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Sample records for temperature pyrolysis deoxygen

  1. Methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-06-30

    Methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. A method for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil comprising the steps of combining a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream with a heated low-oxygen-pyoil diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream is provided. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream has a feed temperature of about 150.degree. C. or greater. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a first deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at first hydroprocessing conditions effective to form a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent.

  2. Apparatuses and methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalnes, Tom N.

    2015-12-29

    Apparatuses and methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In one example, the method comprises of dividing a feedstock stream into first and second feedstock portions. The feedstock stream comprises the biomass-derived pyrolysis oil and has a temperature of about 60.degree. C. or less. The first feedstock portion is combined with a heated organic liquid stream to form a first heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The first heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a first deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to form an intermediate low-oxygen pyoil effluent. The second feedstock portion is combined with the intermediate low-oxygen pyoil effluent to form a second heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The second heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a second deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to form additional low-oxygen pyoil effluent.

  3. Methods for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-07-14

    Methods for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. A method comprising the steps of diluting the biomass-derived pyrolysis oil with a phenolic-containing diluent to form a diluted pyoil-phenolic feed is provided. The diluted pyoil-phenolic feed is contacted with a deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at hydroprocessing conditions effective to form a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent.

  4. Methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating biomass-derived pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Lance Awender; Brandvold, Timothy A.

    2015-10-20

    Embodiments of methods and apparatuses for deoxygenating a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil are provided. In one example, a method comprises the steps of separating a low-oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil effluent into a low-oxygen-pyoil organic phase stream and an aqueous phase stream. Phenolic compounds are removed from the aqueous phase stream to form a phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream. A biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is diluted and heated with the phenolic-rich diluent recycle stream to form a heated diluted pyoil feed stream. The heated diluted pyoil feed stream is contacted with a deoxygenating catalyst in the presence of hydrogen to deoxygenate the heated diluted pyoil feed stream.

  5. Pt/Al₂O₃-catalytic deoxygenation for upgrading of Leucaena leucocephala-pyrolysis oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payormhorm, Jiraporn; Kangvansaichol, Kunn; Reubroycharoen, Presert; Kuchonthara, Prapan; Hinchiranan, Napida

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the quality of bio-oil produced from the pyrolysis of Leucaena leucocephala trunks via catalytic deoxygenation using Pt/Al2O3 (Pt content=1.32% (w/w)). The minimum molar ratio of oxygen/carbon (O/C) at 0.14 was achieved when the amount of catalyst was 10% (w/w, bio-oil) and was applied under 4 bar of initial nitrogen pressure at 340°C for 1h. The reaction mechanism of the catalytic deoxygenation, in terms of reforming, water-gas shift and dehydration reactions, was proposed. To consider the effect of different biomass types on the efficiency of catalytic deoxygenation, the bio-oils obtained from the pyrolysis of sawdust, rice straw and green microalgae were likewise evaluated for direct comparison.

  6. Temperature-programmed Deoxygenation of Acetic Acid on Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Connor P.; Farberow, Carrie A.; Hensley, Jesse E.

    2017-02-07

    Temperature programmed reaction (TPRxn) is a simple yet powerful tool for screening solid catalyst performance at a variety of conditions. A TPRxn system includes a reactor, furnace, gas and vapor sources, flow control, instrumentation to quantify reaction products (e.g., gas chromatograph), and instrumentation to monitor the reaction in real time (e.g., mass spectrometer). Here, we apply the TPRxn methodology to study molybdenum carbide catalysts for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an important reaction among many in the upgrading/stabilization of biomass pyrolysis vapors. TPRxn is used to evaluate catalyst activity and selectivity and to test hypothetical reaction pathways (e.g., decarbonylation, ketonization, and hydrogenation). The results of the TPRxn study of acetic acid deoxygenation show that molybdenum carbide is an active catalyst for this reaction at temperatures above ca. 300 degree C and that the reaction favors deoxygenation (i.e., C-O bond-breaking) products at temperatures below ca. 400 degrees C and decarbonylation (i.e., C-C bond-breaking) products at temperatures above ca. 400 degrees C.

  7. EPR study of deoxygenated high-temperature superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R J Singh; P K Sharma; Shakeel Khan

    2002-05-01

    High-c superconductors are EPR silent but on a little deoxygenation of the high-c materials and their constituents, they yield rich but complex spectra. Spectra of (1) CuO, (2) BaCuO2, (3) CaCuO2, (4) Y2Cu2O5, (5) La2CuO4, (6) La2-CuO4 (M = Sr, Ba), (7) Y based-123, (8) Bi based-2201, 2212, 2223, (9) Tl based-2223 and (10) Hg based-1212,1223 have been studied. One thing common to all these materials is the CuO2 plane which gets fragmented on deoxygenation and the inherent antiferromagnetic coupling is partially destroyed which results in the appearance of the spectra. The spectra recorded have been identified to be due to (1) Cu-monomer, (2) Cu-dimer, (3) Cutetramer, (4) Cu-octamer and (5) one signal at very low field which could not be identified because there was no structure in it and may be due to fragments higher than octamers. Very big fragments do not give any spectra because the original AF order probably remains intact in them. It is expected that when the fragments become magnetically isolated from the bulk, they produce EPR spectra. Most of the spectra have been analyzed and their spin-Hamiltonian parameters determined. The spectra of these species vary a little in terms of g-value and fine-structure splitting constant from sample to sample or even in the same sample and this may be attributed to some extra oxygen attachments retained with these species. Most frequently occurring species is the Cu-tetramer, (CuO)4. As (CuO)4 represents the unit cell of the all important two-dimensional CuO2 plane of the high-c materials, its spectra have been argued to provide some clue to the mechanism of high-c superconductivity. The tetramer (CuO)4 is a four one-half spin system and is essentially 16-fold degenerate by Heisenberg isotropic exchange, it is split into 6 components: one pentet, three triplets and two singlets. In superconductors the pentet appears to be the ground state and in the non-superconducting constituents the singlets seem to form the ground

  8. Ceria promoted deoxygenation and denitrogenation of Thalassiosira weissflogii and its model compounds by catalytic in-situ pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysu, Tevfik; Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes; Sanna, Aimaro

    2016-05-01

    Pyrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose, egg white powder, palm-jojoba oils mixtures Thalassiosira weissflogii model compounds was performed with CeO2 at 500°C, to evaluate its catalytic upgrading mechanism. Light organics, aromatics and aliphatics were originated from carbohydrates, proteins and lipids, respectively. Dehydration and decarboxylation were the main reactions involved in the algae and model compounds deoxygenation, while nitrogen was removed as NH3 and HCN. CeO2 increased decarbonylation reactions compared to in absence of catalyst, with production of ketones. The results showed that the catalysts had a significant effect on the pyrolysis products composition of T. weissflogii. CeO2, NiCeAl2O3 and MgCe/Al2O3 catalysts increased the aliphatics and decreased the oxygen content in bio-oils to 6-7 wt% of the algae starting O2 content. Ceria catalysts were also able to consistently reduce the N-content in the bio-oil to 20-38% of that in the parent material, with NiCe/Al2O3 being the most effective.

  9. Catalytic Deoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapors to Improve Bio-oil Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayton, David C. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-12-22

    The President’s Advanced Energy Initiative called for a change in the way Americans fuel their vehicles to promote improved energy security. Increasing biofuels production from domestic lignocellulosic resources requires advanced technology development to achieve the aggressive targets set forth to reduce motor gasoline consumption by 20% in ten years (by 2017). The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of the Biomass Program (currently Bioenergy Technologies Office) is actively funding research and development in both biochemical and thermochemical conversion technologies to accelerate the deployment of biofuels technologies in the near future to meet the goals of the Advanced Energy Initiative. Thermochemical conversion technology options include both gasification and pyrolysis to enable the developing lignocellulosic biorefineries and maximize biomass resource utilization for production of biofuels.

  10. Low-temperature, selective catalytic deoxygenation of vegetable oil in supercritical fluid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok Ki; Lee, Hong-Shik; Hong, Moon Hyun; Lim, Jong Sung; Kim, Jaehoon

    2014-02-01

    The effects of supercritical fluids on the production of renewable diesel-range hydrocarbons from natural triglycerides were investigated. Various supercritical fluids, which included CO2 (scCO2 ), propane (scC3 H8 ) and n-hexane (scC6 H14 ), were introduced with H2 and soybean oil into a fixed-bed reactor that contained pre-activated CoMo/γ-Al2 O3 . Among these supercritical fluids, scC3 H8 and scC6 H14 efficiently allowed the reduction of the reaction temperature by as much as 50 °C as a result of facilitated heat and mass transfer and afforded similar yields to reactions in the absence of supercritical fluids. The compositional analyses of the gas and liquid products indicated that the addition of scC3 H8 during the hydrotreatment of soybean oil promoted specific deoxygenation pathways, decarbonylation and decarboxylation, which consumed less H2 than the hydrodeoxygenation pathway. As a result, the quantity of H2 required to obtain a high yield of diesel-range hydrocarbons could be reduced to 57 % if scC3 H8 was used. As decarboxylation and decarbonylation are mildly endothermic reactions, the reduced heat transfer resistance in scC3 H8 may drive the deoxygenation reaction to thermodynamically favourable pathways.

  11. Fast pyrolysis of biomass at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna

    content affected the char yield stronger than the heating rates and differences in the plant cell wall compounds between 600 and 3000K s-1. The heat treatment temperature affected more the herbaceous biomass char yield compared with wood. The differences in the char yield for particle size fractions...... pyrolysis at high temperatures plays a significant role in the overall combustion process since the biomass type, the reaction kinetics and heat transfer rates during pyrolysis influence the volatile gas release. The solid residue yield and its properties in suspension firing, including particle size...... to investigate the effects of operating parameters and biomass types on yields of char and soot, their chemistry and morphology as well as their reactivity using thermogravimetric analysis. The experimental study was focused on the influence of a wide range of operating parameters including heat treatment...

  12. Low Temperature Dechlorination of Densified Refuse Derived Fuel in Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; XIE Qiang

    2005-01-01

    Study on behavior of chlorine contained in oval-shaped densified refuse derived fuel (d-RDF) prepared from unicipal solid waste in pyrolysis was carried out by means of temperature-programmed electrical furnace, and the gasevolving from pyrolysis was investigated by FTIR. De-HCl rate was calculated by determining the emission fraction of HCl in the flue gas and the fraction of Cl left in the pyrolysis residue. The results show that Cl in the d-RDF releases primarily in the form of HCl during the pyrolysis, and the initial releasing temperature of HCl enhances with the increase of heating rate. Meanwhile, the higher the end temperature of pyrolysis, the more the Cl released. De-HCl rate is about 70% when the end temperature of pyrolysis is around 600℃. Besides, mechanism of Cl release is discussed.

  13. Effect of temperature on pyrolysis product of empty fruit bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Aizuddin Abdul; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Abdullah, Nurhayati [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Minden, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Pyrolysis of empty fruit bunches (EFB) was performed in a fixed bed reactor equipped with liquid collecting system. Pyrolysis process was conducted by varying the terminal pyrolysis temperature from 300 to 500°C under heating rate of 10°C/min for at least 2 hours. Char yield was obtained highest at 300°C around 55.88 wt%, and started to decrease as temperature increase. The maximum yield of pyrolysis liquid was obtained around 54.75 wt% as pyrolysis temperature reach 450°C. For gas yield percentage, the yield gained as temperature was increased from 300 to 500°C, within the range between 8.44 to 19.32 wt%. The char obtained at 400°C has great potential as an alternative solid fuel, due to its high heating value of 23.37 MJ/kg, low in volatile matter and ash content which are approximately around 40.32 and 11.12 wt%, respectively. The collected pyrolysis liquid within this temperature range found to have high water content of around 16.15 to 18.20 wt%. The high aqueous fraction seemed to cause the pyrolysis liquid to have low HHV which only ranging from 10.81 to 12.94 MJ/kg. These trends of results showed that necessary enhancement should be employ either on the raw biomass or pyrolysis products in order to approach at least the minimum quality of common hydrocarbon solid or liquid fuel. For energy production, both produced bio-char and pyrolysis liquid are considered as sustainable sources of bio-energy since they contained low amounts of nitrogen and sulphur, which are considered as environmental friendly solid and liquid fuel.

  14. Effect of temperature on pyrolysis product of empty fruit bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Aizuddin Abdul; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Abdullah, Nurhayati

    2015-04-01

    Pyrolysis of empty fruit bunches (EFB) was performed in a fixed bed reactor equipped with liquid collecting system. Pyrolysis process was conducted by varying the terminal pyrolysis temperature from 300 to 500°C under heating rate of 10°C/min for at least 2 hours. Char yield was obtained highest at 300°C around 55.88 wt%, and started to decrease as temperature increase. The maximum yield of pyrolysis liquid was obtained around 54.75 wt% as pyrolysis temperature reach 450°C. For gas yield percentage, the yield gained as temperature was increased from 300 to 500°C, within the range between 8.44 to 19.32 wt%. The char obtained at 400°C has great potential as an alternative solid fuel, due to its high heating value of 23.37 MJ/kg, low in volatile matter and ash content which are approximately around 40.32 and 11.12 wt%, respectively. The collected pyrolysis liquid within this temperature range found to have high water content of around 16.15 to 18.20 wt%. The high aqueous fraction seemed to cause the pyrolysis liquid to have low HHV which only ranging from 10.81 to 12.94 MJ/kg. These trends of results showed that necessary enhancement should be employ either on the raw biomass or pyrolysis products in order to approach at least the minimum quality of common hydrocarbon solid or liquid fuel. For energy production, both produced bio-char and pyrolysis liquid are considered as sustainable sources of bio-energy since they contained low amounts of nitrogen and sulphur, which are considered as environmental friendly solid and liquid fuel.

  15. Effects of temperature on pyrolysis products of oil sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo LIU; Wei SONG; Yongfeng NIE

    2008-01-01

    Temperature is the determining factor of pyrolysis, which is one of the alternative technologies for oil sludge treatment. The effects of final:operating temperature ranging from 350 to 550℃ on pyrolysis products of oil sludge were studied in an externally-heating fixed bed reactor. With an increase of temperature, the mass fraction of solid residues, liquids, and gases in the final product is 67.00%-56.00%, 25.60%-32.35%, and 7.40%-11.65%, and their coresponding heat values are 34.4-13.8 MJ/kg, 44.41-46.6 MJ/kg, and 23.94-48.23 MJ/Nm3, respectively. The mass and energy tend to shift from solid to liquid and gas phase (especially to liquid phase) during the process, and the optimum temperature for oil sludge pyrolysis is 500℃. The liquid phase is mainly composed of alkane and alkene (C5.-C29), and the gas phase is dominantly HCs and H2.

  16. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time".

  17. Low temperature microwave-assisted vs conventional pyrolysis of various biomass feedstocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Shuttleworth; Vitaliy Budarin; Mark Gronnow; James H. Clark; Rafael Luque

    2012-01-01

    A comparison between conventional pyrolysis and a novel developed low-temperature microwave-assisted pyrolysis methodology has been performed for the valorisation of a range of biomass feedstocks including waste residues.Microwave pyrolysis was found to efficiently deliver comparable evolution of bio-gases in the system as compared with conventional pyrolysis at significantly reduced temperatures (120-180 ℃ vs 250-400 ℃).The gas obtained from microwave-assistet pyrolysis was found to contain CO2,CH4 and CO as major components as well as other related chemicals (e.g.acids,aldehydes,alkanes) which were obtained in different proportions depending on the selected feedstock.

  18. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on physicochemical properties of biochar obtained from the fast pyrolysis of pitch pine (Pinus rigida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Kim, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Su; Choi, Joon Weon

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties and structure of biochar. Biochar was produced by fast pyrolysis of pitch pine (Pinus rigida) using a fluidized bed reactor at different pyrolysis temperatures (300, 400 and 500 °C). The produced biochars were characterized by elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, particle size distributions, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The yield of biochar decreased sharply from 60.7% to 14.4%, based on the oven-dried biomass weight, when the pyrolysis temperature rose from 300 °C to 500 °C. In addition, biochars were further carbonized with an increase in pyrolysis temperature and the char's remaining carbons were rearranged in stable form. The experimental results suggested that the biochar obtained at 400 and 500 °C was composed of a highly ordered aromatic carbon structure.

  19. Catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell waste in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Bon Seok; Lee, Dong Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell was investigated in a fluidized bed with zsm-5 and equilibrium FCC (Ecat) catalysts. Catalytic pyrolysis oil yields were remarkably reduced and gas yields were increased due to the higher catalytic reaction of primary volatiles compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis. Char yields were affected by temperature and the pore structure of the catalysts. The pyrolysis oil was characterized by lower H/C and O/C molar ratios due to aromatization and deoxygenation of volatiles by the catalysts. The catalytic pyrolysis oils contained more oxygen and nitrogen and less sulfur than petroleum oils. The oils had a high concentration of nitriles, with a carbon number distribution similar to fatty acids. The catalytic pyrolysis oils featured high nitriles yield with Ecat and high aromatics yield in the light fraction with zsm-5, due to characteristics of the catalyst. The catalytic pyrolysis oils showed potentials as feedstocks for bio-diesel and chemicals.

  20. A granular-biomass high temperature pyrolysis model based on the Darcy flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Qi, Guoli; Dong, Peng

    2015-03-01

    We established a model for the chemical reaction kinetics of biomass pyrolysis via the high-temperature thermal cracking of liquid products. We divided the condensable volatiles into two groups, based on the characteristics of the liquid prdoducts., tar and biomass oil. The effects of temperature, residence time, particle size, velocity, pressure, and other parameters on biomass pyrolysis and high-temperature tar cracking were investigated numerically, and the results were compared with experimental data. The simulation results showed a large endothermic pyrolysis reaction effect on temperature and the reaction process. The pyrolysis reaction zone had a constant temperature period in several layers near the center of large biomass particles. A purely physical heating process was observed before and after this period, according to the temperature index curve.

  1. Flash flow pyrolysis: mimicking flash vacuum pyrolysis in a high-temperature/high-pressure liquid-phase microreactor environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantillo, David; Sheibani, Hassan; Kappe, C Oliver

    2012-03-02

    Flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) is a gas-phase continuous-flow technique where a substrate is sublimed through a hot quartz tube under high vacuum at temperatures of 400-1100 °C. Thermal activation occurs mainly by molecule-wall collisions with contact times in the region of milliseconds. As a preparative method, FVP is used mainly to induce intramolecular high-temperature transformations leading to products that cannot easily be obtained by other methods. It is demonstrated herein that liquid-phase high-temperature/high-pressure (high-T/p) microreactor conditions (160-350 °C, 90-180 bar) employing near- or supercritical fluids as reaction media can mimic the results obtained using preparative gas-phase FVP protocols. The high-T/p liquid-phase "flash flow pyrolysis" (FFP) technique was applied to the thermolysis of Meldrum's acid derivatives, pyrrole-2,3-diones, and pyrrole-2-carboxylic esters, producing the expected target heterocycles in high yields with residence times between 10 s and 10 min. The exact control over flow rate (and thus residence time) using the liquid-phase FFP method allows a tuning of reaction selectivities not easily achievable using FVP. Since the solution-phase FFP method does not require the substrate to be volatile any more--a major limitation in classical FVP--the transformations become readily scalable, allowing higher productivities and space-time yields compared with gas-phase protocols. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements and extensive DFT calculations provided essential information on pyrolysis energy barriers and the involved reaction mechanisms. A correlation between computed activation energies and experimental gas-phase FVP (molecule-wall collisions) and liquid-phase FFP (molecule-molecule collisions) pyrolysis temperatures was derived.

  2. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  3. Effect of torrefaction on the properties of rice straw high temperature pyrolysis char: Pore structure, aromaticity and gasification activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Handing; Chen, Xueli; Qin, Yueqiang; Wei, Juntao; Liu, Haifeng

    2017-03-01

    The influence of torrefaction on the physicochemical characteristics of char during raw and water washed rice straw pyrolysis at 800-1200°C is investigated. Pore structure, aromaticity and gasification activity of pyrolysis chars are compared between raw and torrefied samples. For raw straw, BET specific surface area decreases with the increased torrefaction temperature at the same pyrolysis temperature and it approximately increases linearly with weight loss during pyrolysis. The different pore structure evolutions relate to the different volatile matters and pore structures between raw and torrefied straw. Torrefaction at higher temperature would bring about a lower graphitization degree of char during pyrolysis of raw straw. Pore structure and carbon crystalline structure evolutions of raw and torrefied water washed straw are different from these of raw straw during pyrolysis. For both raw and water washed straw, CO2 gasification activities of pyrolysis chars are different between raw and torrefied samples.

  4. A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, J P [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

  5. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Production Conditions on Switchgrass Biochar for Use as a Soil Amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Joy Ashworth

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochars form recalcitrant carbon and increase water and nutrient retention in soils; however, the magnitude is contingent upon production conditions and thermo-chemical conversion processes. Herein we aim at (i characterizing switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.-biochar morphology, (ii estimating water-holding capacity under increasing ratios of char: soil; and, (iii determining nutrient profile variation as a function of pyrolysis conversion methodologies (i.e. continuous, auger pyrolysis system versus batch pyrolysis systems for terminal use as a soil amendment. Auger system chars produced at 600°C had the greatest lignin portion by weight among the biochars produced from the continuous system. On the other hand, a batch pyrolysis system (400 °C – 3h yielded biochar with 73.10% lignin (12 fold increases, indicating higher recalcitrance, whereas lower production temperatures (400 °C yielded greater hemicellulose (i.e. greater mineralization promoting substrate. Under both pyrolysis methods, increasing biochar soil application rates resulted in linear decreases in bulk density (g cm-3. Increases in auger-char (400 °C applications increased soil water-holding capacities; however, application rates of >2 Mt ha-1 are required. Pyrolysis batch chars did not influence water-holding abilities (P>0.05. Biochar macro and micronutrients increased, as the pyrolysis temperature increased in the auger system from 400 to 600 °C, and the residence time increased in the batch pyrolysis system from 1 to 3 h. Conversely, nitrogen levels tended to decrease under the two previously mentioned conditions. Consequently, not all chars are inherently equal, in that varying operation systems, residence times, and production conditions greatly affect uses as a soil amendment and overall rate of efficacy.

  6. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Rice Husk Char Characteristics and Its Tar Adsorption Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchan Paethanom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A biomass waste, rice husk, was inspected by thermoanalytical investigation to evaluate its capability as an adsorbent medium for tar removal. The pyrolysis process has been applied to the rice husk material at different temperatures 600, 800 and 1000 °C with 20 °C/min heating rate, to investigate two topics: (1 influence of temperature on characterization of rice husk char and; (2 adsorption capability of rice husk char for tar removal. The results showed that subsequent to high temperature pyrolysis, rice husk char became a highly porous material, which was suitable as tar removal adsorbent with the ability to remove tar effectively. In addition, char characteristics and tar removal ability were significantly influenced by the pyrolysis temperature.

  7. Kinetics of coffee industrial residue pyrolysis using distributed activation energy model and components separation of bio-oil by sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nanwei; Ren, Jie; Ye, Ziwei; Xu, Qizhi; Liu, Jingyong; Sun, Shuiyu

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the kinetics of coffee industrial residue (CIR) pyrolysis, the effect of pyrolysis factors on yield of bio-oil component and components separation of bio-oil. The kinetics of CIR pyrolysis was analyzed using distributed activation energy model (DAEM), based on the experiments in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), and it indicated that the average of activation energy (E) is 187.86kJ·mol(-1). The bio-oils were prepared from CIR pyrolysis in vacuum tube furnace, and its components were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Among pyrolysis factors, pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor on components yield of bio-oil, directly concerned with the volatilization and yield of components (palmitic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, octadecanoic acid and caffeine). Furthermore, a new method (sequencing temperature-raising pyrolysis) was put forward and applied to the components separation of bio-oil. Based on experiments, a solution of components separation of bio-oil was come out.

  8. Effect of the fast pyrolysis temperature on the primary and secondary products of lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Shuai; Garcia Perez, Manuel; Pecha, Brennan; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; McDonald, Armando G.; Westerhof, Roel J.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results on the primary pyrolysis products of organosolv lignin at temperatures between 360 and 700 °C. To study the primary products, a vacuum screen heater (heating rate of 8000 °C/s, deep vacuum of 0.7 mbar, and very fast cooling at the wall temperature of −100 °C) was used. Th

  9. Interactive Matching between the Temperature Profile and Secondary Reactions of Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yu; Han, Zhennan; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    degrees C and a shale char bed operating at different temperatures. At low temperatures (550 degrees C), severe cracking occurred, converting both heavy and light oil to carbon and gas. The desirably matched reactor temperature profile for high oil yield is discussed via analysis of the tendency......This article investigates the effect of the reactor temperature profile on the distribution and characteristics of the products from fixed-bed pyrolysis of oil shale. Experiments were performed in a one-stage fixed-bed reactor and in a two-stage fixed-bed reactor. In the one-stage reactor......, the shale oil yield reached 7.40 wt % with a reactor temperature profile from 900 to 550 degrees C and decreased to 2.23 wt % with the reverse temperature profile. The effect of the temperature profile was investigated further in the two-stage fixed-bed reactor combining a pyrolysis stage operating at 550...

  10. Effects of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties of empty fruit bunch and rice husk biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claoston, N; Samsuri, A W; Ahmad Husni, M H; Mohd Amran, M S

    2014-04-01

    Biochar has received great attention recently due to its potential to improve soil fertility and immobilize contaminants as well as serving as a way of carbon sequestration and therefore a possible carbon sink. In this work, a series of biochars were produced from empty fruit bunch (EFB) and rice husk (RH) by slow pyrolysis at different temperatures (350, 500, and 650°C) and their physicochemical properties were analysed. The results indicate that porosity, ash content, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH value of both EFB and RH biochars were increased with temperature; however, yield, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and H, C, and N content were decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The Fourier transform IR spectra were similar for both RH and EFB biochars but the functional groups were more distinct in the EFB biochar spectra. There were reductions in the amount of functional groups as pyrolysis temperature increased especially for the EFB biochar. However, total acidity of the functional groups increased with pyrolysis temperature for both biochars.

  11. Effects of pyrolysis temperature and fillers on joining of ceramics via silicone resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Jun; CHEN Zhao-hui; ZHENG Wen-wei; HAN Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    The joining of graphite, ceramic SiC and Cf/SiC composites via preceramic silicone resin(SR) at high temperature (800-1400℃) was studied. The curing and pyrolysis process of SR, pyrolysis temperature, inert and active fillers were especially discussed. The results show that the curing process of SR was accomplished by consuming Si-OH. The temperature of 1200℃ is the appropriate treating temperature for graphite and SiC ceramic, and the temperature of 1400℃ is suitable for Cf/SiC composites. Inert filler SiC powder(5%, mass fraction) has much positive influence on the shear strength of the joints. Active filler nano Ai, Si powder can greatly improve the properties of the joints treated at high temperature. The improvement is over 700%.

  12. Temperature and time influence on the waste plastics pyrolysis in the fixed bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papuga Saša V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis as a technique of chemical recycling of plastic materials is causing an increasing level of interest as an environmentally and economically acceptable option for the processing of waste materials. Studies of these processes are carried out under different experimental conditions, in different types of reactors and with different raw materials, which makes the comparison of different processes and the direct application of process parameters quite complex. This paper presents the results of investigation of the influence of temperature in the range of 450°C to 525°C, on the yield of the process of pyrolysis of waste plastics mixture, composed of 45% polypropylene, 35% low density polyethylene and 25% high density polyethylene. Also, this paper presents results of the investigation of the effect of the reaction, atintervals of 30-90 [min], on the yield of pyrolysis of the mentioned waste plastics mixture. Research was conducted in a fixed bed pilot reactor, which was developed for this purpose. The results of the research show that at a temperature of 500°C, complete conversion of raw materials was achieved, for a period of 45 [min], with a maximum yield of the pyrolysis oil of 32.80%, yield of the gaseous products of 65.75% and the solid remains of 1.46%. Afurther increase of temperature increases the yield of gaseous products, at the expense of reducing the yield of pyrolysis oil. Obtained pyrolysis oil has a high calorific value of 45.96 [MJ/kg], and in this regard has potential applications as an alternative fuel.

  13. Effect of Temperature in Fluidized Bed Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass: Oil Quality Assessment in Test Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, R.J.M.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Pine wood was pyrolyzed in a 1 kg/h fluidized bed fast pyrolysis reactor that allows a residence time of pine wood particles up to 25 min. The reactor temperature was varied between 330 and 580 °C to study the effect on product yields and oil composition. Apart from the physical−chemical analysis, a

  14. Products from the high temperature pyrolysis of RDF at slow and rapid heating rates

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The high-temperature pyrolysis behaviour of a sample of refuse derived fuel (RDF) as a model of municipal solid waste (MSW) was investigated in a horizontal tubular reactor between 700 and 900 °C, at varying heating rates, and at an extended vapour residence time. Experiments were designed to evaluate the influence of process conditions on gas yields as well as gas and oil compositions. Pyrolysis of RDF at 800 °C and at rapid heating rate resulted in the gas yield with the highest CV of 24.8 ...

  15. Development of Nature Protection Technologies of Hydrocarbon Wastes Disposal on the Basis of High- Temperature Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantarin, V. D.; Zemenkova, M. Yu; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    The research shows the thermal balance of low-temperature pyrolysis of birch sawdust with the possibility of further development of nature protection technology of hydrocarbon wastes disposal with secondary useful products production. The actual problem was solved by preventing environmental pollution by greenhouse gases using pyrolysis process as a method of disposal of hydrocarbon wastes with secondary useful products production. The objective of paper is to study features of the processes of thermal processing of wastes and development of environmentally sound technology of disposal C-containing wastes, contributing to the implementation of the pollution prevention concept.

  16. Effect of fast pyrolysis conditions on biomass solid residues at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of wood and straw was conducted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and compared with corresponding data from a wire mesh reactor (WMR) to study the influence of temperature (1000-1400)°C, biomass origin (pinewood, beechwood, wheat straw, alfalfa straw), and heating rate (103 °C/s, 104 °C....../s) on the char yield and morphology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), elemental analysis, and ash compositional analysis were applied to characterize the effect of operational conditions on the solid residues (char, soot) and gaseous products. The char yield from fast pyrolysis in the DTF setup was 3 to 7......% (daf) points lower than in the WMR. During fast pyrolysis pinewood underwent drastic morphological transformations, whereas beechwood and straw samples retained the original porous structure of the parental fuel with slight melting on the surface. The particle size of Danish wheat straw char decreased...

  17. Development of coconut pith chars towards high elemental mercury adsorption performance - Effect of pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Cheu, Siew Chin; Kong, Helen; Mat, Hanapi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, chars from coconut pith (CP) were prepared aiming for superior adsorption towards elemental mercury (Hg(o)). The yield, proximate analysis, textural characteristics, surface functional groups and elemental composition analyses of the chars produced at pyrolysis temperature of 300 °C, 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C were compared. The surface area, pore volume, ash and carbon content of chars increased, while the yield and moisture content decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The changing of physical and chemical properties of the chars produced at variety pyrolysis temperature was much effect on the Hg(o) adsorption performance and definitely provides important information on the Hg(o) adsorption mechanism. The highest Hg(o) adsorption capacity was observed for CP900 (6067.49 μg/g), followed by CP700 (2395.98 μg/g), CP500 (289.76 μg/g), CP300 (1.68 μg/g), and CP (0.73 μg/g). The equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-second order best described the kinetic data of the Hg(o) adsorption onto CP and CP300. For chars produced at higher pyrolysis temperature, however, the pseudo-zero order and pseudo-second order fitted well for the adsorption and breakthrough regions, respectively. The Hg(o) adsorption capacity of chars obtained from high pyrolysis temperature of CP significantly outperformed the commercial activated carbon (Darco KB-B) as well as superior to chars reported in the literature indicating the CP can be used as a precursor for preparation of chars as elemental mercury adsorbents.

  18. Effects of feedstock and pyrolysis temperature on biochar adsorption of ammonium and nitrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiapu Gai

    Full Text Available Biochar produced by pyrolysis of biomass can be used to counter nitrogen (N pollution. The present study investigated the effects of feedstock and temperature on characteristics of biochars and their adsorption ability for ammonium N (NH4(+-N and nitrate N (NO3(--N. Twelve biochars were produced from wheat-straw (W-BC, corn-straw (C-BC and peanut-shell (P-BC at pyrolysis temperatures of 400, 500, 600 and 700°C. Biochar physical and chemical properties were determined and the biochars were used for N sorption experiments. The results showed that biochar yield and contents of N, hydrogen and oxygen decreased as pyrolysis temperature increased from 400°C to 700°C, whereas contents of ash, pH and carbon increased with greater pyrolysis temperature. All biochars could sorb substantial amounts of NH4(+-N, and the sorption characteristics were well fitted to the Freundlich isotherm model. The ability of biochars to adsorb NH4(+-N followed: C-BC>P-BC>W-BC, and the adsorption amount decreased with higher pyrolysis temperature. The ability of C-BC to sorb NH4(+-N was the highest because it had the largest cation exchange capacity (CEC among all biochars (e.g., C-BC400 with a CEC of 38.3 cmol kg(-1 adsorbed 2.3 mg NH4(+-N g(-1 in solutions with 50 mg NH4(+ L(-1. Compared with NH4(+-N, none of NO3(--N was adsorbed to biochars at different NO3(- concentrations. Instead, some NO3(--N was even released from the biochar materials. We conclude that biochars can be used under conditions where NH4(+-N (or NH3 pollution is a concern, but further research is needed in terms of applying biochars to reduce NO3(--N pollution.

  19. Effect of temperature on energy potential of pyrolysis products from oil palm shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina María Romero Millán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Taking into account that near 220 000 tons of oil palm shells are produced every year in Colombia, as a waste of the Elaeis Guineensis palm oil transformation process, the aim of this work is to determine the energy potential of oil palm shells, when transformed through slow pyrolysis process.Methods: Using a fixed bed lab scale reactor, different oil palm shells pyrolysis tests were performed between 300°C and 500°C. The effect of the temperature in the process product yield and in the energy content of produced solids and gases were analyzed.Results: With a maximum mass yield of 50%, the char is considered the main product of oil palm shells pyrolysis, containing up to 73% of the raw biomass energy. The heating value of char raised with the temperature, from 29,6 MJ/kg at 300°C to 31,34 MJ/kg at 500°C. Moreover, the gas produced in the established temperature range had up to 13% of the energy content of the raw biomass, with a heating value near 12,5 MJ/m3.Conclusions: According to the results, slow pyrolysis can be considered an interesting process for the valorization of residual biomass as oil palm shells, through the production of solids and gases that can be used as fuels, or as precursor of other value-added products.

  20. The densification of bio-char: Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the qualities of pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiang; Yang, Haiping; Yao, Dingding; Zhu, Danchen; Wang, Xianhua; Shao, Jingai; Chen, Hanping

    2016-01-01

    The densification of bio-chars pyrolyzed at different temperatures were investigated to elucidate the effect of temperature on the properties of bio-char pellets and determine the bonding mechanism of pellets. Optimized process conditions were obtained with 128MPa compressive pressure and 35% water addition content. Results showed that both the volume density and compressive strength of bio-char pellets initially decreased and subsequently increased, while the energy consumption increased first and then decreased, with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. The moisture adsorption of bio-char pellets was noticeably lower than raw woody shavings but had elevated than the corresponding char particles. Hydrophilic functional groups, particle size and binder were the main factors that contributed to the cementation of bio-char particles at different temperatures. The result indicated that pyrolysis of woody shavings at 550-650°C and followed by densification was suitable to form bio-char pellets for application as renewable biofuels.

  1. Selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2014-12-01

    The selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols without cleaving the Csbnd C bond is crucial for upgrading bio-oil and other biomass-derived molecules to useful fuels and chemicals. In this work, propanal, 1-propanol, furfural and furfuryl alcohol were selected as probe molecules to study the deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) prepared over a Mo(1 1 0) surface. The reaction pathways were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The deoxygenation of propanal and 1-propanol went through a similar intermediate (propoxide or η2(C,O)-propanal) to produce propene. The deoxygenation of furfural and furfuryl alcohol produced a surface intermediate similar to adsorbed 2-methylfuran. The comparison of these results revealed the promising deoxygenation performance of Mo2C, as well as the effect of the furan ring on the selective deoxygenation of the Cdbnd O and Csbnd OH bonds.

  2. Recycling of automobile shredder residue with a microwave pyrolysis combined with high temperature steam gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaj, Pawel; Yang, Weihong; Błasiak, Włodzimierz; Forsgren, Christer

    2010-10-15

    Presently, there is a growing need for handling automobile shredder residues--ASR or "car fluff". One of the most promising methods of treatment ASR is pyrolysis. Apart of obvious benefits of pyrolysis: energy and metals recovery, there is serious concern about the residues generated from that process needing to be recycled. Unfortunately, not much work has been reported providing a solution for treatment the wastes after pyrolysis. This work proposes a new system based on a two-staged process. The ASR was primarily treated by microwave pyrolysis and later the liquid and solid products become the feedstock for the high temperature gasification process. The system development is supported within experimental results conducted in a lab-scale, batch-type reactor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The heating rate, mass loss, gas composition, LHV and gas yield of producer gas vs. residence time are reported for the steam temperature of 1173 K. The sample input was 10 g and the steam flow rate was 0.65 kg/h. The conversion reached 99% for liquids and 45-55% for solids, dependently from the fraction. The H(2):CO mol/mol ratio varied from 1.72 solids and 1.4 for liquid, respectively. The average LHV of generated gas was 15.8 MJ/Nm(3) for liquids and 15 MJ/Nm(3) for solids fuels.

  3. PYROLYSIS OF EMPTY FRUIT BUNCHES: INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON THE YIELDS AND COMPOSITION OF GASEOUS PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Azri Sukiran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing concern on fossil fuel depletion and environmental problems, the utilization of renewable biomass resources is expected to play an important role in the future. Biomass can be converted into a variety of fuels and chemicals by different processes; one of which is pyrolysis that has been subjected to extensive research in recent years. In this study, pyrolysis of oil palm Empty Fruit Bunches (EFB was investigated using a quartz fluidised-fixed bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperatures on the yields and composition of gaseous products were investigated. The temperatures of pyrolysis used were in the range of 300-600°C. The gaseous products from pyrolysis of (EFB were analyzed using a dual-channel micro-GC with Thermal Conductivity Detector (TCD. The highest and lowest gas yields obtained were 42.98 and 31.55% at 600 and 300°C, respectively. The gases detected were Carbon Monoxide (CO, carbon dioxide (CO2, Methane (CH4, Ethane (C2H6 and Ethylene (C2H4. At 300 and 400°C, the gas mixture comprised mainly CO2 (20% and CO (20%. Other gases such as CH4, C2H4 and C2H6 only evolved at higher temperature starting from 400°C with the yield of the latter two gases in very low concentration.

  4. Influence of fast pyrolysis temperature on biochar labile fraction and short-term carbon loss in a loamy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Ibrahim, Norazana;

    2011-01-01

    Production of bio-oil, gas and biochar from pyrolysis of biomass is considered a promising technology for combined production of bioenergy and recalcitrant carbon (C) suitable for sequestration in soil. Using a fast pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) the present study investigated the relation......, emphasizing the importance of knowing the biochar labile fraction when evaluating a specific biochars C sequestration potential. The pyrolysis temperature influenced the outputs of biochar, bio-oil and syngas significantly, as well as the stability of the biochar produced. Contrary to slow pyrolysis a fast...... in soil. As these labile carbohydrates are rapidly mineralized, their presence lowers the biochar-C sequestration potential. By raising the pyrolysis temperature, biochar with none or low contents of these fractions can be produced, but this will be on the expense of the biochar quantity. The yield of CO2...

  5. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Yu, Xinzhi; Song, Chao; Pang, Xiaoli; Huang, Jing; Li, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Biochar produced by biomass pyrolysis has the advantage of carbon sequestration. However, some of the carbon atoms in biochar are not very stable. In this study, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical oxidation stability of bamboo biochar was investigated using the atomic ratios of H/C and O/C, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) oxidation spectrophotometric method. The results show that the carbon yield and ratios of H/C and O/C decreased from 71.72%, 0.71, and 0.32 to 38.48%, 0.22, and 0.06, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 300°C to 700°C. Moreover, the main oxygen-containing functional groups gradually decreased, while the degree of aromatization increased accordingly. The biochar showed a better stability at a higher pyrolysis temperature. The proportion of carbon loss, i.e., the amount of oxidized carbon with respect to the total carbon of the biochar, decreased from 16.52% to 6.69% with increasing temperature.

  6. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on Structural Transformation and Reactivity of Herbaceous Biomasses at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw and rice husks was carried out in an entrained-flow reactor (EFR) and compared with the results from the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) in terms of the char yield at high-temperatures (1000-1500°C) to study the effect of heating rate, final temperature, ash content and part......Fast pyrolysis of wheat straw and rice husks was carried out in an entrained-flow reactor (EFR) and compared with the results from the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) in terms of the char yield at high-temperatures (1000-1500°C) to study the effect of heating rate, final temperature, ash content...... and particle size on the char yield. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), N-adsorption (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis (CAMSIZER XT), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (29Si NMR; 13C NMR) and electron spinning resonance spectroscopy (ESR) were conducted to investigate the effect...... of organic and inorganic matter on the char structural transformations. The results indicate no influence of the free radicals on char reactivity and burnout. The formation of free radicals in fast pyrolysis is related to the differences in the ash composition, namely presence of K+ ions in the wheat straw...

  7. Selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo{sub 2}C) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ke [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yu, Weiting [Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Chen, Jingguang G., E-mail: jgchen@columbia.edu [Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-12-30

    Highlights: • Mo{sub 2}C surface can deoxygenate propanal and 1-propanol to produce propene through a similar intermediate (propoxide or η{sup 2}(C,O)-propanal). • Mo{sub 2}C surface can deoxygenate furfural and furfuryl alcohol to make 2-methylfuran through a 2-methylfuran-like intermediate. • The presence of furan ring modifies the selectivity between deoxygenation and hydrogenation/dehydrogenation pathways. - Abstract: The selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols without cleaving the C-C bond is crucial for upgrading bio-oil and other biomass-derived molecules to useful fuels and chemicals. In this work, propanal, 1-propanol, furfural and furfuryl alcohol were selected as probe molecules to study the deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo{sub 2}C) prepared over a Mo(1 1 0) surface. The reaction pathways were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The deoxygenation of propanal and 1-propanol went through a similar intermediate (propoxide or η{sup 2}(C,O)-propanal) to produce propene. The deoxygenation of furfural and furfuryl alcohol produced a surface intermediate similar to adsorbed 2-methylfuran. The comparison of these results revealed the promising deoxygenation performance of Mo{sub 2}C, as well as the effect of the furan ring on the selective deoxygenation of the C=O and C-OH bonds.

  8. Influence of temperature and particle size on the fixed bed pyrolysis of orange peel residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, L. [Departamento de Mecanica, Universidad de Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Calle Marti 270, final, Pinar del Rio (Cuba); Marquez-Montesinos, F. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Calle Marti 270, final, Pinar del Rio (Cuba); Gonzalo, A.; Sanchez, J.L.; Arauzo, J. [Thermochemical Processes Group (GPT), Aragon Institute for Engineering Research (I3A), University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    Orange peel is a residue from the production of juice. Its energetic valorisation could be interesting in areas where a different use, such as animal feed, is not possible. In order to investigate the viability of energy recovery, the pyrolysis of orange peel residues was studied in a fixed bed reactor, as an initial assessment of this process. The influence of pyrolysis temperature (300-600 C) and particle size (d{sub p}<300{mu}m and d{sub p}>800{mu}m) on product distribution, gas composition and char heating value has been investigated using a factorial design of experiments. Gas, char and water are the main products obtained; tar is only about 6 wt.% of the initial residue. Temperature was found to be the parameter which exerts a more important influence on the results than particle size. (author)

  9. Chemical spray pyrolysis of β-In2S3 thin films deposited at different temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    SALL, THIERNO; Marí Soucase, Bernabé; Mollar García, Miguel Alfonso; Hartitti, Bouchaib; Fahoume, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    In2S3 thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by chemical spray pyrolysis while keeping the substrates at different temperatures. The structures of the sprayed In2S3 thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XFD). The quality of the thin films was determined by Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy were used to explore the surface morphology and topography of the thin films, respectively. The optic...

  10. Effects of biomass type, blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on hybrid coal quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasongko, Dwiwahju; Wulandari, Winny; Rubani, Inga Shaffira; Rusydiansyah, Rifqi

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study on co-pyrolysis of coal with biomass wastes to produce hybrid coal was conducted to investigate the effects of important process variables, namely biomass type (rice husk and sawdust), blend composition, and co-pyrolysis temperature on the quality of hybrid coal. The experiments were carried out using a vertical tubular furnace equipped with temperature controller to maintain the co-pyrolysis reactor at a given temperature. Nitrogen gas was introduced into the furnace to create an inert environment preventing the sample from burning. A known mass of solid sample consisting of manually granulated blend of coal and biomass with binder in spherical shape was contained in a basket made of stainless sieve. After a given residence time, the sample was taken from the furnace. The blend sample prior to experiment and the produced hybrid coal were then characterized for its proximate analysis, ultimate analysis and calorific value. Experimental findings suggested that by increasing co-pyrolysis temperature from 200 to 400 °C, the calorific value of hybrid coal will increase by 14.5-17.7% to be 5585-7060 kcal/kg. It was also showed that 30% increase in the biomass content in the fuel blend would produce a hybrid coal that emitting up to 25.9% less in CO2 when used for combustion, although its calorific value decreased down to 8% compared to the biomass blend. It is shown that hybrid coal obtained from this study is comparable in calorific value to bituminous coal, thus suitable for power plant while being more environmentally friendly.

  11. Wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM degradation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. A.; Hatton, P. J.; Filley, T. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Auclerc, A.; Gormley, M.; Dastmalchi, K.; Stark, R. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about how shifts in tree species composition and increased forest fire frequency and intensity will affect one of the most stable pools of soil organic matter, i.e. the pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM or char). In a previous study, we showed that wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM structure and potential reactivity for two tree species common in high-latitude forests, jack pine (JP) and red maple (RM). Here, we investigate whether these differences affect PyOM turnover by examining the fates of 13C/15N-enriched JP wood and PyOM pyrolyzed at 300 (JP300) and 450 °C (JP450) and RM pyrolyzed at 450 °C (RM450). The substrates were applied 1-3 cm below the O/A interface of a well-drained Spodosol in a long-term forest fire study located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (Pellston, MI, USA). 13C-CO2effluxes from the first 996 days of decay showed a significant wood source by pyrolysis temperature interaction on PyOM field mineralisation rates, with RM450 mineralising twice faster than JP450 during the first 90 days. Increasing pyrolysis temperature substantially decreased field mineralization rates during the first 996 days, with mineralisation rates 24 and 80 times slower for JP300 and JP450 compared with JP wood. After 1 year, (i) bacterial groups were large sinks for PyOM-derived C as pyrolysis temperature increased and as substrate use efficiency decreased; (ii) potential phenol oxidase and net peroxidase activities were unaffected by the PyOM addition, although net peroxidase activities measured tended to lesser for soils amended with JP450 and RM450; and (iii) Collembola detritivores appeared less likely to be found for soils amended with JP450 and RM450. PyOM-derived C and N recoveries did not differ after 1 year; we will present 3-y recovery data. Our results suggest that the composition of angiosperms (e.g. RM) and gymnosperms (e.g. JP) in high-latitude forests is an underappreciated but

  12. Pyrolysis characteristics of integrated circuit boards at various particle sizes and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, H.-L. [Department Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hlchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw; Lin, K.-H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China); Lai, M.-H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dayeh University, Changhua 51591, Taiwan (China); Chen, T.-C. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 91201, Taiwan (China); Ma, S.-Y. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung 831, Taiwan (China)

    2007-10-01

    A pyrolysis method was employed to recycle the metals and brominated compounds blended into printed circuit boards. This research investigated the effect of particle size and process temperature on the element composition of IC boards and pyrolytic residues, liquid products, and water-soluble ionic species in the exhaust, with the overall goal being to identify the pyrolysis conditions that will have the least impact on the environment. Integrated circuit (IC) boards were crushed into 5-40 mesh (0.71-4.4 mm), and the crushed particles were pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 deg. C. The thermal decomposition kinetics were measured by a thermogravimetric (TG) analyzer. The composition of pyrolytic residues was analyzed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (EDS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). In addition, the element compositions of liquid products were analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS. Pyrolytic exhaust was collected by a water-absorption system in an ice-bath cooler, and IC analysis showed that the absorbed solution comprised 11 ionic species. Based on the pyrolytic kinetic parameters of TG analysis and pyrolytic residues at various temperatures for 30 min, the effect of particle size was insignificant in this study, and temperature was the key factor for the IC board pyrolysis. Two stages of decomposition were found for IC board pyrolysis under nitrogen atmosphere. The activation energy was 38-47 kcal/mol for the first-stage reaction and 5.2-9.4 kcal/mol for the second-stage reaction. Metal content was low in the liquid by-product of the IC board pyrolysis process, which is an advantage in that the liquid product could be used as a fuel. Brominate and ammonium were the main water-soluble ionic species of the pyrolytic exhaust. A plan for their safe and effective disposal must be developed if the pyrolytic recycling process is to be applied to IC boards.

