danger. The models and indices may be useful for forecasting hazardous conditions, promoting public awareness, and to estimate past cabin temperatures for use in forensic analyses.

  20. Cell membrane temperature rate sensitivity predicted from the Nernst equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, F S

    1984-01-01

    A hyperpolarized current is predicted from the Nernst equation for conditions of positive temperature derivatives with respect to time. This ion current, coupled with changes in membrane channel conductivities, is expected to contribute to a transient potential shift across the cell membrane for silent cells and to a change in firing rate for pacemaker cells.

  1. Spectral and Concentration Sensitivity of Multijunction Solar Cells at High Temperature: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.; Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John

    2017-06-14

    We model the performance of two-junction solar cells at very high temperatures of ~400 degrees C and beyond for applications such as hybrid PV/solar-thermal power production, and identify areas in which the design and performance characteristics behave significantly differently than at more conventional near-room-temperature operating conditions. We show that high-temperature operation reduces the sensitivity of the cell efficiency to spectral content, but increases the sensitivity to concentration, both of which have implications for energy yield in terrestrial PV applications. For other high-temperature applications such as near-sun space missions, our findings indicate that concentration may be a useful tool to enhance cell efficiency.

  2. Sensitivity studies of a PCV under earthquake loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraslioglu, B.; Shamshiri, I.

    1987-01-01

    The results point out the special sensitivity of the modeling and the time history method analyses. Due to the lack of more precise general statements in literature and regulations which should help to find an otpimal design, the analyst is challenged to make much efforts in finding realistic, conservative, not overestimated results. For the purpose of more precise data due to the temporal combination in time history method he has to abandon the security supplied by enveloped, smoothed and broadened spectra in response spectrum method analysis (RSMA). It is therefore advisable to prefer RSMA or to perform several calculations with variations of frequency, ground shear modulus and earthquake loading condition. (orig./HP)

  3. A generalized conditional heteroscedastic model for temperature downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarres, R.; Ouarda, T. B. M. J.

    2014-11-01

    This study describes a method for deriving the time varying second order moment, or heteroscedasticity, of local daily temperature and its association to large Coupled Canadian General Circulation Models predictors. This is carried out by applying a multivariate generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) approach to construct the conditional variance-covariance structure between General Circulation Models (GCMs) predictors and maximum and minimum temperature time series during 1980-2000. Two MGARCH specifications namely diagonal VECH and dynamic conditional correlation (DCC) are applied and 25 GCM predictors were selected for a bivariate temperature heteroscedastic modeling. It is observed that the conditional covariance between predictors and temperature is not very strong and mostly depends on the interaction between the random process governing temporal variation of predictors and predictants. The DCC model reveals a time varying conditional correlation between GCM predictors and temperature time series. No remarkable increasing or decreasing change is observed for correlation coefficients between GCM predictors and observed temperature during 1980-2000 while weak winter-summer seasonality is clear for both conditional covariance and correlation. Furthermore, the stationarity and nonlinearity Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin (KPSS) and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman (BDS) tests showed that GCM predictors, temperature and their conditional correlation time series are nonlinear but stationary during 1980-2000 according to BDS and KPSS test results. However, the degree of nonlinearity of temperature time series is higher than most of the GCM predictors.

  4. Thermal sterilization of heat-sensitive products using high-temperature short-time sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, A; Kiefer, M; Leuenberger, H

    2001-03-01

    High-temperature short-time (HTST) sterilization with a continuous-flow sterilizer, developed for this study, was evaluated. The evaluation was performed with respect to (a) the chemical degradation of two heat-sensitive drugs in HTST range (140-160 degrees C) and (b) the microbiological effect of HTST sterilization. Degradation kinetics of two heat-sensitive drugs showed that a high peak temperature sterilization process resulted in less chemical degradation for the same microbiological effect than a low peak temperature process. Both drugs investigated could be sterilized with acceptable degradation at HTST conditions. For the evaluation of the microbiological effect, Bacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 spores were used as indicator bacteria. Indicator spore kinetics (D(T), z value, k, and E(a)), were determined in the HTST range. A comparison between the Bigelow model (z value concept) and the Arrhenius model, used to describe the temperature coefficient of the microbial inactivation, demonstrated that the Bigelow model is more accurate in prediction of D(T) values in the HTST range. The temperature coefficient decreased with increasing temperature. The influence of Ca(2+) ions and pH value on the heat resistance of the indicator spores, which is known under typical sterilization conditions, did not change under HTST conditions.

  5. Mixing-model Sensitivity to Initial Conditions in Hydrodynamic Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Josiah; Silva, Humberto; Truman, C. Randall; Vorobieff, Peter

    2017-11-01

    Amagat and Dalton mixing-models were studied to compare their thermodynamic prediction of shock states. Numerical simulations with the Sandia National Laboratories shock hydrodynamic code CTH modeled University of New Mexico (UNM) shock tube laboratory experiments shocking a 1:1 molar mixture of helium (He) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) . Five input parameters were varied for sensitivity analysis: driver section pressure, driver section density, test section pressure, test section density, and mixture ratio (mole fraction). We show via incremental Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) analysis that significant differences exist between Amagat and Dalton mixing-model predictions. The differences observed in predicted shock speeds, temperatures, and pressures grow more pronounced with higher shock speeds. Supported by NNSA Grant DE-0002913.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of uranium solubility under strongly oxidizing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions in the repository on the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions, a mathematical model has been developed to determine the solubility, by utilizing a set of nonlinear algebraic equations to describe the chemical equilibria in the groundwater environment. The model takes into account the predominant precipitation-dissolution reactions, hydrolysis reactions and complexation reactions that may occur under strongly oxidizing conditions. The model also includes the solubility-limiting solids induced by the presence of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, calcium, and sodium in the groundwater. The thermodynamic equilibrium constants used in the solubility calculations are essentially taken from the NEA Thermochemical Data Base of Uranium, with some modification and some uranium minerals added, such as soddyite, rutherfordite, uranophane, uranyl orthophosphate, and becquerelite. By applying this model, the sensitivities of uranium solubility to variations in the concentrations of various groundwater component species are systematically investigated. The results show that the total analytical concentrations of carbonate, phosphate, silicate, and calcium in deep groundwater play the most important role in determining the solubility of uranium under strongly oxidizing conditions

  7. Comparison of winter wheat yield sensitivity to climate variables under irrigated and rain-fed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dengpan; Shen, Yanjun; Zhang, He; Moiwo, Juana P.; Qi, Yongqing; Wang, Rende; Pei, Hongwei; Zhang, Yucui; Shen, Huitao

    2016-09-01

    Crop simulation models provide alternative, less time-consuming, and cost-effective means of determining the sensitivity of crop yield to climate change. In this study, two dynamic mechanistic models, CERES (Crop Environment Resource Synthesis) and APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems Simulator), were used to simulate the yield of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) under well irrigated (CFG) and rain-fed (YY) conditions in relation to different climate variables in the North China Plain (NCP). The study tested winter wheat yield sensitivity to different levels of temperature, radiation, precipitation, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration under CFG and YY conditions at Luancheng Agro-ecosystem Experimental Stations in the NCP. The results from the CERES and APSIM wheat crop models were largely consistent and suggested that changes in climate variables influenced wheat grain yield in the NCP. There was also significant variation in the sensitivity of winter wheat yield to climate variables under different water (CFG and YY) conditions. While a temperature increase of 2°C was the threshold beyond which temperature negatively influenced wheat yield under CFG, a temperature rise exceeding 1°C decreased winter wheat grain yield under YY. A decrease in solar radiation decreased wheat grain yield under both CFG and YY conditions. Although the sensitivity of winter wheat yield to precipitation was small under the CFG, yield decreased significantly with decreasing precipitation under the rainfed YY treatment. The results also suggest that wheat yield under CFG linearly increased by ≈3.5% per 60 ppm (parts per million) increase in CO2 concentration from 380 to 560 ppm, and yield under YY increased linearly by ≈7.0% for the same increase in CO2 concentration.

  8. Sensitivity of regional climate to global temperature and forcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebaldi, Claudia; O’Neill, Brian; Lamarque, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of regional climate to global average radiative forcing and temperature change is important for setting global climate policy targets and designing scenarios. Setting effective policy targets requires an understanding of the consequences exceeding them, even by small amounts, and the effective design of sets of scenarios requires the knowledge of how different emissions, concentrations, or forcing need to be in order to produce substantial differences in climate outcomes. Using an extensive database of climate model simulations, we quantify how differences in global average quantities relate to differences in both the spatial extent and magnitude of climate outcomes at regional (250–1250 km) scales. We show that differences of about 0.3 °C in global average temperature are required to generate statistically significant changes in regional annual average temperature over more than half of the Earth’s land surface. A global difference of 0.8 °C is necessary to produce regional warming over half the land surface that is not only significant but reaches at least 1 °C. As much as 2.5 to 3 °C is required for a statistically significant change in regional annual average precipitation that is equally pervasive. Global average temperature change provides a better metric than radiative forcing for indicating differences in regional climate outcomes due to the path dependency of the effects of radiative forcing. For example, a difference in radiative forcing of 0.5 W m −2 can produce statistically significant differences in regional temperature over an area that ranges between 30% and 85% of the land surface, depending on the forcing pathway. (letter)

  9. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range -100 to 100 degree C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs

  10. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage’s sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  11. Creep of concrete under various temperature, moisture, and loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to obtain information on the time-dependent deformation behavior of concrete in the presence of temperature, moisture, and loading conditions similar to those encountered in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Variables included concrete strength, aggregate types, curing history, temperature, and types of loading (uniaxial, hydrostatic, biaxial, and triaxial). There were 66 test conditions for creep tests and 12 test conditions for unloaded or control specimens. Experimental results are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made concerning the effect of the various test conditions on the behavior of concrete, and general conclusions are formulated

  12. Global sensitivity analysis of water age and temperature for informing salmonid disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaheri, Amir; Babbar-Sebens, Meghna; Alexander, Julie; Bartholomew, Jerri; Hallett, Sascha

    2018-06-01

    Many rivers in the Pacific Northwest region of North America are anthropogenically manipulated via dam operations, leading to system-wide impacts on hydrodynamic conditions and aquatic communities. Understanding how dam operations alter abiotic and biotic variables is important for designing management actions. For example, in the Klamath River, dam outflows could be manipulated to alter water age and temperature to reduce risk of parasite infections in salmon by diluting or altering viability of parasite spores. However, sensitivity of water age and temperature to the riverine conditions such as bathymetry can affect outcomes from dam operations. To examine this issue in detail, we conducted a global sensitivity analysis of water age and temperature to a comprehensive set of hydraulics and meteorological parameters in the Klamath River, California, where management of salmonid disease is a high priority. We applied an analysis technique, which combined Latin-hypercube and one-at-a-time sampling methods, and included simulation runs with the hydrodynamic numerical model of the Lower Klamath. We found that flow rate and bottom roughness were the two most important parameters that influence water age. Water temperature was more sensitive to inflow temperature, air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed, flow rate, and wet bulb temperature respectively. Our results are relevant for managers because they provide a framework for predicting how water within 'high infection risk' sections of the river will respond to dam water (low infection risk) input. Moreover, these data will be useful for prioritizing the use of water age (dilution) versus temperature (spore viability) under certain contexts when considering flow manipulation as a method to reduce risk of infection and disease in Klamath River salmon.

  13. Effects of temperature, genetic variation and species competition on the sensitivity of algae populations to the antibiotic enrofloxacin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, Andreu; Zhao, Wenkai; Gillissen, Frits; Lürling, Miquel; Brink, van den Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Primary producers are amongst the most sensitive organisms to antibiotic pollution in aquatic ecosystems. To date, there is little information on how different environmental conditions may affect their sensitivity to antibiotics. In this study we assessed how temperature, genetic variation and

  14. Neighborhood properties are important determinants of temperature sensitive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Lockwood

    Full Text Available Temperature-sensitive (TS mutants are powerful tools to study gene function in vivo. These mutants exhibit wild-type activity at permissive temperatures and reduced activity at restrictive temperatures. Although random mutagenesis can be used to generate TS mutants, the procedure is laborious and unfeasible in multicellular organisms. Further, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the TS phenotype are poorly understood. To elucidate TS mechanisms, we used a machine learning method-logistic regression-to investigate a large number of sequence and structure features. We developed and tested 133 features, describing properties of either the mutation site or the mutation site neighborhood. We defined three types of neighborhood using sequence distance, Euclidean distance, and topological distance. We discovered that neighborhood features outperformed mutation site features in predicting TS mutations. The most predictive features suggest that TS mutations tend to occur at buried and rigid residues, and are located at conserved protein domains. The environment of a buried residue often determines the overall structural stability of a protein, thus may lead to reversible activity change upon temperature switch. We developed TS prediction models based on logistic regression and the Lasso regularized procedure. Through a ten-fold cross-validation, we obtained the area under the curve of 0.91 for the model using both sequence and structure features. Testing on independent datasets suggested that the model predicted TS mutations with a 50% precision. In summary, our study elucidated the molecular basis of TS mutants and suggested the importance of neighborhood properties in determining TS mutations. We further developed models to predict TS mutations derived from single amino acid substitutions. In this way, TS mutants can be efficiently obtained through experimentally introducing the predicted mutations.

  15. Sensitivity of Sump Water Temperature to Containment Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Misuk; Kim, Seoung Rae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This paper is focused on the containment behavior analysis in the above described cases using GOTHIC-IST (generation of thermal-hydraulic information for containments, industry standard toolset). GOTHIC-IST version 7.2a is an integrated, general purpose thermal-hydraulics software package for design, licensing, safety and operating analysis of nuclear power plant containments and other confinement buildings. In this study, we perform the sensitivity the sump water temperature to containment integrity. For 35% RIH break accident with the malfunction of spray system, local air coolers, ECC(emergency core cooling) pump and heat exchanger, the peak pressure at boiler room do not exceed the design pressure 124kPa(g) of the containment and containment integrity is secured. If accompanied the malfunction of heat exchanger or pump in the time of low pressure safety injection, of ECCS, it will be one of the aggravating factors to the integrity of core and containment.

  16. Temperature-sensitive elastin-mimetic dendrimers: Effect of peptide length and dendrimer generation to temperature sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Chie; Irie, Kotaro; Tada, Tomoko; Tanaka, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    Dendrimers are synthetic macromolecules with unique structure, which are a potential scaffold for peptides. Elastin is one of the main components of extracellular matrix and a temperature-sensitive biomacromolecule. Previously, Val-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly peptides have been conjugated to a dendrimer for designing an elastin-mimetic dendrimer. In this study, various elastin-mimetic dendrimers using different length peptides and different dendrimer generations were synthesized to control the temperature dependency. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed β-turn structure by heating, which was similar to the elastin-like peptides. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers exhibited an inverse phase transition, largely depending on the peptide length and slightly depending on the dendrimer generation. The elastin-mimetic dendrimers formed aggregates after the phase transition. The endothermal peak was observed in elastin-mimetic dendrimers with long peptides, but not with short ones. The peptide length and the dendrimer generation are important factors to tune the temperature dependency on the elastin-mimetic dendrimer. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Temperature field conduction solution by incomplete boundary condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novakovic, M; Petrasinovic, Lj; Djuric, M [Tehnoloski fakultet, Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Perovic, N [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1977-01-01

    The problem of determination of one part boundary conditions temperatures for Fourier partial differential equation when the other part of boundary condition and derivates (heat fluxes) are known is a practical interest as it enables one to determine and accessible temperature by measuring temperatures on other side, of the wall. Method developed and applied here consist of transforming the Fourier partial differential equation by time discretisation in sets of pairs of ordinary differential equations for temperature and heat flux. Such pair of differential equations of first order was solved by Runge-Kutta method. The integration proceeds along space interval simultaneosly for all time intervals. It is interesting to note that this procedure does not require the initial condition.

  18. Trends and Variability in Temperature Sensitivity of Lilac Flowering Phenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanjiong; Dai, Junhu; Rutishauser, This; Gonsamo, Alemu; Wu, Chaoyang; Ge, Quansheng

    2018-03-01

    The responses of plant phenology to temperature variability have many consequences for ecological processes, agriculture, forestry, and human health. Temperature sensitivity (ST) of phenology could measure how and to what degree plant could phenologically track climate change. The long-term trends and spatial patterns in ST have been well studied for vegetative phenology such as leaf unfolding, but trends to be expected for reproductive phenology in the future remain unknown. Here we investigate trends and factors driving the temporal variation of ST of first bloom date (FBD). Using the long-term FBD records during 1963-2013 for common lilac (Syringa vulgaris) from 613 stations in Europe, we compared changes in ST from the beginning to the end of the study period. The Spearman partial correlations were used to assess the importance of four influencing factors. The results showed that the temporal changes in ST of FBD varied considerably among time scales. Mean ST decreased significantly by 0.92 days °C-1 from 1963-1972 to 2004-2013 (P plant species in other climates and environments using similar methods to our study.

  19. High-Sensitivity Temperature-Independent Silicon Photonic Microfluidic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kangbaek

    Optical biosensors that can precisely quantify the presence of specific molecular species in real time without the need for labeling have seen increased use in the drug discovery industry and molecular biology in general. Of the many possible optical biosensors, the TM mode Si biosensor is shown to be very attractive in the sensing application because of large field amplitude on the surface and cost effective CMOS VLSI fabrication. Noise is the most fundamental factor that limits the performance of sensors in development of high-sensitivity biosensors, and noise reduction techniques require precise studies and analysis. One such example stems from thermal fluctuations. Generally SOI biosensors are vulnerable to ambient temperature fluctuations because of large thermo-optic coefficient of silicon (˜2x10 -4 RIU/K), typically requiring another reference ring and readout sequence to compensate temperature induced noise. To address this problem, we designed sensors with a novel TM-mode shallow-ridge waveguide that provides both large surface amplitude for bulk and surface sensing. With proper design, this also provides large optical confinement in the aqueous cladding that renders the device athermal using the negative thermo-optic coefficient of water (~ --1x10-4RIU/K), demonstrating cancellation of thermo-optic effects for aqueous solution operation near 300K. Additional limitations resulting from mechanical actuator fluctuations, stability of tunable lasers, and large 1/f noise of lasers and sensor electronics can limit biosensor performance. Here we also present a simple harmonic feedback readout technique that obviates the need for spectrometers and tunable lasers. This feedback technique reduces the impact of 1/f noise to enable high-sensitivity, and a DSP lock-in with 256 kHz sampling rate can provide down to micros time scale monitoring for fast transitions in biomolecular concentration with potential for small volume and low cost. In this dissertation, a novel

  20. Identification of a novel temperature sensitive promoter in cho cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Friedemann

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO expression system is the leading production platform for manufacturing biopharmaceuticals for the treatment of numerous human diseases. Efforts to optimize the production process also include the genetic construct encoding the therapeutic gene. Here we report about the successful identification of an endogenous highly active gene promoter obtained from CHO cells which shows conditionally inducible gene expression at reduced temperature. Results Based on CHO microarray expression data abundantly transcribed genes were selected as potential promoter candidates. The S100a6 (calcyclin and its flanking regions were identified from a genomic CHO-K1 lambda-phage library. Computational analyses showed a predicted TSS, a TATA-box and several TFBSs within the 1.5 kb region upstream the ATG start signal. Various constructs were investigated for promoter activity at 37°C and 33°C in transient luciferase reporter gene assays. Most constructs showed expression levels even higher than the SV40 control and on average a more than two-fold increase at lower temperature. We identified the core promoter sequence (222 bp comprising two SP1 sites and could show a further increase in activity by duplication of this minimal sequence. Conclusions This novel CHO promoter permits conditionally high-level gene expression. Upon a shift to 33°C, a two to three-fold increase of basal productivity (already higher than SV40 promoter is achieved. This property is of particular advantage for a process with reduced expression during initial cell growth followed by the production phase at low temperature with a boost in expression. Additionally, production of toxic proteins becomes feasible, since cell metabolism and gene expression do not directly interfere. The CHO S100a6 promoter can be characterized as cold-shock responsive with the potential for improving process performance of mammalian expression systems.

  1. Emergent constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity from global temperature variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peter M; Huntingford, Chris; Williamson, Mark S

    2018-01-17

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) remains one of the most important unknowns in climate change science. ECS is defined as the global mean warming that would occur if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentration were instantly doubled and the climate were then brought to equilibrium with that new level of CO 2 . Despite its rather idealized definition, ECS has continuing relevance for international climate change agreements, which are often framed in terms of stabilization of global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate. However, the 'likely' range of ECS as stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has remained at 1.5-4.5 degrees Celsius for more than 25 years. The possibility of a value of ECS towards the upper end of this range reduces the feasibility of avoiding 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, as required by the Paris Agreement. Here we present a new emergent constraint on ECS that yields a central estimate of 2.8 degrees Celsius with 66 per cent confidence limits (equivalent to the IPCC 'likely' range) of 2.2-3.4 degrees Celsius. Our approach is to focus on the variability of temperature about long-term historical warming, rather than on the warming trend itself. We use an ensemble of climate models to define an emergent relationship between ECS and a theoretically informed metric of global temperature variability. This metric of variability can also be calculated from observational records of global warming, which enables tighter constraints to be placed on ECS, reducing the probability of ECS being less than 1.5 degrees Celsius to less than 3 per cent, and the probability of ECS exceeding 4.5 degrees Celsius to less than 1 per cent.

  2. Emergent constraint on equilibrium climate sensitivity from global temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Peter M.; Huntingford, Chris; Williamson, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) remains one of the most important unknowns in climate change science. ECS is defined as the global mean warming that would occur if the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration were instantly doubled and the climate were then brought to equilibrium with that new level of CO2. Despite its rather idealized definition, ECS has continuing relevance for international climate change agreements, which are often framed in terms of stabilization of global warming relative to the pre-industrial climate. However, the ‘likely’ range of ECS as stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has remained at 1.5-4.5 degrees Celsius for more than 25 years. The possibility of a value of ECS towards the upper end of this range reduces the feasibility of avoiding 2 degrees Celsius of global warming, as required by the Paris Agreement. Here we present a new emergent constraint on ECS that yields a central estimate of 2.8 degrees Celsius with 66 per cent confidence limits (equivalent to the IPCC ‘likely’ range) of 2.2-3.4 degrees Celsius. Our approach is to focus on the variability of temperature about long-term historical warming, rather than on the warming trend itself. We use an ensemble of climate models to define an emergent relationship between ECS and a theoretically informed metric of global temperature variability. This metric of variability can also be calculated from observational records of global warming, which enables tighter constraints to be placed on ECS, reducing the probability of ECS being less than 1.5 degrees Celsius to less than 3 per cent, and the probability of ECS exceeding 4.5 degrees Celsius to less than 1 per cent.

  3. Hypomorphic temperature-sensitive alleles of NSDHL cause CK syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W; Severson, Tesa M; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W; Kratz, Lisa E; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E; Merkens, Louise S; Michaud, Jacques L; Waters, Paula J; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I; Herman, Gail E; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I; Jones, Steven J M; Steiner, Robert D; Raymond, F Lucy; Marra, Marco A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2010-12-10

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension: an ambulatory care sensitive condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robin L; Chen, Guanmin; McAlister, Finlay A; Campbell, Norm R C; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Rabi, Doreen; Tu, Karen; Jette, Nathalie; Quan, Hude

    2013-11-01

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) represent an indirect measure of access and quality of community care. This study explored hospitalization rates for 1 ACSC, uncomplicated hypertension, and the factors associated with hospitalization. A cohort of patients with incident hypertension, and their covariates, was defined using validated case definitions applied to International Classification of Disease administrative health data in 4 Canadian provinces between fiscal years 1997 and 2004. We applied the Canadian Institute for Health Information's case definition to detect all patients who had an ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension. We employed logistic regression to assess factors associated with an ACSC hospitalization for uncomplicated hypertension. The overall rate of hospitalizations for uncomplicated hypertension in the 4 provinces was 3.7 per 1000 hypertensive patients. The risk-adjusted rate was lowest among those in an urban setting (2.6 per 1000; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-2.7), the highest income quintile (3.4 per 1000; 95% CI, 2.8-4.2), and those with no comorbidities (3.6 per 1000; 95% CI, 3.2-3.9). Overall, Newfoundland had the highest adjusted rate (5.7 per 1000; 95% CI, 4.9-6.7), and British Columbia had the lowest (3.7 per 1000; 95% CI, 3.4-4.2). The adjusted rate declined from 5.9 per 1000 in 1997 to 3.7 per 1000 in 2004. We found that the rate of hospitalizations for uncomplicated hypertension has decreased over time, which might reflect improvements in community care. Geographic variations in the rate of hospitalizations indicate disparity among the provinces and those residing in rural regions. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensitivity of glaciation in the arid subtropical Andes to changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, L. J.; Galewsky, J.; Rupper, S.; Ward, D. J.

    2018-04-01

    The subtropical Andes (18.5-27 °S) have been glaciated in the past, but are presently glacier-free. We use idealized model experiments to quantify glacier sensitivity to changes in climate in order to investigate the climatic drivers of past glaciations. We quantify the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) sensitivity (the change in ELA per change in climate) to temperature, precipitation, and shortwave radiation for three distinct climatic regions in the subtropical Andes. We find that in the western cordillera, where conditions are hyper-arid with the highest solar radiation on Earth, ELA sensitivity is as high as 34 m per % increase in precipitation, and 70 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. This is compared with the eastern cordillera, where precipitation is the highest of the three regions, and ELA sensitivity is only 10 m per % increase in precipitation, and 25 m per % decrease in shortwave radiation. The high ELA sensitivity to shortwave radiation highlights the influence of radiation on mass balance of high elevation and low-latitude glaciers. We also consider these quantified ELA sensitivities in context of previously dated glacial deposits from the regions. Our results suggest that glaciation of the humid eastern cordillera was driven primarily by lower temperatures, while glaciations of the arid Altiplano and western cordillera were also influenced by increases in precipitation and decreases in shortwave radiation. Using paleoclimate records from the timing of glaciation, we find that glaciation of the hyper-arid western cordillera can be explained by precipitation increases of 90-160% (1.9-2.6× higher than modern), in conjunction with associated decreases in shortwave radiation of 7-12% and in temperature of 3.5 °C.

  6. Apomorphine conditioning and sensitization: the paired/unpaired treatment order as a new major determinant of drug conditioned and sensitization effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Liana Wermelinger; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2010-09-01

    Repeated treatments with psychostimulant drugs generate behavioral sensitization. In the present study we employed a paired/unpaired protocol to assess the effects of repeated apomorphine (2.0 mg/kg) treatments upon locomotion behavior. In the first experiment we assessed the effects of conditioning upon apomorphine sensitization. Neither the extinction of the conditioned response nor a counter-conditioning procedure in which we paired an inhibitory treatment (apomorphine 0.05 mg/kg) with the previously established conditioned stimulus modified the sensitization response. In the second experiment, we administered the paired/unpaired protocol in two phases. In the second phase, we reversed the paired/unpaired protocol. Following the first phase, the paired group alone exhibited conditioned locomotion in the vehicle test and a sensitization response. In the second phase, the initial unpaired group which received 5 paired apomorphine trials during the reversal phase did not develop a conditioned response but developed a potentiated sensitization response. This disassociation of the conditioned response from the sensitization response is attributed to an apomorphine anti-habituation effect that can generate a false positive Pavlovian conditioned response effect. The potentiated sensitization response induced by the treatment reversal protocol points to an important role for the sequential experience of the paired/unpaired protocol in behavioral sensitization. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  8. Sensitivity study and functionalization of cross section to fuel and moderator temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Song, Jae Seung; Cho, Young Chul

    1995-11-01

    A reactor core neutronics code MASTER is under development as a part of Korean Core Design System ADONIS. MASTER solves two-group three-dimensional; neutron diffusion equation which requires fuel assembly-wise group constants, to calculate the neutron flux distribution in the core. The group constants are obtained from the fuel assembly multi-group neutron transport calculation, and inputted as functions of the core operating condition. The functionalization of the group constant requires sensitivity analysis to various core operating conditions. In this report, the sensitivity of group constant to fuel and moderator temperature were analyzed. Lumped higher order macroscopic cross section derivative method was developed to reduce the computer memory and the number of floating point operations to treat group constants in MASTER. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 2 refs. (Author) .new

  9. Human body temperature and new approaches to constructing temperature-sensitive bacterial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Matthew D; Bosio, Catharine M; Duplantis, Barry N; Nano, Francis E

    2011-09-01

    Many of the live human and animal vaccines that are currently in use are attenuated by virtue of their temperature-sensitive (TS) replication. These vaccines are able to function because they can take advantage of sites in mammalian bodies that are cooler than the core temperature, where TS vaccines fail to replicate. In this article, we discuss the distribution of temperature in the human body, and relate how the temperature differential can be exploited for designing and using TS vaccines. We also examine how one of the coolest organs of the body, the skin, contains antigen-processing cells that can be targeted to provoke the desired immune response from a TS vaccine. We describe traditional approaches to making TS vaccines, and highlight new information and technologies that are being used to create a new generation of engineered TS vaccines. We pay particular attention to the recently described technology of substituting essential genes from Arctic bacteria for their homologues in mammalian pathogens as a way of creating TS vaccines.

  10. Simulation of temperature conditions on APT of HMA mixes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJVDM

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available between these APT data and practical application of the outcomes of the tests. The paper starts with general background on the effect of temperature on the loading conditions and response of HMA materials, methods to manage it during APT testing...

  11. Performance of solar collectors under low temperature conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunea, Mircea; Eicher, Sara; Hildbrand, Catherine

    The performance of four solar thermal collectors (flat plate, evacuated tube, unglazed with rear insulation and unglazed without rear insulation) was experimentally measured and simulated for temperatures below ambient. The influence of several parameters (e.g. collector inlet temperature, air...... evaluated and results compared to experimental measurements. A mathematical model is also under development to include, in addition to the condensation phenomena, the frost, the rain and the long-wave radiation gains/losses on the rear of the solar collector. While the potential gain from rain was estimated...... to be around 2%, frost heat gains were measured to be up to 40% per day, under specific conditions. Overall, results have shown that unglazed collectors are more efficient than flat plate or evacuated tube collectors at low operation temperatures or for night conditions, making them more suitable for heat pump...

  12. A High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor with an Integrated Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of a high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor with an integrated signal-conditioning circuit, which consists of an encapsulated pressure-sensitive chip, a temperature compensation circuit and a signal-conditioning circuit. A silicon on insulation (SOI material and a standard MEMS process are used in the pressure-sensitive chip fabrication, and high-temperature electronic components are adopted in the temperature-compensation and signal-conditioning circuits. The entire pressure sensor achieves a hermetic seal and can be operated long-term in the range of −50 °C to 220 °C. Unlike traditional pressure sensor output voltage ranges (in the dozens to hundreds of millivolts, the output voltage of this sensor is from 0 V to 5 V, which can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and measurement accuracy in practical applications of long-term transmission based on experimental verification. Furthermore, because this flexible sensor’s output voltage is adjustable, general follow-up pressure transmitter devices for voltage converters need not be used, which greatly reduces the cost of the test system. Thus, the proposed high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor with an integrated signal-conditioning circuit is expected to be highly applicable to pressure measurements in harsh environments.

  13. Soil warming increases metabolic quotients of soil microorganisms without changes in temperature sensitivity of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Soong, Jenniffer L.; Leblans, Niki I. W.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Dauwe, Steven; Fransen, Erik; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2017-04-01

    Increasing temperatures can accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and release large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, potentially inducing climate change feedbacks. Alterations to the temperature sensitivity and metabolic pathways of soil microorganisms in response to soil warming can play a key role in these soil carbon (C) losses. Here, we present results of an incubation experiment using soils from a geothermal gradient in Iceland that have been subjected to different intensities of soil warming (+0, +1, +3, +5, +10 and +20 °C above ambient) over seven years. We hypothesized that 7 years of soil warming would led to a depletion of labile organic substrates, with a subsequent decrease of the "apparent" temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. Associated to this C limitation and more sub-optimal conditions for microbial growth, we also hypothesized increased microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass), which is associated with increases in the relative amount of C invested into catabolic pathways along the warming gradient. Soil respiration and basal respiration rates decreased with soil warming intensity, in parallel with a decline in soil C availability. Contrasting to our first hypothesis, we did not detect changes in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration with soil warming or on the availability of nutrients and of labile C substrates at the time of incubation. However, in agreement to our second hypothesis, microbial metabolic quotients (soil respiration per unit of microbial biomass) increased at warmer temperatures, while the C retained in biomass decreased as substrate became limiting. Long-term (7 years) temperature increases thus triggered a change in the metabolic functioning of the soil microbial communities towards increasing energy costs for maintenance or resource acquisition, thereby lowering the capacity of C retention and stabilization of warmed soils. These results highlight the need

  14. Nuclear Fuel Fretting Mechanisms in a Room Temperature Unlubricated Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Hyung Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Recently, efforts for evaluating the fretting wear mechanism have been carried out by many researchers in various conditions. In an unlubricated condition, especially, effects of a wear debris and/or its layer on the fretting wear behavior were proposed that the formation of a well-developed glaze layer has a beneficial effect for decreasing a friction coefficient. Otherwise, a wear rate was accelerated by a third-body abrasion. At this time, it is well known that wear debris behaviors are affected by test variables such as a temperature, environment, material characteristics, etc. In a nuclear fuel fretting, however, its contact condition is quite different when compared with general fretting wear studies and could be summarized as the following; first, a fuel rod is supported by spacer grid springs and dimples that were elastically deformable. This results in a unique friction loop and a different fretting mechanism when a fuel rod is vibrated due to a flow-induced vibration (FIV). Next, it is possible that some region of the wear scar area with a specific spring shape condition could be hidden due to different wear debris behavior. So, some of the wear debris layers could be found on the worn surfaces in previous studies even though fretting wear tests were performed in a water lubricated condition. Finally, initial contact condition could be changed both an actual operating condition in power plants (i.e. high temperature and pressurized water (HTHP) under severe irradiation conditions) and the fretting wear tests for evaluating the wear resistant spring in lab conditions (i.e. from room temperature to HTHP without irradiation conditions) due to material degradations and the formation of the wear scar, respectively. In summary, the spring shape effect and the variation of the contact condition with increasing fretting cycle should be evaluated in order to improve the wear resistance of the spacer grid spring. So, in this study, fretting wear tests have been

  15. Temperature sensitivity of the penicillin-induced autolysis mechanism in nongrowing cultures of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kusser, W; Ishiguro, E E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the ampicillin-induced autolysis of nongrowing Escherichia coli was determined. The autolysis mechanisms in amino acid-deprived relA mutant cells treated with chloramphenicol were temperature sensitive. This temperature-sensitive autolysis was demonstrated in three independent ways: turbidimetric determinations, viable cell counts, and solubilization of radiolabeled peptidoglycan.

  16. Influence of temperature on the formation and encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using a temperature-sensitive template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Peter Bengzon Tan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article describes the synthesis of temperature-sensitive and amine-rich microgel particle as a dual reductant and template to generate smart gold/polymer nanocomposite particle. TEM images illustrate the influence of reaction temperature on the formation and in-site encapsulation of gold nanoparticles using the temperature-sensitive microgel template. Thermal stability of the resultant gold/polymer composite particles was also examined.

  17. Shrub encroachment alters sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Jessica M.; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Ogle, Kiona; Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell; Scott, Russell L.; Williams, David G.; Huxman, Travis E.

    2012-03-01

    A greater abundance of shrubs in semiarid grasslands affects the spatial patterns of soil temperature, moisture, and litter, resulting in fertile islands with potentially enhanced soil metabolic activity. The goal of this study was to quantify the microsite specificity of soil respiration in a semiarid riparian ecosystem experiencing shrub encroachment. We quantified the response of soil respiration to different microsite conditions created by big mesquite shrubs (near the trunk and the canopy edge), medium-sized mesquite, sacaton bunchgrasses, and open spaces. We hypothesized that soil respiration would be more temperature sensitive and less moisture sensitive and have a greater magnitude in shrub microsites compared with grass and open microsites. Field and incubation soil respiration data were simultaneously analyzed in a Bayesian framework to quantify the microsite-specific temperature and moisture sensitivities and magnitude of respiration. The analysis showed that shrub expansion increases the heterogeneity of respiration. Respiration has greater temperature sensitivity near the shrub canopy edge, and respiration rates are higher overall under big mesquite compared with those of the other microsites. Respiration in the microsites beneath medium-sized mesquites does not behave like a downscaled version of big mesquite microsites. The grass microsites show more similarity to big mesquite microsites than medium-sized shrubs. This study shows there can be a great deal of fine-scale spatial heterogeneity that accompanies shifts in vegetation structure. Such complexity presents a challenge in scaling soil respiration fluxes to the landscape for systems experiencing shrub encroachment, but quantifying this complexity is significantly important in determining overall ecosystem metabolic behavior.

  18. Differential Search Coils Based Magnetometers: Conditioning, Magnetic Sensitivity, Spatial Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timofeeva Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical and experimental comparison of optimized search coils based magnetometers, operating either in the Flux mode or in the classical Lenz-Faraday mode, is presented. The improvements provided by the Flux mode in terms of bandwidth and measuring range of the sensor are detailed. Theory, SPICE model and measurements are in good agreement. The spatial resolution of the sensor is studied which is an important parameter for applications in non destructive evaluation. A general expression of the magnetic sensitivity of search coils sensors is derived. Solutions are proposed to design magnetometers with reduced weight and volume without degrading the magnetic sensitivity. An original differential search coil based magnetometer, made of coupled coils, operating in flux mode and connected to a differential transimpedance amplifier is proposed. It is shown that this structure is better in terms of volume occupancy than magnetometers using two separated coils without any degradation in magnetic sensitivity. Experimental results are in good agreement with calculations.

  19. Study on Hydroforming of Magnesium Alloy Tube under Temperature Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinsong; Wang, Shouren; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Gaoqi; Guo, Peiquan; Qiao, Yang

    2018-01-01

    First of all, under 100 °C, 150 °C, 200 °C, 250 °C, 300 °C and 350 °C, respectively do the test of magnesium alloy AZ31B temperature tensile and the fracture of SEM electron microscopic scanning, studying the plastic forming ability under six different temperature. Secondly, observe and study the real stress-strain curves and fracture topography. Through observation and research can concluded that with the increase of temperature, the yield strength and tensile strength of AZ31B was increased, and the elongation rate and the plastic deformation capacity are increased obviously. Taking into account the actual production, energy consumption, and mold temperature resistance, 250 °Cwas the best molding temperature. Finally, under the temperature condition of 250 °C, the finite element simulation and simulation of magnesium alloy profiled tube were carried out by Dynaform, and the special wall and forming limit diagram of magnesium alloy were obtained. According to the forming wall thickness and forming limit diagram, the molding experiment can be optimized continuously.

  20. Uncertainty of Wheat Water Use: Simulated Patterns and Sensitivity to Temperature and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarano, Davide; Roetter, Reimund P.; Asseng, Senthold; Ewert, Frank; Wallach, Daniel; Martre, Pierre; Hatfield, Jerry L.; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Ruane, Alex C.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Projected global warming and population growth will reduce future water availability for agriculture. Thus, it is essential to increase the efficiency in using water to ensure crop productivity. Quantifying crop water use (WU; i.e. actual evapotranspiration) is a critical step towards this goal. Here, sixteen wheat simulation models were used to quantify sources of model uncertainty and to estimate the relative changes and variability between models for simulated WU, water use efficiency (WUE, WU per unit of grain dry mass produced), transpiration efficiency (Teff, transpiration per kg of unit of grain yield dry mass produced), grain yield, crop transpiration and soil evaporation at increased temperatures and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). The greatest uncertainty in simulating water use, potential evapotranspiration, crop transpiration and soil evaporation was due to differences in how crop transpiration was modelled and accounted for 50 of the total variability among models. The simulation results for the sensitivity to temperature indicated that crop WU will decline with increasing temperature due to reduced growing seasons. The uncertainties in simulated crop WU, and in particularly due to uncertainties in simulating crop transpiration, were greater under conditions of increased temperatures and with high temperatures in combination with elevated atmospheric [CO2] concentrations. Hence the simulation of crop WU, and in particularly crop transpiration under higher temperature, needs to be improved and evaluated with field measurements before models can be used to simulate climate change impacts on future crop water demand.

  1. Accounting for the temperature conditions during deep prospecting hole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherban, A N; Cheniak, V P; Zolotarenko, U P

    1977-01-01

    A methodology is described for calculating and controlling the temperature in inclined holes in order to establish a non-steady-state heat exchange between the medium circulating in the hole, and the construction components and rock. In order to verify the proposed methodology, the temperature of the drilling fluid is measured directly during the drilling process using a specially-designed automatic device which is lowered into the hole with the drilling string and turned on automatically at a given depth. This device makes it possible to record the drilling fluid temperature on magnetic tape, and convert the sensor signals arriving from the drilling string and the annular space. A comparison of calculation and experimental data confirmed the sufficiently high accuracy of the methods for predicting the thermal conditions in drilling deep prospecting holes.

  2. Passive Wireless Temperature Sensors with Enhanced Sensitivity and Range, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal describes the development of passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) temperature sensors with enhanced sensitivity and detection range for NASA application...

  3. Estimation of thermal sensation during varied air temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, T; Tabuchi, R; Iwanaga, K; Harada, H; Kikuchi, Y

    1998-03-01

    Seven male students were exposed to four varied air temperature environments: hot (37 degrees C) to neutral (27 degrees C) (HN), neutral to hot (NH), cool (17 degrees C) to neutral (CN), and neutral to cool (NC). The air temperature was maintained at the first condition for 20 min, then was changed to the second condition after 15 min and was held there for 20 min. Each subject wore a T-shirt, briefs, trunks, and socks. Each sat on a chair and was continuously evaluated for thermal sensation, thermal comfort, and air velocity sensation. Some physiological and thermal parameters were also measured every 5 s during the experiment. The correlation between thermal sensation and skin temperature at 15 sites was found to be poor. The subjects felt much warmer during the rising phase of the air temperature (CN, NH) than during the descending phase (HN, NC) at a given mean skin temperature. However, thermal sensation at the same heat flux or at the same value of the difference between skin and air temperature (delta(Tsk - Ta)) was not so different among the four experimental conditions, and the correlation between thermal sensation and heat flux or delta(Tsk - Ta) was fairly good. The multiple regression equation of the thermal sensation (TS) on 15 sites of skin temperature (Tsk; degrees C) was calculated and the coefficient of determination (R*2) was found to be 0.656. Higher coefficients of determination were found in the equations of thermal sensation for the heat flux (H; kcal.m-2.h-1) at the right and left thighs of the subjects and on delta(Tsk - Ta) (degrees C) at 4 sites. They were as follows: TS = 2.04 - 0.016 Hright - 0.036 Hleft; R*2 = 0.717, TS = 1.649 + 0.013 delta(Tsk - Ta)UpperArm - 0.036 delta(Tsk - Ta)Chest - 0.223 delta(Tsk - Ta)Thigh-0.083 delta(Tsk - Ta)LowerLeg; R*2 = 0.752, respectively.

  4. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish (Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam

    2015-01-01

    provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish (Cheilodipterusquinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. Tpref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish...... than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns....

  5. Biofilm formation capacity of Salmonella serotypes at different temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Salmonella spp. are one of the most important agents of foodborne disease in several countries, including Brazil. Poultry-derived products are the most common food products, including meat and eggs, involved in outbreaks of human salmonellosis. Salmonella has the capacity to form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces. The biofilm formation process depends on an interaction among bacterial cells, the attachment surface and environmental conditions. These structures favor bacterial survival in hostile environments, such as slaughterhouses and food processing plants. Biofilms are also a major problem for public health because breakage of these structures can cause the release of pathogenic microorganisms and, consequently, product contamination. The aim of this study was to determine the biofilm production capacity of Salmonella serotypes at four different temperatures of incubation. Salmonella strains belonging to 11 different serotypes, isolated from poultry or from food involved in salmonellosis outbreaks, were selected for this study. Biofilm formation was investigated under different temperature conditions (37°, 28°, 12° and 3°C using a microtiter plate assay. The tested temperatures are important for the Salmonella life cycle and to the poultry-products process. A total of 92.2% of the analyzed strains were able to produce biofilm on at least one of the tested temperatures. In the testing, 71.6% of the strains produced biofilm at 37°C, 63% at 28°C, 52.3% at 12°C and 39.5% at 3°C, regardless of the serotype. The results indicate that there is a strong influence of temperature on biofilm production, especially for some serotypes, such as S. Enteritidis, S. Hadar and S. Heidelberg. The production of these structures is partially associated with serotype. There were also significant differences within strains of the same serotype, indicating that biofilm production capacity may be strain-dependent.

  6. Steel billet reheat simulation with growth of oxide layer and investigation on zone temperature sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, Satish Kumar; Srinivasan, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional heat conduction numerical model and simulation of steel billet reheating in a reheat furnace. The model considers the growth of oxide scale on the billet surfaces. Control-volume approach and implicit scheme of finite difference method are used to discretize the transient heat conduction equation. The model is validated with analytical results subject to limited conditions. Simulations are carried out for predictions of three-dimensional temperature filed in the billet and oxide scale growth on the billet surfaces. The model predictions are in agreement with expected trends. It was found that the effect of oxide scale on billet heating is considerable. In order to investigate the effect of zone temperatures on the responses, a parametric sensitivity subject to six responses of interest are carried out using analysis of mean approach. The simulation approach and parametric study presented will be useful and applicable to the steel industry.

  7. Applicability of low-melting-point microcrystalline wax to develop temperature-sensitive formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Kimura, Shin-Ichiro; Iwao, Yasunori; Itai, Shigeru

    2017-10-30

    Low-melting-point substances are widely used to develop temperature-sensitive formulations. In this study, we focused on microcrystalline wax (MCW) as a low-melting-point substance. We evaluated the drug release behavior of wax matrix (WM) particles using various MCW under various temperature conditions. WM particles containing acetaminophen were prepared using a spray congealing technique. In the dissolution test at 37°C, WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs whose melting was starting at approx. 40°C (Hi-Mic-1045 or 1070) released the drug initially followed by the release of only a small amount. On the other hand, in the dissolution test at 20 and 25°C for WM particles containing Hi-Mic-1045 and at 20, 25, and 30°C for that containing Hi-Mic-1070, both WM particles showed faster drug release than at 37°C. The characteristic drug release suppression of WM particles containing low-melting-point MCWs at 37°C was thought attributable to MCW melting, as evidenced by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Taken together, low-melting-point MCWs may be applicable to develop implantable temperature-sensitive formulations that drug release is accelerated by cooling at administered site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heightened fire probability in Indonesia in non-drought conditions: the effect of increasing temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kátia; Verchot, Louis; Baethgen, Walter; Gutierrez-Velez, Victor; Pinedo-Vasquez, Miguel; Martius, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    In Indonesia, drought driven fires occur typically during the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. This was the case of the events of 1997 and 2015 that resulted in months-long hazardous atmospheric pollution levels in Equatorial Asia and record greenhouse gas emissions. Nonetheless, anomalously active fire seasons have also been observed in non-drought years. In this work, we investigated the impact of temperature on fires and found that when the July-October (JASO) period is anomalously dry, the sensitivity of fires to temperature is modest. In contrast, under normal-to-wet conditions, fire probability increases sharply when JASO is anomalously warm. This describes a regime in which an active fire season is not limited to drought years. Greater susceptibility to fires in response to a warmer environment finds support in the high evapotranspiration rates observed in normal-to-wet and warm conditions in Indonesia. We also find that fire probability in wet JASOs would be considerably less sensitive to temperature were not for the added effect of recent positive trends. Near-term regional climate projections reveal that, despite negligible changes in precipitation, a continuing warming trend will heighten fire probability over the next few decades especially in non-drought years. Mild fire seasons currently observed in association with wet conditions and cool temperatures will become rare events in Indonesia.