  13. Toluene pyrolysis studies and high temperature reactions of propargyl chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Qin, Z. [Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The main focus of this program is to investigate the thermal decompositions of fuels that play an important role in the pre-particle soot formation process. It has been demonstrated that the condition of maximum soot yield is established when the reaction conditions of temperature and pressure are sufficient to establish a radical pool to support the production of polyaromatic hydrocarbon species and the subsequent formation of soot particles. However, elevated temperatures result in lower soot yields which are attributed to thermolyses of aromatic ring structures and result in the bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature. The authors have selected several acyclic hydrocarbons to evaluate the chemical thermodynamic and kinetic effects attendant to benzene formation. To assess the thermal stability of the aromatic ring, the authors have studied the pyrolyses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene and pyridine. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) is employed to analyze the reaction zone behind reflected shock waves. Reaction time histories of the reactants, products, and intermediates are constructed and mechanisms are formulated to model the experimental data. The TOF work is often performed with use of laser schlieren densitometry (LS) to measure density gradients resulting from the heats of various reactions involved in a particular pyrolytic system. The two techniques, TOF and LS, provide independent and complementary information about ring formation and ring rupture reactions.

  14. Solvent-extractable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar: influence of pyrolysis temperature and feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Kleber, Markus; Sparrow, Margaret A; Simoneit, Bernd R T; Prahl, Fredrick G

    2012-09-01

    Despite the increasing agricultural use of biochar as a way of combining the utilization of biomass for energy production with the removal of CO(2) from the atmosphere, it is not known how variations in pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type affect concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that inevitably form and associate with biochar. To close this knowledge gap, we quantified 11 unsubstituted three- to five-ring PAHs as well as alkylated forms of phenanthrene and anthracene in grass and wood chars produced in 100 °C increments across a temperature range (100 to 700 °C). Our results show that solvent-extractable PAH concentrations in biochars produced at heat treatment temperatures (HTTs) of 400 and 500 °C greatly exceed those observed at higher and lower temperature, supporting a low HTT solid-phase formation mechanism operable at temperatures commonly used for industrial biochar production. The maximum extractable yield of 'pyrolytic' unsubstituted PAHs for grass (22 μg g(-1) at HTT = 500 °C) greatly exceeds the value for wood (5.9 μg g(-1)). Moreover, PAH signatures (e.g., total monomethylphenanthrene to phenanthrene ratios, MP/P ~2-3) at intermediate temperatures (400 °C) resemble those of fossil oils rather than that commonly attributed to pyrolytic products. Further research is needed to characterize the PAH evolution in modern pyrolysis reactors and assess the fate of biochar-bound PAHs in soils and sediments. Various commonly applied PAH ratios and indicator compounds show promise as markers for specific feedstock materials and pyrolysis conditions of biochars in environmental systems.

  15. Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors Fabricated at Low Temperature by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yesul; Pearson, Christopher; Lee, Yong Uk; Winchester, Lee; Hwang, Jaeeun; Kim, Hongdoo; Do, Lee-Mi; Petty, Michael C.

    2014-11-01

    We report the electrical behavior of undoped zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated by low-temperature chemical spray pyrolysis. An aerosol system utilizing aerodynamic focusing was used to deposit the ZnO. Polycrystalline films were subsequently formed by annealing at the relatively low temperature of 140°C. The saturation mobility of the TFTs was 2 cm2/Vs, which is the highest reported for undoped ZnO TFTs manufactured below 150°C. The devices also had an on/off ratio of 104 and a threshold voltage of -3.5 V. These values were found to depend reversibly on measurement conditions.

  16. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of wood: temperature profiles and solid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceamanos, J.; Bilbao, R.; Aldea, M.E.; Betran, M.; Mastral, J.F. [University of Zaragoza (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The development of techniques for the production of electricity by pyrolysis and combustion of biomass must take into account the behaviour of large particles under very different experimental conditions. In this work the influences of the variable heat flux, the moisture content of the sample and the atmosphere surrounding the particle have been studied. The mathematical model developed takes into account variable thermal properties, variation of temperature and enthalpy of water vaporization with water content, and thermal decomposition kinetics previously obtained by thermogravimetry. It predicts temperature and moisture profiles inside the solid as well as the global conversion. The results obtained agree with the experimental results for most conditions. (author)

  17. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on characteristics and heavy metal adsorptive performance of biochar derived from municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing; Zhou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yuancheng; Ren, Lulu

    2014-07-01

    To investigate systematically the influence of pyrolysis temperature on properties and heavy metal adsorption potential of municipal sludge biochar, biophysical dried sludge was pyrolyzed under temperature varying from 500°C to 900°C. The biochar yield decreased with the increase in pyrolysis temperature, while the ash content retained mostly, thus transforming the biochars into alkaline. The structure became porous as the temperature increased, and the concentrations of surface functional group elements remained low. Despite the comparatively high content of heavy metal in the biochar, the leaching toxicity of biochars was no more than 20% of the Chinese standard. In the batch experiments of cadmium(II) adsorption, the removal capacity of biochars improved under higher temperature, especially at 800°C and 900°C even one order of magnitude higher than that of the commercial activated carbon. For both energy recovery and heavy metal removal, the optimal pyrolysis temperature is 900°C.

  18. Effects of temperature and composite alumina on pyrolysis of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Jin, Baosheng; Wu, Wei; Zuo, Wu; Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Yaji

    2015-04-01

    An interactive dual-circulating fluidized bed system has been proposed in which the pyrolysis of sewage sludge (SS) and incineration of biomass proceed simultaneously, and alumina is used as the bed material and heat carrier. The alumina coated with biomass ash would mix with sewage sludge in the pyrolysis reactor of this device. It is important to know the influence of composite alumina (CA) on the pyrolysis progress. Sewage sludge was pyrolyzed in a fixed bed reactor from 400 to 600°C using CA as catalyst. The effects of temperature and CA additive ratio on the products were investigated. The product yields and component distribution of non-condensable gas were more sensitive to the change of temperature, and the maximum liquid yield of 48.44 wt.% and maximum Useable Energy of Liquid of 3871 kJ/kg sludge were observed at 500°C with 1/5 CA/SS (mass ratio). The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results showed that the increase of temperature enhanced devolatilization of organic matter and promoted cyclization and aromatization of aliphatics. The presence of CA could strengthen secondary cracking and interaction among primary products from different organic compounds, such as acid-amine condensation, and reduce the content of oxygenated compounds. When the CA additive amount exceeded a certain proportion, the aromatization was clearly strengthened. The effects of CA on decomposition of fatty acids and formation of aromatics were similar to that of temperature. This means that the reaction temperature could be lowered by introducing CA, which has a positive effect on reducing energy consumption.

  19. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on characteristics and phosphate adsorption capability of biochar derived from waste-marine macroalgae (Undaria pinnatifida roots).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Kim, Kipal; Jeong, Tae-Un; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The collected roots of Undaria pinnatifida, the main waste in farming sites, accounting for 40-60% of annual production, was pyrolyzed under temperature ranging from 200 to 800°C to evaluate the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar properties and phosphate adsorption capacity. It was confirmed that an increase in the pyrolysis temperature led to a decrease of the yield of biochar, while ash content remained almost due to carbonization followed by mineralization. Elemental analysis results indicated an increase in aromaticity and decreased polarity at a high pyrolysis temperature. When the pyrolysis temperature was increased up to 400°C, the phosphate adsorption capacity was enhanced, while a further increase in the pyrolysis temperature lowered the adsorption capacity due to blocked pores in the biochar during pyrolysis. Finally, a pot experiment revealed that biochar derived from waste-marine macroalgae is a potent and eco-friendly alternative material for fertilizer after phosphate adsorption.

  20. High temperature shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling study of diisopropyl ketone ignition and pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Barari, Ghazal

    2017-03-10

    Diisopropyl ketone (DIPK) is a promising biofuel candidate, which is produced using endophytic fungal conversion. In this work, a high temperature detailed combustion kinetic model for DIPK was developed using the reaction class approach. DIPK ignition and pyrolysis experiments were performed using the UCF shock tube. The shock tube oxidation experiments were conducted between 1093K and 1630K for different reactant compositions, equivalence ratios (φ=0.5–2.0), and pressures (1–6atm). In addition, methane concentration time-histories were measured during 2% DIPK pyrolysis in argon using cw laser absorption near 3400nm at temperatures between 1300 and 1400K near 1atm. To the best of our knowledge, current ignition delay times (above 1050K) and methane time histories are the first such experiments performed in DIPK at high temperatures. Present data were used as validation targets for the new kinetic model and simulation results showed fair agreement compared to the experiments. The reaction rates corresponding to the main consumption pathways of DIPK were found to have high sensitivity in controlling the reactivity, so these were adjusted to attain better agreement between the simulation and experimental data. A correlation was developed based on the experimental data to predict the ignition delay times using the temperature, pressure, fuel concentration and oxygen concentration.

  1. Screening acidic zeolites for catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass and its components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeolites have been shown to effectively promote cracking reactions during pyrolysis resulting in highly deoxygenated and hydrocarbon-rich compounds and stable pyrolysis oil product. Py/GC-MS was employed to study the catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass samples comprising oak, corn...

  2. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  3. Multi-species time-history measurements during high-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Lam, Kingyiu

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature acetone and 2-butanone pyrolysis studies were conducted behind reflected shock waves using five species time-history measurements (ketone, CO, CH3, CH4 and C2H4). Experimental conditions covered temperatures of 1100-1600 Kat 1.6 atm, for mixtures of 0.25-1.5% ketone in argon. During acetone pyrolysis, the CO concentration time-history was found to be strongly sensitive to the acetone dissociation rate constant κ1 (CH3COCH3 → CH3 + CH3CO), and this could be directly determined from the CO time-histories, yielding κ1(1.6 atm) = 2.46 × 1014 exp(-69.3 [kcal/mol]/RT) s-1 with an uncertainty of ±25%. This rate constant is in good agreement with previous shock tube studies from Sato and Hidaka (2000) [3] and Saxena et al. (2009) [4] (within 30%) at temperatures above 1450 K, but is at least three times faster than the evaluation from Sato and Hidaka at temperatures below 1250 K. Using this revised κ1 value with the recent mechanism of Pichon et al. (2009) [5], the simulated profiles during acetone pyrolysis show excellent agreement with all five species time-history measurements. Similarly, the overall 2-butanone decomposition rate constant κtot was inferred from measured 2-butanone time-histories, yielding κ tot(1.5 atm) = 6.08 × 1013 exp(-63.1 [kcal/mol]/RT) s -1 with an uncertainty of ±35%. This rate constant is approximately 30% faster than that proposed by Serinyel et al. (2010) [11] at 1119 K, and approximately 100% faster at 1412 K. Using the measured 2-butanone and CO time-histories and an O-atom balance analysis, a missing removal pathway for methyl ketene was identified. The rate constant for the decomposition of methyl ketene was assumed to be the same as the value for the ketene decomposition reaction. Using the revised κtot value and adding the methyl ketene decomposition reaction to the Serinyel et al. mechanism, the simulated profiles during 2-butanone pyrolysis show good agreement with the measurements for all five species.

  4. Physical properties of ZnO thin films deposited at various substrate temperatures using spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasada Rao, T., E-mail: prasadview@gmail.co [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India); Santhosh Kumar, M.C., E-mail: santhoshmc@yahoo.co [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India); Safarulla, A. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620015 (India); Ganesan, V.; Barman, S.R. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore-452001 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [School of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi-630003 (India)

    2010-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited with various substrate temperatures by spray pyrolysis technique onto glass substrates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed the random growth orientation of the crystallites and the presence of the wurtzite phase of ZnO. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements reveal the presence of Zn{sup 2+} and chemisorbed oxygen in ZnO thin films. Atomic force micrograms (AFM) revealed a granular, polycrystalline morphology for the films. The grain size is found to increase as the substrate temperature increases. All films exhibit a transmittance of about 85% in the visible region. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicated that the intensity of emission peaks significantly varying with substrate temperature. Electrical resistivity has been found to decrease; while the carrier concentration increases with substrate temperature.

  5. Pyrolysis of waste materials: Characterization and prediction of sorption potential across a wide range of mineral contents and pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Sigmund, Gabriel; Hüffer, Thorsten; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    Sewage sludge (50% mineral), manure (29%) and wood (mineral contents. A commercial plant-derived biochar (41% mineral) was also considered. The materials were extensively characterized and tested for their sorption towards the model sorbates benzene, naphthalene and pyrene. Plant-derived materials, regardless of their mineral content, developed micropores causing size exclusion of pyrene. Changes in properties and sorption behavior upon pyrolysis were generally consistent for the manure and wood series. A single regression equation developed on our data (including the sorbate hydrophobicity and sorbent polarity) provided excellent prediction of previously reported changes in sorption upon pyrolysis across a wide range of mineral content (up to 500°C). The sewage sludge series, however, followed a particular behavior, possibly due to very high mineral content (up to 67%).

  6. Recycling of polyethene and polypropene in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor by high temperature pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Waanders, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature pyrolysis of polyethene (PE), polypropene (PP), and mixtures of these polymers was studied in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor (RCR). Experiments showed that the effect of the sand or reactor temperature on the product spectrum obtained is large compared to the effect o

  7. Effect of pyrolysis temperatures and times on the adsorption of cadmium onto orange peel derived biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hai Nguyen; You, Sheng-Jie; Chao, Huan-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism and capacity of adsorption of cadmium (Cd) on orange peel (OP)-derived biochar at various pyrolysis temperatures (400, 500, 600, 700 and 800°C) and heating times (2 and 6 h) were investigated. Biochar was characterized using proximate analysis, point of zero charge (PZC) analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments of Cd adsorption on biochar were performed. The results indicated that the pH value at PZC of biochar approached 9.5. Equilibrium can be reached rapidly (within 1 min) in kinetic experiments and a removal rate of 80.6-96.9% can be generated. The results fitted the pseudo-second-order model closely. The adsorption capacity was estimated using the Langmuir model. The adsorption capacity of Cd on biochar was independent of the pyrolysis temperature and heating time (p>0.01). The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd was 114.69 (mg g(-1)). The adsorption of Cd on biochar was regarded as chemisorption. The primary adsorption mechanisms were regarded as Cπ-cation interactions and surface precipitation. Cadmium can react with calcite to form the precipitation of (Ca,Cd)CO3 on the surface of biochar. The OP-derived biochar can be considered a favourable alternative and a new green adsorbent for removing Cd(2+) ions from an aqueous solution.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mi-Jin; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Man; Sohn, Jung Min; Lee, See-Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics.

  9. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when work...

  10. Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    centrifugel reactor (PCR) at 475, 525, 575, and 625 °C. Maxima of both organic oil yield of 41 wt % on a dry ash free feedstock basis (daf) and a sludge oil energy recovery of 50% were obtained at 575 °C. The water-insoluble fraction, molecular-weight distribution, higher heating value (HHV), and thermal...... behaviors of sludge oils were found to be considerably influenced by the applied pyrolysis temperatures. The sludge oil properties obtained at the optimal temperature of 575 °C were a HHV of 25.5 MJ/kg, a water-insoluble fraction of 18.7 wt %, a viscosity of 43.6 mPa s at 40 °C, a mean molecular weight...

  11. RELATION BETWEEN MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND PYROLYSIS TEMPERATURE OF PHENOL FORMALDEHYDE RESIN FOR GAS SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONIKA ŠUPOVÁ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper has been to characterize the relation between the pyrolysis temperature of phenol-formaldehyde resin, the development of a porous structure, and the mechanical properties for the application of semipermeable membranes for gas separation. No previous study has dealt with this problem in its entirety. Phenol-formaldehyde resin showed an increasing trend toward micropore porosity in the temperature range from 500 till 1000°C, together with closure of mesopores and macropores. Samples cured and pyrolyzed at 1000°C pronounced hysteresis of desorption branch. The ultimate bending strength was measured using a four-point arrangement that is more suitable for measuring of brittle materials. The chevron notch technique was used for determination the fracture toughness. The results for mechanical properties indicated that phenol-formaldehyde resin pyrolyzates behaved similarly to ceramic materials. The data obtained for the material can be used for calculating the technical design of gas separation membranes.

  12. Interface interactions between insecticide carbofuran and tea waste biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Mayakaduwa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Biochars showed a potential as adsorbents for organic contaminants, however, have not been tested for carbofuran, which has been detected frequently in water. This study provides evidences for the use of infused tea residue derived biochar for carbofuran removal. Biochars were produced at 300, 500 and 700 °C by slow pyrolysis and were characterized by proximate and ultimate analysis, FT-IR, SEM, BET and pore size distribution. Pyrolysis temperature showed a pronounced effect on biochar properties. The maximum carbofuran removal was achieved at pH 5. Freundlich and Temkin models best fit the equilibrium data. Biochars produced at 700 °C showed the highest sorption intensity. The adsorption process was likely to be a favorable chemisorption process with electrostatic interactions between carbofuran molecules and biochar surface. Acid-base interactions, electrophilic addition reactions and amide bond formations are the possible mechanisms of carbofuran adsorption. Overall, biochars prepared from tea waste can be utilized as effective adsorbents for removal of aqueous carbofuran.

  13. Indium oxide thin-film transistors processed at low temperature via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Hendrik; Lin, Yen-Hung; Thomas, Stuart R; Zhao, Kui; Pliatsikas, Nikos; McLachlan, Martyn A; Amassian, Aram; Patsalas, Panos A; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2015-01-14

    The use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is demonstrated for the growth of polycrystalline, highly uniform indium oxide films at temperatures in the range of 200-300 °C in air using an aqueous In(NO3)3 precursor solution. Electrical characterization of as-deposited films by field-effect measurements reveals a strong dependence of the electron mobility on deposition temperature. Transistors fabricated at ∼250 °C exhibit optimum performance with maximum electron mobility values in the range of 15-20 cm(2) V (-1) s(-1) and current on/off ratio in excess of 10(6). Structural and compositional analysis of as-grown films by means of X-ray diffraction, diffuse scattering, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that layers deposited at 250 °C are denser and contain a reduced amount of hydroxyl groups as compared to films grown at either lower or higher temperatures. Microstructural analysis of semiconducting films deposited at 250 °C by high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals that as-grown layers are extremely thin (∼7 nm) and composed of laterally large (30-60 nm) highly crystalline In2O3 domains. These unique characteristics of the In2O3 films are believed to be responsible for the high electron mobilities obtained from transistors fabricated at 250 °C. Our work demonstrates the ability to grow high quality low-dimensional In2O3 films and devices via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis over large area substrates while at the same time it provides guidelines for further material and device improvements.

  14. Indium oxide thin-film transistors processed at low temperature via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Faber, Hendrik

    2015-01-14

    The use of ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is demonstrated for the growth of polycrystalline, highly uniform indium oxide films at temperatures in the range of 200-300 °C in air using an aqueous In(NO3)3 precursor solution. Electrical characterization of as-deposited films by field-effect measurements reveals a strong dependence of the electron mobility on deposition temperature. Transistors fabricated at ∼250 °C exhibit optimum performance with maximum electron mobility values in the range of 15-20 cm2 V -1 s-1 and current on/off ratio in excess of 106. Structural and compositional analysis of as-grown films by means of X-ray diffraction, diffuse scattering, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that layers deposited at 250 °C are denser and contain a reduced amount of hydroxyl groups as compared to films grown at either lower or higher temperatures. Microstructural analysis of semiconducting films deposited at 250 °C by high resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals that as-grown layers are extremely thin (∼7 nm) and composed of laterally large (30-60 nm) highly crystalline In2O3 domains. These unique characteristics of the In2O3 films are believed to be responsible for the high electron mobilities obtained from transistors fabricated at 250 °C. Our work demonstrates the ability to grow high quality low-dimensional In2O3 films and devices via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis over large area substrates while at the same time it provides guidelines for further material and device improvements.

  15. Influences of Temperature and Coal Particle Size on the Flash Pyrolysis of Coal in a Fast-entrained Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The experiments on the flash pyrolysis of a lignite were carried out in a fast-entrained bed reactor as a basic study on a so-called 'coal topping process'. The investigation focused on the effects of pyrolysis temperature and coal particle size on the product distribution and composition. The experimental results show that an increase in the pyrolysis temperature results in a higher yield of gaseous products while a larger particle size leads to a decrease of the liquid yield. An optimum temperature for the liquid yield was found to be 650 ℃. A certain amount of phenol groups was found in the liquid products, which may be used to produce high-valued fine chemicals. The FTIR analyses of the coal and chars show that aliphatic structures in the chars are gradually replaced by aromatic structures with the increasing of pyrolysis temperature and coal particle size. The results of this study provide fundamental data and optimal conditions to maximize light oils yields for the coal topping process.

  16. Short-Term Effect of Feedstock and Pyrolysis Temperature on Biochar Characteristics, Soil and Crop Response in Temperate Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Victoria; Ruysschaert, Greet; Müller-Stöver, Dorette Sophie

    2014-01-01

    At present, there is limited understanding of how biochar application to soil could be beneficial to crop growth in temperate regions and which biochar types are most suitable. Biochar’s (two feedstocks: willow, pine; three pyrolysis temperatures: 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C) effect on nitrogen (N) av...

  17. Temperature and Thickness Effects on Electrical Properties of InP Films Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rcfik Kayah; Mehmet Ari; Mustafa Oztas; Metin Bedir; Funda Aksoy

    2009-01-01

    InP film samples are prepared by spray pyrolysis technique using aqueous solutions of InCl3 and Na2HPO4, which are atomized with compressed air as carrier gas onto glass substrates at 500 ℃ with different thicknesses of the films. The structural properties of the samples are determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the crystal structure of the InP films is polycrystailine hexagonal. The orientations of all the obtained films are along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The electrical measurements of the samples are obtained by dc four-probe technique on rectangular-shape samples. The effects of temperature on the electrical properties of the InP films are studied in detail.

  18. Evaluation of Integrated Time-Temperature Effect in Pyrolysis Process of Historically Contaminated Soils with Cadmium (Cd and Lead (Pb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulmău C

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It is already known that heavy metals pollution causes important concern to human and ecosystem health. Heavy metals in soils at the European level represents 37.3% between main contaminates affecting soils (EEA, 2007. This paper illustrates results obtained in the framework of laboratory experiments concerning the evaluation of integrated time-temperature effect in pyrolysis process applied to contaminated soil by two different ways: it is about heavy metals historically contaminated soil from one of the most polluted areas within Romania, and artificially contaminated with PCB-containing transformer oil. In particular, the authors focused on a recent evaluation of pyrolysis efficiency on removing lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd from the contaminated soil. The experimental study evaluated two important parameters related to the studied remediation methodology: thermal process temperature and the retention time in reactor of the contaminated soils. The remediation treatments were performed in a rotary kiln reactor, taking into account three process temperatures (400°C, 600°C and 800°C and two retention times: 30 min. and 60 min. Completed analyses have focused on pyrolysis solids and gas products. Consequently, both ash and gas obtained after pyrolysis process were subjected to chemical analyses.

  19. Flame Temperature Effect on the Structure of SiC Nanoparticles Grown by Laser Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin-Boime, N.; Vicens, J.; Dufour, C.; Ténégal, F.; Reynaud, C.; Rizk, R.

    2004-02-01

    Small SiC nanoparticles (10 nm diameter) have been grown in a flow reactor by CO2 laser pyrolysis from a C2H2 and SiH4 mixture. The laser radiation is strongly absorbed by SiH4 vibration. The energy is transferred to the reactive medium and leads to the dissociation of molecules and the subsequent growth of the nanoparticles. The reaction happens with a flame. The purpose of the experiments reported in this paper is to limit the size of the growing particles to the nanometric scale for which specific properties are expected to appear. Therefore the effects of experimental parameters on the structure and chemical composition of nanoparticles have been investigated. For a given reactive mixture and gas velocity, the flame temperature is governed by the laser power. In this study, the temperature was varied from 875°C to 1100°C. The chemical analysis of the products indicate that their composition is a function of the temperature. For the same C/Si atomic ratio in the gaseous phase, the C/Si ratio in the powder increases from 0.7 at 875°C up to 1.02 at 1100°C, indicating a growth mechanism limited by C2H2 dissociation. As expected, X-ray diffraction has shown an improved crystallisation with increasing temperature. Transmission electron microscopy observations have revealed the formation of 10 nm grains for all values of laser power (or flame temperature). These grains appear amorphous at low temperature, whereas they contain an increasing number of nanocrystals (2 nm diameter) when the temperature increases. These results pave the way to a better control of the structure and chemical composition of laser synthesised SiC nanoparticles in the 10 nm range.

  20. Techno-economic evaluation of high temperature pyrolysis processes for mixed plastic waste.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Koningsbruggen, van M.P.; Ham, van der A.G.J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1998-01-01

    Three pyrolysis processes for Mixed Plastic Waste (MPW) with different reactors (Bubbling Fluidized Bed, Circulating Fluidized Bed and Rotating Cone Reactor, respectively BFB, CFB and RCR) were designed and evaluated. The estimated fixed capital investment for a 50 kton/year MPW pyrolysis plant buil

  1. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2016-03-11

    Bio-oil produced from conventional flash pyrolysis has poor quality and requires expensive upgrading before it can be used as a transportation fuel. In this work, a high quality bio-oil has been produced using a novel approach where flash pyrolysis, catalysis and fractionation of pyrolysis vapors using two stage condensation are combined in a single process unit. A bench scale unit of 1 kg/h feedstock capacity is used for catalytic pyrolysis in an entrained down-flow reactor system equipped with two-staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5), different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low catalyst/biomass ratios did not show any significant improvements in the bio-oil quality, while high catalyst/biomass ratios showed an effective deoxygenation of the bio-oil. The application of zeolites decreased the organic liquid yield due to the increased production of non-condensables, primarily hydrocarbons. The catalytically produced bio-oil was less viscous and zeolites were effective at cracking heavy molecular weight compounds in the bio-oil. Acidic zeolites, H-Y and H-ZSM5, increased the desirable chemical compounds in the bio-oil such as phenols, furans and hydrocarbon, and reduced the undesired compounds such as acids. On the other hand reducing the acidity of zeolites reduced some of the undesired compounds in the bio-oil such as ketones and aldehydes. The performance of H-Y was superior to that of the rest of zeolites studied: bio-oil of high chemical and calorific value was produced with a high organic liquid yield and low oxygen content. H-ZSM5 was a close competitor to H-Y in performance but with a lower yield of bio-oil. Online fractionation of catalytic pyrolysis vapors was employed by controlling the condenser temperature and proved to be a successful process parameter to tailor the

  2. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons toxicity and sorption behaviour of biochars prepared by pyrolysis of paper mill effluent treatment plant sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Parmila; Saroha, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) toxicity and sorption behaviour of biochars prepared from pyrolysis of paper mill effluent treatment plant (ETP) sludge in temperature range 200-700 °C was studied. The sorption behaviour was found to depend on the degree of carbonization where the fractions of carbonized and uncarbonized organic content in the biochar act as an adsorption media and partition media, respectively. The sorption and partition fractions were quantified by isotherm separation method and isotherm parameters were correlated with biochar properties (aromaticity, polarity, surface area, pore volume and ash content). The risk assessment for the 16 priority EPA PAHs present in the biochar matrix was performed and it was found that the concentrations of the PAHs in the biochar were within the permissible limits prescribed by US EPA (except BC400 and BC500 for high molecular weight PAHs).

  3. Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinangeli, Richard; Brandvold, Timothy A; Kocal, Joseph A

    2013-08-27

    Low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oils and methods for producing them from carbonaceous biomass feedstock are provided. The carbonaceous biomass feedstock is pyrolyzed in the presence of a catalyst comprising base metal-based catalysts, noble metal-based catalysts, treated zeolitic catalysts, or combinations thereof to produce pyrolysis gases. During pyrolysis, the catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction whereby at least a portion of the oxygenated hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis gases are converted into hydrocarbons. The oxygen is removed as carbon oxides and water. A condensable portion (the vapors) of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  4. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor James Morgan

    Full Text Available A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water. The amounts of char (organic fraction and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis and high

  5. Fast Pyrolysis Behavior of Banagrass as a Function of Temperature and Volatiles Residence Time in a Fluidized Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Trevor James; Turn, Scott Q; George, Anthe

    2015-01-01

    A reactor was designed and commissioned to study the fast pyrolysis behavior of banagrass as a function of temperature and volatiles residence time. Four temperatures between 400 and 600°C were examined as well as four residence times between ~1.0 and 10 seconds. Pyrolysis product distributions of bio-oil, char and permanent gases were determined at each reaction condition. The elemental composition of the bio-oils and chars was also assessed. The greatest bio-oil yield was recorded when working at 450°C with a volatiles residence time of 1.4 s, ~37 wt% relative to the dry ash free feedstock (excluding pyrolysis water). The amounts of char (organic fraction) and permanent gases under these conditions are ~4 wt% and 8 wt% respectively. The bio-oil yield stated above is for 'dry' bio-oil after rotary evaporation to remove solvent, which results in volatiles and pyrolysis water being removed from the bio-oil. The material removed during drying accounts for the remainder of the pyrolysis products. The 'dry' bio-oil produced under these conditions contains ~56 wt% carbon which is ~40 wt% of the carbon present in the feedstock. The oxygen content of the 450°C, 1.4 s 'dry' bio-oil is ~38 wt%, which accounts for ~33 wt% of the oxygen in the feedstock. At higher temperature or longer residence time less bio-oil and char is recovered and more gas and light volatiles are produced. Increasing the temperature has a more significant effect on product yields and composition than increasing the volatiles residence time. At 600°C and a volatiles residence time of 1.2 seconds the bio-oil yield is ~21 wt% of the daf feedstock, with a carbon content of 64 wt% of the bio-oil. The bio-oil yield from banagrass is significantly lower than from woody biomass or grasses such as switchgrass or miscanthus, but is similar to barley straw. The reason for the low bio-oil yield from banagrass is thought to be related to its high ash content (8.5 wt% dry basis) and high concentration of alkali

  6. Effect of Fast Pyrolysis Conditions on the Biomass Solid Residues at High Temperatures (1000-1400°C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker D.; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    Fast pyrolysis of wood and straw was conducted in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and compared with the experimental work on the wire-mesh reactor (WMR) to study the influence of temperature (1000-1400°C), biomass origin (softwood, hardwood, grass) and heating rate (1000°C/s, 10^4 °C/s) on the char yield...... to the parental fuel, whereas alfalfa straw char particle size remained unaltered with the higher temperatures. In this study, the retained shape of beechwood and herbaceous biomass samples is related to the presence of extractives and formation of silicates. Soot yield from herbaceous fuels occurs lower than...... and morphology. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS), elementary analysis, CAMSIZER XT, ash compositional analysis were applied to characterize the effect of operational conditions on the solid and gas products. Char yield from fast pyrolysis in the DFT setup was 2 to 6 % (daf) lower than in the WMR apparatus...

  7. Chemical spray pyrolysis of β-In2S3 thin films deposited at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sall, Thierno; Marí Soucase, Bernabé; Mollar, Miguel; Hartitti, Bouchaib; Fahoume, Mounir

    2015-01-01

    In2S3 thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates by chemical spray pyrolysis while keeping the substrates at different temperatures. The structures of the sprayed In2S3 thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XFD). The quality of the thin films was determined by Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy were used to explore the surface morphology and topography of the thin films, respectively. The optical band gap was determined based on optical transmission measurements. The indium sulfide phase exhibited a preferential orientation in the (0, 0, 12) crystallographic direction according to the XRD analysis. The phonon vibration modes determined by Raman spectroscopy also confirmed the presence of the In2S3 phase in our samples. According to SEM, the surface morphologies of the films were free of defects. The optical band gap energy varied from 2.82 eV to 2.95 eV.

  8. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Production Conditions on Switchgrass Biochar for Use as a Soil Amendment

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Biochars form recalcitrant carbon and increase water and nutrient retention in soils; however, the magnitude is contingent upon production conditions and thermo-chemical conversion processes. Herein we aim at (i) characterizing switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)-biochar morphology, (ii) estimating water-holding capacity under increasing ratios of char: soil; and, (iii) determining nutrient profile variation as a function of pyrolysis conversion methodologies (i.e. continuous, auger pyrolysis s...

  9. Characteristics of maize biochar with different pyrolysis temperatures and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiubin; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Guoqing; Song, Dali; Zhang, Xiaoya

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the characteristics of maize biochar produced at different pyrolysis temperatures (300, 450 and 600°C) and its effects on organic carbon, nitrogen and enzymatic activities after addition to fluvo-aquic soil were investigated. As pyrolysis temperature increased, ash content, pH, electrical conductivity, surface area, pore volume and aromatic carbon content of biochar increased while yield, ratios of oxygen:carbon and hydrogen: carbon and alkyl carbon content decreased. During incubation, SOC, total N, and ammonium-N contents increased in all biochar-amended treatments compared with the urea treatment; however, soil nitrate-N content first increased and then decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature of the applied biochar. Extracellular enzyme activities associated with carbon transformation first increased and then decreased with biochars pyrolyzed at 450 and 600°C. Protease activity markedly increased with increased pyrolysis temperatures, whereas pyrolysis temperature had limited effect on soil urease activity. The results indicated that the responses of extracellular enzymes to biochar were dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, the enzyme itself and incubation time as well.

  10. Effects of Temperature Rise Rate on Pyrolysis of Plastic Wastes%升温速率对废塑料热解过程的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石耀华; 马晓波; 陈德珍; 周恭明

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, pyrolysis experiments of plastic wastes, i.e. polyethylene ( PE), polypropylene (PP), polyvinylchloride(PVC) and their mixtures, were made at temperature rise rates of lO℃/min,20℃/min and 30℃/min in nitrogen atmosphere in which the temperature was from 20℃ to 700℃.Effects of pyrolysis process of waste plastics at different temperature rise rate were analyzed, and kinetics investigations were carried out by Coast - Redfern integration method. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic parameters of these three kinds of plastic wastes and their mixtures were obtained. The results show that temperature rise rate has an influence on pyrolysis rate, pyrolysis temperature range, activation energy and pre -exponential factor. The greater temperature rise rate, the faster pyrolysis reacts, the greater activation energy required, the more energy consumption on pyrolysis process. Therefore, in the pyrolysis process of waste plastics, temperature rise rate, pyrolysis materials, pyrolysis temperature and other conditions should be considered integrally. This research can provide theoretical and experimental data for the design of pyrolysis technology of plastic wastes.%选取废旧塑料聚乙烯(polyethylene,PE)、聚丙烯(polypropylene,PP)、聚氯乙烯(polyvi-nyl chloride,PVC)及其混合物,在氮气气氛下进行热解实验,实验温度从室温到700℃,升温速率分别为10℃/min、20℃/min和30℃/min.讨论了不同升温速率对废塑料热解过程的影响,并采用Coast-Redfem法进行了热解动力学分析,得到了三种废塑料及其混合物的热解特性及反应动力学、参数.研究结果表明,升温速率对热解速率,热解温度段,活化能,频率因子都有影响.升温速率越快,热解反应越快,所需的活化能也越大,热解过程对能量的消耗越多.因此,在废塑料热解过程中,要综合考虑升温速率,热解原料,热解温度等条件.本文可为废塑料热解工艺的研究提供理论依据和参考数据.

  11. Evaluation of phosphorus adsorption capacity of sesame straw biochar on aqueous solution: influence of activation methods and pyrolysis temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Ok, Y S; Kim, S H; Cho, J S; Heo, J S; Delaune, R D; Seo, D C

    2015-12-01

    The phosphorus (P) adsorption characteristic of sesame straw biochar prepared with different activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures was evaluated. Between 0.109 and 0.300 mg L(-1) in the form of inorganic phosphate was released from raw sesame straw biochar in the first 1 h. The release of phosphate was significantly enhanced from 62.6 to 168.2 mg g(-1) as the pyrolysis temperature increased. Therefore, sesame straw biochar cannot be used as an adsorbent for P removal without change in the physicochemical characteristics. To increase the P adsorption of biochar in aqueous solution, various activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures were applied. The amount of P adsorbed from aqueous solution by biochar activated using different activation agents appeared in the order ZnCl2 (9.675 mg g(-1)) > MgO (8.669 mg g(-1)) ⋙ 0.1N-HCl > 0.1N-H2SO4 > K2SO4 ≥ KOH ≥ 0.1N-H3PO4, showing ZnCl2 to be the optimum activation agent. Higher P was adsorbed by the biochar activated using ZnCl2 under different pyrolysis temperatures in the order 600 °C > 500 °C > 400 °C > 300 °C. Finally, the amount of adsorbed P by activated biochar at different ratios of biochar to ZnCl2 appeared in the order 1:3 ≒ 1:1 > 3:1. As a result, the optimum ratio of biochar to ZnCl2 and pyrolysis temperature were found to be 1:1 and 600 °C for P adsorption, respectively. The maximum P adsorption capacity by activated biochar using ZnCl2 (15,460 mg kg(-1)) was higher than that of typical biochar, as determined by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Therefore, the ZnCl2 activation of sesame straw biochar was suitable for the preparation of activated biochar for P adsorption.

  12. STUDY ON THE GASEOUS PRODUCTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PYROLYSIS OF ACRYLONITRILE POLYMERS BY ON-LINE FTIR METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Genxiang; CHEN Bangjie

    1987-01-01

    The gaseous products of high temperature pyrolysis (300℃ to 960℃) of acrylonitrile polymers were measured continuously under nitrogen atnosphere by on-line Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic method (FTIR). From the variations of characteristic peaks it was found that the nitrogen of macromolecules evolved were mainly in the form of hydrogen cyanide and ammonia. During the pyrolysis amorphous carbonaceous element was formed, and crosslinked to form network structure. Three kinds of samples were used for comparison. The experimental results show that the gaseous products of volatile small molecules were HCN, NH3, CH4, C2H6 and cyanide. CO and CO2 were also formed when copolymers of PAN were thermally pyrolyzed.

  13. Temperature dependent grain-size and microstrain of CdO thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B G Jeyaprakash; K Kesavan; R Ashok Kumar; S Mohan; A Amalarani

    2011-07-01

    CdO thin films on glass substrate were prepared by home built spray pyrolysis unit from aqueous solution of Cd(CH3COO)2.2H2O at different substrate temperatures. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate the formation of polycrystalline cubic CdO phase with preferential orientation along (111) plane. X-ray line broadening technique is adopted to study the effect of substrate temperature on microstructural parameters such as grain size and microstrain. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the film prepared at 250°C consists of spherical shape grains with size in nanometer range and is comparable with the XRD studies.

  14. The effect of temperature and heating rate on char properties obtained from solar pyrolysis of beech wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kuo; Minh, Doan Pham; Gauthier, Daniel; Weiss-Hortala, Elsa; Nzihou, Ange; Flamant, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Char samples were produced from pyrolysis in a lab-scale solar reactor. The pyrolysis of beech wood was carried out at temperatures ranging from 600 to 2000°C, with heating rates from 5 to 450°C/s. CHNS, scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption were employed to investigate the effect of temperature and heating rate on char composition and structure. The results indicated that char structure was more and more ordered with temperature increase and heating rate decrease (higher than 50°C/s). The surface area and pore volume firstly increased with temperature and reached maximum at 1200°C then reduced significantly at 2000°C. Besides, they firstly increased with heating rate and then decreased slightly at heating rate of 450°C/s when final temperature was no lower than 1200°C. Char reactivity measured by TGA analysis was found to correlate with the evolution of char surface area and pore volume with temperature and heating rate.

  15. Effects of temperature and soil components on emissions from pyrolysis of pyrene-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risoul, Véronique; Richter, Henning; Lafleur, Arthur L; Plummer, Elaine F; Gilot, Patrick; Howard, Jack B; Peters, William A

    2005-11-11

    Effects of temperature and soil on yields and identities of light gases (H2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, CO, and CO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from thermal treatment of a pyrene-contaminated (5 wt%) soil in the absence of oxygen were determined for a U.S. EPA synthetic soil matrix prepared to proxy U.S. Superfund soils. Shallow piles (140-170 mg) of contaminated soil particles and as controls, neat (non-contaminated) soil (140-160 mg), neat pyrene (10-15 mg), neat sand (230 mg), and pyrene-contaminated sand (160 mg), were heated in a ceramic boat inside a 1.65 cm i.d. pyrex tube at temperatures from 500 to 1100 degrees C under an axial flow of helium. Volatile products spent 0.2-0.4s at temperature before cooling. Light gases, PAH and a dichloromethane extract of the residue in the ceramic boat, were analyzed by gas chromatography or high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Over 99% pyrene removal was observed when heating for a few tens of seconds in all investigated cases, i.e., at 500, 650, 750, 1000, and 1100 degrees C for soil, and 750 and 1000 degrees C for sand. However, each of these experiments gave significant yields (0.2-16 wt% of the initial pyrene) of other PAH, e.g., cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP), which mutates bacterial cells and human cells in vitro. Heating pyrene-polluted soil gave pyrene conversions and yields of acetylene, CPP, and other PAH exceeding those predicted from similar, but separate heating of neat soil and neat pyrene. Up to 750 degrees C, recovered pyrene, other PAH, and light gases accounted for all or most of the initial pyrene whereas at 1000 and 1100 degrees C conversion to soot was significant. A kinetic analysis disentangled effects of soil-pyrene interactions and vapor phase pyrolysis of pyrene. Increase of residence time was found to be the main reason for the enhanced conversion of pyrene in the case of the presence of a solid soil or sand matrix. Light gas species released due to the thermal treatment, such as

  16. Effect of stress on optical band gap of ZnO thin films with substrate temperature by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, T. Prasada, E-mail: prasadview@gmail.co [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Kumar, M.C. Santhosh, E-mail: santhoshmc@yahoo.co [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India); Angayarkanni, S. Anbumozhi; Ashok, M. [Department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620015 (India)

    2009-10-19

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited with various substrate temperatures by spray pyrolysis method onto glass substrates. The effects of substrate temperature on the crystallization behavior and optical properties of the films have been studied. The evolution of strain and stress effects in ZnO thin films on glass substrate has been studied using X-ray diffraction. The films deposited at low substrate temperature have large compressive stress of 1.77 GPa, which relaxed to 1.47 GPa as the substrate temperature increased to 450 deg. C. Optical parameters such as optical transmittance, reflectance, dielectric constant, refractive index and energy band gap have been studied and discussed with respect to substrate temperature. All films exhibit a transmittance of about 85% in the visible region. It was found that the compressive stress in the films causes a decrease in the optical band gap.

  17. Pyrolysis temperature-dependent changes in dissolved phosphorus speciation of plant and manure biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of plant and animal wastes produces a complex mixture of phosphorus species in amorphous, semi-crystalline, and crystalline inorganic phases, organic (char) components, and within organo-mineral complexes. In order to understand the solubility of different phosphorus species, plant (cotto...

  18. Effects of Biochar Feedstock and Pyrolysis Temperature on Growth of Corn, Soybean, Lettuce and Carrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar, the carbon-rich material remaining after pyrolysis (low oxygen) of cellulosic feedstocks, has the potential as a soil amendment to sequester carbon, improve soil water-holding capacity, and increase nutrient retention thereby enhancing soil conditions to benefit plant gr...

  19. Wettability of poultry litter biochars at variable pyrolysis temperatures and their impact on soil wettability and water retention relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, S. C.; Witt, B.; Guo, M.; Chiu, P.; Imhoff, P. T.

    2012-12-01

    To reduce the impact of poultry farming on greenhouse gas emissions, poultry farming waste - poultry litter - can be converted to biofuel and biochar through slow-pyrolysis, with the biochar added to agricultural soil for nutrient enrichment and carbon sequestration. While biochars from source materials other than poultry litter have been shown to sequester carbon and increase soil fertility, there is considerable variability in biochar behavior - even with biochars created from the same source material. This situation is exacerbated by our limited understanding of how biochars alter physical, chemical, and biological processes in agricultural soils. The focus of this work is to develop a mechanistic understanding of how poultry litter (PL) biochars affect the hydrology, microbial communities, N2O emissions, and nitrogen cycling in agricultural soils. The initial focus is on the impact of PL biochar on soil hydrology. PL from Perdue AgriRecycle, LLC (Seaford, Delaware) was used to produce biochars at pyrolysis temperatures from 300°C to 600°C. To explore the impact of these biochars on soil wettability, the PL biochars were mixed with a 30/40 Accusand in mass fractions from 0% to 100%. The water contact angle was then measured using a goniometer on these sand/biochar mixtures using the sessile drop method and a single layer of sample particles. The PL biochars produced at temperatures between 300°C to 400°C were hydrophobic, while those pyrolized at > 400°C were hydrophilic. Water contact angles for samples with 100% biochar varied systematically with pyrolysis temperature, decreasing from 101.12° to 20.57° as the pyrolysis temperature increased from 300 to 600°C. Even for small amounts of hydrophobic biochar added to the hydrophilic sand, the contact angle of the mixture was altered: for sand/biochar mixtures containing only 2% hydrophobic PL biochar by weight, the contact angle of the mixture increased from ~ 8° (0% biochar) to 20° (2% biochar). For

  20. Characterization of Free Radicals By Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy in Biochars from Pyrolysis at High Heating Rates and at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Anker Degn; Larsen Andresen, Mogens

    Understanding fast pyrolysis of biomass-derived materials is an important step in optimization of combustion processes. Similar to coal combustion, the fuel burn out is known to be influenced by the yield and reactivity of chars, produced during pyrolysis. The rapid heating of small biomass...... particles and the short residence time at high temperatures minimize the char yield and increase char reactivity. The differences in chemical composition of organic and inorganic matter between wood and herbaceous biomass affect the operational flexibility of power plants, and increase the complexity...... of mathematical models that can predict yields, composition and rates of product (char, tar, light gases) formation from fast pyrolysis. The modeling of cross-linking and polymerization reactions in biomass pyrolysis includes the formation of free radicals and their disappearance. Knowledge about these radical...

  1. Research of special carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst for fuel cell through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from novel phthalocyanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yanchuan; YUE Jun; PAN Zhongxiao; XU Haitao; ZHANG Bing; HAN Fengmei; CHEN Lijuan; PENG Bixian; XIE Wenwei; QIAN Haisheng; YAN Tiantang

    2004-01-01

    The carbon nanobeads were prepared through high temperature pyrolysis and deposition from phthaiocyanine. After surface's functionalization treatment of the carbon beads, the carbon nanobeads supported Pt catalyst was produced. The Pt/C catalyst was characterized by SEM,TEM, Raman spectrum, EDS and XRD methods. Combining the carbonaceous paper spreaded up with the catalyst with Nafion membrane, we made MEA electrode. The discharge curves indicated that this carbon nanobeads supported Pt is a good fuel cell catalyst with excellent performance, high activity and sign of a long-time life.

  2. Low Temperature Synthesis of Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide Transparent Conducting Thin Film by Spray Pyrolysis Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun-Byul; Choi, Jae-Seok; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Sung-Churl; Kim, Chang-Yeoul

    2016-02-01

    Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) is widely used for the application of flat panel display like liquid crystal displays and plasma display panel. It is also applied in the field of touch panel, solar cell electrode, low-emissivity glass, defrost window, and anti-static material. Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) thin films were fabricated by spray pyrolysis of ethanol-added FTO precursor solutions. FTO thin film by spray pyrolysis is very much investigated and normally formed at high temperature, about 500 degrees C. However, these days, flexible electronics draw many attentions in the field of IT industry and the research for flexible transparent conducting thin film is also required. In the industrial field, indium-tin oxide (ITO) film on polymer substrate is widely used for touch panel and displays. In this study, we investigated the possibility of FTO thin film formation at relatively low temperature of 250 degrees C. We found out that the control of volume of input precursor and exhaust gases could make it possible to form FTO thin film with a relatively low electrical resistance, less than 100 Ohm/sq and high optical transmittance about 88%.

  3. Bio-oil and bio-char from low temperature pyrolysis of spent grains using activated alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Aimaro; Li, Sujing; Linforth, Rob; Smart, Katherine A; Andrésen, John M

    2011-11-01

    The pyrolysis of wheat and barley spent grains resulting from bio-ethanol and beer production respectively was investigated at temperatures between 460 and 540 °C using an activated alumina bed. The results showed that the bio-oil yield and quality depend principally on the applied temperature where pyrolysis at 460 °C leaves a bio-oil with lower nitrogen content in comparison with the original spent grains and low oxygen content. The viscosity profile of the spent grains indicated that activated alumina could promote liquefaction and prevent charring of the structure between 400 and 460 °C. The biochar contains about 10-12% of original carbon and 13-20% of starting nitrogen resulting very attractive as a soil amendment and for carbon sequestration. Overall, value can be added to the spent grains opening a new market in bio-fuel production without the needs of external energy. The bio-oil from spent grains could meet about 9% of the renewable obligation in the UK.

  4. Pyrolysis of oil at high temperatures: Gas potentials, chemical and carbon isotopic signatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Hui; XIAO XianMing; YANG LiGuo; XIAO ZhongYao; GUO LiGuo; SHEN JiaGui; LU YuHong

    2009-01-01

    Although the gas cracked from oil has been believed to be one of the important sources in highly ma-tured marine basins, there are still some debates on its resource potentials and chemical and isotopic compositions. In this study a Cambrian-sourced marine oil sample from the Silurian reservoir of well TZ62 in the central Tarim basin was pyrolyzed using sealed gold tubes with two different pyrolysis schemes: continuous pyrolysis in a closed system and stepwise semi-open pyrolysis. The results show that the maximum weight yield of C1-5 gases occurs at EasyRo=2.3% and the residual gas poten-tial after this maturity is only 43.4 mL/g, about 12% of the yield of 361 mL/g at EasyRo=2.3%. Combined with the results of kinetic modeling, the main stage of gas generation from oil cracking is believed within the EasyRo=1.6%-2.3%. The increase in the volume yield of C1-5 gases at EasyRo2.3% in a closed system is mainly related to the re-cracking of previously formed C2-5 wet gases, not the direct cracking of oil. The stepwise pyrolysis experiments show that the gas from the cracking of residual oil at EasyRo2.3% is characterized by very high dryness index (higher than 92%) and heavy methane carbon isotopes ranging from -28.7‰ to -26.7‰, which is quite different from the gases from the con-tinuous pyrolysis in a closed system. The kinetic modeling of methane carbon isotope fractionation shows that the carbon isotopes of methane within the main stage of gas generation (EasyRo<2.3%) are far lighter than the carbon isotopes of the precursor oils under a geological heating rate of 2℃/Ma. The above observations and results provide some new clues to the accurate recognition and objective re-source evaluation of oil cracking gas in highly mature marine basins.

  5. Ocean deoxygenation in a warming world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Ralph E; Körtzinger, Arne; Gruber, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Ocean warming and increased stratification of the upper ocean caused by global climate change will likely lead to declines in dissolved O2 in the ocean interior (ocean deoxygenation) with implications for ocean productivity, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, and marine habitat. Ocean models predict declines of 1 to 7% in the global ocean O2 inventory over the next century, with declines continuing for a thousand years or more into the future. An important consequence may be an expansion in the area and volume of so-called oxygen minimum zones, where O2 levels are too low to support many macrofauna and profound changes in biogeochemical cycling occur. Significant deoxygenation has occurred over the past 50 years in the North Pacific and tropical oceans, suggesting larger changes are looming. The potential for larger O2 declines in the future suggests the need for an improved observing system for tracking ocean 02 changes.

  6. The effects of feedstock pre-treatment and pyrolysis temperature on the production of biochar from the green seaweed Ulva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David A; de Nys, Rocky

    2016-03-15

    Green seaweeds from the genus Ulva are a promising feedstock for the production of biochar for carbon (C) sequestration and soil amelioration. Ulva can be cultivated in waste water from land-based aquaculture and Ulva blooms ("green tides") strand millions of tons of biomass on coastal areas of Europe and China each year. The conversion of Ulva into biochar could recycle C and nutrients from eutrophic water into agricultural production. We produce biochar from Ulva ohnoi, cultivated in waste water from an aquaculture facility, and characterize its suitability for C sequestration and soil amelioration through bio-chemical analyses and plant growth experiments. Two biomass pre-treatments (fresh water rinsing to reduce salt, and pelletisation to increase density) were crossed with four pyrolysis temperatures (300-750 °C). Biomass rinsing decreased the ash and increased the C content of the resulting biochar. However, biochar produced from un-rinsed biomass had a higher proportion of fixed C and a higher yield. C sequestration decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures due to the combination of lower yield and lower total C content of biochar produced at high temperatures. Biochar produced from un-rinsed biomass at 300 °C had the greatest gravimetric C sequestration (110-120 g stable C kg(-1) seaweed). Biochar produced from un-pelletised Ulva enhanced plant growth three-fold in low fertility soils when the temperature of pyrolysis was less than 450 °C. The reduced effectiveness of the high-temperature biochars (>450 °C) was due to a lower N and higher salt content. Soil ameliorated with biochar produced from pelletised biomass had suppressed plant germination and growth. The most effective biochar for C sequestration and soil amelioration was produced from un-rinsed and un-pelletised Ulva at 300 °C. The green tide that occurs annually along the Shandong coastline in China generates sufficient biomass (200,000 tons dry weight) to ameliorate 12,500

  7. Deoxygenation of the Baltic Sea during the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Jacob; Andersen, Jesper H; Gustafsson, Bo G; Conley, Daniel J

    2014-04-15

    Deoxygenation is a global problem in coastal and open regions of the ocean, and has led to expanding areas of oxygen minimum zones and coastal hypoxia. The recent expansion of hypoxia in coastal ecosystems has been primarily attributed to global warming and enhanced nutrient input from land and atmosphere. The largest anthropogenically induced hypoxic area in the world is the Baltic Sea, where the relative importance of physical forcing versus eutrophication is still debated. We have analyzed water column oxygen and salinity profiles to reconstruct oxygen and stratification conditions over the last 115 y and compare the influence of both climate and anthropogenic forcing on hypoxia. We report a 10-fold increase of hypoxia in the Baltic Sea and show that this is primarily linked to increased inputs of nutrients from land, although increased respiration from higher temperatures during the last two decades has contributed to worsening oxygen conditions. Although shifts in climate and physical circulation are important factors modulating the extent of hypoxia, further nutrient reductions in the Baltic Sea will be necessary to reduce the ecosystems impacts of deoxygenation.

  8. Effects of pyrolysis temperature on soybean stover- and peanut shell-derived biochar properties and TCE adsorption in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahtab; Lee, Sang Soo; Dou, Xiaomin; Mohan, Dinesh; Sung, Jwa-Kyung; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik

    2012-08-01

    Conversion of crop residues into biochars (BCs) via pyrolysis is beneficial to environment compared to their direct combustion in agricultural field. Biochars developed from soybean stover at 300 and 700 °C (S-BC300 and S-BC700, respectively) and peanut shells at 300 and 700 °C (P-BC300 and P-BC700, respectively) were used for the removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) from water. Batch adsorption experiments showed that the TCE adsorption was strongly dependent on the BCs properties. Linear relationships were obtained between sorption parameters (K(M) and S(M)) and molar elemental ratios as well as surface area of the BCs. The high adsorption capacity of BCs produced at 700 °C was attributed to their high aromaticity and low polarity. The efficacy of S-BC700 and P-BC700 for removing TCE from water was comparable to that of activated carbon (AC). Pyrolysis temperature influencing the BC properties was a critical factor to assess the removal efficiency of TCE from water.

  9. The Influence of Zeolites on Radical Formation During Lignin Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bährle, Christian; Custodis, Victoria; Jeschke, Gunnar; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Vogel, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a promising source of energy, fuels, and chemicals. The conversion of the polymeric lignin to fuels and chemicals can be achieved by catalytic and noncatalytic pyrolysis. The influence of nonporous silica and zeolite catalysts, such as silicalite, HZSM5, and HUSY, on the radical and volatile product formation during lignin pyrolysis was studied by in situ high-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (HTEPR) as well as GC-MS. Higher radical concentrations were observed in the samples containing zeolite compared to the sample containing only lignin, which suggests that there is a stabilizing effect by the inorganic surfaces on the formed radical fragments. This effect was observed for nonporous silica as well as for HUSY, HZSM5, and silicalite zeolite catalysts. However, the effect is far larger for the zeolites owing to their higher specific surface area. The zeolites also showed an effect on the volatile product yield and the product distribution within the volatile phase. Although silicalite showed no effect on the product selectivity, the acidic zeolites such as HZSM5 or HUSY increased the formation of deoxygenated products such as benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), and naphthalene.

  10. Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of coal and oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiumin Zhang; Demin He; Jun Guan [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China). Institute of Coal Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of coal and oil shale was investigated by using Yilan oil shale, Longkou oil shale, Huolinhe lignite, Taiji gas coal and Ruqigou anthracite as raw materia1s. A fixed-bed pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis of these coal and oil shale were investigated. The results indicated that synergetic effect existed with the oil yield increased, water yield decreased, and the synergetic effect varied with the mass percentage of coal differed. The co-pyrolysis oil yield of Yilan oil shale and Ruqigou anthracite is a little higher than the linear sum of their oil yield in the pyrolysis process. But for the co-pyrolysis of Taiji gas coal and Yilan oil shale, no significant change of the oil yield was found. Huolinhe lignite and Longkou oil shale were chosen as the material for the solid heat carrier experiment. Synergetic effect analyses of both the fixed-bed pyrolysis and the retorting process with solid heat carrier were given. Huolinhe lignite is an ideal material for oil recovery by pyrolysis, with high volatile and low ash, its oil content is 8.55%. Longkou oil shale is an ideal material for oil recovery by pyrolysis, with high oil content of 14.38%. The optimum co-pyrolysis temperature for Huolinhe lignite and Longkou oil shale is 510{sup o}C. Synergetic effect was found with the oil increased 9% and water decreased 36%. 5 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Pyrolysis of Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađenović, A.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of relevant literature on coal pyrolysis.Pyrolysis, as a process technology, has received considerable attention from many researchers because it is an important intermediate stage in coal conversion.Reactions parameters as the temperature, pressure, coal particle size, heating rate, soak time, type of reactor, etc. determine the total carbon conversion and the transport of volatiles and therebythe product distribution. Part of the possible environmental pollutants could be removed by optimising the pyrolysis conditions. Therefore, this process will be subsequently interesting for coal utilization in the future

  12. Sorption Characteristic of Phenanthrene on Biochar-Amended Soils: Effect of feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and aging duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, J.

    2015-12-01

    The high sorption capacity of biochar is widely known in environmental studies. Especially, biochar is effective for removal of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) due to high surface area and porosity. In this study, the sorption characteristic of biochar-amended soil was evaluated by sorption kinetic experiment of phenanthrene (PHE). For PHE sorption test, the effect of biochar feedstock (sludge waste char (SWC), municipal waste char (MWC) and wood char (WC), Giant Miscanthus (GM)), pyrolysis temperature (400°C, 500°C and 700°C,), and duration of amending period (0, 3, 6, and 12 months) was assessed. Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques were used to detect pore structure and the surface functional group of biochar amended soils. For all kinetic tests, apparent sorption equilibrium was attained in 24 hr. The result showed that sorption capacity of biochar amended soils was greatly influenced by biochar feedstock and pyrolysis temperature. For all samples, the sorption capacity of PHE by biochar amended soils decreased with aging period. This observation is due to the fact that the aromatic characters of biochar are different by feedstock and pyrolysis temperature and the amount of O-containing hydrophilic functional groups increased surfaces of biochar by natural oxidation (e.g. carboxyl groups) as confirmed by the result of FT-IR and FE-SEM. In addition, biochar pore blockage by inorganic minerals, which tended to increase with aging period, might attenuate the sorption capacity of samples. In conclusion, biochar derived from various feed stocks are all effective for PHE sorption. But the sorption capacity of biochar amended soils decreased with increasing aging duration most likely due to increasing hydrophilic functional groups of biochar surfaces and pore blockage by inorganic minerals in the weathering processes. Therefore, for the design of biochar amendment to attenuate

  13. Deoxygenation of Lake Ikeda, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, R.; Hasegawa, N.

    2010-12-01

    Lake Ikeda (Kagoshima prefecture, Japan) is a deep lake with a maximum depth of 233 m. Monitoring data of lake Ikeda exist since 1975. We have analyzed the long-term variability in the water conditions of Lake Ikeda. Recently, Lake Ikeda has exhibited the phenomenon of incomplete overturning because of climate warming. The concentrations of DO (dissolved oxygen) in the deepest parts of the lake have reduced. This phenomenon was observed to have started in the 1980s, and gradually, the deepest parts of the lake became anoxic. Later, the anoxic layer became thicker. Currently, winter mixing in Lake Ikeda reaches to depths of only 100 m. According to our simple estimation, the total volume of oxygen in Lake Ikeda will reduce from approximately 70% in the mid-1980s to 40% by the end of 2010. In addition to this phenomenon, the oxygen concentration appears to vary with several years oscillations. The depths to which mixing occurs depends on the severity of the winter, such as the air temperature during the winter season. The mixing period generally occurs in February; hence, the limnological year is considered to start in February. During our analysis period, the total DO mass showed high values in 1996, 2001, and 2003. Air temperature data obtained for regions near Lake Ikeda (the station name is Ibusuki) are used to clarify the cause of the high DO mass values in the three abovementioned years. During the period prior to the occurrence of the high DO mass in February 1996, i.e., in December 1995 and January 1996, the air temperature was low. Similarly, in 2001 and 2003, the air temperature was low in January (one month before the high DO mass was observed). In January 2001 and 2003, the AO (Atlantic Oscillation) index was negative. When the AO index is negative, there tends to be a greater movement of cold polar air into mid-latitudinal regions including Japan (Yamakawa, 2005). This movement induced a low air temperature in Ibusuki, and consequently, a high DO mass

  14. Examination and evaluation of the use of screen heaters for the measurement of the high temperature pyrolysis kinetics of polyethene and polypropene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Balk, R.H.P.; Meijer, R.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    A screen heater with a gas sweep was developed and applied to study the pyrolysis kinetics of low density polyethene (LDPE) and polypropene (PP) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 530 C. The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of screen heaters to measure these kinetics. On-line meas

  15. Optimization of growth temperature of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by spray pyrolysis method and application for arsenic removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mageswari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been synthesized at different temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 750 °C on silica supported Fe-Co catalyst by spray pyrolysis method using Citrus limonum oil under nitrogen atmosphere. The as-grown MWNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and Raman spectral studies. The HRTEM and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed the evolution of MWNTs with the outer diameter between 25 and 38 nm. The possibility of use of as-grown MWNTs as an adsorbent for removal of As (V ions from drinking water was studied. Adsorption isotherm data were interpreted by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. Kinetic data were studied using Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism.

  16. Effect of pyrolysis temperatures on freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in sewage sludge-derived biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, Anna; Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sewage sludge pyrolysis on freely dissolved (Cfree) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contents in biochars. Four sewage sludges with varying properties and PAH contents were pyrolysed at temperatures of 500 °C, 600 °C or 700 °C. Cfree PAH contents were determined using polyoxymethylene (POM). The contents of Cfree PAHs in the sludges ranged from 262 to 294 ng L(-1). Sewage sludge-derived biochars have from 2.3- to 3.4-times lower Cfree PAH contents comparing to corresponding sewage sludges. The Cfree PAH contents in the biochars ranged between 81 ng L(-1) and 126 ng L(-1). As regards agricultural use of biochar, the lower contents of Cfree PAHs in the biochars compared to the sewage sludges makes biochar a safer material than sewage sludge in terms of PAH contents.

  17. Substrate temperature dependent studies on properties of chemical spray pyrolysis deposited CdS thin films for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwate, Kiran; Pawbake, Amit; Rondiya, Sachin; Kulkarni, Rupali; Waykar, Ravi; Jadhavar, Ashok; Rokade, Avinash; Funde, Adinath; Mohite, Kakasaheb; Shinde, Manish; Pathan, Habib; Devan, Rupesh; Jadkar, Sandesh

    2017-02-01

    Thin films of CdS have been prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis by spraying precursor solution directly onto soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. Influence of substrate temperature on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties have been investigated by using various techniques such as low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–visible spectroscopy photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy etc. Formation of CdS has been confirmed by low angle XRD, Raman spectroscopy and XPS analysis. XRD pattern showed that CdS films are polycrystalline, have hexagonal structure and prefer orientation of crystallites shifts from (101) to (002) with increase in substrate temperature. Raman spectroscopy revealed that exciton-phonon coupling depends on substrate temperature and hence on crystallite size. Optical band gap increased from 2.43 to 2.99 eV when substrate temperature increased from 325 to 475 ^\\circ {{C}}. Transmittance of the film also showed an increasing trend from ∼ 52 % to ∼ 80 % with increase in substrate temperature. Such high band gap and transmittance values of CdS films prepared at 475 ^\\circ {{C}} make it a useful window material in CdS/CdTe and CdS/Cu2S heterojunction solar cells. Project supported by the Department of Science and Technology (DST), Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India, New Delhi.

  18. Experimental Study on Low Temperature Pyrolysis of Biomass%生物质低温热解炭化特性的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秦超; 卢平; 黄震; 陈丹丹; 夏良燕; 郝江涛

    2012-01-01

    采用固定床和螺旋式2种实验装置,以稻秆、桑树枝、杨树枝和竹子等4种生物质为研究对象,在热解温度为250~300℃、停留时间为10~30min条件下进行生物质低温热解炭化特性的实验研究.结果表明:与生物质原料相比,生物质炭的表观体积缩小,外形收缩,颜色有不同程度加深,O/C质量比下降,热值得到大幅度提高,疏水性和研磨特性得到显著改善.随着热解温度和停留时间的增加,固体产物质量收率不断降低,较高的热解温度有利于气体的生成.桑树枝炭和稻秆炭的质量收率和能量收率随着热解温度的升高不断降低,且在相同热解条件下,生物质的能量收率始终高于质量收率.随着热解温度和停留时间的增加,生物质炭的能量密度不断增加;较低热解温度时,停留时间越长,生物质炭的能量密度增幅越大,但在较高热解温度下,停留时间对生物质炭能量密度增加的效果并不明显.%The low temperature pyrolysis characteristics of four kinds of biotnass, named rice straw (RS), mulberry branch (MB), poplar branch (PB) and bamboo (BM), were carried out in fixed-bed type or screw-type pyrolysis reactor at pyrolysis temperature of 250~300℃ and residence time of 10~30min. Results indicated that compared with raw biomass, the apparent volume of biomass chars are decreased and shrunk, and their color are more brownish; The values of O/C mass ratio are decreased, and lower heating values increase significantly; Meanwhile, hydrophobic and grindability of biomass chars are also improved remarkably. The mass yield of biomass char decrease with the increasing of the pyrolysis temperature and residence time, and the high pyrolysis temperature is favorable to generate gaseous product. The mass and energy yields of MB and RS chars decrease with the increasing of pyrolysis temperature and residence time, and the energy yield of biomass is always higher than its mass

  19. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Physico-Chemical Properties of Corn Stover (Zea mays L.) Biochar and Feasibility for Carbon Capture and Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khalid; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Rafiq, Muhammad Tariq; Shang, Zhanhuan; Joseph, Stephen; Long, Ruijun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar characteristics and evaluated its suitability for carbon capture and energy production. Biochar was produced from corn stover using slow pyrolysis at 300, 400 and 500°C and 2 hrs holding time. The experimental biochars were characterized by elemental analysis, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, NMR (C-13). Higher heating value (HHV) of feedstock and biochars was measured using bomb calorimeter. Results show that carbon content of corn stover biochar increased from 45.5% to 64.5%, with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. A decrease in H:C and O:C ratios as well as volatile matter, coupled with increase in the concentration of aromatic carbon in the biochar as determined by FTIR and NMR (C-13) demonstrates a higher biochar carbon stability at 500°C. It was estimated that corn stover pyrolysed at 500°C could provide of 10.12 MJ/kg thermal energy. Pyrolysis is therefore a potential technology with its carbon-negative, energy positive and soil amendment benefits thus creating win- win scenario.

  20. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Physico-Chemical Properties of Corn Stover (Zea mays L. Biochar and Feasibility for Carbon Capture and Energy Balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khalid Rafiq

    Full Text Available This study examined the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar characteristics and evaluated its suitability for carbon capture and energy production. Biochar was produced from corn stover using slow pyrolysis at 300, 400 and 500°C and 2 hrs holding time. The experimental biochars were characterized by elemental analysis, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, NMR (C-13. Higher heating value (HHV of feedstock and biochars was measured using bomb calorimeter. Results show that carbon content of corn stover biochar increased from 45.5% to 64.5%, with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. A decrease in H:C and O:C ratios as well as volatile matter, coupled with increase in the concentration of aromatic carbon in the biochar as determined by FTIR and NMR (C-13 demonstrates a higher biochar carbon stability at 500°C. It was estimated that corn stover pyrolysed at 500°C could provide of 10.12 MJ/kg thermal energy. Pyrolysis is therefore a potential technology with its carbon-negative, energy positive and soil amendment benefits thus creating win- win scenario.

  1. Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature on Physico-Chemical Properties of Corn Stover (Zea mays L.) Biochar and Feasibility for Carbon Capture and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Khalid; Bachmann, Robert Thomas; Rafiq, Muhammad Tariq; Shang, Zhanhuan; Joseph, Stephen; Long, Ruijun

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar characteristics and evaluated its suitability for carbon capture and energy production. Biochar was produced from corn stover using slow pyrolysis at 300, 400 and 500°C and 2 hrs holding time. The experimental biochars were characterized by elemental analysis, BET, FTIR, TGA/DTA, NMR (C-13). Higher heating value (HHV) of feedstock and biochars was measured using bomb calorimeter. Results show that carbon content of corn stover biochar increased from 45.5% to 64.5%, with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. A decrease in H:C and O:C ratios as well as volatile matter, coupled with increase in the concentration of aromatic carbon in the biochar as determined by FTIR and NMR (C-13) demonstrates a higher biochar carbon stability at 500°C. It was estimated that corn stover pyrolysed at 500°C could provide of 10.12 MJ/kg thermal energy. Pyrolysis is therefore a potential technology with its carbon-negative, energy positive and soil amendment benefits thus creating win- win scenario. PMID:27327870

  2. Low-temperature growth of highly crystallized transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide films by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukano, Tatsuo; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi [Toyota Central Research and Development Laboratories Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2004-05-30

    Following the procedure by Sawada et al. (Thin Solid Films 409 (2002) 46), high-quality SnO{sub 2}:F films were grown on glass substrates at relatively low temperatures of 325-340C by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition using a perfume atomizer for cosmetics use. Even though the substrate temperature is low, as-deposited films show a high optical transmittance of 92% in the visible range, a low electric resistivity of 5.8x10{sup -4}{omega}cm and a high Hall mobility of 28cm{sup 2}/Vs. The F/Sn atomic ratio (0.0074) in the films is low in comparison with the value (0.5) in the sprayed solution. The carrier density in the film is approximately equal to the F-ion density, suggesting that most of the F-ions effectively function as active dopants. Films' transmittance and resistivity show little change after a 450C 60min heat treatment in the atmosphere, evidencing a high heat resistance. The SnO{sub 2}:F films obtained in this work remove the difficulty to improve the figure of merit at low synthesis temperatures.

  3. The impacts of pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type on biochar properties and the effects of biochar application on the properties of a sandy loam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Steve; Doerr, Stefan; Street-Perrott, Alayne

    2013-04-01

    The production of biochar and its application to soil has the potential to make a significant contribution to climate change mitigation whilst simultaneously improving soil fertility, crop yield and soil water-holding capacity. Biochar is produced from various biomass feedstock materials at varying pyrolysis temperatures, but relatively little is known about how these parameters affect the properties of the resultant biochars and their impact on the properties of the soils to which they are subsequently applied. Salix viminalis, M. giganteus and Picea sitchensis feedstocks were chipped then sieved to 2 - 5 mm, oven dried to constant weight, then pyrolyzed at 350, 500, 600 and 800° C in a nitrogen-purged tube furnace. Biochar yields were measured by weighing the mass of each sample before and after pyrolysis. Biochar hydrophobicity was assessed by using a goniometer to measure water-droplet contact-angles. Cation-exchange-capacity (CEC) was measured using the ammonium acetate method. Biochars were also produced in a rotary kiln from softwood pellets at 400, 500, 600 and 700° C then ground to 0.4 - 1 mm and applied to a sandy loam at a rate of 50 g kg-1. Bulk densities of these soil-biochar mixtures were measured on a tapped, dry, basis. The water-holding-capacity (WHC) of each mixture was measured gravimetrically following saturation and free-draining. The filter paper method was used to assess how pyrolysis temperature influences the effect of biochar application on matric suction. For all feedstocks, large decreases in biochar yield were observed between the pyrolysis temperatures of 350° C and 500° C. For Salix viminalis and M. giganteus feedstocks, subsequent reductions in the yield with increasing pyrolysis temperature were much lower. There were significant differences in hydrophobicity between biochars produced from different biomass and mean biochar hydrophobicity decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature for all feedstocks. Results for CEC and WHC

  4. High-temperature pyrolysis of blended animal manures for producing renewable energy and value-added biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we used a commercial pilot-scale, skid-mounted pyrolysis reactor system to produce combustible gas and biochar at 620ºC from three sources (chicken litter, swine solids, mixture of swine solids with rye grass). Pyrolysis of swine solids produced gas with the greatest higher heating va...

  5. Characterization of free radicals by electron spin resonance spectroscopy in biochars from pyrolysis at high heating rates and at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    The concentration and type of free radicals from the decay (termination stage) of pyrolysis at slow and fast heating rates and at high temperatures (above 1000°C) in biomass char have been studied. A room temperature electron spin resonance spectroscopy study was conducted on original wood......, herbaceous biomass, holocelluloses, lignin and their chars, prepared at high temperatures in a wire mesh reactor, an entrained flow reactor, and a tubular reactor. The radical concentrations in the chars from the decay stage range up between 7·1016 and 1.5·1018 spins g -1. The results indicated...... that the biomass major constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin) had a minor effect on remaining radical concentrations comparedto potassium and silica contents. The higher radical concentrations in the wheat straw chars from thedecay stage of pyrolysis in the entrained flow reactor compared to the wood...

  6. SnS Thin Films Prepared by Chemical Spray Pyrolysis at Different Substrate Temperatures for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sall, Thierno; Soucase, Bernabé Marí; Mollar, Miguel; Sans, Juan Angel

    2017-03-01

    The preparation and analysis of morphological, structural, optical, vibrational and compositional properties of tin monosulfide (SnS) thin films deposited on glass substrate by chemical spray pyrolysis is reported herein. The growth conditions were evaluated to reduce the presence of residual phases different to the SnS orthorhombic phase. X-ray diffraction spectra revealed the polycrystalline nature of the SnS films with orthorhombic structure and a preferential grain orientation along the (111) direction. At high substrate temperature (450°C), a crystalline phase corresponding to the Sn2S3 phase was observed. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the dominance of the SnS phase and the presence of an additional Sn2S3 phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the SnS film morphology depends on the substrate temperature. Between 250°C and 350°C, SnS films were shaped as rounded grains with some cracks between them, while at substrate temperatures above 400°C, films were denser and more compact. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis showed that the stoichiometry of sprayed SnS films improved with the increase of substrate temperature and atomic force microscopy micrographs showed films well covered at 350°C resulting in a rougher and bigger grain size. Optical and electrical measurements showed that the optical bandgap and the resistivity decreased when the substrate temperature increased, and smaller values, 1.46 eV and 60 Ω cm, respectively, were attained at 450°C. These SnS thin films could be used as an absorber layer for the development of tandem solar cell devices due to their high absorbability in the visible region with optimum bandgap energy.

  7. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of monolithic carbons derived from solid iron bamboo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzesinska, Marta [Institute of Chemistry and Environment Protection, Jan Dlugosz University Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 13-15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland); Zachariasz, Justyna [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sowinskiego 5, 44-121 Gliwice (Poland)

    2007-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the physical properties of new monolithic porous carbon materials derived from exceptional kind of bamboo characterized by solid, very strong stem, i.e., from iron bamboo (Dendrocalamus strictus). Raw and carbonised bamboo (carbon content up to 82%) was characterized using various methods: elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), helium gas densitometry, ultrasonic measurements, light and scanning electron microscopes. The DSC thermogram showed that the thermal decomposition of iron bamboo was characterized by T{sub 1} = 264 C and T{sub 2} = 356 C, i.e., was finished at T > 400 C. For the higher carbonisation temperatures, above 600 C, weight loss and carbon content were found to be almost constant, while the true density and the elastic parameters: the ultrasonic velocity and the dynamic elastic modulus still increased. This means that more intensive heating did not remove any compounds from stem, but there was probably reorganization of structure of carbonised iron bamboo, resulting in more compact matrix in porous carbon. (author)

  8. Hydrotreating of fast pyrolysis oils from protein-rich pennycress seed presscake

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fast pyrolysis oils produced from proteinaceous biomass, such as pennycress presscake differ significantly from those produced from biomass with mostly lignocellulosic composition. Those from proteinaceous biomass tend to be deoxygenated, contain more nitrogen, be less acidic and be more stable...

  9. Biocrude from biomass: pyrolysis of cottonseed cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozbay, N. [Anadolu University, Bilecik (Turkey). Bozuyuk Vocational School; Putun, A.E.; Uzun, B.B.; Putun, E. [Anadolu University, Bilecik (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-11-01

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis experiments have been conducted on a sample of cottonseed cake to determine the possibility of being a potential source of renewable fuels and chemicals feedstocks, in two different reactors, namely a tubular and a Heinze retort. Pyrolysis atmosphere and pyrolysis temperature effects on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical composition have been investigated. The maximum oil yield of 29.68% was obtained in N{sub 2} atmosphere at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C with a heating rate of 7{sup o}C min{sup -1} in a tubular reactor. (author)

  10. Role of the Support and Reaction Conditions on the Vapor-Phase Deoxygenation of m-Cresol over Pt/C and Pt/TiO2 Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Michael B.; Ferguson, Glen A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Biddy, Mary J.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Schaidle, Joshua A.

    2016-04-01

    The catalytic deoxygenation of biomass fast pyrolysis vapors offers a promising route for the sustainable production of liquid transportation fuels. However, a clear understanding of the mechanistic details involved in this process has yet to be achieved, and questions remain regarding the role of the catalyst support and the influence of reaction conditions. In order to gain insight into these questions, the deoxygenation of m-cresol was investigated over Pt/C and Pt/TiO2 catalysts using experimental and computational techniques. The performance of each catalyst was evaluated in a packed-bed reactor under two conditions (523 K, 2.0 MPa and 623 K, 0.5 MPa), and the energetics of the ring hydrogenation, direct deoxygenation, and tautomerization mechanisms were calculated over hydrogen-covered Pt(111) and oxygen vacancies on the surface of TiO2(101). Over Pt(111), ring hydrogenation to 3-methylcyclohexanone and 3-methylcyclohexanol was found to be the most energetically favorable pathway. Over TiO2(101), tautomerization and direct deoxygenation to toluene were identified as additional energetically favorable routes. These calculations are consistent with the experimental data, in which Pt/TiO2 was more active on a metal site basis and exhibited higher selectivity to toluene at 623 K relative to Pt/C. On the basis of these results, it is likely that the reactivity of Pt/TiO2 and Pt/C is driven by the metallic phase at 523 K, while contributions from the TiO2 support enhance deoxygenation at 623 K. These results highlight the synergistic effects between hydrogenation catalysts and reducible metal oxide supports and provide insight into the reaction pathways responsible for their enhanced deoxygenation performance.

  11. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on lead immobilization by chemically modified coconut fiber-derived biochars in aqueous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weidong; Li, Jianhong; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Müller, Karin; Chu, Yingchao; Zhang, Lingling; Yuan, Guodong; Lu, Kouping; Song, Zhaoliang; Wang, Hailong

    2016-11-01

    Biochar has received widespread attention as an eco-friendly and efficient material for immobilization of toxic heavy metals in aqueous environments. In the present study, three types of coconut fiber-derived biochars were obtained by pyrolyzing at three temperatures, i.e., 300, 500, and 700 °C. In addition, nine types of biochars were prepared by chemical modification with ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric acid, respectively, which were used to investigate changes in physico-chemical properties by inter alia, Fourier transformation infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and BET specific surface area analysis. Batch sorption experiments were carried out to determine the sorption capacity of the biochars for lead (Pb) in aqueous solutions. Results showed that the cation exchange capacity of biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and modified with nitric acid increased threefold compared to the control. Loosely corrugated carbon surface and uneven carbon surface of the biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C were produced during ammonia and nitric acid modifications. Removal rate of Pb by the coconut biochar pyrolyzed at 300 °C and modified with ammonia was increased from 71.8 to 99.6 % compared to the untreated biochar in aqueous solutions containing 100 mg L(-1) Pb. However, chemical modification did not enhance adsorption of Pb of the biochars pyrolyzed at higher temperatures (e.g., 500 or 700 °C), indicating that resistance of biochars to chemical treatment increased with pyrolysis temperature.

  12. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  14. Impact of Initial pH and Pyrolysis Temperature on the Adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ from Aqueous Solutions on Corn Straw-based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Shuai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Batch experiments were performed on Cr(Ⅵ adsorption using four straw-based materials including corn straw and three kinds of biochar pyrolysed at 300 ℃, 450 ℃ and 600 ℃, respectively. The results showed that the Cr(Ⅵ adsorption were significantly affected by initial pH and pyrolysis temperature. The data were described by kinetic and isotherm models, and showed that the adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ was increased with the decrease of initial pH. The removal rates of Cr(Ⅵ were decreased with the increase of the pyrolysis temperature at pH=3 or pH=5. The biochar pyrolysed at 300 ℃ had the best capability of removing Cr(Ⅵ from aqueous solution at pH=1, and the maxi-mum adsorption quantity was 141.24 mg·g-1 approximately. It observed that both the lower initial pH and the lower pyrolysis temperature had positive effects on the removal of Cr(Ⅵ from aqueous solution.

  15. High-Temperature and High-Pressure Pyrolysis of Hexadecane: Molecular Dynamic Simulation Based on Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuojun; Sun, Weizhen; Zhao, Ling

    2017-03-07

    As important products of heavy oil pyrolysis, heavier components such as gasoline and diesel supply the vast majority of energy demand through combustion, and lighter components such as ethylene and propylene are the main sources of industrial chemicals and plastic products. In this work, pyrolysis of hexadecane, as the model compound, was studied by reactive force field (ReaxFF) molecular simulation at high temperatures and high pressures. It was confirmed by unimolecular simulations that there exist eight different initial mechanisms all starting with C-C bond dissociation. The biradical mechanism was verified, through which the pyrolysis process can be accomplished within a shorter time. The enthalpy of reaction was calculated by the QM method, which was well consistent with ReaxFF calculation results. Multimolecular simulations showed that there is a strong dependency relationship between products distribution and temperature, as well as that between reaction rates and temperature. The optimal condition for ethylene formation in our work is 11.6 MPa and 2000 K, whereas it is best for hydrogen formation at conditions of 11.6 MPa and 3500 K. Kinetic analysis was performed with the activation energy of 113.03 kJ/mol and pre-exponential factor of 4.55 × 10(12), and it is in good agreement with previous work.

  16. Flash pyrolysis at high temperature of ligno-cellulosic biomass and its components - production of synthesis gas; Pyrolyse flash a haute temperature de la biomasse ligno-cellulosique et de ses composes - production de gaz de synthese

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couhert, C

    2007-11-15

    Pyrolysis is the first stage of any thermal treatment of biomass and governs the formation of synthesis gas for the production of electricity, hydrogen or liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to establish a link between the composition of a biomass and its pyrolysis gas. We study experimental flash pyrolysis and fix the conditions in which quantities of gas are maximal, while aiming at a regime without heat and mass transfer limitations (particles about 100 {mu}m): temperature of 950 C and residence time of about 2 s. Then we try to predict gas yields of any biomass according to its composition, applicable in this situation where thermodynamic equilibrium is not reached. We show that an additivity law does not allow correlating gas yields of a biomass with fractions of cellulose, hemi-cellulose and lignin contained in this biomass. Several explanations are suggested and examined: difference of pyrolytic behaviour of the same compound according to the biomass from which it is extracted, interactions between compounds and influence of mineral matter. With the aim of industrial application, we study pyrolysis of millimetric and centimetric size particles, and make a numerical simulation of the reactions of pyrolysis gases reforming. This simulation shows that the choice of biomass affects the quantities of synthesis gas obtained. (author)

  17. Effect of ZSM-5 Acidity on Aromatic Product Selectivity during Upgrading of Pine Pyrolysis Vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Mukarakate, Calvin; Starace, Anne K.; Magrini, Kimberly A.; Rogers, Allyson K.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2016-07-01

    The impact of catalyst acidity on the selectivity of upgraded biomass pyrolysis products was studied by passing pine pyrolysis vapors over five ZSM-5 catalysts of varying acidity at 500 degrees C. The SiO2-to-Al2O3 ratio (SAR) of the ZSM-5 zeolite was varied from 23 to 280 to control the acidity of the catalyst and the composition of upgraded products. The upgraded product stream was analyzed by GCMS. Additionally, catalysts were characterized using temperature programmed desorption, diffuse-reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, N2 physisorption, and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the biomass pyrolysis vapors were highly deoxygenated to form a slate of aromatic hydrocarbons over all of the tested ZSM-5 catalysts. As the overall acidity of the ZSM-5 increased the selectivity toward alkylated (substituted) aromatics (e.g., xylene, dimethyl-naphthalene, and methyl-anthracene) decreased while the selectivity toward unsubstituted aromatics (e.g., benzene, naphthalene, and anthracene) increased. Additionally, the selectivity toward polycyclic aromatic compounds (2-ring and 3-ring) increased as catalyst acidity increased, corresponding to a decrease in acid site spacing. The increased selectivity toward less substituted polycyclic aromatic compounds with increasing acidity is related to the relative rates of cyclization and alkylation reactions within the zeolite structure. As the acid site concentration increases and sites become closer to each other, the formation of additional cyclization products occurs at a greater rate than alkylated products. The ability to adjust product selectivity within 1-, 2-, and 3-ring aromatic families, as well as the degree of substitution, by varying ZSM-5 acidity could have significant benefits in terms creating a slate of upgraded biomass pyrolysis products to meet specific target market demands.

  18. Pyrolysis of Pine Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2005-01-01

    In this study, pinewood has been pyrolyzed using a fixed heating rate with a variable end-temperature. The pyrolysis process has been simulated using a mechanism with three parallel reactions for the formation of char, gas and tar. First order irreversible kinetics is assumed. This kind of model...

  19. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1992-11-01

    Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. There have been numerous attempts to discover general methods for the cleavage of aryl carbon-oxygen bonds. All the stoichiometric organic methods for phenol deoxygenation have limited applications and involve expensive reagents. Catalytic method, for the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of phenols involve supported transition metal oxides, such as Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-MO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2}. Typical phenol hydrodeoxygenation conditions involve hydrogen pressures in excess of 100 atm and temperatures in excess of 200{degrees}C. Under these conditions arene ring hydrogenation is generally found to compete with phenol deoxygenation; and the coproduct water is found to impair the activity of the catalysts. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. The deoxygenation of phenols by carbon monoxide mediated by Ir(triphos)OAr has provided us with a catalytic Phenol deoxygenation pathway, through the elimination of CO{sub 2} and formation of a benzyne intermediate. Although the [Pt(triphos)(O-Ph-Me)]PF{sub 6} system is not expected to be as efficient a catalyst as some of the other transition metals systems we are currently exploring, it will provide more information about the deoxygenation mechanism in these triphos complexes. This is due to the presence of the structurally sensitive {sup 3l}P--{sup 195}Pt coupling constant and comparisons to the extensively studied Pt(dppe)(O-Ph){sub 2} systems.

  20. A reactor for high-temperature pyrolysis and oxygen isotopic analysis of cellulose via induction heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael N

    2008-07-01

    A reactor for converting cellulose into carbon monoxide for subsequent oxygen isotopic analysis via continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry is described. The system employs an induction heater to produce temperatures >or=1500 degrees C within a molybdenum foil crucible positioned by boron nitride (BN) spacers within a quartz outer sleeve. For samples of a homogeneous working standard cellulose between 300 and 400 microg in size, the blank/signal ratio is <5%, and the long-term precision is 0.30 per thousand (N = 232). For samples of 30 to 100 microg in size, a gas pressure sintered silicon nitride (Si(3)N(4)) outer sleeve replaces the quartz sleeve, the BN spacers are not used, and 6.0-grade carrier He must be used to minimize the blank signal. With these modifications a blank/sample ratio of <5% and long-term precision of 0.30 per thousand (N = 144) are obtained. These results are similar to those achieved using standard high-temperature furnaces, but the reactor is simpler to pack, the system is more economical to run, and samples as small as 30 microg cellulose may be measured. For both reactors memory is significant in the subsequent sample and is believed to be due to exchange with reactor oxygen at temperatures above 1000 degrees C. Further applications might include online preparation of other materials requiring temperatures of 1500-2600 degrees C.

  1. Temperature-dependent benzoic acid elimination mechanisms in pyrolysis of (--cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Novák

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal elimination of benzoic acid from (--cocaine is shown to be temperature-dependent. In the temperature range of 200-500 °C only a trans-elimination is observed leading to methylecgonidine. Above ca. 500 °C a second mechanism, the cis-elimination, comes up yielding a novel alkaloid methylisoecgonidine which has been characterized by means of mass spectrometry. At 600 °C the cis-elimination predominates. The trans-elimination is postulated a two-step process consisting of a 1,7- and a 1,5-hydrogen shift. The chemistry of cocaine base smoking is explained using the theory of chemical activation.

  2. Synthesis of Ternary Borocarbonitrides by High Temperature Pyrolysis of Ethane 1,2-Diamineborane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Leardini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ethane 1,2-diamineborane (EDAB is an alkyl-containing amine-borane adduct with improved hydrogen desorption properties as compared to ammonia borane. In this work, it is reported the high temperature thermolytic decomposition of EDAB. Thermolysis of EDAB has been investigated by concomitant thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry experiments. EDAB shows up to four H2 desorption events below 1000 °C. Small fractions of CH4, C2H4 and CO/CO2 are also observed at moderate-high temperatures. The solid-state thermolysis product has been characterized by means of different structural and chemical methods, such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy, Elemental analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The obtained results indicate the formation of a ternary borocarbonitride compound with a poorly-crystalline graphitic-like structure. By contrast, XPS measurements show that the surface is rich in carbon and nitrogen oxides, which is quite different to the bulk of the material.

  3. Structure, provenance and residence time of terrestrial organic carbon: insights from Programmed temperature Pyrolysis-Combustion of river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Galy, V.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Roe, K. M.; Williams, E. K.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial organic carbon (OC) represents one of the largest reservoirs of C on earth and thus plays a crucial role in the global C cycle, participating to the regulation of atmospheric chemistry. While degradation of sedimentary OC (petrogenic C) is a source of CO2 for the atmosphere, burial of biospheric C (e.g. plant debris and soil OC) is a long-term sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Over short timescales, the atmospheric CO2 level is also sensitive to variations of the residence time of carbon in continental reservoirs. Fluvial transport plays a crucial role in the organic carbon cycle, constituting the connection between the different reservoirs and promoting the transfer of C from one reservoir to the other. Moreover, thanks to the integrating effect of erosion, studying river sediments allows the spatial and temporal integration of organic carbon exchanges occurring in a given basin. OC transported by rivers (riverine OC) is known to be extremely heterogeneous in nature and reactivity, however; ranging from extremely refractory petrogenic C (e.g. graphite) to soil complex OC to labile vegetation debris. Here we use a recently developed method, a programmed-temperature pyrolysis-combustion system (PTP-CS) coupled to multiisotopic analysis, to determine the reactivity, age and nature of OC in river sediments. The method takes advantage of the wide range of reactivity and radiocarbon content of different components of riverine OC. We submitted to PTP-CS a set of river sediments from 1) the Ganges-Brahmputra river system and, 2) the lower Mississippi river. Preliminary results highlight the heterogeneous nature of riverine OC. Different components of the riverine OC pool decompose at different temperature and are characterized by extremely variable isotopic compositions. The decomposition of radiocarbon dead petrogenic C at very high temperature allows estimating the respective contribution of biospheric and petrogenic C. Moreover, biospheric OC appears to

  4. Characterization of the pyrolysis oil produced in the slow pyrolysis of sunflower-extracted bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorgun, S.; Sensoz, S. [Osmangazi Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-extracted bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of heating rate, final pyrolysis temperature, particle size and pyrolysis atmosphere on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum oil yield of 23% was obtained in N{sub 2} atmosphere at a pyrolysis temperature of 550 {sup o}C and a heating rate of 7 {sup o}C min {sup -1}. The chemical characterisation has shown that the oil obtained from sunflower-extracted bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (Author)

  5. Coal flash pyrolysis. 5. Pyrolysis in an atmosphere of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calkins, W.H.; Bonifaz, C.

    1984-12-01

    Flash pyrolysis of coal at temperatures above 700/sup 0/C and in the presence of methane produces substantially more ethylene and other low molecular weight hydrocarbons than are produced by pyrolysis of coal in the presence of nitrogen alone. Evidence is presented to show that the increase is due to pyrolysis of the methane quite independently of the coal, except with the possible catalysis by the coal, coke or mineral matter in the coal ash. This is contrary to recent reports in the literature.

  6. Biochar carbon stability in a clayey soil as a function of feedstock and pyrolysis temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupinder Pal; Cowie, Annette L; Smernik, Ronald J

    2012-11-06

    The stability of biochar carbon (C) is the major determinant of its value for long-term C sequestration in soil. A long-term (5 year) laboratory experiment was conducted under controlled conditions using 11 biochars made from five C3 biomass feedstocks (Eucalyptus saligna wood and leaves, papermill sludge, poultry litter, cow manure) at 400 and/or 550 °C. The biochars were incubated in a vertisol containing organic C from a predominantly C4-vegetation source, and total CO(2)-C and associated δ(13)C were periodically measured. Between 0.5% and 8.9% of the biochar C was mineralized over 5 years. The C in manure-based biochars mineralized faster than that in plant-based biochars, and C in 400 °C biochars mineralized faster than that in corresponding 550 °C biochars. The estimated mean residence time (MRT) of C in biochars varied between 90 and 1600 years. These are conservative estimates because they represent MRT of relatively labile and intermediate-stability biochar C components. Furthermore, biochar C MRT is likely to be higher under field conditions of lower moisture, lower temperatures or nutrient availability constraints. Strong relationships of biochar C stability with the initial proportion of nonaromatic C and degree of aromatic C condensation in biochar support the use of these properties to predict biochar C stability in soil.

  7. Influence of pyrolysis temperature and hardwood species on resulting biochar properties and their effect on azimsulfuron sorption as compared to other sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, Carmen, E-mail: carmentrigo1@gmail.com [Department of Soil, Water & Climate, University of Minnesota, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Cox, Lucia, E-mail: lcox@irnase.csic.es [Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla (IRNASE-CSIC), P.O. Box 1052, 41080 Seville (Spain); Spokas, Kurt, E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, Rm. 439, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Azimsulfuron is an acidic herbicide with a high water solubility which makes risk of groundwater contamination a concern. Various wood based biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures were characterized along with their sorption capacity for the herbicide azimsulfuron. In addition, we compared sorption on biochars with sorption on mineral sorbents such as clay minerals and iron oxides. In biochar formed at high temperatures (500 °C and 700 °C), FT-IR studies confirmed the increase in aromaticity. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the biochars showed differences in the macroporous structure and lower size pores at higher temperatures. SSA (Specific Surface Area) of the biochars increased with pyrolysis temperature and, for all different biochars, this resulted in higher sorption of azimsulfuron. In the case of mineral sorbents, sorption is not related to SSA. Higher sorption is observed in a montmorillonite, of lower SSA, than in mixture of clay minerals with 30% smectite (w/w). On the contrary as with the clays, sorption on the two iron oxyhydroxides increased with SSA. Desorption studies showed hysteresis. Leaching studies showed no effect on azimsulfuron retention on soil column amended with apple wood biochar, while a reduction of azimsulfuron in leachates in soil columns amended with the modified montmorillonite and alder wood biochar (500 °C). Total retention was shown for alder wood biochar. - Highlights: • Use of biochars and mineral sorbents to mitigate azimsulfuron water contamination • Sorption relates with SSA for biochar and iron oxyhydroxide but not for clays. • Higher sorption values for biochar pyrolysis at 700 °C than mineral sorbents • Different effects on leaching for apple wood biochar, SW-Fe and alder wood biochar.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  9. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-44 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-04-29

    A new family of aluminosilicate zeolites designated UZM-44 has been synthesized. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.k+T.sub.tAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.sub.z where "n" is the mole ratio of Na to (Al+E), M represents a metal or metals from zinc, Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 and or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, "m" is the mole ratio of M to (Al+E), "k" is the average charge of the metal or metals M, T is the organic structure directing agent or agents, and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-44 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  10. Pyrolysis Model of Single Biomass Pellet in Downdraft Gasifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛爱军; 潘继红; 田茂诚; 伊晓璐

    2016-01-01

    By coupling the heat transfer equation with semi-global chemical reaction kinetic equations, a one-dimensional, unsteady mathematical model is developed to describe the pyrolysis of single biomass pellet in the pyrolysis zone of downdraft gasifier. The simulation results in inert atmosphere and pyrolysis zone agree well with the published experimental results. The pyrolysis of biomass pellets in pyrolysis zone is investigated, and the results show that the estimated convective heat transfer coefficient and emissivity coefficient are suitable. The mean pyro-lysis time is 15.22%, shorter than that in inert atmosphere, and the pellet pyrolysis process in pyrolysis zone belongs to fast pyrolysis. Among the pyrolysis products, tar yield is the most, gas the second, and char the least. During pyrolysis, the temperature change near the center is contrary to that near the surface. Pyrolysis gradually moves inwards layer by layer. With the increase of pyrolysis temperature and pellet diameter, the total pyrolysis time, tar yield, char yield and gas yield change in different ways. The height of pyrolysis zone is calculated to be 1.51—3.51 times of the characteristic pellet diameter.