  9. valuation of Germination Characteristics for Hedysarum Criniferum Boiss in Alternative Temperature and Drought Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahbazi

    2016-05-01

    24-26 °C day-night and four drought levels (0, -2, -4, and -6 bar with three replications. According to the results, different levels of drought stress and alternative temperature had significant effects on germination percentage and germination speed of the species seeds (α=5%. The study showed that increasing temperature and drought levels leads to reducing the germination percentage and germination speed of the species. Higher germination percentage of H. criniferum seeds in different drought levels compared to alternative temperature levels of 24-26 °C indicated that this species is more sensitive to higher temperature than high levels of drought condition. Therefore, it could partly be concluded that the H. criniferum is a relatively drought resistance species.

  10. Sensitivity of grounding line dynamics to basal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardini, O.; Brondex, J.; Chauveau, G.; Gillet-chaulet, F.; Durand, G.

    2017-12-01

    In the context of a warming climate, the dynamical contribution of Antarctica to future sea level rise is still tainted by high uncertainties. Among the processes entering these uncertainties is the link between basal hydrology, friction and grounding line dynamics. Recent works have shown how sensitive is the response of the grounding line retreat to the choice of the form of the friction law. Indeed, starting from the same initial state, grounding line retreat rates can range over almost two orders of magnitude depending on the friction law formulation.Here, we use a phenomenological law that depends on the water pressure and allows a continuous transition from a Weertman-type friction at low water pressure to a Coulomb-type friction at high water pressure. This friction law depends on two main parameters that control the Weertman and Coulomb regimes. The range of values for these two parameters is only weakly physically constrained, and it can be shown that, for a given basal shear stress, different couples of parameters can conduct to the same sliding velocity. In addition, we show that close to the grounding line where basal water pressure is high, determining these two parameters might conduct to an ill-posed inverse problem with no solution.The aim of this presentation is to discuss a methodology to guide the choice of the two friction parameters and explore the sensitivity of the grounding line dynamics to this initial choice. We present results obtained both on a synthetic configuration used by the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison exercise and for the Amundsen sea sector using the experiments proposed by InitMIP-Antarctica, the first exercise in a series of ISMIP6 ice-sheet model intercomparison activities.

  11. Operant conditioning of enhanced pain sensitivity by heat-pain titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Susanne; Kleinböhl, Dieter; Klossika, Iris; Hölzl, Rupert

    2008-11-15

    Operant conditioning mechanisms have been demonstrated to be important in the development of chronic pain. Most experimental studies have investigated the operant modulation of verbal pain reports with extrinsic reinforcement, such as verbal reinforcement. Whether this reflects actual changes in the subjective experience of the nociceptive stimulus remained unclear. This study replicates and extends our previous demonstration that enhanced pain sensitivity to prolonged heat-pain stimulation could be learned in healthy participants through intrinsic reinforcement (contingent changes in nociceptive input) independent of verbal pain reports. In addition, we examine whether different magnitudes of reinforcement differentially enhance pain sensitivity using an operant heat-pain titration paradigm. It is based on the previously developed non-verbal behavioral discrimination task for the assessment of sensitization, which uses discriminative down- or up-regulation of stimulus temperatures in response to changes in subjective intensity. In operant heat-pain titration, this discriminative behavior and not verbal pain report was contingently reinforced or punished by acute decreases or increases in heat-pain intensity. The magnitude of reinforcement was varied between three groups: low (N1=13), medium (N2=11) and high reinforcement (N3=12). Continuous reinforcement was applied to acquire and train the operant behavior, followed by partial reinforcement to analyze the underlying learning mechanisms. Results demonstrated that sensitization to prolonged heat-pain stimulation was enhanced by operant learning within 1h. The extent of sensitization was directly dependent on the received magnitude of reinforcement. Thus, operant learning mechanisms based on intrinsic reinforcement may provide an explanation for the gradual development of sustained hypersensitivity during pain that is becoming chronic.

  12. Effects of Soil Moisture on the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Heterotrophic Respiration: A Laboratory Incubation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiping; Hui, Dafeng; Shen, Weijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil heterotrophic respiration (Rh) is an important ecological model parameter and may vary with temperature and moisture. While Q10 generally decreases with increasing temperature, the moisture effects on Q10 have been controversial. To address this, we conducted a 90-day laboratory incubation experiment using a subtropical forest soil with a full factorial combination of five moisture levels (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% water holding capacity - WHC) and five temperature levels (10, 17, 24, 31, and 38°C). Under each moisture treatment, Rh was measured several times for each temperature treatment to derive Q10 based on the exponential relationships between Rh and temperature. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial community structure and soil nutrients were also measured several times to detect their potential contributions to the moisture-induced Q10 variation. We found that Q10 was significantly lower at lower moisture levels (60%, 40% and 20% WHC) than at higher moisture level (80% WHC) during the early stage of the incubation, but became significantly higher at 20%WHC than at 60% WHC and not significantly different from the other three moisture levels during the late stage of incubation. In contrast, soil Rh had the highest value at 60% WHC and the lowest at 20% WHC throughout the whole incubation period. Variations of Q10 were significantly associated with MBC during the early stages of incubation, but with the fungi-to-bacteria ratio during the later stages, suggesting that changes in microbial biomass and community structure are related to the moisture-induced Q10 changes. This study implies that global warming’s impacts on soil CO2 emission may depend upon soil moisture conditions. With the same temperature rise, wetter soils may emit more CO2 into the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. PMID:24647610

  13. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  14. Temperature sensitivity of the oxygenation reaction of stripped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -operativity (n) at all three experimental temperatures compared to L. capensis. The heat of oxygenation (",H) between 8"C (pH 7,63) and. 23"C (pH 7,49) calculated for L capensis haemoglobin (-56,3 kJ.mol ') exceeded that of C. gariepinus ...

  15. Low-temperature magnetic modification of sensitive biological materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, mar (2015), s. 184-188 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis * low-temperature magnetic modification * immobilized enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2015

  16. Mean versus extreme climate in the Mediterranean region and its sensitivity to future global warming conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeth, H.; Hense, A. [Meteorological Inst., Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The Mediterranean region (MTR) has been supposed to be very sensitive to changes in land surface and atmospheric greenhouse-gas (GHG) concentrations. Particularly, an intensification of climate extremes may be associated with severe socio-economic implications. Here, we present an analysis of climate mean and extreme conditions in this subtropical area based on regional climate model experiments, simulating the present-day and possible future climate. The analysis of extreme values (EVs) is based on the assumption that the extremes of daily precipitation and near-surface temperature are well fitted by the Generalized Pareto distribution (GPD). Return values of extreme daily events are determined using the method of L-moments. Particular emphasis is laid on the evaluation of the return values with respect to the uncertainty range of the estimate as derived from a Monte Carlo sampling approach. During the most recent 25 years the MTR has become dryer in spring but more humid especially in the western part in autumn and winter. At the same time, the whole region has been subject to a substantial warming. The strongest rainfall extremes are simulated in autumn over the Mediterranean Sea around Italy. Temperature extremes are most pronounced over the land masses, especially over northern Africa. Given the large uncertainty of the EV estimate, only 1-year return values are further analysed. During recent decades, statistically significant changes in extremes are only found for temperature. Future climate conditions may come along with a decrease in mean and extreme precipitation during the cold season, whereas an intensification of the hydrological cycle is predicted in summer and autumn. Temperature is predominantly affected over the Iberian Peninsula and the eastern part of the MTR. In many grid boxes, the signals are blurred out due to the large amount of uncertainty in the EV estimate. Thus, a careful analysis is required when making inferences about the future

  17. Oxygen sensitization of mammalian cells under different irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, C.C.; Michaels, H.B.; Gerweck, L.E.; Epp, E.R.; Peterson, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of the radiosensitivity of cultured CHO cells was examined in detail with particular attention paid to avoiding possible artifacts due to radiolytic oxygen depletion. Two methods of gas equilibration and irradiation were used. In the first approach, cells were irradiated with 50-kVp X rays in a thin-layer geometry which offered maximum interchange between the cells and the surrounding gas. The second technique employed 280-kVp X irradiation of cells under full-medium conditions with mechanical agitation to minimize the effect of radiochemical oxygen consumption by promoting rapid oxygen replenishment. With these techniques oxygen radiosensitization was clearly resolved at an oxygen concentration of 0.03% in the gas phase. The oxygen K curves measured by these two methods were similar in shape over a wide range of oxygen concentration

  18. Effect of solution treatment conditions on the sensitization of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOFEI YU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the impact of the conditions of solution treatment on the degree of sensitization (DOS of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304 was investigated in detail. The results derived from the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR test indicated that the DOS decreased as the solution treatment temperature and time increased. The reason for this was studied via the SEM morphologies and EDS results, which indicated that the grain size influenced the DOS. Furthermore, cellular automaton (CA was utilized to simulate grain growth, the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides and the three dimensional distribution of the chromium concentration, which vividly illuminated the effect of the grain size on the DOS and was in accordance with the experiment results.

  19. A Methodology for Modeling Confined, Temperature Sensitive Cushioning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    thickness of cushion T, and®- s temperature 0, and as a dependent variable, G, the peak acceleration. The initial model, Equation (IV-11), proved deficient ...k9) = TR * TCTH ALV(60) = Tk * TCTH AL2 V6)= Tk2 * FCTH V2 =TRk * TCrFH *AL V(6~3) =THZ * TC.TH AU! V(,34) =TRa * TCTH 141 Yj)=Tks * T(-Th * AL V(.4b

  20. Temperature-sensitive porous membrane production through radiation co-grafting of NIPAAm on/in PVDF porous membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qi; Zhu Zhiyong; Yang Xiaomin; Chen Xiliang; Song Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) monomer was grafted on and in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) micro-pore membrane by γ-irradiation. The influence of irradiation and reaction conditions on the grafting yield was investigated in detail. The chemical structure of NIPAAm-grafted PVDF (NIPAAm-g-PVDF) membrane was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectra measurements. The morphology of the sample surface as well as the cross-section before and after grafting was characterized by scanning electron microscope. The temperature sensitive properties of the membrane were monitored by measuring the conductance as well as the water flux through the sample thickness. The results show that the membrane exhibits clearly temperature-sensitive permeability to water as expected, i.e. the permeability of water changes dramatically as the temperature goes over the lower critical solution temperature of NIPAAm

  1. Further studies on a temperature-sensitive mutant of Escherichia coli with defective repair capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfiadakis, I.; Geissler, E.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1981-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive mutant of E. coli, WG24, was studied with respect to its sensitivity to photodynamic action, its capacity to perform host controlled reactivation, and its sensitivity to transduction at elevated temperatures. Mutant cells are much more sensitive than wild type cells to photodynamic action by thiopyronine and visible light at elevated temperatures. As well defined rec mutants, WG24 cells are less able to reactivate UV irradiated lambdac phages at elevated temperatures, while their ability to repair T1 phages is less impaired. Mutant cells cannot be transduced to T6 resistance at a detectable rate at elevated temperature. It is concluded, therefore, that some rec gene carries a ts mutation in this mutant. (author)

  2. Perovskite Nanoparticle-Sensitized Ga2O3 Nanorod Arrays for CO Detection at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Jan; Baltrus, John P; Gao, Haiyong; Ding, Yong; Nam, Chang-Yong; Ohodnicki, Paul; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2016-04-13

    Noble metal nanoparticles are extensively used for sensitizing metal oxide chemical sensors through the catalytic spillover mechanism. However, due to earth-scarcity and high cost of noble metals, finding replacements presents a great economic benefit. Besides, high temperature and harsh environment sensor applications demand material stability under conditions approaching thermal and chemical stability limits of noble metals. In this study, we employed thermally stable perovskite-type La(0.8)Sr(0.2)FeO3 (LSFO) nanoparticle surface decoration on Ga2O3 nanorod array gas sensors and discovered an order of magnitude enhanced sensitivity to carbon monoxide at 500 °C. The LSFO nanoparticle catalysts was of comparable performance to that achieved by Pt nanoparticles, with a much lower weight loading than Pt. Detailed electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggested the LSFO nanoparticle sensitization effect is attributed to a spillover-like effect associated with the gas-LSFO-Ga2O3 triple-interfaces that spread the negatively charged surface oxygen ions from LSFO nanoparticles surfaces over to β-Ga2O3 nanorod surfaces with faster surface CO oxidation reactions.

  3. A survey of new temperature-sensitive, embryonic-lethal mutations in C. elegans: 24 alleles of thirteen genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M O'Rourke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To study essential maternal gene requirements in the early C. elegans embryo, we have screened for temperature-sensitive, embryonic lethal mutations in an effort to bypass essential zygotic requirements for such genes during larval and adult germline development. With conditional alleles, multiple essential requirements can be examined by shifting at different times from the permissive temperature of 15°C to the restrictive temperature of 26°C. Here we describe 24 conditional mutations that affect 13 different loci and report the identity of the gene mutations responsible for the conditional lethality in 22 of the mutants. All but four are mis-sense mutations, with two mutations affecting splice sites, another creating an in-frame deletion, and one creating a premature stop codon. Almost all of the mis-sense mutations affect residues conserved in orthologs, and thus may be useful for engineering conditional mutations in other organisms. We find that 62% of the mutants display additional phenotypes when shifted to the restrictive temperature as L1 larvae, in addition to causing embryonic lethality after L4 upshifts. Remarkably, we also found that 13 out of the 24 mutations appear to be fast-acting, making them particularly useful for careful dissection of multiple essential requirements. Our findings highlight the value of C. elegans for identifying useful temperature-sensitive mutations in essential genes, and provide new insights into the requirements for some of the affected loci.

  4. Study on temperature sensitivity of topological insulators based on long-period fiber grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianhua; Zhao, Chenghai; Li, Jianbo; He, Mengdong

    2017-06-01

    Based on a long-period fiber grating, we conducted experimental research on the temperature sensitivity of topological insulators. The long-period fiber grating and topological insulators solution were encapsulated in a capillary tube using UV glue, and the temperature response was measured. Within a range of 35 to 75 centigrade, one resonance dip of a long-period fiber grating exhibits a redshift of 1.536 nm. The temperature sensitivity is about 7.7 times of an ordinary long-period fiber grating's sensitivity (0.005 nm/°C). A numerical simulation is also performed on the basis of the experiments.

  5. Fires in Non-drought Conditions in Indonesia: the Role of Increasing Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, K.; Verchot, L. V.; Baethgen, W.; Gutierrez-Velez, V.; Pinedo-Vasquez, M.; Martius, C.

    2017-12-01

    In Indonesia, drought driven fires occur typically during the warm phase of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), such as those of 1997 and 2015 that resulted in months-long hazardous atmospheric pollution levels in Equatorial Asia and record greenhouse gas emissions. Nonetheless, anomalously active fire seasons have also been observed in non-drought years. In this work, we investigated whether fires are impacted by temperature anomalies and if so, if the responses differ under contrasting precipitation regimes. Our findings show that when the July-October dry-season is anomalously dry, the sensitivity of fires to temperature anomalies is similar regardless of the sign of the anomalies. In contrast, in wet condition, fire risk increases sharply when the dry season is anomalously warm. We also present a characterization of near-term regional climate projections over the next few decades and the implications of continuing global temperature increase in future fire probability in Indonesia.

  6. Hydrothermal carbonization of biomass waste under low temperature condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putra Herlian Eriska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of banana peel for energy purposes was investigated. Banana peel is a lignocellulosic waste since it is the most widely produced and consumed fruit in Indonesia. Among the others, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC was chosen as alternative themochemical process, suitable for high moisture biomass. Through a 1 L stirred reactor, hydrothermal treatments were performed under low temperature condition (190, 210 and 230 °C, residence times (30 and 60 min, and biomass to water ratio (1:3, 1:5, and 1:10. Three of product were collected from the process with primary material balance. Solid phase (hydrochar was evaluated in terms of calorific value, proximate and ultimate analysis. The results suggested that the hydrothermal carbonization of banana peel gave high heating value (HHV of 20.09 MJ/kg for its char after dried naturally.

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy under ambient pressure and temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank Ogletree, D.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore D.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions of pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  8. Field Effect Devices Sensitive to CO at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo ARAG?N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available [5,10,15-Tris(2,6-dichlorophenylcorrolate] cobalt(III was used to chemisorb CO selectively, on the gap-gate of MOS capacitors and the state of charge monitored by voltage shifts of the photocurrent induced by pulsed illumination under constant D. C. bias, proportionally to CO concentration in air. Negative chemically induced charges at room temperature induce positive responses above and negative shifts below the threshold voltage, conforming to acceptor behavior, and the dynamic range (125 ppm is limited by the silicon doping concentration. The linear proportionality between CO concentration and surface charge (6.46[ppm.m2.µC-1] corresponds to the low concentration limit of the Langmuir isotherm. Sluggish CO desorption can be compensated by photo stimulation at 395 nm.

  9. Modeling FBG sensors sensitivity from cryogenic temperatures to room temperature as a function of metal coating thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendittozzi, Cristian; Felli, Ferdinando; Lupi, Carla

    2018-05-01

    Fiber optics with photo-imprinted Bragg grating have been studied in order to be used as temperature sensors in cryogenic applications. The main disadvantage presented by Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors is the significant drop in sensitivity as temperature decreases, mainly due to the critical lowering of the thermo-optic coefficient of the fiber and the very low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of fused silica at cryogenic temperatures. Thus, especially for the latter, it is important to enhance sensitivity to temperature by depositing a metal coating presenting higher CTE. In this work the thermal sensitivity of metal-coated FBG sensors has been evaluated by considering their elongation within temperature variations in the cryogenic range, as compared to bare fiber sensors. To this purpose, a theoretical model simulating elongation of metal-coated sensors has been developed. The model has been used to evaluate the behaviour of different metals which can be used as coating (Ni, Cu, Al, Zn, Pb and In). The optimal coating thickness has been calculated at different fixed temperature (from 5 K to 100 K) for each metal. It has been found that the metal coating effectiveness depends on thickness and operating temperature in accordance to our previous experimental work and theory suggest.

  10. Oxidation performance of high temperature materials under oxyfuel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuurna, Satu; Pohjanne, Pekka; Yli-Olli, Sanni; Kinnunen, Tuomo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    Oxyfuel combustion is widely seen as a major option to facilitate carbon capture and storage (CCS) from future boiler plants utilizing clean coal technologies. Oxyfuel combustion can be expected to differ from combustion in air by e.g. modified distribution of fireside temperatures, much reduced NOx but increased levels of fireside CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and water levels due to extensive flue gas recirculation. Modified flue gas chemistry results in higher gas emissivity that can increase the thermal stresses at the heat transfer surfaces of waterwalls and superheaters. In addition, increased flue gas recirculation can increase the concentration of a number of contaminants in the deposited ash and promote fouling and corrosion. There is relatively little experimental information available about the effects of oxyfuel combustion on the performance of boiler material. In this work, the oxidation performance of steels X20CrMoV11-1 and TP347HFG has been determined at 580 C/650 C under simulated oxyfuel firing conditions. The results are presented and compared to corresponding results from simulated air firing conditions. (orig.)

  11. Evaluating Weather Research and Forecasting Model Sensitivity to Land and Soil Conditions Representative of Karst Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Fan, Xingang; Mahmood, Rezaul; Groves, Chris; Polk, Jason S.; Yan, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Due to their particular physiographic, geomorphic, soil cover, and complex surface-subsurface hydrologic conditions, karst regions produce distinct land-atmosphere interactions. It has been found that floods and droughts over karst regions can be more pronounced than those in non-karst regions following a given rainfall event. Five convective weather events are simulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting model to explore the potential impacts of land-surface conditions on weather simulations over karst regions. Since no existing weather or climate model has the ability to represent karst landscapes, simulation experiments in this exploratory study consist of a control (default land-cover/soil types) and three land-surface conditions, including barren ground, forest, and sandy soils over the karst areas, which mimic certain karst characteristics. Results from sensitivity experiments are compared with the control simulation, as well as with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction multi-sensor precipitation analysis Stage-IV data, and near-surface atmospheric observations. Mesoscale features of surface energy partition, surface water and energy exchange, the resulting surface-air temperature and humidity, and low-level instability and convective energy are analyzed to investigate the potential land-surface impact on weather over karst regions. We conclude that: (1) barren ground used over karst regions has a pronounced effect on the overall simulation of precipitation. Barren ground provides the overall lowest root-mean-square errors and bias scores in precipitation over the peak-rain periods. Contingency table-based equitable threat and frequency bias scores suggest that the barren and forest experiments are more successful in simulating light to moderate rainfall. Variables dependent on local surface conditions show stronger contrasts between karst and non-karst regions than variables dominated by large-scale synoptic systems; (2) significant

  12. Modelling firn thickness evolution during the last deglaciation: constraints on sensitivity to temperature and impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bréant

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of snow into ice is a complex phenomenon that is difficult to model. Depending on surface temperature and accumulation rate, it may take several decades to millennia for air to be entrapped in ice. The air is thus always younger than the surrounding ice. The resulting gas–ice age difference is essential to documenting the phasing between CO2 and temperature changes, especially during deglaciations. The air trapping depth can be inferred in the past using a firn densification model, or using δ15N of air measured in ice cores. All firn densification models applied to deglaciations show a large disagreement with δ15N measurements at several sites in East Antarctica, predicting larger firn thickness during the Last Glacial Maximum, whereas δ15N suggests a reduced firn thickness compared to the Holocene. Here we present modifications of the LGGE firn densification model, which significantly reduce the model–data mismatch for the gas trapping depth evolution over the last deglaciation at the coldest sites in East Antarctica (Vostok, Dome C, while preserving the good agreement between measured and modelled modern firn density profiles. In particular, we introduce a dependency of the creep factor on temperature and impurities in the firn densification rate calculation. The temperature influence intends to reflect the dominance of different mechanisms for firn compaction at different temperatures. We show that both the new temperature parameterization and the influence of impurities contribute to the increased agreement between modelled and measured δ15N evolution during the last deglaciation at sites with low temperature and low accumulation rate, such as Dome C or Vostok. We find that a very low sensitivity of the densification rate to temperature has to be used in the coldest conditions. The inclusion of impurity effects improves the agreement between modelled and measured δ15N at cold East Antarctic sites during the last

  13. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally vali...

  14. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  15. The dependence of thermoluminescence sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation in meteorites and in terrestrial apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.A.; Al-Khalifa, I.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are reported on the TL sensitivity (i.e. TL glow output per unit γ ray test dose) of meteoritic specimens as well as terrestrial fluor- and chlor-apatites, as a function of irradiation temperature (T irr ). The irradiation temperatures ranged from liquid nitrogen to room temperature (77 - 293 K). A kilocurie 60 Co γ ray source was used to deliver test doses of 400 Gy (40 krad) and 40 (4 krad) to the various samples. A strong dependence of the TL sensitivity upon the temperature of irradiation was noted in the case of Kirin meteorite: its TL sensitivity (for the 493 K readout peak) decreased by a factor of ∼ 2 when T irr rose from liquid nitrogen (77 K) to dry ice in acetone (197 K) temperature, in the case of both 400 Gy and 40 Gy γ ray doses. In the case of the Antarctic meteorite specimen (ALHA 77182.13), there was a smaller effect, viz. a fall of ∼ 14% in the TL output corresponding to dry ice and higher irradiating temperatures as compared to the 77 K irradiation. For chlorapatite, the TL sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing temperature for both the 563 K and the 448 K glow peaks. For the fluorapatite, the effect of reduced response was observed only between -17 0 C (256 K) and room temperature (293 K). Both the theoretical and the practical implications of these observations are discussed. (author)

  16. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Mouse Hepatitis Virus Strain A59: Isolation, Characterization and Neuropathogenic Properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.M. Koolen (Marck); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G. van Steenis (Bert); M.C. Horzinek; B.A.M. van der Zeijst (Ben)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractTwenty 5-fluorouracil-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants of mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 were isolated from 1284 virus clones. Mutants were preselected on the basis of their inability to induce syncytia in infected cells at the restrictive temperature (40 degrees) vs the

  17. Sensitivity of summer stream temperatures to climate variability in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles Luce; Brian Staab; Marc Kramer; Seth Wenger; Dan Isaak; Callie McConnell

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the thermal response of streams to a warming climate is important for prioritizing native fish conservation efforts. While there are plentiful estimates of air temperature responses to climate change, the sensitivity of streams, particularly small headwater streams, to warming temperatures is less well understood. A substantial body of literature correlates...

  18. Ultra-sensitive quasi-distributed temperature sensor based on an apodized fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nazmi A; El Serafy, Hatem O

    2018-01-10

    This work targets a remarkable quasi-distributed temperature sensor based on an apodized fiber Bragg grating. To achieve this, the mathematical formula for a proposed apodization function is carried out and tested. Then, an optimization parametric process required to achieve the remarkable accuracy that is based on coupled mode theory (CMT) is done. A detailed investigation for the side lobe analysis, which is a primary judgment factor, especially in quasi-distributed configuration, is investigated. A comparison between elite selection of apodization profiles (extracted from related literatures) and the proposed modified-Nuttal profile is carried out covering reflectivity peak, full width half maximum (FWHM), and side lobe analysis. The optimization process concludes that the proposed modified-Nuttal profile with a length (L) of 15 mm and refractive index modulation amplitude (Δn) of 1.4×10 -4 is the optimum choice for single-stage and quasi-distributed temperature sensor networks. At previous values, the proposed profile achieves an acceptable reflectivity peak of 10 -0.426   dB, acceptable FWHM of 0.0808 nm, lowest side lobe maximum (SL max) of 7.037×10 -12   dB, lowest side lobe average (SL avg) of 3.883×10 -12   dB, and lowest side lobe suppression ratio (SLSR) of 1.875×10 -11   dB. These optimized characteristics lead to an accurate single-stage sensor with a temperature sensitivity of 0.0136 nm/°C. For the quasi-distributed scenario, a noteworthy total isolation of 91 dB is achieved without temperature, and an isolation of 4.83 dB is achieved while applying temperature of 110°C for a five-stage temperature-sensing network. Further investigation is made proving that consistency in choosing the apodization profile in the quasi-distributed network is mandatory. If the consistency condition is violated, the proposed profile still survives with a casualty of side lobe level rise of -73.2070  dB when adding uniform apodization and

  19. Overnight storage of whole blood: cooling and transporting blood at room temperature under extreme temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, L; Beauséjour, A; Jacques, A; Ducas, E; Tremblay, M

    2014-02-01

    Many countries allow the overnight storage of whole blood (WB) at ambient temperature. Some countries, such as Canada, also require a rapid cooling of WB with an active cooling system. Given the significant operational constraints associated with current cooling systems, an alternative method for cooling and transporting WB at 20-24°C was evaluated. Phase 22 cooling packs (TCP Reliable Inc., USA) were used in combination with vacuum-insulated panel (VIP) boxes. Temperature profiles of simulated WB units were studied in extreme temperatures (-35 and 40°C). The quality of blood components prepared using Phase 22 packs and CompoCool-WB (Fresenius HemoCare, Germany) was studied. Phase 22 packs reduced the temperature of simulated WB bags from 37 to 24°C in 1·7 ± 0·2 h. Used in combination with VIP boxes, Phase 22 packs maintain the temperature of bags between 20 and 24°C for 15 and 24 h, compared to 2 and 11 h with CompoCool-WB, when exposed at -35 and 40°C, respectively. The quality of platelet concentrates and plasma was comparable, regardless of the cooling system used. For red blood cell units, per cent haemolysis on day 42 was slightly higher in products prepared after cooling with Phase 22 packs compared to CompoCool-WB (0·33 ± 0·15% vs. 0·21 ± 0·06%; P environmental conditions. © 2013 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  20. Dye-sensitized solar cells with ZnO nanoparticles fabricated at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sungjae; Moon, Byungjoon; Son, Dongick [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Byoungwook; Choi, Wonkook [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The authors investigated the microstructural and the electrical properties of ZnO based dyesensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated using a low-temperature-processed(200 .deg. C) dye-sensitized ZnO-nanoparticle thin film and a Pt catalyst deposited on ITO/glass by using RF magnetron sputtering. A hydropolymer containing PEG (poly(ethylene glycol)) and PEO (poly ethylene oxide) was used to make uniformly-distributed ZnO nanoparticle layer that form a nano-porous ZnO network after heat treatment and was then dye sensitized and sandwiched between two electrodes in an electrolyte to make a DSSC device. The highest measured parameters, the short circuit current density (J{sub sc}), the open circuit potential(V{sub oc}), the fill factor(FF), and the power conversion efficiency (η), of the DSSC fabricated under optimized conditions were observed to be 4.93 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.56 V, 0.40, and 1.12%, respectively.

  1. Development of an ozone high sensitive sensor working at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, F; Ghaddab, B; Sanchez, J B; Mavon, C

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid SnO 2 /SWNTs thin layer were deposited by using sol-gel process. Such sensitive layers showed very high performances for O 3 flow detection at ambient temperature. Limit sensitivity, lower than 21,5 ppb of O 3 in air has been reached by using these hybrid layers. Compared to usefull metal oxide sensors, the main advantage of the use of such hybrid layers, is that these devices enable the detection of O 3 traces at room temperature. The influence of sensor's working temperature is discussed and finally a reactional mechanism for the detection of O 3 is proposed.

  2. Development and application of a species sensitivity distribution for temperature-induced mortality in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de P.; Tamis, J.E.; Murk, A.J.; Smit, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Current European legislation has static water quality objectives for temperature effects, based on the most sensitive species. In the present study a species sensitivity distribution (SSD) for elevated temperatures is developed on the basis of temperature sensitivity data (mortality) of 50 aquatic

  3. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures. © 2014 SETAC.

  4. Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive element of multifunctional sensor for measuring temperature, strain and magnetic field induction has been developed based on the studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of silicon and germanium microcrystals in the temperature range 4.2—70 K, strain ±1.5*10–3 rel.un. and magnetic fields of 0—14 T. The feature of the sensitive element is the using of the p- and n-type conductivity germanium microcrystals as mechanical and magnetic field sensors, respectively, and the p-type silicon microcrystal — as temperature sensor. That allows providing the compensation of temperature influence on piezoresistance and on sensitivity to the magnetic field.

  5. Classifying Multi-Model Wheat Yield Impact Response Surfaces Showing Sensitivity to Temperature and Precipitation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; hide

    2017-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in temperature (minus 2 to plus 9 degrees Centigrade) and precipitation (minus 50 to plus 50 percent). Model results were analysed by plotting them as impact response surfaces (IRSs), classifying the IRS patterns of individual model simulations, describing these classes and analysing factors that may explain the major differences in model responses. The model ensemble was used to simulate yields of winter and spring wheat at four sites in Finland, Germany and Spain. Results were plotted as IRSs that show changes in yields relative to the baseline with respect to temperature and precipitation. IRSs of 30-year means and selected extreme years were classified using two approaches describing their pattern. The expert diagnostic approach (EDA) combines two aspects of IRS patterns: location of the maximum yield (nine classes) and strength of the yield response with respect to climate (four classes), resulting in a total of 36 combined classes defined using criteria pre-specified by experts. The statistical diagnostic approach (SDA) groups IRSs by comparing their pattern and magnitude, without attempting to interpret these features. It applies a hierarchical clustering method, grouping response patterns using a distance metric that combines the spatial correlation and Euclidian distance between IRS pairs. The two approaches were used to investigate whether different patterns of yield response could be related to different properties of the crop models, specifically their genealogy, calibration and process description. Although no single model property across a large model ensemble was found to explain the integrated yield response to temperature and precipitation perturbations, the

  6. Influence of variation of etching conditions on the sensitivity of PADC detectors with a new evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechtner-Scharrer, A.; Mayer, S.; Boschung, M.; Whitelaw, A.

    2011-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institut, a personal neutron dosimetry system based on chemically etched poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) detectors and an automatic track counting (Autoscan 60) for neutron dose evaluations has been in routine use since 1998. Today, the hardware and the software of the Autoscan 60 are out of date, no spare components are available anymore and more sophisticated image-analysis systems are already developed. Therefore, a new evaluation system, the 'TASLIMAGE', was tested thoroughly in 2009 for linearity, reproducibility, influence of etching conditions and so forth, with the intention of replacing the Autoscan 60 in routine evaluations. The TASLIMAGE system is based on a microscope (high-quality Nikon optics) and an ultra-fast three-axis motorised control for scanning the detectors. In this paper, the TASLIMAGE system and its possibilities for neutron dose calculation are explained in more detail and the study of the influence of the variation of etching conditions on the sensitivity and background of the PADC detectors is described. The etching temperature and etching duration were varied, which showed that the etching conditions do not have a significant influence on the results of non-irradiated detectors. However, the sensitivity of irradiated detectors decreases by 5 % per 1 deg. C when increasing the etching temperature. For the variation of the etching duration, the influence on the sensitivity of irradiated detectors is less pronounced. (authors)

  7. Radiation sensitivities of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from chicken meat and their growth at refrigeration temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsojo; Banati, D.; Ito, H.

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes were isolated in 5 lots, more than one cell in each 25-g sample of 10 lots of chicken meat, which was obtained from several different areas in Japan. From taxonomic study, the psychrotrophic type of 3 isolates grew well at 4°C on Trypticase soy agar slant, whereas 2 isolates grew poorly. Cells of all isolates were sensitive to γ-irradiation in phosphate buffer, and the D 10 values obtained were 0.16 to 0.18 kGy under aerobic irradiation conditions similar to the values of salmonellae. In the chicken meat sample, the D 10 value obtained was 0.42 kGy the same value as in phosphate buffer under anaerobic irradiation conditions, and the necessary dose for inactivation of L. monocytogenes was estimated to be 2 kGy in raw chicken meat below 10 -4 CFU (colony forming unit) per gram. In the storage study of chicken meat which was inoculated with about 3×10 3 CFU per gram of L. monocytogenes, the psychrotrophic type of the isolates grew quickly at 7 to 10°C storage. However, a dose of 1 kGy was also effective to suppress the growth of L. monocytogenes at refrigeration temperatures below 10°C

  8. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  9. A temperature monitor circuit with small voltage sensitivity using a topology-reconfigurable ring oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Tadashi; Ishihara, Tohru; Onodera, Hidetoshi

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature monitor circuit that exhibits a small supply voltage sensitivity adopting a circuit topology of a reconfigurable ring oscillator. The circuit topology of the monitor is crafted such that the oscillation frequency is determined by the amount of subthreshold leakage current, which has an exponential dependence on temperature. Another important characteristic of the monitor is its small supply voltage sensitivity. The measured oscillation frequency of a test chip fabricated in a 65 nm CMOS process varies only 2.6% under a wide range of supply voltages from 0.4 to 1.0 V at room temperature. The temperature estimation error ranges from -0.3 to 0.4 °C over a temperature range of 10 to 100 °C.

  10. SENSITIVITY TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE RESEARCH OF TV-CAMERAS BASED ON SILICON MATRIXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey N. Starchenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The research is dedicated to the analysis of sensitivity change patterns of the cameras based on silicon CMOS-matrixes in various ambient temperatures. This information is necessary for the correct camera application for photometric measurements in-situ. The paper deals with studies of sensitivity variations of two digital cameras with different silicon CMOS matrixes in visible and near IR regions of the spectrum at temperature change. Method. Due to practical restrictions the temperature changes were recorded in separate spectral intervals important for practical use of the cameras. The experiments were carried out with the use of a climatic chamber, providing change and keeping the temperature range from minus 40 to plus 50 °C at a pitch of 10 о С. Two cameras were chosen for research: VAC-135-IP with OmniVision OV9121 matrix and VAC-248-IP with OnSemiconductor VITA2000 matrix. The two tested devices were placed in a climatic chamber at the same time and illuminated by one radiation source with a color temperature about 3000 K in order to eliminate a number of methodological errors. Main Results. The temperature dependence of the signals was shown to be linear and the matrixes sensitivities were determined. The results obtained are consistent with theoretical views, in general. The coefficients of thermal sensitivity were computed by these dependencies. It is shown that the greatest affect of temperature on the sensitivity occurs in the area (0.7–1.1 mkm. Temperature coefficients of sensitivity increase with the downward radiation wavelength increase. The experiments carried out have shown that it is necessary to take into account the changes in temperature sensitivity of silicon matrixes in the red and near in IR regions of the spectrum. The effect reveals itself in a clearly negative way in cameras with an amplitude resolution of 10-12 bits used for aerospace and space spectrozonal photography. Practical Relevance

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Heavy Fuel Oil Spray and Combustion under Low-Speed Marine Engine-Like Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available On account of their high power, thermal efficiency, good reliability, safety, and durability, low-speed two-stroke marine diesel engines are used as the main drive devices for large fuel and cargo ships. Most marine engines use heavy fuel oil (HFO as the primary fuel, however, the physical and chemical characteristics of HFO are not clear because of its complex thermophysical properties. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of fuel properties on the spray and combustion characteristics under two-stroke marine engine-like conditions via a sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity analysis of fuel properties for non-reacting and reacting simulations are conducted by comparing two fuels having different physical properties, such as fuel density, dynamic viscosity, critical temperature, and surface tension. The performances of the fuels are comprehensively studied under different ambient pressures, ambient temperatures, fuel temperatures, and swirl flow conditions. From the results of non-reacting simulations of HFO and diesel fuel properties in a constant volume combustion chamber, it can be found that the increase of the ambient pressure promotes fuel evaporation, resulting in a reduction in the steady liquid penetration of both diesel and HFO; however, the difference in the vapor penetrations of HFO and diesel reduces. Increasing the swirl flow significantly influences the atomization of both HFO and diesel, especially the liquid distribution of diesel. It is also found that the ambient temperature and fuel temperature have the negative effects on Sauter mean diameter (SMD distribution. For low-speed marine engines, the combustion performance of HFO is not sensitive to activation energy in a certain range of activation energy. At higher engine speed, the difference in the effects of different activation energies on the in-cylinder pressure increases. The swirl flow in the cylinder can significantly promote fuel evaporation and

  12. Effect of Propellant Composition to the Temperature Sensitivity of Composite Propellant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Amir; Mamat, Rizalman; Amin, Makeen; Wan Ali, Wan Khairuddin

    2012-01-01

    The propellant composition is one of several parameter that influencing the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant. In this paper, experimental investigation of temperature sensitivity in burning rate of composite propellant was conducted. Four sets of different propellant compositions had been prepared with the combination of ammonium perchlorate (AP) as an oxidizer, aluminum (Al) as fuel and hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as fuel and binder. For each mixture, HTPB binder was fixed at 15% and cured with isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). By varying AP and Al, the effect of oxidizer- fuel mixture ratio (O/F) on the whole propellant can be determined. The propellant strands were manufactured using compression molded method and burnt in a strand burner using wire technique over a range of pressure from 1 atm to 31 atm. The results obtained shows that the temperature sensitivity, a, increases with increasing O/F. Propellant p80 which has O/F ratio of 80/20 gives the highest value of temperature sensitivity which is 1.687. The results shows that the propellant composition has significant effect on the temperature sensitivity of composite propellant

  13. Boundary integral method to calculate the sensitivity temperature error of microstructured fibre plasmonic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hamid; Arzi, Ezatollah; Légaré, François; Hassani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, using the boundary integral method (BIM), we simulate the effect of temperature fluctuation on the sensitivity of microstructured optical fibre (MOF) surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. The final results indicate that, as the temperature increases, the refractometry sensitivity of our sensor decreases from 1300 nm/RIU at 0 °C to 1200 nm/RIU at 50 °C, leading to ∼7.7% sensitivity reduction and the sensitivity temperature error of 0.15% °C −1 for this case. These results can be used for biosensing temperature-error adjustment in MOF SPR sensors, since biomaterials detection usually happens in this temperature range. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our sensor decreases from 0.265 at 0 °C to 0.154 at 100 °C with the average reduction rate of ∼0.42% °C −1 . The results suggest that at lower temperatures the sensor has a higher SNR. (paper)

  14. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  15. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehem, Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara; de Oliveira, Maria Regina Fernandes; Ciosak, Suely Itsuko; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. The hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH) was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. There are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  16. Record of hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions: validation of the hospital information system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cristina Morais Santa Barbara Rehem

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to estimate the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of the Unified Health System's Hospital Information System for the appropriate recording of hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions. METHOD: the hospital information system records for conditions which are sensitive to ambulatory care, and for those which are not, were considered for analysis, taking the medical records as the gold standard. Through simple random sampling, a sample of 816 medical records was defined and selected by means of a list of random numbers using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. RESULT: the sensitivity was 81.89%, specificity was 95.19%, the positive predictive value was 77.61% and the negative predictive value was 96.27%. In the study setting, the Hospital Information System (SIH was more specific than sensitive, with nearly 20% of care sensitive conditions not detected. CONCLUSION: there are no validation studies in Brazil of the Hospital Information System records for the hospitalizations which are sensitive to primary health care. These results are relevant when one considers that this system is one of the bases for assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care.

  17. Amphetamine-induced sensitization and reward uncertainty similarly enhance incentive salience for conditioned cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike J F; Anselme, Patrick; Suchomel, Kristen; Berridge, Kent C

    2015-08-01

    Amphetamine and stress can sensitize mesolimbic dopamine-related systems. In Pavlovian autoshaping, repeated exposure to uncertainty of reward prediction can enhance motivated sign-tracking or attraction to a discrete reward-predicting cue (lever-conditioned stimulus; CS+), as well as produce cross-sensitization to amphetamine. However, it remains unknown how amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress interact with uncertainty in controlling CS+ incentive salience attribution reflected in sign-tracking. Here rats were tested in 3 successive phases. First, different groups underwent either induction of amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress, or else were not sensitized or stressed as control groups (either saline injections only, or no stress or injection at all). All next received Pavlovian autoshaping training under either certainty conditions (100% CS-UCS association) or uncertainty conditions (50% CS-UCS association and uncertain reward magnitude). During training, rats were assessed for sign-tracking to the CS+ lever versus goal-tracking to the sucrose dish. Finally, all groups were tested for psychomotor sensitization of locomotion revealed by an amphetamine challenge. Our results confirm that reward uncertainty enhanced sign-tracking attraction toward the predictive CS+ lever, at the expense of goal-tracking. We also reported that amphetamine sensitization promoted sign-tracking even in rats trained under CS-UCS certainty conditions, raising them to sign-tracking levels equivalent to the uncertainty group. Combining amphetamine sensitization and uncertainty conditions did not add together to elevate sign-tracking further above the relatively high levels induced by either manipulation alone. In contrast, repeated restraint stress enhanced subsequent amphetamine-elicited locomotion, but did not enhance CS+ attraction. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. A quantitative sensitivity analysis on the behaviour of common thermal indices under hot and windy conditions in Doha, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human thermal perception is best described through thermal indices. The most popular thermal indices applied in human bioclimatology are the perceived temperature (PT), the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), and the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). They are analysed focusing on their sensitivity to single meteorological input parameters under the hot and windy meteorological conditions observed in Doha, Qatar. It can be noted, that the results for the three indices are distributed quite differently. Furthermore, they respond quite differently to modifications in the input conditions. All of them show particular limitations and shortcomings that have to be considered and discussed. While the results for PT are unevenly distributed, UTCI shows limitations concerning the input data accepted. PET seems to respond insufficiently to changes in vapour pressure. The indices should therefore be improved to be valid for several kinds of climates.

  19. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutants of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triman, K; Becker, E; Dammel, C

    1989-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants have been isolated following hydroxylamine mutagenesis of a plasmid containing Escherichia coli rRNA genes carrying selectable markers for spectinomycin resistance (U1192 in 16 S rRNA) and erythromycin resistance (G2058 in 23 S rRNA). These antibiotic resistance....... The mutations were localized by in vitro restriction fragment replacement followed by in vivo marker rescue and were identified by DNA sequence analysis. We report here seven single-base alterations in 16 S rRNA (A146, U153, A350, A359, A538, A1292 and U1293), five of which produce temperature......-sensitive spectinomycin resistance and two that produce unconditional loss of resistance. In each case, loss of ribosomal function can be accounted for by disruption of base-pairing in the secondary structure of 16 S rRNA. For the temperature-sensitive mutants, there is a lag period of about two generations between...

  20. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam; Steffensen, John F.; Rummer, Jodie L.

    2015-12-01

    As global temperatures increase, fish populations at low latitudes are thought to be at risk as they are adapted to narrow temperature ranges and live at temperatures close to their thermal tolerance limits. Behavioural movements, based on a preference for a specific temperature ( T pref), may provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. T pref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish to behaviourally manipulate their thermal environment. Regardless of treatment temperature, fish preferred 29.5 ± 0.25 °C, approximating summer average temperatures in the wild. However, 32 °C fish moved more frequently to correct their thermal environment than 28 °C fish, and daytime movements were more frequent than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns.

  1. Metal-semiconductor interface in extreme temperature conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, L.P.; Erofeeva, I.A.; Vorobiev, Yu.V.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present an investigation of electrons' and phonons' temperatures in the volume of a semiconductor (or metal) sample and at the interface between metal and semiconductor. Two types of mismatch between electrons' and phonons' temperatures take place: at metal-semiconductor interfaces and in the volume of the sample. The temperature mismatch leads to nonlinear terms in expressions for heat and electricity transport. The nonlinear effects should be taken into consideration in the study of electrical and heat transport in composites and in electronic chips

  2. Effect of the temperature in the sensitivity of CaSO4: Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, P.R.; Alcantara, B.C.; Azorin, J.; Furetta, C.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity of a Tl material is one of the most important properties for dosimetry. This property is optimized by means of various processes such as the incorporation of different dopants into the matrix material, the application of certain doses of ionizing radiation and carefully controlled thermal treatments among others. Results obtained of studying the sensitivity of diverse preparations of CaSO 4 : Dy submitted different thermal treatments are presented. The material, which presented the highest sensitivity, was that one it was heated to 800 C during one hour. When the temperature was raised over this value it was observed that sensitivity drops again. In other hand, as the heating rate in lowing down, during the readout, the height of the glow curve decreases proportionally. The temperature of the maximum of the main peak also decreases. (Author)

  3. Phenotypic characterization of adenovirus type 12 temperature-sensitive mutants in productive infection and transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, S; Kimura, G

    1980-01-01

    Eleven temperature-sensitive mutants of adenovirus type 12, capable of forming plaques in human cells at 33 C but not at 39.5 C, were isolated from a stock of a wild-type strain after treatment with either nitrous acid or hydroxylamine. Complementation tests in doubly infected human cells permitted a tentative assignment of eight of these mutants to six complementation groups. Temperature-shift experiments revealed that one mutant is affected early and most of the other mutants are affected late. Only the early mutant, H12ts505, was temperature sensitive in viral DNA replication. Infectious virions of all the mutants except H12ts505 and two of the late mutants produced at 33 C, appeared to be more heat labile than those of the wild type. Only H12ts505 was temperature sensitive for the establishment of transformation of rat 3Y1 cells. One of the late mutants (H12ts504) had an increased transforming ability at the permissive temperature. Results of temperature-shift transformation experiments suggest that a viral function affected in H12ts505 is required for "initiation" of transformation. Some of the growth properties of H12ts505-transformed cells were also temperature dependent, suggesting that a functional expression of a gene mutation in H12ts505 is required to maintain at least some aspects of the transformed state.