  11. Pyrolysis of rapeseed cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Culcuoglu, E.

    2001-05-15

    In this study, biomass in the form of rapeseed cake was pyrolyzed in a fixed bed stainless steel reactor under static atmosphere at varying temperatures of 450, 550, 650, 750, and 850{sup o}C and at heating rates of either 15{sup o}C min{sup -1} or 25{sup o}C min{sup -1}. The studies reported here were aimed towards understanding the influence of heating rate and pyrolysis temperature on product yield. The maximum oil yield was observed to be evolving at 650{sup o}C pyrolysis temperature and at a heating rate of 15{sup o}C min{sup -1}. The results showed the potential of rapeseed cake as an important source of alternative liquid fuel. (author)

  12. Semi-Batch Deoxygenation of Canola- and Lard-Derived Fatty Acids to Diesel-Range Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, JP; Thapaliya, N; Kelly, MJ; Roberts, WL; Lamb, HH

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) derived via thermal hydrolysis of food-grade lard and canola oil were deoxygenated in the liquid phase using a commercially available 5 wt % Pd/C catalyst. Online quadrupole mass spectrometry and gas chromatography were used to monitor the effluent gases from the semi-batch stirred autoclave reactors. Stearic, oleic, and palmitic acids were employed as model compounds. A catalyst lifetime exceeding 2200 turnovers for oleic acid deoxygenation was demonstrated at 300 degrees C and 15 atm under 10% H-2. The initial decarboxylation rate of palmitic acid under 5% H-2 decreases sharply with increasing initial concentration; in contrast, the initial decarbonylation rate increases linearly, indicative of first-order kinetics. Scale-up of diesel-range hydrocarbon production was investigated by increasing the reactor vessel size, initial FA concentration, and FA/catalyst mass ratio. Lower CO2 selectivity and batch productivity were observed at the larger scales (600 and 5000 mL), primarily because of the higher initial FA concentration (67 wt %) employed. Because unsaturated FAs must be hydrogenated before deoxygenation can proceed at an appreciable rate, the additional batch time required for FA hydrogenation reduces the batch productivity for unsaturated feedstocks. Low-temperature hydrogenation of unsaturated feedstocks (using Pd/C or another less-expensive catalyst) prior to deoxygenation is recommended.

  13. Effects of several types of biomass fuels on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot from fast pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of biomass origin on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Soot was produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates and at temperatures of 1250 and 1400 °C in a drop tube furnace. The structure of solid residues was characterized...... demonstrated differences in alkali content, particle size and nanostructure. Potassium was incorporated in the soot matrix and significantly influenced soot reactivity. Pinewood soot particles produced at 1250 °C had a broader particle size range (27.2–263 nm) compared to beechwood soot (33.2–102 nm) and wheat...

  14. Pyrolysis Strategies for Effective Utilization of Lignocellulosic and Algal Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Balakrishna

    protein degradation). Algal bio-char also had a significantly higher N-content. Overall, our results suggest that it is feasible to convert algal cultures deficient in lipids, such as nuisance algae obtained from natural blooms, into liquid fuels by thermochemical methods. Next, pyrolysis characteristics of each of the major components present in lignocellulosic as well as algal biomass were studied independently in a thermo-gravimetric analyzer, using model compounds. From those studies, we have established that, with algae and oil seed feed stocks, triglycerides degrade at distinctly higher temperatures (T>350 C) compared to both protein and carbohydrate fractions (T ~ 250-350 C). Similar trend was not seen for lignocellulosic biomass, where degradation temperature interval of lignin overlapped with that of carbohydrates. This unique trend observed for algal biomass (and oil seeds) can be exploited in multiple ways. First, it permits to separately collect high value triglyceride degradation products not contaminated with N-compounds from protein and oxygenates from carbohydrates; this observation formed the basis of a novel "pyrolytic fractionation technique" developed in this thesis. Second, it led to the development of a new and simple analytical method for rapid estimation of the triglyceride content of oleaginous feed stocks. Pyrolytic fractionation is a two-step pyrolysis approach that can be implemented for oleaginous feed stocks (algae and oil-seeds) to separately recover triglyceride degradation products as a "high-quality" bio-oil fraction. The first step is a low-temperature pyrolysis (T ~ 300-320 C) to produce bio-oils from degradation of protein and carbohydrate fractions. Solid residues left behind can subsequently be subjected to a second higher temperature pyrolysis (T ~ 420-430 C) to volatilize and/or degrade triglycerides to produce fatty acids and their derivatives (such as mono-, di- and tri-glycerides) and long chain hydrocarbons. Proof

  15. Substrate Temperature Effect on Charge Transport Performance of ZnO Electron Transport Layer Prepared by a Facile Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis in Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for high-quality ZnO films based on zinc-ammonia solution was achieved in air. To investigate the structural and optical properties as well as the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs, ZnO films at different substrate temperatures and thicknesses were prepared. The performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene:[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM based PSC was found to be improved due to the ZnO films. The crystal structure and roughness of the ZnO films fabricated at different temperatures were found to affect the performance of PSCs. The optimized power conversion efficiency was found to be maximum for PSCs with ZnO films prepared at 200°C. The growth process of these ZnO films is very simple, cost-effective, and compatible for larger-scale PSC preparation. The precursor used for spray pyrolysis is environmentally friendly and helps to achieve ZnO film preparation at a relative low temperature.

  16. Direct Synthesis of Fe3C-Functionalized Graphene by High Temperature Autoclave Pyrolysis for Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to direct fabrication of few-layer graphene sheets with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles from pyrolysis of volatile non-graphitic precursors without any substrate. This one-step autoclave approach is facile and potentially scalable for production. Tested as an electroca......We present a novel approach to direct fabrication of few-layer graphene sheets with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles from pyrolysis of volatile non-graphitic precursors without any substrate. This one-step autoclave approach is facile and potentially scalable for production. Tested...... as an electrocatalyst, the graphene-based composite exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution with an onset potential of ca. 1.05 V (vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode) and a half-wave potential of 0.83 V, which is comparable to the commercial Pt/C catalyst....

  17. Modeling pyrolysis of charring material in fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A modified model of pyrolysis for charring materials in fire has been proposed in this note. In this model some special factors which show the effect on pyrolysis are considered, i.e. heat loss by convection and radiation caused by surface temperature rise and shrinkage of char surface are considered. Experimental device is designed specially for validating the reliability of the model. Effects of density of materials and heat radiation on pyrolysis of materials have also been investigated.

  18. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Usman Hanif

    Full Text Available The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata] through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%, 600°C for syngas (22 wt%, and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%. Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products.

  19. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad Usman; Capareda, Sergio C; Iqbal, Hamid; Arazo, Renato Ortiz; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2016-01-01

    The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata]) through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%), 600°C for syngas (22 wt%), and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%). Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products.

  20. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Characteristics of Biomass Char%热解温度对生物质半焦特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁许鳌; 冉旭; 郑小龙; 阎维平

    2012-01-01

    Mechanism-based pyrolysis experiments were carried out on rice husk and straw, during which physicochemical properties of the char were studied using TG, SEM, EDX and XDR, such as the pore structure, slagging characteristics, migration of chlorine and sulfur, and crystalline phase of the inorganic compound, etc. Results show that the pore structure of biomass char changes a lot at 500-800 ℃. When the pyrolysis temperature gets up to 1 000 ℃, the convex side of rice husk char will appear in melting state, while the straw char in melting and bounding condition. Most remaining of chlorine and sulfur will precipitate from the char at 800-1 000 ℃. The phase changes greatly and amorphous inorganic compound appears at a final pyrolysis temperature of 1 000 ℃ in the process of rice husk and straw pyrolysis.%对稻壳和稻秸进行了机理性热解试验,并采用TG、SEM、EDS和XDR方法研究和分析了半焦的孔隙结构、结渣特性、氯和硫元素迁移和无机化合物晶相等物化特性的变化规律.结果表明:在500~800℃,生物质热解半焦孔隙结构的变化较大.当热解温度为1000℃时,稻壳半焦的凸面呈现熔融现象,稻秸半焦呈现熔融黏结现象.在800~1000℃,半焦中剩余的氯和硫大部分会析出;在稻壳和稻秸热解过程中,当终温为1000℃时,物相发生较大变化并且出现非晶态的无机化合物.

  1. Suspension Combustion of Wood: Influence of Pyrolysis Conditions on Char Yield, Morphology, and Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall'Ora, Michelangelo; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Chars from pine and beech wood were produced by fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor and by slow pyrolysis in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The influence of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and particle size on char yield and morphology was investigated. The applied pyrolysis temperatur...

  2. Co-Pyrolysis Behaviors of the Cotton Straw/PP Mixtures and Catalysis Hydrodeoxygenation of Co-Pyrolysis Products over Ni-Mo/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derun Hua

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The doping of PP (polypropylene with cotton straw improved the bio-oil yield, which showed there was a synergy in the co-pyrolysis of the cotton straw and PP at the range of 380–480 °C. In a fixed-bed reactor, model compounds and co-pyrolysis products were used for reactants of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO over Ni-Mo/Al2O3. The deoxygenation rate of model compounds decreased over Ni-Mo/Al2O3 in the following order: alcohol > aldehyde > acetic acid > ethyl acetate. The upgraded oil mainly consisted of C11 alkane.

  3. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  4. Catalytic Oxidation and Deoxygenation of Renewables with Rhenium Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, T.J.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Transformation of renewables has received major research interest in recent years, opening up completely new research areas, in particular in the field of oxidation and deoxygenation. For the oxidation reaction, rhenium complexes, in particular methyltrioxorhenium, are well known for their potential

  5. Cephalopod Susceptibility to Asphyxiation via Ocean Incalescence, Deoxygenation, and Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A

    2016-11-01

    Squids are powerful swimmers with high metabolic rates despite constrained oxygen uptake and transport. They have evolved novel physiological strategies for survival in extreme environments that provide insight into their susceptibility to asphyxiation under anthropogenic ocean incalescence (warming), deoxygenation, and acidification. Plasticity of ecological and physiological traits, in conjunction with vertical and latitudinal mobility, may explain their evolutionary persistence and ensure their future survival.

  6. Kinetic investigation of wood pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurner, F.; Mann, U.; Beck, S. R.

    1980-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the kinetics of the primary reactions of wood pyrolysis. A new experimental method was developed which enabled us to measure the rate of gas, tar, and char production while taking into account the temperature variations during the wood heating up. The experimental method developed did not require any sophisticated instruments. It facilitated the collection of gas, tar and residue (unreacted wood and char) as well as accurate measurement of the temperature inside the wood sample. Expressions relating the kinetic parameters to the measured variables were derived. The pyrolysis kinetics was investigated in the range of 300 to 400/sup 0/C at atmospheric pressure and under nitrogen atmosphere. Reaction temperature and mass fractions of gas, tar, and residue were measured as a function of time. Assuming first-order reactions, the kinetic parameters were determined using differential method. The measured activation energies of wood pyrolysis to gas, tar, and char were 88.6, 112.7, and 106.5 kJ/mole, respectively. These kinetic data were then used to predict the yield of the various pyrolysis products. It was found that the best prediction was obtained when an integral-mean temperature obtained from the temperature-time curve was used as reaction temperature. The pyrolysis products were analyzed to investigate the influence of the pyrolysis conditions on the composition. The gas consisted mainly of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and C/sub 3//sup +/-compounds. The gas composition depended on reaction time as well as reactor temperature. The tar analysis indicated that the tar consisted of about seven compounds. Its major compound was believed to be levoglucosan. Elemental analysis for the char showed that the carbon content increased with increasing temperature.

  7. Comparison of activation media and pyrolysis temperature for activated carbons development by pyrolysis of potato peels for effective adsorption of endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzidou, Anastasia C; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2016-03-15

    Activated carbon prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product has been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor, Bisphenol-A, from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with H3PO4, KOH and ZnCl2 in order the effect of the activation agent to be evaluated. The activated biomass was carbonized at 400, 600 and/or 800 °C in order the effect of carbonization temperature on the texture, surface chemistry and adsorption properties to be found. The activated carbons prepared were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscope, thermal analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Equilibrium adsorption data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption followed second order rate kinetics. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found 454.62 mg g(-1) at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon carbonized at 400 °C that proved to be the best adsorbent.

  8. Pyrolysis processing for solid waste resource recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  9. Pyrolysis process for producing fuel gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Michael A. (Inventor); Kroo, Erik (Inventor); Wojtowicz, Marek A. (Inventor); Suuberg, Eric M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Solid waste resource recovery in space is effected by pyrolysis processing, to produce light gases as the main products (CH.sub.4, H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, H.sub.2O, NH.sub.3) and a reactive carbon-rich char as the main byproduct. Significant amounts of liquid products are formed under less severe pyrolysis conditions, and are cracked almost completely to gases as the temperature is raised. A primary pyrolysis model for the composite mixture is based on an existing model for whole biomass materials, and an artificial neural network models the changes in gas composition with the severity of pyrolysis conditions.

  10. Direct synthesis of Fe3 C-functionalized graphene by high temperature autoclave pyrolysis for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yunjie; Cleemann, Lars N; Xing, Wei; Bjerrum, Niels J; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel approach to direct fabrication of few-layer graphene sheets with encapsulated Fe3 C nanoparticles from pyrolysis of volatile non-graphitic precursors without any substrate. This one-step autoclave approach is facile and potentially scalable for production. Tested as an electrocatalyst, the graphene-based composite exhibited excellent catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution with an onset potential of ca. 1.05 V (vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode) and a half-wave potential of 0.83 V, which is comparable to the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  11. Wood Pyrolysis Using Aspen Plus Simulation and Industrially Applicable Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestinsky Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, a great deal of experimental work has been carried out on the development of pyrolysis processes for wood and waste materials. Pyrolysis is an important phenomenon in thermal treatment of wood, therefore, the successful modelling of pyrolysis to predict the rate of volatile evolution is also of great importance. Pyrolysis experiments of waste spruce sawdust were carried out. During the experiment, gaseous products were analysed to determine a change in the gas composition with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the model of pyrolysis was created using Aspen Plus software. Aspects of pyrolysis are discussed with a description of how various temperatures affect the overall reaction rate and the yield of volatile components. The pyrolysis Aspen plus model was compared with the experimental data. It was discovered that the Aspen Plus model, being used by several authors, is not good enough for pyrolysis process description, but it can be used for gasification modelling.

  12. An Earth-system perspective on ocean deoxygenation during the end-Permian mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Global ocean anoxia has been proposed to be the cause of the end-Permian (252 Ma) marine extinction event. Evidence for global-scale anoxia mainly comes from the study of organic geochemistry, framboidal pyrite, and redox-sensitive elements, although disagreement exists with respect to the interpretation of the observed patterns. Climate models with biogeochemical components often fail to generate global-scale anoxia induced by warming alone, unless increased phosphate level is invoked. Here, I use the carbon isotope inversion approach in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (GENIE) with modern phosphate levels to investigate ocean deoxygenation due to global warming through continuous CO­2 emission. I evaluate the temporal and spatial extent of ocean deoxygenation for a best-fit scenario that represents contact metamorphism of organic-rich sediments (δ13C = -25‰) during Siberian Traps volcanism eruption. This scenario is characterized by total peak amount of ~30,000 Gt of carbon and global sea surface temperature increase of 5 oC (Cui et al., 2014). The global surface ocean oxygen concentration shows only a modest decrease (from 230 to 215 µmol kg-1) during peak C emission, whereas the global deep ocean oxygen concentration shows a 70% decrease (from 160 to 50 µmol kg-1). During peak C emission, the oxygen minimum zone (~800 m depth) expands vertically and horizontally, and vast regions in the deep northern Panthalassa becomes hypoxic (extinction and minimum surface saturation state, suggesting ocean deoxygenation and ocean acidification might go hand in hand causing the largest extinction of all time. Reference Cui, Y., L. Kump, et al. (2014 in press). Spatial and temporal patterns of ocean acidification during the end-Permian mass extinction - An Earth system model evaluation. Volcanism and Global Environmental Change. L. T. elkins-Tanton, Fristad, K. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

  13. Pyrolysis kinetics and residue characteristics of petrochemical industrial sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, H L; Lo, J C; Tsai, J H; Chang, G M

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the pyrolysis characteristics of sludge from wastewater treatment plants in the petrochemical industry and focused on the pyrolysis kinetics, elemental composition of residue, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of exhaust gas. As pyrolysis temperature increased to 773 K, the increasing rate of crude oil production tended to a stable condition. The result indicated that the optimal temperature of crude oil and water mixed production was 773 K. When pyrolysis temperature increased from 673 to 973 K, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen concentrations of residue decreased and the sulfur concentration of residue increased. The concentrations of benzene, toluene,ethylbenzene, and styrene increased by the increasing pyrolysis temperature. We found that the reaction order of sludge pyrolysis was 2.5 and the activation energy of the reaction was 11.06 kJ/mol. We believe that our pyrolysis system is transitional between devolatilization and combustion.

  14. An optically accessible pyrolysis microreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, J. H.; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); David, D. E. [Integrated Instrument Development Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Daily, J. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We report an optically accessible pyrolysis micro-reactor suitable for in situ laser spectroscopic measurements. A radiative heating design allows for completely unobstructed views of the micro-reactor along two axes. The maximum temperature demonstrated here is only 1300 K (as opposed to 1700 K for the usual SiC micro-reactor) because of the melting point of fused silica, but alternative transparent materials will allow for higher temperatures. Laser induced fluorescence measurements on nitric oxide are presented as a proof of principle for spectroscopic characterization of pyrolysis conditions.

  15. Effects of pyrolysis temperature on carbon retention and stability of biochar%热解温度对生物质炭碳保留量及稳定性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞跃; 汪建飞; 谢越; 李贺; 李孝良; 李粉茹

    2015-01-01

    以核桃壳为生物质炭生产原料,研究热解温度(200~700℃)对生物质炭产率、元素组成、表面官能团分布及其稳定性的影响,以期探明生物质炭基本性质随热解温度变化的规律,为全面了解生物质炭固碳减排效果提供理论参考。结果表明,生物质炭的C含量随温度升高而增加,H和O元素含量却随温度升高而降低。此外,生物质炭的H/C和O/C随着温度增加而减少。生物质炭的产率及碳保留量随着温度的升高而降低。红外光谱分析结果表明,经过热解核桃壳原材料分子中所含的-C-O和O-CH3基团消失,随着热解温度升高,生物质炭中的烷烃基团-CH逐渐减少,芳香化程度逐渐升高。500℃制备生物质炭的K2Cr2O7和KMnO4氧化碳损失量均最低,分别为10.4%和1.66%。相关分析表明,生物质炭的产率、碳保留量及稳定性与热解温度之间均具有显著相关关系。%Turning biomass wastes into biochar under the conditions of low temperature and limited oxygen has recently proven to be a promising approach for long-term carbon sequestration. However, the ultimate carbon sequestration efficiency of biochar depends not only on the feedstock type and production condition, but also on the environmental conditions of soil. In order to reveal the effects of pyrolysis temperature which is main parameter of biochar production condition on carbon retention and biochar stability, and provide more information for further improvement of carbon sequestration potential by turning biomass into biochar, the characteristics of biochar derived from walnut shell under lab condition were analyzed. During a typical slow pyrolysis process, the biochar was heated at a speed of approximately 20℃/minin a Muffle Furnace under limited oxygen and held at 200-700℃ for 2 h; then, biochar yield, elemental composition, functional groups distribution using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR

  16. Method and apparatus for producing pyrolysis oil having improved stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Lance A.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Muller, Stefan

    2016-12-27

    Methods and apparatus to improve hot gas filtration to reduce the liquid fuel loss caused by prolonged residence time at high temperatures are described. The improvement can be obtained by reducing the residence time at elevated temperature by reducing the temperature of the pyrolysis vapor, by reducing the volume of the pyrolysis vapor at the elevated temperature, by increasing the volumetric flow rate at constant volume of the pyrolysis vapor, or by doing a combination of these.

  17. 低温热解法修复前后土壤汞形态研究%Study on the Mercury Forms in Soils Before and After the Remediation by Using Low Temperature Pyrolysis Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖莉

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the changes of the mercury forms before and after the remediation of mercury -contaminated soils by using low temperature pyrolysis method .Before the pyrolysis ,the organic-bound and residual are the major forms in the soil .After the pyrolysis ,the residue is the major form of the rest mercury in the soil .%对采取低温热解法进行汞重污染土壤修复前后土壤的汞的形态进行了探索,结果表明:热解前土壤汞形态以难氧化有机结合态和残渣态为主;热解后,土壤中残留的汞中大部分都为残渣态。

  18. Effect of temperature and AAEM species on fast pyrolysis of biomass tar%热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质快速热解焦油的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯冬冬; 赵义军; 唐文博; 张宇; 钱娟; 孙绍增

    2016-01-01

    生物质热解受热解温度、热解速率和碱金属及碱土金属(AAEM)元素影响显著。利用热裂解气相色谱质谱联用法(Py-GC/MS)针对热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质快速热解焦油的影响展开深入研究,通过样品热解前后的失重情况分析了热解温度及AAEM元素对生物质(稻壳和木屑、酸洗稻壳和酸洗木屑)热解特性的影响规律,利用气相色谱质谱仪(GC/MS)对热解焦油组分及含量进行了在线半定量分析,并对热解焦油组分分子量分布情况展开了讨论。结果表明生物质Py-GC/MS快速热解实验,酸洗脱除AAEM元素致使热解失重率减小。500~900℃范围内随温度的升高,大分子焦油成分逐渐减少,逐渐转化为轻质组分。AAEM 元素限制了焦油前体的聚合,进一步抑制了含氧杂环类碳环(糠醛等)的生成。稻壳的热解焦油的相对分子质量主要分布在110~129。木屑快速热解焦油产率明显高于稻壳,且热解焦油中分子量分布广泛,含有更多较大分子量(150~209)的化合物成分。%Pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, alkali metal and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species have significant effects on biomass pyrolysis. In this paper, by using the pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), the effect of temperature and AAEM species on fast pyrolysis of the biomass tar was investigated. The influence of pyrolysis temperature and AAEM species on the pyrolysis characteristics of biomass (rice husk and sawdust, H-form rice husk and H-form sawdust) was analyzed by means of mass loss of samples. The online semi quantitative analysis of pyrolysis tar was carried out by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The distribution of molecular weight of pyrolysis tar was discussed. The results showed that during fast pyrolysis of biomass, the removal of AAEM species reduced the mass loss rate. With increasing pyrolysis temperature in

  19. Potential method for gas production: high temperature co-pyrolysis of lignite and sewage sludge with vacuum reactor and long contact time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Weijiang

    2015-03-01

    Lignite and sewage sludge were co-pyrolyzed in a vacuum reactor with high temperature (900°C) and long contact time (more than 2h). Beneficial synergetic effect on gas yield was clearly observed. Gas yield of blend fuel was evidently higher than that of both parent fuels. The gas volume yield, gas lower heating value (LHV), fixed carbon conversion and H2/CO ratio were 1.42 Nm(3)/kg(blend fuel), 10.57 MJ/Nm(3), 96.64% and 0.88% respectively, which indicated this new method a feasible one for gas production. It was possible that sewage sludge acted as gasification agents (CO2 and H2O) and catalyst (alkali and alkaline earth metals) provider during co-pyrolysis, promoting CO2-char and H2O-char gasification which, as a result, invited the improvement of gas volume yield, gas lower heating value and fixed carbon conversion.

  20. PYROLYSIS OF TOBACCO RESIDUE: PART 1. THERMAL

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The pyrolysis of two types of tobacco residue was carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures between 300 and 600 °C and a residence time of 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product distributions was investigated and the composition of the bio-oils identified. The variation in product distribution depended on both the temperature and the type of tobacco residues. The maximum liquid yields were obtained at 400°C for one sample and at 500°C for the ot...

  1. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Y. Raskar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The de-oxygenation of CO2 was explored by using hydrogen, methane, carbon etc., over alumina supported catalysts. The alumina-supported ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, molybdenum, vanadium and magnesium catalysts were first reduced in hydrogen atmosphere and then used for the de-oxygenation of CO2. Furthermore, experimental variables for the de-oxygenation of CO2 were temperature (range 50 to 650 oC, H2/CO2 mole ratios (1.0 to 5, and catalyst loading (0.5 to 10 wt %. During the de-oxygenation of CO2 with H2 or CH4 or carbon, conversion of CO2, selectivity to CO and CH4 were estimated. Moreover, 25.4 % conversion of CO2 by hydrogen was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 650 oC with 33.8 % selectivity to CH4. However, 8.1 to 13.9 % conversion of CO2 was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 550 oC in the presence of both H2 and CH4. Moreover, 42.8 to 79.4 % CH4 was converted with 9 to 23.1 % selectivity to CO. It was observed that the de-oxygenation of CO2 by hydrogen, carbon and methane produced carbon, CO and CH4. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th February 2012; Revised: 23rd April 2012; Accepted: 24th April 2012[How to Cite: R. Y. Raskar, K. B. Kale, A. G. Gaikwad. (2011. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 59-69.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69 ] | View in 

  2. Low-temperature co-pyrolysis of a low-rank coal and biomass to prepare smokeless fuel briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blesa, M.J.; Miranda, J.L.; Moliner, R.; Izquierdo, M.T. [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, P.O. Box 589, 50080 Zaragoza (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2003-12-01

    Smokeless fuel briquettes have been prepared with low-rank coal and biomass. These raw materials have been mixed in different ratios and have been pyrolysed at 600C with the aim to reduce both the volatile matter and the sulphur content, and to increase the high calorific value (HCV). The co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass has shown a synergetic effect. The biomass favours the release of hydrogen sulphide during the thermal treatment. This fact can be explained in terms of the hydrogen-donor character of the biomass. Moreover, the optimisation of the amount of binder and the influence of different types of biomass in the blend have been studied with respect to the mechanical properties of the briquettes (impact resistance, compression strength and abrasion). Briquettes prepared with sawdust (S) present better mechanical properties than those with olive stones (O) because of its fibrous texture.

  3. Decrease of bulk pinning strength in deoxygenated YBCO single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, A.J.; Bekeris, V. [Buenos Aires Univ. (Argentina). Lab. de Bajas Temperaturas

    2000-07-01

    We measured the first and third harmonics of the complex AC susceptibility in YBCO single crystals with different oxygen contents (6.5 {<=} x {<=} 7). The amplitude of the AC field was varied in presence of an external dc field both applied parallel to the c-axis of the crystals. We give evidence that deoxygenation leads to a reduction of the bulk pinning strength and consequently to a stronger contribution of geometrical barriers. These results support the recently reported investigations showing that deoxygenation makes the YBCO crystals more anisotropic reducing the effective bulk pinning for quasi two-dimensional vortices. We also show measurements for the same crystals with the AC field applied perpendicular to the c-axis. (orig.)

  4. 大颗粒生物质高温热解模型的建立及数值模拟%CONSTRUCTION OF LARGE BIOMASS HIGH TEMPERATURE PYROLYSIS MODEL AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐国利; 董芃; 张玉; 谈和平

    2011-01-01

    Through analysing the physico-chemical characteristics and pyrolysis mechanism of biomass deeply, bio-mass pyrolysis model under high temperature was built. Coupling the heat transfer equation with the chemical kinetics equations and solving them numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta and TDMA method, and the computation results were compared with experimental date. The simulation results shown that temperature rate of increase is high at the radial position close to face compared to that at the centre of the particle; As the particle radius increases , the time of completion of pyrolysis increases; Macromolecular tar begin to fast pyrolysis when ambient temperature reach 1273K, and as the temperature is higher, the tar pyrolysis rate is faster, when temperature come to 1673 K, the macromolecular tar is almost cracked completely.%通过对生物质理化特性和热解机理的深入分析,建立了高温条件下生物质热解模型.耦合生物质热解化学反应动力学方程和传热方程,用四阶龙格库塔法和三角追赶法求解,并将计算结果与文献中的实验数据进行对比.模拟结果表明:在径向位置颗粒中心温度的增加速率比表面的增加速率高;随着颗粒粒径的增加,生物质热解完成所需的时间加长;大分子焦油在1273K以上才开始快速裂解,温度越高裂解速率越快,当温度达到1673K时,大分子焦油几乎裂解完全.

  5. Platelet inhibition by nitrite is dependent on erythrocytes and deoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirada Srihirun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. METHODOLOGY/FINDING: Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger, suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. CONCLUSION: Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia.

  6. Molecular products from the pyrolysis and oxidative pyrolysis of tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibet, Joshua K; Khachatryan, Lavrent; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-05-01

    The thermal degradation of tyrosine at a residence time of 0.2s was conducted in a tubular flow reactor in flowing N2 and 4% O2 in N2 for a total pyrolysis time of 3min. The fractional pyrolysis technique, in which the same sample was heated continuously at each pyrolysis temperature, was applied. Thermal decomposition of tyrosine between 350 and 550°C yielded predominantly phenolic compounds (phenol, p-cresol, and p-tyramine), while decomposition between 550 and 800°C yielded hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, and ethyl benzene as the major reaction products. For the first time, the identification of p-tyramine, a precursor for the on of formation of p-tyramine and its degradation to phenol and p-cresol, and toxicological discussion of some of the harmful reaction products is also presented.

  7. Pyrolysis of fast-growing aquatic biomass -Lemna minor (duckweed): Characterization of pyrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim; Fidalgo, Beatriz; Gujar, Amit C; T-Raissi, Ali

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this work was to conduct the experimental study of pyrolysis of fast-growing aquatic biomass -Lemna minor (commonly known as duckweed) with the emphasis on the characterization of main products of pyrolysis. The yields of pyrolysis gas, pyrolytic oil (bio-oil) and char were determined as a function of pyrolysis temperature and the sweep gas (Ar) flow rate. Thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses of duckweed samples in inert (helium gas) and oxidative (air) atmosphere revealed differences in the TG/DTG patterns obtained for duckweed and typical plant biomass. The bio-oil samples produced by duckweed pyrolysis at different reaction conditions were analyzed using GC-MS technique. It was found that pyrolysis temperature had minor effect on the bio-oil product slate, but exerted major influence on the relative quantities of the individual pyrolysis products obtained. While, the residence time of the pyrolysis vapors had negligible effect on the yield and composition of the duckweed pyrolysis products.

  8. Influence of substrate temperature on physical properties of (111 oriented CdIn2S4 thin films by nebulized spray pyrolysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Raj Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the substrate temperature influenced change in the structural, optical, morphological, and electrical conductivity properties of CdIn2S4 thin films deposited on amorphous glass substrates by nebulized spray pyrolysis (NSP technique. X-ray diffraction pattern revealed that the as-deposited CdIn2S4 thin films had a cubic structure with a preferred orientation along (111 plane. The reduced strain by increasing the substrate temperature from 200 to 350 °C increased the average crystalline size from 17 to 33 nm while the formation of secondary phases such as CdIn2O4 and In2O3 reduced it to 21 nm after the substrate temperature at 450 °C. The energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX studies confirmed the presence of Cd, In, and S. The absorption coefficient, direct band gap energy, Urbach energy, skin depth, and extinction coefficient of CdIn2S4 films were analyzed by optical absorption spectra. The better conductivity and mobility noticed at Ts = 350 °C are explained by carrier concentration and crystalline size. Better optical and electrical conductivity behavior of CdIn2S4 thin film sample suggests for effective PEC solar cell fabrication.

  9. PYROLYSIS OF TOBACCO RESIDUE: PART 1. THERMAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet K. Akalin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The pyrolysis of two types of tobacco residue was carried out at different pyrolysis temperatures between 300 and 600 °C and a residence time of 1 h in a nitrogen atmosphere. The effect of pyrolysis temperature on the product distributions was investigated and the composition of the bio-oils identified. The variation in product distribution depended on both the temperature and the type of tobacco residues. The maximum liquid yields were obtained at 400°C for one sample and at 500°C for the other. The compositions of bio-oils from the pyrolysis of the two samples were found to be very similar. N-containing compounds were found to be the major compounds identified in ether extracts for both samples.

  10. Oxygen isotope analysis of carbonates in the calcite-dolomite-magnesite solid-solution by high-temperature pyrolysis: initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Stephen F; Spero, Howard J; Winter, David A; Sloane, Hilary J; Croudace, Ian W

    2008-06-01

    Accurate and efficient measurement of the oxygen isotope composition of carbonates (delta(C) (18)O) based on the mass spectrometric analysis of CO(2) produced by reacting carbonate samples with H(3)PO(4) is compromised by: (1) uncertainties associated with fractionation factors (alpha(CO)(2)C) used to correct measured oxygen isotope values of CO(2)(delta(CO(2)(18)O) to delta(C) (18)O; and (2) the slow reaction rates of many carbonates of geological and environmental interest with H(3)PO(4). In contrast, determination of delta(C) (18)O from analysis of CO produced by high-temperature (>1400 degrees C) pyrolytic reduction, using an elemental analyser coupled to continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (TC/EA CF-IRMS), offers a potentially efficient alternative that measures the isotopic composition of total carbonate oxygen and should, therefore, theoretically be free of fractionation effects. The utility of the TC/EA CF-IRMS technique was tested by analysis of carbonates in the calcite-dolomite-magnesite solid-solution and comparing the results with delta(C) (18)O measured by conventional thermal decomposition/fluorination (TDF) on the same materials. Initial results show that CO yields are dependent on both the chemical composition of the carbonate and the specific pyrolysis conditions. Low gas yields (+0.2 per thousand) deviations in delta(C(TC/EA) (18)O compared with delta(C(TDF) (18)O. At a pyrolysis temperature of 1420 degrees C the difference between delta(C) (18)O measured by TC/EA CF-IRMS and TDF (Delta(C(TC/EA,TDF) (18)O) was found to be negatively correlated with gas yield (r = -0.785) and this suggests that delta(C) (18)O values (with an estimated combined standard uncertainty of +/-0.38 per thousand) could be derived by applying a yield-dependent correction. Increasing the pyrolysis temperature to 1500 degrees C also resulted in a statistically significant correlation with gas yield (r = -0.601), indicating that delta(C) (18)O values (with an

  11. 低温煤热解焦油产率和品质影响因素研究%Influencing factors of coal tar yield and quality from low-temperature coal pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗青; 郑化安; 张生军; 李学强; 陈静升; 张志刚

    2014-01-01

    煤焦油是低温煤热解技术的主要产物,是重要的化工原料,其产率和品质是评价煤热解工艺的重要指标。从原煤性质(煤种和煤粒径)、热解反应器结构形式及热解工艺条件(原煤预处理、热解温度、压力、升温速率、停留时间、热解气氛及催化剂)等方面综合分析了煤热解焦油产率和品质的影响因素,认为通过优选煤种和热解反应器,对煤样进行适当预处理,选择合适的工艺操作条件和引入加氢催化热解等有助于提高焦油产率和品质。%Coal tar,the main product of low-temperature coal pyrolysis,is an essential chemical material.The yield and quality of coal tar is an important indicator to evaluate the pyrolysis.Investigate the influencing factors of coal tar yield and quality from the aspects of raw coal characteristics such as coal types and coal particle size,structure of pyrolysis reactors and technical conditions including raw coal pretreat-ment,reaction temperature and pressure,heating rate,gas residence time,reaction atmosphere and catalysts.The results show that the yield and quality of coal tar can be improved by using proper coal and pyrolysis reactors,choosing appropriate technical conditions,adopting cat-alytic hydrogenation pyrolysis and the like.

  12. Manipulating catalytic pathways: deoxygenation of palmitic acid on multifunctional catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Baoxiang; Zhao, Chen; Kasakov, Stanislav; Foraita, Sebastian; Lercher, Johannes A

    2013-04-08

    The mechanism of the catalytic reduction of palmitic acid to n-pentadecane at 260 °C in the presence of hydrogen over catalysts combining multiple functions has been explored. The reaction involves rate-determining reduction of the carboxylic group of palmitic acid to give hexadecanal, which is catalyzed either solely by Ni or synergistically by Ni and the ZrO2 support. The latter route involves adsorption of the carboxylic acid group at an oxygen vacancy of ZrO2 and abstraction of the α-H with elimination of O to produce the ketene, which is in turn hydrogenated to the aldehyde over Ni sites. The aldehyde is subsequently decarbonylated to n-pentadecane on Ni. The rate of deoxygenation of palmitic acid is higher on Ni/ZrO2 than that on Ni/SiO2 or Ni/Al2O3, but is slower than that on H-zeolite-supported Ni. As the partial pressure of H2 is decreased, the overall deoxygenation rate decreases. In the absence of H2, ketonization catalyzed by ZrO2 is the dominant reaction. Pd/C favors direct decarboxylation (-CO2), while Pt/C and Raney Ni catalyze the direct decarbonylation pathway (-CO). The rate of deoxygenation of palmitic acid (in units of mmol moltotal metal(-1) h(-1)) decreases in the sequence r(Pt black) ≈r(Pd black) >r(Raney Ni) in the absence of H2 . In situ IR spectroscopy unequivocally shows the presence of adsorbed ketene (C=C=O) on the surface of ZrO2 during the reaction with palmitic acid at 260 °C in the presence or absence of H2.

  13. Direct spray pyrolysis of aluminum chloride solution for alumina preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国志; 张廷安; 王龙; 马思达; 豆志河; 刘燕

    2014-01-01

    The effects of pyrolysis mode and pyrolysis parameters on Cl content in alumina were investigated, and the alumina products were characterized by XRD, SEM and ASAP. The experimental results indicate that the spray pyrolysis efficiency is higher than that of static pyrolysis process, and the reaction and evaporation process lead to a multi-plot state of the alumina products by spray pyrolysis. Aluminum phase starts to transform intoγ-Al2O3 at spray pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C, which is about 200 °C lower than that of static pyrolysis process. The primary particle size of γ-Al2O3 product is 27.62 nm, and Cl content in alumina products is 0.38%at 800 °C for 20 min.

  14. Fixed bed pyrolysis of the rapeseed cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensoz, S.; Yorgun, S.; Angin, D.; Culcuoglu, E.; Ozcimen, D.; Karaosmanoglu, F.

    2001-12-15

    The fixed bed atmospheric pressure pyrolysis and nitrogen swept pyrolysis of the rapeseed cake obtained from cold extraction press have been investigated. Experiments were performed in the Heinze retort at a 7{sup o}C min{sup -1} heating rate, with a 500{sup o}C final temperature varying sweep gas velocity (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1}) under nitrogen atmosphere. Liquid, gas, and char yields were determined, pyrolysis conversion was calculated, and liquid, char, and gas products were presented as an environmentally friendly fuel candidate. (author)

  15. Effects of torrefaction and densification on switchgrass pyrolysis products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zixu; Sarkar, Madhura; Kumar, Ajay; Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis behaviors of four types of pretreated switchgrass (torrefied at 230 and 270°C, densification, and torrefaction at 270°C followed by densification) were studied at three temperatures (500, 600, 700°C) using a pyroprobe attached to a gas chromatogram mass spectroscopy (Py-GC/MS). The torrefaction of switchgrass improved its oxygen to carbon ratio and energy content. Contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products of torrefied switchgrass were higher than those in pyrolysis products of raw switchgrass. As the torrefaction temperature increased from 230 to 270°C, the contents of anhydrous sugars and phenols in pyrolysis products increased whereas content of guaiacols decreased. High pyrolysis temperature (600 and 700°C as compared to 500°C) enhanced decomposition of lignin and anhydrous sugars, leading to increase in phenols, aromatics and furans. Densification enhanced depolymerization of cellulose and hemicellulose during pyrolysis.

  16. Influence of Antarctic Intermediate Water on the deoxygenation of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Guilherme Cordova; Kerr, Rodrigo; Azevedo, José Luiz Lima; Mendes, Carlos Rafael Borges; da Cunha, Letícia Cotrim

    2016-12-01

    Hydrographic trends in the Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) layer that may be associated with changes in the thickness and oxygen content of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the eastern tropical South Atlantic (ETSA) and eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) are investigated by using historical data (1960 to 2015). Our results reveal that the thickness of these OMZs has continually increased (2.58 ± 0.67 m yr-1 for the ETSA and 3.37 ± 0.73 m yr-1 for the ETNA), the mean oxygen concentration has decreased (- 0.12 ± 0.03 μmol kg-1 yr-1 for the ETSA and - 0.17 ± 0.05 μmol kg-1 yr-1 for the ETNA), and the mean temperature has increased. The optimum multiparameter analysis method is used to track modifications in the AAIW along its path through the South Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. We observe an AAIW layer vertical expansion rate of 1.67 ± 0.71 m yr-1, a decrease in the mean oxygen concentration of - 0.18 ± 0.04 μmol kg-1 yr-1 and an increase in the mean temperature of 0.010 ± 0.005 °C yr-1. Moreover, a similar decrease in oxygen concentrations is observed in the AAIW layer of the studied OMZ regions compared to those in the non-AAIW portions of these OMZs, which indicates strong deoxygenation in this water mass over time. Our results suggest that warming in the AAIW source region and in its extensive temporal displacement through the SASG to the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean appreciably shifted this water mass toward lower densities with depleted oxygen (increases in ventilation age and oxygen consumption). The warming trend that is reported here suggests that global warming is one of the factors that influence oxygen solubility changes during the deoxygenation and expansion of OMZs.

  17. Pyrolysis of Indonesian coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachimoellah; Endah [Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopemba, Surabaya (Indonesia). Department of Chemical Engineering; Karaman, N.; Kusuma, S.A. [UPN Surabaya, (Indonesia). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1997-04-01

    It has been estimated that there is 36 billion tons of coal resource potential in Indonesia. Over 21.4 billion tons is classified as low rank (lignitic) coal. The coal deposits are located mainly in Sumatra and Kalimantan. As an energy source, low rank coals are not widely used, because of their high moisture content, low calorific value and variable ash content. One of the key questions for utilizing low rank coal is whether lignite can be upgraded into another form which is more economically viable. In this study tests were carried out in a pilot plant fixed bed pyrolysis reactor unit provided with hopper, electric heater, coolers and product receivers. The yield of char, tar and gases was found to depend on temperature which also affected the composition of gas produced. Results also indicated the temperature and particle size giving maximum tar yield, gas concentration, and the atmosphere of inert nitrogen. 1 tab., 2 figs., 10 refs.

  18. Influence of pyrolysis gas convective transport on the temperature field of thermally decomposing resin composite%热分解气体对流传输对树脂基复合材料温度场的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈敏孙; 江厚满; 刘泽金

    2011-01-01

    The one-dimensional temperature field model of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser was solved with the commonly-used finite difference method.By comparing the simulation result with the experimental result which was reported by related literature, the influence of the pyrolysis gas convective transport on the temperature field of resin composite was studied.The analysis indicates that the simulation temperature field considering the convective transport of pyrolysis gas matches better than the simulation temperature field without considering the convective transport of pyrolysis gas with the experimental temperature, namely the convective transport of pyrolysis gas has a large influence on the temperature field of resin composite.Therefore, while constructing a three-dimensional temperature field model of thermally decomposing resin composite irradiated by laser, on the premise of without introducing any mechanical quantities, the convective transport of pyrolysis gas should be considered.%用有限差分法对激光辐照下复合材料树脂基热解时的一维温度场模型进行数值求解,将数值模拟结果与相关文献中给出的实验结果进行对比.结果表明:考虑了对流传输效应的数值模拟结果比没有考虑对流传输效应的数值模拟结果与实验结果符合的更好,即热分解气体的对流传输对树脂基复合材料的温度场有较大的影响.因此,在不引入力学量的前提下,建立激光辐照下复合材料树脂基热解时的三维温度场模型时,需要考虑热分解气体的对流传输效应.

  19. 小球藻粉热解及其催化热解试验研究%Experimental Study on Direct and Catalytic Pyrolysis of Chlorella Vulgaris Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时艳; 王许云; 李芳; 仲卫成; 郭庆杰

    2013-01-01

    采用热重分析法考察小球藻粉的热解特性,以HZSM-5、HY分子筛为催化剂,对小球藻粉直接热解和催化热解后生物油的化学组成进行对比分析,研究2种分子筛催化剂对催化热解的影响.结果表明,小球藻粉的热解温度为160~600℃;小球藻粉加入HZSM-5分子筛催化剂催化热解后,十六酸及含氮化合物的含量大幅降低,烃类物质的含量提高,含有较多甲苯、二甲苯等芳香烃;经HY分子筛催化热解后,十六酸含量降低,含氮化合物的含量大幅提高,形成大量的萘等多环芳烃;HZSM-5分子筛具有较好的催化脱氧、择形芳构化功能,HY分子筛择形性较差,导致多环芳烃及含氮化合物的含量提高.%The pyrolysis characteristics of chlorella vulgaris powders were investigated by thermogravimetry technology.Using HZSM-5 zeolite and HY zeolite as catalysts,a comparison on chemical composition of bio-oil from chlorella vulgaris powders by direct and catalytic pyrolysis approaches was presented.The influence of the two kinds of catalysts on catalytic pyrolysis was explored.The results show that the pyrolysis temperature of chlorella vulgaris powders ranges from 160 to 600 ℃.The contents of hexadecanoic acid and nitrogenous compounds are greatly decreased by catalytic pyrolysis ofchlorella vulgaris powders with HZSM-5 zeolite.The amount of hydrocarbons is increased,including plentiful aromatic hydrocarbons such as toluene and xylenes.The content of hexadecanoic acid is reduced by catalytic pyrolysis of chlorella vulgaris powders with HY zeolite,but the content of nitrogenous compounds is greatly increased.The bio-oil contains abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon,especially naphthalene.HZSM-5 zeolite is highly active in deoxygenation and aromatization.Due to the poor shape-selectivity of HY zeolite,the contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and nitrogenous compounds are increased.

  20. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, D. E.; Mhlongo, G. H.; Kortidis, I.; Nkosi, S. S.; Malgas, G. F.; Mwakikunga, B. W.; Ray, S. Sinha; Kiriakidis, G.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  1. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motaung, D.E., E-mail: dmotaung@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Mhlongo, G.H., E-mail: gmhlongo@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kortidis, I. [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Nkosi, S.S., E-mail: skosi@csir.co.za [CSIR-National Laser Centre, 626 Meiring Naude Rd, Brummeria, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Private Bag X3, Johannesburg 2030 (South Africa); Malgas, G.F.; Mwakikunga, B.W.; Ray, S.Sinha [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kiriakidis, G., E-mail: kiriakid@iesl.forth.gr [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Physics, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  2. Study on biomass catalytic pyrolysis for production of bio-gasoline by on-line FTIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Bo Lu; Jian Zhong Yao; Wei Gang Lin; Wen Li Song

    2007-01-01

    The pyrolysis of biomass is a promising way for production of bio-gasoline if the stability and quality problems of the bio-crudeoil can be solved by catalytic cracking and reforming. In this paper, an on-line infrared spectrum was used to study the characteristics of catalytic pyrolysis with the following preliminary results. The removal of C=O of organic acid is more difficult than that of aldehydes and ketones. HUSY/γ-Al2O3 and REY/γ-Al2O3 catalysts exhibited better deoxygenating activities while HZSM-5/γ-Al2O3 catalyst exhibited preferred selectivities for production of iso-alkanes and aromatics. Finally, possible mechanisms of biomass catalytic pyrolysis are discussed as well.

  3. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  4. 生物质与低阶煤低温共热解转化研究%STUDY ON LOW TEMPERATURE CO-PYROLYSIS OF BIOMASS AND LOW RANK COAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何选明; 潘叶; 陈康; 吴梁森

    2012-01-01

    将野生浮萍与长焰煤以不同比例掺混,采用自行设计的煤干馏实验装置进行生物质与煤共热解实验,对液体产物煤焦油进行GC-MS分析,以探索生物质与煤低温共热解的反应及煤焦油轻质化规律.同时采用热重分析仪,探讨生物质添加对煤热解过程的影响机理.结果表明,随着混合样品中生物质量的增加,焦油收率增大10%左右,焦油中直链烷烃及高附加值的萘、酚和芴等化合物得到一定的富集,实现了低温煤焦油轻质化的目的.样品失重率增大,TG曲线向低温区移动,热解活化能逐渐减小,长焰煤、生物质及其混合物热分解动力学模型符合准一级动力学方程,两者的掺混促进了整个反应的进行.%Co-pyrolysis characteristics of low rank coal mixed with biomass(duckweed )in different proportions were studied in a dry distillation equipment, and focusing on the coal tar of the product with GC-MS in order to investigate the reaction mechanism of the co-pyrolysis between biomass and coal. Furthermore, the research studied on the pyrolysis mechanism with bio-mass added by thermogravimetric analyzer. The results show that low-temperature tar could be upgraded with the increasing of biomass content, straight chain alkanes and high-value chemicals such as naphthalene, phenol, anthracene were enriched. The biomass can do favor to the pyrolysis process of coal by reducing the temperature of coaPs pyrolysis and active energy(E), The co-pyrolysis process belongs to first-order kinetic reaction, and the synergetic effect was found during coal and biomass co-prolysis by comparing with the individual pyrolysis.