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide alters the firing rates of hypothalamic temperature sensitive and insensitive neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Eleanor R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient hyperthermic shifts in body temperature have been linked to the endogenous hormone calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, which can increase sympathetic activation and metabolic heat production. Recent studies have demonstrated that these centrally mediated responses may result from CGRP dependent changes in the activity of thermoregulatory neurons in the preoptic and anterior regions of the hypothalamus (POAH. Results Using a tissue slice preparation, we recorded the single-unit activity of POAH neurons from the adult male rat, in response to temperature and CGRP (10 μM. Based on the slope of firing rate as a function of temperature, neurons were classified as either warm sensitive or temperature insensitive. All warm sensitive neurons responded to CGRP with a significant decrease in firing rate. While CGRP did not alter the firing rates of some temperature insensitive neurons, responsive neurons showed an increase in firing rate. Conclusion With respect to current models of thermoregulatory control, these CGRP dependent changes in firing rate would result in hyperthermia. This suggests that both warm sensitive and temperature insensitive neurons in the POAH may play a role in producing this hyperthermic shift in temperature.

  5. Resonance analysis of a high temperature piezoelectric disc for sensitivity characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N; Bond, Leonard J

    2018-07-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for high temperature (200 °C+) applications are a key enabling technology for advanced nuclear power systems and in a range of chemical and petro-chemical industries. Design, fabrication and optimization of such transducers using piezoelectric materials remains a challenge. In this work, experimental data-based analysis is performed to investigate the fundamental causal factors for the resonance characteristics of a piezoelectric disc at elevated temperatures. The effect of all ten temperature-dependent piezoelectric constants (ε 33 , ε 11 , d 33 , d 31 , d 15 , s 11 , s 12 , s 13 , s 33 , s 44 ) is studied numerically on both the radial and thickness mode resonances of a piezoelectric disc. A sensitivity index is defined to quantify the effect of each of the temperature-dependent coefficients on the resonance modes of the modified lead zirconium titanate disc. The temperature dependence of s 33 showed highest sensitivity towards the thickness resonance mode followed by ε 33 , s 11 , s 13 , s 12 , d 31 , d 33 , s 44 , ε 11 , and d 15 in the decreasing order of the sensitivity index. For radial resonance modes, the temperature dependence of ε 33 showed highest sensitivity index followed by s 11 , s 12 and d 31 coefficient. This numerical study demonstrates that the magnitude of d 33 is not the sole factor that affects the resonance characteristics of the piezoelectric disc at high temperatures. It appears that there exists a complex interplay between various temperature dependent piezoelectric coefficients that causes reduction in the thickness mode resonance frequencies which is found to be agreement in with the experimental data at an elevated temperature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of extreme precipitation events in the south-eastern Alpine forelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, Katharina; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2016-04-01

    factors leads to the urgent questions of what we might expect from future heavy precipitation, particularly summertime convective storms, and how the associated risks will change if the observed trends persist. Working on an event basis allows us to consider a robust diversity of indicators such as storm duration, total sums, and peak intensities of the individual rainfall events in our analysis. First results suggest that the temperature sensitivity of precipitation events in the study region generally rises in accordance with the CC rate, but rates diverge dependent on the spatio-temporal properties of the sampling. At high temperatures above about 25 °C, the heaviest events do not show increases beyond the CC rate, as have been reported in some other studies for temperatures below 25°C. This is likely due to limitations of moisture availability in hot summer conditions. Observations of relative humidity available for 77 out of the 188 stations used support this hypothesis. When events where humidity is well below saturation are excluded from the sample, quantile regression results show higher scaling rates. The preliminary findings underline the need for a more sophisticated analysis of the temperature-precipitation relationship especially in heterogeneous regions with complex terrain.

  7. Sensitive Indicators of Zonal Stipa Species to Changing Temperature and Precipitation in Inner Mongolia Grassland, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaomin; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Yuhui; Song, Xiliang

    2016-01-01

    Climate change often induces shifts in plant functional traits. However, knowledge related to sensitivity of different functional traits and sensitive indicator representing plant growth under hydrothermal change remains unclear. Inner Mongolia grassland is predicted to be one of the terrestrial ecosystems which are most vulnerable to climate change. In this study, we analyzed the response of four zonal Stipa species (S. baicalensis, S. grandis, S. breviflora, and S. bungeana) from Inner Mongolia grassland to changing temperature (control, increased 1.5, 2, 4, and 6°C), precipitation (decreased 30 and 15%, control, increased 15 and 30%) and their combined effects via climate control chambers. The relative change of functional traits in the unit of temperature and precipitation change was regarded as sensitivity coefficient and sensitive indicators were examined by pathway analysis. We found that sensitivity of the four Stipa species to changing temperature and precipitation could be ranked as follows: S. bungeana > S. grandis > S. breviflora > S. baicalensis. In particular, changes in leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio could account for 86% of the changes in plant biomass in the four Stipa species. Also these three measurements were more sensitive to hydrothermal changes than the other functional traits. These three functional indicators reflected the combination of plant production capacity (leaf area), adaptive strategy (root/shoot ratio), instantaneous environmental effects (specific leaf area), and cumulative environmental effects (leaf area and root/shoot ratio). Thus, leaf area, specific leaf area and root/shoot ratio were chosen as sensitive indicators in response to changing temperature and precipitation for Stipa species. These results could provide the basis for predicting the influence of climate change on Inner Mongolia grassland based on the magnitude of changes in sensitive indicators. PMID:26904048

  8. The observed sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, Phillip A; Janowiak, John; Smith, Thomas M; Sapiano, Mathew R P

    2010-01-01

    Climate models project large changes in global surface temperature in coming decades that are expected to be accompanied by significant changes in the global hydrological cycle. Validation of model simulations is essential to support their use in decision making, but observing the elements of the hydrological cycle is challenging, and model-independent global data sets exist only for precipitation. We compute the sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature using available global precipitation data sets and compare the results against the sensitivities derived from model simulations of 20th century climate. The implications of the results for the global climate observing system are discussed.

  9. Flux Balance Analysis of Escherichia coli under Temperature and pH Stress Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    important roles in specific conditions and are essential genes under those conditions. E. coli is a model organism, which is widely used. It can adapt to many stress conditions, including temperature, pH, osmotic, antibiotic, etc. Underlying mechanisms

  10. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  11. Influence of Temperature Variation on Optical Receiver Sensitivity and its Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Prokes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the influence of temperature variation on the sensitivity of an avalanche-photodiode-based optical receiver applied in the free space optical communication link is discussed. Communication systems of this type are exposed to a wide range of operating temperatures, which markedly affect many photodiode and preamplifier parameters. The paper presents a receiver sensitivity calculation, taking into consideration the temperature dependence of avalanche photodiode gain, excess noise factor, dark current and thermal noise of preamplifier resistances, and describes the compensation of temperature effects on photodiode gain based on a corresponding change in the reverse voltage applied to the diode. The calculations are demonstrated on the connection of a small-area silicon APD operating in the wavelength range from 820 to 1150 nm with a transimpedance preamplifier using a bipolar junction transistor.

  12. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Bohn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP. It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q and a species distribution index (ΩAWP. ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length. The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a

  13. Species composition and forest structure explain the temperature sensitivity patterns of productivity in temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Friedrich J.; May, Felix; Huth, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    Rising temperatures due to climate change influence the wood production of forests. Observations show that some temperate forests increase their productivity, whereas others reduce their productivity. This study focuses on how species composition and forest structure properties influence the temperature sensitivity of aboveground wood production (AWP). It further investigates which forests will increase their productivity the most with rising temperatures. We described forest structure by leaf area index, forest height and tree height heterogeneity. Species composition was described by a functional diversity index (Rao's Q) and a species distribution index (ΩAWP). ΩAWP quantified how well species are distributed over the different forest layers with regard to AWP. We analysed 370 170 forest stands generated with a forest gap model. These forest stands covered a wide range of possible forest types. For each stand, we estimated annual aboveground wood production and performed a climate sensitivity analysis based on 320 different climate time series (of 1-year length). The scenarios differed in mean annual temperature and annual temperature amplitude. Temperature sensitivity of wood production was quantified as the relative change in productivity resulting from a 1 °C rise in mean annual temperature or annual temperature amplitude. Increasing ΩAWP positively influenced both temperature sensitivity indices of forest, whereas forest height showed a bell-shaped relationship with both indices. Further, we found forests in each successional stage that are positively affected by temperature rise. For such forests, large ΩAWP values were important. In the case of young forests, low functional diversity and small tree height heterogeneity were associated with a positive effect of temperature on wood production. During later successional stages, higher species diversity and larger tree height heterogeneity were an advantage. To achieve such a development, one could plant

  14. Amphetamine-induced sensitization and reward uncertainty similarly enhance incentive salience for conditioned cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike J.F.; Anselme, Patrick; Suchomel, Kristen; Berridge, Kent C.

    2015-01-01

    Amphetamine and stress can sensitize mesolimbic dopamine-related systems. In Pavlovian autoshaping, repeated exposure to uncertainty of reward prediction can enhance motivated sign-tracking or attraction to a discrete reward-predicting cue (lever CS+), as well as produce cross-sensitization to amphetamine. However, it remains unknown how amphetamine-sensitization or repeated restraint stress interact with uncertainty in controlling CS+ incentive salience attribution reflected in sign-tracking. Here rats were tested in three successive phases. First, different groups underwent either induction of amphetamine sensitization or repeated restraint stress, or else were not sensitized or stressed as control groups (either saline injections only, or no stress or injection at all). All next received Pavlovian autoshaping training under either certainty conditions (100% CS-UCS association) or uncertainty conditions (50% CS-UCS association and uncertain reward magnitude). During training, rats were assessed for sign-tracking to the lever CS+ versus goal-tracking to the sucrose dish. Finally, all groups were tested for psychomotor sensitization of locomotion revealed by an amphetamine challenge. Our results confirm that reward uncertainty enhanced sign-tracking attraction toward the predictive CS+ lever, at the expense of goal-tracking. We also report that amphetamine sensitization promoted sign-tracking even in rats trained under CS-UCS certainty conditions, raising them to sign-tracking levels equivalent to the uncertainty group. Combining amphetamine sensitization and uncertainty conditions together did not add together to elevate sign-tracking further above the relatively high levels induced by either manipulation alone. In contrast, repeated restraint stress enhanced subsequent amphetamine-elicited locomotion, but did not enhance CS+ attraction. PMID:26076340

  15. Clusterin and chemotherapy sensitivity under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kevans, David

    2012-06-01

    In vitro studies have shown that clusterin modulates treatment sensitivity in a number of human cancers; however, the interaction between clusterin expression and hypoxia in controlling treatment response in CRC has not previously been examined. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clusterin overexpression in CRC cells on sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and FOLFOX treatment under normoxic and graded hypoxic conditions.

  16. IgE sensitization and sociodemographic conditions as determinant factors in asthma severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gaviria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Latin America there are few data about the factors that influence the control and severity of asthma. Objective: To describe the association between IgE sensitization to intra-home allergens and housing conditions in the severity of asthma. Methods: Sensitization to aero-allergens was evaluated by skin prick test and socio-demographic data by a questionnaire in a population between 6 and 14 years of age with diagnosis of asthma. Asthma control was measured according to spirometric results and to the application of the ACT (Asthma Control Test; the severity and symptom control was evaluated according to the GINA guideline. Results: A total of 150 resident patients from the Aburra Valley (Colombia were included. The median age of participants was 11 years, 95 (63.3 % male. 92 % of the patients resided in the urban area. Mite sensitization was the most prevalent in controlled and uncontrolled patients. Sensitization to cockroach and some poverty conditions were risk factors for asthma severity. Conclusion: Poverty conditions appear to favor the development of severe asthma and in turn IgE sensitization to cockroaches. This sensitization could serve as a biomarker of severity.

  17. Effect of cold work on low-temperature sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V. E-mail: vivkain@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Chandra, K.; Adhe, K.N.; De, P.K

    2004-09-01

    The effects of cold work and low-temperature sensitization heat treatment of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels have been investigated and related to the cracking in nuclear power reactors. Types 304, 304L and 304LN developed martensite after 15% cold working. Heat treatment of these cold worked steels at 500 deg. C led to sensitization of grain boundaries and the matrix and a desensitization effect was seen in 11 days due to fast diffusion rate of chromium in martensite. Types 316L and 316LN did not develop martensite upon cold rolling due to its chemical composition suppressing the martensite transformation (due to deformation) temperature, hence these were not sensitized at 500 deg. C. The sensitization of the martensite phase was always accompanied by a hump in the reactivation current peak in the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test, thus providing a test to detect such sensitization. It was shown that bending does not produce martensite and therefore, is a better method to simulate weld heat affected zone. Bending and heating at 500 deg. C for 11 days led to fresh precipitation due to increased retained strain and desensitization of 304LN due to faster diffusion rate of chromium along dislocations. The as received or solution annealed 304 and 304LN with 0.15% nitrogen showed increased sensitization after heat treatment at 500 deg. C, indicating the presence of carbides/nitrides.

  18. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration rates enhanced by microbial community response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhu, Kristiina; Auffret, Marc D; Dungait, Jennifer A J; Hopkins, David W; Prosser, James I; Singh, Brajesh K; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wookey, Philip A; Agren, Göran I; Sebastià, Maria-Teresa; Gouriveau, Fabrice; Bergkvist, Göran; Meir, Patrick; Nottingham, Andrew T; Salinas, Norma; Hartley, Iain P

    2014-09-04

    Soils store about four times as much carbon as plant biomass, and soil microbial respiration releases about 60 petagrams of carbon per year to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. Short-term experiments have shown that soil microbial respiration increases exponentially with temperature. This information has been incorporated into soil carbon and Earth-system models, which suggest that warming-induced increases in carbon dioxide release from soils represent an important positive feedback loop that could influence twenty-first-century climate change. The magnitude of this feedback remains uncertain, however, not least because the response of soil microbial communities to changing temperatures has the potential to either decrease or increase warming-induced carbon losses substantially. Here we collect soils from different ecosystems along a climate gradient from the Arctic to the Amazon and investigate how microbial community-level responses control the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. We find that the microbial community-level response more often enhances than reduces the mid- to long-term (90 days) temperature sensitivity of respiration. Furthermore, the strongest enhancing responses were observed in soils with high carbon-to-nitrogen ratios and in soils from cold climatic regions. After 90 days, microbial community responses increased the temperature sensitivity of respiration in high-latitude soils by a factor of 1.4 compared to the instantaneous temperature response. This suggests that the substantial carbon stores in Arctic and boreal soils could be more vulnerable to climate warming than currently predicted.

  19. Soil respiration sensitivities to water and temperature in a revegetated desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Dong, Xue-Jun; Xu, Bing-Xin; Chen, Yong-Le; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Yan-Hong; Hu, Yi-Gang; Huang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration in water-limited ecosystems is affected intricately by soil water content (SWC), temperature, and soil properties. Eight sites on sand-fixed dunes that revegetated in different years since 1950s, with several topographical positions and various biological soil crusts (BSCs) and soil properties, were selected, as well as a moving sand dune (MSD) and a reference steppe in the Tengger Desert of China. Intact soil samples of 20 cm in depth were taken and incubated randomly at 12 levels of SWC (0 to 0.4 m3 m-3) and at 9 levels of temperature (5 to 45°C) in a growth chamber; additionally, cryptogamic and microbial respirations (RM) were measured. Total soil respiration (RT, including cryptogamic, microbial, and root respiration) was measured for 2 years at the MSD and five sites of sand-fixed dunes. The relationship between RM and SWC under the optimal SWC condition (0.25 m3 m-3) is linear, as is the entire range of RT and SWC. The slope of linear function describes sensitivity of soil respiration to water (SRW) and reflects to soil water availability, which is related significantly to soil physical properties, BSCs, and soil chemical properties, in decreasing importance. Inversely, Q10 for RM is related significantly to abovementioned factors in increasing importance. However, Q10 for RT and respiration rate at 20°C are related significantly to soil texture and depth of BSCs and subsoil only. In conclusion, through affecting SRW, soil physical properties produce significant influences on soil respiration, especially for RT. This indicates that a definition of the biophysical meaning of SRW is necessary, considering the water-limited and coarse-textured soil in most desert ecosystems.

  20. Design of cross-sensitive temperature and strain sensor based on sampled fiber grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,a cross-sensitive temperature and strain sensor based on sampled fiber grating is designed.Its temperature measurement range is -50-200℃,and the strain measurement rangeis 0-2 000 με.The characteristics of the sensor are obtained using simulation method.Utilizing SPSS software,we found the dual-parameter matrix equations of measurement of temperature and strain,and calibrated the four sensing coefficients of the matrix equations.

  1. Characterization of the temperature-sensitive mutations un-7 and png-1 in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterle, Michael G; Wiest, Aric E; Plamann, Mike; McCluskey, Kevin

    2010-05-18

    The model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has been studied for over fifty years and many temperature-sensitive mutants have been generated. While most of these have been mapped genetically, many remain anonymous. The mutation in the N. crassa temperature-sensitive lethal mutant un-7 was identified by a complementation based approach as being in the open reading frame designated NCU00651 on linkage group I. Other mutations in this gene have been identified that lead to a temperature-sensitive morphological phenotype called png-1. The mutations underlying un-7 result in a serine to phenylalanine change at position 273 and an isoleucine to valine change at position 390, while the mutation in png-1 was found to result in a serine to leucine change at position 279 although there were other conservative changes in this allele. The overall morphology of the strain carrying the un-7 mutation is compared to strains carrying the png-1 mutation and these mutations are evaluated in the context of other temperature-sensitive mutants in Neurospora.

  2. Low temperature sensitization of austenitic stainless steel: an ageing effect during BWR service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Rastogi, P.K.; Kulkarni, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitization in austenitic stainless steel refers to chromium carbide precipitation at the grain boundaries with concomitant depletion of chromium below 12% near grain boundaries. This makes the material susceptible to either intergranular corrosion (IGC) or intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This effect is predominant whenever austenitic stainless steel is subjected to thermal exposure in the temperature range 723-1073K either during welding or during heat treatment. Low temperature sensitization (LTS) refers to sensitization at temperature below the typical range of sensitization i.e. 723-1073K. A prerequisite for LTS phenomenon is reported to be the presence of chromium carbide nuclei at the grain boundaries which can grow during boiling water reactor service even at a relatively lower temperature of around 560K. LTS can lead to failure of BWR pipe due to IGSCC. The paper reviews the phenomenological and mechanistic aspects of LTS. Studies carried out regarding effect of prior cold work on LTS are reported. Summary of the studies reported in literature to examine the occurrence of LTS during BWR service has also been included. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  3. Alginate microgels loaded with temperature sensitive liposomes for magnetic resonance imageable drug release and microgel visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Elk, Merel; Lorenzato, Cyril; Ozbakir, Burcin; Oerlemans, Chris; Storm, Gert; Nijsen, Frank; Deckers, Roel; Vermonden, Tina; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and characterize alginate microgels loaded with temperature sensitive liposomes, which release their payload after mild hyperthermia. It is further aimed that by using these microgels both the drug release and the microgel deposition can be visualized by

  4. Shrub encroachment alters sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature and moisture 2115

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrub encroachment into grasslands creates a mosaic of different soil microsites ranging from open spaces to well-developed shrub canopies, and it is unclear how this affects the spatial variability in soil respiration characteristics, such as the sensitivity to soil temperature and moisture. This i...

  5. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Structural Changes in Temperature-Sensitive Microgel Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.; Richtering, W.; Pedersen, J.S.; Lindner, P.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgels in dilute suspension was investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering. A direct modeling expression for the scattering intensity distribution was derived which describes very well the experimental data at all

  6. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  7. QTL mapping of inbreeding-related cold sensitivity and conditional lethality in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    of inbreeding-related and conditionally expressed lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. The lethal effect was triggered by exposure to a cold shock. We used a North Carolina crossing Design 3 to establish the mapping population, as well as to estimate the average dominance ratio and heritability. We found two......Inbreeding depression is a central theme within genetics, and is of specific interest for researchers within evolutionary and conservation genetics and animal and plant breeding. Inbreeding effects are thought to be caused by the joint expression of conditional and unconditional deleterious alleles....... Whenever the expression of deleterious alleles is conditional, this can result in extreme environmental sensitivity in certain inbred lineages. Analysis of conditional lethal effects can reveal some of the loci that are sensitive to inbreeding. We performed a QTL (quantitative trait locus) mapping study...

  8. Effect of soil moisture on the temperature sensitivity of Northern soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minions, C.; Natali, S.; Ludwig, S.; Risk, D.; Macintyre, C. M.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic and boreal ecosystems are vast reservoirs of carbon and are particularly sensitive to climate warming. Changes in the temperature and precipitation regimes of these regions could significantly alter soil respiration rates, impacting atmospheric concentrations and affecting climate change feedbacks. Many incubation studies have shown that both temperature and soil moisture are important environmental drivers of soil respiration; this relationship, however, has rarely been demonstrated with in situ data. Here we present the results of a study at six field sites in Alaska from 2016 to 2017. Low-power automated soil gas systems were used to measure soil surface CO2 flux from three forced diffusion chambers and soil profile concentrations from three soil depth chambers at hourly intervals at each site. HOBO Onset dataloggers were used to monitor soil moisture and temperature profiles. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) was determined at each site using inversion analysis applied over different time periods. With highly resolved data sets, we were able to observe the changes in soil respiration in response to changes in temperature and soil moisture. Through regression analysis we confirmed that temperature is the primary driver in soil respiration, but soil moisture becomes dominant beyond a certain threshold, suppressing CO2 flux in soils with high moisture content. This field study supports the conclusions made from previous soil incubation studies and provides valuable insights into the impact of both temperature and soil moisture changes on soil respiration.

  9. Greenland Regional and Ice Sheet-wide Geometry Sensitivity to Boundary and Initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, L. C.; Narayanan, S. H. K.; Greve, R.; Heimbach, P.

    2017-12-01

    Ice sheet and glacier model outputs require inputs from uncertainly known initial and boundary conditions, and other parameters. Conservation and constitutive equations formalize the relationship between model inputs and outputs, and the sensitivity of model-derived quantities of interest (e.g., ice sheet volume above floatation) to model variables can be obtained via the adjoint model of an ice sheet. We show how one particular ice sheet model, SICOPOLIS (SImulation COde for POLythermal Ice Sheets), depends on these inputs through comprehensive adjoint-based sensitivity analyses. SICOPOLIS discretizes the shallow-ice and shallow-shelf approximations for ice flow, and is well-suited for paleo-studies of Greenland and Antarctica, among other computational domains. The adjoint model of SICOPOLIS was developed via algorithmic differentiation, facilitated by the source transformation tool OpenAD (developed at Argonne National Lab). While model sensitivity to various inputs can be computed by costly methods involving input perturbation simulations, the time-dependent adjoint model of SICOPOLIS delivers model sensitivities to initial and boundary conditions throughout time at lower cost. Here, we explore both the sensitivities of the Greenland Ice Sheet's entire and regional volumes to: initial ice thickness, precipitation, basal sliding, and geothermal flux over the Holocene epoch. Sensitivity studies such as described here are now accessible to the modeling community, based on the latest version of SICOPOLIS that has been adapted for OpenAD to generate correct and efficient adjoint code.

  10. Weather/temperature-sensitive vasomotor rhinitis may be refractory to intranasal corticosteroid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert; Lieberman, Philip; Kent, Edward; Silvey, MaryJane; Locantore, Nicholas; Philpot, Edward E

    2009-01-01

    Vasomotor rhinitis (VMR) is a common but poorly understood disorder of which there are two major subgroups: VMR(w/t), triggered by weather/temperature and VMR(ir), triggered by airborne irritants. No specific biological pathways or specific treatments for VMR(w/t) or VMR(ir) have been identified. However, intranasal corticosteroids (INSs) are effective in treating many forms of nonallergic rhinitis that include these conditions. A recently introduced INS with established efficacy in allergic rhinitis and enhanced affinity, fluticasone furoate, may possess the potency and safety profile required to treat chronic VMR(w/t). Two replicate studies (FFR30006 and FFR30007) were conducted in six countries to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluticasone furoate nasal spray in subjects with VMR(w/t). After a 7- to 14-day screening period, subjects (n = 699) with symptomatic VMR(w/t) received fluticasone furoate, 110 mug q.d. or placebo for 4 weeks in these two randomized, double-blind, parallel-group studies. Subjects rated their nasal symptoms (congestion, rhinorrhea, and postnasal drip) twice daily on a 4-point categorical scale and evaluated their overall response to treatment at study end. Fluticasone furoate did not significantly improve daily reflective total nasal symptom scores, the primary end point, versus placebo (p = 0.259) and there was no improvement in any other measure of efficacy. The active treatment was well tolerated. Fluticasone furoate was not effective in treating subjects with a newly defined condition, weather-sensitive VMR. These unexpected results suggest that VMR(w/t) is a distinct subgroup of VMR that is refractory to treatment with INSs. Additional study of other treatments for VMR(w/t) (including INSs) is warranted.

  11. The Effect of Conditional Conservatism and Agency Cost on Investment-Cashflow Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bima Abdi Wibawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to give empirical evidence of the effect of conditional conservatism on company’s investment-cashflow sensitivity, and whether the impact is stronger in high agency cost firms compare to in low agency cost firms. This research uses dividend payout ratio to measure the agency cost because this study uses Indonesia as a research context where companies in Indonesia majority have concentrated ownership and funding through debt so that agency conflict that appears more dominant is the conflict of agency type two and three. This study uses the sample from manufacturing companies listed on Indonesia Stock Exchange during the period 2008-2012. The total observation in this research is 474 firm years, which 152 of the samples is classified as high agency cost firms and 322 sample as low agency cost firms. The result shows that as the recognition of economic losses becomes more timely, the sensitivity of firm investment to cashflow decreases. Conditional conservatism decreases investment-cashflow sensitivity in low agency cost firms but increases the sensitivity in high agency cost firms. In fact, before implementation of conditional conservatism, high agency cost firms have smaller investment cashflow sensitivity compared to the low agency cost one.

  12. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A. [Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Advanced Materials Group, International Specialty Products, Inc., Wayne, New Jersey 07470 (United States); Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density ({Delta}OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance ({lambda}{sub max}) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 degree sign C. The {Delta}OD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in {lambda}{sub max}. A compensation scheme using {lambda}{sub max} and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry.

  13. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  15. Contrasting effects of elevated CO2 and warming on temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a Chinese paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaozhi; Wang, Bingyu; Wang, Jinyang; Pan, Genxing; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-10-01

    Climate changes including elevated CO2 and temperature have been known to affect soil carbon (C) storage, while the effects of climate changes on the temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) are unclear. A 365-day laboratory incubation was used to investigate the temperature sensitivity for decomposition of labile (Q 10-L) and recalcitrant (Q 10-R) SOMs by comparing the time required to decompose a given amount of C at 25 and 35 °C. Soils were collected from a paddy field that was subjected to four treatments: ambient CO2 and temperature, elevated CO2 (500 μmol/mol), enhanced temperature (+2 °C), and their combination. The results showed that the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition increased with increasing SOM recalcitrance in this paddy soil (Q 10-L = 2.21 ± 0.16 vs. Q 10-R = 2.78 ± 0.42; mean ± SD). Elevated CO2 and enhanced temperature showed contrasting effects on the temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition. Elevated CO2 stimulated Q 10-R but had no effect on Q 10-L; in contrast, enhanced temperature increased Q 10-L but had no effect on Q 10-R. Furthermore, the elevated CO2 combined with enhanced temperature treatment significantly increased Q 10-L and Q 10-R by 18.9 and 10.2 %, respectively, compared to the ambient conditions. Results suggested that the responses of SOM to temperature, especially for the recalcitrant SOM pool, were altered by climate changes. The greatly enhanced temperature sensitivity of SOM decomposition by elevated CO2 and temperature indicates that more CO2 will be released to the atmosphere and losses of soil C may be even greater than that previously expected in paddy field.

  16. Surgical implantation of temperature-sensitive transmitters and data-loggers to record body temperature in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D; Johnston, S D; Beard, L; Nicholson, V; Lisle, A; Gaughan, J; Larkin, R; Theilemann, P; Mckinnon, A; Ellis, W

    2016-01-01

    Under predicted climate change scenarios, koala distribution in Australia is expected to be adversely affected. Recent studies have attempted to identify suitable habitat, based on models of bioclimatic regions, but to more accurately reflect the thermal tolerance and behavioural adaptations of the various regional populations, the koala's response to periods of heat stress will need to be investigated at the individual animal level. To explore the safety and suitability of temperature-sensitive intra-abdominal implants for monitoring core body temperature in the koala. A temperature-sensitive radio transmitter and thermal iButton data-logger, waxed together as a package, were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity of four captive koalas. In one animal the implant was tethered and in the other three, it was left free-floating. After 3 months, the implants were removed and all four koalas recovered without complications. The tethering of the package in the one koala resulted in minor inflammation and adhesion, so this practice was subsequently abandoned. The free-floating deployments were complication-free and revealed a diurnal body temperature rhythm, with daily ranges of 0.4-2.8°C. The minimum recorded body temperature was 34.2°C and the maximum was 37.7°C. The difference in the readings obtained from the transmitters and iButtons never exceeded 0.3°C. The suitability of the surgical approach was confirmed, from both the animal welfare and data collection points of view. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  17. Electrochemical polarization behavior of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushiya, K [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Sugimoto, K; Ejima, T

    1978-11-01

    Anodic polarization curves for a solution-treated or sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel and solution-treated Fe-Ni-Cr ternary alloys containing 10%Ni and 6 to 14%Cr have been measured in deaerated 0.5 mol/l Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions of pH 2.0 to 5.9 at 298, 523 and 553 K. Corrosion potentials for U-bend SCC test specimens of sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel have also been monitored for a long time in the same solutions as those used for the polarization measurements except that they were aerated. It was found that the differences in the current densities in the passive state, i sub(pass), between the solution treated steel and the sensitized one and also between the ternary alloy with higher Cr content and the one with lower Cr content become large with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. This means that the difference in the values of i sub(pass) between grain bodies and Cr-depleted zones along grain boundaries of sensitized steel becomes larger and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of the sensitized steel in the passivation region becomes higher with increasing temperature and decreasing pH. Since corrosion potentials for the U-bend SCC test specimens in air-satulated solutions lie in the passive region of anodic polarization curves for the sensitized steel in deaerated solutions, the intergranular stress-corrosion cracking of the sensitized steel in high temperature water with dissolved oxygen is considered to be caused by the preferential corrosion in the Cr-depleted zone.

  18. The tradeoff between signal detection and recognition rules auditory sensitivity under variable background noise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Marco

    2015-12-07

    Animal acoustic communication commonly takes place under masked conditions. For instance, sound signals relevant for mating and survival are very often masked by background noise, which makes their detection and recognition by organisms difficult. Ambient noise (AN) varies in level and shape among different habitats, but also remarkable variations in time and space occurs within the same habitat. Variable AN conditions mask hearing thresholds of the receiver in complex and unpredictable ways, thereby causing distortions in sound perception. When communication takes place in a noisy environment, a highly sensitive system might confer no advantage to the receiver compared to a less sensitive one. The effects of noise masking on auditory thresholds and hearing-related functions are well known, and the potential role of AN in the evolution of the species' auditory sensitivity has been recognized by few authors. The mechanism of the underlying selection process has never been explored, however. Here I present a simple fitness model that seeks for the best sensitivity of a hearing system performing the detection and recognition of the sound under variable AN conditions. The model predicts higher sensitivity (i.e. lower hearing thresholds) as best strategy for species living in quiet habitats and lower sensitivity (i.e. higher hearing thresholds) as best strategy for those living in noisy habitats provided the cost of incorrect recognition is not low. The tradeoff between detection and recognition of acoustic signals appears to be a key factor determining the best level of hearing sensitivity of a species when acoustic communication is corrupted by noise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on novel cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymeric vaginal delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Kaoxiang; Mu, Hongjie; Tang, Mingtan; Liang, Rongcai; Wang, Aiping; Zhou, Shasha; Sun, Haijun; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Jianwen; Liu, Wanhui

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on a novel cleavable hydrazone-based pH-sensitive methoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-hydrazone-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (mPEG-Hz-CHEMS) polymer was used for vaginal administration. Methods The pH-sensitive, cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS was designed as a modified pH-sensitive liposome that would selectively degrade under locally acidic vaginal conditions. The novel pH-sensitive liposome was engineered to form a thermogel at body temperature and to degrade in an acidic environment. Results A dual-sensitive liposome gel with a high encapsulation efficiency of arctigenin was formed and improved the solubility of arctigenin characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The dual-sensitive liposome gel with a sol-gel transition at body temperature was degraded in a pH-dependent manner, and was stable for a long period of time at neutral and basic pH, but cleavable under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Arctigenin encapsulated in a dual-sensitive liposome gel was more stable and less toxic than arctigenin loaded into pH-sensitive liposomes. In vitro drug release results indicated that dual-sensitive liposome gels showed constant release of arctigenin over 3 days, but showed sustained release of arctigenin in buffers at pH 7.4 and pH 9.0. Conclusion This research has shed some light on a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel using a cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer for vaginal delivery. PMID:22679372

  20. Temperature sensitivity of gaseous elemental mercury in the active layer of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Zhijia; Peng, Fei; Xue, Xian; Zhang, Xiaoshan

    2018-07-01

    Soils represent the single largest mercury (Hg) reservoir in the global environment, indicating that a tiny change of Hg behavior in soil ecosystem could greatly affect the global Hg cycle. Climate warming is strongly altering the structure and functions of permafrost and then would influence the Hg cycle in permafrost soils. However, Hg biogeochemistry in climate-sensitive permafrost is poorly investigated. Here we report a data set of soil Hg (0) concentrations in four different depths of the active layer in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau permafrost. We find that soil Hg (0) concentrations exhibited a strongly positive and exponential relationship with temperature and showed different temperature sensitivity under the frozen and unfrozen condition. We conservatively estimate that temperature increases following latest temperature scenarios of the IPCC could result in up to a 54.9% increase in Hg (0) concentrations in surface permafrost soils by 2100. Combining the simultaneous measurement of air-soil Hg (0) exchange, we find that enhanced Hg (0) concentrations in upper soils could favor Hg (0) emissions from surface soil. Our findings indicate that Hg (0) emission could be stimulated by permafrost thawing in a warmer world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sensitivity analyses of biodiesel thermo-physical properties under diesel engine conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Xinwei; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Gan, Suyin

    2016-01-01

    This reported work investigates the sensitivities of spray and soot developments to the change of thermo-physical properties for coconut and soybean methyl esters, using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics fuel spray modelling. The choice of test fuels made was due to their contrasting...... saturation-unsaturation compositions. The sensitivity analyses for non-reacting and reacting sprays were carried out against a total of 12 thermo-physical properties, at an ambient temperature of 900 K and density of 22.8 kg/m3. For the sensitivity analyses, all the thermo-physical properties were set...... as the baseline case and each property was individually replaced by that of diesel. The significance of individual thermo-physical property was determined based on the deviations found in predictions such as liquid penetration, ignition delay period and peak soot concentration when compared to those of baseline...

  2. Thermal conditions influence changes in body temperature induced by intragastric administration of capsaicin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Noriyuki; Urata, Tomomi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Capsaicin has been reported to have unique thermoregulatory actions. However, changes in core temperature after the administration of capsaicin are a controversial point. Therefore, we investigated the effects of environmental thermal conditions on changes in body temperature caused by capsaicin in mice. We showed that intragastric administration of 10 and 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperatures in the core temperature (CT)-constant and CT-decreasing conditions. In the CT-increasing condition, 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperature. However, 10 mg/kg capsaicin increased colonic temperature. Furthermore, the amount of increase in tail temperature was greater in the CT-decreasing condition and lower in the CT-increasing condition, compared with that of the CT-constant condition. These findings suggest that the changes in core temperature were affected by the environmental thermal conditions and that preliminary thermoregulation state might be more important than the constancy of temperature to evaluate the effects of heat diffusion and thermogensis.

  3. [Emission spectrum temperature sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : mn induced by laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Liu, Jing-Ru; Shao, Jun; Hu, Zhi-Yun; Tao, Bo; Huang, Mei-Sheng

    2013-08-01

    In order to develop a new sort of thermally sensitive phosphor coating, the emission spectrum thermally sensitivity of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn induced by laser was studied. The spectrum measurement system with heating function was set up, and the emission spectrum of Mg4FGeO6 : Mn at various temperatures were measured. Absorption spectrum was measured, and the mechanism of formation of the structure of double peak was analyzed with the perturbation theory of crystal lattice. The group of peaks around 630 nm is represented by the transitions 4F"2 to 4A2, whereas the group of peaks around 660 nm is due to the transitions 4F'2 to 4A2. The occupancy of both excited states 4F'2 and 4F"2 is in thermal equilibrium. Thus increasing temperature causes the intensity of the emission in the group around 630 nm to increase at the expense of the emission intensity of the group around 660 nm. The various spectral regions in emission differ with temperature, which could be used to support the intensity-ratio measurement method. The intensity-ratio change curve as a function of temperature was fitted, which shows that the range of temperature measurement is between room temperature and 800 K.

  4. A luminescent Lanthanide-free MOF nanohybrid for highly sensitive ratiometric temperature sensing in physiological range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, You; Zhang, Denan; Zeng, Jin; Gan, Ning; Cuan, Jing

    2018-05-01

    Luminescent MOF materials with tunable emissions and energy/charge transfer processes have been extensively explored as ratiometric temperature sensors. However, most of the ratiometric MOF thermometers reported thus far are based on the MOFs containing photoactive lanthanides, which are potentially facing cost issue and serious supply shortage. Here, we present a ratiometric luminescent thermometer based on a dual-emitting lanthanide-free MOF hybrid, which is developed by encapsulation of a fluorescent dye into a robust nanocrystalline zirconium-based MOF through a one-pot synthesis approach. The structure and morphology of the hybrid product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurement and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The pore confinement effect well isolates the guest dye molecules and therefore suppresses the nonradiative energy transfer process between dye molecules. The incorporated dye emission is mainly sensitized by the organic linkers within MOF through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The ratiometric luminescence of the MOF hybrid shows a significant response to temperature due to the thermal-related back energy transfer process from dye molecules and organic linkers, thus can be exploited for self-calibrated temperature sensing. The maximum thermometric sensitivity is 1.19% °C -1 in the physiological temperature range, which is among the highest for the ratiomtric MOF thermometers that operating in 25-45°C. The temperature resolution is better than 0.1°C over the entire operative range (20-60°C). By integrating the advantages of excellent stability, nanoscale nature, and high sensitivity and precision in the physiological temperature range, this dye@MOF hybrid might have potential application in biomedical diagnosis. What' more, this work has expanded the possibility of non-lanthanide luminescent MOF materials for the development of ratiometric temperature sensors. Copyright © 2018

  5. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  6. Low temperature spent fuel oxidation under tuff repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Woodley, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is studying the suitability of tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, for high level waste disposal. The oxidation state of LWR spent fuel in a tuff repository may be a significant factor in determining its ability to inhibit radionuclide migration. Long term exposure at low temperatures to the moist air expected in a tuff repository is expected to increase the oxidation state of the fuel. A program is underway to determine the spent fuel oxidation mechanisms which might be active in a tuff repository. Initial work involves a series of TGA experiments to determine the effectiveness of the technique and to obtain preliminary oxidation data. Tests were run at 200 0 C and 225 0 C for as long as 720 hours. Grain boundary diffusion appears to open up a greater surface area for oxidation prior to onset of bulk diffusion. Temperature strongly influences the oxidation rates. The effect of moisture is small but readily measurable. 25 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Electrodermal responses during appetitive conditioning are sensitive to contingency instruction ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Karolien; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Jansen, Anita

    2017-08-01

    Studies on human appetitive conditioning using food rewards can benefit from including psychophysiological outcome measures. The present study tested whether the skin conductance response can function as a measure of differential responding in an appetitive conditioning paradigm including an acquisition and extinction phase, and examined which time window during a trial is most sensitive to conditioning effects. As a secondary aim, the effects of ambiguous vs. non-ambiguous contingency instructions on conditioned responses (skin conductance responses, US expectancies, chocolate desires, and CS evaluations) were assessed. Results indicated differential skin conductance responses in an anticipatory time window and during unexpected omission of the US in early extinction. Interestingly however, anticipatory responses were only found for participants who received ambiguous contingency instructions - possibly indicating a call for additional processing resources in response to the ambiguous CS+. Further, ambiguous instructions slowed the extinction of US expectancies but did not influence chocolate desires and CS evaluations. It is concluded that skin conductance can function as a sensitive measure of differential responding in appetitive conditioning, though its sensitivity might depend on the specific task context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication of a microfluidic chip by UV bonding at room temperature for integration of temperature-sensitive layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlautmann, S.; Besselink, G. A. J.; Radhakrishna Prabhu, G.; Schasfoort, R. B. M.

    2003-07-01

    A method for the bonding of a microfluidic device at room temperature is presented. The wafer with the fluidic structures was bonded to a sensor wafer with gold pads by means of adhesive bonding, utilizing an UV-curable glue layer. To avoid filling the fluidic channels with the glue, a stamping process was developed which allows the selective application of a thin glue layer. In this way a microfluidic glass chip was fabricated that could be used for performing surface plasmon resonance measurements without signs of leakage. The advantage of this method is the possibility of integration of organic layers as well as other temperature-sensitive layers into a microfluidic glass device.

  9. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Pil-Mun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Seok [Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Min [Atomic Energy Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Gwacheon 427-715 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young-Jin [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju-Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr

    2009-07-15

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D{sub 10} value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  10. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-01-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster (Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D 10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  11. Radiation sensitivity of poliovirus, a model for norovirus, inoculated in oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and culture broth under different conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Pil-Mun; Park, Jae Seok; Park, Jin-Gyu; Park, Jae-Nam; Han, In-Jun; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Baek, Min; Chung, Young-Jin; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    Poliovirus is a recognized surrogate for norovirus, pathogen in water and food, due to the structural and genetic similarity. Although radiation sensitivity of poliovirus in water or media had been reported, there has been no research in food model such as shellfish. In this study, oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) was incubated in artificial seawater contaminated with poliovirus, and thus radiation sensitivity of poliovirus was determined in inoculated oyster. The effects of ionizing radiation on the sensitivity of poliovirus were also evaluated under different conditions such as pH (4-7) and salt concentration (1-15%) in culture broth, and temperature during irradiation. The D10 value of poliovirus in PBS buffer, virus culture broth and oyster was determined to 0.46, 2.84 and 2.94 kGy, respectively. The initial plaque forming unit (PFU) of poliovirus in culture broth was slightly decreased as the decrease of pH and the increase of salt concentration, but radiation sensitivity was not affected by pH and salt contents. However, radiation resistance of poliovirus was increased at frozen state. These results provide the basic information for the inactivation of pathogenic virus in foods by using irradiation.

  12. Sensitivity of extreme precipitation to temperature: the variability of scaling factors from a regional to local perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2018-06-01

    Potential increases in extreme rainfall induced hazards in a warming climate have motivated studies to link precipitation intensities to temperature. Increases exceeding the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) rate of 6-7%/°C-1 are seen in short-duration, convective, high-percentile rainfall at mid latitudes, but the rates of change cease or revert at regionally variable threshold temperatures due to moisture limitations. It is unclear, however, what these findings mean in term of the actual risk of extreme precipitation on a regional to local scale. When conditioning precipitation intensities on local temperatures, key influences on the scaling relationship such as from the annual cycle and regional weather patterns need better understanding. Here we analyze these influences, using sub-hourly to daily precipitation data from a dense network of 189 stations in south-eastern Austria. We find that the temperature sensitivities in the mountainous western region are lower than in the eastern lowlands. This is due to the different weather patterns that cause extreme precipitation in these regions. Sub-hourly and hourly intensities intensify at super-CC and CC-rates, respectively, up to temperatures of about 17 °C. However, we also find that, because of the regional and seasonal variability of the precipitation intensities, a smaller scaling factor can imply a larger absolute change in intensity. Our insights underline that temperature precipitation scaling requires careful interpretation of the intent and setting of the study. When this is considered, conditional scaling factors can help to better understand which influences control the intensification of rainfall with temperature on a regional scale.

  13. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Dan; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Guirui; He, Nianpeng; Wang, Rongfu

    2015-01-01

    The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C) quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT) hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm), microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm), and mineral fractions (MF, temperature and aggregate size significantly affected on SOM decomposition, with notable interactive effects (Ptemperature in the following order: MA>MF>bulk soil >MI(P classes (P temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  14. Numerical Analysis of Exergy for Air-Conditioning Influenced by Ambient Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Nang Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents numerical analysis of exergy for air-conditioning influenced by ambient temperature. The model of numerical simulation uses an integrated air conditioning system exposed in varied ambient temperature to observe change of the four main devices, the compressor, the condenser, the capillary, and the evaporator in correspondence to ambient temperature. The analysis devices of the four devices’s exergy influenced by the varied ambient temperature and found that the capillary has unusual increasing exergy loss vs. increasing ambient temperature in comparison to the other devices. The result shows that reducing exergy loss of the capillary influenced by the ambient temperature is the key for improving working efficiency of an air-conditioning system when influence of the ambient temperature is considered. The higher ambient temperature causes the larger pressure drop of capillary and more exergy loss.

  15. Pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions and second-order sensitivity relations in optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowska, Hélène; Hoehener, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to pointwise second-order necessary optimality conditions for the Mayer problem arising in optimal control theory. We first show that with every optimal trajectory it is possible to associate a solution p (ṡ) of the adjoint system (as in the Pontryagin maximum principle) and a matrix solution W (ṡ) of an adjoint matrix differential equation that satisfy a second-order transversality condition and a second-order maximality condition. These conditions seem to be a natural second-order extension of the maximum principle. We then prove a Jacobson like necessary optimality condition for general control systems and measurable optimal controls that may be only ;partially singular; and may take values on the boundary of control constraints. Finally we investigate the second-order sensitivity relations along optimal trajectories involving both p (ṡ) and W (ṡ).

  16. The effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region: Sensitivity analysis for APR-1400 LBLOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Gu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The nodalization of APR-1400 was modified to reflect the characteristic of upper region temperature. • The effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region on LBLOCA consequence was evaluated. • The modification of nodalization is an essential prerequisite in APR-1400 LBLOCA analysis. - Abstract: In best estimate (BE) calculation, the definition of system nodalization is important step influencing the prediction accuracy for specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena. The upper region of reactor is defined as the region of the upper guide structure (UGS) and upper dome. It has been assumed that the temperature of upper region is close to average temperature in most large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) analysis cases. However, it was recently found that the temperature of upper region of APR-1400 reactor might be little lower than or similar to hot leg temperature through the review of detailed design data. In this study, the nodalization of APR-1400 was modified to reflect the characteristic of upper region temperature, and the effect of nodalization and temperature of reactor upper region on LBLOCA consequence was evaluated by sensitivity analysis including best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU) calculation. In basecase calculation, in case of modified version, the peak cladding temperature (PCT) in blowdown phase became higher and the blowdown quenching (or cooling) was significantly deteriorated as compared to original case, and as a result, the cladding temperature in reflood phase became higher and the final quenching was also delayed. In addition, thermal-hydraulic parameters were compared and analyzed to investigate the effect of change of upper region on cladding temperature. In BEPU analysis, the 95 percentile PCT used in current regulatory practice was increased due to the modification of upper region nodalization, and it occurred in the reflood phase unlike original case.