  5. Charcoal Production via Multistage Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adetoyese Olajire Oyedun; Ka Leung Lam; Chi Wai Hui

    2012-01-01

    Interests in charcoal usage have recently been re-ignited because it is believed that charcoal is a muchbetter fuel than wood. The conventional charcoal production consumes a large amount of energy due to the prolonged heating time and cooling time which contribute to the process completing in one to several days. Wood py-rolysis consists of both endothermic and exothermic reactions as well as the decomposition of the different components at different temperature range (hemicellulose: 200-260℃; cellulose: 240-350℃ and lignin: 280-500℃). Inthis study we propose a multistagepyrolysis which is an approach to carry out pyrolysis with multiple heating stages so as to gain certain processing benefits. We propose a three-stage approach which includes rapid stepwise heating stage to a variable target temperatures of 250 ℃, 300℃, 350 ℃ and 400 ℃, slow and gradual heatingstage to a tinal temperature of 400℃ and adiabatic with cooling stage. The multi-stage pyrolysis process can save 30% energy and the processing time by using a first temperature target of 300 ℃and heating rate of 5℃.min-1 to produce a fixed-carbon yield of 25.73% as opposed to the base case with a fixed-carbon yield of23.18%.

  6. High quality bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass over alumina-supported sodium carbonate

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Performance of a novel alumina-supported sodium carbonate catalyst was studied to produce a valuable bio-oil from catalytic flash pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass. Post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was investigated in a catalyst fixed bed reactor at the downstream of the pyrolysis reactor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in an entrained flow pyrolysis reactor by feeding a premixed feedstock of the catalyst and biomass. Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 was very effective for de-oxygenation of the pyrolysis liquid and oxygen content of the bio-oil was decreased from 47.5 wt.% to 16.4 wt.%. An organic rich bio-oil was obtained with 5.8 wt.% water content and a higher heating value of 36.1 MJ/kg. Carboxylic acids were completely removed and the bio-oil had almost a neutral pH. This bio-oil of high calorific low, low water and oxygen content may be an attractive fuel precursor. In-situ catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapor produced a very similar quality bio-oil compared to post treatment of pyrolysis vapors, and shows the possible application of Na2CO3/gamma-Al2O3 in a commercial type reactor system such as a fluidized bed reactor. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stochastic state-space temperature regulation of biochar production Part II: Application to manure processing via pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: The concept of a designer biochar that targets the improvement of a specific soil property imposes the need for production processes to generate biochars with both high consistency and quality. These important production parameters can be affected by variations in process temperature tha...

  8. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... to be major chemical components in the lignin oil. The maximal yields of 0.62, 0.67, and 0.38 wt % db were obtained for syringol, p-vinylguaiacol, and guaiacol, respectively. The reactor temperature effect was investigated in a range of 450−600 °C and has a considerable effect on the observed chemical...

  9. PROPERTIES OF GAS AND CHAR FROM MICROWAVE PYROLYSIS OF PINE SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hua Wang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pine sawdust pyrolysis was carried out respectively using microwave and conventional electrical heating at different temperatures in order to understand the properties of pyrolytic products from microwave pyrolysis of biomass. Less char material was obtained by microwave pyrolysis compared to conventional heating at the same temperature. While comparing the components of the pyrolytic gases, it was revealed that the microwave pyrolysis gas usually had higher H2 and CO contents and lower CH4 and CO2 contents than those obtained by conventional pyrolysis at the same temperature. The texture analysis results of the microwave pyrolysis chars showed that the chars would melt and the pores would shrink at high temperatures, and hence, the specific surface areas of the chars decreased with increasing temperature. Similarly, the reactivity of the char was remarkably reduced when the microwave pyrolysis temperature exceeded 600°C.

  10. Study on Thermal Pyrolysis of C6 F-ketone Fire Extinguishant at High Temperatures%全氟己酮灭火剂高温热裂解性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔凤霞; 覃况; 石磊; 张品; 潘仁明

    2015-01-01

    基于GC、GC-MS和KM900手持式烟气分析仪测试手段,研究了全氟己酮在管式反应器中滞留时间为2 s和5 s、裂解温度为500~750℃时的热裂解规律。结果表明:全氟己酮在550℃时开始分解,超过650℃裂解剧烈;主要裂解气体产物为十氟丁烷、六氟丙烯和全氟异戊烷;随着裂解温度和滞留时间的增加,全氟己酮裂解程度加剧,十氟丁烷和六氟丙烯生成量增加,全氟异戊烷的生成量先增加后减少;值得重视的是全氟己酮高温热裂解时有剧毒气体全氟异丁烯和毒性气体一氧化碳产生。%The thermal pyrolysis of C6 F-ketone was studied in a stainless tubular reactor under atmospheric pressure and attemperatures between 500 ℃ and 750 ℃ with residence times of 2 s and 5 s. The pyrolysis gaseous products were analyzed by on-line gas chromatography ( GC ) , gas chromatography-mass spectrometry ( GC-MS ) and KM900 hand-held combustion analyzer. The results indicate that the thermal pyrolysis of C6 F-ketone initiates at about 550 ℃ and becomes intense at 650 ℃. As both pyrolysis temperature and residence time increase, the thermal pyrolysis of C6 F-ketone is trig-gered, which makes the concentration of C6 F-ketone plummet, the yields of main gaseous products perflubutane, hexaflu-oropropylene increase and 1,1,1,2,2,3,4,4,4-nonafluoro-3-( trifluoromethyl) butane decrease after its peak. Besides, highly toxic gaseous products,perfluoroisobutene and carbon monoxide, were detected in the thermal pyrolysis process.

  11. Pyrolysis of waste tyres: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T., E-mail: p.t.williams@leeds.ac.uk

    2013-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of waste tyres produces oil, gas and char, and recovered steel. • Batch, screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed are main reactor types. • Product yields are influenced by reactor type, temperature and heating rate. • Pyrolysis oils are complex and can be used as chemical feedstock or fuel. • Research into higher value products from the tyre pyrolysis process is reviewed. - Abstract: Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H{sub 2}, C{sub 1}–C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, CO and H{sub 2}S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

  12. Study on the optimization of low-temperature pyrolysis conditions for removal of mercury from soil%低温热解去除土壤汞污染的条件优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖银锋

    2016-01-01

    The low-temperature pyrolysis method was used to remove the soil mercury pollution by heating the soil with low temperature( ﹤600℃). The mercury and its compounds in the soil could be converted into gas and the soil could be collected and used for cultivation. The temperature,heating time and water content in soil were the key factors affecting the removal of mercury from soil by low-temperature pyrolysis. This experimental studying on the relationship between the soil mercury removal rate with pyrolysis temperature,heating time,water content in soil,and optimize the influential factors to reach the best treatment effect.%低温热解法去除土壤汞污染利用低温(﹤600℃)加热土壤,使土壤中汞及其化合物转化为气态进行收集处理,处理后的土壤可继续用于耕作.热解温度、加热时间、土壤含水量是影响低温热解法去除土壤汞污染的关键因素.通过实验研究不同热解温度、热解时间、土壤含水量与土壤汞去除率之间的关系,优化低温热解法脱汞效率的影响因素,以期达到最好的处理效果.

  13. Influence of Bark Pyrolysis Technology on Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yong; YAN Zhen; LIU Yurong; WANG Shu

    2006-01-01

    With the self-made pyrolysis equipment in miniature,we experimented in different pyrolysis conditions to get different pyrolyzate yields (carbon,vinegar and gas).It proved that with the rise of temperature,the average yield of carbon descends gradually while the yields of vinegar and gas rise gradually.As the temperature rises,the yield of gas increases much more than that of vinegar.When speeding up the rising temperature,yield of carbon goes down while yields of vinegar and gas go up.

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions and soil properties following amendment with manure-derived biochars: Influence of pyrolysis temperature and feedstock type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Raghunath; Taupe, Natalie; Pelissetti, Simone; Petruzzelli, Laura; Bertora, Chiara; Leahy, James J; Grignani, Carlo

    2016-01-15

    Manure-derived biochars can offer a potential option for the stabilization of manure, while mitigating climate change through carbon sequestration and the attenuation of nitrous oxide emission. A laboratory incubation study was conducted to assess the effects of four different manure-derived biochars produced from different feedstocks (poultry litter and swine manure) at different temperatures (400 or 600 °C). A commonly available standard wood chip biochar, produced at a greater temperature (1000 °C), and non-amended treatments were used as references. Two different soils (sandy and silt-loam) were amended with 2% (w/w) biochar on a dry soil weight basis (corresponding to 20 Mg ha(-1)), with the soil moisture being adjusted to 75% saturation level. After a pre-incubation period (21 days), 170 kg N ha(-1) of NH4NO3 fertilizer was added. Measurements of CO2, N2O, CH4 emissions and soil N mineralisation were carried out on different days during the 85 days of incubation. The net C mineralization and N2O emissions from both soils amended with poultry litter biochar at 400 °C were significantly greater than the other biochar treatments. Nitrate availability was greater in both soils in which the manure-derived biochar was used instead of the standard biochar. All of the biochars increased the pH of the silt-loam, sub-acid soil, but failed to improve the cation exchange capacities (CEC) in either soil. Total C and N, P, K and Mg (except Ca) were significantly increased in the manure-derived biochar amended soils, compared to the Control, and were positively correlated to the biochar nutrient contents. This study indicates that the soil application of biochar engenders effects that can vary considerably according to the biochar properties, as determined on the basis of the feedstock types and process conditions. Low-temperature biochar production from manure represents a possible way of producing a soil amendment that can stabilize C while supplying a

  15. Acute survivorship of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Gulf of Mexico under acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J Lunden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Changing global climate due to anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are driving rapid changes in the physical and chemical environment of the oceans via warming, deoxygenation, and acidification. These changes may threaten the persistence of species and populations across a range of latitudes and depths, including species that support diverse biological communities that in turn provide ecological stability and support commercial interests. Worldwide, but particularly in the North Atlantic and deep Gulf of Mexico, Lophelia pertusa forms expansive reefs that support biological communities whose diversity rivals that of tropical coral reefs. In this study, L. pertusa colonies were collected from the Viosca Knoll region in the Gulf of Mexico (390 to 450 m depth, genotyped using microsatellite markers, and exposed to a series of treatments testing survivorship responses to acidification, warming, and deoxygenation. All coral nubbins survived the acidification scenarios tested, between pH of 7.67 and 7.90 and aragonite saturation states of 0.92 and 1.47. However, calcification generally declined with respect to pH, though a disparate response was evident where select individuals net calcified and others exhibited net dissolution near a saturation state of 1. Warming and deoxygenation both had negative effects on survivorship, with up to 100% mortality observed at temperatures above 14ºC and oxygen concentrations of approximately 1.5 ml·l-1. These results suggest that, over the short-term, climate change and OA may negatively impact L. pertusa in the Gulf of Mexico, though the potential for acclimation and the effects of genetic background should be considered in future research.

  16. Acute survivorship of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Gulf of Mexico under acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunden, Jay J.; McNicholl, Conall G.; Sears, Christopher R.; Morrison, Cheryl; Cordes, Erik E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing global climate due to anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are driving rapid changes in the physical and chemical environment of the oceans via warming, deoxygenation, and acidification. These changes may threaten the persistence of species and populations across a range of latitudes and depths, including species that support diverse biological communities that in turn provide ecological stability and support commercial interests. Worldwide, but particularly in the North Atlantic and deep Gulf of Mexico, Lophelia pertusa forms expansive reefs that support biological communities whose diversity rivals that of tropical coral reefs. In this study, L. pertusa colonies were collected from the Viosca Knoll region in the Gulf of Mexico (390 to 450 m depth), genotyped using microsatellite markers, and exposed to a series of treatments testing survivorship responses to acidification, warming, and deoxygenation. All coral nubbins survived the acidification scenarios tested, between pH of 7.67 and 7.90 and aragonite saturation states of 0.92 and 1.47. However, net calcification generally declined with respect to pH, though a disparate response was evident where select individuals net calcified and others exhibited net dissolution near a saturation state of 1. Warming and deoxygenation both had negative effects on survivorship, with up to 100% mortality observed at temperatures above 14°C and oxygen concentrations of approximately 1.5 ml· l−1. These results suggest that, over the short-term, climate change and OA may negatively impact L. pertusa in the Gulf of Mexico, though the potential for acclimation and the effects of genetic background should be considered in future research.

  17. Molecular products and radicals from pyrolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibet, J; Khachatryan, L; Dellinger, B

    2012-12-04

    Thermal degradation of lignin under two reaction regimes (pyrolysis in N(2) and oxidative pyrolysis in 4% O(2) in N(2)) has been investigated in a tubular, isothermal, flow-reactor over the temperature range 200-900 °C at a residence time of 0.2 s. Two experimental protocols were adopted: (1) Partial pyrolysis in which the same lignin sample was continuously pyrolyzed at each temperature and (2) conventional pyrolysis, in which new lignin samples were pyrolyzed at each pyrolysis temperature. The results identified common relationships between the two modes of experiments, as well as some differences. The majority of products from partial pyrolysis peaked between 300 and 500 °C, whereas for conventional pyrolysis reaction products peaked between 400 and 500 °C. The principal products were syringol (2,6-dimethoxy phenol), guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol), phenol, and catechol. Of the classes of compounds analyzed, the phenolic compounds were the most abundant, contributing over 40% of the total compounds detected. Benzene, styrene, and p-xylene were formed in significant amounts throughout the entire temperature range. Interestingly, six ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were formed during partial pyrolysis. Oxidative pyrolysis did not result in large differences from pyrolysis; the main products still were syringol, guaiacol, phenol, the only significant difference being the product distribution peaked between 200 and 400 °C. For the first time, low temperature matrix isolation electron paramagnetic resonance was successfully interfaced with the pyrolysis reactor to elucidate the structures of the labile reaction intermediates. The EPR results suggested the presence of methoxyl, phenoxy, and substituted phenoxy radicals as precursors for formation of major products; syringol, guaiacol, phenols, and substituted phenols.

  18. Simultaneous recovery of organic and inorganic content of paper deinking residue through low-temperature microwave-assisted pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhanrong; Macquarrie, Duncan J; Aguiar, Pedro M; Clark, James H; Matharu, Avtar S

    2015-02-17

    Significant amounts of paper deinking residue (DIR) has been and is still being generated from paper deinking processes, representing both an economic and environmental burden for recycled paper mills. Our research on low-temperature (chromatography-mass spectrometry, liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), X-ray diffraction, solid-state cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (13)C NMR, and Bloch-decay (13)C NMR). The results reveal that the process efficiently separates the inorganic minerals as microwave residue (mainly calcite and kaolinite) from organic matter, and hence the microwave residue could be reused to produce new paper/cardboard products. The organic fraction bio-oil generated is energy-densified and rich in carbohydrates and is a potential source for valuable aromatic compounds.

  19. Reprint of: Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dezhen, E-mail: chendezhen@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan [Thermal & Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • MSW pyrolysis reactors, products and environmental impacts are reviewed. • MSW pyrolysis still has to deal with flue gas emissions and products’ contamination. • Definition of standardized products is suggested to formalize MSW pyrolysis technology. • Syngas is recommended to be the target product for single MSW pyrolysis technology. - Abstract: Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  20. Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dezhen, E-mail: chendezhen@tongji.edu.cn [Thermal and Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan [Thermal and Environmental Engineering Institute, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); He, Pinjing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • MSW pyrolysis reactors, products and environmental impacts are reviewed. • MSW pyrolysis still has to deal with flue gas emissions and products’ contamination. • Definition of standardized products is suggested to formalize MSW pyrolysis technology. • Syngas is recommended to be the target product for single MSW pyrolysis technology. - Abstract: Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  1. Kinetic analysis on lignite pyrolysis,combustion and gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xin; WANG Zhihua; ZHOU Zhijun; YOU Zhuo; ZHOU Junhu; CEN Kefa

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system is a more efficient way for lignite utilization,and can also produce variety of valuable pyrolysis products.To explore the feasibility of this polygeneration system,thermo-gravimetric analysis on YM lignite and DT bituminous coal was conducted,and the characteristic parameters for pyrolysis,combustion,and gasification were obtained.Moreover,the activation energy of each reaction was calculated by Coats-Redfern method.The experimental results showed that,compared with DT bituminous coal,YM lignite pyrolysis process starts at a lower temperature,and its semi-coke reactivity during combustion and gasification was better.In addition,activation energy calculation indicated that,the apparent activation energy of gasification of both coals were much higher than that of the pyrolysis.Therefore,for lignite,pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system may achieve higher efficiency and be worthy for further research.

  2. Pyrolysis Recovery of Waste Shipping Oil Using Microwave Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Adibah Wan Mahari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of microwave pyrolysis as a recovery method for waste shipping oil. The influence of different process temperatures on the yield and composition of the pyrolysis products was investigated. The use of microwave heating provided a fast heating rate (40 °C/min to heat the waste oil at 600 °C. The waste oil was pyrolyzed and decomposed to form products dominated by pyrolysis oil (up to 66 wt. % and smaller amounts of pyrolysis gases (24 wt. % and char residue (10 wt. %. The pyrolysis oil contained light C9–C30 hydrocarbons and was detected to have a calorific value of 47–48 MJ/kg which is close to those traditional liquid fuels derived from fossil fuel. The results show that microwave pyrolysis of waste shipping oil generated an oil product that could be used as a potential fuel.

  3. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass for liquid biofuels production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Production of 2nd-generation biofuels from biomass residues and waste feedstock is gaining great concerns worldwide. Pyrolysis, a thermochemical conversion process involving rapid heating of feedstock under oxygen-absent condition to moderate temperature and rapid quenching of intermediate products......, is an attractive way for bio-oil production. Various efforts have been made to improve pyrolysis process towards higher yield and quality of liquid biofuels and better energy efficiency. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis is one of the promising attempts, mainly due to efficient heating of feedstock by ‘‘microwave...... dielectric heating’’ effects. This paper presents a state-of-the-art review of microwave-assisted pyrolysis of biomass. First, conventional fast pyrolysis and microwave dielectric heating is briefly introduced. Then microwave-assisted pyrolysis process is thoroughly discussed stepwise from biomass...

  4. 黑龙江帽儿山12种草本可燃物的慢速升温热解特性%Pyrolysis Characteristics under Slowly Rising Temperature of 12Herbaceous Species in Maoershan in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金森; 宋彦彦; 孙才英

    2012-01-01

    以黑龙江帽儿山12种草本可燃物为研究对象,用热重分析法对其升温速率为10℃·min-1的慢速热解过程进行研究,利用TG-DTG曲线分析它们的热解特性,得到了纤维素和木质素的热解与温度、失重量以及失重速率的关系.结果表明:空气气氛下12种草本可燃物的热解均经历3个主要阶段,根据3个阶段的平均失重速率和初始分解温度,可对12种草本可燃物在不同燃烧阶段的燃烧性进行评价.这3个阶段是:1)失水阶段,温度范围是室温~ 120℃,根据该阶段的平均失水速率和初始热解温度判断,猴腿蹄盖蕨、芍药和耧斗菜最易燃;2)综纤维素热分解阶段,温度范围是100 ~370℃,根据综纤维素的平均分解速率判断,耧斗菜的有焰燃烧最剧烈;3)木素热分解阶段,温度范围370 ~500℃,根据木素的平均分解速率判断,宽叶山蒿和蚊子草无焰燃烧最剧烈.%Pyrolysis processes of 12 herbaceous species grown in Maoershan in Heilongjiang Province were studied by the Thermogravimetric analysis with a temperature rising rate of 10℃ ·min-1 . The TG-DTG curves of these fuels were used to analyze their pyrolysis characteristics. The results showed that the pyrolysis processes of the 12 species could be separated into three phases. Flammability of the 12 species was evaluated by the average decomposition rate of the three phases and the starting pyrolysis temperature. The three phases are; 1) dehydration when temperature is ambient one to 120 ℃ . Athyrium multidentatum, Paeonia lactiflora, and Aquilegia vulgaris are the most flammable species when evaluated by the mean dehydration rate and the starting pyrolysis temperature. 2) Pyrolysis process of holocellulose under 100 -370 ℃ , in which 41% -51% of its original mass losses. In terms of the mean pyrolysis rate of holocellulose, Aquilegia vulgaris burns most severely for flammable combustion. 3) Decomposition of lignin, which occurs under 370

  5. Pyrolysis Process in Aramid Fibers Investigated by Py-GC/MS & TGA-DTA/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-wei; HU Zu-ming; LIU Zhao-feng

    2007-01-01

    Poly(m-phenylene isophthalamine) (PMIA) and Poly( p-phenylene terphthalamine) (PPTA) are among the most important high-temperature resistant aramid fibers. The pyrolysis behaviors of these two fibers under inert gases were studied using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectrometry ( TGA-DTA/MS ). The pyrolysis processes of PMIA and PPTA are distinguishing, and the stepwise pyrolysates reflect these differences. A mechanism system of pyrolysis is suggested, which involving hydrolysis and homolysis. At low pyrolysis temperatures, hydrolysis is a primary reaction, and it is very noticeable in the first-step pyrolysis region of PMIA. Elevating pyrolysis temperature, homolysis is enhanced and keep a large advantage in the high temperature range. On the other hand, at higher temperatures, carbonization appens and the homolysis and carbonization of PPTA are emphasized more than of PMIA.

  6. 热解温度对低阶煤热解性能影响研究%Influence of temperature on pyrolysis properties of low rank coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商铁成

    2014-01-01

    为获得高品质高产率热解油气,以榆林长焰煤为研究对象,采用1 kg / h 外热式回转炉,研究不同热解温度下榆林长焰煤的产品产率、半焦强度及煤焦油品质。结果表明:随着热解温度的升高,榆林煤裂解程度加深,有机质剧烈分解,气体、液体产物不断析出,半焦产率下降,煤气产率增加;热解水量受温度影响不大,仅随温度升高略有增加。随热解温度升高,榆林煤热解半焦结构强度和半焦微孔均增大,温度越高,气孔结构越发达。煤焦油中脂肪族和芳香族含量与热解温度成正比,极性物含量与热解温度成反比。长焰煤适宜热解温度为600℃,此时煤焦油产率达到极大值8.66%,为格金焦油产率的79.5%;半焦结构强度在78%以上,煤焦油中脂肪族和芳香族含量在50%以上,极性物含量32.9%,族组成较为理想。%In order to get high quality and yield coal tar,taking Yulin long flame coal as research object,the paper investigated the products yield,char strength and coal tar properties under different prolysis temperature using 1 kg/ h external heated rotary furnace.The results showed that,the rising temperature aggravated the pyrolysis,the gas and liquid products yield increased,the char yield decreased.With the rise of temperature,the yield of water yield increased slightly,the char structural strength and aperture also raised.The higher the tempera-ture,the better-developed pore structure.The aliphatic and aromatic content were proportional to the temperature,while the polar composi-tion was inversely proportional to the temperature.The optimum prolysis temperature was 600 ℃ for long flame coal,the maximum coal tar yield was 8.66%,which was 79.5% of Gray-King yield.The semi-coke strength was greater than 78% when the polar composition was 32. 9% and the aliphatic and aromatic content was more than 50%.

  7. Effect of Pyrolysis Temperature on Characteristics of Biomass Char and Coal Char%热解温度对生物质和煤成焦特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米翠丽; 樊孝华; 魏刚; 马登卿; 张利孟; 王学斌

    2014-01-01

    以麦秆、橡树木屑和华亭烟煤为原料,研究热解产物的理化特性并讨论燃料种类和热解温度对其的影响。采用BET、SEM-EDS、XRD和TGA对其进行分析表征。结果表明:在600~1000℃的温度范围内,煤焦的比表面积和孔隙容积随热解温度增加而增大,而木屑焦的变化不明显,麦秆焦在800℃时比表面积和孔隙容积最大,更高温度则发生烧结;焦样中C元素含量随热解温度升高而增加,而H元素和O元素随之降低,麦秆焦的着火特性优于木屑焦和煤焦。木屑焦和煤焦的着火特性随热解温度升高而变差,而麦秆焦在800℃具有最佳的着火特性。%The effects of fuel type and pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties of coal char( C-char)and biomass char were investigated with straw,oak sawdust,and Huating bituminous coal as raw materials. BET,SEM-EDS,XRD,and TGA were used to analyze the coke specimens. Results show that the BET surface area and porous volume of C-char increase as the pyrolysis temperature increases,whereas those of wood char( W-char)insignificantly change,from 600 to 1 000 ℃. Straw char ( S-char)has the largest surface area and pore volume at 800 ℃ as sintering occurs at higher temperatures. As the pyrolysis temperature increases,the C content of char increases and its H and O contents decrease. The ignition characteristic of S-char is superior to those of W-char and C-char. The ignition characteristics of Wood-char and C-char decrease with the increase of pyrolysis temperature. Straw-char exhibits the best ignition characteristic at 800℃.

  8. Kinetics and Mechanism of Deoxygenation Reactions over Proton-Form and Molybdenum-Modified Zeolite Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Jeremy William

    The depletion of fossil fuel resources and the environmental consequences of their use have dictated the development of new sources of energy that are both sustainable and economical. Biomass has emerged as a renewable carbon feedstock that can be used to produce chemicals and fuels traditionally obtained from petroleum. The oxygen content of biomass prohibits its use without modification because oxygenated hydrocarbons are non-volatile and have lower energy content. Chemical processes that eliminate oxygen and keep the carbon backbone intact are required for the development of biomass as a viable chemical feedstock. This dissertation reports on the kinetic and mechanistic studies conducted on high and low temperature catalytic processes for deoxygenation of biomass precursors to produce high-value chemicals and fuels. Low temperature, steady state reaction studies of acetic acid and ethanol were used to identify co-adsorbed acetic acid/ethanol dimers as surface intermediates within specific elementary steps involved in the esterification of acetic acid with ethanol on zeolites. A reaction mechanism involving two dominating surface species, an inactive ethanol dimeric species adsorbed on Bronsted sites inhibiting ester formation and a co-adsorbed complex of acetic acid and ethanol on the active site reacting to produce ethyl acetate, is shown to describe the reaction rate as a function of temperature (323 -- 383 K), acetic acid (0.5 -- 6.0 kPa), and ethanol (5.0 -- 13.0 kPa) partial pressure on proton-form BEA, FER, MFI, and MOR zeolites. Measured differences in rates as a function of zeolite structure and the rigorous interpretation of these differences in terms of esterification rate and equilibrium constants is presented to show that the intrinsic rate constant for the activation of the co-adsorbed complex increases in the order FER carbon dioxide with methane (CH3COOH/CH4 = 0.04-0.10, HCOOH/CH 4 = 0.01-0.03, CO2/CH4 = 0.01-0.03) on Mo/H-ZSM-5 formulations at

  9. Pyrolysis of Pine Wood, Experiments and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    In this study, pinewood has been pyrolyzed using a fixed heating rate with a variable end-temperature. The pyrolysis process has been simulated using a mechanism with three parallel reactions for the formation of char, gas and tar. First order irreversible kinetics is assumed. This kind of model...... may predict the variation of product yield with operating conditions such as temperature and heating rate. The system of coupled differential equations describing the pyrolysis process is solved using the software DYMOLA. Various literature values for kinetic parameters have been compared...

  10. 污水污泥低温热解技术工艺与能量平衡分析%Analysis on Conditions and Energy Balance of Low-temperature Pyrolysis of Sewage Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡艳军; 宁方勇

    2013-01-01

    Process conditions of pyrolysis technology with one-time feeding and stable operation system to produce the three-phase sewage sludge pyrolysis were in detailed investigated. Energy balance relationship was analyzed through energy-flow diagram, energy recycling rate and energy consumption rate. It was found that yield and calorific value of sludge pyrolysis product were influenced with three key factors in a decreased order of final temperature, reaction time and heating rate. Heating loss has a significant difference under different pyrolysis working conditions. Residence time and lower heating rate can cause obvious increase of input energy and the heat loss. Results of the heating balance analysis showed that pyrolysis system that produce gas products with high quality has the highest energy recycling rate and energy consumption rate, which are 0.94 and 1.73 respectively. Compared with pyrolysis process to produce liquid oil product, total energy is almost the same but total energy consumption can be reduced by 35%. It can be verified that low temperature pyrolysis technology of sewage sludge is more suitable to produce gas product according to its energy recovery and saving.%针对一次给料稳定运行污泥热解系统制取三相产物的工艺展开分析,并基于能流图、能源回收率、能耗比等方法和衡算指标讨论该工艺的能量平衡关系.研究发现:热解产物的产率和热值高低受热解终温影响最大,反应时间次之,升温速率最小.不同工况条件下热解过程热量损失具有明显差别,热解停留时间长、升温速率低都造成输入能量、热损失增大.热解过程能量平衡分析也验证了以制取气相产物为目标的污泥热解工艺条件的回收率和能耗比最高,分别为0.94和1.73;与高产出液相油的热解过程相比,产物总能量相差不多而系统消耗的能量能够减少35%.从能源回收、节约能源角度分析,污泥低温热解制取可燃性气

  11. Pyrolysis of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessire, Brody K; Lahankar, Sridhar A; Minton, Timothy K

    2015-01-28

    Molar yields of the pyrolysis products of thermal protection systems (TPSs) are needed in order to improve high fidelity material response models. The volatile chemical species evolved during the pyrolysis of a TPS composite, phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA), have been probed in situ by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 100 to 935 °C. The relative molar yields of the desorbing species as a function of temperature were derived by fitting the mass spectra, and the observed trends are interpreted in light of the results of earlier mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of phenolic resins. The temperature-dependent product evolution was consistent with earlier descriptions of three stages of pyrolysis, with each stage corresponding to a temperature range. The two main products observed were H2O and CO, with their maximum yields occurring at ∼350 °C and ∼450 °C, respectively. Other significant products were CH4, CO2, and phenol and its methylated derivatives; these products tended to desorb concurrently with H2O and CO, over the range from about 200 to 600 °C. H2 is presumed to be the main product, especially at the highest pyrolysis temperatures used, but the relative molar yield of H2 was not quantified. The observation of a much higher yield of CO than CH4 suggests the presence of significant hydroxyl group substitution on phenol prior to the synthesis of the phenolic resin used in PICA. The detection of CH4 in combination with the methylated derivatives of phenol suggests that the phenol also has some degree of methyl substitution. The methodology developed is suitable for real-time measurements of PICA pyrolysis and should lend itself well to the validation of nonequilibrium models whose aim is to simulate the response of TPS materials during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  12. Investigation on the photo-induced de-oxygenation process of myoglobin in aqueous solution by use of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A photo-induced de-oxygenation process of myoglobin (Mb) in aqueous solution was investigated by use of fluorescence spectroscopy. The spectra are characterized by the fluorescence intensity declining gradually after each scan,and the decay of fluorescence intensity being significant in each scan,which is assigned to the release of oxygen from the opening of the heme-pockets induced by illumination. More illumination will cause more release of oxygen; if the temperature of an Mb solution is increased when it is illuminated,the rate of de-oxygenation will be higher. It was found that ligand-oxygen in Fe-porphyrin could be removed from Mb by nitrogen. This indicates that the interac-tion between oxy-Mb and other different gases can be tested by the method of fluorescence spectros-copy. In addition,fluorescence spectroscopy can be employed to probe the energy transfer between Fe-porphyrin and tryptophan or tyrosine in Mb molecules.

  13. Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhen; Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan; He, Pinjing

    2014-12-01

    Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO2 and NH3, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  14. Reprint of: Pyrolysis technologies for municipal solid waste: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhen; Yin, Lijie; Wang, Huan; He, Pinjing

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis has been examined as an attractive alternative to incineration for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal that allows energy and resource recovery; however, it has seldom been applied independently with the output of pyrolysis products as end products. This review addresses the state-of-the-art of MSW pyrolysis in regards to its technologies and reactors, products and environmental impacts. In this review, first, the influence of important operating parameters such as final temperature, heating rate (HR) and residence time in the reaction zone on the pyrolysis behaviours and products is reviewed; then the pyrolysis technologies and reactors adopted in literatures and scale-up plants are evaluated. Third, the yields and main properties of the pyrolytic products from individual MSW components, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) made from MSW, and MSW are summarised. In the fourth section, in addition to emissions from pyrolysis processes, such as HCl, SO2 and NH3, contaminants in the products, including PCDD/F and heavy metals, are also reviewed, and available measures for improving the environmental impacts of pyrolysis are surveyed. It can be concluded that the single pyrolysis process is an effective waste-to-energy convertor but is not a guaranteed clean solution for MSW disposal. Based on this information, the prospects of applying pyrolysis technologies to dealing with MSW are evaluated and suggested.

  15. Effect of temperature on composition of tar generated from pyrolysis of organic fraction of municipal solid waste%温度对城市有机垃圾热解焦油成分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尚毅; 刘国涛; 唐利兰; 谢梦佩

    2016-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were performed to characterize the composition change of tars generated from pyrolysis of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) at the final pyrolysis temperatures of 600, 700 and 800℃, respectively. The carbon content in the tars increased from 74.49% to 83.42% with the pyrolysis temperature increased from 600 to 800℃. Although the aromaticity of tars was higher than OFMSW and lower than chars, the polarity of tars was lower than both OFMSW and chars. Decreases in H/C and O/C ratios in tars were observed with the increase in final pyrolysis temperature. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the dominant components of tars, increased from 54.06% to 83.45% when the pyrolysis temperature rose from 600 to 800°C. Naphthalene and its derivatives were main components of PAHs, and they accounted for 50.72%, 46.80% and 39.26% of total PAHs in tars that were obtained at 600, 700, 800℃, respectively. The pyrolysis tars generated from OFMSW could be utilized as carbon based matrix composites and the raw materials for the production of dyes, resins, solvents, and insect repellents, etc.%以城市有机垃圾热解焦油为对象,研究了不同热解终温下(600~800℃)焦油的特性及其随温度的变化规律.结果表明:随着热解终温从600℃升高至800℃,焦油中C含量从74.49%增至83.42%;焦油的芳香化程度高于原料而低于热解炭,焦油的极性低于原料和热解炭,随着热解终温的升高,焦油的H/C和O/C逐渐降低;多环芳烃(PAHs)是焦油的主要成分,随着热解终温从600℃升高至800℃,其含量从54.06%增至83.45%;萘及其衍生物是焦油PAHs的主要成分,其含量在热解终温600、700、800℃时分别占PAHs的50.72%、46.80%、39.26%.研究结果证明了垃圾热解焦油可用作碳基复合材料和作为制备染料、树脂、溶剂、驱虫剂等的原料.

  16. [Characterization of pyrolysis of waste printed circuit boards by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanhong; Huang, Hong; Xia, Zhengbin; Chen, Huanqin

    2008-07-01

    Thermal degradation of pyrolysis of waste circuit boards was investigated by high-resolution pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PyGC-MS) and thermogravimetry (TG). In helium atmosphere, the products of FR-4 waste printed circuit board were pyrolyzed at 350, 450, 550, 650, and 750 degrees degrees C, separately, and the pyrolysis products were identified by online MS. The results indicated that the pyrolysis products of the FR-4 waste circuit board were three kinds of substances, such as the low boiling point products, phenol, bisphenol and their related products. Moreover, under 300 degrees degrees C, only observed less pyrolysis products. As the increase of pyrolysis temperature, the relative content of the low boiling point products increased. In the range of 450-650 degrees degrees C, the qualitative analysis and character were similar, and the relative contents of phenol and bisphenol were higher. The influence of pyrolysis temperature on pyrolyzate yields was studied. On the basis of the pyrolyzate profile and the dependence of pyrolyzate yields on pyrolysis temperature, the thermal degradation mechanism of brominated epoxy resin was proposed.

  17. Pyrolysis and Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification include processes that thermally convert carbonaceous materials into products such as gas, char, coke, ash, and tar. Overall, pyrolysis generates products like gas, tar, and char, while gasification converts the carboncontaining materials (e.g. the outputs from pyrolysis....... Today gasification is used within a range of applications, the most important of which are conversion of coal into syngas for use as chemical feedstock or energy production; but also gasification of biomass and waste is gaining significant interest as emerging technologies for sustainable energy. From...

  18. Comparative study on pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass using a thermogravimetric and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ting; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics of four algal and lignocellulosic biomass samples were studied by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and biomass type on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were investigated. The average activation energy for pyrolysis of biomass samples by FWO and KAS methods in this study were in the range of 211.09-291.19kJ/mol. CO2 was the main gas component in the early stage of pyrolysis, whereas H2 and CH4 concentrations increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Bio-oil from Chlorellavulgaris showed higher content of nitrogen containing compounds compared to lignocellulosic biomass. The concentration of aromatic organic compounds such as phenol and its derivatives were increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature up to 700°C. FTIR analysis results showed that with increasing pyrolysis temperature, the concentration of OH, CH, CO, OCH3, and CO functional groups in char decreased sharply.

  19. Hydrogen-rich gas formation characteristics during microwave-induced high temperature pyrolysis of sewage sludge%污泥微波高温热解条件下富氢气体生成特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓磊; 邓文义; 于伟超; 苏亚欣

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis of sewage sludge was conducted in a single-mode microwave reactor and an electric-heated tube furnace, respectively. The effects of particle size, moisture content, pyrolysis temperature, and structure of microwave receptor on the yield and composition of hydrogen-rich gas were studied. The results indicate that the sludge particle size within 0 ~ 5. 00 mm has no obvious effect on the mass distribution of pyrolysis products. However, H2 and CO concentrations increase with decreasing of particle size. When the size decreases from 2.50 ~5.00 mm to <0. 45 mm, the H2 concentration increases from 31% to 34% , and that of CO increases from 17% to 22%. Both the sludge moisture content and the pyrolysis temperature have great influences on distribution of the pyrolysis products. Higher moisture content or pyrolysis temperature will lead to markedly higher concentrations of H2 and CO. When the sludge moisture content increases from 0 to 83% , H2 concentration increases from 32% to 42% , and CO concentration increases from 20% to 31%. Microwave absorber in powder phase can transform more volatile compounds into incondensable gas than that in fixed phase, and the concentrations of H2 and CO also increase slightly.%分别采用单模微波炉和电加热管式炉对污泥热解过程进行了实验研究,分析了污泥粒径、含水率、热解温度和微波吸收剂形态等参数对热解产物分布特性和气体组分浓度的影响规律和机理.结果表明,在粒径0~5.00 mm,污泥粒径大小对污泥微波热解产物分布无明显影响,但粒径减小可以提高H2和CO浓度,当粒径从2.50 ~5.00 rnm减小至小于0.45 mm,H2和CO体积分数分别从31%和17%上升至34%和22%;污泥含水率和微波热解温度对热解产物分布和热解气组分浓度分布都有显著影响,提高污泥含水率或微波热解温度都可以显著提高H2和CO浓度,当污泥含水率从0上升至83%,H2和CO体积分数分别从32%和20

  20. Studies on characteristics of producer gas from sewage sludge pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Haiying; Zhang Guijie [Coll. of Metallurgy and Energy, Heibei Polytechnic Univ., Tangshan (China); Zhang Shuting; Chen Guanyi [School of Environment Science and Technology, Tianjin Univ., Nankai District, TJ (China)

    2008-07-01

    The pyrolysis experiments of sewage sludge at low and middle temperature range from 250 C to 700de;C were carried out in a {phi} 200mm laboratory fixed bed external-heat reactor. The influence of final pyrolysis temperature on product yield of gases was studied. It was found that the gases yield increased with increasing the final pyrolysis temperature. But the productive rate increased above 450 C. The results indicated the secondary pyrolysis of intermediate product occurred about 450 C. According to the analysis of NCG, the yield of CO{sub 2} was maximum at lower pyrolysis temperature but the yields of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4} were higher at elevated pyrolysis temperature and the maximum caloric value of gaseous emissions were 16712 kJ/m{sup 3}. According the TG-DTA curves the decomposition of sewage sludge had three stages. The first stage was deprivation of interstitial moisture (100 C-110 C), the second stage was the depolymerization reactions of lipid and the generation of large molecular intermediate fragments (110 C-325 C), the last stage was cracking of the large molecular and the decomposition of protein and saccharide (325 C-600 C). All the results can offer reliable base data for the application of pyrolysis technique of sewage sludge. (orig.)

  1. Deoxygenation of glycolaldehyde and furfural on Mo2C/Mo(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jesse R.; Vohs, John M.

    2014-12-01

    The desire to produce fuels and chemicals in an energy conscious, environmentally sympathetic approach has motivated considerable research on the use of cellulosic biomass feedstocks. One of the major challenges facing the utilization of biomass is finding effective catalysts for the efficient and selective removal of oxygen from the highly-oxygenated, biomass-derived platform molecules. Herein, a study of the reaction pathways for the biomass-derived platform molecule furfural and biomass-derived sugar model compound glycolaldehyde provides insight into the mechanisms of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) on a model molybdenum carbide catalyst, Mo2C/Mo(100). Using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), it was found that the Mo2C/Mo(100) catalyst was active for selective deoxygenation of the aldehyde carbonyl by facilitating adsorption of the aldehyde in an η2(C,O) bonding configuration. Furthermore, the catalyst showed no appreciable activity for furanic ring hydrogenation, highlighting the promise of relatively inexpensive Mo2C catalysts for selective HDO chemistry.

  2. STUDY ON PYROLYSIS OF POLYPHENYLSILSESQUIOXANE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Ma; Liang-he Shi; Jian-min Zhang; Bai-yu Li; De-yan Shen; Jian Xu

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical change ofpolyphenylsilsesquioxane (PPSQ) during pyrolysis in flowing nitrogen. Two temperature ranges were found for pyrolysedPPSQ below and above 600℃, respectively. The former is related to the rearrangement of PPSQ backbone and the latterreflects that most of backbone structure of PPSQ might be broken down and unorganized. Carbon formed in carbonization ofPPSQ sample pyrolysed at 900℃ should be sp3 bonded carbon with crystallite size effects or defects.

  3. Pyrolysis of waste tyres: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul T

    2013-08-01

    Approximately 1.5 billion tyres are produced each year which will eventually enter the waste stream representing a major potential waste and environmental problem. However, there is growing interest in pyrolysis as a technology to treat tyres to produce valuable oil, char and gas products. The most common reactors used are fixed-bed (batch), screw kiln, rotary kiln, vacuum and fluidised-bed. The key influence on the product yield, and gas and oil composition, is the type of reactor used which in turn determines the temperature and heating rate. Tyre pyrolysis oil is chemically very complex containing aliphatic, aromatic, hetero-atom and polar fractions. The fuel characteristics of the tyre oil shows that it is similar to a gas oil or light fuel oil and has been successfully combusted in test furnaces and engines. The main gases produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres are H(2), C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons, CO(2), CO and H(2)S. Upgrading tyre pyrolysis products to high value products has concentrated on char upgrading to higher quality carbon black and to activated carbon. The use of catalysts to upgrade the oil to a aromatic-rich chemical feedstock or the production of hydrogen from waste tyres has also been reported. Examples of commercial and semi-commercial scale tyre pyrolysis systems show that small scale batch reactors and continuous rotary kiln reactors have been developed to commercial scale.

  4. Pyrolysis of biomass briquettes, modelling and experimental verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, B; Lammers, G; Beenackers, AACM; Kopetz, H; Weber, T; Palz, W; Chartier, P; Ferrero, GL

    1998-01-01

    Carbonisation of biomass briquettes was studied using a dedicated single briquette carbonisation reactor. The reactor enabled continuous measurement of the briquette mass and continuous measurement of the radial temperature profile in the briquette. Furthermore pyrolysis gas production and compositi

  5. Investigation of waste biomass co-pyrolysis with petroleum sludge using a response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Zhang, Xinying; Li, Yubao

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of waste biomass (sawdust) through co-pyrolysis with refinery oily sludge was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. Response surface method was applied to evaluate the main and interaction effects of three experimental factors (sawdust percentage in feedstock, temperature, and heating rate) on pyrolysis oil and char yields. It was found that the oil and char yields increased with sawdust percentage in feedstock. The interaction between heating rate and sawdust percentage as well as between heating rate and temperature was significant on the pyrolysis oil yield. The higher heating value of oil originated from sawdust during co-pyrolysis at a sawdust/oily sludge ratio of 3:1 increased by 5 MJ/kg as compared to that during sawdust pyrolysis alone, indicating a synergistic effect of co-pyrolysis. As a result, petroleum sludge can be used as an effective additive in the pyrolysis of waste biomass for improving its energy recovery.

  6. Catalytic Pyrolysis and a Pyrolysis Kinetic Study of Shredded Printed Circuit Board for Fuel Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmiaton Ali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scrap printed circuit boards (PCBs are the most abundant wastes that can be found in the landfills in Malaysia and this disposal certainly poses serious detrimental to the environment. This research aims to investigate optimum temperature for pyrolyzing waste PCBs, find out the best catalyst to be used in accelerating PCBs’ pyrolysis, select suitable ratio of catalyst to PCBs for higher oil yield and examine kinetics pyrolysis of the waste PCBs’ decomposition. Operating temperatures ranged from 200 to 350 ˚C of PCB’s pyrolysis were conducted with the optimum temperature obtained was 275 ˚C. Fluid cata-lytic cracking (FCC catalyst, zeolite socony mobil-5 (ZSM-5, H-Y-type zeolite and dolomite were used to accelerate PCB’s pyrolysis at 275 ˚C and FCC was identified as the best catalyst to be used. Differ-ent ratios of FCC to waste PCBs such as 10:90, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60 and 50:50 were applied in the pyro-lysis at 275 ˚C and ratio of 10:90 was selected as the suitable ratio to be utilized for maximum yield. The kinetic study was done through thermogravimetric analysis on waste PCBs under various heating rates and different particle sizes. The GC-MS analysis revealed that compounds detected in the pyro-oil have the potential to be used as fuel. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 23rd July 2014; Revised: 14th August 2014; Accepted: 14th August 2014 How to Cite: Ng, C.H., Salmiaton, A., Hizam, H. (2014. Catalytic Pyrolysis and a Pyrolysis Kinetic Study of Shredded Printed Circuit Board for Fuel Recovery. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (3: 224-240. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.7148.224-240 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.7148.224-240

  7. 热解终温对酚醛树脂层压板真空热裂解产物的影响%Effect of final temperature on products of phenolic resin matrix laminate by vacuum pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴文彪; 丘克强

    2011-01-01

    采用程序升温的热解反应器对酚醛树脂层压板的真空热解规律进行研究,着重考查不同热解终温对热解产物产率和热解油组成的影响,同时利用元素分析、工业分析、热重分析、GC-MS分析对层压板原料及产物油进行分析.研究结果表明:酚醛树脂层压板裂解可获得产率分别为50.25%54.58%,33.00%,~41.00%和8.75%~12.95%的液体、固体和气体,其产物油的成分主要为酚类、磷酸芳基酯类、脂肪酸酯类、腈类等物质;随着热解终温的升高,固体产率逐渐下降,液体产率在650℃有1个峰值,而气体产率则呈上升趋势,并且双酚F、双酚A、长链脂肪酸酯、磷酸三芳基酯等相对分子质量较大的物质含量逐渐降低,而苯酚、甲酚、二甲酚、对异丙基苯酚等相对分子质量较小的物质含量逐渐增大;样品有3个主要的质量损失台阶(在190~320,320~390和390~510℃),热质量损失率分别为9%,20%和31%.%Vacuum pyrolysis of phenolic resin matrix laminate in temperature - programmed furnace reactor was studied. The effect of final temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and the composition of pyrolysis oils was examined. The sample and product oils were analyzed by ultimate analysis, proximate analysis, thermogravimetric analysis(TGA) and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The results show that the pyrolysis of phenolic resin matrix laminate can get 50.25%-54.58% liquid yield, 33.00%-41.00% solid yield and 8.75%-12.95% gas yield under the conditions of the experiment, and the products of the pyrolysis oils mainly consist of phenols, aryl phosphate esters, fatty acid esters, nitriles, and so on. The solid yield decreases gradually when the final temperature increases, and the liquid yield has a peak at 650 °C, while the gas yield shows a rising trend. However, the content of the compounds with large molecular mass, such as bisphenol F, bisphenol A

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste mandarin over nanoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Kwon; Kim, Jeong Wook; Park, Sung Hoon; Kim, Seong-Soo; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Lee, See Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of waste mandarin was performed using nanoporous catalysts. AI-MCM-41 and Meso-MFI, which had different acid characteristics, were used. In addition, the characteristics of Pt/Meso-MFI were compared with those of Meso-MFI. To analyze the characteristics of the catalyst samples, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area, temperature programmed desorption of NH3, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses were performed. In addition, pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to facilitate the direct analysis of the pyrolytic products. The products obtained from catalytic pyrolysis contained a greater amount of valuable components than did those obtained from non-catalytic pyrolysis, indicating that catalytic pyrolysis improved the quality of the bio-oil. Additionally, valuable products such as furan and aromatic compounds were produced in greater quantities when Meso-MFI was used. When Pt/Meso-MFI was used, the amounts of furan and aromatic compounds produced increased even further.

  9. Rapid continuous pyrolysis of cotton stalks for charcoal production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobarak, F.

    1983-10-01

    Charcoal of more than 80% carbon content was obtained from cotton stalks by using a rapid continuous pyrolysis process. The yield ranged from 17 to 37% depending on the pyrolysis temperature. When raising the temperature from 400 to 700 degrees C the carbon content of the charcoal initially increased, then remained constant while the yield decreased continually. The optimum pyrolysis temperature was found to be 600 degrees C. At this temperature a product having 86% carbon content on a moisture and ash free basis was obtained. The bulk density went through a minimum at a pyrolysis temperature of 600 degrees C. The increase observed at higher temperatures was attributed to the collapse of the cell wall structure. On the other hand, the adsorption activity decreased continually with increasing pyrolysis temperature. To some extent, charcoal properties depend on particle size of the raw material. Thus, the fine fraction had a higher ash content and a higher adsorption capacity than the coarse fraction. Compared to similar charcoal samples from other agricultural residues and wood the cotton stalk charcoal showed a remarkably high adsorption activity even without any additional activation. Gathering cotton stalks and their prompt conversion to charcoal by rapid continuous pyrolysis would eliminate worm dissemination and fire hazards resulting from storage of the stalks by the farmers.