  17. Sea-ice cover in the Nordic Seas and the sensitivity to Atlantic water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.; Spall, Michael A.

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the sea-ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. However, with its proximity to the warm Atlantic water, how a sea-ice cover can persist in the Nordic Seas is not well understood. In this study, we apply an eddy-resolving configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model with an idealized topography to study the presence of sea ice in a Nordic Seas-like domain. We assume an infinite amount of warm Atlantic water present in the south by restoring the southern area to constant temperatures. The sea-surface temperatures are restored toward cold, atmospheric temperatures, and as a result, sea ice is present in the interior of the domain. However, the sea-ice cover in the margins of the Nordic Seas, an area with a warm, cyclonic boundary current, is sensitive to the amount of heat entering the domain, i.e., the restoring temperature in the south. When the temperature of the warm, cyclonic boundary current is high, the margins are free of sea ice and heat is released to the atmosphere. We show that with a small reduction in the temperature of the incoming Atlantic water, the Nordic Seas-like domain is fully covered in sea ice. Warm water is still entering the Nordic Seas, however, this happens at depths below a cold, fresh surface layer produced by melted sea ice. Consequently, the heat release to the atmosphere is reduced along with the eddy heat fluxes. Results suggest a threshold value in the amount of heat entering the Nordic Seas before the sea-ice cover disappears in the margins. We study the sensitivity of this threshold to changes in atmospheric temperatures and vertical diffusivity.

  18. High-temperature sensitivity and its acclimation for photosynthetic electron reactions of desert succulents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetti, M.B.; Nobel, P.S. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Photosynthetic electron reactions of succulent plants from hot deserts are able to tolerate extremely high temperatures and to acclimate to seasonal increase in temperature. In this study, we report the influence of relatively long, in vivo, high-temperature treatments on electron transport reactions for two desert succulents, Agave deserti and Opuntia ficus-indica, species which can tolerate 60{degree}C. Whole chain electron transport averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive to a 1-hour high-temperature treatment than did PSII (Photosystem II) which in turn averaged 3{degree}C more sensitive than did PSI. For plants maintained at day/night air temperatures of 30{degree}C/20{degree}C, treatment at 50{degree}C cause these reactions to be inhibited an average of 39% during the first hour, an additional 31% during the next 4 hours, and 100% by 12 hours. Upon shifting the plants from 30{degree}C/20{degree}C to 45{degree}C/35{degree}C, the high temperatures where activity was inhibited 50% increased 3{degree}C to 8{degree}C for the three electron transport reactions, the half-times for acclimation averaging 5 days for A. deserti and 4 days for O. ficus-indica. For the 45{degree}C/35{degree}C plants treated at 60{degree}C for 1 hour, PSI activity was reduced by 54% for A. deserti and 36% for O. ficus-indica. Acclimation leads to a toleration of very high temperatures without substantial disruption of electron transport for these desert succulents, facilitating their survival in hot deserts. Indeed, the electron transport reactions of these species tolerate longer periods at higher temperatures than any other vascular plants so far reported.

  19. Predicting plant performance under simultaneously changing environmental conditions – the interplay between temperature, light and internode growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eKahlen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant performance is significantly influenced by prevailing light and temperature conditions during plant growth and development. For plants exposed to natural fluctuations in abiotic environmental conditions it is however laborious and cumbersome to experimentally assign any contribution of individual environmental factors to plant responses. This study aimed at analyzing the interplay between light, temperature and internode growth based on model approaches. We extended the light-sensitive virtual plant model L-Cucumber by implementing a common Arrhenius function for appearance rates, growth rates and growth durations. For two greenhouse experiments, the temperature-sensitive model approach resulted in a precise prediction of cucumber mean internode lengths and number of internodes, as well as in accurately predicted patterns of individual internode lengths along the main stem. In addition, a system’s analysis revealed that environmental data averaged over the experimental period were not necessarily related to internode performance. Finally, the need for a species-specific parameterization of the temperature response function and related aspects in modelling temperature effects on plant development and growth is discussed.

  20. Stability studies needed to define the handling and transport conditions of sensitive pharmaceutical or biotechnological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Claude

    2011-12-01

    Many pharmaceutical or biotechnological products require transport using temperature-controlled systems to keep their therapeutic properties. There are presently no official guidelines for testing pharmaceutical products in order to define suitable transport specifications. After reviewing the current guidance documents, this paper proposes a methodology for testing pharmaceutical products and defining appropriate transport conditions.

  1. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian; Qian, Zhiyu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Xinyang; Hu, Yuzhu; Gu, Yueqing

    2008-05-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 °C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment.

  2. In vivo non-invasive optical imaging of temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Hu Yuzhu; Zhang Jian; Liu Fei; Chen Xinyang; Gu Yueqing; Qian Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of hyperthermia in pathological tissue is a promising strategy for earlier diagnosis of malignant tumors. In this study, temperature-sensitive co-polymeric nanohydrogel poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (PNIPA-co-AA) was successfully synthesized by the precipitation polymerization method. The diameters of nanohydrogels were controlled to be less than 100 nm. Also the lower critical solution temperature (LCST, 40 deg. C) was manipulated above physiological temperature after integration of near-infrared (NIR) organic dye (heptamethine cyanine dye, HMCD) within its interior cores. NIR laser light (765 nm), together with sensitive charge coupled device (CCD) cameras, were designed to construct an NIR imaging system. The dynamic behaviors of PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites in denuded mice with or without local hyperthermia treatment were real-time monitored by an NIR imager. The results showed that the PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites accumulated in the leg treated with local heating and diffused much slower than that in the other leg without heating. The results demonstrated that the temperature-responsive PNIPA-co-AA-HMCD composites combining with an NIR imaging system could be an effective temperature mapping technique, which provides a promising prospect for earlier tumor diagnosis and thermally related therapeutic assessment

  3. Access to care for patients with time-sensitive conditions in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Rama A; Edwards, J Matthew; Gaieski, David F; Band, Roger A; Abella, Benjamin S; Carr, Brendan G

    2014-05-01

    Collective knowledge and coordination of vital interventions for time-sensitive conditions (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI], stroke, cardiac arrest, and septic shock) could contribute to a comprehensive statewide emergency care system, but little is known about population access to the resources required. We seek to describe existing clinical management strategies for time-sensitive conditions in Pennsylvania hospitals. All Pennsylvania emergency departments (EDs) open in 2009 were surveyed about resource availability and practice patterns for time-sensitive conditions. The frequency with which EDs provided essential clinical bundles for each condition was assessed. Penalized maximum likelihood regressions were used to evaluate associations between ED characteristics and the presence of the 4 clinical bundles of care. We used geographic information science to calculate 60-minute ambulance access to the nearest facility with these clinical bundles. The percentage of EDs providing each of the 4 clinical bundles in 2009 ranged from 20% to 57% (stroke 20%, STEMI 32%, cardiac arrest 34%, sepsis 57%). For STEMI and stroke, presence of a board-certified/board-eligible emergency physician was significantly associated with presence of a clinical bundle. Only 8% of hospitals provided all 4 care bundles. However, 53% of the population was able to reach this minority of hospitals within 60 minutes. Reliably matching patient needs to ED resources in time-dependent illness is a critical component of a coordinated emergency care system. Population access to critical interventions for the time-dependent diseases discussed here is limited. A population-based planning approach and improved coordination of care could improve access to interventions for patients with time-sensitive conditions. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Classifying multi-model wheat yield impact response surfaces showing sensitivity to temperature and precipitation change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; Asseng, Senthold; Baranowski, Piotr; Basso, Bruno; Bodin, Per; Buis, Samuel; Cammarano, Davide; Deligios, Paola; Destain, Marie France; Dumont, Benjamin; Ewert, Frank; Ferrise, Roberto; François, Louis; Gaiser, Thomas; Hlavinka, Petr; Jacquemin, Ingrid; Kersebaum, Kurt Christian; Kollas, Chris; Krzyszczak, Jaromir; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Minet, Julien; Minguez, M.I.; Montesino, Manuel; Moriondo, Marco; Müller, Christoph; Nendel, Claas; Öztürk, Isik; Perego, Alessia; Rodríguez, Alfredo; Ruane, Alex C.; Ruget, Françoise; Sanna, Mattia; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Slawinski, Cezary; Stratonovitch, Pierre; Supit, Iwan; Waha, Katharina; Wang, Enli; Wu, Lianhai; Zhao, Zhigan; Rötter, Reimund P.

    2018-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in

  5. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series for carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and oxidants (Ox were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO2 and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  6. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and oxidants (Ox) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO2 and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor. PMID:29360749

  7. Evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized 304SS in low-temperature borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1981-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been observed in constant extension rate tests, CERT and constant load tests of 304SS tested at 32 0 C in borated water plus 15 ppM C1 - . Evidence of IGSCC was obtained in CERT tests of welded pipe samples only when the original inner diameter surface was intact and with 15 ppM C1 - added to the borated water while IGSCC occurred in a furnace sensitized pipe sample after 500 h at a constant stress of 340 MPa in borated water containing 15 ppM C1 - . These results indicate that surface features associated with weld preparation grinding contributed to the susceptibility of sensitized 304SS to IGSCC in low temperature borated water; however, the constant load test indicates that such surface defects are not necessary for IGSCC in low temperature borated water

  8. Modeling programmable deformation of self-folding all-polymer structures with temperature-sensitive hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wei; Zhou, Jinxiong; Li, Meie

    2013-01-01

    Combination of soft active hydrogels with hard passive polymers gives rise to all-polymer composites. The hydrogel is sensitive to external stimuli while the passive polymer is inert. Utilizing the different behaviors of two materials subject to environmental variation, for example temperature, results in self-folding soft machines. We report our efforts to model the programmable deformation of self-folding structures with temperature-sensitive hydrogels. The self-folding structures are realized either by constructing a bilayer structure or by incorporating hydrogels as hinges. The methodology and the results may aid the design, control and fabrication of 3D complex structures from 2D simple configurations through self-assembly. (paper)

  9. Temperature-sensitive gating of hCx26: high-resolution Raman spectroscopy sheds light on conformational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniggendorf, Ann-Kathrin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Yuan, Xiaogang; Roth, Bernhard; Seifert, Astrid; Fertig, Niels; Zeilinger, Carsten

    2014-07-01

    The temperature-sensitive gating of human Connexin 26 (hCx26) was analyzed with confocal Raman microscopy. High-resolution Raman spectra covering the spectral range between 400 and 1500 rel. cm(-1) with a spectral resolution of 1 cm(-1) were fully annotated, revealing notable differences between the spectrum recorded from solubilized hCx26 in Ca(2+)-buffered POPC at 10°C and any other set of protein conditions (temperature, Ca(2+) presence, POPC presence). Spectral components originating from specific amino acids show that the TM1/EL1 parahelix and probably the TM4 trans-membrane helix and the plug domain are involved in the gating process responsible for fully closing the hemichannel.

  10. Temperature modulates coccolithophorid sensitivity of growth, photosynthesis and calcification to increasing seawater pCO₂.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlett Sett

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO₂ concentrations are expected to impact pelagic ecosystem functioning in the near future by driving ocean warming and acidification. While numerous studies have investigated impacts of rising temperature and seawater acidification on planktonic organisms separately, little is presently known on their combined effects. To test for possible synergistic effects we exposed two coccolithophore species, Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica, to a CO₂ gradient ranging from ∼0.5-250 µmol kg⁻¹ (i.e. ∼20-6000 µatm pCO₂ at three different temperatures (i.e. 10, 15, 20°C for E. huxleyi and 15, 20, 25°C for G. oceanica. Both species showed CO₂-dependent optimum-curve responses for growth, photosynthesis and calcification rates at all temperatures. Increased temperature generally enhanced growth and production rates and modified sensitivities of metabolic processes to increasing CO₂. CO₂ optimum concentrations for growth, calcification, and organic carbon fixation rates were only marginally influenced from low to intermediate temperatures. However, there was a clear optimum shift towards higher CO₂ concentrations from intermediate to high temperatures in both species. Our results demonstrate that the CO₂ concentration where optimum growth, calcification and carbon fixation rates occur is modulated by temperature. Thus, the response of a coccolithophore strain to ocean acidification at a given temperature can be negative, neutral or positive depending on that strain's temperature optimum. This emphasizes that the cellular responses of coccolithophores to ocean acidification can only be judged accurately when interpreted in the proper eco-physiological context of a given strain or species. Addressing the synergistic effects of changing carbonate chemistry and temperature is an essential step when assessing the success of coccolithophores in the future ocean.

  11. Transposition of Tn5096 from a temperature-sensitive transducible plasmid in Streptomyces spp.

    OpenAIRE

    McHenney, M A; Baltz, R H

    1991-01-01

    Transposon Tn5096 was inserted into a derivative of the temperature-sensitive plasmid pMT660 containing the bacteriophage FP43 pac site. The resulting plasmid, pRHB126, was transduced by FP43 into several Streptomyces species. Tn5096 transposed from pRHB126 into different sites in the genomes of Streptomyces ambofaciens, Streptomyces cinnamonensis, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), Streptomyces fradiae, Streptomyces griseofuscus, and Streptomyces thermotolerans.

  12. Refractive index and temperature sensitivity characteristics of a micro-slot fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Pouneh; Yan, Zhijun; Zhou, Kaiming; Zhang, Lin

    2012-07-10

    Fabrication and characterization of a UV inscribed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with a micro-slot liquid core is presented. Femtosecond (fs) laser patterning/chemical etching technique was employed to engrave a micro-slot with dimensions of 5.74 μm(h)×125 μm(w)×1388.72 μm(l) across the whole grating. The device has been evaluated for refractive index (RI) and temperature sensitivities and exhibited distinctive thermal response and RI sensitivity beyond the detection limit of reported fiber gratings. This structure has not just been RI sensitive, but also maintained the robustness comparing with the bare core FBGs and long-period gratings with the partial cladding etched off.

  13. Polarization-sensitive and broadband germanium sulfide photodetectors with excellent high-temperature performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dezhi; Zhang, Wenjin; Wang, Xiaofan; Koirala, Sandhaya; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2017-08-31

    Layered materials, such as graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides and black phosphorene, have been established rapidly as intriguing building blocks for optoelectronic devices. Here, we introduce highly polarization sensitive, broadband, and high-temperature-operation photodetectors based on multilayer germanium sulfide (GeS). The GeS photodetector shows a high photoresponsivity of about 6.8 × 10 3 A W -1 , an extremely high specific detectivity of 5.6 × 10 14 Jones, and broad spectral response in the wavelength range of 300-800 nm. More importantly, the GeS photodetector has high polarization sensitivity to incident linearly polarized light, which provides another degree of freedom for photodetectors. Tremendously enhanced photoresponsivity is observed with a temperature increase, and high responsivity is achievable at least up to 423 K. The establishment of larger photoinduced reduction of the Schottky barrier height will be significant for the investigation of the photoresponse mechanism of 2D layered material-based photodetectors. These attributes of high photocurrent generation in a wide temperature range, broad spectral response, and polarization sensitivity coupled with environmental stability indicate that the proposed GeS photodetector is very suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  14. Temperature-sensitive host range mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koment, R.W.; Rapp, F.

    1975-01-01

    Herpesviruses are capable of several types of infection of a host cell. To investigate the early events which ultimately determine the nature of the virus-host cell interaction, a system was established utilizing temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2. Four mutants have been isolated which fail to induce cytopathic effects and do not replicate at 39 C in hamster embryo fibroblast cells. At least one mutant is virus DNA negative. Since intracellular complementation is detectable between pairs of mutants, a virus function is known to be temperature sensitive. However, all four mutants induce cytopathic effects and replicate to parental virus levels in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C. This suggests that a host cell function, lacking or nonfunctional in HEF cells but present in rabbit kidney cells at 39 C, is required for the replication of these mutants in hamster embryo fibroblast cells at 39 C. Therefore, we conclude that these mutants are both temperature sensitive and exhibit host range properties

  15. Martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel during isothermal holding at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-hwa; Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel to determine the stability of the austenitic phase at low temperatures. We found that a specimen that was sensitized at 973 K for 100 h exhibits an isothermal martensitic transformation when the specimen is held in the temperature range between 60 and 260 K. We constructed a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram corresponding to the formation of 0.5 vol. % α'-martensite. A magnetization measurement was used to evaluate the volume fraction of a'-martensite. The TTT diagram shows a double-C curve with two noses located at about 100 and 200 K. In-situ optical microscope observations reveal that the double C-curve is due to two different transformation sequences. That is, the upper part of the C-curve is due to a direct γ → α' martensitic transformation and the lower part of the C-curve is due to a successive γ → ψ → α' martensitic transformation. The direct γ → α' transformation occurs in the vicinity of grain boundaries while the successive γ → ψ' → α' transformation occurs near the centre of grains. A scanning electron microscope observation reveals that carbide particles of M 23 C 6 are formed in the grain boundaries. The concentration difference between the centre of the grains and regions near grain boundaries is the reason for the difference in the isothermal transformation sequence for the sensitized SUS304 stainless steel.

  16. Identification of complex model thermal boundary conditions based on exterior temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianming; Ouyang Guangyao; Zhang Ping; Rong Bojun

    2012-01-01

    Combining the advantages of the finite element software in temperature field analyzing with the multivariate function optimization arithmetic, a feasibility method based on the exterior temperature was proposed to get the thermal boundary conditions, which was required in temperature field analyzing. The thermal boundary conditions can be obtained only by some temperature measurement values. Taking the identification of the convection heat transfer coefficient of a high power density diesel engine cylinder head as an example, the calculation result shows that when the temperature measurement error was less than 0.5℃, the maximum relative error was less than 2%. It is shown that the new method was feasible (authors)

  17. [Soil Microbial Respiration Under Different Soil Temperature Conditions and Its Relationship to Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Invertase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Shu-tao; Hu, Zheng-hua; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the soil microbial respiration under different temperature conditions and its relationship to soil dissolved organic carbon ( DOC) and invertase, an indoor incubation experiment was performed. The soil samples used for the experiment were taken from Laoshan, Zijinshan, and Baohuashan. The responses of soil microbial respiration to the increasing temperature were studied. The soil DOC content and invertase activity were also measured at the end of incubation. Results showed that relationships between cumulative microbial respiration of different soils and soil temperature could be explained by exponential functions, which had P values lower than 0.001. The coefficient of temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) varied from 1.762 to 1.895. The Q10 value of cumulative microbial respiration decreased with the increase of soil temperature for all soils. The Q10 value of microbial respiration on 27 days after incubation was close to that of 1 day after incubation, indicating that the temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant organic carbon may be similar to that of labile organic carbon. For all soils, a highly significant ( P = 0.003 ) linear relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and soil DOC content could be observed. Soil DOC content could explain 31.6% variances of cumulative soil microbial respiration. For the individual soil and all soils, the relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and invertase activity could be explained by a highly significant (P soil microbial respiration.

  18. Acute toxicity tests using rotifers. 4. Effects of cyst age, temperature, and salinity on the sensitivity of Brachionus calyciflorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, T.W.; Moffat, B.D.; Janssen, C.; Persoone, G. (University of Tampa, Florida (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Several aspects of the response to toxicants using a standardized toxicity test with the freshwater rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus are described. Test animals are obtained by hatching cysts which produce animals of similar age and physiological condition. The acute toxicity of 28 compounds is described with 24-hr LC50's. The LC50's span five orders of magnitude, from silver at 0.008 mg.liter-1 to benzene at more than 1000 mg.liter-1. Control mortality in 84 tests averaged 2% with a standard deviation of 3%, indicating very consistent test sensitivity. Only once in 84 trials did a test fail because of excessive control mortality, yielding a failure rate of 1.2%. Cyst age from 0 to 18 months had no effect on the sensitivity of neonates to reference toxicants. Both high and low temperatures increased rotifer sensitivity to reference toxicants. Copper sensitivity was greater at 10, 25, and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Likewise, sodium pentachlorophenol toxicity was greater at 10 and 30 degrees C compared with results at 20 degrees C. Survivorship curves at 25 degrees C of neonates under control conditions indicated that mortality begins at about 30 hr. This places a practical limit on toxicant exposure for the assay of 24 hr. B. calyciflorus cysts hatch at salinities up to 5 ppt and acute toxicity tests using pentachlorophenol at this salinity yielded LC50's about one-half those of standard freshwater. B. calyciflorus is preferred over Brachionus plicatilis for toxicity tests in salinities up to 5 ppt because it is consistently more sensitive.

  19. Sensitivities of dry season runoff to precipitation and temperature in southern Sierra Nevada streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safeeq, M.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bales, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    In a mediterranean climate, dry season runoff sustains water supply and supports aquatic habitat and other ecosystems. Precipitation and temperature directly, by regulating recharge and evapotranspiration (ET), and indirectly, by regulating amount and timing of snowmelt, control the dry season runoff in the Sierra Nevada. Here, we explored relative impacts of precipitation and temperature variability on dry season runoff using path analysis. Specific objectives include: (i) to quantify the direct and indirect impacts of precipitation and temperature on 7-day average minimum flow (Qmin) and (ii) to explore the role of preceding year Qmin on fall season runoff (QF). We used daily runoff, air temperature, precipitation, and snow water equivalent (SWE) over 2004-2015 for the ten catchments in the Kings River Experimental Watersheds. For path analysis model of Qmin, we defined annual precipitation and temperature as exogenous variables and peak SWE, day of snow disappearance, and Qmin as endogenous variables. For QF, we defined current year fall precipitation and preceding year Qmin as exogenous variables and current year QF as an endogenous variable. Path analysis results for Qmin show precipitation as a dominant driver when compared to temperature, peak SWE, and day of snow disappearance. However, in half of the catchments that are mostly located at higher elevations the impact of temperature on Qmin was either comparable or exceeded that of precipitation. This relatively high sensitivity of Qmin to air temperature in high elevation catchments is consistent with the earlier findings of increased ET in proportion to warming. The direct effects of peak SWE and day of snow disappearance on Qmin were limited, and indirect effects of temperature and precipitation via peak SWE and day of snow disappearance were not significant. The preceding year Qmin and fall precipitation showed comparable impacts on QF, indicating that the storage in the preceding year modulates current

  20. Identification of ribonucleotide reductase mutation causing temperature-sensitivity of herpes simplex virus isolates from whitlow by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Oyama, Yukari; Yajima, Misako; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Shimada, Yuka; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Miwa, Naoko; Okuda, Tomoko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 caused a genital ulcer, and a secondary herpetic whitlow appeared during acyclovir therapy. The secondary and recurrent whitlow isolates were acyclovir-resistant and temperature-sensitive in contrast to a genital isolate. We identified the ribonucleotide reductase mutation responsible for temperature-sensitivity by deep-sequencing analysis.

  1. Effect of growth temperature on lipid composition and ultraviolet sensitivity of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAleer, M.A.; Moore, S.P.; Moss, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Human skin fibroblasts were incubated at either 25 or 37 0 C before UV irradiation. Cells incubated at 25 0 C were more resistant to near UV radiation than cells grown at 37 0 C, but cells grown at the lower temperature were more sensitive to 254 nm radiation. Fatty acid analysis of membranes of cells showed that cells incubated at the lower temperature contained significantly higher amounts of linoleic acid (18:2) and linolenic acid (18:3) than cells incubated at 37 0 C. To determine if this difference in fatty acid content of the membranes was responsible for the UV survival characteristics of cells incubated at different temperatures, cells were enriched with either linoleate or linolenate during a 37 0 C incubation period. Gas chromatography revealed that cells incorporated the supplied fatty acid. Fatty acid enriched cells were then irradiated with near UV, and survival characteristics were compared to those obtained with cells grown at the lower incubation temperature. The results suggest that the different proportion of fatty acid content of the cells is not the cause of different UV sensitivities of cells grown at 25 0 C compared to cells grown at 37 0 C. (author)

  2. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  3. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the mineralizable pool of soil organic matter to changes in temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulina, A. S.; Semenov, V. M.

    2015-08-01

    The sensitivity of the potentially mineralizable pool of soil organic matter (Cpm) to changes in temperature and moisture has been assessed from the temperature coefficient ( Q10) and the moisture coefficient ( W 10), which indicate how much the Cpm size changes, when the temperature changes by 10°C and the soil water content changes by 10 wt %, respectively. Samples of gray forest soil, podzolized chernozem, and dark chestnut soil taken from arable plots have been incubated at 8, 18, and 28°C and humidity of 10, 25, and 40 wt %. From the data on the production of C-CO2 by soil samples during incubation for 150 days, the content of Cpm has been calculated. It has been shown that, on average for the three soils, an increase in temperature accounts for 63% of the rise in the pool of potentially mineralizable organic matter, whereas an increase in moisture accounts for 8% of that rise. The temperature coefficients of the potentially mineralizable pool are 2.71 ± 0.64, 1.27 ± 0.20, and 1.85 ± 0.30 in ranges of 8-18, 18-28, and 8-28°C, respectively; the moisture coefficients are 1.19 ± 0.11, 1.09 ± 0.05, and 1.14 ± 0.06 in ranges of 10-25, 25-40, and 10-40 wt %, respectively. The easily mineralizable fraction (C1, k 1 > 0.1 days-1) of the active pool of soil organic matter is less sensitive to temperature than the hardly mineralizable fraction (C3, 0.01 > k 3 > 0.001 days-1); their Q 10 values are 0.91 ± 0.15 and 2.40 ± 0.31, respectively. On the contrary, the easily mineralizable fraction is more sensitive to moistening than the hardly mineralizable fraction: their W 10 values are 1.22 ± 0.06 and 1.03 ± 0.08, respectively. The intensification of mineralization with rising temperature and water content during a long-term incubation results in the exhausting of the active pool, which reduces the production of CO2 by the soils during the repeated incubation under similar conditions nonlimiting mineralization.

  4. Influence of external and internal conditions of detector sample treatment on the particle registration sensitivity of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors of type CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of charged particle registration with SSNTD is the most important parameter to decide about the applicability of those detectors in research, technology and environmental dosimetry. The sensitivity is strongly influenced by the treatment of detector samples before, during and after the exposure and the final evaluation process by chemical etching. Whereas changes in detection properties by external environmental influences are generally considered, the dependences on the etching conditions are ignored. Commonly the sensitivity is assumed to compensate variations in the etching conditions for track revealing. In the present work the validity of this hypothesis will be checked. In the frame of the existing database the sensitivity is not really independent on variations in etching temperatures and should be corrected for differences in the activation energies for stimulation of the bulk and track etching process. Differences in the concentration dependence may be of minor importance. Furthermore, the registration sensitivity depends on environmental conditions before, during and after the irradiation with particles under investigation. Such external parameters are the air pressure, the sample temperature and modification of bulk material by out-gassing in vacuum and exposure to γ-rays. However, the available database is insufficient and inaccurate to draw final conclusions on the detection properties of SSNTD under various external and internal conditions.

  5. Research on suitable heating conditions during local PWHT. Pt. 1. Influence of heating conditions on temperature distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Jinkichi; Horii, Yukihiko; Sato, Masanobu; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Wang Jianhua

    1999-01-01

    To improve weld joint properties a heat treatment so called post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is often implemented for steel weldment. Generally, the PWHT is conducted in a furnace at a factory. But in site welds such as the girth joint of pipe, a local PWHT is applied using electric heater and so on. In the local PWHT steep temperature gradient occurs depending on the heating condition and it leads to rise of the thermal stress in addition to the welding residual stress. However, heating condition is not always defined the same in some standards. Therefore, suitable heat conditions for the local PWHT were studied supposing the power plant and so on experimentally and theoretically. Temperature distribution and thermal strains under different heating conditions were measured during the local PWHT using carbon steel pipes of 340 mm in diameter and 53 mm in wall thickness. The temperature gradient, thermal strain were also analyzed using Finite Element Method (FEM) as axis-symmetric model. Further, the influences of pipe size and heat transfer coefficient on the temperature distribution were analyzed and suitable heating source widths for various pipe sizes were proposed from the viewpoint of temperature distribution. (orig.)

  6. Increase of ozone concentrations, its temperature sensitivity and the precursor factor in South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the possible connections between the local and regional photochemical problem and global warming. The current study assesses the trend of ozone in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD in South China and investigates the interannual changes of sensitivity of ozone to air temperature, as well as the trends in regional precursors. Results reveal, at the three monitoring sites from the mid-1990s to 2010, an increase in the mean ozone concentrations from 1.0 to 1.6 µg m−3 per year. The increase occurred in all seasons, with the highest rate in autumn. This is consistent with trends and temperature anomalies in the region. The increase in the sensitivity of ozone to temperature is clearly evident from the correlation between ozone (OMI [Ozone Monitoring Instrument] column amount and surface air temperature (from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder displayed in the correlation maps for the PRD during the prominently high ozone period of July–September. It is observed to have increased from 2005 to 2010, the latter being the hottest year on record globally. To verify this temporal change in sensitivity, the ground-level trends of correlation coefficients/regression slopes are analysed. As expected, results reveal a statistically significant upward trend over a 14-year period (1997–2010. While the correlation revealed in the correlation maps is in agreement with the corresponding OMI ozone maps when juxtaposed, temperature sensitivity of surface ozone also shows an association with ozone concentration, with R=0.5. These characteristics of ozone sensitivity are believed to have adverse implications for the region. As shown by ground measurements and/or satellite analyses, the decrease in nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx in Hong Kong is not statistically significant while NO2 of the PRD has only very slightly changed. However, carbon dioxide has remarkably declined in the whole region. While these observations concerning

  7. Temperature dependence of energy-transducing functions and inhibitor sensitivity in chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurmans, J.J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Francke, J.A.; Torres-Pereira, J.M.G.; Kraayenhof, R.

    1984-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the temperature dependence of energy-transducing reactions in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts and their sensitivity for uncouplers and energy-transfer inhibitors at different temperatures is presented. Arrhenius plots reveal two groups of transitions, around 19/sup 0/C and around 12/sup 0/C. Activities that show transitions around 19/sup 0/C include linear electron flow from water to ferricyanide, its coupled photophosphorylation, the dark-release of the fluorescent probe atebrin, and the slow component of the 515 nm (carotenoid) absorbance decay after a flash. The transitions around 12/sup 0/C are observed with pyocyanine-mediated cyclic photophosphorylation, light- and dithioerythritol-activated ATP hydrolysis, the dark-release of protons, and the fast 515 nm decay component. It is suggested that both groups of temperature transitions are determined by proton displacements in different domains of the exposed thylakoid membranes. The effects of various uncouplers and an energy-transfer inhibitor are temperature dependent. Some uncouplers also show a different relative inhibition of proton uptake and ATP synthesis at lower temperatures. The efficiency of energy transduction (ATP/e/sub 3/) varied with temperature and was optimal around 10/sup 0/C.

  8. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris M van Beest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer. We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in

  9. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beest, Floris M; Milner, Jos M

    2013-01-01

    Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance are likely contributory factors. Climate-related effects on animal

  10. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  11. Temperature monitoring of vehicle engine exhaust gases under vibration condition using optical fibre temperature sensor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W Z; Suna, T; Grattana, K T V; Shen, Y H; Wei, C L; Al-Shamma'a, A I

    2006-01-01

    Two optical approaches, comprising and contracting both the fluorescence decay lifetime and the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) methods, were developed and evaluated for temperature monitoring of exhaust gases for use on a vehicle engine. The FBGs used in the system were written into specially designed Bi-Ge co-doped photosensitive fibres, to enable them to sustain high temperatures to over 800 0 C, which is far beyond that of FBGs written into most commercial photosensitive fibres. The sensors were subjected to a range of vibration tests, as a part of an optical exhaust monitoring network under development, and results from the test carried out are reported

  12. Optical temperature sensor with enhanced sensitivity by employing hybrid waveguides in a silicon Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoyan; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2016-01-01

    We report on a novel design of an on-chip optical temperature sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration where the two arms consist of hybrid waveguides providing opposite temperature-dependent phase changes to enhance the temperature sensitivity of the sensor. The sensitivity...... of the fabricated sensor with silicon/polymer hybrid waveguides is measured to be 172 pm/°C, which is two times larger than a conventional all-silicon optical temperature sensor (∼80 pm/°C). Moreover, a design with silicon/titanium dioxide hybrid waveguides is by calculation expected to have a sensitivity as high...

  13. Empirically Derived and Simulated Sensitivity of Vegetation to Climate Across Global Gradients of Temperature and Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quetin, G. R.; Swann, A. L. S.

    2017-12-01

    Successfully predicting the state of vegetation in a novel environment is dependent on our process level understanding of the ecosystem and its interactions with the environment. We derive a global empirical map of the sensitivity of vegetation to climate using the response of satellite-observed greenness and leaf area to interannual variations in temperature and precipitation. Our analysis provides observations of ecosystem functioning; the vegetation interactions with the physical environment, across a wide range of climates and provide a functional constraint for hypotheses engendered in process-based models. We infer mechanisms constraining ecosystem functioning by contrasting how the observed and simulated sensitivity of vegetation to climate varies across climate space. Our analysis yields empirical evidence for multiple physical and biological mediators of the sensitivity of vegetation to climate as a systematic change across climate space. Our comparison of remote sensing-based vegetation sensitivity with modeled estimates provides evidence for which physiological mechanisms - photosynthetic efficiency, respiration, water supply, atmospheric water demand, and sunlight availability - dominate the ecosystem functioning in places with different climates. Earth system models are generally successful in reproducing the broad sign and shape of ecosystem functioning across climate space. However, this general agreement breaks down in hot wet climates where models simulate less leaf area during a warmer year, while observations show a mixed response but overall more leaf area during warmer years. In addition, simulated ecosystem interaction with temperature is generally larger and changes more rapidly across a gradient of temperature than is observed. We hypothesize that the amplified interaction and change are both due to a lack of adaptation and acclimation in simulations. This discrepancy with observations suggests that simulated responses of vegetation to

  14. Parametric sensitivity analysis of a SOLRGT system with the indirect upgrading of low/mid-temperature solar heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Na; Cai, Rui Xian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A solar-assisted methane chemically recuperated gas turbine cycle has been proposed. ► The parametric sensitivity analysis of a SOLRGT system has been carried out. ► The concept of indirect upgrading of solar heat proves to be feasible. -- Abstract: Development of novel solar–fossil fuel hybrid system is important for the efficient utilization of low temperature solar heat. A solar-assisted methane chemically recuperated gas turbine (SOLRGT) system was proposed by Zhang and co-worker, which integrated solar heat into a high efficiency power system. The low temperature solar heat is first converted into vapor latent heat provided for a reformer, and then indirectly upgraded to high-grade generated syngas chemical energy by the reformation reaction. In this paper, based on the above mentioned cycle, a parametric analysis is performed using ASPEN PLUS code to further evaluate the effect of key thermodynamics parameters on the SOLRGT performance. It can be shown that solar collector temperature, steam/air mass ratio, turbine inlet pressure, and turbine inlet temperature have significant effects on system efficiency, solar-to-electricity efficiency, fossil fuel saving ratio, specific CO 2 emission and so on. The solar collector temperature is varied between 140 and 240 °C and the maximum net solar-to-electricity efficiency and system efficiency for a given turbine inlet condition (turbine inlet temperature of 1308 °C and pressure ratio of 15) is 30.2% and 52.9%, respectively. The fossil fuel saving ratio can reach up to 21.8% and the reduction of specific CO 2 emission is also 21.8% compared to the reference system. The system performance is promising for an optimum pressure ratio at a given turbine inlet temperature.

  15. Predicting a contact's sensitivity to initial conditions using metrics of frictional coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flicek, Robert C.; Hills, David A.; Brake, Matthew Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting how sensitive a frictional contact’s steady-state behavior is to its initial conditions. Previous research has proven that if a contact is uncoupled, i.e. if slip displacements do not influence the contact pressure distribution, then its steady-state response is independent of initial conditions, but if the contact is coupled, the steady-state response depends on initial conditions. In this paper, two metrics for quantifying coupling in discrete frictional systems are examined. These metrics suggest that coupling is dominated by material dissimilarity due to Dundurs’ composite material parameter β when β ≥ 0.2, but geometric mismatch becomes the dominant source of coupling for smaller values of β. Based on a large set of numerical simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients, a contact’s sensitivity to initial conditions is found to be correlated with the product of the coupling metric and the friction coefficient. For cyclic shear loading, this correlation is maintained for simulations with different contact geometries, material combinations, and friction coefficients. Furthermore, for cyclic bulk loading, the correlation is only maintained when the contact edge angle is held constant.

  16. Regional Variation in the Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition in China's Forests and Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; He, N.; Zhu, J.; Yu, G.; Xu, L.; Niu, S.; Sun, X.; Wen, X.

    2017-12-01

    How to assess the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and its regional variation with high accuracy is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the intensity and direction of the global carbon (C) cycle in response to climate change. In this study, we collected a series of soils from 22 forest sites and 30 grassland sites across China to explore regional variation in Q10 and its underlying mechanisms. We conducted a novel incubation experiment with periodically changing temperature (5-30 °C), while continuously measuring soil microbial respiration rates. The results showed that Q10 varied significantly across different ecosystems, ranging from 1.16 to 3.19 (mean 1.63). Q10 was ordered as follows: alpine grasslands (2.01) > temperate grasslands (1.81) > tropical forests (1.59) > temperate forests (1.55) > subtropical forests (1.52). The Q10 of grasslands (1.90) was significantly higher than that of forests (1.54). Furthermore, Q10 significantly increased with increasing altitude and decreased with increasing longitude. Environmental variables and substrate properties together explained 52% of total variation in Q10 across all sites. Overall, pH and soil electrical conductivity primarily explained spatial variation in Q10. The general negative relationships between Q10 and substrate quality among all ecosystem types supported the C quality temperature (CQT) hypothesis at a large scale, which indicated that soils with low quality should have higher temperature sensitivity. Furthermore, alpine grasslands, which had the highest Q10, were predicted to be more sensitive to climate change under the scenario of global warming.

  17. What is the Right Temperature Sensitivity for Foraminiferal Mg/ca Paleothermometry in Ancient Oceans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggins, S.; Holland, K.; Hoenisch, B.; Spero, H. J.; Allen, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mg/Ca seawater thermometry has become a cornerstone of modern paleoceanography. Laboratory experiments, seafloor core-top samples, plankton trap and tow collected materials all indicate consistent temperature sensitivity (9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C) for a full range of modern planktic foraminifer species. While these results demonstrate the overall robustness of Mg/Ca paleothermometry for the modern ocean, it is an empirical tool for which there is limited understanding of its bio-physio-chemical basis and its applicability to ancient oceans. We have undertaken experimental cultures of Orbulina universa, Globigerinoides sacculifer and Globigerinoides ruber (pink) across a range of seawater compositions (temperature, carbonate chemistry and Mg/Casw) that encompass modern and ancient Paleogene and Cretaceous ocean compositions (Mg/Casw 0.25x to 2x modern and pCO2 = 200 to 1500 ppmv). Our results reveal that the sensitivity of the Mg/Ca-thermometer for planktic foraminifers reduces significantly with Mg/Casw, rather than remaining constant as has been widely assumed or, increasing at lower Mg/Casw as proposed recently by Evans and Müller (2012). These results indicate that the modern sensitivity of 9-10% increase in Mg/Ca per °C cannot yet be applied to obtain reliable relative temperature change estimates to ancient oceans. These results further suggest that variations in foraminiferal Mg/Ca compositions in ancient oceans with lower Mg/Casw may correspond to larger temperature variations than in the modern ocean. Evans D. and Müller W., Paleoceanography, vol. 27, PA4205, doi:10.1029/2012PA002315, 2012

  18. Effect of temperature on the effectiveness of artificial reproduction of dace [Cyprinidae (Leuciscus leuciscus (L.))] under laboratory and field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosad, Joanna; Targońska, Katarzyna; Chwaluczyk, Rafał; Kaszubowski, Rafał; Kucharczyk, Dariusz

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to determine the effect of water temperature on the effectiveness of artificial reproduction of dace brooders under laboratory and field conditions. Three temperatures were tested in the laboratory: 9.5, 12 and 14.5 °C (± 0.1 °C). The water temperature under field conditions was 11.0 ± 0.3 °C (Czarci Jar Fish Farm) and 13.2 ± 1.4 °C (Janowo Fish Farm). The study showed that artificial reproduction of dace is possible in all the temperature ranges under study and an embryo survival rate of over 87% can be achieved. Dace has also been found to be very sensitive to rapid temperature changes, even within the temperature ranges optimal for the species. Such changes have an adverse effect on the outcome of the reproduction process, such as a decrease in the percentage of reproducing females, a decrease in the pseudo-gonado-somatic index (PGSI) and a decrease in the embryo survival rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed

  20. A gaze-contingent display to study contrast sensitivity under natural viewing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Michael; Bex, Peter J.

    2011-03-01

    Contrast sensitivity has been extensively studied over the last decades and there are well-established models of early vision that were derived by presenting the visual system with synthetic stimuli such as sine-wave gratings near threshold contrasts. Natural scenes, however, contain a much wider distribution of orientations, spatial frequencies, and both luminance and contrast values. Furthermore, humans typically move their eyes two to three times per second under natural viewing conditions, but most laboratory experiments require subjects to maintain central fixation. We here describe a gaze-contingent display capable of performing real-time contrast modulations of video in retinal coordinates, thus allowing us to study contrast sensitivity when dynamically viewing dynamic scenes. Our system is based on a Laplacian pyramid for each frame that efficiently represents individual frequency bands. Each output pixel is then computed as a locally weighted sum of pyramid levels to introduce local contrast changes as a function of gaze. Our GPU implementation achieves real-time performance with more than 100 fps on high-resolution video (1920 by 1080 pixels) and a synthesis latency of only 1.5ms. Psychophysical data show that contrast sensitivity is greatly decreased in natural videos and under dynamic viewing conditions. Synthetic stimuli therefore only poorly characterize natural vision.

  1. Extreme temperatures increase the deleterious consequences of inbreeding under laboratory and semi-natural conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Barker, J. Stuart F.; Pedersen, Kamilla Sofie

    2008-01-01

    when compared with non-inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster under different temperature conditions. Egg-to-adult viability, developmental time and sex ratio of emerging adults are studied under low, intermediate and high temperatures under laboratory as well as semi-natural conditions. The results...... show inbreeding depression for egg-to-adult viability. The level of inbreeding depression is highly dependent on test temperature and is observed only at low and high temperatures. Inbreeding did not affect the developmental time or the sex ratio of emerging adults. However, temperature affected...... the sex ratio with more females relative to males emerging at low temperatures, suggesting that selection against males in pre-adult life stages is stronger at low temperatures. The coefficient of variation (CV) of egg-to-adult viability within and among lines is higher for inbred flies and generally...

  2. Numerical simulation of temperature's sensitivity of chamfer hole's resistance on hydraulic step cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinhua, Wang; Hanliang, Bo; Wenxiang, Zheng; Jinnong, Yang

    2003-01-01

    The control rod drive is a very important device for controlling nuclear reactor startup, operation, shut down, and power change. The ability of the control rod drive to move safely and reliably directly relates to reactor safety. The Hydraulic Control Rod Drive System (HCRDS) is a new type of control rod drive system developed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University for Nuclear Heating Reactors. The HCRDS, designed using the hydrodynamic principle, has many advantages, including having the structure complete in the vessel, no possible ejection accident, short drive line, simple movable parts structure and safe shutdown during accidents. The hydraulic step cylinder is the key part for the HCRDS. In the process of reactor startup, the variation of temperature could make the water's density and viscosity change, and the force from the water flow would change accordingly. These factors could influence the performance of the hydraulic step cylinder. In this paper, the temperature sensitivity of the chamfer hole's resistance in the hydraulic step cylinder was studied with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program CFX5.5. The results were satisfactory: the discipline of variation of the chamfer hole's resistance with the outer tube's position was the same at different temperatures, the discrepancy of the chamfer hole's resistance was small for the same position at different temperatures, the chamfer hole's resistance decreased gradually with the increase of temperature, and the decrease extent was relatively small

  3. Temperature sensitivity study of eddy current and digital gauge probes for nuclear fuel rod oxide measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Faith R.; Lind, R. Paul; Smith, James A.

    2018-04-01

    Novel fuels are part of the nationwide effort to reduce the enrichment of Uranium for energy production. Performance of such fuels is determined by irradiating their surfaces. To test irradiated samples, the instrumentation must operate remotely. The plate checker used in this experiment at Idaho National Lab (INL) performs non-destructive testing on fuel rod and plate geometries with two different types of sensors: eddy current and digital thickness gauges. The sensors measure oxide growth and total sample thickness on research fuels, respectively. Sensor measurement accuracy is crucial because even 10 microns of error is significant when determining the viability of an experimental fuel. One parameter known to affect the eddy current and thickness gauge sensors is temperature. Since both sensor accuracies depend on the ambient temperature of the system, the plate checker has been characterized for these sensitivities. The manufacturer of the digital gauge probes has noted a rather large coefficient of thermal expansion for their linear scale. It should also be noted that the accuracy of the digital gauge probes are specified at 20°C, which is approximately 7°C cooler than the average hot-cell temperature. In this work, the effect of temperature on the eddy current and digital gauge probes is studied, and thickness measurements are given as empirical functions of temperature.

  4. Continuous cooling and low temperature sensitization of AISI types 316 SS and 304 SS with different degrees of cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvathavarthini, N.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B. (Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Programme); Seshadri, S.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering)

    This paper presents the results of investigations carried out to study the sensitization behaviour of AISI Types 316 SS and 304 SS with various degrees of cold work ranging from 0 to 25%. Initially Time-Temperature-Sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM standard A262 Practice A and E tests. From these diagrams it was found that the rate of sensitization and overall susceptibility to intergranular corrosion increases up to 15% cold work and above that starts decreasing. Desensitization was observed to be faster for higher levels of cold work, especially in the higher sensitization temperature range. From the TTS diagrams, the critical linear cooling rate below which sensitization occurs was calculated. From these data, Continuous Cooling Sensitization (CCS) diagrams were established. The results show that as the degree of cold work increases up to 15%, time needed for sensitization decreases and hence faster cooling rates must be used in order to avoid sensitization. At temperatures sufficiently below the nose temperature of the TTS diagram, log t versus 1/T plots follow a linear relationship where t is the time needed for the onset of sensitization at temperature T. From the slope, the apparent activation energy for sensitization was estimated. The validity of extrapolating these linear plots to lower temperatures (725 to 775 K) (which lie in the operating temperature regime of fast reactors) has been verified by experiment. The effect of heat treatment and microstructure on the Low Temperature Sensitization (LTS) behaviour was investigated. The results indicate that carbides of optimum size and distribution are the essential pre-requisites for LTS and cold work enhances susceptibility of stainless steels to LTS. (orig.).