  10. Marine ecosystem resilience during extreme deoxygenation: the Early Jurassic oceanic anoxic event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Bryony A; Frid, Christopher L J

    2017-01-01

    Global warming during the Early Jurassic, and associated widespread ocean deoxygenation, was comparable in scale with the changes projected for the next century. This study quantifies the impact of severe global environmental change on the biological traits of marine communities that define the ecological roles and functions they deliver. We document centennial-millennial variability in the biological trait composition of Early Jurassic (Toarcian) seafloor communities and examine how this changed during the event using biological traits analysis. Environmental changes preceding the global oceanic anoxic event (OAE) produced an ecological shift leading to stressed benthic palaeocommunities with reduced resilience to the subsequent OAE. Changes in traits and ecological succession coincided with major environmental changes; and were of similar nature and magnitude to those in severely deoxygenated benthic communities today despite the very different timescales. Changes in community composition were linked to local redox conditions whereas changes in populations of opportunists were driven by primary productivity. Throughout most of the OAE substitutions by tolerant taxa conserved the trait composition and hence functioning, but periods of severe deoxygenation caused benthic defaunation that would have resulted in functional collapse. Following the OAE recovery was slow probably because the global nature of the event restricted opportunities for recruitment from outside the basin. Our findings suggest that future systems undergoing deoxygenation may initially show functional resilience, but severe global deoxygenation will impact traits and ecosystem functioning and, by limiting the species pool, will slow recovery rates.

  11. Pyrolysis of Polytrimethylene Terephthalate (PTT) Fiber by Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN He-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis of polytrimethylene terephthalate (PTT) fiber has been investigated by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy in the temperature range from 400℃ to 750℃ in order to observe the possible effect of the temperature on its composition of pyrolysates. At 400℃, pyrolysis of molecular chain could occur, only 13 pyrolysates could be identified. The trimethylene moieties bound to the macromolecular core by ester bonds are cleaved at around 400℃. At 550℃ -750℃, pyrolysis of molecular chain could completely take place, 46 pyrolysates could be found. As the temperature increases, the compositions of pyrolysate are distinctly increased. Several compounds, especially benzoic acid, monopropenyl-p-phthalate, 2 - propenyl benzoate, di - 2 - propenyl ester, 1,4 -benzenedicarboxylic acid, benzene, 1, 5 - hexadiene, biphenyl and 1, 3 - propanediol dibenzoate could be formed. The thermal degradation mechanism, which is determined by structure and amount of the thermal decomposition products, are described. During pyrolysis of polytrimethylene terephthalate, polymeric chain scissions take place a peeling reaction as a successive removal of the dimer units from the polymeric chain. The chain scissions are followed by the elimination reaction, linkage action and secondary reactions, which bring about a variety fragment.

  12. Fluidized-bed pyrolysis of waste bamboo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Bamboo was a popular material substituting for wood, especially for one-off commodity in China. In order to recover energy and materials from waste bamboo, the basic characteristics of bamboo pyrolysis were studied by a thermogravimetric analyzer. It implied that the reaction began at 190~210 ℃, and the percentage of solid product deceased from about 25% to 17% when temperature ranged from 400 ℃ to 700 ℃. A lab-scale fluidized-bed furnace was setup to research the detailed properties of gaseous, liquid and solid products respectively. When temperature increased from 400 ℃ to 700 ℃, the mass percent of solid product decreased from 27% to 17% approximately, while that of syngas rose up from 19% to 35%. When temperature was about 500℃, the percentage of tar reached the top, about 31%. The mass balance of these experiments was about 93%~95%. It indicated that three reactions involved in the process: pyrolysis of exterior bamboo, pyrolysis of interior bamboo and secondary pyrolysis of heavy tar.

  13. Pyrolysis process for the treatment of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grycová, Barbora; Koutník, Ivan; Pryszcz, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Different waste materials were pyrolysed in the laboratory pyrolysis unit to the final temperature of 800°C with a 10min delay at the final temperature. After the pyrolysis process a mass balance of the resulting products, off-line analysis of the pyrolysis gas and evaluation of solid and liquid products were carried out. The gas from the pyrolysis experiments was captured discontinuously into Tedlar gas sampling bags and the selected components were analyzed by gas chromatography (methane, ethene, ethane, propane, propene, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide). The highest concentration of measured hydrogen (WaCe 61%vol.; WaPC 66%vol.) was analyzed at the temperature from 750 to 800°C. The heating values of the solid and liquid residues indicate the possibility of its further use for energy recovery.

  14. 热解温度和恒温时间对锦界煤焦-CO2气化活性的影响%Effect of pyrolysis temperature and constant temperature time on gasification activitybetween CO2 and Jin Jie coal char

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸿伟; 索新良; 陈江涛; 赵振虎; 杨新

    2012-01-01

    The effect of pyrolysis temperature (650 ℃ , 800 ℃ , 900 ℃ ) and constant temperature time (8 min, 30 min, 60 min) on Jin Jie coal char isothermal gasification by carbon dioxide in the condition of normal pressure and different gasification temperature was studied under chemical controlled regime in a self-built fixed bed reactor. And the kinetics parameters were calculated with the different kinetic models. The results show that the gasification activity of Jin Jie coal char decreases and the activity energy increases along with the increment of pyrolysis temperature and the extension of constant temperature time. Compared with constant temperature time, the effect of pyrolysis temperature is more remarkable on the gasification activity of Jin Jie coal char.%在化学反应动力学控制实验条件下,利用自建固定床实验台研究了常压、不同气化温度下热解温度(650℃、800℃、900℃)、恒温时间(8 min、30 min、60 min)对锦界煤焦等温CO2气化反应活性的影响,并用不同模型求算动力学参数,实验结果表明:随着热解温度的提高和恒温时间的延长,锦界煤焦的气化活性逐渐降低,活化能逐渐增加.热解温度对锦界煤焦气化活性的影响比恒温时间的影响显著些.

  15. The influence of pyrolysis temperature on the component of biomass pyrolytic tar%裂解温度对生物质热解焦油成分的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    典平鸽; 张乐观; 江程程

    2012-01-01

    Sawdust was chosen as raw materials for biomass pyrolysis tar experiments. Then experiments about the influence of reaction temperature to the yield of tar and the chemical composition of tar had been studied. The results showed that the yield of tar derived from biomass pyrolysis reached maximum at 500 ℃, the higher or lower temperature were conducive to the reduction of biomass tar. Under the different temperature, the hydrocarbons of tar are mainly aromatics and a small amount of aliphatic hydrocarbons, the oxygenated compounds are mainly phenol and its alkyl derivatives, the nitrogen compounds are mainly heterocyclic compounds, such as pyridine, pyrrole and its alkyl derivatives.%以锯末粉体为生物质热解焦油研究对象,研究了热解温度对焦油产量和焦油化学成分的影响规律,结果表明,热解温度为500 ℃时,生物质热解产生的焦油量最大,温度过高或过低都有利于焦油的减少.不同热解温度下,焦油中碳氢化合物的成分主要是芳香烃和少量的脂肪烃,含氧化合物主要是苯酚及其烷基衍生物,含氮化合物主要是吡啶、吡咯及其烷基衍生物等杂环化合物.

  16. Molybdenum carbide as a highly selective deoxygenation catalyst for converting furfural to 2-methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Lee, Wen-Sheng; Bhan, Aditya; Chen, Jingguang G

    2014-08-01

    Selectively cleaving the C=O bond outside the furan ring of furfural is crucial for converting this important biomass-derived molecule to value-added fuels such as 2-methylfuran. In this work, a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, surface science studies, and reactor evaluation identified molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) as a highly selective deoxygenation catalyst for converting furfural to 2-methylfuran. These results indicate the potential application of Mo2 C as an efficient catalyst for the selective deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates including furanics and aromatics.

  17. A New Method of Deoxygenation in the Synthesis of Taxanes by Hypophosphorous Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Jun; ZHANG Meng; YIN Da-Li

    2003-01-01

    @@ Based on the chemistry involved in the radical chain deoxygenation of alcohols by the Barton-McCombie reaction, numerous applications in the synthesis of taxanes were reported. [1] In the original Barton-McCombie method,tributyltin hydride was the hydrogen atom source and tributyltin radical generated from the hydride served as a chain carrier. [2] Although the method gave the good yield and found many applications, the problems associated with the price, toxicity and removal of tin residues prompted search for other hydrogen atom sources. Radical chain deoxygenation of alcohols can be carried out with phosphorus centered radicals, generated from hypophosphorous acid orits salts. [3

  18. Refining fast pyrolysis of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil produced from biomass is a promising renewable alternative to crude oil. Such pyrolysis oil has transportation, storage, and processing benefits, none of which are offered by the bulky, inhomogeneous solid biomass from which it originates. However, pyrolysis oil has both a different co

  19. Effect of torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis on the pyrolysis poly-generation of pine wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Li, Yanjun; Deng, Minsi; Wang, Jiayang; Chen, Miao; Yan, Bei; Yuan, Qiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Torrefaction of pine wood was performed in a tube furnace at three temperatures (220, 250, and 280°C) for 30min. Then catalytic pyrolysis of raw and torrefied pine wood was performed using HZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor at 550°C for 15min. Torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis have an very important effect on the yield, property, and energy distribution of pyrolysis products. The results showed that the yield of biochar rapidly increased, while that of bio-oil decreased with increasing torrefaction temperature. The oxy-compound content of bio-oil, such as acids and aldehydes, sharply decreased. However, the aromatic hydrocarbon content not only increased but also further promoted by HZSM-5 catalyst. With highest mass yields and energy yields, biochar was also the very important product of pyrolysis. The oxygen content in biomass was mainly removed in the form of CO2 and H2O, leading to increasing CO2 content in non-condensable gas.

  20. Preparation of doping titania antibacterial powder by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Shun-wen; PENG Bing; CHAI Li-yuan; LIU Yun-chao; LI Zhu-ying

    2008-01-01

    Doping titania powders were synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method from an aqueous solution containing H2TiF6 and AgNO3. The effects of the processing parameters on panicle size distribution, structure, and morphology of doping panicles were investigated. The results show that aggregation-free spherical panicles with average diameter of 200-600 nm are obtained and the particle size of the powder can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of solution. The experimental approach indicates that the size and the value of standard deviation of panicle size increase from 210 nm to 450 nm and from 0.46 to 0.73 respectively with the increase of the titanic ion concentration from 0.05 to 0.4 mol/L. Composite TiOF2 is obtained when the pyrolysis temperature is set to be 400 ℃. With increasing pyrolysis temperature from 400 ℃ to 800 ℃, the crystal size of titania powders increases from 14.1 to 26.5 nm and TiOF2 content of powder decreases dramatically. The property of ion released from powder is affected significantly by the pyrolysis temperature, and the amount of fluorine ion and silver ion released from powder decrease with increasing pyrolysis temperature. The optical property of doping titania powders is not affected by pyrolysis temperature. Antibacterial test results show that composite powders containing more fluorine ions exhibit stronger antibacterial activity against E.coli.

  1. Additives initiate selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huizhe; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Jingmei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To improve chemicals selectivity under low temperature, a new method that involves the injection of additives into biomass pyrolysis is introduced. This method allows biomass pyrolysis to achieve high selectivity to chemicals under low temperature (300°C), while nothing was obtained in typical pyrolysis under 300°C. However, by using the new method, the first liquid drop emerged at the interval between 140°C and 240°C. Adding methanol to mushroom scrap pyrolysis obtained high selectivity to acetic acid (98.33%), while adding ethyl acetate gained selectivity to methanol (65.77%) in bagasse pyrolysis and to acetone (72.51%) in corncob pyrolysis. Apart from basic chemicals, one high value-added chemical (2,3-dihydrobenzofuran) was also detected, which obtained the highest selectivity (10.33%) in corncob pyrolysis through the addition of ethyl acetate. Comparison of HZSM-5 and CaCO3 catalysis showed that benzene emerged in the liquid because of the larger degree of cracking and hydrodeoxygenation over HZSM-5.

  2. Production of Lunar Oxygen Through Vacuum Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-26

    radially outward from the solar corona . The solar wind is deflected by magnetic fields but absorbed by surface materials on a body like the Moon. Solar...very high temperature crucible for pyrolysis. A zirconia (ZrO2) ceramic crucible was selected to provide thermal stability at high temperatures, shown...in Figure 20. Two zirconia crucibles were used. One of the zirconia crucibles was poorly manufactured and could not withstand the high thermal

  3. Toxicity of Pyrolysis Gases from Elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, Carlos J.; Kosola, Kay L.; Solis, Alida N.; Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Parker, John A.

    1977-01-01

    The toxicity of the pyrolysis gases from six elastomers was investigated. The elastomers were polyisoprene (natural rubber), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ethylene propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM), acrylonitrile rubber, chlorosulfonated polyethylene rubber, and polychloroprene. The rising temperature and fixed temperature programs produced exactly the same rank order of materials based on time to death. Acryltonitrile rubber exhibited the greatest toxicity under these test conditions; carbon monoxide was not found in sufficient concentrations to be the primary cause of death.

  4. Adding nickel formate in alkali lignin to increase contents of alkylphenols and aromatics during fast pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jing; Wang, Wen-Liang; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Chang, Jian-Min; Cai, Li-Ping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2017-03-01

    The composition of pyrolysis vapors obtained from alkali lignin pyrolysis with the additive of nickel formate was examined using the pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Characterization of bio-chars was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results showed that the nickel formate significantly increased liquid yield, simplified the types of alkali lignin pyrolysis products and increased individual component contents. The additive of nickel formate increased contents of alkylphenols and aromatics from alkali lignin pyrolysis. With an increase in temperature, a greater amount of the relative contents can be achieved. The nickel formate was thermally decomposed to form hydrogen, resulting in hydrodeoxygenation of alkali lignin during pyrolysis. It was also found that Ni is in favor of producing alkylphenols. The analysis based on the experimental result provided evidences used to propose reaction mechanism for pyrolysis of nickel formate-assisted alkali lignin.

  5. Flash pyrolysis of jatropha oil cake in electrically heated fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, S. Antony; Kennedy, Z. Robert; Pillai, B.C.; Lee, C. Lindon Robert [School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu 641114 (India)

    2010-07-15

    Fluidized bed flash pyrolysis experiments have been conducted on a sample of jatropha oil cake to determine particularly the effects of particle size, pyrolysis temperature and nitrogen gas flow rate on the pyrolysis yields. The particle size, nitrogen gas flow rate and temperature of jatropha oil cake were varied from 0.3 to 1.18 mm, 1.25 to 2.4 m{sup 3}/h and 350 to 550 C. The maximum oil yield of 64.25 wt% was obtained at a nitrogen gas flow rate of 1.75 m{sup 3}/h, particle size of 0.7-1.0 mm and pyrolysis temperature of 500 C. The calorific value of pyrolysis oil was found to be 19.66 MJ/kg. The pyrolysis gas can be used as a gaseous fuel. (author)

  6. Volatile Compounds Detected in Coconut Shell Liquid Smoke through Pyrolysis at a Fractioning Temperature of 350-420 C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslin Hadanu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the volatile components of liquid smoke from coconut shells obtained through the pyrolysis process at fraction 350-420 °C. The volatile compounds of liquid smoke from a coconut shell were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Nineteen peaks were detected by GC-MS in the coconut shell liquid smoke, and 19 compounds also were identified. The volatile compounds were identified as follows based on their function group’s composition percentage: phenol (90.75%, carbonyl (3.71%, alcohol (1.81%, and benzene (3.73%, respectively. The liquid smoke contains a high ratio of phenol derivatives (90.75% in volatile profile. The phenol derivatives were the major volatile compounds found in the coconut shell liquid smoke.

  7. Study on pyrolysis and gasification of wood in MSW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to develop municipal solid waste(MSW) pyrolysis/gasification and melting technology with low emission and high efficiency, it was planed that all the main components in MSW and some typical kinds of MSW were pyrolyzed/gasified to propose an expert system for raw MSW. In this paper, wood, which was a prevalent component in MSW, was pyrolyzed and gasified in fluidized-bed reactors at different apparent excess air ratios (EARs), temperatures and fluidizing velocities. For pyrolysis, with temperature increasing from 400℃ to 700℃, the yield of pyrolysis char decreased while that of pyrolysis gas increased (in this paper respectively from 28% to 20% and from 10% to 35%), and when temperature was 500℃, the yield of pyrolysis tar reached the highest,up to 38% in this paper. It was the optimum for gasification when temperature was 600℃ and apparent EAR was 0.4. Under the experimental conditions of this paper, gasification efficiency achieved 73%, lower heat value(LHV) reached 5800 kJ/(Nm3) and yield of syngas was 2.01 Nm3/kg. Lower fluidizing velocity was useful to upgrade gasification efficiency and LHV of syngas for wood gasification. Based on the results, the reactive courses and mechanism were analyzed respectively for wood pyrolysis and gasification.

  8. Thermal analysis of charring materials based on pyrolysis interface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charring thermal protection systems have been used to protect hypersonic vehicles from high heat loads. The pyrolysis of charring materials is a complicated physical and chemical phenomenon. Based on the pyrolysis interface model, a simulating approach for charring ablation has been designed in order to obtain one dimensional transient thermal behavior of homogeneous charring materials in reentry capsules. As the numerical results indicate, the pyrolysis rate and the surface temperature under a given heat flux rise abruptly in the beginning, then reach a plateau, but the temperature at the bottom rises very slowly to prevent the structural materials from being heated seriously. Pyrolysis mechanism can play an important role in thermal protection systems subjected to serious aerodynamic heat.

  9. Studies on Catalytic Pyrolysis of Daqing Atmospheric Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟祥海; 徐春明; 张倩; 高金森

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of Daqing atmospheric residue on catalyst CEP-1 was investigated in a confined fluidized bed reactor. The results show that reaction temperature, the mass ratios of catalyst to oil and steam to oil have significant effects on product distribution and yields of light olefins. The yields of light olefins show the maxima with the increase of reaction temperature, the mass ratios of catalyst to oil and steam to oil, respectively. The optimized operating conditions were determined in the laboratory, and under that condition the yields of ethylene, propylene and total light olefins by mass were 15.9%, 20.7% and 44.3% respectively. The analysis of pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis liquid indicates that CEP-1 has good capacity of converting heavy oils into light olefins, and there is a large amount of aromatics in pyrolysis liquid.

  10. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Wang, Tiejun; Ma, Longlong; Chang, Jie

    2008-11-01

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na2CO3, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 degrees C to 600 degrees C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 degrees C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 degrees C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) approximately 205 degrees C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na2CO3 addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H2, CO, CH4, CO2, C2H4 and C2H6. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  11. Pyrolysis temperature optimization of biochar from tobacco stalk and its physicochemical characterization%烟秆生物质炭热解温度优化及理化性质分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨兴; 黄化刚; 王玲; 申燕; 陆扣萍; 韩学博; 王海龙

    2016-01-01

    microporous structures . Previous studies have demonstrated that biochar can be used for remediation of soils contaminated with organic and inorganic pollutants . Moreover , biochar has the potential of enhancing long‐term sequestration on soil organic carbon , improving soil structure and water retention ability , promoting bioavailability and retention of the nutrients , and ultimately promoting plant growth and increasing crop yield . The environmental behavior and impacts of biochar mainly depend on its physical and chemical properties , while pyrolysis temperature is the main factor affecting the physicochemical characteristic . To understand the influence of pyrolysis temperature on the physicochemical properties of biochars , the tobacco stalk was pyrolyzed at 350 , 400 , 450 , 500 , 550 and 600 ℃ , then the properties of biochars such as yield rate , pH value , electrical conductivity and specific surface area were determined . The composition and structure characteristics of biochars were investigated by scanning electron microscopy , Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy , energy dispersive X‐ray spectrometry , X‐ray diffraction and 13 C‐nuclear magnetic resonance analyses . The results showed that the yield rate ,contents of O and H as well as the H/C ,O/C , (O + N)/C ratios of the biochars decreased with the rise of pyrolysis temperature . However , the pH value , electrical conductivity , specific surface area and total carbon contents of biochars increased as the pyrolysis temperature increased . The yield rate and pH value of biochar tended to be stable above 500 ℃ , and the specific surface area and pH value peaked at 450 ℃ . With the rise of pyrolysis temperature , the content of mineral elements and surface crystal increased , whereas the content of oxygen‐containing functional groups decreased . Concentrations of K , Al and Ca were 28 .46 35 .47 , 10 .74 35 .86 and 13 .15 24 .95 g/kg , respectively . The stability and aromaticity of

  12. Fish Ecology and Evolution in the World's Oxygen Minimum Zones and Implications of Ocean Deoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, N D; Levin, L A

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and oxygen limited zones (OLZs) are important oceanographic features in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Ocean, and are characterized by hypoxic conditions that are physiologically challenging for demersal fish. Thickness, depth of the upper boundary, minimum oxygen levels, local temperatures, and diurnal, seasonal, and interannual oxycline variability differ regionally, with the thickest and shallowest OMZs occurring in the subtropics and tropics. Although most fish are not hypoxia-tolerant, at least 77 demersal fish species from 16 orders have evolved physiological, behavioural, and morphological adaptations that allow them to live under the severely hypoxic, hypercapnic, and at times sulphidic conditions found in OMZs. Tolerance to OMZ conditions has evolved multiple times in multiple groups with no single fish family or genus exploiting all OMZs globally. Severely hypoxic conditions in OMZs lead to decreased demersal fish diversity, but fish density trends are variable and dependent on region-specific thresholds. Some OMZ-adapted fish species are more hypoxia-tolerant than most megafaunal invertebrates and are present even when most invertebrates are excluded. Expansions and contractions of OMZs in the past have affected fish evolution and diversity. Current patterns of ocean warming are leading to ocean deoxygenation, causing the expansion and shoaling of OMZs, which is expected to decrease demersal fish diversity and alter trophic pathways on affected margins. Habitat compression is expected for hypoxia-intolerant species, causing increased susceptibility to overfishing for fisheries species. Demersal fisheries are likely to be negatively impacted overall by the expansion of OMZs in a warming world.

  13. 程序升温热解磷酸氨镁及热解产物的氨氮脱除性能%Temperature-programmed pyrolysis of magnesium ammonium phosphate and removal of ammonia-nitrogen by its pyrolysate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐建军; 陈益清; 钟振辉; 李文龙; 尹娟

    2016-01-01

    为使磷酸氨镁(MAP)脱氨完全及改善热解产物的氨氮去除性能,研究了一种程序升温的热解方式,并探讨了热解产物去除氨氮的热力学及动力学过程。结果表明,热解方式及热解终点温度明显影响 MAP热解产物的氨氮去除性能,控制热解终点温度为180°C、5°C/min的程序升温方式,以及氨氮反应体系的pH值为9.5较为合适,在此条件下,MAP热解产物对氨氮的去除量达95.62 mg/g,经120 min对起始浓度为1000 mg/L氨氮的去除率达82%;动力学及热力学结果表明,MAP 热解产物去除氨氮是 H+与4NH+的离子交换过程,其动力学符合Lagergren准二级模型,平衡时间为120 min,等温曲线符合Freundlich模型。%In order to achieve the dual goals of complete deamination of magnesium ammonium phosphate (MAP) and ensure the pyrolysate’s good removal properties towards ammonia-nitrogen, a temperature-programmed method for the pyrolysis of MAP was studied, as well as the thermodynamic and kinetic processes involved in the removal reaction system between MAP pyrolysate and aqueous ammonium. It was found that the pyrolysis method and pyrolysis final temperature had significant effects on the MAP pyrolysate’s removal properties towards aqueous ammonium, and the following conditions were deemed to be more appropriate:pyrolysis final temperature and heating rate at 180 °C and 5 °C/min, respectively, and a pH level of 9.5 for the removal reaction system. The resultant ammonium removal capacity by the MAP pyrolysate was 95.62 mg/g. After 120 min, the removal rate with an initial concentration of 1000 mg/L was 82%. The kinetic and thermodynamic results indicated that the removal of aqueous ammonium by MAP pyrolysate was the exchange process between H+and NH4+via MAP precipitation. The kinetics complied with the Lagergren quasi second-order model with an equilibrium time of 120 min, while the isothermal curves complied with the

  14. Molybdenum Carbides, Active and In Situ Regenerable Catalysts in Hydroprocessing of Fast Pyrolysis Bio-Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-Soon; Zacher, Alan H.; Wang, Huamin; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Armstrong, Beth L.; Meyer, Harry M.; Soykal, I. Ilgaz; Schwartz, Viviane

    2016-06-16

    We assessed molybdenum carbides as a potential catalyst for fast pyrolysis bio-oil hydroprocessing. Currently, high catalyst cost, short catalyst lifetime, and lack of effective regeneration methods are hampering the development of this otherwise attractive renewable hydrocarbon technology. A series of metal-doped bulk Mo carbides were synthesized, characterized and evaluated in sequential low-temperature stabilization and high-temperature deoxygenation of a pine-derived bio-oil. During a typical 60-h run, Mo carbides were capable of upgrading raw bio-oil to a level suitable for direct insertion into the current hydrocarbon infrastructure with residual oxygen content and total acid number of upgraded oils below 2 wt% and 0.01 mg KOH g-1, respectively. The performance was shown to be sensitive to the type of metal dopant, Ni-doped Mo carbides outperforming Co-, Cu-, or Ca-doped counterparts; a higher Ni loading led to a superior catalytic performance. No bulk oxidation or other significant structural changes were observed. Besides the structural robustness, another attractive property of Mo carbides was in situ regenerability. The effectiveness of regeneration was demonstrated by successfully carrying out four consecutive 60-h runs with a reductive decoking between two adjacent runs. These results strongly suggest that Mo carbides are promising catalytic materials which could lead to a significant cost reduction in hydroprocessing bio-oils. This paper highlights areas for future research which will be needed to further understand carbide structure-function relationships and help design practical bio-oil upgrading catalysts based on Mo carbides.

  15. Effects of disodium cromoglycate on cationic exchange of deoxygenated sickle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizumukama, Léonidas; Ferster, Alina; Gulbis, Béatrice; Kumps, Alain; Cotton, Frédéric

    2011-08-31

    In the present work, we explored the way in which cromoglycate, a drug used to treat allergies acts on ion movements in sickle cells. Cells were either slowly deoxygenated by overnight exposure to nitrogen or acutely deoxygenated by exposure to metabisulfite, a strong reducing agent which induces sickling of red blood sickle cells. Flushing the cells with nitrogen increased the intracellular concentration of Na(+) and decreased the intracellular concentration of K(+) and the sum of the concentrations of the two cations. One hundred nM cromoglycate inhibited the decrease of intracellular K(+) and the increase of intracellular Na(+) induced by deoxygenation (n=17). Metabisulfite (100mM) increased the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) (measured by Fura Red) (n=15) and the shape of the cells (measured by light scattering) (n=9). One μM cromoglycate partially inhibited these two responses. In conclusion, cromoglycate partially inhibits abnormal K(+) loss, Ca(2+) entry pathways or Ca(2+) channels opened by cell deoxygenation and ensuing membrane modifications and prevents cell sickling.

  16. Reductive Deoxygenation of Carbonyl to Methylene by LiAlH4/InBr3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Yan FU; Xue Mei ZHAO; Yao Feng YUAN; Ji Tao WANG

    2003-01-01

    The reductive deoxygenation of aldehydes and ketones into the corresponding alkanes isaccomplished by LiA1H4 in the presence of Lewis acid InBr3. It provides a convenient method tocomplete the transformation from carbonyl compounds to alkanes.

  17. I/Ca evidence for upper ocean deoxygenation during the PETM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoli; Thomas, Ellen; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Winguth, Arne M. E.; Lu, Zunli

    2014-10-01

    Anthropogenic global warming affects marine ecosystems in complex ways, and declining ocean oxygenation is a growing concern. Forecasting the geographical and bathymetric extent, rate, and intensity of future deoxygenation and its effects on oceanic biota, however, remains highly challenging because of the complex feedbacks in the Earth-ocean biota system. Information on past global warming events such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ~55.5 Ma), a potential analog for present and future global warming, may help in such forecasting. Documenting past ocean deoxygenation, however, is hampered by the lack of sensitive proxies for past oceanic oxygen levels throughout the water column. As yet no evidence has been presented for pervasive deoxygenation in the upper water column through expansion of oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). We apply a novel proxy for paleoredox conditions, the iodine to calcium ratio (I/Ca) in bulk coarse fraction sediment and planktonic foraminiferal tests from pelagic sites in different oceans, and compared our reconstruction with modeled oxygen levels. The reconstructed iodate gradients indicate that deoxygenation occurred in the upper water column in the Atlantic, Indian Oceans, and possibly the Pacific Ocean, as well during the PETM, due to vertical and potentially lateral expansion of OMZs.

  18. Deoxygenation of benzoic acid on metal oxides. 2. Formation of byproducts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de M.W.; Ommen, van J.G.; Lefferts, L.

    2002-01-01

    Benzene, benzophenone, toluene and benzylalcohol are byproducts in the selective deoxygenation of benzoic acid to benzaldehyde on ZnO and ZrO2. In this paper, the pathways to the byproducts are discussed and a complete overview of the reaction network is presented. Benzene and benzophenone are produ

  19. Structure-performance relations of molybdenum- and tungsten carbide catalysts for deoxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellwagen, D.R.; Bitter, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time that carbide particle size is a critical factor for the activity and stability of carbon supported tungsten- and molybdenum carbide catalysts in (hydro-)deoxygenation reactions. The stability of the catalyst was shown to increase for larger particles due to

  20. Deoxygenation of benzoic acid on metal oxides. I. The selective pathway to benzaldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, de M.W.; Ommen, van J.G.; Lefferts, L.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of the selective deoxygenation of benzoic acid to benzaldehyde was studied on ZnO and ZrO2. The results show conclusively that the reaction proceeds as a reverse type of Mars and van Krevelen mechanism consisting of two steps: hydrogen activates the oxide by reduction resulting in the

  1. Theoretical study of the pyrolysis of vanillin as a model of secondary lignin pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Liu, Chao; Xu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Qibin

    2016-06-01

    The unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition reactions in processes of vanillin pyrolysis were theoretically investigated by employing density functional theory (DFT) method at M06-2X/6-31 G+(d,p) level. The result shows that the homolytic cleavage of O-CH3 bond could be the dominant initial step in the pyrolysis of vanillin. The hydrogen abstractions from functional groups of vanillin by the formed radicals play important roles in the formation of main products. Both formyl, hydroxyl and methoxyl group contribute to the formation of CO. Benzene is formed from the hydrogen addition reaction between hydrogen radical and phenol at high temperature.

  2. Thermal decomposition and gasification of biomass pyrolysis gases using a hot bed of waste derived pyrolysis char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2016-03-01

    Chars produced from the pyrolysis of different waste materials have been investigated in terms of their use as a catalyst for the catalytic cracking of biomass pyrolysis gases during the two-stage pyrolysis-gasification of biomass. The chars were produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres, refused derived fuel and biomass in the form of date stones. The results showed that the hydrocarbon tar yields decreased significantly with all the char materials used in comparison to the non-char catalytic experiments. For example, at a cracking temperature of 800°C, the total product hydrocarbon tar yield decreased by 70% with tyre char, 50% with RDF char and 9% with biomass date stones char compared to that without char. There was a consequent increase in total gas yield. Analysis of the tar composition showed that the content of phenolic compounds decreased and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased in the product tar at higher char temperatures.

  3. Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis products separation for recycling organic materials from waste liquid crystal display panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-01-25

    Waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panels mainly contain inorganic materials (glass substrate with indium-tin oxide film), and organic materials (polarizing film and liquid crystal). The organic materials should be removed beforehand since the organic matters would hinder the indium recycling process. In the present study, pyrolysis process is used to remove the organic materials and recycle acetic as well as and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) from waste LCD panels in an environmental friendly way. Several highlights of this study are summarized as follows: (i) Pyrolysis characteristics and pyrolysis kinetics analysis are conducted which is significant to get a better understanding of the pyrolysis process. (ii) Optimum design is developed by applying Box-Behnken Design (BBD) under response surface methodology (RSM) for engineering application which is significant to guide the further industrial recycling process. The oil yield could reach 70.53 wt% and the residue rate could reach 14.05 wt% when the pyrolysis temperature is 570 °C, nitrogen flow rate is 6 L min(-1) and the particle size is 0.5 mm. (iii) Furthermore, acetic acid and TPP are recycled, and then separated by rotary evaporation, which could reduce the consumption of fossil energy for producing acetic acid, and be reused in electronics manufacturing industry.

  4. Photobioreactor cultivation and catalytic pyrolysis of the microalga Desmodesmus communis (Chlorophyceae) for hydrocarbons production by HZSM-5 zeolite cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Roberto; Pezzolesi, Laura; Pistocchi, Rossella; Torri, Cristian; Massoli, Patrizio; Fabbri, Daniele

    2016-12-01

    The study evaluated the growth of Desmodesmus communis on column photobioreactor and its thermochemical treatment by catalytic pyrolysis using HZSM-5 zeolite. D. communis showed good results in terms of growth (0.05gL(-1)d(-1)). Analytical pyrolysis of original algae and derived bio-oil mixed with zeolite was used as a screening method in order to gather information on the cracking process. Preparative pyrolysis on bench scale reactor was performed on algae biomass over a zeolite bed at 1:10 ratio (wt/wt). Py-GC-MS of biomass/catalyst mixture showed that the denitrogenation/deoxygenation increased with increasing zeolite load from 1:5 to 1:20 ratio and became significant at 1:10 ratio. The composition observed by analytical pyrolysis was featured by the predominance of alkylated monoaromatic hydrocarbons. The scaling-up to bench scale confirmed the results obtained with analytical pyrolysis in terms of monoaromatic hydrocarbons. However, low yield of catalytic oil (8% by weight) was observed.

  5. Solid waste utilization: pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Mixon, W.R.; Dean, C.; Lizdas, D.J.

    1977-08-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) Program, a number of technology evaluations are being prepared on various current and emerging sources of energy. This evaluation considers the use of pyrolysis as a method of producing energy from municipal solid waste. The energy can be in the form of a gas, oil, chars, or steam. Pyrolysis, the decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (or in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere), has been used to convert organic matter to other products or fuels. This process is also described as ''destructive distillation''. Four processes are described in detail: the ''Landgard'' System (Monsanto Environ-Chem Systems, Inc.); the Occidental Research Corporation Process (formerly the Garrett Research and Development Company; The ''Purox'' System (Union Carbide Corporation); and the ''Refu-Cycler'' (Hamilton Standard Corporation). ''Purox'' and ''Refu-Cycler'' produce a low-Btu gas; the Occidental process produces an oil, and the ''Landgard'' process produces steam using on-site auxiliary boilers to burn the fuel gases produced by the pyrolysis unit. Also included is a listing of other pyrolysis processes currently under development for which detailed information was not available. The evaluation provides information on the various process flowsheets, energy and material balances, product characteristics, and economics. Pyrolysis of municipal solid waste as an energy source can be considered a potential for the future; however little operational or economic information is available at this time.

  6. Pyrolysis of Rubber in a Screw Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnik, A. V.; Savchin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of an analysis of thermal methods described in the literature and from the results of experimental investigations of steam conversion, the authors have developed and created a facility for thermal processing of rubber waste. Rubber crumb was used as the raw material; the temperature in the reactor was 500°C; nitrogen, steam, and a mixture of light hydrocarbons (noncondensable part of pyrolysis products) represented the working medium. The pyrolysis yielded 36-38% of a solid fraction, 54-56% of a liquid hydrocarbon fraction, and 6-9% of noncondensable gases. Changes in the composition of the gas mixture have been determined at different stages of processing. Gas chromatography of pyrolysis gases has shown that the basic gases produced by pyrolysis are H2 and hydrocarbons C2H4, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, C2H6, C3H6O2, and C4H10, and a small amount of H2S, CO, and CO2. Noncondensable gases will be used as a fuel to heat the reactor and to implement the process.

  7. Fast Pyrolysis of Four Lignins from Different Isolation Processes Using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a promising approach that is being investigated to convert lignin into higher value products including biofuels and phenolic chemicals. In this study, fast pyrolysis of four types of lignin, including milled Amur linden wood lignin (MWL, enzymatic hydrolysis corn stover lignin (EHL, wheat straw alkali lignin (AL and wheat straw sulfonate lignin (SL, were performed using pyrolysis gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA showed that the four lignins exhibited widely different thermolysis behaviors. The four lignins had similar functional groups according to the FTIR analysis. Syringyl, guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenylpropane structural units were broken down during pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis product distributions from the four lignins depended strongly on the lignin origin and isolation process. Phenols were the most abundant pyrolysis products from MWL, EHL and AL. However, SL produced a large number of furan compounds and sulfur compounds originating from kraft pulping. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and time on the product distributions from corn stover EHL were also studied. At 350 °C, EHL pyrolysis mainly produced acids and alcohols, while phenols became the main products at higher temperature. No obvious influence of pyrolysis time was observed on EHL pyrolysis product distributions.

  8. Co-pyrolysis of rice straw and polypropylene using fixed-bed pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzatie, N. I.; Basha, M. H.; Uemura, Y.; Mazlan, M. A.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Amin, N. A. M.; Hamid, M. F.

    2016-11-01

    The present work encompasses the impact of temperature (450, 500, 550, 600 °C) on the properties of pyrolysis oil and on other product yield for the co-pyrolysis of Polypropylene (PP) plastics and rice straw. Co-pyrolysis of PP plastic and rice straw were conducted in a fixed-bed drop type pyrolyzer under an inert condition to attain maximum oil yield. Physically, the pyrolysis oil is dark-brown in colour with free flowing and has a strong acrid smell. Copyrolysis between these typically obtained in maximum pyrolysis oil yields up to 69% by ratio 1:1 at a maximum temperature of 550 °C. From the maximum yield of pyrolysis oil, characterization of pyrolysis product and effect of biomass type of the composition were evaluated. Pyrolysis oil contains a high water content of 66.137 wt.%. Furfural, 2- methylnaphthalene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), toluene and acetaldehyde were the major organic compounds found in pyrolysis oil of rice straw mixed with PP. Bio-char collected from co-pyrolysis of rice straw mixed with PP plastic has high calorific value of 21.190 kJ/g and also carbon content with 59.02 wt.% and could contribute to high heating value. The non-condensable gases consist of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane as the major gas components.

  9. Pyrolysis of waste plastic crusts of televisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinmin; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Dongyan; Guo, Qingjie

    2012-09-01

    The disposal of waste plastic crusts of televisions is an issue that is gaining increasing interest around the world. In this investigation, the pyrolysis and catalytic cracking of the waste television crusts mainly composed of acrylonitrile--butadiene-styrene copolymer was studied. Thermogravimetric analysis was used for initial characterization of the pyrolysis of the waste plastic, but most of the investigations were carried out using a 600 mL tubing reactor. Effects of temperature, reaction time and catalyst on the pyrolysis of the waste television crusts were investigated. The results showed that the oil yield increased with increasing temperature or with prolongation of reaction time. With increasing temperature, the generating percentage of gasoline and diesel oil increased, but the heavy oil yield decreased. Zinc oxide, iron oxide and fluid catalytic cracking catalyst (FCC catalyst) were employed to perform a series of experiments. It was demonstrated that the liquid product was markedly improved and the reaction temperature decreased 100 degrees C when FCC was used. The composition ofpyrolysis oils was analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and they contained 36.49% styrene, 19.72% benzenebutanenitrile, 12.1% alpha-methylstyrene and 9.69% dimethylbenzene.

  10. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1992-08-01

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. The phenolic C-O bond energy of 103 kcal/mol is as strong as a benzene C-H bond and over a 10 kcal/mol stronger than the C-O bonds of methanol and ethanol. The consequence of this is that the hydrogenation/deoxygenation methods in current use require severe conditions and give low selectivities. The ongoing research described herein is based on the unprecedented, but thermodynamically promising, use of carbon monoxide as the oxygen atom acceptor for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols.

  11. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technial progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1992-08-01

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. The phenolic C-O bond energy of 103 kcal/mol is as strong as a benzene C-H bond and over 10 kcal/mol stronger than the C-O bonds of methanol and ethanol. The consequence of this is that the hydrogenation/deoxygenation methods in current use require severe conditions and give low selectivities. The ongoing research described herein is based on the unprecedented, but thermodynamically promising, use of carbon monoxide as the oxygen atom acceptor for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Study on Pyrolysis of Isopsoralen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu-zhong Yang; Feng Zhang; Liang-yuan Jia; Li-dong Zhang; Fei Qi; Hai-yan Fan; Ji-bao Cai

    2012-01-01

    The pyrolysis of isopsoralen was studied by synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry at low pressure.The pyrolysis products were detected at different photon energies,the ratios of products to precursor were measured at various pyrolysis temperatures.The experimental results demonstrate that the main pyrolysis products are primary CO and sequential CO elimination products (C10H6O2 and C9H6O).The decomposition channels of isopsoralen were also studied by the density functional theory,then rate constants for competing pathways were calculated by the transition state theory.The dominant decomposition channels of isopsoralen and the molecular structures for corresponding products were identified bv combined experimental and theoretical studies.

  13. Pyrolysis and gasification behavior of black liquor under pressurized conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitty, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study has been to enhance the understanding of the processes involved in pressurized black liquor gasification. Gasification is known to occur in three stages: drying, pyrolysis and char gasification. The work presented here focuses on the pyrolysis and gasification stages. Experiments were carried out primarily in two laboratory-scale reactors. A pressurized grid heater was used to study black liquor pyrolysis under pressurized conditions. Char yields and the fate of elements in the liquor, as well as the degree of liquor swelling, were measured in this device. A pressurized thermogravimetric reactor was used to measure the rate of the char gasification process under different temperatures and pressures and in various gas atmospheres. Pyrolysis experiments were also carried out in this device, and data on swelling behavior, char yields and component release were obtained 317 refs.

  14. Bio-oil from Flash Pyrolysis of Agricultural Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Norazana

    bio-oils. Mainly the influence of feedstock type (wheat straw, rice husk and pine wood), feedstock water content and reactor temperature on the yield of char, bio-oil and gas were investigated. The storage stability of bio-oils with respect to changes in viscosity, water content and pH were...... liquid organics yield. In addition, the chemical compositions of the bio-oils and the chars of the investigated feedstocks were also analyzed. The utilization of the pyrolysis oil in static combustion equipments such as boilers and turbine have shown that the suitability of the pyrolysis oil...... to substitute fossil fuel. However, several limitations still arise due to the instability of the pyrolysis oil that may cause problems with transport and storage. Pyrolysis oil contains more than hundred of chemical compounds and has a wide range of volatility (different boiling points). The stability...

  15. Pyrolysis of polystyrene - polyphenylene oxide to recover styrene and useful products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert J.; Chum, Helena L.

    1995-01-01

    A process of using fast pyrolysis in a carrier gas to convert a polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide plastic waste to a given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components therein comprising: selecting a first temperature range to cause pyrolysis of given polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide and its high value monomeric constituent prior to a temperature range that causes pyrolysis of other plastic components; selecting a catalyst and a support and treating the feed stream with the catalyst to affect acid or base catalyzed reaction pathways to maximize yield or enhance separation of high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide in the first temperature range; differentially heating the feed stream at a heat rate within the first temperature range to provide differential pyrolysis for selective recovery of the high value monomeric constituent of styrene from polystyrene and polyphenylene oxide prior to pyrolysis of other plastic components; separating the high value monomer constituent of styrene; selecting a second higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis to a different derived high value product of polyphenylene oxide from the plastic waste and differentially heating the feed stream at the higher temperature range to cause pyrolysis of the plastic into a polyphenylene oxide derived product; and separating the different derived high value polyphenylene oxide product.

  16. Olive bagasse (Olea europa L.) pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sensoz, S.; Demiral, I. [Osmangazi Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Gercel, H.F. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-15

    Olive bagasse (Olea europea L.) was pyrolysed in a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, heating rate, particle size and sweep gas flow rates on the yields of the products were investigated. Pyrolysis runs were performed using pyrolysis temperatures between 350 and 550 {sup o}C with heating rates of 10 and 50 {sup o}C min{sup -} {sup 1}. The particle size and sweep gas flow rate varied in the ranges 0.224-1.8 mm and 50-200 cm{sup 3} min {sup -1}, respectively. The bio-oil obtained at 500 {sup o}C was analysed and at this temperature the liquid product yield was the maximum. The various characteristics of bio-oil obtained under these conditions were identified on the basis of standard test methods. The empirical formula of the bio-oil with heating value of 31.8 MJ kg{sup -1} was established as CH{sub 1.65}O{sub 0.25}N{sub 0.03}. The chemical characterization showed that the bio-oil obtained from olive bagasse may be potentially valuable as a fuel and chemical feedstock. (author)

  17. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Physical and Chemical Properties of Corn Biochar and Wheat Biochar%制炭温度对玉米和小麦生物质炭理化性质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许燕萍; 谢祖彬; 朱建国; 刘钢; 刘琦

    2013-01-01

    通过缓慢高温裂解方式生产不同温度的小麦和玉米生物质炭,并对其性质进行分析.结果显示,生物质炭性质受裂解温度和生物质种类的影响而表现出差异.当裂解温度从300℃升高到500℃时,小麦生物质炭产率从44.3%降低到38.4%,其生物质炭碳含量从617.9 g/kg升高到674.0 g/kg;玉米生物质炭产率从42.8%(300℃)降低到29.7%(500℃),其生物质炭碳含量从574.8 g/kg(300℃)升高到651.1 g/kg(500℃).生物质炭pH、灰分含量、全磷含量等也随制炭温度升高而升高,小麦生物质炭pH从7.59(300℃)上升到10.51(500℃),灰分含量从186.1 g/kg(300℃)升高到268.2 g/kg(500℃),全磷含量从0.70 g/kg(300℃)升高到1.10 g/kg(500℃);玉米生物质炭pH从9.35(300℃)升高到10.12(500℃),全磷含量从2.34 g/kg(300℃)升高到4.37 g/kg(500℃).说明制炭温度和生物质种类对生物质炭理化性质具有决定性作用.%The experiments investigated the properties of wheat and corn biochars pyrolyzed at different temperatures. Results showed that pyrolysis temperatures and original materials significantly influenced the properties of biochars. When pyrolysis temperature rose from 300 ℃ to 500 ℃, the yeild of wheat and corn biochars (biochar produced by wheat straw and corn straw) decreased from 44.3% to 38.4% and from 42.8% to 29.7%, respectively; the total carbon content of wheat and corn biochars increased from 617.9 g/kg to 674.0 g/kg and from 574.8 g/kg to 651.1 g/kg respectively. For wheat biochar, pH and total P content increased from 7.59 (300℃) to 10.51 (500℃) and from 0.70 g/kg (300℃) to 1.10g/kg (500℃), respectively; for corn biochar, pH and total P content increased from 9.35(300℃) to 10.12(500℃) and from 2.34g/kg (300℃) to 4.37g/kg (500℃), respectively. It indicated that the properties of biochar are depended on the pyrolysis temperature and original materials.

  18. Pyrolysis process and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Kuei

    1983-01-01

    This invention discloses a process and apparatus for pyrolyzing particulate coal by heating with a particulate solid heating media in a transport reactor. The invention tends to dampen fluctuations in the flow of heating media upstream of the pyrolysis zone, and by so doing forms a substantially continuous and substantially uniform annular column of heating media flowing downwardly along the inside diameter of the reactor. The invention is particularly useful for bituminous or agglomerative type coals.

  19. Quality improvement of pyrolysis oil from waste rubber by adding sawdust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-liang; Chang, Jian-min; Cai, Li-ping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2014-12-01

    This work was aimed at improving the pyrolysis oil quality of waste rubber by adding larch sawdust. Using a 1 kg/h stainless pyrolysis reactor, the contents of sawdust in rubber were gradually increased from 0%, 50%, 100% and 200% (wt%) during the pyrolysis process. Using a thermo-gravimetric (TG) analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis of evolving products (TG-FTIR), the weight loss characteristics of the heat under different mixtures of sawdust/rubber were observed. Using the pyrolysis-gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), the vapors from the pyrolysis processes were collected and the compositions of the vapors were examined. During the pyrolysis process, the recovery of the pyrolysis gas and its composition were measured in-situ at a reaction temperature of 450 °C and a retaining time of 1.2s. The results indicated that the efficiency of pyrolysis was increased and the residual carbon was reduced as the percentage of sawdust increased. The adding of sawdust significantly improved the pyrolysis oil quality by reducing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogen and sulfur compounds contents, resulting in an improvement in the combustion efficiency of the pyrolysis oil.

  20. Pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse and co-pyrolysis with an Argentinean subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonelli, P.R.; Buonomo, E.L.; Cukierman, A.L. [University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-07-01

    Physicochemical properties of the charcoal arising from pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse at 600{sup o}C and 800{sup o}C were determined to evaluate potentialities for specific end uses. The charcoals were found fairly adequate as solid bio-fuels. Their quality was comparable to charcoals obtained from some other agro-industrial by-products, reportedly proposed as substitutes of wood-based ones. Surface properties of the charcoal generated at the higher temperature indicated that it is reasonably suited for potential use as low-cost rough adsorbent, soil amender, and/or for further upgrading to activated carbon. Moreover, kinetic measurements for pyrolysis of the sugarcane bagasse individually and mixed with an Argentinean subbituminous coal in equal proportions were conducted by thermogravimetry for the range 25 -900{sup o}C. Data modeling accounting for variations in the activation energy with process evolution provided a proper description of pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis over the entire temperature range.