  5. Low-Temperature Crystalline Titanium Dioxide by Atomic Layer Deposition for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chandiran, Aravind Kumar

    2013-04-24

    Low-temperature processing of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is crucial to enable commercialization with low-cost, plastic substrates. Prior studies have focused on mechanical compression of premade particles on plastic or glass substrates; however, this did not yield sufficient interconnections for good carrier transport. Furthermore, such compression can lead to more heterogeneous porosity. To circumvent these problems, we have developed a low-temperature processing route for photoanodes where crystalline TiO2 is deposited onto well-defined, mesoporous templates. The TiO2 is grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the crystalline films are achieved at a growth temperature of 200 C. The ALD TiO2 thickness was systematically studied in terms of charge transport and performance to lead to optimized photovoltaic performance. We found that a 15 nm TiO2 overlayer on an 8 μm thick SiO2 film leads to a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% with the state-of-the-art zinc porphyrin sensitizer and cobalt bipyridine redox mediator. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. The microbial temperature sensitivity to warming is controlled by thermal adaptation and is independent of C-quality across a pan-continental survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Eva; Rousk, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Climate models predict that warming will result in an increased loss of soil organic matter (SOM). However, field experiments suggest that although warming results in an immediate increase in SOM turnover, the effect diminishes over time. Although the use and subsequent turnover of SOM is dominated by the soil microbial community, the underlying physiology underpinning warming responses are not considered in current climate models. It has been suggested that a reduction in the perceived quality of SOM to the microbial community, and changes in the microbial thermal adaptation, could be important feed-backs to soil warming. Thus, studies distinguishing between temperature relationships and how substrate quality influences microbial decomposition are a priority. We examined microbial communities and temperature sensitivities along a natural climate gradient including 56 independent samples from across Europe. The gradient included mean annual temperatures (MAT) from ca -4 to 18 ˚ C, along with wide spans of environmental factors known to influence microbial communities, such as pH (4.0 to 8.8), nutrients (C/N from 7 to 50), SOM (from 4 to 94%), and plant communities, etc. The extensive ranges of environmental conditions resulted in wide ranges of substrate quality, indexed as microbial respiration per unit SOM, from 5-150 μg CO2g-1 SOM g-1 h-1. We hypothesised microbial communities to (1) be adapted to the temperature of their climate, leading to warm adapted bacterial communities that were more temperature sensitive (higher Q10s) at higher MAT; (2) have temperature sensitivities affected by the quality of SOM, with higher Q10s for lower quality SOM. To determine the microbial use of SOM and its dependence on temperature, we characterized microbial temperature dependences of bacterial growth (leu inc), fungal growth (ac-in-erg) and soil respiration in all 56 sites. Temperature dependences were determined using brief (ca. 1-2 h at 25˚ C) laboratory incubation

  7. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage with single well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jun-Seo; Lee, Seung-Rae; Pasquinelli, Lisa; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage system usually shows higher performance than other borehole thermal energy storage systems. Although there is a limitation in the widespread use of the HT-ATES system because of several technical problems such as clogging, corrosion, etc., it is getting more attention as these issues are gradually alleviated. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of recovery efficiency in two cases of HT-ATES system with a single well is conducted to select key parameters. For a fractional factorial design used to choose input parameters with uniformity, the optimal Latin hypercube sampling with an enhanced stochastic evolutionary algorithm is considered. Then, the recovery efficiency is obtained using a computer model developed by COMSOL Multiphysics. With input and output variables, the surrogate modeling technique, namely the Gaussian-Kriging method with Smoothly Clopped Absolute Deviation Penalty, is utilized. Finally, the sensitivity analysis is performed based on the variation decomposition. According to the result of sensitivity analysis, the most important input variables are selected and confirmed to consider the interaction effects for each case and it is confirmed that key parameters vary with the experiment domain of hydraulic and thermal properties as well as the number of input variables. - Highlights: • Main and interaction effects on recovery efficiency in HT-ATES was investigated. • Reliability depended on fractional factorial design and interaction effects. • Hydraulic permeability of aquifer had an important impact on recovery efficiency. • Site-specific sensitivity analysis of HT-ATES was recommended.

  10. Palmitoylethanolamide attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-Infantes, Emma; Rosell Del Valle, Cristina; Ladrón de Guevara-Miranda, David; Galeano, Pablo; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Blanco, Eduardo; Santín, Luis Javier

    2018-03-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors. Previous studies have demonstrated that cocaine, as well as other drugs of abuse, alters the levels of lipid-based signaling molecules, such as N-acylethanolamines (NAEs). Moreover, brain levels of NAEs have shown sensitivity to cocaine self-administration and extinction training in rodents. Given this background, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of repeated or acute administration of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous NAE, on psychomotor sensitization and cocaine-induced contextual conditioning. To this end, the potential ability of repeated PEA administration (1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) to modulate the acquisition of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization (BS) and conditioned place preference (CPP) was assessed in male C57BL/6J mice. In addition, the expression of cocaine-induced BS and CPP following acute PEA administration were also studied. Results showed that repeated administration of both doses of PEA were able to block the acquisition of cocaine-induced BS. Furthermore, acute administration of both doses of PEA was able to abolish the expression of BS, while the highest dose also abolished the expression of cocaine-induced CPP. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenous administration of PEA attenuated psychomotor sensitization, while the effect of PEA in cocaine-induced CPP depended on whether PEA was administered repeatedly or acutely. These findings could be relevant to understand the role that NAEs play in processes underlying the development and maintenance of cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Richter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  12. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Friedrich; Drusch, Matthias; Kaleschke, Lars; Maaß, Nina; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Mecklenburg, Susanne

    2018-03-01

    Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  13. Effects of temperature, genetic variation and species competition on the sensitivity of algae populations to the antibiotic enrofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Andreu; Zhao, Wenkai; Gillissen, Frits; Lürling, Miquel; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2018-02-01

    Primary producers are amongst the most sensitive organisms to antibiotic pollution in aquatic ecosystems. To date, there is little information on how different environmental conditions may affect their sensitivity to antibiotics. In this study we assessed how temperature, genetic variation and species competition may affect the sensitivity of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and the green-algae Scenedesmus obliquus to the antibiotic enrofloxacin. First, we performed single-species tests to assess the toxicity of enrofloxacin under different temperature conditions (20°C and 30°C) and to assess the sensitivity of different species strains using a standard temperature (20°C). Next, we investigated how enrofloxacin contamination may affect the competition between M. aeruginosa and S. obliquus. A competition experiment was performed following a full factorial design with different competition treatments, defined as density ratios (i.e. initial bio-volume of 25/75%, 10/90% and 1/99% of S. obliquus/M. aeruginosa, respectively), one 100% S. obliquus treatment and one 100% M. aeruginosa treatment, and four different enrofloxacin concentrations (i.e. control, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.10mg/L). Growth inhibition based on cell number, bio-volume, chlorophyll-a concentration as well as photosynthetic activity were used as evaluation endpoints in the single-species tests, while growth inhibition based on measured chlorophyll-a was primarily used in the competition experiment. M. aeruginosa photosynthetic activity was found to be the most sensitive endpoint to enrofloxacin (EC50-72h =0.02mg/L), followed by growth inhibition based on cell number. S. obliquus was found to be slightly more sensitive at 20°C than at 30°C (EC50-72h cell number growth inhibition of 38 and 41mg/L, respectively), whereas an opposite trend was observed for M. aeruginosa (0.047 and 0.037mg/L, respectively). Differences in EC50-72h values between algal strains of the same species were within a factor

  14. A temperature-sensitive winter wheat chlorophyll mutant derived from space mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongbin; Guo Huijun; Zhao Linshu; Gu Jiayu; Zhao Shirong; Li Junhui; Liu Luxiang

    2010-01-01

    A temperature-sensitive winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chlorophyll mutant Mt18, induced by spaceflight mutagenesis, was studied on agronomic traits, ultrastructure of chloroplast and photosynthesis characteristics. The leaf color of the mutant Mt18 showed changes from green to albino and back to green during the whole growth period. Plant height, productive tillers, spike length, grains and grain weight per plant, and 1000-grain weight of the mutant were lower than those of the wild type. The ultrastructural observation showed that no significant difference was found between the mutant and the wild type during prior albino stage, however, at the albino stage the number of granum-thylakoids and grana lamellae became fewer or completely disappeared, but the strom-thylakoid was obviously visible. After turning green,the structure of most chloroplasts recovered to normal, but number of chloroplast was still lower than that of the wild type. When exposed to photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) of 110 μmol·m -2 ·s -1 , the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of mutant was significantly lower than that of the wild type, and the non-regulated energy dissipation (Y NO ) was significantly higher than that of the wild type, while the change of the maximum photosystem II quantum yield (F v /F m ), potential activity of photosystem II (F v /F o ), photochemical quenching (q P ), effective quantum yield (Y PSI I) and regulated non-photochemical energy dissipation (Y NPQ ) were different at various stages. In addition, the differences of the electron transport rate (ETR), photochemical quenching (q P ), and effective quantum yield (Y PSI I) between mutant and wild type varied under different PAR conditions. It was concluded that with the change of chloroplast ultrastructure, the leaf color and photosynthesis of the wheat mutant Mt18 change correspondingly. The chloroplast ultrastructure was obviously different from that of wild type, and the photosynthetic efficiency

  15. Mass rearing of the Medfly temperature sensitive lethal genetic sexing strain in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caceres, C.; Fisher, K.; Rendon, P.

    2000-01-01

    Field tests have demonstrated the increased efficiency of the sterile insect technique (SIT) for the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied.), when only male Medflies are released (Robinson et al. 1986, Nitzan et al. 1993, McInnis et al. 1994, Rendon 1996). Genetic sexing strains (GSS) of Medflies, containing temperature sensitive lethal (tsl) and white pupae colour (wp) mutations (Franz et al. 1994) developed by FAO/IAEA, allow the separation of male flies from female flies. GSS technology has reached a stage where it is being used in large-scale operational programmes, such as the Moscamed Program in Guatemala. GSS based on the wp/tsl have the advantages of: 1) not requiring sophisticated equipment for sex separation, 2) a high accuracy of separation (> 99.5% males) is possible and, 3) separation is achieved during egg development, which excludes the unnecessary rearing of females (Franz et al. 1996). It was shown by Franz et al. (1994) that tsl GSS are genetically stable for many generations under small-scale rearing conditions. However, under the large-scale rearing of operational programmes such as Moscamed (Hentze and Mata 1987), a gradual loss of the sex separation mechanism through recombination remains a problem, as has been demonstrated in Guatemala during 1994-1996. This in no way precludes the use of GSS technology, but it does mean that a management system must be used to control this gradual loss of stability; a strategy for colony management which maintains a stable and high level of accuracy of male-only production. The El Pino facility, which mass produces sterile flies for the Guatemala Medflies SIT Program, has introduced a filter rearing system (FRS) (Fisher and Caceres 1999), and has demonstrated in a Medfly tsl GSS known as VIENNA 4/Tol-94, that genetic stability can be maintained. We report the operation of the FRS and its impact upon genetic stability and male-only production. The concept of the FRS has the potential to improve the

  16. Fabrication of ultra-high sensitive and selective CH4 room temperature gas sensing of TiO2nanorods: Detailed study on the annealing temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshabalala, Zamaswazi P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Applications of ultra-highly sensitive and selective methane (CH(sub4)) room temperature gas sensors are important for various operations especially in underground mining environment. Therefore, this study is set out to investigate the effect...

  17. Sensitivity of surface temperature to radiative forcing by contrail cirrus in a radiative-mixing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schumann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Earth's surface temperature sensitivity to radiative forcing (RF by contrail cirrus and the related RF efficacy relative to CO2 are investigated in a one-dimensional idealized model of the atmosphere. The model includes energy transport by shortwave (SW and longwave (LW radiation and by mixing in an otherwise fixed reference atmosphere (no other feedbacks. Mixing includes convective adjustment and turbulent diffusion, where the latter is related to the vertical component of mixing by large-scale eddies. The conceptual study shows that the surface temperature sensitivity to given contrail RF depends strongly on the timescales of energy transport by mixing and radiation. The timescales are derived for steady layered heating (ghost forcing and for a transient contrail cirrus case. The radiative timescales are shortest at the surface and shorter in the troposphere than in the mid-stratosphere. Without mixing, a large part of the energy induced into the upper troposphere by radiation due to contrails or similar disturbances gets lost to space before it can contribute to surface warming. Because of the different radiative forcing at the surface and at top of atmosphere (TOA and different radiative heating rate profiles in the troposphere, the local surface temperature sensitivity to stratosphere-adjusted RF is larger for SW than for LW contrail forcing. Without mixing, the surface energy budget is more important for surface warming than the TOA budget. Hence, surface warming by contrails is smaller than suggested by the net RF at TOA. For zero mixing, cooling by contrails cannot be excluded. This may in part explain low efficacy values for contrails found in previous global circulation model studies. Possible implications of this study are discussed. Since the results of this study are model dependent, they should be tested with a comprehensive climate model in the future.

  18. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  19. Modeling validation and control analysis for controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min; Chen, Chien-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14 °C, 0006 kg(w)/kg(da) in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  20. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Nang Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system.

  1. Cohort Removal Induces Changes in Body Temperature, Pain Sensitivity, and Anxiety-Like Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Keizo; Shoji, Hirotaka; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal). Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests. PMID:27375443

  2. Cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo eTakao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mouse behavior is analyzed to elucidate the effects of various experimental manipulations, including gene mutation and drug administration. When the effect of a factor of interest is assessed, other factors, such as age, sex, temperature, apparatus, and housing, are controlled in experiments by matching, counterbalancing, and/or randomizing. One such factor that has not attracted much attention is the effect of sequential removal of animals from a common cage (cohort removal. Here we evaluated the effects of cohort removal on rectal temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior by analyzing the combined data of a large number of C57BL/6J mice that we collected using a comprehensive behavioral test battery. Rectal temperature increased in a stepwise manner according to the position of sequential removal from the cage, consistent with previous reports. In the hot plate test, the mice that were removed first from the cage had a significantly longer latency to show the first paw response than the mice removed later. In the elevated plus maze, the mice removed first spent significantly less time on the open arms compared to the mice removed later. The results of the present study demonstrated that cohort removal induces changes in body temperature, pain sensitivity, and anxiety-like behavior in mice. Cohort removal also increased the plasma corticosterone concentration in mice. Thus, the ordinal position in the sequence of removal from the cage should be carefully counterbalanced between groups when the effect of experimental manipulations, including gene manipulation and drug administration, are examined using behavioral tests.

  3. Temperature- and pH-sensitive wearable materials for monitoring foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo P

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Salvo,1,2 Nicola Calisi,1 Bernardo Melai,1 Valentina Dini,3 Clara Paoletti,1 Tommaso Lomonaco,1 Andrea Pucci,1 Fabio Di Francesco,1 Alberto Piaggesi,4 Marco Romanelli3 1Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, 2Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research, 3Wound Healing Research Unit, Department of Dermatology, University of Pisa, 4Diabetic Foot Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Foot ulcers account for 15% of comorbidities associated with diabetes. Presently, no device allows the status of foot ulcers to be continuously monitored when patients are not hospitalized. In this study, we describe a temperature and a pH sensor capable of monitoring diabetic foot and venous leg ulcers developed in the frame of the seventh framework program European Union project SWAN-iCare (smart wearable and autonomous negative pressure device for wound monitoring and therapy. Temperature is measured by exploiting the variations in the electrical resistance of a nanocomposite consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene. The pH sensor used a graphene oxide (GO layer that changes its electrical potential when pH changes. The temperature sensor has a sensitivity of ~85 Ω/°C in the range 25°C–50°C and a high repeatability (maximum standard deviation of 0.1% over seven repeated measurements. For a GO concentration of 4 mg/mL, the pH sensor has a sensitivity of ~42 mV/pH and high linearity (R2=0.99. Keywords: diabetic foot ulcer, wearable sensors, wound temperature, wound pH

  4. On the sensitivity of a helicopter combustor wall temperature to convective and radiative thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Richard, S.; Duchaine, F.; Staffelbach, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coupling of LES, DOM and conduction is applied to an industrial combustor. • Thermal sensitivity of the combustor to convection and radiation is investigated. • CHT based on LES is feasible in an industrial context with acceptable CPU costs. • Radiation heat fluxes are of the same order of magnitude that the convective ones. • CHT with radiation are globally in good agreement with thermocolor test. - Abstract: The design of aeronautical engines is subject to many constraints that cover performance gain as well as increasingly sensitive environmental issues. These often contradicting objectives are currently being answered through an increase in the local and global temperature in the hot stages of the engine. As a result, hot spots could appear causing a premature aging of the combustion chamber. Today, the characterization of wall temperatures is performed experimentally by complex thermocolor tests in advanced phases of the design process. To limit such expensive experiments and integrate the knowledge of the thermal environment earlier in the design process, efforts are currently performed to provide high fidelity numerical tools able to predict the combustion chamber wall temperature including the main physical phenomena: combustion, convection and mixing of hot products and cold flows, radiative transfers as well as conduction in the solid parts. In this paper, partitioned coupling approaches based on a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, a Discrete Ordinate Method radiation solver and an unsteady conduction code are used to investigate the sensitivity of an industrial combustor thermal environment to convection and radiation. Four computations including a reference adiabatic fluid only simulation, Conjugate Heat Transfer, Radiation-Fluid Thermal Interaction and fully coupled simulations are performed and compared with thermocolor experimental data. From the authors knowledge, such comparative study with LES has never been published. It

  5. An Efficient Method of Reweighting and Reconstructing Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation Data for Extrapolation to Different Temperature and Density Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces an efficient technique to generate new molecular simulation Markov chains for different temperature and density conditions, which allow for rapid extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages at a range of temperatures and densities different from the original conditions where a single simulation is conducted. Obtained information from the original simulation are reweighted and even reconstructed in order to extrapolate our knowledge to the new conditions. Our technique allows not only the extrapolation to a new temperature or density, but also the double extrapolation to both new temperature and density. The method was implemented for Lennard-Jones fluid with structureless particles in single-gas phase region. Extrapolation behaviors as functions of extrapolation ranges were studied. Limits of extrapolation ranges showed a remarkable capability especially along isochors where only reweighting is required. Various factors that could affect the limits of extrapolation ranges were investigated and compared. In particular, these limits were shown to be sensitive to the number of particles used and starting point where the simulation was originally conducted.

  6. An Efficient Method of Reweighting and Reconstructing Monte Carlo Molecular Simulation Data for Extrapolation to Different Temperature and Density Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu; Kadoura, Ahmad Salim; Salama, Amgad

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces an efficient technique to generate new molecular simulation Markov chains for different temperature and density conditions, which allow for rapid extrapolation of canonical ensemble averages at a range of temperatures and densities different from the original conditions where a single simulation is conducted. Obtained information from the original simulation are reweighted and even reconstructed in order to extrapolate our knowledge to the new conditions. Our technique allows not only the extrapolation to a new temperature or density, but also the double extrapolation to both new temperature and density. The method was implemented for Lennard-Jones fluid with structureless particles in single-gas phase region. Extrapolation behaviors as functions of extrapolation ranges were studied. Limits of extrapolation ranges showed a remarkable capability especially along isochors where only reweighting is required. Various factors that could affect the limits of extrapolation ranges were investigated and compared. In particular, these limits were shown to be sensitive to the number of particles used and starting point where the simulation was originally conducted.

  7. Evaluation of stability of allergen extracts for sublingual immunotherapy during transport under unfavourable temperature conditions with an innovative thermal insulating packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinelli, P; Natoli, V; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Incorvaia, C; Barbieri, S; Masieri, S; Frati, F

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical and biotechnological products are temperature-sensitive and should normally be kept at a controlled temperature, particularly during transport, in order to prevent the loss of their stability and activity. Therefore, stability studies should be performed for temperature-sensitive products, considering product characteristics, typical environmental conditions, and anticipating environmental extremes that may occur during product transport in a specific country. Staloral products for sublingual immunotherapy are temperature sensitive and are labelled for maintenance under refrigerated conditions (2-8°C). Given the peculiar climatic context of Italy and the great temperature fluctuations that may occur during transport, this study was aimed at evaluating the impact of a new engineered thermal insulating packaging for Staloral. In particular, the purpose was to assess whether the new packaging could create a container condition able to preserve the stability and immunological activity of the product during the transport phase throughout Italy. The results showed that the range of temperatures that can affect the product, in the area surrounding the product packaging, may reach a peak of 63°C during transport under the most unfavourable climatic conditions, i.e. in a non-refrigerated van during the summer season, from the site of production in France to the patient's house in Catania, the city with the highest temperatures in Italy. However, the highest temperature reached inside the vaccine did not exceed 45°C over a period of about 2 h. The ELISA inhibition test on samples subjected to the extreme temperature conditions previously defined (45°C) showed an immunological activity higher than 75% of that initially measured and was comparable to those obtained with samples stored at controlled temperature (5°C). This means that, even in the worst case scenario, the structure of the allergen extracts is not influenced and the vaccine potency is

  8. Temperature sensitivity of void nucleation and growth parameters for single crystal copper: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, S; Chavan, V M; Warrier, M; Chaturvedi, S

    2011-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the void nucleation and growth is studied using the molecular dynamics (MD) code LAMMPS (Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). Single crystal copper is triaxially expanded at 5 × 10 9  s −1 strain rate keeping the temperature constant. It is shown that the nucleation and growth of voids at these atomistic scales follows a macroscopic nucleation and growth (NAG) model. As the temperature increases there is a steady decrease in the nucleation and growth thresholds. As the melting point of copper is approached, a double-dip in the pressure–time profile is observed. Analysis of this double-dip shows that the first minimum corresponds to the disappearance of the long-range order due to the creation of stacking faults and the system no longer has a FCC structure. There is no nucleation of voids at this juncture. The second minimum corresponds to the nucleation and incipient growth of voids. We present the sensitivity of NAG parameters to temperature and the analysis of double-dip in the pressure–time profile for single crystal copper at 1250 K

  9. Flow Visualization at Cryogenic Conditions Using a Modified Pressure Sensitive Paint Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Goad, William K.; Obara, Clifford J.; Sprinkle, Danny R.; Campbell, Richard L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Pendergraft, Odis C., Jr.; Bell, James H.; Ingram, JoAnne L.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    2005-01-01

    A modification to the Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) method was used to visualize streamlines on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) model at full-scale flight Reynolds numbers. In order to achieve these conditions, the tests were carried out in the National Transonic Facility operating under cryogenic conditions in a nitrogen environment. Oxygen is required for conventional PSP measurements, and several tests have been successfully completed in nitrogen environments by injecting small amounts (typically < 3000 ppm) of oxygen into the flow. A similar technique was employed here, except that air was purged through pressure tap orifices already existent on the model surface, resulting in changes in the PSP wherever oxygen was present. The results agree quite well with predicted results obtained through computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), which show this to be a viable technique for visualizing flows without resorting to more invasive procedures such as oil flow or minitufts.

  10. Model Forecast Skill and Sensitivity to Initial Conditions in the Seasonal Sea Ice Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Wrigglesworth, E.; Cullather, R. I.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Bitz, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the skill of predictions of September Arctic sea ice extent from dynamical models participating in the Sea Ice Outlook (SIO). Forecasts submitted in August, at roughly 2 month lead times, are skillful. However, skill is lower in forecasts submitted to SIO, which began in 2008, than in hindcasts (retrospective forecasts) of the last few decades. The multimodel mean SIO predictions offer slightly higher skill than the single-model SIO predictions, but neither beats a damped persistence forecast at longer than 2 month lead times. The models are largely unsuccessful at predicting each other, indicating a large difference in model physics and/or initial conditions. Motivated by this, we perform an initial condition sensitivity experiment with four SIO models, applying a fixed -1 m perturbation to the initial sea ice thickness. The significant range of the response among the models suggests that different model physics make a significant contribution to forecast uncertainty.

  11. γ-Radiolysis of benzophenone aqueous solution at elevated temperatures up to supercritical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Katsumura, Yosuke; Lin Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Kudo, Hisaaki; Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru

    2006-01-01

    A product analysis study of γ-irradiated benzophenone aqueous solutions from room temperature to 400 deg. C has been carried out by the combination of a flow irradiation system and a liquid chromatographic method. At room temperature, the main decomposition products are phenol and hydroxybenzophenone isomers. In high temperature and supercritical water solutions, 9-fluorenone appears as an important product and the G-value of benzophenone consumption depends significantly on the water density under supercritical conditions

  12. Numerical Simulations of Evaporating Sprays in High Pressure and Temperature Operating Conditions (Engine Combustion Network [ECN])

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    temperature effect in nonreacting and reacting diesel sprays using a novel injector , and imaging diagnostics for liquid phase penetration, light-off...ambient conditions. A single hole, modern common rail injector with an injector diameter of 90 µ (Bosch CRIN 2.4) is used at typical diesel injection...Temperature (K) 363 Ambient temperature (K) 900 Nozzle Diameter (mm) 0.09 Ambient density (kg/m3) 22.8 Injection Duration (ms) 1.5 Number of injector holes

  13. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.

    2016-01-01

    of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated...

  14. Temperature conditions of foundation plates under nuclear power plant reactor compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsaulov, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Method for calculation of temperature conditions for foundation plates under reactor compartments located in the main building, used in construction of the second stage of the Kostroma nuclear power plant, is considered. The obtained calculation data can be used for determining the most suitable period of concrete placement, composition, initial temperature, manufacturing technology and ways of delivery of concrete mixture

  15. Measurement of bovine body and scrotal temperature using implanted temperature sensitive radio transmitters, data loggers and infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallage, A. L.; Gaughan, J. B.; Lisle, A. T.; Beard, L.; Collins, C. W.; Johnston, S. D.

    2017-07-01

    Synchronous and continuous measurement of body (BT) and scrotal temperature (ST) without adverse welfare or behavioural interference is essential for understanding thermoregulation of the bull testis. This study compared three technologies for their efficacy for long-term measurement of the relationship between BT and ST by means of (1) temperature sensitive radio transmitters (RT), (2) data loggers (DL) and (3) infrared imaging (IRI). After an initial pilot study on two bulls to establish a surgical protocol, RTs and DLs were implanted into the flank and mid-scrotum of six Wagyu bulls for between 29 and 49 days. RT frequencies were scanned every 15 min, whilst DLs logged every 30 min. Infrared imaging of the body (flank) and scrotum of each bull was recorded hourly for one 24-h period and compared to RT and DL data. After a series of subsequent heat stress studies, bulls were castrated and testicular tissue samples processed for evidence of histopathology. Radio transmitters were less reliable than DLs; RTs lost >11 % of data, whilst 11 of the 12 DLs had 0 % data loss. IRI was only interpretable in 35.8 % of images recorded. Pearson correlations between DL and RT were strong for both BT ( r > 0.94, P 0.80, P animals post-surgery. Whilst scar tissue was observed at all surgical sutured sites when bulls were castrated, there was no evidence of testicular adhesion and normal active spermatogenesis was observed in six of the eight implanted testicles. There was no significant correlation of IRI with either DL or RT. We conclude that DLs provided to be a reliable continuous source of data for synchronous measurement of BT and ST.

  16. Temperature sensitivity indicates that chlorination of organic matter in forest soil is primarily biotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastviken, David; Svensson, Teresia; Karlsson, Susanne; Sandén, Per; Oberg, Gunilla

    2009-05-15

    Old assumptions that chloride is inert and that most chlorinated organic matter in soils is anthropogenic have been challenged by findings of naturally formed organochlorines. Such natural chlorination has been recognized for several decades, but there are still very few measurements of chlorination rates or estimates of the quantitative importance of terrestrial chlorine transformations. While much is known about the formation of specific compounds, bulk chlorination remains poorly understood in terms of mechanisms and effects of environmental factors. We quantified bulk chlorination rates in coniferous forest soil using 36Cl-chloride in tracer experiments at different temperatures and with and without molecular oxygen (O2). Chlorination was enhanced by the presence of O2 and had a temperature optimum at 20 degrees C. Minimum rates were found at high temperatures (50 degrees C) or under anoxic conditions. The results indicate (1) that most of the chlorination between 4 and 40 degrees C was biotic and driven by O2 dependent enzymes, and (2) that there is also slower background chlorination occurring under anoxic conditions at 20 degrees C and under oxic conditions at 50 degrees C. Hence, while oxic and biotic chlorination clearly dominated, chlorination by other processes including possible abiotic reactions was also detected.

  17. On the use of temperature for online condition monitoring of geared systems - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touret, T.; Changenet, C.; Ville, F.; Lalmi, M.; Becquerelle, S.

    2018-02-01

    Gear unit condition monitoring is a key factor for mechanical system reliability management. When they are subjected to failure, gears and bearings may generate excessive vibration, debris and heat. Vibratory, acoustic or debris analyses are proven approaches to perform condition monitoring. An alternative to those methods is to use temperature as a condition indicator to detect gearbox failure. The review focuses on condition monitoring studies which use this thermal approach. According to the failure type and the measurement method, it exists a distinction whether it is contact (e.g. thermocouple) or non-contact temperature sensor (e.g. thermography). Capabilities and limitations of this approach are discussed. It is shown that the use of temperature for condition monitoring has a clear potential as an alternative to vibratory or acoustic health monitoring.

  18. Differential chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA synthesis in temperature-sensitive mutants of Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unrau, P.

    1977-01-01

    The amount and type of residual DNA synthesis was determined in eight temperature-sensitive mutants of the smut fungus Ustilago maydis after incubation at the restrictive temperature (32/sup 0/C) for eight hours. Mutants ts-220, ts-207, ts-432 and ts-346 were found to have an overall reduction in the synthesis of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in comparison to the wild-type. In mutants ts-20, tsd 1-1, ts-84 and pol 1-1 nuclear DNA synthesis was depressed relative to mitochondrial synthesis. The DNA-polymerase mutant pol 1-1 had persistent nuclear synthesis at about 50% of the rate of synthesis of mitochondrial DNA and similar behavior was observed in a diploid homozygous strain. Mutant ts-84 had an initial burst of DNA synthesis which was reduced for nuclear but not mitochondrial synthesis after three hours preincubation at 32/sup 0/C. tsd 1-1 and ts-20 had nuclear residual synthesis amounting to about 25% of the relative rate of mitochondrial synthesis which correlates to increasing UV sensitivity of these strains on incubation at 32/sup 0/C. A pol 1-1 ts-84 double mutant had an additive loss of nuclear DNA synthesis which indicates that the steps of replication involved may be sequential.

  19. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  20. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  1. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  2. pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on novel cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymeric vaginal delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Daquan Chen,1,2 Kaoxiang Sun,1,2 Hongjie Mu,1 Mingtan Tang,3 Rongcai Liang,1,2 Aiping Wang,1,2 Shasha Zhou,1 Haijun Sun,1 Feng Zhao,1 Jianwen Yao,1 Wanhui Liu1,21School of Pharmacy, Yantai University, 2State Key Laboratory of Longacting and Targeting Drug Delivery Systems, Yantai, 3School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: In this study, a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on a novel cleavable hydrazone-based pH-sensitive methoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-hydrazone-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer was used for vaginal administration.Methods: The pH-sensitive, cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS was designed as a modified pH-sensitive liposome that would selectively degrade under locally acidic vaginal conditions. The novel pH-sensitive liposome was engineered to form a thermogel at body temperature and to degrade in an acidic environment.Results: A dual-sensitive liposome gel with a high encapsulation efficiency of arctigenin was formed and improved the solubility of arctigenin characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The dual-sensitive liposome gel with a sol-gel transition at body temperature was degraded in a pH-dependent manner, and was stable for a long period of time at neutral and basic pH, but cleavable under acidic conditions (pH 5.0. Arctigenin encapsulated in a dual-sensitive liposome gel was more stable and less toxic than arctigenin loaded into pH-sensitive liposomes. In vitro drug release results indicated that dual-sensitive liposome gels showed constant release of arctigenin over 3 days, but showed sustained release of arctigenin in buffers at pH 7.4 and pH 9.0.Conclusion: This research has shed some light on a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel using a cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer for vaginal delivery.Keywords: mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer, pH-sensitive liposomes, thermosensitive

  3. Influence of pre-deformation, sensitization and oxidation in high temperature water on corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Jinlong, E-mail: ljltsinghua@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liang, Tongxiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); State Key Lab of New Ceramic and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Luo, Hongyun [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Xueyuan Road 37, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The pre-strain accelerated desensitization and sensitization for austenitic stainless steels. • Low temperature sensitization (carbide precipitation) induced α′-martensite. • The sensitization level could affect directly corrosion resistance of the oxide film. - Abstract: The effects of pre-deformation on sensitization of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test. The effects of pre-deformation and sensitization on high temperature oxidized film formed in high temperature water were analyzed by a XRD and SEM. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at room temperature was used to study corrosion resistance of oxidized film. The point defect density of oxidized film was calculated by Mott–Schottky plots. The results showed that the value of the degree of sensitization first decreased and then slight increased with the increasing of engineering strain. Moreover, low temperature promoted to form sensitization induced “secondary” α′-martensite. The sample with 20% engineering strain had higher impedance value than other samples. The result was supported by further Mott–Schottky experiments. Considering increased α′-martensite with the increasing of strain, the results of the impedance were more consistent with values of the degree of sensitization.

  4. Development and application of genetic sexing systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly based on a temperature sensitive lethal mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, G.; Willhoeft, U.; Kerremans, P.; Hendrichs, J.; Rendon, P.

    1997-01-01

    The present status in genetic sexing for the Mediterranean fruit fly is discussed. This includes the selection of the appropriate sexing gene (which determines the feasibility and practical applicability of the sexing system) as well as the selection of the appropriate Y-autosome translocation (which determines the stability of the sexing system). A temperature sensitive lethal mutation is used to eliminate females during the egg stage. This mutation in combination with new Y-autosome translocations allowed the construction of a genetic sexing strain, named VIENNA-42, that is stable enough for large scale mass rearing. Also described are the analysis of this strain under field cage and field conditions and, in preparation for large scale tests in Guatemala, the outcrossing of VIENNA-42 with genetic material from the target area. (author)

  5. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, Corneel J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    of inbreeding effects in specific traits, such as age-specific mortality and life span, provide a good starting point, as a limited set of genes is expected to be involved. Results Here we report on a QTL mapping study on inbreeding related and temperature sensitive lethality in male Drosophila melanogaster...... and the molecular properties of genes that give rise to or modulate its deleterious effects is lacking. These questions warrant the detailed study of genetic loci giving rise to inbreeding depression. However, the complex and polygenic nature of general inbreeding depression makes this a daunting task. Study...... simple, being due mainly to a single recessive QTL on the left arm of chromosome 2. This locus colocalised with a QTL that conditioned variation in female life span, acting as an overdominant locus for this trait. Male life span was additionally affected by variation at the X-chromosome. Conclusion...

  6. Sensitivity of Distributions of Climate System Properties to Surface Temperature Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardoni, A. G.; Forest, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of climate change from models depend strongly on the representation of climate system properties emerging from the processes and feedbacks in the models. The quality of any model prediction can be evaluated by determining how well its output reproduces the observed climate system. With this evaluation, the reliability of climate projections derived from the model and provided for policy makers is assessed and quantified. In this study, surface temperature, upper-air temperature, and ocean heat content data are used to constrain the distributions of the parameters that define three climate system properties in the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model: climate sensitivity, the rate of ocean heat uptake into the deep ocean, and net anthropogenic aerosol forcing. In particular, we explore the sensitivity of the distributions to the surface temperature dataset used to estimate the likelihood of model output given the observed climate records. In total, five different reconstructions of past surface temperatures are used and the resulting parameter distribution functions differ from each other. Differences in estimates of climate sensitivity mode and mean are as great as 1 K between the datasets, with an overall range of 1.2 to 5.3 K using the 5-95 confidence intervals. Ocean effective diffusivity is poorly constrained regardless of which dataset is used. All distributions show broad distributions and only three show signs of a distribution mode. When a mode is present, they tend to be for low diffusivity values. Distributions for the net aerosol forcing show similar shapes and cluster into two groups that are shifted by approximately 0.1 watts per square meter. However, the overall spread of forcing values from the 5-95 confidence interval, -0.19 to -0.83 watts per square meter, is small compared to other uncertainties in climate forcings. Transient climate response estimates derived from these distributions range between 0.87 and 2.41 K. Similar to the

  7. Dynamic Performance of Maximum Power Point Trackers in TEG Systems Under Rapidly Changing Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, E. A.; Sera, D.; Mathe, L.; Schaltz, E.; Rosendahl, L.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric generators (TEG) is widely discussed and equipment has been built that can perform such analysis. One method is often used to perform such characterization: constant temperature with variable thermal power input. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) methods for TEG systems are mostly tested under steady-state conditions for different constant input temperatures. However, for most TEG applications, the input temperature gradient changes, exposing the MPPT to variable tracking conditions. An example is the exhaust pipe on hybrid vehicles, for which, because of the intermittent operation of the internal combustion engine, the TEG and its MPPT controller are exposed to a cyclic temperature profile. Furthermore, there are no guidelines on how fast the MPPT must be under such dynamic conditions. In the work discussed in this paper, temperature gradients for TEG integrated in several applications were evaluated; the results showed temperature variation up to 5°C/s for TEG systems. Electrical characterization of a calcium-manganese oxide TEG was performed at steady-state for different input temperatures and a maximum temperature of 401°C. By using electrical data from characterization of the oxide module, a solar array simulator was emulated to perform as a TEG. A trapezoidal temperature profile with different gradients was used on the TEG simulator to evaluate the dynamic MPPT efficiency. It is known that the perturb and observe (P&O) algorithm may have difficulty accurately tracking under rapidly changing conditions. To solve this problem, a compromise must be found between the magnitude of the increment and the sampling frequency of the control algorithm. The standard P&O performance was evaluated experimentally by using different temperature gradients for different MPPT sampling frequencies, and efficiency values are provided for all cases. The results showed that a tracking speed of 2.5 Hz can be successfully implemented on a TEG

  8. On the quench sensitivity of 7010 aluminum alloy forgings in the overaged condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryakioğlu, Murat, E-mail: m.tiryakioglu@unf.edu [School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Robinson, Jeremy S. [Department of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Eason, Paul D. [School of Engineering, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    The quench sensitivity of an overaged 7010 alloy forging was characterized by tensile and Vickers hardness tests, as well as scanning electron microscopy. Longitudinal tensile specimens, excised from a rectilinear open die forging were cooled from the solution treatment temperature following thirty-two different cooling paths including interrupted and delayed quenches. SEM analysis of the microstructure showed that quench precipitates were (i) Al{sub 2}CuMg (S) which nucleated heterogeneously on grain boundaries and (ii) Mg(Zn,Cu,Al){sub 2} (η) on grain boundaries, dispersoid bands, subgrain boundaries as well as in the aluminum matrix. The quench sensitivity of the alloy's yield strength and Vickers hardness was modeled simultaneously by quadruple-C curves, using an improved methodology for Quench Factor Analysis. The four C-curves used in the model represented loss of solute by (i) precipitation of S on grain boundaries, and precipitation of η (ii) on grain boundaries and dispersoid bands, (iii) on subgrain boundaries and (iv) in the matrix. The model yielded coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) values of 0.967 and 0.974 for yield strength and Vickers hardness, respectively. The model and the implications of the results are discussed in this paper.

  9. Thermal and Electrical Characterization of a Semi-Transparent Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Module under Real Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cornaro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cell technology is having an important role in renewable energy research due to its features and low-cost manufacturing processes. Devices based on this technology appear very well suited for integration into glazing systems due to their characteristics of transparency, color tuning and manufacturing directly on glass substrates. Field data of thermal and electrical characteristics of dye-sensitized solar modules (DSM are important since they can be used as input of building simulation models for the evaluation of their energy saving potential when integrated into buildings. However, still few studies in the literature provide this information. The study presented here aims to contribute to fill this lack providing a thermal and electrical characterization of a DSM in real operating conditions using a method developed in house. This method uses experimental data coming from test boxes exposed outdoor and dynamic simulation to provide thermal transmittance (U-value and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC of a DSM prototype. The device exhibits a U-value of 3.6 W/m2·K, confirmed by an additional measurement carried on in the lab using a heat flux meter, and a SHGC of 0.2, value compliant with literature results. Electrical characterization shows an increase of module power with respect to temperature resulting DSM being suitable for integration in building facades.

  10. Flux Balance Analysis of Escherichia coli under Temperature and pH Stress Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-05-12

    An interesting discovery in biology is that most genes in an organism are dispensable. That means these genes have minor effects on survival of the organism in standard laboratory conditions. One explanation of this discovery is that some genes play important roles in specific conditions and are essential genes under those conditions. E. coli is a model organism, which is widely used. It can adapt to many stress conditions, including temperature, pH, osmotic, antibiotic, etc. Underlying mechanisms and associated genes of each stress condition responses are usually different. In our analysis, we combined protein abundance data and mutant conditional fitness data into E. coli constraint-based metabolic models to study conditionally essential metabolic genes under temperature and pH stress conditions. Flux Balance Analysis was employed as the modeling method to analysis these data. We discovered lists of metabolic genes, which are E. coli dispensable genes, but conditionally essential under some stress conditions. Among these conditionally essential genes, atpA in low pH stress and nhaA in high pH stress found experimental evidences from previous studies. Our study provides new conditionally essential gene candidates for biologists to explore stress condition mechanisms.

  11. Differences in SOM decomposition and temperature sensitivity among soil aggregate size classes in a temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available The principle of enzyme kinetics suggests that the temperature sensitivity (Q10 of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is inversely related to organic carbon (C quality, i.e., the C quality-temperature (CQT hypothesis. We tested this hypothesis by performing laboratory incubation experiments with bulk soil, macroaggregates (MA, 250-2000 μm, microaggregates (MI, 53-250 μm, and mineral fractions (MF, MF>bulk soil >MI(P <0.05. The Q10 values were highest for MA, followed (in decreasing order by bulk soil, MF, and MI. Similarly, the activation energies (Ea for MA, bulk soil, MF, and MI were 48.47, 33.26, 27.01, and 23.18 KJ mol-1, respectively. The observed significant negative correlations between Q10 and C quality index in bulk soil and soil aggregates (P<0.05 suggested that the CQT hypothesis is applicable to soil aggregates. Cumulative C emission differed significantly among aggregate size classes (P <0.0001, with the largest values occurring in MA (1101 μg g-1, followed by MF (976 μg g-1 and MI (879 μg g-1. These findings suggest that feedback from SOM decomposition in response to changing temperature is closely associated withsoil aggregation and highlights the complex responses of ecosystem C budgets to future warming scenarios.

  12. Effect of oxyanions on the IGSCC inhibition of sensitized 304 stainless steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuge, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Junichiro; Nagano, Hiroo.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of oxyanions such as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- on the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water was studied. The results obtained are as follows: 1) Addition of such oxyanion as MoO 4 2- , WO 4 2- , and CrO 4 2- suppresses IGSCC of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature nondeaerated water. The effectiveness of the inhibitive action by the oxyanion is ranked in the order of MoO 4 2- >WO 4 2- >CrO 4 2- . 2) The mechanism of IGSCC inhibition by MoO 4 2- ion for sentized Type 304 stainless steel in high temperature water is considered as follows, i.e., the presence MoO 4 2- ion decreases the dissolution rate of Cr depleted zone at grain boundaries to the level of matrix by helping the formation of the Cr rich film containing MoO 3 or adsorbed MoO 4 2- ion on the surface of Type 304 stainless steel. (author)

  13. The validity of Actiwatch2 and SenseWear armband compared against polysomnography at different ambient temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirim Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There were no validation studies on portable sleep devices under different ambient temperature, thus this study evaluated the validity of wrist Actiwatch2 (AW2 or SenseWear armband (SWA against polysomnography (PSG in different ambient temperatures. Nine healthy young participants (6 males, aged 23.3±4.1 y underwent nine nights of study at ambient temperature of 17 °C, 22 °C and 29 °C in random order, after an adaptation night. They wore the AW2 and SWA while being monitored for PSG simultaneously. A linear mixed model indicated that AW2 is valid for sleep onset latency (SOL, total sleep time (TST and sleep efficiency (SE but significantly overestimated wake after sleep onset (WASO at 17 °C and 22 °C. SWA is valid for WASO, TST and SE at these temperatures, but severely underestimates SOL. However, at 29 °C, SWA significantly overestimated WASO and underestimated TST and SE. Bland–Altman plots showed small biases with acceptable limits of agreement (LoA for AW2 whereas, small biases and relatively wider LoA for most sleep variables were observed in SWA. The kappa statistic showed a moderate sleep–wake epoch agreement, with a high sensitivity but poor specificity; wake detection remains suboptimal. AW2 showed small biases for most of sleep variables at all temperature conditions, except for WASO. SWA is reliable for measures of TST, WASO and SE at 17–22 °C but not at 29 °C, and SOL approximates that of PSG only at 29 °C, thus caution is needed when monitoring sleep at different temperatures, especially in home sleep studies, in which temperature conditions are more variable.

  14. Effects of annealing conditions on the photoelectrochemical properties of dye-sensitized solar cells made with ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lanlan; Li, Renjie; Fan, Ke [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Peng, Tianyou [College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated by using porous ZnO electrodes derived from home-made ZnO nanoparticles. Electrochemical impedance spectra and open-circuit photovoltage decay curves measurements were performed to investigate the photoelectrochemical characteristics of ZnO films annealed at different temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the effects of the bulk traps and the surface states within the ZnO films on the recombination processes of the photoinjected electrons in DSSCs depend on the annealing temperature. The DSSC based on the ZnO electrode annealed at 400 C exhibits an optimal energy conversion efficiency of 3.92% under the illumination of one sun simulated sunlight because the farthest decrease in the effects of both bulk traps and surface states at this film can maintain a lower charge recombination probability. This result indicates that the ZnO film electrode has promising application in the field of DSSCs, and the optimization of porous film fabrication condition is efficient for the improvement of ZnO-based DSSC's performances. (author)

  15. On conditions and parameters important to model sensitivity for unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prindle, R.W.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Project (HYDROCOIN) was formed to evaluate hydrogeologic models and computer codes and their use in performance assessment for high-level radioactive-waste repositories. This report describes the results of a study for HYDROCOIN of model sensitivity for isothermal, unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuffs. We investigated both the types of flow behavior that dominate the performance measures and the conditions and model parameters that control flow behavior. We also examined the effect of different conceptual models and modeling approaches on our understanding of system behavior. The analyses included single- and multiple-parameter variations about base cases in one-dimensional steady and transient flow and in two-dimensional steady flow. The flow behavior is complex even for the highly simplified and constrained system modeled here. The response of the performance measures is both nonlinear and nonmonotonic. System behavior is dominated by abrupt transitions from matrix to fracture flow and by lateral diversion of flow. The observed behaviors are strongly influenced by the imposed boundary conditions and model constraints. Applied flux plays a critical role in determining the flow type but interacts strongly with the composite-conductivity curves of individual hydrologic units and with the stratigraphy. One-dimensional modeling yields conservative estimates of distributions of groundwater travel time only under very limited conditions. This study demonstrates that it is wrong to equate the shortest possible water-travel path with the fastest path from the repository to the water table. 20 refs., 234 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Tochilinite: A Sensitive Indicator of Alteration Conditions on the CM Asteroidal Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, L. B.; Bourcier, W. L.

    1996-03-01

    Each CM chondrite experienced a different degree of aqueous alteration. As a group, then, these meteorites preserve tangible evidence of asteroidal reactions that were interrupted at many different stages of completion. Geochemical modeling of CM reaction progress should elucidate the nature of the accreted CM materials and the specific types of asteroidal processes and conditions that subsequently influenced them. However, most of the minerals in CM chondrites are stable under a wide range of environmental conditions, which hinders efforts to capitalize on the diverse degree of CM alteration. Petrologic evidence suggests that Fe-rich tochilinite, the widespread mineralic component of CM chondrites previously referred to as "poorly characterized phase (PCP)", may be the most sensitive indicator of the conditions of CM alteration. This possibility has not previously been explored because thermodynamic data for tochilinite are lacking. We have estimated the thermodynamic properties of tochilinite from mixing equations and then calculated its stability limits with associated non-silicate phases as a function of PS2, PO2, and PCO2. The resultant phase relations : a) are consistent with mineral association in CM chondrites, b) indicate that the CM fluids were S-depleted and extremely reducing, c) imply the possibility of H2 gas seeps on the CM parent body, and d) suggest that the alteration of CM materials occurred at significant asteroidal depths.

  17. Interactive effects of food quality, temperature and rearing time on condition of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, B D; Elsdon, T S; Gillanders, B M

    2010-06-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the interactive effects of temperature and diet on condition indices of juvenile black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri, reared for time periods ranging from 2 to 42 days. After fish were reared for varying periods, growth, morphometric (Fulton's K) and biochemical [RNA:DNA (R:D) ratios] indices were measured. Fulton's K responded primarily to temperature, with progressive decrease in condition over time for fish reared at high temperatures. In contrast, R:D ratios were primarily affected by diet composition, with the highest values observed for fish reared on fish-based diets as opposed to vegetable-based diets. Significant effects of rearing time were also observed for Fulton's K and R:D ratios, as were some interactive treatment effects. In addition, Fulton's K and R:D ratios were not significantly correlated, perhaps due to the different periods of time integrated by each index or their relative sensitivity to lipid and protein deposition. These results highlight the complex responses of these condition indices to environmental variables and nutritional status.

  18. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Stavarache, Ionel

    2017-07-21

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling of nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. It is reported here the significant progress introduced by synthesis procedure to the in-situ structuring of Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films by heating the substrate at low temperature, 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency of 850 %. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the efort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  19. Activation of temperature-sensitive TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons reduces food intake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC respond to numerous hormonal and neural signals, resulting in changes in food intake. Here, we demonstrate that ARC POMC neurons express capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1-like receptors. To show expression of TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons, we use single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, TRPV1 knock-out (KO, and TRPV1-Cre knock-in mice. A small elevation of temperature in the physiological range is enough to depolarize ARC POMC neurons. This depolarization is blocked by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist and by Trpv1 gene knockdown. Capsaicin-induced activation reduces food intake that is abolished by a melanocortin receptor antagonist. To selectively stimulate TRPV1-like receptor-expressing ARC POMC neurons in the ARC, we generate an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 carrying a Cre-dependent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP expression cassette under the control of the two neuronal POMC enhancers (nPEs. Optogenetic stimulation of TRPV1-like receptor-expressing POMC neurons decreases food intake. Hypothalamic temperature is rapidly elevated and reaches to approximately 39 °C during treadmill running. This elevation is associated with a reduction in food intake. Knockdown of the Trpv1 gene exclusively in ARC POMC neurons blocks the feeding inhibition produced by increased hypothalamic temperature. Taken together, our findings identify a melanocortinergic circuit that links acute elevations in hypothalamic temperature with acute reductions in food intake.

  20. An individual reproduction model sensitive to milk yield and body condition in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun-Lafleur, L; Cutullic, E; Faverdin, P; Delaby, L; Disenhaus, C

    2013-08-01

    To simulate the consequences of management in dairy herds, the use of individual-based herd models is very useful and has become common. Reproduction is a key driver of milk production and herd dynamics, whose influence has been magnified by the decrease in reproductive performance over the last decades. Moreover, feeding management influences milk yield (MY) and body reserves, which in turn influence reproductive performance. Therefore, our objective was to build an up-to-date animal reproduction model sensitive to both MY and body condition score (BCS). A dynamic and stochastic individual reproduction model was built mainly from data of a single recent long-term experiment. This model covers the whole reproductive process and is composed of a succession of discrete stochastic events, mainly calving, ovulations, conception and embryonic loss. Each reproductive step is sensitive to MY or BCS levels or changes. The model takes into account recent evolutions of reproductive performance, particularly concerning calving-to-first ovulation interval, cyclicity (normal cycle length, prevalence of prolonged luteal phase), oestrus expression and pregnancy (conception, early and late embryonic loss). A sensitivity analysis of the model to MY and BCS at calving was performed. The simulated performance was compared with observed data from the database used to build the model and from the bibliography to validate the model. Despite comprising a whole series of reproductive steps, the model made it possible to simulate realistic global reproduction outputs. It was able to well simulate the overall reproductive performance observed in farms in terms of both success rate (recalving rate) and reproduction delays (calving interval). This model has the purpose to be integrated in herd simulation models to usefully test the impact of management strategies on herd reproductive performance, and thus on calving patterns and culling rates.

  1. Acquiring variation in an artificial language: Children and adults are sensitive to socially conditioned linguistic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Anna; Smith, Kenny; Brown, Helen; Wonnacott, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    demonstrate that children and adults are sensitive to speaker identity cues, an ability which is fundamental to tracking sociolinguistic variation, and that children's well-established tendency to regularize does not prevent them from learning sociolinguistically conditioned variation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaporation and Ignition Characteristics of Water Emulsified Diesel under Conventional and Low Temperature Combustion Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaowen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The combination of emulsified diesel and low temperature combustion (LTC technology has great potential in reducing engine emissions. A visualization study on the spray and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel was conducted experimentally in a constant volume chamber under conventional and LTC conditions. The effects of ambient temperature on the evaporation, ignition and combustion characteristics of water emulsified diesel were studied under cold, evaporating and combustion conditions. Experimental results showed that the ambient temperature had little effect on the spray structures, in terms of the liquid core length, the spray shape and the spray area. However, higher ambient temperature slightly reduced the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD of the spray droplets. The auto-ignition delay time increased significantly with the decrease of the ambient temperature. The ignition process always occurred at the entrainment region near the front periphery of the liquid core. This entrainment region was evolved from the early injected fuel droplets which were heated and mixed by the continuous entrainment until the local temperature and equivalence ratio reached the ignition condition. The maximum value of integrated natural flame luminosity (INFL reduced by 60% when the ambient temperature dropped from 1000 to 800 K, indicating a significant decrease of the soot emissions could be achieved by LTC combustion mode than the conventional diesel engines.

  3. Referral Regions for Time-Sensitive Acute Care Conditions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, David J; Mohan, Deepika; Angus, Derek C; Driessen, Julia R; Seymour, Christopher M; Yealy, Donald M; Roberts, Mark M; Kurland, Kristen S; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2018-03-24

    Regional, coordinated care for time-sensitive and high-risk medical conditions is a priority in the United States. A necessary precursor to coordinated regional care is regions that are actionable from clinical and policy standpoints. The Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, the major health care referral construct in the United States, uses regions that cross state and county boundaries, limiting fiscal or political ownership by key governmental stakeholders in positions to create incentive and regulate regional care coordination. Our objective is to develop and evaluate referral regions that define care patterns for patients with acute myocardial infraction, acute stroke, or trauma, yet also preserve essential political boundaries. We developed a novel set of acute care referral regions using Medicare data in the United States from 2011. For acute myocardial infraction, acute stroke, or trauma, we iteratively aggregated counties according to patient home location and treating hospital address, using a spatial algorithm. We evaluated referral political boundary preservation and spatial accuracy for each set of referral regions. The new set of referral regions, the Pittsburgh Atlas, had 326 distinct regions. These referral regions did not cross any county or state borders, whereas 43.1% and 98.1% of all Dartmouth Atlas hospital referral regions crossed county and state borders. The Pittsburgh Atlas was comparable to the Dartmouth Atlas in measures of spatial accuracy and identified larger at-risk populations for all 3 conditions. A novel and straightforward spatial algorithm generated referral regions that were politically actionable and accountable for time-sensitive medical emergencies. Copyright © 2018 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel Digital Features Discriminate Between Drought Resistant and Drought Sensitive Rice Under Controlled and Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfeng Duan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic quantification of drought response is a key issue both for variety selection and for functional genetic study of rice drought resistance. Traditional assessment of drought resistance traits, such as stay-green and leaf-rolling, has utilized manual measurements, that are often subjective, error-prone, poorly quantified and time consuming. To relieve this phenotyping bottleneck, we demonstrate a feasible, robust and non-destructive method that dynamically quantifies response to drought, under both controlled and field conditions. Firstly, RGB images of individual rice plants at different growth points were analyzed to derive 4 features that were influenced by imposition of drought. These include a feature related to the ability to stay green, which we termed greenness plant area ratio (GPAR and 3 shape descriptors [total plant area/bounding rectangle area ratio (TBR, perimeter area ratio (PAR and total plant area/convex hull area ratio (TCR]. Experiments showed that these 4 features were capable of discriminating reliably between drought resistant and drought sensitive accessions, and dynamically quantifying the drought response under controlled conditions across time (at either daily or half hourly time intervals. We compared the 3 shape descriptors and concluded that PAR was more robust and sensitive to leaf-rolling than the other shape descriptors. In addition, PAR and GPAR proved to be effective in quantification of drought response in the field. Moreover, the values obtained in field experiments using the collection of rice varieties were correlated with those derived from pot-based experiments. The general applicability of the algorithms is demonstrated by their ability to probe archival Miscanthus data previously collected on an independent platform. In conclusion, this image-based technology is robust providing a platform-independent tool for quantifying drought response that should be of general utility for breeding and functional

  5. Prediction of the optimum hybridization conditions of dot-blot-SNP analysis using estimated melting temperature of oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokai, Sachiko; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nishio, Takeshi

    2010-08-01

    Although the dot-blot-SNP technique is a simple cost-saving technique suitable for genotyping of many plant individuals, optimization of hybridization and washing conditions for each SNP marker requires much time and labor. For prediction of the optimum hybridization conditions for each probe, we compared T (m) values estimated from nucleotide sequences using the DINAMelt web server, measured T (m) values, and hybridization conditions yielding allele-specific signals. The estimated T (m) values were comparable to the measured T (m) values with small differences of less than 3 degrees C for most of the probes. There were differences of approximately 14 degrees C between the specific signal detection conditions and estimated T (m) values. Change of one level of SSC concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0x SSC corresponded to a difference of approximately 5 degrees C in optimum signal detection temperature. Increasing the sensitivity of signal detection by shortening the exposure time to X-ray film changed the optimum hybridization condition for specific signal detection. Addition of competitive oligonucleotides to the hybridization mixture increased the suitable hybridization conditions by 1.8. Based on these results, optimum hybridization conditions for newly produced dot-blot-SNP markers will become predictable.

  6. Temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus: isolation and genetic characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, J.W.; McGeoch, D.; Barry, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    Forty-nine temperature-sensitive mutants of fowl plague virus (FPV) strain Rostock and four ts mutants of FPV-strain Dobson were isolated by utilizing two methods of plaque screening, after either spontaneous or chemically induced mutagenesis. Twenty-nine of the FPV-Rostock mutants were further characterized by genetic recombination studies and were found to fall into six high frequency recombination groups. The genome segment carrying the ts mutation in each group was identified by analyzing the gene composition of ts + recombinants generated from crosses between representatives of each group and ts mutants of FPV-Dobson. It was concluded that the six groups correspond to mutations in six different genome segments, namely, those coding for the P 1 , P 2 , P 3 , HA, NP, and NS proteins

  7. Hand and finger dexterity as a function of skin temperature, EMG, and ambient condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Lin; Shih, Yuh-Chuan; Chi, Chia-Fen

    2010-06-01

    This article examines the changes in skin temperature (finger, hand, forearm), manual performance (hand dexterity and strength), and forearm surface electromyograph (EMG) through 40-min, 11 degrees C water cooling followed by 15-min, 34 degrees C water rewarming; additionally, it explores the relationship between dexterity and the factors of skin temperature, EMG, and ambient condition. Hand exposure in cold conditions is unavoidable and significantly affects manual performance. Two tasks requiring gross and fine dexterity were designed, namely, nut loosening and pin insertion, respectively. The nested-factorial design includes factors of gender, participant (nested within gender), immersion duration, muscle type (for EMG), and location (for skin temperature). The responses are changes in dexterity, skin temperature, normalized amplitude of EMG, and grip strength. Finally, factor analysis and stepwise regression are used to explore factors affecting hand and finger dexterity. Dexterity, EMG, and skin temperature fell with prolonged cooling, but the EMG of the flexor digitorum superficialis remained almost unchanged during the nut loosening task. All responses but the forearm skin temperature recovered to the baseline level at the end of rewarming. The three factors extracted by factor analysis are termed skin temperature, ambient condition, and EMG. They explain approximately two thirds of the variation of the linear models for both dexterities, and the factor of skin temperature is the most influential. Sustained cooling and warming significantly decreases and increases finger, hand, and forearm skin temperature. Dexterity, strength, and EMG are positively correlated to skin temperature. Therefore, keeping the finger, hand, and forearm warm is important to maintaining hand performance. The findings could be helpful to building safety guidelines for working in cold environments.

  8. Immunolocalization and distribution of functional temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhan, Ubaidus; Sato, Masaki; Shinomiya, Takashi; Okubo, Migiwa; Tsumura, Maki; Muramatsu, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Mitsuru; Tazaki, Masakazu; Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are unique cellular sensors involved in multiple cellular functions. Their role in salivary secretion remains to be elucidated. The expression and localization of temperature-sensitive TRP channels in salivary (submandibular, sublingual and parotid) glands were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The effects of various TRP channel agonists on carbachol (CCh)-induced salivary secretion in the submandibular gland and on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in a submandibular epithelial cell line were also investigated. Immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of TRP-melastatin subfamily member 8 (TRPM8) and TRP-ankyrin subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in the sublingual, submandibular and parotid glands. In addition, TRP-vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), TRPV3 and TRPV4 were also expressed in myoepithelial, acinar and ductal cells in all three types of gland. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR results demonstrated the mRNA expression of TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM8 and TRPA1 in acinar and ductal cells in these salivary glands. Perfusion of the entire submandibular gland with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin (1 μM) via the submandibular artery significantly increased CCh-induced salivation, whereas perfusion with TRPM8 and TRPA1 agonists (0.5 μM WS12 and 100 μM allyl isothiocyanate) decreased it. Application of agonists for each of the thermosensitive TRP channels increased [Ca(2+)]i in a submandibular epithelial cell line. These results indicate that temperature-sensitive TRP channels are localized and distributed in acinar, ductal and myoepithelial cells in salivary glands and that they play a functional role in the regulation and/or modulation of salivary secretion.

  9. What is felt temperature? Air conditioning with felt temperature in buildings and vehicles?; Was ist gefuehlte Temperatur? Klimaregelung mit gefuehlter Temperatur in Gebaeuden und Fahrzeugen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigel, Franz [Technology Marketing Support, St. Georgen (Germany); Rengshausen, Detlef [Vereta GmbH, Einbeck (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The term 'felt temperature' reaches back to a long series of medical, empirical-sociological and meteorological studies accomplished world-wide for human temperature feeling. The consideration of the felt temperature at the regulation of refrigerators meets not only the comfort feeling of humans, but also saves cash money at the same time.

  10. Partial characterization and response under hyperregulating conditions of Na+-K+ ATPase and levamisole-sensitive alkaline phosphatase activities in chela muscle of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Andrea Pinoni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence, characteristics and response to changes in environmental salinity of Na+-K+ ATPase and levamisole-sensitive alkaline phosphatase (AP activities were studied in chela muscle of the euryhaline crab Cyrtograpsus angulatus. Chela muscle exhibited an Na+-K+ ATPase activity which was strongly dependent on ATP concentration, pH and temperature of the reaction mixture. Maximal activity was found at 1 mM ATP, 30-37°C and pH 7.4. Levamisole-sensitive AP activity was characterised at physiological pH 7.4 and at pH 8.0. I50 for levamisole-sensitive AP activity was 8.8 mM and 8.0 mM at pH 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. At both pH levels, levamisole-sensitive AP activity exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km=3.451 mM and 6.906 mM at pH 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. Levamisole-sensitive AP activities were strongly affected by temperature, exhibiting a peak at 37ºC. In crabs acclimated to low salinity (10; hyperegulating conditions, Na+-K+ ATPase activity and levamisole-sensitive AP activity at the physiological pH were higher than in 35 psu (osmoconforming conditions. The response to low salinity suggests that both activities could be components of muscle regulatory mechanisms at the biochemical level secondary to hyperegulation of C. angulatus. The study of these activities under hyperegulating conditions contributes to a better understanding of the complexity of biochemical mechanisms underlying the adaptive process of euryhaline crabs.

  11. An efficient protocol for the synthesis of highly sensitive indole imines utilizing green chemistry: optimization of reaction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Bushra; Rubab, Syeda Laila; Raza, Abdul Rauf; Tariq, Sobia; Sultan, Ayesha; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2018-04-11

    Novel and highly sensitive indole-based imines have been synthesized. Their synthesis has been compared employing a variety of protocols. Ultimately, a convenient, economical and high yielding set of conditions employing green chemistry have been designed for their synthesis.

  12. The Advantages of Hybrid 4DEnVar in the Context of the Forecast Sensitivity to Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyo-Jong; Shin, Seoleun; Ha, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Sujeong

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid four-dimensional ensemble variational data assimilation (hybrid 4DEnVar) is a prospective successor to three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVar) in operational weather prediction centers currently developing a new weather prediction model and those that do not operate adjoint models. In experiments using real observations, hybrid 4DEnVar improved Northern Hemisphere (NH; 20°N-90°N) 500 hPa geopotential height forecasts up to 5 days in a NH summer month compared to 3DVar, with statistical significance. This result is verified against ERA-Interim through a Monte Carlo test. By a regression analysis, the sensitivity of 5 day forecast is associated with the quality of the initial condition. The increased analysis skill for midtropospheric midlatitude temperature and subtropical moisture has the most apparent effect on forecast skill in the NH including a typhoon prediction case. Through attributing the analysis improvements by hybrid 4DEnVar separately to the ensemble background error covariance (BEC), its four-dimensional (4-D) extension, and climatological BEC, it is revealed that the ensemble BEC contributes to the subtropical moisture analysis, whereas the 4-D extension does to the midtropospheric midlatitude temperature. This result implies that hourly wind-mass correlation in 6 h analysis window is required to extract the potential of hybrid 4DEnVar for the midlatitude temperature analysis to the maximum. However, the temporal ensemble correlation, in hourly time scale, between moisture and another variable is invalid so that it could not work for improving the hybrid 4DEnVar analysis.

  13. Land surface temperature downscaling using random forest regression: primary result and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Cao, Chen; Yang, Yingbao; Li, Xiaolong; Shan, Liangliang; Zhu, Xi

    2018-04-01

    The land surface temperature (LST) derived from thermal infrared satellite images is a meaningful variable in many remote sensing applications. However, at present, the spatial resolution of the satellite thermal infrared remote sensing sensor is coarser, which cannot meet the needs. In this study, LST image was downscaled by a random forest model between LST and multiple predictors in an arid region with an oasis-desert ecotone. The proposed downscaling approach was evaluated using LST derived from the MODIS LST product of Zhangye City in Heihe Basin. The primary result of LST downscaling has been shown that the distribution of downscaled LST matched with that of the ecosystem of oasis and desert. By the way of sensitivity analysis, the most sensitive factors to LST downscaling were modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI)/normalized multi-band drought index (NMDI), soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI)/ shortwave infrared reflectance (SWIR)/normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), normalized difference building index (NDBI)/SAVI and SWIR/NDBI/MNDWI/NDWI for the region of water, vegetation, building and desert, with LST variation (at most) of 0.20/-0.22 K, 0.92/0.62/0.46 K, 0.28/-0.29 K and 3.87/-1.53/-0.64/-0.25 K in the situation of +/-0.02 predictor perturbances, respectively.

  14. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  15. Sensory profiling of Dalmatian dry-cured ham under different temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Janječić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of the Dalmatian ham processing conditions on weight loss and sensory characteristics, 20 hams were processed following different temperature conditions during salting and ripening. For that purpose, hams were evaluated using quantitative descriptive analysis. The weight loss was higher and all sensory traits except presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine crystals were higher rated for hams processed at higher temperatures. The most significant (P<0.0001 influence of temperature was established on subcutaneous fat color, muscle color and presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine, whereas no influence was established on appearance, marbling, flavor and melting. This concludes that there is overall significant effect of higher temperature on sensory characteristics most likely due to the more intense proteolysis and lipolysis.

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF THE TEMPERATURE CONTROL SCHEME FOR ROLLER COMPACTED CONCRETE DAMS BASED ON FINITE ELEMENT AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Zhou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving an effective combination of various temperature control measures is critical for temperature control and crack prevention of concrete dams. This paper presents a procedure for optimizing the temperature control scheme of roller compacted concrete (RCC dams that couples the finite element method (FEM with a sensitivity analysis method. In this study, seven temperature control schemes are defined according to variations in three temperature control measures: concrete placement temperature, water-pipe cooling time, and thermal insulation layer thickness. FEM is employed to simulate the equivalent temperature field and temperature stress field obtained under each of the seven designed temperature control schemes for a typical overflow dam monolith based on the actual characteristics of a RCC dam located in southwestern China. A sensitivity analysis is subsequently conducted to investigate the degree of influence each of the three temperature control measures has on the temperature field and temperature tensile stress field of the dam. Results show that the placement temperature has a substantial influence on the maximum temperature and tensile stress of the dam, and that the placement temperature cannot exceed 15 °C. The water-pipe cooling time and thermal insulation layer thickness have little influence on the maximum temperature, but both demonstrate a substantial influence on the maximum tensile stress of the dam. The thermal insulation thickness is significant for reducing the probability of cracking as a result of high thermal stress, and the maximum tensile stress can be controlled under the specification limit with a thermal insulation layer thickness of 10 cm. Finally, an optimized temperature control scheme for crack prevention is obtained based on the analysis results.

  17. Micrometeorological function of paddy fields that control temperature conditions; Suiden no ondo kankyo kanwa kino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oue, H; Fukushima, T [Ehime University, Ehime (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture; Maruyama, T [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1994-10-01

    A verification was conducted on the micrometeorological function of paddy fields that control temperature conditions. A movement measurement was executed in order to elucidate air temperature distribution in the paddy field area. The observation revealed the following matters: air temperatures over paddy fields and farm lands are lower than those at bare lands and paved areas; air temperatures downwind the paddy fields are lower than those in residential areas; and air temperatures on the paddy fields are lower than those on the farm lands. Measurement of the air temperature distribution in paddy fields revealed that a paddy field becomes a heat absorbing source in the process of breeze blowing over the paddy field, and alleviates the temperature environment in the downwind area. A discussion was given on the specificity of surface temperature of the paddy field from the above result. It is the feature of paddy fields in summer that the energy exceeding the radiated amount is distributed into latent heat around the noon of a day. The surface temperatures are in the decreasing order of non-irrigated bare land > irrigated bare land > atmometer water surface > farm land > paddy field. The upper limit for the paddy field surface was around 28{degree}C. Surface temperature forming factors were discussed, and the surface temperature parameters (relative humidity, evaporation efficiency, etc.) were derived on each type of the land surface. The surface temperatures on each land surface were calculated using the parameter values. The result revealed that a paddy field having high relative humidity and evaporation efficiency has an effect to suppress the surface temperatures. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The sensitivity of US wildfire occurrence to pre-season soil moisture conditions across ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Daniel; Reager, John T.; Zajic, Brittany; Rousseau, Nick; Rodell, Matthew; Hinkley, Everett

    2018-01-01

    It is generally accepted that year-to-year variability in moisture conditions and drought are linked with increased wildfire occurrence. However, quantifying the sensitivity of wildfire to surface moisture state at seasonal lead-times has been challenging due to the absence of a long soil moisture record with the appropriate coverage and spatial resolution for continental-scale analysis. Here we apply model simulations of surface soil moisture that numerically assimilate observations from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission with the USDA Forest Service’s historical Fire-Occurrence Database over the contiguous United States. We quantify the relationships between pre-fire-season soil moisture and subsequent-year wildfire occurrence by land-cover type and produce annual probable wildfire occurrence and burned area maps at 0.25 degree resolution. Cross-validated results generally indicate a higher occurrence of smaller fires when months preceding fire season are wet, while larger fires are more frequent when soils are dry. This is consistent with the concept of increased fuel accumulation under wet conditions in the pre-season. These results demonstrate the fundamental strength of the relationship between soil moisture and fire activity at long lead-times and are indicative of that relationship’s utility for the future development of national-scale predictive capability.

  19. Flowering time of butterfly nectar food plants is more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly adult flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharouba, Heather M; Vellend, Mark

    2015-09-01

    1. Variation among species in their phenological responses to temperature change suggests that shifts in the relative timing of key life cycle events between interacting species are likely to occur under climate warming. However, it remains difficult to predict the prevalence and magnitude of these shifts given that there have been few comparisons of phenological sensitivities to temperature across interacting species. 2. Here, we used a broad-scale approach utilizing collection records to compare the temperature sensitivity of the timing of adult flight in butterflies vs. flowering of their potential nectar food plants (days per °C) across space and time in British Columbia, Canada. 3. On average, the phenology of both butterflies and plants advanced in response to warmer temperatures. However, the two taxa were differentially sensitive to temperature across space vs. across time, indicating the additional importance of nontemperature cues and/or local adaptation for many species. 4. Across butterfly-plant associations, flowering time was significantly more sensitive to temperature than the timing of butterfly flight and these sensitivities were not correlated. 5. Our results indicate that warming-driven shifts in the relative timing of life cycle events between butterflies and plants are likely to be prevalent, but that predicting the magnitude and direction of such changes in particular cases is going to require detailed, fine-scale data. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  20. Weak Hydrological Sensitivity to Temperature Change over Land, Independent of Climate Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Forster, P. M.; Hodnebrog, O.; Andrews, T.; Boucher, O.; Faluvegi, G.; Flaeschner, D.; Kasoar, M.; Kharin, V.; hide

    2018-01-01

    We present the global and regional hydrological sensitivity (HS) to surface temperature changes, for perturbations to CO2, CH4, sulfate and black carbon concentrations, and solar irradiance. Based on results from ten climate models, we show how modeled global mean precipitation increases by 2-3% per kelvin of global mean surface warming, independent of driver, when the effects of rapid adjustments are removed. Previously reported differences in response between drivers are therefore mainly ascribable to rapid atmospheric adjustment processes. All models show a sharp contrast in behavior over land and over ocean, with a strong surface temperature-driven (slow) ocean HS of 3-5%/K, while the slow land HS is only 0-2%/K. Separating the response into convective and large-scale cloud processes, we find larger inter-model differences, in particular over land regions. Large-scale precipitation changes are most relevant at high latitudes, while the equatorial HS is dominated by convective precipitation changes. Black carbon stands out as the driver with the largest inter-model slow HS variability, and also the strongest contrast between a weak land and strong sea response. We identify a particular need for model investigations and observational constraints on convective precipitation in the Arctic, and large-scale precipitation around the Equator.

  1. On the sensitivities of idealized moist baroclinic waves to environmental temperature and moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, Daniel; Merlis, Timothy; Gyakum, John; McTaggart-Cowan, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The impact of cloud diabatic heating on baroclinic life cycles has been studied for decades, with the nearly universal finding that this heating enhances the system growth rate. However, few if any studies have systematically addressed the sensitivity of baroclinic waves to environmental temperature. For a given relative humidity, warmer atmospheres contain more moisture than colder atmospheres. They also are more prone to the development of deep moist convection, which is itself a major source of diabatic heating. Thus, it is reasonable to expect faster baroclinic wave growth in warmer systems. To address this question, this study performs idealized simulations of moist baroclinic waves in a periodic channel, using initial environments with identical relative humidities, dry stabilities, and dry available potential energies but varying environmental temperatures and moist instabilities. While the dry versions of these simulations exhibit virtually identical wave growth, the moist versions exhibit major differences in life cycle. Counter-intuitively, despite slightly faster initial wave growth, the warmer and moister waves ultimately develop into weaker baroclinic systems with an earlier onset of the decay phase. An energetics analysis reveals that the reduced wave amplitude in the warmer cases stems from a reduced transfer of available potential energy into eddy potential energy. This reduced energy transfer is associated with an unfavorable phasing of mid-to-upper-level thermal and vorticity anomalies, which limits the meridional heat flux.

  2. Isolation of temperature-sensitive mutations in murC of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Mihoko; Kurokawa, Kenji; Nishida, Satoshi; Ueno, Kohji; Matsuo, Miki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2007-09-01

    Enzymes in the bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway are important targets for novel antibiotics. Of 750 temperature-sensitive (TS) mutants of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, six were complemented by the murC gene, which encodes the UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid:l-alanine ligase. Each mutation resulted in a single amino acid substitution and, in all cases, the TS phenotype was suppressed by high osmotic stress. In mutant strains with the G222E substitution, a decrease in the viable cell number immediately after shift to the restrictive temperature was observed. These results suggest that S. aureus MurC protein is essential for cell growth. The MurC H343Y mutation is located in the putative alanine recognition pocket. Consistent with this, allele-specific suppression was observed of the H343Y mutation by multiple copies of the aapA gene, which encodes an alanine transporter. The results suggest an in vivo role for the H343 residue of S. aureus MurC protein in high-affinity binding to L-alanine.

  3. Radiation synthesis of the water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer, copolymer and study on their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Maolin; Yin Min; Ha Hongfei

    1994-01-01

    In order to obtain the water-soluble, temperature sensitive polymer and activated copolymer, the radiation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm), radiation copolymerization of NIPAAm and N-acryloxysuccide (NASI) in aqueous solution or in buffer solution (PBS pH = 7.4) have been carried out by γ-rays from 60 Co source at room temperature. The optimum dose range (1-7 kGy), dose rate (>40 Gy/min) and monomer concentration (1%) were chosen through determining the monomer conversion yield and molecular weight (M w = 6.8 x 10 5 ) of product. Synthesis of the reversible linear polymer was performed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) as well. In this way a white powder product could be obtained which possesses of thermally reversible property too, when it was dissolved in water or PBS. The only disadvantages of this method is that the molecular weight of the polymer produced in THF was much lower than that in aqueous solution

  4. Influence of Slip Condition on Unsteady Free Convection Flow of Viscous Fluid with Ramped Wall Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ul Haq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to explore the influence of wall slip condition on a free convection flow of an incompressible viscous fluid with heat transfer and ramped wall temperature. Exact solution of the problem is obtained by using Laplace transform technique. Graphical results to see the effects of Prandtl number Pr, time t, and slip parameter η on velocity and skin friction for the case of ramped and constant temperature of the plate are provided and discussed.

  5. Cluster analysis of midlatitude oceanic cloud regimes: mean properties and temperature sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Gordon

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play an important role in the climate system by reducing the amount of shortwave radiation reaching the surface and the amount of longwave radiation escaping to space. Accurate simulation of clouds in computer models remains elusive, however, pointing to a lack of understanding of the connection between large-scale dynamics and cloud properties. This study uses a k-means clustering algorithm to group 21 years of satellite cloud data over midlatitude oceans into seven clusters, and demonstrates that the cloud clusters are associated with distinct large-scale dynamical conditions. Three clusters correspond to low-level cloud regimes with different cloud fraction and cumuliform or stratiform characteristics, but all occur under large-scale descent and a relatively dry free troposphere. Three clusters correspond to vertically extensive cloud regimes with tops in the middle or upper troposphere, and they differ according to the strength of large-scale ascent and enhancement of tropospheric temperature and humidity. The final cluster is associated with a lower troposphere that is dry and an upper troposphere that is moist and experiencing weak ascent and horizontal moist advection.

    Since the present balance of reflection of shortwave and absorption of longwave radiation by clouds could change as the atmosphere warms from increasing anthropogenic greenhouse gases, we must also better understand how increasing temperature modifies cloud and radiative properties. We therefore undertake an observational analysis of how midlatitude oceanic clouds change with temperature when dynamical processes are held constant (i.e., partial derivative with respect to temperature. For each of the seven cloud regimes, we examine the difference in cloud and radiative properties between warm and cold subsets. To avoid misinterpreting a cloud response to large-scale dynamical forcing as a cloud response to temperature, we require horizontal and vertical

  6. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: Implications from other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko eNishiyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts phenotype and does not replicate at 41oC. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  7. Moisture Sensitivity of Crumb Rubber Modified Modifier Warm Mix Asphalt Additive for Two Different Compaction Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilema, Munder A.; Aman, Mohamad Y.; Hassan, Norhidayah A.; Ahmad, Kabiru A.; Elghatas, Hamza M.; Radwan, Ashraf A.; Shyaa, Ahmed S.

    2018-04-01

    Crumb rubber obtained from scrap tires has been incorporated with asphalt binder to improve the performance of asphalt mixtures in the past decades. Pavements containing crumb-rubber modified (CRM) binders present one major drawback: larger amounts of greenhouse gas emissions are produced as there is rise in the energy consumption at the asphalt plant due to the higher viscosity of these type of binders compared with a conventional mixture. The objective of this paper is to calculate the optimum bitumen content for each percentage and evaluate the moisture sensitivity of crumb rubber modified asphalt at two different compacting temperatures. In this study, crumb rubber modified percentages was 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% from the binder weight, with adding 1.5% warm mix asphalt additive (Sasobit) and crush granite aggregate of 9.5mm Nominal maximum size was used after assessing its properties. Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) used by 2% from fine aggregate. The wet method was using to mix the CRM with bitumen, the CRM conducted at 177°C for 30 min with 700rpm and Sasobit conducted at 120°C for 10 min with 1000rpm. As a result, from this study the optimum bitumen content (OBC) was increased with increased crumb rubber content. For performance test, it was conducted using the AASHTO T283 (2007): Resistance of Compacted Bituminous Mixture to Moisture-Induced Damage. The result was as expected and it was within the specification of the test, the result show that the moisture damage increased with increased the crumb rubber content but it is not exceeding the limit of specification 80% for indirect tension strength ratio (ITSR). For the temperature was with lowing the temperature the moisture damage increased.

  8. Photo-sensitive Ge nanocrystal based films controlled by substrate deposition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavarache, Ionel; Maraloiu, Valentin Adrian; Negrila, Catalin; Prepelita, Petronela; Gruia, Ion; Iordache, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    Lowering the temperature of crystallization by deposition of thin films on a heated substrate represents the easiest way to find new means to develop and improve new working devices based on nanocrystals embedded in thin films. The improvements are strongly related with the increasing of operation speed, substantially decreasing the energy consumption and reducing unit fabrication costs of the respective semiconductor devices. This approach avoids major problems, such as those related to diffusion or difficulties in controlling nanocrystallites size, which appear during thermal treatments at high temperatures after deposition. This article reports on a significant progress given by structuring Ge nanocrystals (Ge-NCs) embedded in silicon dioxide (SiO2) thin films by heating the substrate at 400 °C during co-deposition of Ge and SiO2 by magnetron sputtering. As a proof-of-concept, a Si/Ge-NCs:SiO2 photo-sensitive structure was fabricated thereof and characterized. The structure shows superior performance on broad operation bandwidth from visible to near-infrared, as strong rectification properties in dark, significant current rise in the inversion mode when illuminated, high responsivity, high photo-detectivity of 1014 Jones, quick response and significant conversion efficiency with peak value reaching 850% at -1 V and about 1000 nm. This simple preparation approach brings an important contribution to the effort of structuring Ge nanocrystallites in SiO2 thin films at a lower temperature for the purpose of using these materials for devices in optoelectronics, solar cells and electronics on flexible substrates.

  9. Late Quaternary glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation distribution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ann V. Rowan; Simon H. Brocklehurst; David M. Schultz; Mitchell A. Plummer; Leif S. Anderson; Neil F. Glasser

    2014-05-01

    Glaciers respond to climate variations and leave geomorphic evidence that represents an important terrestrial paleoclimate record. However, the accuracy of paleoclimate reconstructions from glacial geology is limited by the challenge of representing mountain meteorology in numerical models. Precipitation is usually treated in a simple manner and yet represents difficult-to-characterize variables such as amount, distribution, and phase. Furthermore, precipitation distributions during a glacial probably differed from present-day interglacial patterns. We applied two models to investigate glacier sensitivity to temperature and precipitation in the eastern Southern Alps of New Zealand. A 2-D model was used to quantify variations in the length of the reconstructed glaciers resulting from plausible precipitation distributions compared to variations in length resulting from change in mean annual air temperature and precipitation amount. A 1-D model was used to quantify variations in length resulting from interannual climate variability. Assuming that present-day interglacial values represent precipitation distributions during the last glacial, a range of plausible present-day precipitation distributions resulted in uncertainty in the Last Glacial Maximum length of the Pukaki Glacier of 17.1?km (24%) and the Rakaia Glacier of 9.3?km (25%), corresponding to a 0.5°C difference in temperature. Smaller changes in glacier length resulted from a 50% decrease in precipitation amount from present-day values (-14% and -18%) and from a 50% increase in precipitation amount (5% and 9%). Our results demonstrate that precipitation distribution can produce considerable variation in simulated glacier extents and that reconstructions of paleoglaciers should include this uncertainty.

  10. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for short-term decomposition. Factors

  11. Neutral lipid accumulation at elevated temperature in conditional mutants of two microalgae species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Brandt, Anders Bøving; Egsgaard, Helge

    2012-01-01

    Triacylglycerols, an energy storage compound in microalgae, are known to be accumulated after nitrogen starvation of microalgae cells. Microalgae could be of importance for future biodiesel production due to their fast growth rate and high oil content. In collections of temperature sensitive...... accumulation in microalgae and suggest possibilities for biodiesel production by specific induction of lipid accumulation in miroalgal cultures by cell-cycle inhibition....

  12. Hospitalisations and costs relating to ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheridan, A

    2012-03-08

    BACKGROUND: Ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are conditions for which the provision of timely and effective outpatient care can reduce the risks of hospitalisation by preventing, controlling or managing a chronic disease or condition. AIMS: The aims of this study were to report on ACSCs in Ireland, and to provide a baseline for future reference. METHODS: Using HIPE, via Health Atlas Ireland, inpatient discharges classified as ACSCs using definitions from the Victorian ACSC study were extracted for the years 2005-2008. Direct methods of standardisation allowed comparison of rates using the EU standard population as a comparison for national data, and national population as comparison for county data. Costs were estimated using diagnosis-related groups. RESULTS: The directly age-standardised discharge rate for ACSC-related discharges increased slightly, but non-significantly, from 15.40 per 1,000 population in 2005 to 15.75 per 1,000 population in 2008. The number of discharges increased (9.5%) from 63,619 in 2005 to 69,664 in 2008, with the estimated associated hospital costs increasing (31.5%) from 267.8 million in 2005 to 352.2 million in 2008. Across the country, there was considerable variation in the discharge rates for the Top-10 ACSCs for the years 2005-2008. Significantly lower rates of hospitalisation were observed in more urban areas including Cork, Dublin and Galway. The most common ACSC in 2008 was diabetes with complications (29.8%). CONCLUSIONS: The variation in rates observed indicates the scope of reducing hospitalisations and associated costs for ACSCs, across both adult\\'s and children\\'s services and particularly in relation to diabetes complications.

  13. Calculation of the fuel temperature field under heat release and heat conductance transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, E.K.; Chernukhina, G.M.

    1974-01-01

    Results of calculation of the temperature distribution in an annular fuel element at transient thermal conductivity and heat release values are given. The calculation has been carried out by the mesh technique with the third-order boundary conditions for the inner surface assumed and with heat fluxes and temperatures at the zone boundaries to be equal. Three variants of solving the problem of a stationary temperature field are considered for failed fuel elements with clad flaking or cracks. The results obtained show the nonuniformity of the fuel element temperature field to depend strongly on the perturbation parameter at transient thermal conductivity and heat release values. In case of can flaking at a short length, the core temperature rises quickly after flaking. While evaluating superheating, one should take into account the symmetry of can flaking [ru

  14. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core δT at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities

  15. Sensitivity of Horn of Africa Rainfall to Regional Sea Surface Temperature Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdu T. Segele

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP version 4.4 Regional Climate Model (RegCM4 is used to investigate the rainfall response to cooler/warmer sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA forcing in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. The effect of SSTA forcing in a specific ocean basin is identified by ensemble, averaging 10 individual simulations in which a constant or linearly zonally varying SSTA is prescribed in individual basins while specifying the 1971–2000 monthly varying climatological sea surface temperature (SST across the remaining model domain. The nonlinear rainfall response to SSTA amplitude also is investigated by separately specifying +1K, +2K, and +4K SSTA forcing in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The simulation results show that warm SSTs over the entire Indian Ocean produce drier conditions across the larger Blue Nile catchment, whereas warming ≥ +2K generates large positive rainfall anomalies exceeding 10 mm·day−1 over drought prone regions of Northeastern Ethiopia. However, the June–September rainy season tends to be wetter (drier when the SST warming (cooling is limited to either the Northern or Southern Indian Ocean. Wet rainy seasons generally are characterized by deepening of the monsoon trough, east of 40°E, intensification of the Mascarene high, strengthening of the Somali low level jet and the tropical easterly jet, enhanced zonal and meridional vertically integrated moisture fluxes, and steeply vertically decreasing moist static energy. The opposite conditions hold for dry monsoon seasons.

  16. Characterization of ash melting behaviour at high temperatures under conditions simulating combustible solid waste gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Miaomiao; Dong, Qing; Huang, Yaji; Jin, Baosheng; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Haiming

    2018-05-01

    To achieve high-temperature gasification-melting of combustible solid waste, ash melting behaviour under conditions simulating high-temperature gasification were studied. Raw ash (RA) and gasified ash (GA) were prepared respectively by waste ashing and fluidized bed gasification. Results of microstructure and composition of the two-ash indicated that GA showed a more porous structure and higher content of alkali and alkali earth metals among metallic elements. Higher temperature promoted GA melting and could reach a complete flowing state at about 1250°C. The order of melting rate of GA under different atmospheres was reducing condition > inert condition > oxidizing condition, which might be related to different existing forms of iron during melting and different flux content with atmosphere. Compared to RA, GA showed lower melting activity at the same condition due to the existence of an unconverted carbon and hollow structure. The melting temperature for sufficient melting and separation of GA should be at least 1250°C in this work.

  17. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  18. Effect of Temperature, Pressure and Equivalence Ratio on Ignition Delay in Ignition Quality Tester (IQT): Diesel,n-Heptane, andiso-Octane Fuels under Low Temperature Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Seung Yeon; Naser, Nimal; Chung, Suk-Ho; Cha, Junepyo

    2015-01-01

    -octane in relatively low temperature conditions to simulate unsteady spray ignition behavior. A KAUST Research ignition quality tester (KR-IQT) was utilized, which has a feature of varying temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio using a variable displacement fuel

  19. Low temperature sensitization behavior in the weld metal of austenitic stainless steel. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels and its improvement by laser surface melting treatment. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Nakao, Yoshikuni

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior in the weld metal of Type308 stainless steel was investigated in this study. Three kinds of Type308 stainless steels, of which carbon contents were 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%, were used for this study. TIG welding method was adopted to make the weld metals. Weld metals were subjected to the sensitizing heat treatment in the temperature range between 773 K and 1073 K. The degree of sensitization were examined by the EPR method and the Strauss test. Chromium carbide was absorbed to precipitate at δ/γ grain boundaries in the as-welded weld metals Corrosion test results have shown that the higher carbon content in the weld metal is, the earlier sensitization yields in it. Sensitization in weld metals is found to occur faster than in those solution heat-treated at 1273 K prior to sensitizing heat-treatment. This fact suggests that preexisted chromium carbides have an effect to accelerate sensitization. That is, it is apparent that LTS phenomenon occur even in the weld metal. Moreover, sensitization in the weld metal has occurred in much shorter time than in HAZ, which is attributed to the preferential precipitation of chromium carbide at δ/γ grain boundaries in the weld metals. (author)

  20. Fuel temperature influence on diesel sprays in inert and reacting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payri, Raul; García-Oliver, Jose M.; Bardi, Michele; Manin, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of the evaporation–combustion process of the Diesel spray is a key factor for the development of robust injection strategies able to reduce the pollutant emissions and keep or increase the combustion efficiency. In this work several typical measurement applied to the diesel spray diagnostic (liquid length, lift-off length and ignition delay) have been employed in a novel continuous flow test chamber that allows an accurate control on a wide range of thermodynamic test conditions (up to 1000 K and 15 MPa). A step forward in the control of the test boundary conditions has been done employing a special system to study the fuel temperature effect on the evaporation and combustion of the spray. The temperature of the injector body has been controlled with a thermostatic system and the relationship between injector body and fuel temperature has been observed experimentally. Imaging diagnostics have been employed to visualize the liquid phase penetration in evaporative/inert conditions and, lift-off length and ignition delay in reactive condition. The results underline a clear influence of the injector body temperature on both conditions, evaporative and, in a lesser degree, reactive; finally the physical models found in the literature have been compared with the results obtained experimentally. - Highlights: ► The effect of the fuel temperature is substantial on liquid length (up to 15%). ► Fuel temperature has low effect but still appreciable on LOL and ignition delay. ► Theoretical one dimensional spray models are able to reproduce the experimental results with good accuracy.