  1. Formation of Submicron Copper Sulfide Particles Using Spray Pyrolysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggoro, I.; Kang, Yun; Komiya, Takafumi; Okuyama, Kikuo; Tohge, Noboru

    1998-03-01

    The morphology and crystalline phase of submicron copper sulfide particles prepared by spray pyrolysis method have been studied. In a nitrogen gas atmosphere, the covellite phase (CuS) spherical particles could be prepared using the solution with molar ratio of copper nitrate to thiourea and furnace temperatures of 1:2 at 200 300°C, as well as of 1:5 at 200 600°C. The crystalline phase of particles was highly depended on the composition of the precursors and the pyrolysis temperature. The sphericity of particles could be enhanced by increasing the temperature and prolonging the residence time of the droplets or particles in the furnace.

  2. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical physical characteristics of biomass char%热解温度对生物质焦理化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学斌; 许伟刚; 靳维新; 张利孟; 王新民; 谭厚章

    2013-01-01

    The straw pyrolysis chars obtained at 873, 1 073 and 1 273 K were investigated with SEM, BET and TGA to conduct the characterization. The reduction of NO by different straw chars was investigated, with considering the effects of char concentration cchar and NO concentration cNO, to analyze the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the chemical physical characteristics of biomass char. The results show that straw char obtained at 1 073 K holds the most developed pore structure and surface area, the best combustion activity, and the highest NO reduction rate. As the char concentration increases, NO reduction rate linearly increases. As the NO concentration increases, NO reduction rate decreases as a power-function relation. At the transition temperature about 1 173 K the char-NO reaction changes from dynamic-control region to diffusion-control region. In the dynamic-control region, the pyrolysis temperature affects the activation of the char-NO reaction inconspicuously. The reaction orders for NO and straw char are found to be 0. 89 and 1.00, respectively.%利用SEM、BET及TGA对在873、1 073和1 273 K下制得的麦秆焦的理化特性进行分析,进行了用制得的麦秆焦还原NO的实验,同时考虑了焦样及NO初始浓度对该反应的影响,得出了热解温度对麦秆焦的各种物理化学特性及其与NO反应活性的影响.结果表明,1 073 K焦样的孔隙特征最为发达,燃烧活性最高,并对应最高的NO还原效率.焦作用下NO的还原率随着焦样浓度的增大线性升高,而随着初始NO浓度的增大呈幂函数的规律下降.不同热解温度下麦秆焦样与NO的反应均在1 173 K附近存在动力学控制和扩散控制的转折温度;在动力学控制的反应温度范围内,热解温度对麦秆焦与NO反应活化能的影响不大(89.78 ~95.41 kJ/mol),其中,NO浓度项和焦浓度项的反应级数分别为0.89和1.00.

  3. Flash Pyrolysis and Fractional Pyrolysis of Oleaginous Biomass in a Fluidized-bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Brook

    the initial feed mass was recovered as bio-oil. However, the mass of high calorific lipid-derived components in the collected bio-oils remained nearly constant at reaction temperatures above 415°C; between 80-90% of the feedstock lipids were recovered in the bio-oil fraction. In addition, multi-step fractional flash pyrolysis experiments were performed to assess the possibility of producing higher quality bio-oils since a large fraction of protein and carbohydrates degrade at lower temperatures (320-400°C). A low temperature pyrolysis step was first performed and was followed by pyrolysis of the residues at higher temperature. This fractional pyrolysis approach which produced higher quality bio-oil with low water- and nitrogen- content from the higher temperature steps.

  4. Pyrolysis of EVA and its application in recycling of photovoltaic modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG De-wen; Manfred Born; Karsten Wambach

    2004-01-01

    The basic pyrolysis behaviour of ethylene vinyl acetate(EVA) copolymer, which is often used as a lamination agent in solar modules, was investigated in thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis(DTA) and thermovolumetry. The TG analysis showed that the EVA pyrolysis can be accelerated under the partial oxidizing atmosphere but the end pyrolysis temperature must be higher than in nitrogen, to eliminate the coke formed. Meanwhile, a strong exothermal peak occurs at about 450℃ under the air condition and gets weaker obviously at the oxygen content lower than 10 vol.%. The mass balance of EVA pyrolysis was given through thermovolumetry with the output of 10 wt.% permanent gas, 89.9 wt.% condensate and 0.1% residual coke. Besides, the composition of the permanent gas and condensate at different pyrolysis stages were analysed and interpreted on the known pyrolysis mechanism.

  5. Activated carbon from char obtained from vacuum pyrolysis of teak sawdust: pore structure development and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismadji, S; Sudaryanto, Y; Hartono, S B; Setiawan, L E K; Ayucitra, A

    2005-08-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from vacuum pyrolysis char of teak sawdust was studied and the results are presented in this paper. The effects of process variables such as temperature and activation time on the pore structure of activated carbons were studied. The activated carbon prepared from char obtained by vacuum pyrolysis has higher surface area and pore volume than that from atmospheric pyrolysis char. The BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbon prepared from vacuum pyrolysis char were 1150 m2/g and 0.43 cm3/g, respectively.

  6. Synergies in co-pyrolysis of Thai lignite and corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonobe, Taro [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Worasuwannarak, Nakorn; Pipatmanomai, Suneerat [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand)

    2008-12-15

    The results from TGA experiments at the temperature range of 300-600 C evidently distinguished the different pyrolysis behaviours of lignite and corncob; however, no clear synergistic effects could be observed for the mixture. The investigation of co-pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor, however, found significant synergies in both pyrolysis product yields and gas product compositions. The solid yield of the 50:50 lignite/corncob blend was much lower (i.e. 9%) than expected from the calculated value based on individual materials under the range of temperatures studied, and coincided with the higher liquid and gas yield. The synergistic effect in product gas composition was highly pronouncing for CH{sub 4} formation, i.e. three times higher than the calculated value at 400 C. Possible mechanisms were described including the interaction between corncob volatiles and lignite particles, and the effect of the heat profiles of lignite and corncob pyrolysis on the temperature dependent reactions. The enhanced devolatilisation of the blend was explained by the transfer of hydrogen from biomass to coal as well as the promotion of low-temperature thermal decomposition of lignite by exothermic heat released from corncob pyrolysis. Moreover, water, which was one of the major components in corncob volatiles produced mainly at around 200-375 C, can also be expected to act as a reactive agent to promote the secondary tar cracking producing more CH{sub 4}. (author)

  7. The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongyun; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Huan; Yu, Ren; Luo, Guangqian; Liu, Wenqiang; Li, Aijun; Yao, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The fate of sulfur during rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires at temperatures from 673 to 1073K was investigated. Sulfur was predominant in the forms of thiophenic and inorganic sulfides in raw scrap tires. In the pyrolysis process, sulfur in organic forms was unstable and decomposed, leading to the sulfur release into tar and gases. At 673 and 773K, a considerable amount of sulfur was distributed in tar. Temperature increasing from 773 to 973K promoted tar decomposition and facilitated sulfur release into gases. At 1073K, the interactions between volatiles and char stimulated the formation of high-molecular-weight sulfur-containing compounds. After pyrolysis, almost half of the total content of sulfur in raw scrap tires still remained in the char and was mostly in the form of sulfides. Moreover, at temperatures higher than 873K, part of sulfur in the char was immobilized in the sulfates. In the pyrolysis gases, H2S was the main sulfur-containing gas. Increasing temperature stimulated the decomposition of organic polymers in scrap tires and more H2S was formed. Besides H2S, other sulfur-containing gases such as CH3SH, COS and SO2 were produced during the rapid pyrolysis of scrap tires.

  8. Gold Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Environmentally Benign Deoxygenation of Epoxides to Alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotomi Kaneda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a highly efficient and green catalytic deoxygenation of epoxides to alkenes using gold nanoparticles (NPs supported on hydrotalcite [HT: Mg6Al2CO3(OH16] (Au/HT with alcohols, CO/H2O or H2 as the reducing reagent. Various epoxides were selectively converted to the corresponding alkenes. Among the novel metal NPs on HT, Au/HT was found to exhibit outstanding catalytic activity for the deoxygenation reaction. Moreover, Au/HT can be separated from the reaction mixture and reused with retention of its catalytic activity and selectivity. The high catalytic performance of Au/HT was attributed to the selective formation of Au-hydride species by the cooperative effect between Au NPs and HT.

  9. Deoxygenation alters bacterial diversity and community composition in the ocean's largest oxygen minimum zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J Michael; Carolan, Molly T

    2013-01-01

    Oceanic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) have a central role in biogeochemical cycles and are expanding as a consequence of climate change, yet how deoxygenation will affect the microbial communities that control these cycles is unclear. Here we sample across dissolved oxygen gradients in the oceans' largest OMZ and show that bacterial richness displays a unimodal pattern with decreasing dissolved oxygen, reaching maximum values on the edge of the OMZ and decreasing within it. Rare groups on the OMZ margin are abundant at lower dissolved oxygen concentrations, including sulphur-cycling Chromatiales, for which 16S rRNA was amplified from extracted RNA. Microbial species distribution models accurately replicate community patterns based on multivariate environmental data, demonstrate likely changes in distributions and diversity in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, and highlight the sensitivity of key bacterial groups to deoxygenation. Through these mechanisms, OMZ expansion may alter microbial composition, competition, diversity and function, all of which have implications for biogeochemical cycling in OMZs.

  10. Pteropods on the edge: Cumulative effects of ocean acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednaršek, Nina; Harvey, Chris J.; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Feely, Richard A.; Možina, Jasna

    2016-06-01

    We review the state of knowledge of the individual and community responses of euthecosome (shelled) pteropods in the context of global environmental change. In particular, we focus on their responses to ocean acidification, in combination with ocean warming and ocean deoxygenation, as inferred from a growing body of empirical literature, and their relatively nascent place in ecosystem-scale models. Our objectives are: (1) to summarize the threats that these stressors pose to pteropod populations; (2) to demonstrate that pteropods are strong candidate indicators for cumulative effects of OA, warming, and deoxygenation in marine ecosystems; and (3) to provide insight on incorporating pteropods into population and ecosystem models, which will help inform ecosystem-based management of marine resources under future environmental regimes.

  11. Bifunctional Nanoparticle-SILP Catalysts (NPs@SILP) for the Selective Deoxygenation of Biomass Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luska, Kylie L. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Julis, Jennifer [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany); Stavitski, Eli [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zakharov, Dmitri N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, Alina [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Leitner, Walter [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Coal Research, Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    We immobilized ruthenium nanoparticles onto an acidic supported ionic liquid phase (RuNPs@SILP) in the development of bifunctional catalysts for the selective deoxygenation of biomass substrates. RuNPs@SILPs possessed high catalytic activities, selectivities and recyclabilities in the hydrogenolytic deoxygenation and ring opening of C8- and C9-substrates derived from furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetone. When we tailor the acidity of the SILP through the ionic liquid loading provided a molecular parameter by which the catalytic activity and selectivity of the RuNPs@SILPs were controlled to provide a flexible catalyst system toward the formation of different classes of value-added products: cyclic ethers, primary alcohols or aliphatic ethers.

  12. Supercritical water pyrolysis of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wenchao; Du, Guiyue; Li, Jian; Fang, Yuanhao; Hou, Li'an; Chen, Guanyi; Ma, Degang

    2017-01-01

    Municipal sewage sludge (SS) from wastewater treatment plant containing high water content (>85wt.%), lead to the difficulty of co-combustion with MSW or coal due to the high cost of drying. This study explores an alternative method by supercritical water (SCW) pyrolysis of sewage sludge (SS) in a high pressure reaction vessel. The effects of temperature and moisture content of SS on yield and composition of the products (bio-oil, bio char and non-condensable gas) were studied. A temperature of 385°C and moisture content of 85wt.% were found to be the optimum conditions for the maximum bio-oil production of 37.23wt.%, with a higher heating value of 31.08MJ/kg. In the optimum condition, the yields of aliphatic hydrocarbon and phenols were about 29.23wt.% and 12.51wt.%, respectively. The physical and chemical properties of bio-char were analyzed by using XRF and BET. Results of GC analyses of NCG showed that it has the maximum HHV of 13.39MJ/m(3) at 445°C and moisture content of 85wt.%. The reaction path from SS to bio-oil through SCW pyrolysis was given. Moreover, carbon balance was calculated for the optimal condition, and finding out that 64.27wt.% of the carbon content was transferred from SS to bio-oil. Finally, this work demonstrates that the SCW pyrolysis is a promising disposal method for SS.

  13. Thermogravimetric analysis and fast pyrolysis of Milkweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Soo; Agblevor, Foster A

    2014-10-01

    Pyrolysis of Milkweed was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a bubbling fluidized bed reactor. Total liquid yield of Milkweed pyrolysis was between 40.74% and 44.19 wt% between 425 °C and 550 °C. The gas yield increased from 27.90 wt% to 33.33 wt% with increasing reaction temperature. The higher heating values (HHV) of the Milkweed bio-oil were relatively high (30.33-32.87 MJ/kg) and varied with reaction temperature, feeding rate and fluidization velocity. The selectivity for CO2 was highest within non-condensable gases, and the molar ratio of CO2/CO was about 3 at the different reaction conditions. The (13)C NMR analysis, of the bio-oil showed that the relative concentration carboxylic group and its derivatives was higher at 425 °C than 475 °C, which resulted in slightly higher oxygen content in bio-oil. The pH of aqueous phase obtained at 475 °C was 7.37 which is the highest reported for any lignocellulosic biomass pyrolysis oils.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Synthesis Using Coal Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothi, Kapil; Simate, Geoffrey S; Falcon, Rosemary; Iyuke, Sunny E; Meyyappan, M

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates carbon nanotube (CNT) production from coal pyrolysis wherein the output gases are used in a chemical vapor deposition reactor. The carbon products are similar to those using commercial coal gas as feedstock, but coal is a relatively cheaper feedstock compared to high purity source gases. A Gibbs minimization model has been developed to predict the volume percentages of product gases from coal pyrolysis. Methane and carbon monoxide were the largest carbon components of the product stream and thus formed the primary source for CNT synthesis. Both the model and the observations showed that increasing the furnace temperature led to a decrease in the absolute quantities of "useful" product gases, with the optimal temperature between 400 and 500 °C. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic rate law for CNT from coal pyrolysis was derived as d[CNT]/dt = K([CO][CH4])(1/2), where K is a function of several equilibrium constants representing various reactions in the CNT formation process.

  15. Responses of mesopelagic fish assemblages to environmental disturbance: ocean deoxygenation and oceanic fronts

    OpenAIRE

    Netburn, Amanda Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the global ocean, there is an abundant and diverse assemblage of fishes aggregated at mesopelagic (200-1000 m) depths. These fishes are critical to pelagic food webs and carbon transport. In the southern California Current Ecosystem, with naturally hypoxic mesopelagic waters, mesopelagic fishes may be vulnerable to predicted ocean deoxygenation. Additionally, water property discontinuities at oceanic fronts can disproportionately affect abundance, compositions, and reproduction o...

  16. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    OpenAIRE

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate us...

  17. Characterization of a C3 Deoxygenation Pathway Reveals a Key Branch Point in Aminoglycoside Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Meinan; Ji, Xinjian; Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Chen; Su, Li; Ding, Wei; Deng, Zixin; Yu, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2016-05-25

    Apramycin is a clinically interesting aminoglycoside antibiotic (AGA) containing a highly unique bicyclic octose moiety, and this octose is deoxygenated at the C3 position. Although the biosynthetic pathways for most 2-deoxystreptamine-containing AGAs have been well characterized, the pathway for apramycin biosynthesis, including the C3 deoxygenation process, has long remained unknown. Here we report detailed investigation of apramycin biosynthesis by a series of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatical studies. We show that AprD4 is a novel radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme, which uses a noncanonical CX3CX3C motif for binding of a [4Fe-4S] cluster and catalyzes the dehydration of paromamine, a pseudodisaccharide intermediate in apramycin biosynthesis. We also show that AprD3 is an NADPH-dependent reductase that catalyzes the reduction of the dehydrated product from AprD4-catalyzed reaction to generate lividamine, a C3' deoxygenated product of paromamine. AprD4 and AprD3 do not form a tight catalytic complex, as shown by protein complex immunoprecipitation and other assays. The AprD4/AprD3 enzyme system acts on different pseudodisaccharide substrates but does not catalyze the deoxygenation of oxyapramycin, an apramycin analogue containing a C3 hydroxyl group on the octose moiety, suggesting that oxyapramycin and apramycin are partitioned into two parallel pathways at an early biosynthetic stage. Functional dissection of the C6 dehydrogenase AprQ shows the crosstalk between different AGA biosynthetic gene clusters from the apramycin producer Streptomyces tenebrarius, and reveals the remarkable catalytic versatility of AprQ. Our study highlights the intriguing chemistry in apramycin biosynthesis and nature's ingenuity in combinatorial biosynthesis of natural products.

  18. Study of Pyrolysisis of Polymers and Coal and Co-Pyrolysis of Their Blends, Kinetics of the Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana MIKULOVÁ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Amount of polymer waste increase every year and for this reason upgrading of this waste is a necessity. Nowadays waste disposal and incineration of polymers waste are the most frequently used methods which (i did not allowed chemical and energy utilization and (ii are not environmentally friendly. Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis provide an attractive way to dispose of and convert polymer waste and coal into higher value fuel and the specific benefits of this method potentially include many environmental friendly advantages. Pyrolysis and co-pyrolysis has been studied using termogravimetry apparatus NETZCH TG-DTA STA 409 EP. The pyrolysis of all polymers except for scrap tyres was a one-step process and temperature range was narrower than for coal pyrolysis. The overlapping temperature range for pyrolysis of polymers and coal was 200–600°C. The synergic effect and kinetics of co-pyrolysis of polymers and coal has been studied in the given temperature range. The addition of polymers to coal led to (i the enhancement of weight loss of brown coal, (ii the shift of temperature of the max pyrolysis speed and (iii the slight influence of EA of coal pyrolysis.

  19. Validation Results for Core-Scale Oil Shale Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staten, Josh; Tiwari, Pankaj

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes a study of oil shale pyrolysis at various scales and the subsequent development a model for in situ production of oil from oil shale. Oil shale from the Mahogany zone of the Green River formation was used in all experiments. Pyrolysis experiments were conducted at four scales, powdered samples (100 mesh) and core samples of 0.75”, 1” and 2.5” diameters. The batch, semibatch and continuous flow pyrolysis experiments were designed to study the effect of temperature (300°C to 500°C), heating rate (1°C/min to 10°C/min), pressure (ambient and 500 psig) and size of the sample on product formation. Comprehensive analyses were performed on reactants and products - liquid, gas and spent shale. These experimental studies were designed to understand the relevant coupled phenomena (reaction kinetics, heat transfer, mass transfer, thermodynamics) at multiple scales. A model for oil shale pyrolysis was developed in the COMSOL multiphysics platform. A general kinetic model was integrated with important physical and chemical phenomena that occur during pyrolysis. The secondary reactions of coking and cracking in the product phase were addressed. The multiscale experimental data generated and the models developed provide an understanding of the simultaneous effects of chemical kinetics, and heat and mass transfer on oil quality and yield. The comprehensive data collected in this study will help advance the move to large-scale in situ oil production from the pyrolysis of oil shale.

  20. Pyrolysis of Softwood Carbohydrates in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Yu. Murzin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work pyrolysis of pure pine wood and softwood carbohydrates, namely cellulose and galactoglucomannan (the major hemicellulose in coniferous wood, was conducted in a batch mode operated fluidized bed reactor. Temperature ramping (5°C/min was applied to the heating until a reactor temperature of 460 °C was reached. Thereafter the temperature was kept until the release of non-condensable gases stopped. The different raw materials gave significantly different bio-oils. Levoglucosan was the dominant product in the cellulose pyrolysis oil. Acetic acid was found in the highest concentrations in both the galactoglucomannan and in the pine wood pyrolysis oils. Acetic acid is most likely formed by removal of O-acetyl groups from mannose units present in GGM structure.

  1. Bio-oil from Flash Pyrolysis of Agricultural Residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Norazana

    -oil was around 525 °C to 550 °C for all straw moisture contents. It was investigated how differences in biomass composition influence pyrolysis products yields and the composition of char and bio-oils. Details about this investigation are explained in Paper II (Chapter 3). The used pine wood had a low ash...... at reactor temperatures ranging from 475 to 575 oC. It was observed that the formation of char and gas is affected by the biomass alkali content. Increasing biomass alkali content caused an increased feedstock conversion at low temperature, a lower maximum liquid organic yield temperature and a lower maximum......This thesis describes the production of bio-oils from flash pyrolysis of agricultural residues, using a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor (PCR). By thermal degradation of agricultural residues in the PCR, a liquid oil, char and non-condensable gases are produced. The yield of each fraction...

  2. How plasma induced oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation influences viability of skin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Strudwick, Xanthe; Short, Robert D.; Ogawa, Kotaro; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Gaur, Nishtha; Hong, Sung-Ha; Cowin, Allison J.; Fukuhara, Hideo; Inoue, Keiji; Ito, Masafumi; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick W.; Bradley, James W.; Graves, David B.; Szili, Endre J.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of oxidation, oxygenation, and de-oxygenation arising from He gas jet and He plasma jet treatments on the viability of skin cells cultured in vitro has been investigated. He gas jet treatment de-oxygenated cell culture medium in a process referred to as "sparging." He plasma jet treatments oxidized, as well as oxygenated or de-oxygenated cell culture medium depending on the dissolved oxygen concentration at the time of treatment. He gas and plasma jets were shown to have beneficial or deleterious effects on skin cells depending on the concentration of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules at the time of treatment. Different combinations of treatments with He gas and plasma jets can be used to modulate the concentrations of dissolved oxygen and other oxidative molecules to influence cell viability. This study highlights the importance of a priori knowledge of the concentration of dissolved oxygen at the time of plasma jet treatment, given the potential for significant impact on the biological or medical outcome. Monitoring and controlling the dynamic changes in dissolved oxygen is essential in order to develop effective strategies for the use of cold atmospheric plasma jets in biology and medicine.

  3. Electrochemical interfacial influences on deoxygenation and hydrogenation reactions in CO reduction on a Cu(100) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Wen-Feng; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2016-06-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons on a copper surface has attracted much attention in the last few decades for providing a sustainable way for energy storage. During the CO2 and further CO electroreduction processes, deoxygenation that is C-O bond dissociation, and hydrogenation that is C-H bond formation, are two main types of surface reactions catalyzed by the copper electrode. In this work, by performing the state-of-the-art constrained ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we have systematically investigated deoxygenation and hydrogenation reactions involving two important intermediates, COHads and CHOads, under various conditions of (i) on a Cu(100) surface without water molecules, (ii) at the water/Cu(100) interface and (iii) at the charged water/Cu(100) interface, in order to elucidate the electrochemical interfacial influences. It has been found that the electrochemical interface can facilitate considerably the C-O bond dissociation via changing the reaction mechanisms. However, C-H bond formation has not been affected by the presence of water or electrical charge. Furthermore, the promotional roles of an aqueous environment and negative electrode potential in deoxygenation have been clarified, respectively. This fundamental study provides an atomic level insight into the significance of the electrochemical interface towards electrocatalysis, which is of general importance for understanding electrochemistry.

  4. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue deoxygenation during exercise in type 1 diabetes patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Juha E; Koponen, Anne S; Pullinen, Katri; Hägglund, Harriet; Aho, Jyrki M; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Tikkanen, Heikki O

    2012-05-31

    We used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate whether leg and arm skeletal muscle and cerebral deoxygenation differ during incremental cycling exercise in men with type 1 diabetes (T1D, n=10, mean±SD age 33±7 years) and healthy control men (matched by age, anthrometry, and self-reported physical activity, CON, n=10, 32±7 years) to seek an explanation for lower aerobic capacity (˙VO2peak) often reported in T1D. T1D had lower ˙VO2peak (35±4mlkg(-1)min(-1) vs. 43±8mlkg(-1)min(-1), Prate (219±33W vs. 290±44W, Prate, but not at peak exercise, while arm muscle and cerebral deoxygenation were similar. Thus, in T1D compared with CON, faster leg muscle deoxygenation suggests limited circulatory ability to increase O(2) delivery as a plausible explanation for lower ˙VO2peak and earlier fatigue in T1D.

  5. Factors Controlling Deoxygenation of "Floodwater" Overlying an Acid Sulfate Soil: Experimental Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. LIN; P. G. HASKINS; J. LIN

    2003-01-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to simulate the effect of flooding on water deoxygenation in acid sulfate soil floodplain systems. The originally oxygenated "floodwater" could be deoxygenated immediately following "flooding" and it is likely that this was caused mainly by decomposition of organic debris from the inundated plants. Deoxygenation eventually led to the depletion of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the "floodwater"and it is highly possible that this resulted in the transformations of ferric Fe to ferrous Fe, sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and organic nitrogen to ammonia (ammonification). The accumulation of these reduced substances allows the "floodwater" to develop DO-consuming capacity (DOCC). When the "floodwater" is mixed with the introduced oxygenated water, apart from the dilution effects, the reduced substances contained in the "floodwater" oxidize to further consume DO carried by the introduced water. However, it appears that the DO drop in the mixed water can only last for a few hours if no additional DO-depleted "floodwater" is added.Entry of atmospheric oxygen into the water can raise the DO level of the mixed water and lower water pH through the oxidation of the reduced substances.

  6. A mathematical model relating cortical oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin flows and volumes to neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Nathan R.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Suh, Minah; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Doerschuk, Peter C.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. To describe a toolkit of components for mathematical models of the relationship between cortical neural activity and space-resolved and time-resolved flows and volumes of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin motivated by optical intrinsic signal imaging (OISI). Approach. Both blood flow and blood volume and both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are accounted for. Flow and volume are described by including analogies to both resistive and capacitive electrical circuit elements. Oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and their interconversion are described by generalization of Kirchhoff's laws based on well-mixed compartments. Main results. Mathematical models built from this toolkit are able to reproduce experimental single-stimulus OISI results that are described in papers from other research groups and are able to describe the response to multiple-stimuli experiments as a sublinear superposition of responses to the individual stimuli. Significance. The same assembly of tools from the toolkit but with different parameter values is able to describe effects that are considered distinctive, such as the presence or absence of an initial decrease in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration, indicating that the differences might be due to unique parameter values in a subject rather than different fundamental mechanisms.

  7. Kinetics of scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Gartzen; Aguado, Roberto; Olazar, Martín; Arabiourrutia, Miriam; Bilbao, Javier

    2009-10-01

    Scrap tyre pyrolysis under vacuum is attractive because it allows easier product condensation and control of composition (gas, liquid and solid). With the aim of determining the effect of vacuum on the pyrolysis kinetics, a study has been carried out in thermobalance. Two data analysis methods have been used in the kinetic study: (i) the treatment of experimental data of weight loss and (ii) the deconvolution of DTG (differential thermogravimetry) curve. The former allows for distinguishing the pyrolysis of the three main components (volatile components, natural rubber and styrene-butadiene rubber) according to three successive steps. The latter method identifies the kinetics for the pyrolysis of individual components by means of DTG curve deconvolution. The effect of vacuum in the process is significant. The values of activation energy for the pyrolysis of individual components of easier devolatilization (volatiles and NR) are lower for pyrolysis under vacuum with a reduction of 12K in the reaction starting temperature. The kinetic constant at 503K for devolatilization of volatile additives at 0.25atm is 1.7 times higher than that at 1atm, and that corresponding to styrene-butadiene rubber at 723K is 2.8 times higher. Vacuum enhances the volatilization and internal diffusion of products in the pyrolysis process, which contributes to attenuating the secondary reactions of the repolymerization and carbonization of these products on the surface of the char (carbon black). The higher quality of carbon black is interesting for process viability. The large-scale implementation of this process in continuous mode requires a comparison to be made between the economic advantages of using a vacuum and the energy costs, which will be lower when the technologies used for pyrolysis require a lower ratio between reactor volume and scrap tyre flow rate.

  8. Pyrolysis oil as diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S. [Wartsila Diesel International Ltd., Vaasa (Finland). Diesel Technology

    1996-12-31

    Wood waste pyrolysis oil is an attractive fuel alternative for diesel engine operation. The main benefit is the sustainability of the fuel. No fossil reserves are consumed. The fact that wood waste pyrolysis oil does not contribute to CO{sub 2} emissions is of utmost importance. This means that power plants utilising pyrolysis oil do not cause additional global warming. Equally important is the reduced sulphur emissions that this fuel alternative implies. The sulphur content of pyrolysis oil is extremely low. The high water content and low heating value are also expected to result in very low NO{sub x} emissions. Utilisation of wood waste pyrolysis oil in diesel engines, however, involves a lot of challenges and problems to be solved. The low heating value requires a new injection system with high capacity. The corrosive characteristics of the fluid also underline the need for new injection equipment materials. Wood waste pyrolysis oil contains solid particles which can clog filters and cause abrasive wear. Wood waste pyrolysis oil has proven to have extremely bad ignition properties. The development of a reliable injection system which is able to cope with such a fuel involves a lot of optimisation tests, redesign and innovative solutions. Successful single-cylinder tests have already been performed and they have verified that diesel operation on wood pyrolysis oil is technically possible. (orig.)

  9. Microwave Heating Applied to Pyrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Yolanda; Arenillas, Ana; Menendez, J. Angel

    2011-01-01

    the MW pyrolysis as an original thermochemical process of materials is presented. This chapter comprises a general overview of the thermochemical and quantifying aspects of the pyrolysis process, including current application togethe with a compilation of the most frequently used materials

  10. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Nitroethane Pyrolysis at a Low Pressure: Competition Reactions in the Primary Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Kuiwen; Glarborg, Peter; Zhou, Xueyao

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of nitroethane has been investigated over the temperature range of 682-1423 K in a plug flow reactor at a low pressure. The major species in the pyrolysis process have been identified and quantified using tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry...... pyrolysis of nitroethane, with the latter channel being more important at high temperatures. The adoption of new decomposition pathways of CH3CHNO2 has resulted in reasonable predictions for relevant intermediates....

  11. Direct upgrading of fast pyrolysis lignin vapor over the HZSM-5 catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy M.;

    2016-01-01

    Lignin has been pyrolyzed in a continuous fast pyrolysis reactor and the vapor was subsequently upgraded in situ over a downstream, close coupled HZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed bed reactor. The effect of the catalyst temperature on the HZSM-5 upgrading of lignin derived pyrolysis vapor was investigat...

  12. Pyrolysis of cassava rhizome in a counter-rotating twin screw reactor unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirijanusorn, Somsak; Sriprateep, Keartisak; Pattiya, Adisak

    2013-07-01

    A counter-rotating twin screw reactor unit was investigated for its behaviour in the pyrolysis of cassava rhizome biomass. Several parameters such as pyrolysis temperature in the range of 500-700°C, biomass particle size of twin screw reactor was relatively low, whereas the solids content was relatively high, compared to some other reactor configurations.

  13. Production of fuel by pyrolysis of the bagasse of grapes: yield and high thermal power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foussard, J.N.; Talayrach, B.; Besombes Vailhe, J.

    1979-01-01

    A liquid fuel of high calorific value was obtained by the pyrolysis of grape bagasse, with the pyrolysis temperature being the factor determining the product composition. Grape bagasse is produced in distilleries and is thus a practical and readily available material.

  14. The effect of different pyrolysis temperatures on the speciation and availability in soil of P in biochar produced from the solid fraction of manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Sander; Harmer, Sarah L; Bekiaris, Georgios;

    2017-01-01

    had little effect on P speciation; however, as the temperature increased above 600 °C, the P gradually became more thermodynamically stable in species such as apatite. At very high temperatures above 1000 °C, there were indications of reduced forms of P. Biochar production decreased the immediate...

  15. Co-pyrolysis of lignite with hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Haykiri-Acma, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department

    2005-07-01

    In this study, the formation rates of the apparent pyrolytic products of Elbistan lignite sample from Turkey and Turkish hazelnut shell were investigated. For this purpose, original samples and their blends were subjected to pyrolysis process using a thermogravimetric analyzer under a dynamic nitrogen atmosphere of 40 cc/min. Temperature was increased from ambient to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis curves were obtained, by which the rates of pyrolysis process at different temperatures were evaluated. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A new approach to study fast pyrolysis of pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Yao, J.; Lin, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemical Metallurgy Fast Reactions Laboratory, Beijing, BJ (China)

    2002-07-01

    An experimental study of the effects of varying bed temperature and coal particle size on the fast pyrolysis of pulverized coal in a downer reactor is described. A Datong bituminous coal (particle size 0.5 and 0.34 mm) was studied at temperatures ranging from 592{sup o} C to 720{sup o} C. The experiments were conducted in a batch apparatus. An on-line gas analyzer was used to measure carbon dioxide release curves. The experimental data were used to develop a pyrolysis model that quantifies the fast heating of fine coal particles. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization.

  18. Environmental fatigue behaviors of wrought and cast stainless steels in 310 .deg. C Deoxygenated Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Pyung Yeon

    2011-02-15

    Environmental fatigue behaviors of wrought type 316LN stainless steel and cast CF8M stainless steel were investigated. LCF tests were performed at fixed strain rate of 0.04%/s with 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%, 1.0% strain amplitudes in 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment. In addition, to analyze microstructure effect on fatigue behavior, low cycle fatigue tests in air environment were performed at fixed strain rate of 0.4%/s, 0.04%/s with 0.4%, 0.8% strain amplitudes. It was shown that the low cycle fatigue life of CF8M in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment was slightly longer than that of 316LN. On the other hand, the low cycle fatigue life of CF8M in a 310 .deg. C air environment was slightly shorter than that of 316LN or was similar with that of 316LN. Through OM observation and phase image analysis, it was confirmed that the ferrite content of CF8M tested in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment was larger than that of CF8M tested in a 310 .deg. C air environment. It was shown that the ferrite phase fraction of CF8M tested in 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment was approximately 26∼28% and that of CF8M tested in air environment was approximately 10∼12%. The difference of ferrite content in CF8M results in superior tensile properties as higher ferrite content. Furthermore, the difference of ferrite content in CF8M might be the cause of different result of fatigue life between CF8M and 316LN depending on environment. In this study, focused on CF8M having 26∼28% ferrite content, to understand the causes of these differences in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment, fracture surface and crack morphology were observed. And material factors like microstructure, mechanical properties factors like stress behavior during fatigue life, factors by environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) like hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and chemical compositions of both materials were analyzed. Mainly in a 310 .deg. C deoxygenated water environment, the

  19. Finding the chemistry in biomass pyrolysis: Millisecond chemical kinetics and visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Christoph

    Biomass pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical method for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable sources. Development of a fundamental understanding of biomass pyrolysis chemistry is difficult due to the multi-scale and multi-phase nature of the process; biomass length scales span 11 orders of magnitude and pyrolysis phenomena include solid, liquid, and gas phase chemistry in addition to heat and mass transfer. These complexities have a significant effect on chemical product distributions and lead to variability between reactor technologies. A major challenge in the study of biomass pyrolysis is the development of kinetic models capable of describing hundreds of millisecond-scale reactions of biomass into lower molecular weight products. In this work, a novel technique for studying biomass pyrolysis provides the first- ever experimental determination of kinetics and rates of formation of the primary products from cellulose pyrolysis, providing insight into the millisecond-scale chemical reaction mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of heat and mass transport limitations for cellulose pyrolysis chemistry and are used to identify the length scales at which transport limitations become relevant during pyrolysis. Through this technique, a transition is identified, known as the reactive melting point, between low and high temperature depolymerization. The transition between two mechanisms of cellulose decompositions unifies the mechanisms that govern low temperature char formation, intermediate pyrolysis conditions, and high temperature gas formation. The conditions under which biomass undergoes pyrolysis, including modes of heat transfer, have been shown to significantly affect the distribution of biorenewable chemical and fuel products. High-speed photography is used to observe the liftoff of initially crystalline cellulose particles when impinged on a heated surface, known as the Leidenfrost effect for room-temperature liquids. Order

  20. Kinetics Analysis of Coconut Shell Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xue-mei; JIANG; Jian-chun; SUN; Kang; XU; Fan; XU; Yu

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The paper aimed to study kinetics analysis of coconut shell pyrolysis. [Method] Thermo gravimetric analysis was used to study the pyrolysis characteristic of coconut shell at different pyrolysis rates (5, 10, 20 K/min). [Result] The pyrolysis process included 3 stages, water loss, pyrolysis, and thermal condensation. The pyrolysis process can be described through first-order reaction model. With the increasing pyrolysis rate, activation energy in the first stage rose, but activation energy in the second stage reduced. [Conclusion] The study provided theoretical basis for the promotion and application of biomass energy.

  1. Fuel-N Evolution during the Pyrolysis of Industrial Biomass Wastes with High Nitrogen Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshikawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, sewage sludge and mycelial waste from antibiotic production were pyrolyzed in a batch scale fixed-bed reactor as examples of two kinds of typical industrial biomass wastes with high nitrogen content. A series of experiments were conducted on the rapid pyrolysis and the slow pyrolysis of these wastes in the temperature range from 500–800 °C to investigate the Fuel-N transformation behavior among pyrolysis products. The results showed that Fuel-N conversion to Char-N intimately depended on the pyrolysis temperature and the yield of Char-N reduced with the increase of the pyrolysis temperature. Under the same pyrolysis conditions, Tar-N production mainly depended on complex properties of the different biomasses, including volatile matter, nitrogen content and biomass functional groups. HCN was the predominant NOx precursor in the rapid pyrolysis of biomass, whereas in the slow pyrolysis of mycelial waste, more NH3 was produced than HCN due to the additional NH3 formation through the hydrogenation reaction of Char-N, HCN and H radicals. At the same time, some part of the char was analyzed by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR to get more information on the nitrogen functionality changes and the tar was also characterized by Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (GCMS to identify typical nitrogenous tar compounds. Finally, the whole nitrogen distribution in products was discussed.

  2. Flash pyrolysis fuel oil: BIO-POK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, S. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Flash pyrolysis oil from Ensyn Tech., Canada and Union Fenosa, Spain was combusted with simple pressure atomisation equipment commonly used with light fuel oils in intermediate size (0.1-1 MW) boilers. With a number of modifications to the combustion system, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO{sub x}) could be reduced to acceptable levels: CO < 30 ppm and NO{sub x} < 140 ppm. Particulate emissions which were initially very high (Bacharach 4-5) were reduced (Bach. 2-3) by system changes but are still higher than from light fuel oil (Bach. <1). The modifications to the combustion system were: acid resistant progressive cavity pump, higher oil preheat temperature and higher oil pressure than for light fuel oils, refractory section between burner and boiler warmed up to at least 800 deg C. In addition, it was necessary to store pyrolysis oil samples under inert conditions to prevent oxidation and to rinse nozzles with alcohol after shutdown to prevent coking. The complexity and cost of these system modifications are considered to be too great for current grades of flash pyrolysis oil to be sold as a light fuel oil replacement. Improvements to fuel quality will be necessary. The main improvements are lowering of viscosity and improving of stability

  3. Oxidative desulfurization of tire pyrolysis oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low cost method for the purification of oils obtained from the pyrolysis of used tires. Oxidative desulfurization is a promising route for purification of tire pyrolysis oils as hydro-desulfurization may not be affordable for small scale industries. Different additives and acids have been employed for the enhancement of properties of pyrolytic oils. The experimental conditions were kept identical throughout, i.e. atmospheric pressure and 50°C temperature for comparison of performance of various additives. The use of hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid mixture (10 wt.% was found more economical and effective in desulfurization and improvement of fuel properties of sample oils. The contribution of sulfuric acid in desulfurization and decreasing viscosity was also satisfactory but due to high price of concentrated sulfuric acid its use may not be economical. Calcium oxide and Fuller’s earth was not found to be effective in desulfurization. Results indicate that oxidative desulfurization could render tire pyrolysis oils suitable for blending as heating fuel.

  4. Pyrolysis and dehalogenation of plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoning; Sun, Lushi; Xiang, Jun; Hu, Song; Su, Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Plastics from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) have been an important environmental problem because these plastics commonly contain toxic halogenated flame retardants which may cause serious environmental pollution, especially the formation of carcinogenic substances polybrominated dibenzo dioxins/furans (PBDD/Fs), during treat process of these plastics. Pyrolysis has been proposed as a viable processing route for recycling the organic compounds in WEEE plastics into fuels and chemical feedstock. However, dehalogenation procedures are also necessary during treat process, because the oils collected in single pyrolysis process may contain numerous halogenated organic compounds, which would detrimentally impact the reuse of these pyrolysis oils. Currently, dehalogenation has become a significant topic in recycling of WEEE plastics by pyrolysis. In order to fulfill the better resource utilization of the WEEE plastics, the compositions, characteristics and dehalogenation methods during the pyrolysis recycling process of WEEE plastics were reviewed in this paper. Dehalogenation and the decomposition or pyrolysis of WEEE plastics can be carried out simultaneously or successively. It could be 'dehalogenating prior to pyrolysing plastics', 'performing dehalogenation and pyrolysis at the same time' or 'pyrolysing plastics first then upgrading pyrolysis oils'. The first strategy essentially is the two-stage pyrolysis with the release of halogen hydrides at low pyrolysis temperature region which is separate from the decomposition of polymer matrixes, thus obtaining halogenated free oil products. The second strategy is the most common method. Zeolite or other type of catalyst can be used in the pyrolysis process for removing organohalogens. The third strategy separate pyrolysis and dehalogenation of WEEE plastics, which can, to some degree, avoid the problem of oil value decline due to the use of catalyst, but obviously, this strategy may increase the cost of

  5. Removal of organobromine compounds from the pyrolysis oils of flame retarded plastics using zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, William J.; Williams, Paul T. [Energy and Resources Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    Two flame retarded plastics have been pyrolysed in the presence of two zeolite catalysts to remove the organobromine compounds from the derived pyrolysis oil. The flame retarded plastics were, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) that was flame retarded with tetrabromobisphenol A and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) that was flame retarded with decabromodiphenyl ether. The two catalysts investigated were zeolite ZSM-5 and zeolite Y-Zeolite. Pyrolysis was carried out in a fixed bed reactor at a final pyrolysis temperature of 440 C. The pyrolysis gases were passed immediately to a fixed bed of the catalyst. It was found that the presence of zeolite catalysts increased the amount of gaseous hydrocarbons produced during pyrolysis but decreased the amount of pyrolysis oil produced. In addition, significant quantities of coke were formed on the surface of the catalysts during pyrolysis. The zeolite catalysts were found to reduce the formation of some valuable pyrolysis products such as styrene and cumene, but other products such as naphthalene were formed instead. The zeolite catalysts, especially Y-Zeolite, were found to be very effective at removing volatile organobromine compounds. However, they were less effective at removing antimony bromide from the volatile pyrolysis products, although some antimony bromide was found on the surfaces of the spent catalysts. (author)

  6. Catalytic hydroprocessing of fast pyrolysis oils: Impact of biomass feedstock on process efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Daniel; Westover, Tyler; Howe, Daniel; Deutch, Steve; Starace, Anne; Emerson, Rachel; Hernandez, Sergio; Santosa, Daniel; Lukins, Craig; Kutnyakov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    We report here on an experimental study to produce refinery-ready fuel blendstocks via catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (upgrading) of pyrolysis oil using several biomass feedstocks and various blends. Blends were tested along with the pure materials to determine the effect of blending on product yields and qualities. Within experimental error, oil yields from fast pyrolysis and upgrading are shown to be linear functions of the blend components. Switchgrass exhibited lower fast pyrolysis and upgrading yields than the woody samples, which included clean pine, oriented strand board (OSB), and a mix of pinon and juniper (PJ). The notable exception was PJ, for which the poor upgrading yield of 18% was likely associated with the very high viscosity of the PJ fast pyrolysis oil (947 cp). The highest fast pyrolysis yield (54% dry basis) was obtained from clean pine, while the highest upgrading yield (50%) was obtained from a blend of 80% clean pine and 20% OSB (CP8OSB2). For switchgrass, reducing the fast pyrolysis temperature to 450 degrees C resulted in a significant increase to the pyrolysis oil yield and reduced hydrogen consumption during hydrotreating, but did not directly affect the hydrotreating oil yield. The water content of fast pyrolysis oils was also observed to increase linearly with the summed content of potassium and sodium, ranging from 21% for clean pine to 37% for switchgrass. Multiple linear regression models demonstrate that fast pyrolysis is strongly dependent upon the contents lignin and volatile matter as well as the sum of potassium and sodium.

  7. Pyrolysis characteristics of the mixture of printed circuit board scraps and coal powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Juan; Wang, Haifeng; Chen, Shuhe; Cai, Bin; Ge, Linhan; Xia, Wencheng

    2014-10-01

    Thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and infrared spectroscopy were used to analyze the pyrolysis characteristics of printed circuit board scraps (PCBs), coal powder and their mixtures under nitrogen atmosphere. The experimental results show that there is a large difference between waste PCBs and coal powder in pyrolysis processing. The pyrolysis properties of the mixing samples are the result of interaction of the PCBs and coal powder, which is influenced by the content of mixture. The degree of pyrolysis and pyrolysis properties of the mixture are much better than that of the single component. The TG and the differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves of the PCBs mixed with coal powder move towards the high-temperature zone with increasing amount of coal powder and subsequently the DTG peak also becomes wider. The Coats-Redfern integral method was used to determine the kinetic parameters of pyrolysis reaction mechanism with the different proportion of mixture. The gas of pyrolysis mainly composes of CO2, CO, H2O and some hydrocarbon. The bromide characteristic absorption peak has been detected obviously in the pyrolysis gas of PCBs. On the contrary, the absorption peak of the bromide is not obvious in pyrolysis gas of the PCBs samples adding 40% coal powder.

  8. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is wasteful of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduced the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (1) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (2) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (3) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. Hydrogen may be obtained from methane by pyrolysis in the temperature range 10000-12000C. The main reaction products are hydrogen and carbon, though very small amounts of higher hydrocarbons, including aromatic hydrocarbons are formed. The conversion efficiency is about 95% at 12000C. One needs to distinguish between thermodynamic equilibrium conversion and conversion limited by kinetics in a finite reactor.

  9. Mechanism of Xylan Pyrolysis by Py-GC/MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-rong; LIANG Tao; RU Bin; GUO Xiu-juan

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the decomposition behavior of hemicellulose,xylan was chosen as the representative of hemicellulose to study the fast pyrolysis on the combination system of analytical pyrolyzer and gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer(Py-GC/MS).The main condensable products of xylan pyrolysis consisted of acids,aldehydes,and ketones; while gas products contained CO2,CO,CH4 and H2.Acetic acid and furfural were the most abundant products with the highest contents of 20.11% and 20.24% respectively.While furfural and acetic acid were formed competitively with residence time and temperature increases,the distribution of xylan pyrolysis products did not vary with the residence time and temperature,while the total content of several kinds of products changed a lot.According to the analysis of experimental data,a reaction pathway of xylan decomposition was deduced so as to illustrate the formation mechanism of main products.

  10. Comparative Study on the Pyrolysis Behaviors of Corn Stalk and Pine Sawdust Using TG-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云鹏; 丁曼; 窦有权; 樊星; 王月伦; 魏贤勇

    2014-01-01

    The pyrolysis behaviors of corn stalk (CS) and pine sawdust (PS) were investigated with thermogravim-etry-mass spectroscopy (TG-MS). The peak temperature of PS was higher and the main decomposition region shifted to higher temperature compared with CS, which implied that the hemicellulose and cellulose of PS were more ther-mally stable than those of CS. However, the hemicellulose and cellulose of PS were more easily decomposed into gaseous products than those of CS during pyrolysis. The pyrolysis process of biomass can be described by a two-step independent first-order kinetic model. This fundamental study provides a basic insight into the biomass pyrolysis, which is beneficial for understanding the pyrolysis mechanism of biomass and developing an advanced thermal proc-ess for effective utilization of biomass.

  11. Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

  12. Co-pyrolysis of pine sawdust and lignite in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuyao; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2014-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of lignite and pine sawdust were studied in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and blending ratio on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products (gas, tar, and char) were investigated. TGA experiments showed that pine sawdust decomposition took place at lower temperatures compared to lignite. With increasing the pine sawdust content in the blend, the DTG peaks shifted towards lower temperatures due to synergetic effect. In fixed-bed experiments, the synergetic effect increased the yield of volatile matter compared to the calculated values. The major gases released at low temperatures were CO2 and CO. However, hydrogen was the primary gaseous product at higher temperatures. During co-pyrolysis, concentrations of benzene, naphthalene, and hydrocarbons in the tar decreased, accompanied by an increase in phenols and guaiacol concentrations. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the OH, aliphatic CH, CO, and CO functional groups in char decomposed substantially.