  1. Arabidopsis ZED1-related kinases mediate the temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhicai; Cui, Dayong; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Cheng; Xin, Wei; Li, Yuan; Liu, Na; Ren, Dongtao; Tang, Dingzhong; Hu, Yuxin

    2017-07-01

    Activation of the immune response in plants antagonizes growth and development in the absence of pathogens, and such an autoimmune phenotype is often suppressed by the elevation of ambient temperature. However, molecular regulation of the ambient temperature-sensitive intersection of immune response and growth is largely elusive. A genetic screen identified an Arabidopsis mutant, zed1-D, by its high temperature-dependent growth retardation. A combination of molecular, cytological and genetic approaches was used to investigate the molecular basis behind the temperature-sensitive growth and immune response in zed1-D. A dominant mutation in HOPZ-ETI-DEFICIENT 1 (ZED1) is responsible for a high temperature-dependent autoimmunity and growth retardation in zed1-D. The autoimmune phenotype in zed1-D is dependent on the HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1). ZED1 and some ZED1-related kinases (ZRKs) are induced by elevated temperature and function cooperatively to suppress the immune response by modulating the transcription of SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1-1 CONSTITUTIVE 1 (SNC1) in the absence of pathogens. Our data reveal a previously unidentified role of ZRKs in the ambient temperature-sensitive immune response in the absence of pathogens, and thus reveals a possible molecular mechanism underlying the temperature-mediated intersection of immune response and growth in plants. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Effect of annealing temperature and dopant concentration on the thermoluminescence sensitivity in LiF:Mg,Cu,Ag material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyaabadi, Akram; Torkzadeh, Falamarz; Rezaei Ochbelagh, Dariush; Hosseini Pooya, Seyed Mahdi

    2018-04-24

    LiF:Mg,Cu,Ag is a new dosimetry material that is similar to LiF:Mg,Cu,P in terms of dosimetric properties. The effect of the annealing temperature in the range of 200 to 350°C on the thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity and the glow curve structure of this material at different concentrations of silver (Ag) was investigated. It has been demonstrated that the optimum values of the annealing temperature and the Ag concentration are 240°C and 0.1 mol% for better sensitivity, respectively. The TL intensity decreases at annealing temperatures lower than 240°C or higher than 240°C, reaching a minimum at 300°C and then again increases for various Ag concentrations. It was observed that the glow curve structure altered and the area under the low temperature peak as well as the area under the main dosimetric peak decreased with increasing annealing temperature. The position of the main dosimetric peak moved in the direction of higher temperatures, but at 320 and 350°C annealing temperatures, it shifted to lower temperatures. It was also observed that the TL sensitivity could partially be recovered by a combined annealing procedure. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of RCW Temperature on the Moderator Subcooling Margin for the LBLOCA of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Si Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Choi, Sung Soo [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Min [Central Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Moderator subcooling margin has been analyzed using the MODTURC{sub C}LAS code in the Large LOCA FSAR PARTs C and F. Performance of moderator heat exchangers depends on RCW (Raw reCirculated Water) temperature. And also the temperature is affected by sea water temperature. Unfortunately, sea water temperature is gradually increasing by global warming. So it will cause increase of RCW temperature inevitably. There is no assessment result of moderator subcooling with increasing RCW temperature even if it is important problem. Therefore, sensitivity analysis is performed to give information about the relation between RCW temperature and moderator subcooling in the present study. The moderator subcooling margin has to be ensured to establish the moderator heat removal when Large LOCA with LOECI and Loss of Class IV Power occurs. However, sea water temperature is increasing gradually due to global warming. So it is necessary that sensitivity analysis of RCW temperature on the moderator subcooling margin to estimate the availability of the moderator heat removal. In the present paper, the moderator subcooling analysis is performed using the same methodology and assumptions except for RCW temperature used in FSAR Large LOCA PART F.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of RCW Temperature on the Moderator Subcooling Margin for the LBLOCA of Wolsong NPP Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Si Won; Kim, Jong Hyun; Choi, Sung Soo; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Moderator subcooling margin has been analyzed using the MODTURC_CLAS code in the Large LOCA FSAR PARTs C and F. Performance of moderator heat exchangers depends on RCW (Raw reCirculated Water) temperature. And also the temperature is affected by sea water temperature. Unfortunately, sea water temperature is gradually increasing by global warming. So it will cause increase of RCW temperature inevitably. There is no assessment result of moderator subcooling with increasing RCW temperature even if it is important problem. Therefore, sensitivity analysis is performed to give information about the relation between RCW temperature and moderator subcooling in the present study. The moderator subcooling margin has to be ensured to establish the moderator heat removal when Large LOCA with LOECI and Loss of Class IV Power occurs. However, sea water temperature is increasing gradually due to global warming. So it is necessary that sensitivity analysis of RCW temperature on the moderator subcooling margin to estimate the availability of the moderator heat removal. In the present paper, the moderator subcooling analysis is performed using the same methodology and assumptions except for RCW temperature used in FSAR Large LOCA PART F.

  5. Temperature sensitive lethal factors and puparial colour sex separation mechanisms in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch-Petersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    A programme to develop genetic sexing mechanisms in the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), was initiated at the IAEA Laboratories, Seibersdorf, in 1983. Because of the potential benefits arising from the elimination of females early in the developmental cycle, combined with the anticipated relative ease of inducing temperature sensitive lethal (tsl) factors, it was decided to attempt to induce and isolate tsl factors active in the egg or early larval stages. Initially, five recombination suppressor (RS) strains were isolated. The degree of recombination suppression ranged from 77.6% to 99.1%. The viability of each of the five RS strains was assessed and RS 30/55 was selected as the most suitable strain. Ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS) was used to induce the tsl factors, by feeding two-day old adult males with a suspension of EMS in a 10% solution of sugar in the drinking water supply. Temperature tolerance tests indicated a discriminating temperature of 32 deg. C when isolating tsl factors active in the egg stage and 35 deg. C when isolating such factors in the early larval stage. A total of 39 and 22 tsl factors have been isolated in the two stages, respectively. However, none has yet proved stable. Induction of tsl factors with a reduced dose of EMS is now being attempted. An alternative genetic sexing programme was initiated in 1985, based on the use of pupal colour dimorphisms. Previously, a genetic sexing strain, T:Y(wp + )101, based on a white female/brown male puparial colour dimorphism, had twice been assessed for stability under mass rearing conditions. In both cases the sexual colour dimorphism disintegrated immediately. Another similarly dimorphic strain, T:Y(wp + )30C, was developed. This strain remained stable for seven generations of mass rearing, after which it started to disintegrate. Disintegration of this strain was probably caused by accidental contamination by wild type medflies. 34 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  6. High temperature polymer film dielectrics for aerospace power conditioning capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat, Narayanan, E-mail: venkats3@gmail.co [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Dang, Thuy D. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Nanostructured and Biological Materials Branch (AFRL/RXBN) (United States); Bai Zongwu; McNier, Victor K. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); DeCerbo, Jennifer N. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Tsao, B.-H. [University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Stricker, Jeffery T. [Air Force Research Laboratory-Electrical Technology Branch (AFRL/RZPE), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Polymer dielectrics are the preferred materials of choice for capacitive energy-storage applications because of their potential for high dielectric breakdown strengths, low dissipation factors and good dielectric stability over a wide range of frequencies and temperatures, despite having inherently lower dielectric constants relative to ceramic dielectrics. They are also amenable to large area processing into films at a relatively lower cost. Air Force currently has a strong need for the development of compact capacitors which are thermally robust for operation in a variety of aerospace power conditioning applications. While such applications typically use polycarbonate (PC) dielectric films in wound capacitors for operation from -55 deg. C to 125 deg. C, future power electronic systems would require the use of polymer dielectrics that can reliably operate up to elevated temperatures in the range of 250-350 deg. C. The focus of this research is the generation and dielectric evaluation of metallized, thin free-standing films derived from high temperature polymer structures such as fluorinated polybenzoxazoles, post-functionalized fluorinated polyimides and fluorenyl polyesters incorporating diamond-like hydrocarbon units. The discussion is centered mainly on variable temperature dielectric measurements of film capacitance and dissipation factor and the effects of thermal cycling, up to a maximum temperature of 350 deg. C, on film dielectric performance. Initial studies clearly point to the dielectric stability of these films for high temperature power conditioning applications, as indicated by their relatively low temperature coefficient of capacitance (TCC) (approx2%) over the entire range of temperatures. Some of the films were also found to exhibit good dielectric breakdown strengths (up to 470 V/mum) and a film dissipation factor of the order of <0.003 (0.3%) at the frequency of interest (10 kHz) for the intended applications. The measured relative dielectric

  7. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassnig, R; Hollerer, M; Striedinger, B; Fian, A; Stadlober, B; Winkler, A

    2015-11-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p ++ -silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3-4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact-channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility.

  8. A High-Sensitivity Gas Sensor Toward Methanol Using ZnO Microrods: Effect of Operating Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, M.; Mahapatra, R.; Mondal, B.; Ghosh, R.

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, zinc oxide (ZnO) microrods with the average diameter of 350 nm have been synthesized on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate using a hydrothermal reaction process at a low temperature of 90°C. The methanol gas sensing behaviour of as-synthesized ZnO microrods have been studied at different operating temperatures (100-300°C). The gas sensing results show that the ZnO microrods exhibit excellent sensitivity, selectivity, and stability toward methanol gas at 300°C. The as-grown ZnO microrods sensor also shows the good sensitivity for methanol even at a low operating temperature of 100°C. The ultra-high sensitivity of 4.41 × 104% [gas sensitivity, S g = ( I g - I a)/ I a × 100%] and 5.11 × 102% to 100 ppm methanol gas at a temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively, has been observed. A fast response time of 200 ms and 270 ms as well as a recovery time of 120 ms and 1330 ms to methanol gas have also been found at an operating temperature of 300°C and 100°C, respectively. The response and recovery time decreases with increasing operation temperature of the sensor.

  9. Improved Sterilization of Sensitive Biomaterials with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide at Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bernhardt

    Full Text Available The development of bio-resorbable implant materials is rapidly going on. Sterilization of those materials is inevitable to assure the hygienic requirements for critical medical devices according to the medical device directive (MDD, 93/42/EG. Biopolymer-containing biomaterials are often highly sensitive towards classical sterilization procedures like steam, ethylene oxide treatment or gamma irradiation. Supercritical CO₂ (scCO₂ treatment is a promising strategy for the terminal sterilization of sensitive biomaterials at low temperature. In combination with low amounts of additives scCO₂ treatment effectively inactivates microorganisms including bacterial spores. We established a scCO₂ sterilization procedure under addition of 0.25% water, 0.15% hydrogen peroxide and 0.5% acetic anhydride. The procedure was successfully tested for the inactivation of a wide panel of microorganisms including endospores of different bacterial species, vegetative cells of gram positive and negative bacteria including mycobacteria, fungi including yeast, and bacteriophages. For robust testing of the sterilization effect with regard to later application of implant materials sterilization all microorganisms were embedded in alginate/agarose cylinders that were used as Process Challenge Devices (PCD. These PCD served as surrogate models for bioresorbable 3D scaffolds. Furthermore, the impact of scCO₂ sterilization on mechanical properties of polysaccharide-based hydrogels and collagen-based scaffolds was analyzed. The procedure was shown to be less compromising on mechanical and rheological properties compared to established low-temperature sterilization methods like gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide exposure as well as conventional steam sterilization. Cytocompatibility of alginate gels and scaffolds from mineralized collagen was compared after sterilization with ethylene oxide, gamma irradiation, steam sterilization and scCO₂ treatment. Human

  10. Sporulation of Bremia lactucae affected by temperature, relative humidity, and wind in controlled conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, H.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Subbarao, K.V.; Scherm, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of temperature (5 to 25degreesC), relative humidity (81 to 100%), wind speed (0 to 1.0 in s(-1)), and their interactions on sporulation of Bremia lactucae on lettuce cotyledons were investigated in controlled conditions. Sporulation was affected significantly (P <0.0001) by

  11. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  12. Boundary conditions in Ginsburg Landau theory and critical temperature of high-T superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykov, A. N.

    2008-06-01

    New mixed boundary conditions to the Ginsburg-Landau equations are found to limit the critical temperature ( T) of high- T superconductors. Moreover, the value of the pseudogap in these superconductors can be explained by using the method. As a result, the macroscopic approach is proposed to increase T of cuprate superconductors.

  13. Boundary conditions in Ginsburg-Landau theory and critical temperature of high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lykov, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    New mixed boundary conditions to the Ginsburg-Landau equations are found to limit the critical temperature (T c ) of high-T c superconductors. Moreover, the value of the pseudogap in these superconductors can be explained by using the method. As a result, the macroscopic approach is proposed to increase T c of cuprate superconductors

  14. Thermal comfort index and infrared temperatures for lambs subjected to different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago do Prado Paim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an abundance of thermal indices with different input parameters and applicabilities. Infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating the response of animals to the environment and differentiating between genetic groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate superficial body temperatures of lambs from three genetic groups under different environmental conditions, correlating these with thermal comfort indices. Forty lambs (18 males and 22 females from three genetic groups (Santa Inês, Ile de France × Santa Inês and Dorper × Santa Inês were exposed to three climatic conditions: open air, housed and artificial heating. Infrared thermal images were taken weekly at 6h, 12h and 21h at the neck, front flank, rear flank, rump, nose, skull, trunk and eye. Four thermal comfort indices were calculated using environmental measurements including black globe temperature, air humidity and wind speed. Artificial warming, provided by infrared lamps and wind protection, conserved and increased the superficial body temperature of the lambs, thus providing lower daily thermal ranges. Artificial warming did not influence daily weight gain or mortality. Skin temperatures increased along with increases in climatic indices. Again, infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating thermal stress conditions and differentiating environments. However, the use of thermal imaging for understanding animal responses to environmental conditions requires further study.

  15. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  16. Patient characteristics associated with hospitalisations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Zahid

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulatory Care Sensitive Conditions (ACSCs are those for which hospitalisation is thought to be avoidable with the application of preventive care and early disease management, usually delivered in a primary care setting. ACSCs are used extensively as indicators of accessibility and effectiveness of primary health care. We examined the association between patient characteristics and hospitalisation for ACSCs in the adult and paediatric population in Victoria, Australia, 2003/04. Methods Hospital admissions data were merged with two area-level socioeconomic indexes: Index of Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSED and Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were performed for both adult (age 18+ years and paediatric (age Results Predictors were much more strongly associated with ACSCs admissions compared to non-ACSCs admissions in the adult group than for the paediatric group with the exception of rurality. Significant adjusted ORs in the adult group were 1.06, 1.15, 1.13, 1.06 and 1.11 for sex, rurality, age, IRSED and ARIA variables, and 1.34, 1.04 and 1.09 in the paediatric group for rurality, IRSED and ARIA, respectively. Conclusions Disadvantaged paediatric and adult population experience more need of hospital care for ACSCs. Access barriers to primary care are plausible causes for the observed disparities. Understanding the characteristics of individuals experiencing access barriers to primary care will be useful for developing targeted interventions meeting the unique ambulatory needs of the population.

  17. Signal detection in global mean temperatures after "Paris": an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Hans; Dangendorf, Sönke; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Bregman, Bram; Petersen, Arthur C.

    2018-02-01

    In December 2015, 195 countries agreed in Paris to hold the increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST) well below 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C. Since large financial flows will be needed to keep GMSTs below these targets, it is important to know how GMST has progressed since pre-industrial times. However, the Paris Agreement is not conclusive as regards methods to calculate it. Should trend progression be deduced from GCM simulations or from instrumental records by (statistical) trend methods? Which simulations or GMST datasets should be chosen, and which trend models? What is pre-industrial and, finally, are the Paris targets formulated for total warming, originating from both natural and anthropogenic forcing, or do they refer to anthropogenic warming only? To find answers to these questions we performed an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis where datasets and model choices have been varied. For all cases we evaluated trend progression along with uncertainty information. To do so, we analysed four trend approaches and applied these to the five leading observational GMST products. We find GMST progression to be largely independent of various trend model approaches. However, GMST progression is significantly influenced by the choice of GMST datasets. Uncertainties due to natural variability are largest in size. As a parallel path, we calculated GMST progression from an ensemble of 42 GCM simulations. Mean progression derived from GCM-based GMSTs appears to lie in the range of trend-dataset combinations. A difference between both approaches appears to be the width of uncertainty bands: GCM simulations show a much wider spread. Finally, we discuss various choices for pre-industrial baselines and the role of warming definitions. Based on these findings we propose an estimate for signal progression in GMSTs since pre-industrial.

  18. Signal detection in global mean temperatures after “Paris”: an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Visser

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In December 2015, 195 countries agreed in Paris to hold the increase in global mean surface temperature (GMST well below 2.0 °C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C. Since large financial flows will be needed to keep GMSTs below these targets, it is important to know how GMST has progressed since pre-industrial times. However, the Paris Agreement is not conclusive as regards methods to calculate it. Should trend progression be deduced from GCM simulations or from instrumental records by (statistical trend methods? Which simulations or GMST datasets should be chosen, and which trend models? What is pre-industrial and, finally, are the Paris targets formulated for total warming, originating from both natural and anthropogenic forcing, or do they refer to anthropogenic warming only? To find answers to these questions we performed an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis where datasets and model choices have been varied. For all cases we evaluated trend progression along with uncertainty information. To do so, we analysed four trend approaches and applied these to the five leading observational GMST products. We find GMST progression to be largely independent of various trend model approaches. However, GMST progression is significantly influenced by the choice of GMST datasets. Uncertainties due to natural variability are largest in size. As a parallel path, we calculated GMST progression from an ensemble of 42 GCM simulations. Mean progression derived from GCM-based GMSTs appears to lie in the range of trend–dataset combinations. A difference between both approaches appears to be the width of uncertainty bands: GCM simulations show a much wider spread. Finally, we discuss various choices for pre-industrial baselines and the role of warming definitions. Based on these findings we propose an estimate for signal progression in GMSTs since pre-industrial.

  19. Conditions for lowering the flue gas temperature; Foerutsaettning foer saenkning av roekgastemperatur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordling, Magnus

    2012-02-15

    In heat and power production, the efficiency of the power plant increases the larger share of heat from the flue gas that is converted to power. However, this also implies that the temperature of the heat exchanging surfaces is lowered. If the temperature is lowered to a temperature below the dew point of the flue gas, this would result in condensation of the gas, which in turn elevates the risk of serious corrosion attack on the surfaces where condensation occurs. Thus, it is important to determine the dew point temperature. One way of determining the dew point temperature is to use data on composition of the fuel together with operation parameters of the plant, thus calculating the dew point temperature. However, this calculation of the dew point is not so reliable, especially if hygroscopic salts are present. Therefore, for safety reasons, the temperature of the flue gas is kept well above the dew point temperature. This results in lowered over-all efficiency of the plant. It could also be expected that for a certain plant, some construction materials under certain operation conditions would have corrosion characteristics that may allow condensation on the surface without severe and unpredictable corrosion attack. However, by only using operation parameters and fuel composition, it is even harder to predict the composition of the condensate at different operation temperatures than to calculate the dew point temperature. If the dew point temperature was known with a greater certainty, the temperature of the flue gas could be kept lower, just above the estimated value of the dew point, without any increased risk for condensation. If, in addition, also the resulting composition of the condensate at different temperatures below the dew point is known, it can be predicted if the construction materials of the flue gas channel were compatible with the formed condensate. If they are compatible, the flue gas temperature can be further lowered from the dew point

  20. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  1. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  2. Low temperature conditioning of garlic (Allium sativum L. "seed" cloves induces alterations in sprouts proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel David Dufoo-Hurtado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves substitutes the initial climatic requirements of the crop and accelerates the cycle. We have reported that seed bulbs from ‘Coreano’ variety conditioned at 5 °C for five weeks reduces growth and plant weight as well as the crop yields and increases the synthesis of phenolic compounds and anthocyanins. Therefore, this treatment suggests a cold stress. Plant acclimation to stress is associated with deep changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. The aim of this work was to study the changes in the protein profiles of garlic seed cloves subjected to conditioning at low-temperature using proteomics approach. Two sets of garlic bulbs were used, one set was stored at room temperature (23 °C, and the other was conditioned at low temperature (5 °C for five weeks. Total soluble proteins were extracted from sprouts of cloves and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots showing statistically significant changes in abundance were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS and identified by database search analysis using the Mascot search engine. The results revealed that low-temperature conditioning of garlic seed cloves causes alterations in the accumulation of proteins involved in different physiological processes such as cellular growth, antioxidative/oxidative state, macromolecules transport, protein folding and transcription regulation process. The metabolic pathways affected include protein biosynthesis and quality control system, photosynthesis, photorespiration, energy production, and carbohydrate and nucleotide metabolism. These processes can work cooperatively to establish a new cellular homeostasis that might be related with the physiological and biochemical changes observed in previous

  3. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  4. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yusung, E-mail: yusung-kim@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Seol, Dong Rim [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Mohapatra, Sucheta [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Sunderland, John J. [Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Schultz, Michael K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Radiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Domann, Frederick E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Lim, Tae-Hong [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the

  5. Petunia × hybrida floral scent production is negatively affected by high-temperature growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cna'ani, Alon; Mühlemann, Joelle K; Ravid, Jasmin; Masci, Tania; Klempien, Antje; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Dudareva, Natalia; Pichersky, Eran; Vainstein, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Increasing temperatures due to changing global climate are interfering with plant-pollinator mutualism, an interaction facilitated mainly by floral colour and scent. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses revealed that increasing ambient temperature leads to a decrease in phenylpropanoid-based floral scent production in two Petunia × hybrida varieties, P720 and Blue Spark, acclimated at 22/16 or 28/22 °C (day/night). This decrease could be attributed to down-regulation of scent-related structural gene expression from both phenylpropanoid and shikimate pathways, and up-regulation of a negative regulator of scent production, emission of benzenoids V (EOBV). To test whether the negative effect of increased temperature on scent production can be reduced in flowers with enhanced metabolic flow in the phenylpropanoid pathway, we analysed floral volatile production by transgenic 'Blue Spark' plants overexpressing CaMV 35S-driven Arabidopsis thaliana production of anthocyanin pigments 1 (PAP1) under elevated versus standard temperature conditions. Flowers of 35S:PAP1 transgenic plants produced the same or even higher levels of volatiles when exposed to a long-term high-temperature regime. This phenotype was also evident when analysing relevant gene expression as inferred from sequencing the transcriptome of 35S:PAP1 transgenic flowers under the two temperature regimes. Thus, up-regulation of transcription might negate the adverse effects of temperature on scent production. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Soot measurements for diesel and biodiesel spray combustion under high temperature highly diluted ambient conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ji

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the soot temperature and KL factor for biodiesel, namely fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and diesel fuel combustion in a constant volume chamber using a two-color technique. The KL factor is a parameter for soot concentration, where K is an absorption coefficient and proportional to the number density of soot particles, L is the geometric thickness of the flame along the optical detection axis, and KL factor is proportional to soot volume fraction. The main objective is to explore a combustion regime called high-temperature and highly-diluted combustion (HTHDC) and compare it with the conventional and low-temperature combustion (LTC) modes. The three different combustion regimes are implemented under different ambient temperatures (800 K, 1000 K, and 1400 K) and ambient oxygen concentrations (10%, 15%, and 21%). Results are presented in terms of soot temperature and KL factor images, time-resolved pixel-averaged soot temperature, KL factor, and spatially integrated KL factor over the soot area. The time-averaged results for these three regimes are compared for both diesel and biodiesel fuels. Results show complex combined effects of the ambient temperature and oxygen concentration, and that two-color temperature for the HTHDC mode at the 10% oxygen level can actually be lower than the conventional mode. Increasing ambient oxygen and temperature increases soot temperature. Diesel fuel results in higher soot temperature than biodiesel for all three regimes. Results also show that diesel and biodiesel fuels have very different burning and sooting behavior under the three different combustion regimes. For diesel fuel, the HTHDC regime offers better results in terms of lower soot than the conventional and LTC regimes, and the 10% O2, 1400 K ambient condition shows the lowest soot concentration while maintaining a moderate two-color temperature. For biodiesel, the 15% O2, 800 K ambient condition shows some advantages in terms of reducing soot

  7. Statistical modeling of urban air temperature distributions under different synoptic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christoph; Breitner, Susanne; Cyrys, Josef; Hald, Cornelius; Hartz, Uwe; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Richter, Katja; Schneider, Alexandra; Wolf, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    Within urban areas air temperature may vary distinctly between different locations. These intra-urban air temperature variations partly reach magnitudes that are relevant with respect to human thermal comfort. Therefore and furthermore taking into account potential interrelations with other health related environmental factors (e.g. air quality) it is important to estimate spatial patterns of intra-urban air temperature distributions that may be incorporated into urban planning processes. In this contribution we present an approach to estimate spatial temperature distributions in the urban area of Augsburg (Germany) by means of statistical modeling. At 36 locations in the urban area of Augsburg air temperatures are measured with high temporal resolution (4 min.) since December 2012. These 36 locations represent different typical urban land use characteristics in terms of varying percentage coverages of different land cover categories (e.g. impervious, built-up, vegetated). Percentage coverages of these land cover categories have been extracted from different sources (Open Street Map, European Urban Atlas, Urban Morphological Zones) for regular grids of varying size (50, 100, 200 meter horizonal resolution) for the urban area of Augsburg. It is well known from numerous studies that land use characteristics have a distinct influence on air temperature and as well other climatic variables at a certain location. Therefore air temperatures at the 36 locations are modeled utilizing land use characteristics (percentage coverages of land cover categories) as predictor variables in Stepwise Multiple Regression models and in Random Forest based model approaches. After model evaluation via cross-validation appropriate statistical models are applied to gridded land use data to derive spatial urban air temperature distributions. Varying models are tested and applied for different seasons and times of the day and also for different synoptic conditions (e.g. clear and calm

  8. UV-B-inducible and temperature-sensitive photoreactivation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Qishen; Hays, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CBPDs) in vivo from the DNA of UV-irradiated eight-leaf seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was rapid in the presence of visible light (half-life about 1 hour); removal of CBPDs in the dark, presumably via excision repair, was an order of magnitude slower. Extracts of plants contained significant photolyase in vitro, as assayed by restoration of transforming activity to UV-irradiated Escherichia coli plasmids; activity was maximal from four-leaf to 12-leaf stages. UV-B treatment of seedlings for 6 hours increased photolyase specific activity in extracts twofold. Arabidopsis photolyase was markedly temperature-sensitive, both in vitro (half-life at 30C about 12 minutes) and in vivo (half-life at 30C, 30 to 45 minutes). The wavelength dependency of the photoreactivation cross-section showed a broad peak at 375 to 400 nm, and is thus similar to that for maize pollen; it overlaps bacterial and yeast photolyase action spectra

  9. Effect of Low-Temperature Sensitization on Hydrogen Embrittlement of 301 Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieh Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of metastable austenite on the hydrogen embrittlement (HE of cold-rolled (30% reduction in thickness 301 stainless steel (SS was investigated. Cold-rolled (CR specimens were hydrogen-charged in an autoclave at 300 or 450 °C under a pressure of 10 MPa for 160 h before tensile tests. Both ordinary and notched tensile tests were performed in air to measure the tensile properties of the non-charged and charged specimens. The results indicated that cold rolling caused the transformation of austenite into α′ and ε-martensite in the 301 SS. Aging at 450 °C enhanced the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, G, and σ phases in the cold-rolled specimen. In addition, the formation of α′ martensite and M23C6 carbides along the grain boundaries increased the HE susceptibility and low-temperature sensitization of the 450 °C-aged 301 SS. In contrast, the grain boundary α′-martensite and M23C6 carbides were not observed in the as-rolled and 300 °C-aged specimens.

  10. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. Copyright © 2015 Kofoed et al.

  11. Highly sensitive room temperature ammonia gas sensor based on Ir-doped Pt porous ceramic electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wenlong [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China); Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Yu [Department of chemical and materials engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Do, Jing-Shan, E-mail: jsdo@ncut.edu.tw [Department of chemical and materials engineering, National Chin-Yi University of Technology, Taichung 411, Taiwan (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijing@cdu.edu.cn [College of pharmacy and biological engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu, 610106 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the Pt and Pt-Ir porous ceramic electrodes. • The gas sensors based on the Pt and Pt-Ir alloy electrodes possess good sensing performances. • The reaction path of the ammonia on platinum has been discussed. - Abstract: Room temperature NH{sub 3} gas sensors based on Pt and Pt-Ir (Ir doping Pt) porous ceramic electrodes have been fabricated by both electroplating and sputtering methods. The properties of the gaseous ammonia sensors have been examined by polarization and chronoamperometry techniques. The influence of humidity on the features of the resulting sensors in the system has also been discussed, and the working potential was optimized. Water vapors seem to hugely improve the electrochemical activity of the electrode. With increasing the relative humidity, the response of the Pt-Ir(E)/Pt(S)/PCP sensor to NH{sub 3} gas could be enhanced remarkably, and the sensitivity increases from 1.14 to 12.06 μA ppm{sup −1} cm{sup −2} .Then we have also discussed the sensing mechanism of the Pt-Ir sensor and the result has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the electrode surface before and after reaction in the end.

  12. Expression of temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8 in sperm cells correlates with vertebrate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Majhi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily Melastatin, member 8 (TRPM8 is involved in detection of cold temperature, different noxious compounds and in execution of thermo- as well as chemo-sensitive responses at cellular levels. Here we explored the molecular evolution of TRPM8 by analyzing sequences from various species. We elucidate that several regions of TRPM8 had different levels of selection pressure but the 4th–5th transmembrane regions remain highly conserved. Analysis of synteny suggests that since vertebrate origin, TRPM8 gene is linked with SPP2, a bone morphogen. TRPM8, especially the N-terminal region of it, seems to be highly variable in human population. We found 16,656 TRPM8 variants in 1092 human genomes with top variations being SNPs, insertions and deletions. A total of 692 missense mutations are also mapped to human TRPM8 protein of which 509 seem to be delateroiours in nature as supported by Polyphen V2, SIFT and Grantham deviation score. Using a highly specific antibody, we demonstrate that TRPM8 is expressed endogenously in the testis of rat and sperm cells of different vertebrates ranging from fish to higher mammals. We hypothesize that TRPM8 had emerged during vertebrate evolution (ca 450 MYA. We propose that expression of TRPM8 in sperm cell and its role in regulating sperm function are important factors that have guided its molecular evolution, and that these understandings may have medical importance.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation for temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Licong; Zhang Xinrong; Niu Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann method is developed to simulate temperature-sensitive magnetic fluids in a porous cavity. In the simulation, the magnetic force, efficient gravity, viscous loss term and geometric loss term in porous medium are imported to the momentum equation. To test the reliability of the method, a validation with water in porous cavity is carried out. Good agreements with the previous results verify that the present lattice Boltzmann method is promising for simulation of magnetic fluids in porous medium. In this study, we investigate the change of magnetization with external magnetic field, and we present numerical results for the streamlines, isotherms, and magnetization at vertical or horizontal mid-profiles for different values of Ram. In addition, Nusselt numbers changing with magnetic Rayleigh numbers are also investigated. - Highlights: → Developed a lattice Boltzmann method for magnetic nano-fluids in porous cavity. → Clarified flow and heat transfer for different values of (magnetic) Rayleigh numbers. → Heat transfer enhancement for magnetic fluid in porous cavity.

  14. Testing the Metabolic Theory of Ecology with marine bacteria: Different temperature sensitivity of major phylogenetic groups during the spring phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2017-08-24

    Although temperature is a key driver of bacterioplankton metabolism, the effect of ocean warming on different bacterial phylogenetic groups remains unclear. Here, we conducted monthly short-term incubations with natural coastal bacterial communities over an annual cycle to test the effect of experimental temperature on the growth rates and carrying capacities of four phylogenetic groups: SAR11, Rhodobacteraceae, Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. SAR11 was the most abundant group year-round as analysed by CARD-FISH, with maximum abundances in summer, while the other taxa peaked in spring. All groups, including SAR11, showed high temperature-sensitivity of growth rates and/or carrying capacities in spring, under phytoplankton bloom or post-bloom conditions. In that season, Rhodobacteraceae showed the strongest temperature response in growth rates, estimated here as activation energy (E, 1.43 eV), suggesting an advantage to outcompete other groups under warmer conditions. In summer E values were in general lower than 0.65 eV, the value predicted by the Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE). Contrary to MTE predictions, carrying capacity tended to increase with warming for all bacterial groups. Our analysis confirms that resource availability is key when addressing the temperature response of heterotrophic bacterioplankton. We further show that even under nutrient-sufficient conditions, warming differentially affected distinct bacterioplankton taxa. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitivity of the sea ice concentration over the Kara-Barents Sea in autumn to the winter temperature variability over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, K. H.; Chang, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we performed sensitivity experiments by utilizing the Global/Regional Integrated Model system with different conditions of the sea ice concentration over the Kara-Barents (KB) Sea in autumn, which can affect winter temperature variability over East Asia. Prescribed sea ice conditions are 1) climatological autumn sea ice concentration obtained from 1982 to 2016, 2) reduced autumn sea ice concentration by 50% of the climatology, and 3) increased autumn sea ice concentration by 50% of climatology. Differently prescribed sea ice concentration changes surface albedo, which affects surface heat fluxes and near-surface air temperature. The reduced (increased) sea ice concentration over the KB sea increases (decreases) near-surface air temperature that leads the lower (higher) sea level pressure in autumn. These patterns are maintained from autumn to winter season. Furthermore, it is shown that the different sea ice concentration over the KB sea has remote effects on the sea level pressure patterns over the East Asian region. The lower (higher) sea level pressure over the KB sea by the locally decreased (increased) ice concentration is related to the higher (lower) pressure pattern over the Siberian region, which induces strengthened (weakened) cold advection over the East Asian region. From these sensitivity experiments it is clarified that the decreased (increased) sea ice concentration over the KB sea in autumn can lead the colder (warmer) surface air temperature over East Asia in winter.

  16. Opportunities to Reduce Air-Conditioning Loads Through Lower Cabin Soak Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, R.; Cuddy, M.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J.

    1999-01-01

    Air-conditioning loads can significantly reduce electric vehicle (EV) range and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) fuel economy. In addition, a new U. S. emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the United States. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. If the size of the air-conditioning system is reduced, the cabin soak temperature must also be reduced, with no penalty in terms of passenger thermal comfort. This paper presents the impact of air-conditioning on EV range and HEV fuel economy, and compares the effectiveness of advanced glazing and cabin ventilation. Experimental and modeled results are presented

  17. Evolution of vertebrate transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 channels: opposite temperature sensitivity between mammals and western clawed frogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Saito

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels serve as temperature receptors in a wide variety of animals and must have played crucial roles in thermal adaptation. The TRP vanilloid (TRPV subfamily contains several temperature receptors with different temperature sensitivities. The TRPV3 channel is known to be highly expressed in skin, where it is activated by warm temperatures and serves as a sensor to detect ambient temperatures near the body temperature of homeothermic animals such as mammals. Here we performed comprehensive comparative analyses of the TRPV subfamily in order to understand the evolutionary process; we identified novel TRPV genes and also characterized the evolutionary flexibility of TRPV3 during vertebrate evolution. We cloned the TRPV3 channel from the western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis to understand the functional evolution of the TRPV3 channel. The amino acid sequences of the N- and C-terminal regions of the TRPV3 channel were highly diversified from those of other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV3 channels, although central portions were well conserved. In a heterologous expression system, several mammalian TRPV3 agonists did not activate the TRPV3 channel of the western clawed frog. Moreover, the frog TRPV3 channel did not respond to heat stimuli, instead it was activated by cold temperatures. Temperature thresholds for activation were about 16 °C, slightly below the lower temperature limit for the western clawed frog. Given that the TRPV3 channel is expressed in skin, its likely role is to detect noxious cold temperatures. Thus, the western clawed frog and mammals acquired opposite temperature sensitivity of the TRPV3 channel in order to detect environmental temperatures suitable for their respective species, indicating that temperature receptors can dynamically change properties to adapt to different thermal environments during evolution.

  18. Simulated sensitivity of the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle to the ambient temperature profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xulin; He, Jie; Ge, Xuyang

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the impacts of the environmental temperature profile on the tropical cyclone eyewall replacement cycle are examined using idealized numerical simulations. It is found that the environmental thermal condition can greatly affect the formation and structure of a secondary eyewall and the intensity change during the eyewall replacement cycle. Simulation with a warmer thermal profile produces a larger moat and a prolonged eyewall replacement cycle. It is revealed that the enhanced static stability greatly suppresses convection, and thus causes slow secondary eyewall formation. The possible processes influencing the decay of inner eyewall convection are investigated. It is revealed that the demise of the inner eyewall is related to a choking effect associated with outer eyewall convection, the radial distribution of moist entropy fluxes within the moat region, the enhanced static stability in the inner-core region, and the interaction between the inner and outer eyewalls due to the barotropic instability. This study motivates further research into how environmental conditions influence tropical cyclone dynamics and thermodynamics.

  19. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of T91 Steel in Dry and Humid Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghao Leong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature oxidation behavior of T91 ferritic/martensitic steel was examined over the temperature range of 500 to 700°C in dry and humid environments.  The weight gain result revealed that oxidation occurs at all range of temperatures and its rate is accelerated by increasing the temperature. The weight gain of the oxidized steel at 700°C in steam condition was six times bigger than the dry oxidation.. SEM/EDX of the cross-sectional image showed that under dry condition, a protective and steady growth of the chromium oxide (Cr2O3 layer was formed on the steel with the thickness of 2.39±0.34 µm. Meanwhile for the humid environment, it is found that the iron oxide layer, which consists of the hematite (Fe2O3 and magnetite (Fe3O4 was formed as the outer scale, and spinnel as inner scale. This result indicated that the oxidation behavior of T91 steel was affected by its oxidation environment. The existence of water vapor in steam condition may prevent the formation of chromium oxide as protective layer.

  20. Effect of different seed treatments on maize seed germination parameters under optimal and suboptimal temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujošević Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different seed treatments on germination parameters of three maize genotypes under optimal and suboptimal temperature conditions. Seed was treated with recommended doses of three commercial pesticide formulations: metalaxyl-m 10 g/L + fludioxonil 25 g/L, metalaxyl 20 g/kg + prothioconazole 100 g/kg and thiacloprid 400 g/L. Testing was conducted at 25°C and 15°C. Results of the study indicate that there are differences in response of maize genotypes to applied seed treatments, as well as to a specific treatment at optimal and suboptimal temperatures. Some treatments, depending on the mixing partner and temperature conditions, can affect final germination. In other cases, germination rate can be accelerated or prolonged, but with no effect on final germination. In order to provide fast and uniform emergence under different temperature conditions, further examination of the response of maize genotypes to specific seed treatments would be beneficial.

  1. Anaerobic digestion in mesophilic and room temperature conditions: Digestion performance and soil-borne pathogen survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Le; Jian, Shanshan; Bi, Jinhua; Li, Yunlong; Chang, Zhizhou; He, Jian; Ye, Xiaomei

    2016-05-01

    Tomato plant waste (TPW) was used as the feedstock of a batch anaerobic reactor to evaluate the effect of anaerobic digestion on Ralstonia solanacearum and Phytophthora capsici survival. Batch experiments were carried out for TS (total solid) concentrations of 2%, 4% and 6% respectively, at mesophilic (37±1°C) and room (20-25°C) temperatures. Results showed that higher digestion performance was achieved under mesophilic digestion temperature and lower TS concentration conditions. The biogas production ranged from 71 to 416L/kg VS (volatile solids). The inactivation of anaerobic digestion tended to increase as digestion performance improved. The maximum log copies reduction of R. solanacearum and P. capsici detected by quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction) were 3.80 and 4.08 respectively in reactors with 4% TS concentration at mesophilic temperatures. However, both in mesophilic and room temperature conditions, the lowest reduction of R. solanacearum was found in the reactors with 6% TS concentration, which possessed the highest VFA (volatile fatty acid) concentration. These findings indicated that simple accumulation of VFAs failed to restrain R. solanacearum effectively, although the VFAs were considered poisonous. P. capsici was nearly completely dead under all conditions. Based on the digestion performance and the pathogen survival rate, a model was established to evaluate the digestate biosafety. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The investigation of contact line effect on nanosized droplet wetting behavior with solid temperature condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegon, Lee; Joonsang, Lee

    2017-11-01

    In many multi-phase fluidic systems, there are essentially contact interfaces including liquid-vapor, liquid-solid, and solid-vapor phase. There is also a contact line where these three interfaces meet. The existence of these interfaces and contact lines has a considerable impact on the nanoscale droplet wetting behavior. However, recent studies have shown that Young's equation does not accurately represent this behavior at the nanoscale. It also emphasized the importance of the contact line effect.Therefore, We performed molecular dynamics simulation to imitate the behavior of nanoscale droplets with solid temperature condition. And we find the effect of solid temperature on the contact line motion. Furthermore, We figure out the effect of contact line force on the wetting behavior of droplet according to the different solid temperature condition. With solid temperature condition variation, the magnitude of contact line friction decreases significantly. We also divide contact line force by effect of bulk liquid, interfacial tension, and solid surface. This work was also supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean Government (MSIP) (No. 2015R1A5A1037668) and BrainKorea21plus.

  3. Effects of Temperature on Sensitivity of Bacilus licheniformis RI 75-1 Vegetative Cells at Gamma Quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Larrea Vega, O.; Rios Brito, F.; Marquez Alvarez, M.; Padron Soler, E.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that strains of E. Coli with wild genotype for reparation, when are irradiated at temperature between 42 0 C and 45 0 C, shown an increase of radioresistance. At the given temperature the number of double strands breaks of DNA decrease. Some authors report that the radioresistance increased is due to the elevation of the irradiation temperature is related to the cell membrane status. The paper includes reports on the effects of increased temperature on the sensitivity - at gamma quantum - of Bacillus licheniformis RI 75-1 vegetative cells. Temperatures of 42 0 C and 60 0 C during irradiation were employed. An increase in radioresistance was found when the temperature of irradiation was increased to 42 0 C. However, a decrease in viability was observed. Heat treatment prior to irradiation showed an increase in the number of radioresistance colonies when compared. (author)

  4. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  5. Enhancement of NH3 gas sensitivity at room temperature by carbon nanotube-based sensor coated with Co nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lich Quang; Phan, Pho Quoc; Duong, Huyen Ngoc; Nguyen, Chien Duc; Nguyen, Lam Huu

    2013-01-30

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH(3) gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH(3) gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH(3), compared with alcohol and LPG.

  6. Enhancement of NH3 Gas Sensitivity at Room Temperature by Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensor Coated with Co Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lich Quang Nguyen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT film has been fabricated onto Pt-patterned alumina substrates using the chemical vapor deposition method for NH3 gas sensing applications. The MWCNT-based sensor is sensitive to NH3 gas at room temperature. Nanoclusters of Co catalysts have been sputtered on the surface of the MWCNT film to enhance gas sensitivity with respect to unfunctionalized CNT films. The gas sensitivity of Co-functionalized MWCNT-based gas sensors is thus significantly improved. The sensor exhibits good repeatability and high selectivity towards NH3, compared with alcohol and LPG.

  7. Enhancement of the sensitivity of a temperature sensor based on fiber Bragg gratings via weak value amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Serrano, L J; Barrera, D; Amaya, W; Sales, S; Pruneri, V; Capmany, J; Torres, J P

    2015-09-01

    We present a proof-of-concept experiment aimed at increasing the sensitivity of Fiber-Bragg-gratings temperature sensors by making use of a weak-value-amplification scheme. The technique requires only linear optics elements for its implementation and appears as a promising method for increasing the sensitivity than state-of the-art sensors can currently provide. The device implemented here is able to generate a shift of the centroid of the spectrum of a pulse of ∼0.035  nm/°C, a nearly fourfold increase in sensitivity over the same fiber-Bragg-grating system interrogated using standard methods.

  8. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  9. Crude oil degradation by bacterial consortia under four different redox and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Shunzi; Li, Xia; Chen, Jianfa; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-02-01

    There is emerging interest in the anaerobic degradation of crude oil. However, there is limited knowledge about the geochemical effects and microbiological activities for it. A mixture of anaerobic sludge and the production water from an oil well was used as an inoculum to construct four consortia, which were incubated under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions at either mesophilic or thermophilic temperatures. Significant degradation of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons and the changing quantities of some marker compounds, such as pristane, phytane, hopane and norhopane, and their relative quantities, suggested the activity of microorganisms in the consortia. Notably, the redox conditions and temperature strongly affected the diversity and structure of the enriched microbial communities and the oil degradation. Although some specific biomarker showed larger change under methanogenic condition, the degradation efficiencies for total aromatic and saturated hydrocarbon were higher under sulfate-reducing condition. After the 540-day incubation, bacteria of unknown classifications were dominant in the thermophilic methanogenic consortia, whereas Clostridium dominated the mesophilic methanogenic consortia. With the exception of the dominant phylotypes that were shared with the methanogenic consortia, the sulfate-reducing consortia were predominantly composed of Thermotogae, Deltaproteobacteria, Spirochaeta, and Synergistetes phyla. In conclusion, results in this study demonstrated that the different groups of degraders were responsible for degradation in the four constructed crude oil degrading consortia and consequently led to the existence of different amount of marker compounds under these distinct conditions. There might be distinct metabolic mechanism for degrading crude oil under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions.

  10. Finite temperature LGT in a finite box with BPS monopole boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Molodtsov, S.V.; Mueller-Preussker, M.; Veselov, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Finite temperature SU(2) lattice gauge theory is investigated in a 3D cubic box with fixed boundary conditions (b.c.) provided by a discretized, static BPS monopole solution with varying core scale μ. For discrete μ-values we find stable classical solutions either of electro-magnetic ('dyon') or of purely magnetic type inside the box. Near the deconfinement transition we study the influence of the b.c. on the quantized fields inside the box. In contrast to the purely magnetic background field case, for the dyon case we observe confinement for temperatures above the usual critical one

  11. The optimal condition of performing MTT assay for the determination of radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Il Han

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of radiation survival using a clonogenic assay, the established standard, can be difficult and time consuming. In this study, We have used the MTT assay, based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to a purple formazan precipitate by living cells, as a substitution for clonogenic assay and have examined the optimal condition for performing this assay in determination of radiation sensitivity. Four human cancer cell lines - PCI-1, SNU-1066, NCI-H63O and RKO cells have been used. For each cell line, a clonogenic assay and a MTT assay using Premix WST-1 solution, which is one of the tetrazolium salts and does not require washing or solubilization of the precipitate were carried out after irradiation of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Gy, For clonogenic assay, cells in 25 cm 2 flasks were irradiated after overnight incubation and the resultant colonies containing more than 50 cells were scored after culturing the cells for 10-14 days, For MTT assay, the relationship between absorbance and cell number, optimal seeding cell number, and optimal timing of assay was determined. Then, MTT assay was performed when the irradiated cells had regained exponential growth or when the non-irradiated cells had undergone four or more doubling times. There was minimal variation in the values gained from these two methods with the standard deviation generally less than 5%, and there were no statistically significant differences between two methods according to t-test in low radiation dose (below 6 Gy). The regression analyses showed high linear correlation with the R 2 value of 0.975-0.992 between data from the two different methods. The optimal cell numbers for MTT assay were found to be dependent on plating efficiency of used cell line. Less than 300 cells/well were appropriate for cells with high plating efficiency (more than 30%). For cells with low plating efficiency (less than 30%), 500 cells/well or more were appropriate for assay. The optimal time for MTT assay was alter 6

  12. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  13. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  14. Home Health Agency Characteristics and Quality Outcomes for Medicare Beneficiaries With Rehabilitation-Sensitive Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Tracy M; Meadow, Ann; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Wolff, Jennifer L

    2018-06-01

    To examine associations between organizational characteristics of home health agencies (eg, profit status, rehabilitation therapy staffing model, size, and rurality) and quality outcomes in Medicare beneficiaries with rehabilitation-sensitive conditions, conditions for which occupational, physical, and/or speech therapy have the potential to improve functioning, prevent or slow substantial decline in functioning, or increase ability to remain at home safely. Retrospective analysis. Home health agencies. Fee-for-service beneficiaries (N=1,006,562) admitted to 9250 Medicare-certified home health agencies in 2009. Not applicable. Institutional admission during home health care, community discharge, and institutional admission within 30 days of discharge. Nonprofit (vs for-profit) home health agencies were more likely to discharge beneficiaries to the community (odds ratio [OR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.33) and less likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions within 30 days of discharge (OR, .93; 95% CI, .88-.97). Agencies in rural (vs urban) counties were less likely to discharge patients to the community (OR, .83; 95% CI, .77-.90) and more likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions during home health (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.18-1.30) and within 30 days of discharge (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22). Agencies with contract (vs in-house) therapy staff were less likely to discharge beneficiaries to the community (OR, .79, 95% CI, .70-.91) and more likely to have beneficiaries incur institutional admissions during home health (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15) and within 30 days of discharge (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07-1.28). As payers continue to test and implement reimbursement mechanisms that seek to reward value over volume of services, greater attention should be paid to organizational factors that facilitate better coordinated, higher quality home health care for beneficiaries who may benefit from rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017

  15. Effect of forming temperature conditions on the properties of radiation laced polyethylene films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trizno, M S; Gasparyan, K A; Arutyunyan, G V; Borovko, V N

    1978-11-01

    The effect of radiation lace on the thermomechanical properties of polyethylene films depending on the radiation dose and temperature conditions of their formation was studied. The samples were produced at 160 deg under the pressure of 150 kN/m/sup 2/ with the following cooling in two temperature conditions: 1) cooling of the sample just after pressing in the icy water, and 2) slow cooling of the sample in a press. Films obtained using above conditions were subjected to the radiation lace in the argon medium using ..gamma..-radiation of /sup 60/Co at the exposure dose of 0.8x10/sup 6/ rad/hr. The total radiation dose was from 30 to 200 Mrad. It is shown that the films, obtained under the first cooling conditions have a lower degree of crystallinity. Investigations of gel-fraction content, density, elastic modulus, deformability, modulus of high elasticity, breaking stress, and relative elongation for rupture depending on radiation doze and the degree of crystallinity have shown that minimum degree of crystallinity of initial films provided most uniform adn compact net structure in the laced polyethylene(LP). In this case the material working capacity increases at high temperatures. In order to improve the mechanical properties of LP when exploiting it in the amorphous crystalline state it is recommended to irradiate material with maximum degree of crystallinity.

  16. The effectiveness of cooling conditions on temperature of canine EDTA whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Karen M; Serrano, Leslie; Sun, Xiaocun; Flatland, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Preanalytic factors such as time and temperature can have significant effects on laboratory test results. For example, ammonium concentration will increase 31% in blood samples stored at room temperature for 30 min before centrifugation. To reduce preanalytic error, blood samples may be placed in precooled tubes and chilled on ice or in ice water baths; however, the effectiveness of these modalities in cooling blood samples has not been formally evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of various cooling modalities on reducing temperature of EDTA whole blood samples. Pooled samples of canine EDTA whole blood were divided into two aliquots. Saline was added to one aliquot to produce a packed cell volume (PCV) of 40% and to the second aliquot to produce a PCV of 20% (simulated anemia). Thirty samples from each aliquot were warmed to 37.7 °C and cooled in 2 ml allotments under one of three conditions: in ice, in ice after transfer to a precooled tube, or in an ice water bath. Temperature of each sample was recorded at one minute intervals for 15 min. Within treatment conditions, sample PCV had no significant effect on cooling. Cooling in ice water was significantly faster than cooling in ice only or transferring the sample to a precooled tube and cooling it on ice. Mean temperature of samples cooled in ice water was significantly lower at 15 min than mean temperatures of those cooled in ice, whether or not the tube was precooled. By 4 min, samples cooled in an ice water bath had reached mean temperatures less than 4 °C (refrigeration temperature), while samples cooled in other conditions remained above 4.0 °C for at least 11 min. For samples with a PCV of 40%, precooling the tube had no significant effect on rate of cooling on ice. For samples with a PCV of 20%, transfer to a precooled tube resulted in a significantly faster rate of cooling than direct placement of the warmed tube onto ice. Canine EDTA whole blood samples cool most

  17. Efficiency of measures aimed at improving health by normalization of temperature conditions in the Kochegarka mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinov, G.I.; Nifonov, V.P.; Kobets, A.N.

    1981-06-01

    This paper evaluates effects of air conditioning in the Kochegarka black coal mine on miners' health. Up to 1975 air temperature in the lowest mine horizon located at a depth of 970 m ranged from 26 to 32 C, in summer from 34 to 36 C. Air humidity ranged from 94 to 98%. Since 1975 KhTMF-248-4000 freon air cooling machines have been used in the mine; their capacity amounts to 3.8 x 10/SUP/6 kcal/h. Use of air cooling systems reduces air temperature to permissible limits. Air temperature measured at a distance of 1 km from mine shaft ranges from 24 to 26 C, and air humidity from 90 to 95%. At a distance of 1.5 km from the mine shaft air temperature in conveyor roadways is 26.4 C, in dead-end development workings 27 C, and at working faces 26 C (with air humidity ranging from 96 to 98%). ARVP systems for local air cooling are used at places distant from the mine shaft. The ARVP reduces air temperature from 2 to 4.5 C at a distance ranging from 4 to 8 m from the machine. Reducing air temperature, combined with other measures aimed at improving miners' health, has caused a decrease in miner absenteeism due to illness by 25.4%.

  18. Temperature effects on egg development and larval condition in the lesser sandeel, Ammodytes marinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Thomas; Gibb, Fiona M.; Wright, Peter J.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the influence of temperature on egg development and larval condition in planktonic fish is a prerequisite to understanding the phenological impacts of climate change on marine food-webs. The lesser sandeel, Ammodytes marinus (Raitt 1934), is a key trophic link between zooplankton and many piscivorous fish, sea birds and mammals in the northeast Atlantic. Temperature-egg development relationships were determined for batches of lesser sandeel eggs. Hatching began as early as 19 days post fertilisation at 11 °C and as late as 36 days post fertilisation at 6 °C, which is faster than egg development rates reported for closely related species at the lower end of the tested temperature range. The average size of newly hatched larvae decreased with increasing incubation temperatures in early hatching larvae, but this effect was lost by the middle of the hatching period. While the study revealed important temperature effects on egg development rate, predicted variability based on the range of temperatures eggs experience in the field, suggests it is only a minor contributor to the observed inter-annual variation in hatch date.

  19. Monitoring Streambed Scour/Deposition Under Nonideal Temperature Signal and Flood Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeese, Timothy; Tonina, Daniele; Luce, Charles

    2017-12-01

    Streambed erosion and deposition are fundamental geomorphic processes in riverbeds, and monitoring their evolution is important for ecological system management and in-stream infrastructure stability. Previous research showed proof of concept that analysis of paired temperature signals of stream and pore waters can simultaneously provide monitoring scour and deposition, stream sediment thermal regime, and seepage velocity information. However, it did not address challenges often associated with natural systems, including nonideal temperature variations (low-amplitude, nonsinusoidal signal, and vertical thermal gradients) and natural flooding conditions on monitoring scour and deposition processes over time. Here we addressed this knowledge gap by testing the proposed thermal scour-deposition chain (TSDC) methodology, with laboratory experiments to test the impact of nonideal temperature signals under a range of seepage velocities and with a field application during a pulse flood. Both analyses showed excellent match between surveyed and temperature-derived bed elevation changes even under very low temperature signal amplitudes (less than 1°C), nonideal signal shape (sawtooth shape), and strong and changing vertical thermal gradients (4°C/m). Root-mean-square errors on predicting the change in streambed elevations were comparable with the median grain size of the streambed sediment. Future research should focus on improved techniques for temperature signal phase and amplitude extractions, as well as TSDC applications over long periods spanning entire hydrographs.

  20. Kinetics of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from champagne glasses in tasting conditions: the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Villaume, Sandra; Cilindre, Clara; Jeandet, Philippe

    2009-03-11

    Measurements of CO(2) fluxes outgassing from a flute poured with a standard Champagne wine initially holding about 11 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2) were presented, in tasting conditions, all along the first 10 min following the pouring process. Experiments were performed at three sets of temperature, namely, 4 degrees C, 12 degrees C, and 20 degrees C, respectively. It was demonstrated that the lower the champagne temperature, the lower CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute. Therefore, the lower the champagne temperature, the lower its progressive loss of dissolved CO(2) concentration with time, which constitutes the first analytical proof that low champagne temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps retains its effervescence. A correlation was also proposed between CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from the flute poured with champagne and its continuously decreasing dissolved CO(2) concentration. Finally, the contribution of effervescence to the global kinetics of CO(2) release was discussed and modeled by the use of results developed over recent years. The temperature dependence of the champagne viscosity was found to play a major role in the kinetics of CO(2) outgassing from a flute. On the basis of this bubbling model, the theoretical influence of champagne temperature on CO(2) volume fluxes outgassing from a flute was discussed and found to be in quite good accordance with our experimental results.

  1. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shann S; Scherer, Randy L; Ortega, Ryan A; Bell, Charleson S; O'Neil, Conlin P; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Giorgio, Todd D

    2011-02-27

    Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs) that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide)-bl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PPS-b-PEG) copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that demonstrate controlled drug release in oxidative

  2. Enzymatic- and temperature-sensitive controlled release of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortega Ryan A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and contrast agent delivery systems that achieve controlled release in the presence of enzymatic activity are becoming increasingly important, as enzymatic activity is a hallmark of a wide array of diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. Here, we have synthesized clusters of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs that sense enzymatic activity for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. To achieve this goal, we utilize amphiphilic poly(propylene sulfide-bl-poly(ethylene glycol (PPS-b-PEG copolymers, which are known to have excellent properties for smart delivery of drug and siRNA. Results Monodisperse PPS polymers were synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of propylene sulfide, and were sequentially reacted with commercially available heterobifunctional PEG reagents and then ssDNA sequences to fashion biofunctional PPS-bl-PEG copolymers. They were then combined with hydrophobic 12 nm USPIO cores in the thin-film hydration method to produce ssDNA-displaying USPIO micelles. Micelle populations displaying complementary ssDNA sequences were mixed to induce crosslinking of the USPIO micelles. By design, these crosslinking sequences contained an EcoRV cleavage site. Treatment of the clusters with EcoRV results in a loss of R2 negative contrast in the system. Further, the USPIO clusters demonstrate temperature sensitivity as evidenced by their reversible dispersion at ~75°C and re-clustering following return to room temperature. Conclusions This work demonstrates proof of concept of an enzymatically-actuatable and thermoresponsive system for dynamic biosensing applications. The platform exhibits controlled release of nanoparticles leading to changes in magnetic relaxation, enabling detection of enzymatic activity. Further, the presented functionalization scheme extends the scope of potential applications for PPS-b-PEG. Combined with previous findings using this polymer platform that

  3. Automatic CT-based finite element model generation for temperature-based death time estimation: feasibility study and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Sebastian; Muggenthaler, Holger; Hubig, Michael; Erdmann, Bodo; Weiser, Martin; Zachow, Stefan; Heinrich, Andreas; Güttler, Felix Victor; Teichgräber, Ulf; Mall, Gita

    2017-05-01

    Temperature-based death time estimation is based either on simple phenomenological models of corpse cooling or on detailed physical heat transfer models. The latter are much more complex but allow a higher accuracy of death time estimation, as in principle, all relevant cooling mechanisms can be taken into account.Here, a complete workflow for finite element-based cooling simulation is presented. The following steps are demonstrated on a CT phantom: Computer tomography (CT) scan Segmentation of the CT images for thermodynamically relevant features of individual geometries and compilation in a geometric computer-aided design (CAD) model Conversion of the segmentation result into a finite element (FE) simulation model Computation of the model cooling curve (MOD) Calculation of the cooling time (CTE) For the first time in FE-based cooling time estimation, the steps from the CT image over segmentation to FE model generation are performed semi-automatically. The cooling time calculation results are compared to cooling measurements performed on the phantoms under controlled conditions. In this context, the method is validated using a CT phantom. Some of the phantoms' thermodynamic material parameters had to be determined via independent experiments.Moreover, the impact of geometry and material parameter uncertainties on the estimated cooling time is investigated by a sensitivity analysis.

  4. Temperature effect on the photoinduced reduction of methyl viologen with several sensitizers and the evolution of hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenadovic, M.T.; Micic, O.I.; Rajh, T.; Savic, D.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation by visible light of an aqueous solution containing a photosensitizer, methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid leads to the formation of the reduced form of methyl viologen (MV/sup +/). The quantum yield for the formation of MV/sup +/ depends strongly on the time during which the formation is observed owing to the reaction of MV/sup +/ with oxidative products and its reduction to MV/sup 0/. Proflavin, acridine yellow and ruthenium(II)tris(2,2-bipyridyl) were used as photosensitizers and showed the same ability to promote hydrogen evolution. When CdS was used as a sensitizer a factor of 10 less hydrogen was obtained than when the dyes were used. The redox catalysts platinum, Pt-TiO/sub 2/-RuO/sub 2/ and Pt-CdS in colloidal systems showed approximately the same activity towards the reduction of water. The reduction of MV/sup 2 +/ and the evolution of hydrogen were enhanced at higher temperatures (70/sup 0/C). The optimum conditions for water reduction on redox catalysts in colloidal system under continuous illumination are analysed.

  5. Experimental study on capacitance void fraction meters for high temperature and high pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hironori; Mitsutake, Toru; Shibata, Mitsuhiko; Takase, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The electro-void fraction meter (Capacitance type meter) was applied to higher pressure conditions of 18 MPa than BWR operating conditions of 7 MPa. The void fraction measurement system has been developed including the electrodes of void fraction measurement, instrumentation cables with mineral insulation and simplified electric circuit to provide good signal-to-noise ratio. It satisfied the performance of thermal and pressure resistance and electric insulating capacity. Calibration function for high temperature and high pressure conditions was confirmed through calibration test with 37-rod bundle against datum 19-rod bundle by the quick-shut valve method respectively under 2 MPa conditions. It was confirmed that the measured data were consistent with those measured by the quick-shut valve method. (author)

  6. Hydration, phase separation and nonlinear rheology of temperature-sensitive water-soluble polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Fumihiko; Koga, Tsuyoshi [Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kaneda, Isamu [Department of Food Science, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Winnik, Francoise M, E-mail: ftanaka@phys.polym.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Montreal, Montreal, H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-07-20

    The collapse of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) chain upon heating and the phase diagrams of aqueous PNIPAM solutions with a very flat lower critical solution temperature (LCST) phase separation line are theoretically studied on the basis of cooperative dehydration (simultaneous dissociation of bound water molecules in a group of correlated sequence), and compared with the experimental observation of temperature-induced coil-globule transition by light scattering methods. The transition becomes sharper with the cooperativity parameter {sigma} of hydration. The reentrant coil-globule-coil transition and cononsolvency in a mixed solvent of water and methanol are also studied from the viewpoint of competitive hydrogen bonds between polymer-water and polymer-methanol. The downward shift of the cloud-point curves (LCST cononsolvency) with the mol fraction of methanol due to the competition is calculated and compared with the experimental data. Aqueous solutions of hydrophobically modified PNIPAM carrying short alkyl chains at both chain ends (telechelic PNIPAM) are theoretically and experimentally studied. The LCST of these solutions is found to shift downward along the sol-gel transition curve as a result of end-chain association (association-induced phase separation), and separate from the coil-globule transition line. Associated structures in the solution, such as flower micelles, mesoglobules, and higher fractal assembly, are studied by ultra small-angle neutron scattering with theoretical modeling of the scattering function. Dynamic-mechanical modulus, nonlinear stationary viscosity, and stress build-up in start-up shear flows of the associated networks are studied on the basis of the affine and non-affine transient network theory. The molecular conditions for thickening, strain hardening, and stress overshoot are found in terms of the nonlinear amplitude A of the chain tension and the tension-dissociation coupling constant g.

  7. Organic matter cycling in a neotropical reservoir: effects of temperature and experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Bottino

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM:This study reports a comparison between decomposition kinetics of detritus derived from two macrophyte species (Polygonum lapathifolium L.: Polygonaceae; Eichhornia azurea (Sw. Kunth.: Pontederiaceae growing in a neotropical reservoir (Brazil, under laboratory and field conditions, in order to assess hypotheses on the main differences in factors affecting organic matter cycling, including the effect of temperature. METHODS: Plant and water samples were collected from the reservoir in August 2009. In field incubation mass loss was assessed using a litter bag technique and in the laboratory the decay was followed using a decomposition chamber maintained under controlled conditions (i.e. in the dark, at 15 ºC and 25 ºC. A kinetic model was adopted to explain and compare the organic matter decay, ANOVA (Repeated Measures testing was used to describe the differences between the treatments and a linear correlation was used to compare in situ and in vitro experiments. RESULTS: The mass decay was faster in natural conditions with rapid release of the labile-soluble portion. The simulated values of mineralization rates of dissolved organic matter and refractory organic matter were rapid in high temperatures (25 ºC. The high Q10 results (mainly for E. azurea, and experimental conditions, and outcomes of ANOVA testing indicate the temperature variation (10 ºC influence the rates of mass decay. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggested rapid organic matter cycling in warm months (from October to December supporting the microbial loop. Although the particulate organic matter losses are high in field conditions the results are of the same magnitude in both conditions suggesting an equivalence of the mass decay kinetic.

  8. The Usher Syndrome Type IIIB Histidyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutation Confers Temperature Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Guth, Ethan; Kim, Cindy; Regan, Cathy; Siu, Victoria M; Rupar, C Anthony; Demeler, Borries; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2017-07-18

    Histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HARS) is a highly conserved translation factor that plays an essential role in protein synthesis. HARS has been implicated in the human syndromes Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) Type 2W and Type IIIB Usher (USH3B). The USH3B mutation, which encodes a Y454S substitution in HARS, is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion and associated with childhood deafness, blindness, and episodic hallucinations during acute illness. The biochemical basis of the pathophysiologies linked to USH3B is currently unknown. Here, we present a detailed functional comparison of wild-type (WT) and Y454S HARS enzymes. Kinetic parameters for enzymes and canonical substrates were determined using both steady state and rapid kinetics. Enzyme stability was examined using differential scanning fluorimetry. Finally, enzyme functionality in a primary cell culture was assessed. Our results demonstrate that the Y454S substitution leaves HARS amino acid activation, aminoacylation, and tRNA His binding functions largely intact compared with those of WT HARS, and the mutant enzyme dimerizes like the wild type does. Interestingly, during our investigation, it was revealed that the kinetics of amino acid activation differs from that of the previously characterized bacterial HisRS. Despite the similar kinetics, differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that Y454S is less thermally stable than WT HARS, and cells from Y454S patients grown at elevated temperatures demonstrate diminished levels of protein synthesis compared to those of WT cells. The thermal sensitivity associated with the Y454S mutation represents a biochemical basis for understanding USH3B.

  9. Sensitivity of Support Vector Machine Predictions of Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Over Snow-covered Terrain in High Mountain Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, J. A.; Forman, B. A.

    2017-12-01

    High Mountain Asia (HMA) serves as a water supply source for over 1.3 billion people, primarily in south-east Asia. Most of this water originates as snow (or ice) that melts during the summer months and contributes to the run-off downstream. In spite of its critical role, there is still considerable uncertainty regarding the total amount of snow in HMA and its spatial and temporal variation. In this study, the NASA Land Information Systems (LIS) is used to model the hydrologic cycle over the Indus basin. In addition, the ability of support vector machines (SVM), a machine learning technique, to predict passive microwave brightness temperatures at a specific frequency and polarization as a function of LIS-derived land surface model output is explored in a sensitivity analysis. Multi-frequency, multi-polarization passive microwave brightness temperatures as measured by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over the Indus basin are used as training targets during the SVM training process. Normalized sensitivity coefficients (NSC) are then computed to assess the sensitivity of a well-trained SVM to each LIS-derived state variable. Preliminary results conform with the known first-order physics. For example, input states directly linked to physical temperature like snow temperature, air temperature, and vegetation temperature have positive NSC's whereas input states that increase volume scattering such as snow water equivalent or snow density yield negative NSC's. Air temperature exhibits the largest sensitivity coefficients due to its inherent, high-frequency variability. Adherence of this machine learning algorithm to the first-order physics bodes well for its potential use in LIS as the observation operator within a radiance data assimilation system aimed at improving regional- and continental-scale snow estimates.

  10. Temperature sensitivity of drought-induced tree mortality portends increased regional die-off under global-change-type drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D.; Guardiola-Claramonte, Maite; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.; Villegas, Juan Camilo; Breshears, David D.; Zou, Chris B.; Troch, Peter A.; Huxman, Travis E.

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale biogeographical shifts in vegetation are predicted in response to the altered precipitation and temperature regimes associated with global climate change. Vegetation shifts have profound ecological impacts and are an important climate-ecosystem feedback through their alteration of carbon, water, and energy exchanges of the land surface. Of particular concern is the potential for warmer temperatures to compound the effects of increasingly severe droughts by triggering widespread vegetation shifts via woody plant mortality. The sensitivity of tree mortality to temperature is dependent on which of 2 non-mutually-exclusive mechanisms predominates—temperature-sensitive carbon starvation in response to a period of protracted water stress or temperature-insensitive sudden hydraulic failure under extreme water stress (cavitation). Here we show that experimentally induced warmer temperatures (≈4 °C) shortened the time to drought-induced mortality in Pinus edulis (piñon shortened pine) trees by nearly a third, with temperature-dependent differences in cumulative respiration costs implicating carbon starvation as the primary mechanism of mortality. Extrapolating this temperature effect to the historic frequency of water deficit in the southwestern United States predicts a 5-fold increase in the frequency of regional-scale tree die-off events for this species due to temperature alone. Projected increases in drought frequency due to changes in precipitation and increases in stress from biotic agents (e.g., bark beetles) would further exacerbate mortality. Our results demonstrate the mechanism by which warmer temperatures have exacerbated recent regional die-off events and background mortality rates. Because of pervasive projected increases in temperature, our results portend widespread increases in the extent and frequency of vegetation die-off. PMID:19365070

  11. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  12. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  13. Effects of stress conditions on the generation of negative bias temperature instability-associated interface traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yue; Pu Shi; Lei Xiao-Yi; Chen Qing; Ma Xiao-Hua; Hao Yue

    2013-01-01

    The exponent n of the generation of an interface trap (N it ), which contributes to the power-law negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) degradation, and the exponent's time evolution are investigated by simulations with varying the stress voltage V g and temperature T. It is found that the exponent n in the diffusion-limited phase of the degradation process is irrelevant to both V g and T. The time evolution of the exponent n is affected by the stress conditions, which is reflected in the shift of the onset of the diffusion-limited phase. According to the diffusion profiles, the generation of the atomic hydrogen species, which is equal to the buildup of N it , is strongly correlated with the stress conditions, whereas the diffusion of the hydrogen species shows V g -unaffected but T-affected relations through the normalized results

  14. Influence of annealing temperature and organic dyes as sensitizers on sol–gel derived TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Mamta; Abbas, Saeed J.; Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of rice shaped TiO{sub 2} nanorods with anatase structure by sol–gel method. • Effect of post deposition annealing on structural properties of TiO{sub 2} is studied. • Unlike individual dye, absorption of Cocktail dye with TiO{sub 2} nanorods is broader. • Cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} film has more photosensitivity than EY, RB, AO. • Increase in photosensitivity up to optimum temperature is due to hole passivation. - Abstract: Five different organic dyes and reported cocktail dye composed of these dyes are used as sensitizer for titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). Rice shaped (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods are prepared by using sol–gel method. The films annealed at 673 K and above are crystalline with anatase structure. The effect of post annealing temperature is studied on various structural parameters. Cocktail dye shows broader absorption with TiO{sub 2} nanorods in visible region compared with five dyes. Maximum photosensitivity is obtained with RhB dye, followed by FGF and cocktail dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} films. Increase in photosensitivity is due to passivating some hole traps on the surface up to some optimum temperature, above which photosensitivity decreases due to a higher photo activation energy compared to dark conductivity in low temperature region and also may be due to damage of the dye molecule. This work may prove its worth for understanding the electron transport in dye sensitized nanodevices.

  15. Temperature effect on rose downy mildew development under environmental controlled conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Filgueira D., Juan José; Zambrano, Angélica

    2014-01-01

    The rose downy mildew disease, caused by Peronospora sparsa Berkeley, is one of the most important that affect rose crops in Colombia. To manage this disease, flower growers must deal with high-costs due to the excessive application of fungicides, but without good results. Studies on P. sparsa behavior have shown its narrow relationship with environmental conditions. In this study, the temperature effect was evaluated during the infection and sporulation of P. sparsa in Charlotte leaflets, a ...

  16. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions

    OpenAIRE

    De Oliveira , Tiago; Guégan , Régis; Thiebault , Thomas; Le Milbeau , Claude; Muller , Fabrice; Teixeira , Vinicius; Giovanela , Marcelo; Boussafir , Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Accepted Manuscript; International audience; Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental d...

  17. Tribological reactions of perfluoroalkyl polyether oils with stainless steel under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1989-01-01

    The reaction between three types of commercial perfluoroalkyl polyether (PFPE) oils and stainless steel 440C was investigated experimentally during sliding under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature. It is found that the tribological reaction of PFPE is mainly affected by the activity of the mechanically formed fresh surfaces of metals rather than the heat generated at the sliding contacts. The fluorides formed on the wear track act as a boundary layer, reducing the friction coefficient.

  18. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki; Mansfield, Andrew B.; Wooldridge, Margaret S.; Im, Hong G.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  19. Experimental assessment for instantaneous temperature and heat flux measurements under Diesel motored engine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torregrosa, A.J.; Bermúdez, V.; Olmeda, P.; Fygueroa, O.

    2012-01-01

    Higlights: ► We measured in-cylinder wall heat fluxes. ► We examine the effects of different engine parameters. ► Increasing air mass flow increase heat fluxes. ► The effect of engine speed can be masked by the effect of volumetric efficiency. ► Differences among the different walls have been found. - Abstract: The main goal of this work is to validate an innovative experimental facility and to establish a methodology to evaluate the influence of some of the engine parameters on local engine heat transfer behaviour under motored steady-state conditions. Instantaneous temperature measurements have been performed in order to estimate heat fluxes on a modified Diesel single cylinder combustion chamber. This study was divided into two main parts. The first one was the design and setting on of an experimental bench to reproduce Diesel conditions and perform local-instantaneous temperature measurements along the walls of the combustion chamber by means of fast response thermocouples. The second one was the development of a procedure for temperature signal treatment and local heat flux calculation based on one-dimensional Fourier analysis. A thermodynamic diagnosis model has been employed to characterise the modified engine with the new designed chamber. As a result of the measured data coherent findings have been obtained in order to understand local behaviour of heat transfer in an internal combustion engine, and the influence of engine parameters on local instantaneous temperature and heat flux, have been analysed.

  20. Movement influences carambola leaflet chlorophyll fluorescence and temperature under sunny conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marler, T.E.; Lawton, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    Leaflets of 'Arkin', 'B-10', 'Kary', and 'Sri Kembangan' carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) trees were restrained in a horizontal position for 3.5 h during midday under full sun conditions to determine the influence of overriding natural leaflet movement on adaxial chlorophyll fluorescence and temperature. Induced chlorophyll fluorescence obtained after 30 minutes of dark adaptation following the period of full sun exposure was affected by leaflet movement. Restrained leaflets exhibited a variable fluorescence (Fv)/peak fluorescence (Fm) of 0.48, while that of unrestrained leaflets was 0.65. Adaxial leaflet temperature of restrained leaflets was 6C higher than that of leaflets that were allowed to move. The influence of leaflet movement on temperature or chlorophyll fluorescence was not different among the four cultivars. However, mean Fv/Fm of 'Kary' and 'Sri Kembangan' was lower than that of 'B-10'. Our results indicate that the ability of carambola to change leaflet angle leads to lower temperature and higher photochemical efficiency than occurs when leaflets are not allowed to move naturally (vertically orient) under full sun conditions

  1. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-05-31

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of power depression and axial power factor effect on fuel pin to temperature and related properties distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwardi, S.

    2001-01-01

    The presented paper is a preliminary step to evaluate the effect of radial and axial distribution of power generation on thermal analysis of whole fuel pin model with large L/D ratio. The model takes into account both radial and axial distribution of power generation due to power depression and core geometry, temperature and microstructure dependent on thermal conductivity. The microstructure distribution and the gap conductance for typical steady-state situation are given for the sensitivity analysis. The temperature and thermal conductivity distribution along the radial and axial directions obtained by different power distribution is used to indicate the sensitivity of power depression and power factor on thermal aspect. The evaluation is made for one step of incremental time and steady state approach is used. The analysis has been performed using a finite element-finite difference model. The result for typical reactor fuel shows that the sensitivity is too important to be omitted in thermal model

  3. Mechanical characterization of alloys in extreme conditions of high strain rates and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoni, Ezio

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the description of the mechanical characterization of alloys under extreme conditions of temperature and loading. In fact, in the frame of the Cost Action CA15102 “Solutions for Critical Raw Materials Under Extreme Conditions (CRM-EXTREME)” this aspect is crucial and many industrial applications have to consider the dynamic response of materials. Indeed, for a reduction and substitution of CRMs in alloys is necessary to design the materials and understand if the new materials behave better or if the substitution or reduction badly affect their performance. For this reason, a deep knowledge of the mechanical behaviour at high strain-rates of considered materials is required. In general, machinery manufacturing industry or transport industry as well as energy industry have important dynamic phenomena that are simultaneously affected by extended strain, high strain-rate, damage and pressure, as well as conspicuous temperature gradients. The experimental results in extreme conditions of high strain rate and high temperature of an austenitic stainless steel as well as a high-chromium tempered martensitic reduced activation steel Eurofer97 are presented.

  4. On selecting a sensitive region thickness of a silicon semiconductor detector for operation under counting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronkin, N.S.; Khakhalin, V.V.

    1972-01-01

    The paper discusses the selection of a thickness of a sensitive area of a silicon semiconductor detector, used in the count regime based on the signal to noise ratio and β-radiation registration efficiency. (author)

  5. CULTURE AND SENSITIVITY OF BACTERIAL GROWTH FROM EXOTIC COWS SUFFERING FROM ENDOMETRITIS UNDER PAKISTANI CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Ali Zahid

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriology of endometritis and in vitro antibiotic sensitivity of the isolates in Holstein Friesian and Jersey cows maintained at Research Institute for Physiology of Animal Reproduction, Bhunikey, District Kasur were carried out. Out of 100 samples, 89 contained different strains of bacteria and 11 were found bacteriologically sterile. Different species of bacteria isolated from these samples were, Bacillus subtilis (08.99%, Corynebacterium pyogenes (19.10%, Escherichia coli (29.21%, Neisseria meningitides (03.37%, Staphylococcus aureus (23.60%, Streptococcus pneumonia (03.37% and Streptococcus pyogenes (12.36%. The in vitro antibiotic sensitivity test indicated that the highest number of isolates (92% were sensitive to neomycin, followed by doxycyline (89%. Clindramycin showed the lowest results in terms of in vitro antibiotic sensitivity (51%.

  6. Association of Income Inequality With Pediatric Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care-Sensitive Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettenhausen, Jessica L; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Berry, Jay G; Puls, Henry T; Markham, Jessica L; Plencner, Laura M; Krager, Molly K; Johnson, Matthew B; Queen, Mary Ann; Walker, Jacqueline M; Latta, Grant M; Riss, Robert R; Hall, Matt

    2017-06-05

    The level of income inequality (ie, the variation in median household income among households within a geographic area), in addition to family-level income, is associated with worsened health outcomes in children. To determine the influence of income inequality on pediatric hospitalization rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) and whether income inequality affects use of resources per hospitalization for ACSCs. This retrospective, cross-sectional analysis used the 2014 State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project of 14 states to evaluate all hospital discharges for patients aged 0 to 17 years (hereafter referred to as children) from January 1 through December 31, 2014. Using the 2014 American Community Survey (US Census), income inequality (Gini index; range, 0 [perfect equality] to 1.00 [perfect inequality]), median household income, and total population of children aged 0 to 17 years for each zip code in the 14 states were measured. The Gini index for zip codes was divided into quartiles for low, low-middle, high-middle, and high income inequality. Rate, length of stay, and charges for pediatric hospitalizations for ACSCs. A total of 79 275 hospitalizations for ACSCs occurred among the 21 737 661 children living in the 8375 zip codes in the 14 included states. After adjustment for median household income and state of residence, ACSC hospitalization rates per 10 000 children increased significantly as income inequality increased from low (27.2; 95% CI, 26.5-27.9) to low-middle (27.9; 95% CI, 27.4-28.5), high-middle (29.2; 95% CI, 28.6-29.7), and high (31.8; 95% CI, 31.2-32.3) categories (P inequality (2.5 days; 95% CI, 2.4-2.5 days) compared with low inequality (2.4 days; 95% CI, 2.4-2.5 days; P income inequality have higher rates of hospitalizations for ACSCs. Consideration of income inequality, in addition to income level, may provide a better understanding of the complex relationship between socioeconomic

  7. Highly Sensitive Reentrant Cavity-Microstrip Patch Antenna Integrated Wireless Passive Pressure Sensor for High Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reentrant cavity-microstrip patch antenna integrated wireless passive pressure sensor was proposed in this paper for high temperature applications. The reentrant cavity was analyzed from aspects of distributed model and equivalent lumped circuit model, on the basis of which an optimal sensor structure integrated with a rectangular microstrip patch antenna was proposed to better transmit/receive wireless signals. In this paper, the proposed sensor was fabricated with high temperature resistant alumina ceramic and silver metalization with weld sealing, and it was measured in a hermetic metal tank with nitrogen pressure loading. It was verified that the sensor was highly sensitive, keeping stable performance up to 300 kPa with an average sensitivity of 981.8 kHz/kPa at temperature 25°C, while, for high temperature measurement, the sensor can operate properly under pressure of 60–120 kPa in the temperature range of 25–300°C with maximum pressure sensitivity of 179.2 kHz/kPa. In practical application, the proposed sensor is used in a method called table lookup with a maximum error of 5.78%.

  8. Sensitivity of decomposition rates of soil organic matter with respect to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Trumbore, Susan E.; Davidson, Eric A.; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, I.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to global environmental change is a topic of prominent relevance for the global carbon cycle. Decomposition depends on multiple factors that are being altered simultaneously as a result of global environmental change; therefore, it is important to study the sensitivity of the rates of soil organic matter decomposition with respect to multiple and interacting drivers. In this manuscript, we present an analysis of the potential response of decomposition rates to simultaneous changes in temperature and moisture. To address this problem, we first present a theoretical framework to study the sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition when multiple driving factors change simultaneously. We then apply this framework to models and data at different levels of abstraction: (1) to a mechanistic model that addresses the limitation of enzyme activity by simultaneous effects of temperature and soil water content, the latter controlling substrate supply and oxygen concentration for microbial activity; (2) to different mathematical functions used to represent temperature and moisture effects on decomposition in biogeochemical models. To contrast model predictions at these two levels of organization, we compiled different data sets of observed responses in field and laboratory studies. Then we applied our conceptual framework to: (3) observations of heterotrophic respiration at the ecosystem level; (4) laboratory experiments looking at the response of heterotrophic respiration to independent changes in moisture and temperature; and (5) ecosystem-level experiments manipulating soil temperature and water content simultaneously.

  9. Effect of post-exercise hydrotherapy water temperature on subsequent exhaustive running performance in normothermic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Alan; Crampton, David; Egaña, Mikel

    2013-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of cold water immersion (CWI) in normothermic conditions, little data is available on its effect on subsequent endurance performance. This study examined the effect of CWI as a recovery strategy on subsequent running performance in normothermic ambient conditions (∼22°C). Nine endurance-trained men completed two submaximal exhaustive running bouts on three separate occasions. The running bouts (Ex1 and Ex2) were separated by 15min of un-immersed seated rest (CON), hip-level CWI at 8°C (CWI-8) or hip-level CWI at 15°C (CWI-15). Intestinal temperature, blood lactate and heart rate were recorded throughout and V˙O2, running economy and exercise times were recorded during the running sessions. Running time to failure (min) during Ex2 was significantly (p<0.05, ES=0.7) longer following CWI-8 (27.7±6.3) than CON (23.3±5) but not different between CWI-15 (26.3±3.4) and CON (p=0.06, ES=0.7) or CWI-8 and CWI-15 (p=0.4, ES=0.2). Qualitative analyses showed a 95% and 89% likely beneficial effect of CWI-8 and CWI-15 during Ex2 compared with CON, respectively. Time to failure during Ex2 was significantly shorter than Ex1 only during the CON condition. Intestinal temperature and HR were significantly lower for most of Ex2 during CWI-8 and CWI-15 compared with CON but they were similar at failure for the three conditions. Blood lactate, running economy and V˙O2 were not altered by CWI. These data indicate that a 15min period of cold water immersion applied between repeated exhaustive exercise bouts significantly reduces intestinal temperature and enhances post-immersion running performance in normothermic conditions. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Krokot (Portulaca oleracea L As a Natural Sensitizer for TiO2 Dye-sensitized Solar Cells: The Effect of Temperature Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyza Anni Mufidah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The solar cell is formed by a sandwich structure, in which two electrodes flank the primary electrolyte that is containing redox I-/based on PEG (Polyethylene Glycol. The working-electrode which is TiO2 layer on an ITO glass substrate is sensitized with krokot dye as the electron donor. The counter electrode is a layer of carbon. The fabrication cell is immersed with the krokot dye with 40°C, 50°C, 60°C extract temperature. The result of the UV-Vis shows that the absorption of wave-length from dye extract of krokot is located in the visible region with the absorbance peak in 420,5 nm and 665,5 nm which are the peak of chlorophyll. For the UV-Vis solid system, there are the highest band gap  in  50°C extract temperature that make the capability of absorption toward UV spectrum is large. Furthermore, in the functional group analysed by FT-IR, there are shiften-carbonil and hydroxyl group after they are sensitized. From the current and voltage test with I-V meter keithley 2400 is resulted that on the 50°C extract temperature produces the highest efficiency of reaches which is 2.63 x 10-3 %.

  11. Context-dependent efficacy of a counter-conditioning strategy with atypical neuroleptic drugs in mice previously sensitized to cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Lima, A J; Marinho, Eav; Santos-Baldaia, R; Hollais, A W; Baldaia, M A; Talhati, F; Ribeiro, L T; Wuo-Silva, R; Berro, L F; Frussa-Filho, R

    2017-02-06

    We have previously demonstrated that treatment with ziprasidone and aripiprazole selectively inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to cocaine in mice. We now investigate their effects on a counter-conditioning strategy in mice and the importance of the treatment environment for this phenomenon. Evaluate the context-specificity of ziprasidone and aripiprazole on conditioned locomotion to cocaine and cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and behavioral sensitization in a counter-conditioning strategy in mice. Animals were sensitized with saline or cocaine injections in the open-field apparatus in a 15-day intermittent treatment and subsequently treated with vehicle, 5mg/kg ziprasidone or 0.1mg/kg aripiprazole paired to the open-field or the home-cage for 4 alternate days. Mice were then challenged with saline and cocaine in the open-field apparatus on subsequent days. While treatment with ziprasidone decreased spontaneous locomotion and conditioned locomotion alike, treatment with aripiprazole specifically attenuated the expression of conditioned hyperlocomotion to cocaine. Ziprasidone and aripiprazole had no effects on cocaine-induced conditioned hyperlocomotion observed during saline challenge after drug withdrawal. Treatment with either ziprasidone or aripiprazole when previously given in the cocaine-paired environment attenuated the subsequent expression of behavioral sensitization to cocaine. Animals treated with aripiprazole in the open-field, but not in the home-cage, showed a blunted response to cocaine when receiving a cocaine challenge for the first time. Both neuroleptic drugs showed a context-dependent effectiveness in attenuating long-term expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization when administered in the cocaine-associated environment, with aripiprazole also showing effectiveness in blocking the expression of acute cocaine effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Sensitivity of soil respiration to variability in soil moisture and temperature in a humid tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana Wood; M. Detto; W.L. Silver

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and temperature are important drivers of soil respiration. The role of moisture and temperature are generally explored at seasonal or inter-annual timescales; however, significant variability also occurs on hourly to daily time-scales. We used small (1.54 m2), throughfall exclusion shelters to evaluate the role soil moisture and temperature as temporal...

  13. Towards a Kieselguhr- and PVPP-Free Clarification and Stabilization Process of Rough Beer at Room-Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Alessio; Moresi, Mauro

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the main constraint (that is, beer chilling and chill haze removing) of the current beer conditioning techniques using Kieselguhr filtration and Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) treatment was overcome by developing a novel higher-throughput conditioning process, operating at room temperatures with no use of filter aids. The effect of filtration temperature (T F ) in the range of 0 to 40 °C on the hydraulic permeability of ceramic hollow-fiber (HF) membranes with nominal pore size of 0.2 to 1.4 μm, as well as on their limiting permeation flux (J * ) when feeding precentrifuged rough beer, was preliminarily assessed. When using the 1.4-μm HF membrane operating at T F ≥ 20 °C, it was possible to enhance the average permeation flux at values (676 to 1844 L/m 2 /h), noticeably higher than those (250 to 500 L/m 2 /h) characteristics of conventional powder filtration. Despite its acceptable permanent haze, the resulting beer permeate still exhibited colloidal instability. By resorting to the commercial enzyme preparation Brewers Clarex® before beer clarification, it was possible to significantly improve its colloidal stability as measured using a number of European Brewing Convention forcing tests, especially with respect to that of precentrifuged rough beer by itself. By combining the above enzymatic treatment with membrane clarification at 30 °C across the ceramic 1.4-μm HF membrane module, it was possible to limit the haze development due to chilling, sensitive proteins, and alcohol addition to as low as 0.78, 4.1, and 4.0 EBC-U, respectively, the enzymatic treatment being by far more effective than that using PVPP. A novel Kieselguhr- and PVPP-free rough beer conditioning process at room temperatures was set up. By submitting precentrifuged rough beer to commercial preparation Brewers Clarex ® and then to membrane clarification at 30 °C across a ceramic 1.4-μm hollow-fiber membrane module, it was possible to obtain a clear and stable beer with

  14. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  15. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon; Jung, Young Suk

    2014-01-01

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid

  16. The relationship between heating energy use, indoor temperature and heating energy demand under reference conditions in residential buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Sara Moreira Coelho de

    etching. In this case, an excimer laser was used. Extremely thin fiber tips were obtained, with an ultra-high sensitivity to strain. The other technique employed to fabricate the fiber Bragg gratings was the point-by-point femtosecond laser inscription. In this case, the sensing elements are very stable at high temperatures and can be used to measure strain in harsh conditions. The employment of optical fiber lasers as sensing elements was also considered in this Thesis. Two laser cavities were studied, one based on the ring configuration and the other based on a figure-of-eight configuration. From these works, the quality of the laser emission, namely the signal-to-noise ratio, the reduced full-width at half maximum and the stability should be highlighted. These characteristics allowed the measurement of different physical parameters, such as strain, temperature and torsion. Lastly, the possibility to use microspheres as sensing elements was considered. Using the electric arc of a fusion splicer, it is possible to create microspheres at the tip of an optical fiber. Furthermore, with this technique it is chains of microspheres can be obtained, constituting Mach-Zehnder-type interferometers which are sensitive to physical parameters like strain and temperature. The preliminary results obtained by introducing silica microspheres in a support structure are also presented. In this case, the sensors were subjected to temperature variations. All the experimental work was combined with the respective theoretical considerations. Many questions have been raised with the course of this PhD, and there are still some without a definite answer. Thus, new research paths can be followed, having their basis grounded in the configurations here presented.

  17. Conditioned Pain Modulation and Pressure Pain Sensitivity in the Adult Danish General Population: The DanFunD Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Jørgensen, Torben; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    with cold pressor pain (hand) for 2 minutes. Conditioning pain intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale and questionnaire data were collected. Female sex (P stress......Increased pressure pain sensitivity and impaired descending pain control have been associated with chronic pain, but knowledge on the variability in the adult general population is lacking. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and descending pain control assessed using conditioned pain modulation (CPM...... (P ≤ .02), and high visual analog scale score (P ≤ .02) were associated with a larger CPM response. PERSPECTIVE: Data from this large population-based study provide new insight into the gender and age variation in pain sensitivity and CPM response. Decreased CPM potency and increased pain sensitivity...

  18. Temperature and precipitation records from stalagmites grown under disequilibrium conditions: A model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlinghaus, C.; Scholz, D.; Mangini, A.

    2009-04-01

    To reconstruct past variations in Earth's climate, a variety of climate archives are studied. During the last decades stalagmites came into focus due to their long, continuous growth and absolute dating techniques. In this study a numerical model was developed, which calculates variations in temperature and precipitation during the growth period of stalagmites grown under isotopic disequilibrium conditions using the isotope profiles both along the growth axis and individual growth layers as well as the growth depth relation. The model is based on the inversion and combination of existing models (Dreybrodt 1999, Kaufmann et al. 2004, Mühlinghaus et al. 2007, Scholz et al. 2008, Mühlinghaus et al. 2008b) and incorporates important parameters describing the cave and the overlying soil. Beside the dependence on temperature and water supply it depends on the isotopic composition of the drip water, the pCO2 pressure of the soil and the cave atmosphere as well as on the mixing coefficient, which describes mixing between the impinging drop and the existing solution layer. To determine the characteristics of temperature and precipitation, in a first step all other parameters are assumed to remain constant over the whole growth period to simplify calculations. This allows to run the model with only two input variables: the isotopic composition ^13C of the drip water and a temperature information at any point of time during the growth period of the stalagmite (e.g. the recent cave temperature). All other parameters are determined by the model. The CSM (Combined Stalagmite Model, Mühlinghaus et al. 2008a) was applied to three stalagmites from the Marcelo Arévalo cave in Southern Patagonia, Chile (Schimpf 2005, Kilian et al. 2006, Schimpf et al. in prep). These stalagmites grew in a small cave next to each other during the last 4500 years. However, their isotopic profiles along the growth axis show different kinetic influences. Despite these conditions, the temperature

  19. Data on the experiments of temperature-sensitive hydrogels for pH-sensitive drug release and the characterizations of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This article contains experimental data on the strain sweep, the calibration curve of drug (doxorubicin, DOX and the characterizations of materials. Data included are related to the research article “Injectable and body temperature sensitive hydrogels based on chitosan and hyaluronic acid for pH sensitive drug release” (Zhang et al., 2017 [1]. The strain sweep experiments were performed on a rotational rheometer. The calibration curves were obtained by analyzing the absorbance of DOX solutions on a UV–vis-NIR spectrometer. Molecular weight (Mw of the hyaluronic acid (HA and chitosan (CS were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The deacetylation degree of CS was measured by acid base titration.

  20. [Trends in hospitalization for primary care-sensitive conditions and associated factors in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Juvenal Soares Dias; Pattussi, Marcos Pascoal; Morimoto, Tissiani; de Arruda, Jocinei Santos; Bratkowski, Gabriela Rodrigues; Sopelsa, Mariani; Fritzen, Janaina Soder; do Canto, Vaneza de Andrade da Fontoura; Marques, Maximiliano Chagas

    2016-04-01

    An ecological study was conducted to analyze trends in hospitalization for primary care-sensitive conditions linking the results to the investments in health and coverage of the Family Health Strategy in Porto Alegre, between 1998 and 2012. The causes of hospitalization for primary care-sensitive conditions were based on the national list provided by the Ministry of Health. The data were obtained from the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System (SUS). Standardized rates were created and investments increased by 27%, though investments in primary care increased by 83%. The expansion of coverage by the Family Health Strategy was almost fourfold, though it remained below the recommended values. There was no change in the trend of hospitalization for primary care-sensitive conditions. The analysis did not make it possible to establish if patients who were hospitalized for primary care-sensitive conditions had access to the Family Health Strategy or not, suggesting the need to incorporate data of place of origin in the information system. Studies using the Hospital Information System contribute to its enhancement, fomenting the assessment, management and design of health policies.