  13. In operando evidence of deoxygenation in ionic liquid gating of YBa2Cu3O7-X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Muñoz, Ana M; Schio, Pedro; Poloni, Roberta; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto; Cezar, Julio C; Salas-Colera, Eduardo; Castro, German R; Kinney, Joseph; Leon, Carlos; Santamaria, Jacobo; Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier; Goldman, Allen M

    2017-01-10

    Field-effect experiments on cuprates using ionic liquids have enabled the exploration of their rich phase diagrams [Leng X, et al. (2011) Phys Rev Lett 107(2):027001]. Conventional understanding of the electrostatic doping is in terms of modifications of the charge density to screen the electric field generated at the double layer. However, it has been recently reported that the suppression of the metal to insulator transition induced in VO2 by ionic liquid gating is due to oxygen vacancy formation rather than to electrostatic doping [Jeong J, et al. (2013) Science 339(6126):1402-1405]. These results underscore the debate on the true nature, electrostatic vs. electrochemical, of the doping of cuprates with ionic liquids. Here, we address the doping mechanism of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-X (YBCO) by simultaneous ionic liquid gating and X-ray absorption experiments. Pronounced spectral changes are observed at the Cu K-edge concomitant with the superconductor-to-insulator transition, evidencing modification of the Cu coordination resulting from the deoxygenation of the CuO chains, as confirmed by first-principles density functional theory (DFT) simulations. Beyond providing evidence of the importance of chemical doping in electric double-layer (EDL) gating experiments with superconducting cuprates, our work shows that interfacing correlated oxides with ionic liquids enables a delicate control of oxygen content, paving the way to novel electrochemical concepts in future oxide electronics.

  14. Study on Pyrolysis of Newly Developed Copolyester PETG by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry%裂解气相色谱-质谱法研究新型共聚酯PETG的热分解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻爱芳; 钱和生

    2004-01-01

    Poly (ethylene glycol-co-cyclohexane 1,4-dimethanol terephthalate) (PETG) is a newly developed copolyester. The thermal degradation of PETG was investigated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (PY-GC/MS). The pyrolytic gas of PETG at temperatures 300 C, 400 C ,500 C,600 C and 700 C were identified, respectively. The results showed that the pyrolysis products are very different at diferent pyrolysis temperature. At 600 C, the pyrolysis products of PETG were characteristic of PETG composition, which can be used to determine the polymer chemical structure.

  15. Supported molybdenum oxides as effective catalysts for the catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugappan, Karthick; Mukarakate, Calvin; Budhi, Sridhar; Shetty, Manish; Nimlos, Mark R.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) of pine was investigated over 10 wt% MoO3/TiO2 and MoO3/ZrO2 at 500 degrees C and H2 pressures =0.75 bar. The product distributions were monitored in real time using a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS). Both supported MoO3 catalysts show different levels of deoxygenation based on the cumulative biomass to MoO3 mass ratio exposed to the catalytic bed. For biomass to MoO3 mass ratios <1.5, predominantly olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons are produced with no detectable oxygen-containing species. For ratios =1.5, partially deoxygenated species comprised of furans and phenols are observed, with a concomitant decrease of olefinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. For ratios =5, primary pyrolysis vapours break through the bed, indicating the onset of catalyst deactivation. Product quantification with a tandem micropyrolyzer-GCMS setup shows that fresh supported MoO3 catalysts convert ca. 27 mol% of the original carbon into hydrocarbons comprised predominantly of aromatics (7 C%), olefins (18 C%) and paraffins (2 C%), comparable to the total hydrocarbon yield obtained with HZSM-5 operated under similar reaction conditions. Post-reaction XPS analysis on supported MoO3/ZrO2 and MoO3/TiO2 catalysts reveal that ca. 50% of Mo surface species exist in their partially reduced forms (i.e., Mo5+ and Mo3+), and that catalyst deactivation is likely associated to coking.

  16. The Study of Kinetic Properties and Analytical Pyrolysis of Coconut Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Said

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic properties of coconut shells during pyrolysis were studied to determine its reactivity in ground form. The kinetic parameters were determined by using thermogravimetric analyser. The activation energy was 122.780 kJ/mol. The pyrolysis products were analyzed using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effects of pyrolysis temperature on the distribution of the pyrolytic products were assessed in a temperature range between 673 K and 1073 K. The set time for pyrolysis was 2 s. Several compounds were observed; they were grouped into alkanes, acids, ethers and alcohols, esters, aldehydes and ketones, furans and pyrans, aromatic compounds, and nitrogen containing compounds. The product compositions varied with temperature in that range. The highest gas proportion was observed at high temperature while the acid proportion was observed to be highest in coconut shells, thus lowering the quality of bio-oil. It has been concluded that higher pyrolysis temperature increases the amount of pyrolysis products to a maximum value. It has been recommended to use coconut shell for production of gas, instead of production of bio-oil due to its high proportion of acetic acid.

  17. Comparison of the pyrolysis behavior of lignins from different tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shurong; Wang, Kaige; Liu, Qian; Gu, Yueling; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa; Fransson, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of biomass pyrolysis, little is known about the pyrolysis behavior of lignin--one of the main components of biomass--due to its structural complexity and the difficulty in its isolation. In the present study, we extracted lignins from Manchurian ash (Fraxinus mandschurica) and Mongolian Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) using the Bjorkman procedure, which has little effect on the structure of lignin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry was used to characterize the microstructure of the Bjorkman lignins, i.e., milled wood lignins (MWLs), from the different tree species. The pyrolysis characteristics of MWLs were investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer, and the release of the main volatile and gaseous products of pyrolysis were detected by FTIR spectroscopy. During the pyrolysis process, MWLs underwent thermo-degradation over a wide temperature range. Manchurian ash MWL showed a much higher thermal degradation rate than Mongolian Scots pine MWL in the temperature range from 290-430 degrees C. High residue yields were achieved at 37 wt.% for Mongolian Scots pine MWL and 26 wt.% for Manchurian ash MWL. In order to further investigate the mechanisms of lignin pyrolysis, we also analyzed the FTIR profiles for the main pyrolysis products (CO(2), CO, methane, methanol, phenols and formaldehyde) and investigated the variation in pyrolysis products between the different MWLs.

  18. Non-thermal radio frequency and static magnetic fields increase rate of hemoglobin deoxygenation in a cell-free preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Muehsam

    Full Text Available The growing body of clinical and experimental data regarding electromagnetic field (EMF bioeffects and their therapeutic applications has contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action. This study reports that two EMF modalities currently in clinical use, a pulse-modulated radiofrequency (PRF signal, and a static magnetic field (SMF, applied independently, increased the rate of deoxygenation of human hemoglobin (Hb in a cell-free assay. Deoxygenation of Hb was initiated using the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT in an assay that allowed the time for deoxygenation to be controlled (from several min to several hours by adjusting the relative concentrations of DTT and Hb. The time course of Hb deoxygenation was observed using visible light spectroscopy. Exposure for 10-30 min to either PRF or SMF increased the rate of deoxygenation occurring several min to several hours after the end of EMF exposure. The sensitivity and biochemical simplicity of the assay developed here suggest a new research tool that may help to further the understanding of basic biophysical EMF transduction mechanisms. If the results of this study were to be shown to occur at the cellular and tissue level, EMF-enhanced oxygen availability would be one of the mechanisms by which clinically relevant EMF-mediated enhancement of growth and repair processes could occur.

  19. Pyrolysis of furan in a microreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urness, Kimberly N.; Guan, Qi; Golan, Amir; Daily, John W.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Stanton, John F.; Ahmed, Musahid; Ellison, G. Barney

    2013-09-01

    A silicon carbide microtubular reactor has been used to measure branching ratios in the thermal decomposition of furan, C4H4O. The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of furan (approximately 0.01%) entrained in a stream of helium through the heated reactor. The SiC reactor (0.66 mm i.d., 2 mm o.d., 2.5 cm long) operates with continuous flow. Experiments were performed with a reactor inlet pressure of 100-300 Torr and a wall temperature between 1200 and 1600 K; characteristic residence times in the reactor are 60-150 μs. The unimolecular decomposition pathway of furan is confirmed to be: furan (+ M) rightleftharpoons α-carbene or β-carbene. The α-carbene fragments to CH2=C=O + HC≡CH while the β-carbene isomerizes to CH2=C=CHCHO. The formyl allene can isomerize to CO + CH3C≡CH or it can fragment to H + CO + HCCCH2. Tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry is used to monitor the products and to measure the branching ratio of the two carbenes as well as the ratio of [HCCCH2]/[CH3C≡CH]. The results of these pyrolysis experiments demonstrate a preference for 80%-90% of furan decomposition to occur via the β-carbene. For reactor temperatures of 1200-1400 K, no propargyl radicals are formed. As the temperature rises to 1500-1600 K, at most 10% of the decomposition of CH2=C=CHCHO produces H + CO + HCCCH2 radicals. Thermodynamic conditions in the reactor have been modeled by computational fluid dynamics and the experimental results are compared to the predictions of three furan pyrolysis mechanisms. Uncertainty in the pressure-dependency of the initiation reaction rates is a possible a source of discrepancy between experimental results and theoretical predictions.

  20. Kinetic and Mechanistic Assessment of Alkanol/Alkanal Decarbonylation and Deoxygenation Pathways on Metal Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Elif I; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-09-23

    This study combines theory and experiment to determine the kinetically relevant steps and site requirements for deoxygenation of alkanols and alkanals. These reactants deoxygenate predominantly via decarbonylation (C-C cleavage) instead of C-O hydrogenolysis on Ir, Pt, and Ru, leading to strong inhibition effects by chemisorbed CO (CO*). C-C cleavage occurs via unsaturated species formed in sequential quasi-equilibrated dehydrogenation steps, which replace C-H with C-metal bonds, resulting in strong inhibition by H2, also observed in alkane hydrogenolysis. C-C cleavage occurs in oxygenates only at locations vicinal to the C═O group in RCCO* intermediates, because such adjacency weakens C-C bonds, which also leads to much lower activation enthalpies for oxygenates than hydrocarbons. C-O hydrogenolysis rates are independent of H2 pressure and limited by H*-assisted C-O cleavage in RCHOH* intermediates on surfaces with significant coverages of CO* formed in decarbonylation events. The ratio of C-O hydrogenolysis to decarbonylation rates increased almost 100-fold as the Ir cluster size increased from 0.7 to 7 nm; these trends reflect C-O hydrogenolysis reactions favored on terrace sites, while C-C hydrogenolysis prefers sites with lower coordination, because of the relative size of their transition states and the crowded nature of CO*-covered surfaces. C-O hydrogenolysis becomes the preferred deoxygenation route on Cu-based catalysts, thus avoiding CO inhibition effects. The relative rates of C-O and C-C cleavage on these metals depend on their relative ability to bind C atoms, because C-C cleavage transitions states require an additional M-C attachment.

  1. Effect of combined slow pyrolysis and steam gasification of sugarcane bagasse on hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, Prakash; Narayanan, Sheeba [National Institute of Technology, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-11-15

    The present work aims at improving the generation of H2 from sugarcane bagasse in steam gasification process by incorporating slow pyrolysis technique. As a bench scale study, slow pyrolysis of sugarcane bagasse is performed at various pyrolysis temperature (350, 400, 450, 500 and 550 .deg. C) and feed particle size (90pyrolysis of biomass followed by steam gasification of char), first slow pyrolysis is carried out at the effective conditions (pyrolysis temperature and particle size) of char generation (determined from bench scale study) and steam gasification is at varying gasification temperature (600, 650, 700, 750 and 800 .deg. C) and steam to biomass (S/B) ratio (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6) to determine the effective conditions of H{sub 2} generation. The effect of temperature and S/B on gas product composition and overall product gas volume was also investigated. At effective conditions (gasification temperature and S/B) of H2 generation, individual slow pyrolysis and steam gasification were also experimented to evaluate the performance of combined process. The effective condition of H{sub 2} generation in combined process was found to be 800 .deg. C (gasification temperature) and 5 (S/B), respectively. The combined process produced 35.90% and 23.60% more gas volume (overall) than slow pyrolysis and steam gasification process, respectively. With respect to H{sub 2} composition, the combined process generated 72.37% more than slow pyrolysis and 17.91% more than steam gasification process.

  2. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  3. Co-pyrolysis of polymethyl methacrylate with brown coal and effect on monomer production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Orinak; L. Halas; I. Amar; J.T. Andersson; M. Adamova [University of P.J. Safarik, Kosice (Slovakia). Faculty of Sciences, Institute of Chemistry

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis capillary gas chromatography has been applied to the study of the co-pyrolysis of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with Slovakian brown coal with the aim of finding pyrolysis conditions yielding a maximum amount of methyl methacrylate (MMA). Effects of pyrolysis temperature and PMMA-coal weight ratios were investigated. Capillary gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detector (cGC-MS) was used for MMA identification. The highest yield of MMA in the pyrolysate was obtained at 750{sup o}C. The optimal PMMA-coal weight ratio for maximum MMA production lies in the interval 0.5 mg PMMA and 0.6-0.8 mg brown coal with an MMA yield of 64%. Coal addition to the sample affects species recombination in gaseous phase, augments MMA production at higher temperatures and eliminates degradation products of PMMA and coal pyrolysis. Different conversion diagrams are characteristic for thermal degradation of single PMMA and in the mixture with coal. Detailed mechanism of synergetic effects arisen during co-pyrolysis are not yet known. It was also found that lower pyrolysis temperatures are more suitable to study degradation mechanism and kinetics while higher temperatures are more applicable for identification purposes. MMA decomposes completely at 900{sup o}C. 24 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Simulation of hydrocarbons pyrolysis in a fast-mixing reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MG Ktalkherman; IG Namyatov

    2015-01-01

    Currently, thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons for the production of basic petrochemicals (ethylene, propyl-ene) is carried out in steam-cracking processes. Aside from the conventional method, under consideration are alternative ways purposed for process intensification. In the context of these activities, the method of high-temperature pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in a heat-carrier flow is studied, which differs from previous ones and is based on the ability of an ultra-short time of feedstock/heat-carrier mixing. This enables to study the pyrolysis process at high temperature (up to 1500 K) at the reactor inlet. A set of model experiments is conducted on the lab scale facility. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and naphtha are used as a feedstock. The detailed data are obtain-ed on temperature and product distributions within a wide range of the residence time. A theoretical model based on the detailed kinetics of the process is developed, too. The effect of governing parameters on the pyrolysis process is analyzed by the results of the simulation and experiments. In particular, the optimal temperature is detected which corresponds to the maximum ethylene yield. Product yields in our experiments are compared with the similar ones in the conventional pyrolysis method. In both cases (LPG and naphtha), ethylene selectivity in the fast-mixing reactor is substantial y higher than in current technology.

  5. Kinetic Study on Pyrolysis of Oil Palm Frond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, V. S. Y.; Chin, B. L. F.; Lim, A. C. R.

    2016-03-01

    The pyrolysis of oil palm frond is studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. The present study investigates the thermal degradation behaviour and determination of the kinetic parameters such as the activation energy (EA ) and pre-exponential factor (A) values of oil palm frond under pyrolysis condition. The kinetic data is produced based on first order rate of reaction. In this study, the experiments are conducted at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 K/min in the temperature range of 323-1173 K under non-isothermal condition. Argon gas is used as an inert gas to remove any entrapment of gases in the TGA equipment.

  6. The effect of coal type and pyrolysis temperature on the electrochemical activity of coal at a solid carbon anode in molten carbonate media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. A.; Glenn, M.; Donne, S. W.

    2015-04-01

    A systematic assessment of the electrochemical activity of two different parent coal types, pyrolysed at temperatures between 500 and 900 °C higher heating temperature (HHT), is presented in this work. Analysis shows that certain coal chars are catalytically activated in molten carbonate media at 600 °C, however activity does not appear to follow trends established for ashless carbon sources. It is seen here that it is not possible to predict activity based solely on electrical resistance, surface functionalization, or the BET surface area of pyrolysed coals. Instead, it is suggested that coal ash type, abundance and distribution plays a pivotal role in activating the coal char to allow fast electrochemical oxidation through a catalytically enhanced pathway. Activation from ash influence is discussed to result from wetting of the molten carbonate media with the carbon surface (change in polarity of electrode surface), through ash mediated oxide adsorption and transfer to carbon particles, or possibly through another catalytic pathway not yet able to be predicted from current results.

  7. Co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilgin, M.; Deveci Duranay, N.; Pehlivan, D. [Firat University, Chemical Engineering Department, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    Today, worldwide studies have been undertaken on the biomass usage and co-conversion of biomass and coal to seek out alternative fuels for supplying energy in an environmental friendly way. The objective of this work is to study co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp in 50/50 (wt./wt.) ratio of blend pellets, to elucidate their thermal behaviour under pyrolysis conditions and to assess major decomposition products in terms of their yields. A special chamber, which has enabled very fast heating rates, was used in the pyrolysis experiments carried at 600 C. The results were interpreted in the light of liquid, solid and gaseous yields, resulting from thermal decomposition, and kinetics of thermogravimetric analysis. Proximate volatile matter and ash contents of the blends were different compared to those found by using individual values. Sugar beet pulp decomposed faster within a relatively narrow temperature range than lignite and underwent a significant shrinkage during pyrolysis. It was found that the chars left behind after the flash pyrolysis of these pellets at 600 C have substantial amounts of volatile matter that would evolve upon further heating. (author)

  8. A Comparison of Lignin, Macroalgae, Wood and Straw Fast Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    with respect to carbon and oxygen contents, HHV, thermal behaviors and mean molecular weight. The HHV of wood, straw, lignin and algae oils were 24.0, 23.7, 29.7 and 25.7 MJ/kg db, respectively. The distributions of metals, Cl and S in char and bio-oil were investigated for the biomasses. Almost all the metals......A fast pyrolysis study on lignin and macroalgae (non-conventional biomass) and wood and straw (conventional biomass) were carried out in a pyrolysis centrifugal reactor at pyrolysis temperature of 550 ºC. The product distributions and energy recoveries were measured and compared among...... these biomasses. The fast pyrolysis of macroalgae showed a promising result with a bio-oil yield of 65 wt% dry ash free basis (daf) and 76 % energy recovery in the bio-oil while the lignin fast pyrolysis provides a bio-oil yield of 47 wt% daf and energy recovery in bio-oil of 45 %. The physiochemical properties...

  9. [Pyrolysis characteristics of medical waste compositions containing PVC (polyvinyl chloride)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Na; Zhang, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Wei; Ma, Hong-Ting; Wei, Li-Li

    2008-03-01

    To obtain pyrolysis characteristics of medical waste compositions containing PVC (polyvinyl chloride), thermogravimetric study of tube for transfusion (TFT) and sample collector for urine (SCFU) was carried out using the thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) with N2. The heat change in pyrolysis process was analyzed and the properties of pyrolysis residues are reported. The mathematics model with two-step and four-reaction was established to simulate the pyrolysis process. The results show that: 1) The pyrolysis mechanism of the two samples is in agreement with that of PVC. The decomposition process appears two stages in 200 - 390 degrees C and 390 - 550 degrees C, which are clearly expressed with two prominent peaks with maximum rate of weight loss at about 315 degrees C and 470 degrees C. 2) Complex ingredients in samples result in irregular and uneven shape of DTG peaks, in which plasticizer lowers the antichloration temperature and enhances the weight loss rate. 3) The model could satisfactorily describe the weight loss and differential process of TFT and SCFU.

  10. Study on the Pyrolysis Behavior of Polycarbosilane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wenyi; ZHOU Jian

    2015-01-01

    The pyrolysis behavior of polycarbosilane (PCS) and chemical reaction mechanism during the pyrolysis process were studied by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) combined with X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopic analysis methods. The experimental results indicate that the main gas phase products generated during pyrolysis of PCS in nitrogen atmosphere include H2, -CH3 and CH4. The heating rate has a large effect on the pyrolysis process of PCS, the lower heating rate releases more small molecule gases and gets bigger rate of pyrolysis mass loss, demonstrating that the lower heating rate is beneifcial to fully pyrolysis of PCS and obtain ceramics products with better microstructure.

  11. Kinetic Characteristics in Pyrolysis of RPF with Additives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HWANG Hyeonuk; KIM Myunggyun; NZIOKA Antonymutua; KIM Youngju; TAHIR Imranqureshi; YAN Caozheng

    2016-01-01

    PVC (polyvinyl chloride) was isolated from waste plastic before manufacturing RPF (refuse paper & plastic fuel), and the characteristics of manufactured RPF including properties, calorific value, pyrolysis, chlorine content and kinetics analysis were analyzed. Based on the result of TGA (Thermogravimetric analysis), the kinetics characteristics was analyzed by using Kissinger method and Ozawa method which are the most common methods for obtaining activation energy, and the experimental conditions of TGA were set as follows: in a nitrogen atmosphere, with gas lfow rate of 20 mL/min, heating rate of 5-50℃/min, and maximum temperature of 800℃. In conclusion, the activation energy showed a tendency to gradually increase by a rise of reaction rate. Although the activation energy with pyrolysis of RPF was irregularly scattered, it was shown that the activation energy was stabilized by co-pyrolysis of RPF and additives (rice bran and sawdust).

  12. Co-pyrolysis characteristics of coal and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, L.R.; Zhang, J.M.; Lian, H.; Luo, M. [Shanghai University of Science & Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2007-05-15

    A co-pyrolysis experiment of coal and natural gas was investigated on a fixed-bed reactor. SEM was used to study the structure changes of the exterior surface of char prepared in this co-pyrolysis experiment, while GC was also utilized to analyze the associated gas. The result showed that, with increasing temperature, the coal char tended to agglomerate. GC and SEM results show that the CH{sub 4} decomposition on the exterior surface of char was turned to filamentous char and extended around like coral. It was also proved that the co-pyrolysis of coal and natural gas promoted syngas production. A synergistic effect of coal and natural gas does exist during this process.

  13. Experimental investigation of flash pyrolysis oil droplet combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Norazana; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and compare the combustion behaviour of a single droplet of pyrolysis oil derived from wheat straw and heavy fossil oil in a single droplet combustion chamber. The initial oil droplet diameters were in between 500 μm to 2500 μm. The experiments were performed...... at a temperature ranging between 1000 and 1400°C with an initial gas velocity of 1.6 m/s and oxygen concentration of 3%. The evolution of combustion of bio-oil droplets was recorded by a digital video camera. It was observed that the combustion behaviour of pyrolysis oil droplet differ from the heavy oil in terms...... both of ignition, devolatilisation and char oxidation. The pyrolysis oil is more difficult to ignite and has a shorter devolatilisation time and a longer char oxidation time. Copyright © 2013, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l....

  14. Pyrolysis of microalgal biomass in carbon dioxide environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Heon; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Young Jae; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2015-10-01

    This work mechanistically investigated the influence of CO2 in the thermo-chemical process of microalgal biomass (Chlorella vulgaris and Microcystis aeruginosa) to achieve a fast virtuous cycle of carbon via recovering energy. This work experimentally justified that the influence of CO2 in pyrolysis of microalgal biomass could be initiated at temperatures higher than 530 °C, which directly led to the enhanced generation of syngas. For example, the concentration of CO from pyrolysis of M. aeruginosa increased up to ∼ 3000% at 670 °C in the presence of CO2. The identified universal influence of CO2 could be summarized by the expedited thermal cracking of VOCs evolved from microalgal biomass and by the unknown reaction between VOCs and CO2. This identified effectiveness of CO2 was different from the Boudouard reaction, which was independently occurred with dehydrogenation. Thus, microalgal biomass could be a candidate for the thermo-chemical process (pyrolysis and gasification).

  15. Pyrolysis of a waste from the grinding of scrap tyres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A M; Barriocanal, C; Alvarez, R

    2012-02-15

    The fibres that are used to reinforce tyres can be recovered as a waste in the process of grinding of scrap tyres. In this paper beneficiation through pyrolysis is studied since the fibres are made up of polymers with a small amount of rubber because the latter is difficult to separate. The experiments were performed at three temperatures (400, 550 and 900°C) in a horizontal oven. The three products - gas, oil and char - obtained from the pyrolysis were investigated. The composition of the gas was analyzed by means of gas chromatography. The oil was studied by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. The char porous structure was determined by N(2) adsorption. In addition, the topography of the chars was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The products resulting from the pyrolysis of the fibres were compared with those obtained from scrap rubber.

  16. Specialists' workshop on fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This workshop brought together most of those who are currently working in or have published significant findings in the area of fast pyrolysis of biomass or biomass-derived materials, with the goal of attaining a better understanding of the dominant mechanisms which produce olefins, oxygenated liquids, char, and tars. In addition, background papers were given in hydrocarbon pyrolysis, slow pyrolysis of biomass, and techniques for powdered-feedstock preparation in order that the other papers did not need to introduce in depth these concepts in their presentations for continuity. In general, the authors were requested to present summaries of experimental data with as much interpretation of that data as possible with regard to mechanisms and process variables such as heat flux, temperatures, partial pressure, feedstock, particle size, heating rates, residence time, etc. Separate abstracts have been prepared of each presentation for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  17. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of coal-MBM blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodras, G; Grammelis, P; Basinas, P

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, thermogravimetric analysis was employed in order to investigate the behaviour of MBM and their blends with Greek brown coal, under pyrolysis and combustion conditions. MBM presented enhanced pyrolysis rates reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents compared to Greek brown coal. Increased conversion rates were observed when MBM was added in the brown coal sample. Significant interactions were detected between the two fuel blend components leading to significant deviations from the expected behaviour. The catalytic effect of mineral matter on the pyrolysis of MBM resulted in reaction rate decrease and DTG curve shift to lower temperatures for the demineralised MBM. Alterations in the combustion process due to the mineral matter were minimal when testing the blends. Interactions maintained during combustion and lower reactivity of MBM was achieved due to the reduced oxygen content.

  18. Pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of coal-MBM blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skodras, G.; Grammelis, P.; Basinas, P. [Center for Research & Technology Hellas, Ptolemais (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    In the present work, thermogravimetric analysis was employed in order to investigate the behaviour of MBM (meat and bone meal) and their blends with Greek brown coal, under pyrolysis and combustion conditions. MBM presented enhanced pyrolysis rates reflecting its high volatile and low ash contents compared to Greek brown coal. Increased conversion rates were observed when MBM was added in the brown coal sample. Significant interactions were detected between the two fuel blend components leading to significant deviations from the expected behaviour. The catalytic effect of mineral matter on the pyrolysis of MBM resulted in reaction rate decrease and DTG curve shift to lower temperatures for the demineralised MBM. Alterations in the combustion process due to the mineral matter were minimal when testing the blends. Interactions maintained during combustion and lower reactivity of MBM was achieved due to the reduced oxygen content.

  19. Pyrolysis of sugar cane bagasse in a wire-mesh reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, A.R.F.; Drummond, I.W. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Improved experimental techniques are described, using a wire mesh reactor; for determining the pyrolysis yields of lignocellulosic materials. In this apparatus pyrolysis tars are rapidly swept from the hot zone of the reactor and quenched, secondary reactions are thereby greatly diminished. Particular emphasis is placed upon the measurement of the pyrolysis yields for sugar cane bagasse, an abundant agricultural waste product. The role of the important pyrolysis parameters, peak temperature and heating rate, in defining the ultimate tar yield is investigated, with the value for bagasse being 54.6% at 500 C and 1,000 C/s. The pyrolysis yields, under similar conditions, of another biomass material, silver birch, are also reported and compared to those of bagasse.

  20. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on the physical and chemical properties of oyster shell%热解温度对牡蛎壳物理化学特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉英; 王颖莉

    2014-01-01

    采用程序升温热解技术研究牡蛎壳煅制过程。通过运用X 射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、红外光谱(FTIR)、能谱仪(EDS)和热重(TG)等表征技术手段,分析研究高温煅制前后牡蛎壳的物理化学特性变化规律。研究表明,在445℃附近牡蛎壳中的碳酸钙由文石型相转变方解石型,756.2℃处最大热失重速率为5.24%min-1,是方解石型碳酸钙分解所致。800℃高温煅烧后碳酸盐分解产生的CaO具有较强的吸水能力生成Ca(OH)2,高温煅制过程对牡蛎壳中Si有明显的富集作用。%In this paper,the calcination processes of oyster shell is studied through the temperature-programmed pyrolysis technology. The changes of physical and chemical properties of oyster shell before and after calcination were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) , energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) , and thermogravimetry (TG). At the peak temperature of 756.2℃,oyster shell thermal maximum weight loss rate was 5.24% min-1. It was caused by calcium carbonate decomposition calcite type. After calcination at 800℃,oyster shell was decomposed to CaO. Due to the complexity of oyster shells physical structure,CaO generated Ca(OH)2 by absorbing water. The calcined process of oyster shell at high temperature has the obvious enrichment effect on Si.

  1. Effect of annealing temperature on the structural–microstructural and electrical characteristics of thallium bearing HTSC films prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Verma; R S Tiwari; O N Srivastava

    2005-04-01

    In order to get good quality reproducible films of Tl : HTSC system, we have studied the different annealing conditions to finally achieve the optimized annealing condition. In the present investigation, Tl–Ca–Ba–Cu–O superconducting films have been prepared on YSZ (100) and MgO (100) single crystal substrates via precursor route followed by thallination. The post deposition heat treatments of the precursor films were carried out for various annealing temperatures (870°C, 890°C) and durations (1 and 2 min). The optimized thallination procedure occurred at 870°C for 2 min into good quality films with c ( = 0) ∼ 103 K for YSZ and c ( = 0) ∼ 98 K for MgO substrates, respectively. Further we have correlated the structural/microstructural characteristics of the films.

  2. Nanocrystalline Chalcopyrite Materials (CuInS2 and CuInSe2) via Low-Temperature Pyrolysis of Molecular Single-Source Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Stephanie L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2003-01-01

    Nanometer sized particles of the chalcopyrite compounds CuInS2 and CuInSe2 were synthesized by thermal decomposition of molecular single-source precursors (PPh3)2CuIn(SEt)4 and (PPh3)2CuIn(SePh)4, respectively, in the non-coordinating solvent dioctyl phthalate at temperatures between 200 and 300 C. The nanoparticles range in size from 3 - 30 nm and are aggregated to form roughly spherical clusters of about 500 nm in diameter. X-ray diffraction of the nanoparticle powders shows greatly broadened lines indicative of very small particle sizes, which is confirmed by TEM. Peaks present in the XRD can be indexed to reference patterns for the respective chalcopyrite compounds. Optical spectroscopy and elemental analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy support the identification of the nanoparticles as chalcopyrites.

  3. Nanocrystalline CuInS2 And CuInSe2 via Low-Temperature Pyrolysis Of Single-Source Molecular Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Stephanie L.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2002-01-01

    Single-source precursors are molecules which contain all the necessary elements for synthesis of a desired material. Thermal decomposition of the precursor results in the formation of the material with the correct stoichiometry, as a nanocrystalline powder or a thin film. Nanocrystalline materials hold potential as components of next-generation Photovoltaic (PV) devices. Presented here are the syntheses of CuInS2 and CuInSe2 nanocrystals from the precursors (PPh3)2CuIn(SEt)4 and (PPh3)2CuIn(SePh)4, respectively. The size of the nanocrystals varies with the reaction temperature; a minimum of 200 C is required for the formation of the smallest CuInS2 crystals (approximately 1.6 nm diameter); at 300 C, crystals are approximately 7 nm.

  4. Bio-Fuel Production Assisted with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James O' Brien; Michael McKellar

    2012-06-01

    Two hybrid energy processes that enable production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure are presented. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), these two hybrid energy processes have the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce dependence on imported oil. The first process discusses a hydropyrolysis unit with hydrogen addition from HTSE. Non-food biomass is pyrolyzed and converted to pyrolysis oil. The pyrolysis oil is upgraded with hydrogen addition from HTSE. This addition of hydrogen deoxygenates the pyrolysis oil and increases the pH to a tolerable level for transportation. The final product is synthetic crude that could then be transported to a refinery and input into the already used transportation fuel infrastructure. The second process discusses a process named Bio-Syntrolysis. The Bio-Syntrolysis process combines hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier that yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid synthetic crude. Conversion of syngas to liquid synthetic crude, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model

  5. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study on pyrolysis of representative medical waste composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Na; Zhang, Yu-feng; Wang, Yan

    2008-01-01

    To obtain detailed information on the pyrolysis characteristics, a thermogravimetric study on the pyrolysis of 14 typical medical waste compositions was carried out in thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment using dynamic techniques in a stream of N2. An index representing pyrolysis reactivity of waste was presented. Kinetic parameters were obtained by Coats-Redfern method and used to model the TG curve. The results showed that: (a) Plastic, protein, cellulosic material, synthetic fibre, and rubber entered pyrolysis process in succession. (b) There was one decomposition stage in the pyrolysis of one-off medical glove, operating glove, cellulosic waste, absorbable catgut suture and adhesive plaster, while other components had two obvious weight loss stages. (c) The obtained apparent activation energy for second stage pyrolysis was comparably higher than that for first stage. (d) Each stage was controlled by only one kinetic mechanism, in which kinetic parameters were constant. (e) The degradation kinetics of medical waste may be affected by special physical and chemical treatment in the product manufacturing process. (f) Among 13 waste samples, the pyrolysis index of cellulosic matter was the highest, which indicated cellulosic matter had strong pyrolysis reactivity. (g) With increasing heating rate, TG curve and DTG peak shifted to high temperatures and main reaction interval of the sample became longer.

  6. Oxygen Delivery and Muscle Deoxygenation during Continuous, Long- and Short-Interval Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafeiridis, A; Kounoupis, A; Dipla, K; Kyparos, A; Nikolaidis, M G; Smilios, I; Vrabas, I S

    2015-11-01

    This study compared the O2 delivery (a central determinant of VO2) and muscle deoxygenation (reflecting a peripheral determinant of VO2) during intense continuous, long-interval, and short-interval exercise protocols. Twelve young men completed the 3 protocols with equal overall effort. Simultaneous and continuous recordings of central hemodynamics, muscle oxygenation/deoxygenation and VO2 were performed. Peak responses for stroke volume and peripheral resistance did not differ among protocols, whereas peak cardiac output and VO2 were higher in long-interval vs. continuous and short-interval protocols with inactive rest phases (pexercise (pexercise-time above 80% VO2max were also higher in continuous and long-interval vs. short-interval protocol (pprotocols. In conclusion, all 3 protocols resulted in a great activation of central and peripheral determinants of VO2. When performed with equal overall effort, the intense continuous and interval modalities reveal similarities in muscle O2-utilization response, but differences in central hemodynamic and VO2 responses. Intense continuous and long-interval protocols exert a more commanding role on the cardiovascular system and VO2 response compared to short-interval exercise with inactive rest phases.

  7. Deoxygenation rate, reaeration and potential for self-purification of a small tropical urban stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Paulo Cunha de Menezes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models used to simulate the water quality and the processes of self purification of water bodies are important tools to support effective water resource management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of organic pollution on water quality and the assimilative capacity of organic matter in the Ribeirão Vermelho stream situated in the city of Lavras in Minas Gerais. The deoxygenation rate (K1 and reaeration (K2 were determined and tested in three segments of the Ribeirão Vermelho over two seasons (summer and winter. The purification process simulation was performed using the Streeter-Phelps model. The highest K1 and K2 values occurred during the winter period which was characterized by lower flows. Simulation of the dissolved oxygen profile and biological oxygen demand fitted the model well, indicating the prevalence of carbonaceous deoxygenation due to nitrification and also demonstrating the importance of natural reaeration as part of the purification process. Different response was observed during the winter, in which the high primary productivity values stood in the reaeration process stream. Biological oxygen demand values did not meet the limits recommended by the Resolution of the Ministry of the Environment 357/2005 throughout the river system and the entire study period. In conclusion, the Ribeirão Vermelho is unable to self-purify along its entire length, and water quality is influenced by effluent discharge which intensifies degradation.

  8. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  9. Development of a high-performance, coal-fired power generating system with a pyrolysis gas and char-fired high-temperature furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenker, J.

    1995-11-01

    A high-performance power system (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined-cycle plant that will have an efficiency of at least 47 percent, based on the higher heating value of the fuel. The original emissions goal of the project was for NOx and SOx to each be below 0.15 lb/MMBtu. In the Phase 2 RFP this emissions goal was reduced to 0.06 lb/MMBtu. The ultimate goal of HIPPS is to have an all-coal-fueled system, but initial versions of the system are allowed up to 35 percent heat input from natural gas. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is currently leading a team effort with AlliedSignal, Bechtel, Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Research-Cottrell, TRW and Westinghouse. Previous work on the project was also done by General Electric. The HIPPS plant will use a high-Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) to achieve combined-cycle operation with coal as the primary fuel. The HITAF is an atmospheric-pressure, pulverized-fuel-fired boiler/air heater. The HITAF is used to heat air for the gas turbine and also to transfer heat to the steam cycle. its design and functions are very similar to conventional PC boilers. Some important differences, however, arise from the requirements of the combined cycle operation.

  10. Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

  11. Fabrication of Transparent Conductive Zinc Oxide Co-Doped with Fluorine and Zirconium Thin Solid Films by Ultrasonic Chemical Pyrolysis: Effects of Precursor Solution Aging and Substrate Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Castañeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly transparent, conducting zinc oxide [ZnO] thin films co-doped with fluorine and zirconium have been deposited on glass substrates by the ultrasonic chemical spraying technique. The effects of aging of the starting solution and substrate temperature on the structural, morphological, and electrical properties of the ZnO:F:Zr films have been studied. The resistivity of the films decreases with the aging time of the starting solution until the seventeenth day reaching a minimum of about 1.2×10−2 Ω cm and then increases. Though all the samples are of polycrystalline hexagonal wurtzite type and grow preferentially with (002 plane parallel to the substrate, their morphology depends strongly on the aging time of the reaction solution. The optical transmittance of all the films remained around 80% in the visible spectral range. These highly transparent, low resistive thin films are expected to be highly useful as transparent electrodes in the fabrication of thin film solar cells.

  12. Total condensable effluents yield in slow pyrolysis of bagasse briquettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, L.E.; Penedo, M. [Universidade de Oriente, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba); Cortez, L.A.B.; Bezzon, G.; Olivares, E. [University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Interdisciplinary Energy Planning Center (NIPE), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    A full 2{sup 3} experimental factorial design approach was applied to obtain a mathematical model relating the total condensable effluents in slow pyrolysis of bagasse briquettes to three independent variables. These were apparent density of pressed bagasse briquettes (231 and 371 kg/m{sup 3}), highest pyrolysis temperature (400 and 450degC) and residence time at highest pyrolysis temperature (0 and 30 min). Detailed data processing to obtain a model as well as the model's statistical evaluation are shown. The conclusions are that the studied response depends on all three factors, although it is believed that the particular conditions of the pyrolysis installation used could be the cause of the significant result found for the residence time variable. It is inferred that measurable amounts of very low boiling organic compounds are present in the bagasse's liquid effluents. These volatile substances should require effluents' cooling devices working at temperatures well below 0degC. (Author)

  13. Co-pyrolysis of coal with organic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straka, P.; Buchtele, J. [Inst. of Rock Structure and Mechanics, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    The co-pyrolysis of high volatile A bituminous coal with solid organic materials (proteins, cellulose, polyisoprene, polystyrene, polyethylene-glycolterephtalate-PEGT) at a high temperature conditions was investigated. Aim of the work was to evaluate, firstly, the changes of the texture and of the porous system of solid phase after high temperature treatment in presence of different types of macromolecular solids, secondly, properties and composition of the tar and gas. Considered organic solids are important waste components. During their co-pyrolysis the high volatile bituminous coal acts as a hydrogen donor in the temperature rank 220-480{degrees}C. In the rank 500- 1000{degrees}C the solid phase is formed. The co-pyrolysis was carried out at heating rate 3 K/min. It was found that an amount of organic solid (5-10%) affects important changes in the optical texture forms of solid phase, in the pore distribution and in the internal surface area. Transport large pores volume decreases in presence of PEGT, polystyrene and cellulose and increases in presence of proteins and polyisoprene. (image analysis measurements show that the tendency of coal to create coarse pores during co-pyrolysis is very strong and increases with increasing amount of organic solid in blend). An addition of considered materials changes the sorption ability (methylene blue test, iodine adsorption test), moreover, the reactivity of the solid phase.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation under simulated coal seam pyrolysis conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Shuqin; Wang Yuanyuan; Wang Caihong; Bao Pengcheng; Dang Jinli

    2011-01-01

    Coal seam pyrolysis occurs during coal seam fires and during underground coal gasification.This is an important source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in China.Pyrolysis in a coal seam was simulated in a tubular furnace.The 16 US Environmental Protection Agency priority controlled PAHs were analyzed by HPLC.The effects of temperature,heating rate,pyrolysis atmosphere,and coal size were investigated.The results indicate that the 3-ring PAHs AcP and AcPy are the main species in the pyrolysis gas.The 2-ring NaP and the 4-ring Pyr are also of concern.Increasing temperature caused the total PAH yield to go through a minimum.The lowest value was obtained at the temperature of 600 ℃ Higher heating rates promote PAH formation,especially formation of the lower molecular weight PAHs.The typical heating rate in a coal seam,5 ℃/min,results in intermediate yields of PAHs.The total PAHs yield in an atmosphere of N2 is about 1.81 times that seen without added N2,which indicates that an air flow through the coal seam accelerates the formation of PAHs.An increase in coal particle size reduces the total PAHs emission but promotes the formation of 5- and 6-ring PAHs.

  15. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Phoenix Tree Residues as a Potential Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By using a thermogravimetric analyser under argon atmosphere, the pyrolysis process and the kinetic model of phoenix tree residues (the little stem, middle stem, and leaf at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate and the phoenix tree mix at three different heating rates (10 °C min−1, 30 °C min−1, and 50 °C min−1 were examined. The catalyst and the co-pyrolysis samples were at a 30 °C min−1 heating rate. The catalysts were Na2CO3, ZnCl2 and CaO in a mass fraction of 5 %. The experimental results revealed that the phoenix tree residues pyrolysis process consisted of three stages: dehydration stage, main pyrolysis stage, and the slow decomposition of residues. As the heating rate increased, the pyrolysis characteristic temperature of the phoenix tree grew, there was a backward-shift of the pyrolysis rate curve, and the mass loss rate gradually increased. The phoenix tree residues’ activation energy changed throughout the whole pyrolysis process, and the pyrolysis temperature ranges of the three main components (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin existed in overlapping phenomenon. As compared to the little stem, middle stem, and leaf, the phoenix tree mix was more likely to be pyrolysed under the same heating rate. Different catalysts had a different impact on the pyrolysis: ZnCl2 moved the start point of the reaction to the lower temperatures, but did not speed up the reaction; Na2CO3 speeded up the reaction without changing the start point of the reaction; CaO speeded up the reaction, moved the start point of the reaction to higher temperatures.

  16. Development of advanced technologies for biomass pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ran

    The utilization of biomass resources as a renewable energy resource is of great importance in responding to concerns over the protection of the environment and the security of energy supply. This PhD research focuses on the investigation of the conversion of negative value biomass residues into value-added fuels through flash pyrolysis. Pyrolysis Process Study. A pilot plant bubbling fluidized bed pyrolyzer has been set up and extensively used to thermally crack various low or negative value agricultural, food and biofuel processing residues to investigate the yields and quality of the liquid [bio-oil] and solid (bio-char] products. Another novel aspect of this study is the establishment of an energy balance from which the thermal self-sustainability of the pyrolysis process can be assessed. Residues such as grape skins and mixture of grape skins and seeds, dried distiller's grains from bio-ethanol plants, sugarcane field residues (internal bagasse, external and whole plant) have been tested. The pyrolysis of each residue has been carried out at temperatures ranging from 300 to 600°C and at different vapor residence times, to determine its pyrolysis behavior including yields and the overall energy balance. The thermal sustainability of the pyrolysis process has been estimated by considering the energy contribution of the product gases and liquid bio-oll in relation to the pyrolysis heat requirements. The optimum pyrolysis conditions have been identified in terms of maximizing the liquid blo-oil yield, energy density and content of the product blo-oil, after ensuring a self-sustainable process by utilizing the product gases and part of char or bio-oil as heat sources. Adownflow pyrolyzer has also been set up. Preliminary tests have been conducted using much shorter residence times. Bio-oil Recovery. Bio-oil recovery from the pyrolysis unit includes condensation followed by demisting. A blo-oil cyclonic condensing system is designed A nearly tangential entry forces

  17. Flash pyrolysis fuel oil: bio-pok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, S. [Neste Oy, Porvoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    Samples of flash pyrolysis liquid produced by Union Fenosa, Spain from pine and straw and samples produced by Ensyn of Canada from mixed hardwoods were combusted with simple pressure atomization equipment commonly used with light fuel oils in intermediate size (0.1-1 MW) boilers. With a number of modifications to the combustion system, carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrous oxide (NO{sub x}) could be reduced to acceptable levels: CO < 30 ppm and NO{sub x} < 140 ppm. Particulate emissions which were initially very high (Bacharach 4-5) were reduced (Bach. 2-3) by system improvements but are still higher than from light fuel oil (Bach. <1). The modifications to the combustion system were: refractory section between burner and boiler, acid resistant progressive cavity pump, higher liquid preheat temperature and higher pressure than for light fuel oils. The main problems with pyrolysis liquids concerns their instability or reactivity. At temperatures above 100 deg C they begin to coke, their viscosity increases during storage and oxygen from air causes skin formation. This requires that special handling procedures are developed for fuel storage, delivery and combustion systems. (orig.)

  18. Fast pyrolysis of oil palm shell (OPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurhayati; Sulaiman, Fauziah; Aliasak, Zalila

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is an important renewable source of energy. Residues that are obtained from harvesting and agricultural products can be utilised as fuel for energy generation by conducting any thermal energy conversion technology. The conversion of biomass to bio oil is one of the prospective alternative energy resources. Therefore, in this study fast pyrolysis of oil palm shell was conducted. The main objective of this study was to find the optimum condition for high yield bio-oil production. The experiment was conducted using fixed-bed fluidizing pyrolysis system. The biomass sample was pyrolysed at variation temperature of 450°C - 650°C and at variation residence time of 0.9s - 1.35s. The results obtained were further discussed in this paper. The basic characteristic of the biomass sample was also presented here. The experiment shows that the optimum bio-oil yield was obtained at temperature of 500°C at residence time 1.15s.

  19. Microwave-assisted pyrolysis of methyl ricinoleate for continuous production of undecylenic acid methyl ester (UAME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yong; Duan, Ying; Gong, Ruchao; Yu, Shangzhi; Lu, Meizhen; Yu, Fengwen; Ji, Jianbing

    2015-06-01

    Undecylenic acid methyl ester (UAME) was continuously produced from methyl ricinoleate using a microwave-assisted pyrolysis system with atomization feeding. The UAME yield of 77 wt.% was obtained at 500°C using SiC as the microwave absorbent and heating medium. The methyl ricinoleate conversion and UAME yield from microwave-assisted pyrolysis process were higher than those from conventional pyrolysis. The effect of temperature on the pyrolysis process was also investigated. The methyl ricinoleate conversion increased but the cracking liquid yield decreased when the temperature increased from 460°C to 560°C. The maximum UAME yield was obtained at the temperature of 500°C.

  20. Pyrolysis polygeneration of pine nut shell: Quality of pyrolysis products and study on the preparation of activated carbon from biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Chen, Xiaojuan; Sun, Jun; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Fu, Kexin

    2016-09-01

    A lab-scale pyrolysis reactor was utilized to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature (300-700°C) on the yield, quality, and energy distribution of products issued from the pyrolysis polygeneration of pine nut shells. Afterward, activated carbon was prepared from biochar using the steam activation method. Pyrolysis temperatures ranging from 500 to 600°C were found to be optimal in inducing products with improved properties, such as higher heating values of non-condensable gas, lower water content and elevated heating values of bio-oil, and substantial fixed carbon content and greater specific surface area of biochar. In addition, it was noticed that the activation conditions had a significant effect on the yield and adsorption performance of the activated carbon. As a result, activated carbon with elevated specific surface area reaching 1057.8m(2)/g was obtained at the optimal conditions of 850°C activation temperature, 80min activation time, and 1.5 steam/biochar ratio.

  1. Influence of Pyrolysis Parameters on the Performance of CMSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C. Campo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon hollow fiber membranes have been prepared by pyrolysis of a P84/S-PEEK blend. Proximate analysis of the precursor was performed using thermogravimetry (TGA, and a carbon yield of approximately 40% can be obtained. This study aimed at understanding the influence of pyrolysis parameters—end temperature, quenching effect, and soaking time—on the membrane properties. Permeation experiments were performed with N2, He, and CO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM has been done for all carbon hollow fibers. The highest permeances were obtained for the membrane submitted to an end temperature of 750°C and the highest ideal selectivities for an end temperature of 700°C. In both cases, the membranes were quenched to room temperature.

  2. Pyrolysis characteristic of tobacco stem studied by Py-GC/MS, TG-FTIR, and TG-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Liu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis characteristics and mechanism of tobacco stem were studied by pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS, thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and mass spectrometry (TG-FTIR and TG-MS techniques. The composition of evolved volatiles from fast pyrolysis of tobacco stem was determined by Py-GC/MS analysis, and the evolution patterns of the major products were investigated by TG-FTIR and TG-MS. Py-GC/MS data indicated that furfural and phenol were the major products in low temperature pyrolysis, and these were generated from depolymerization of cellulose. Indene and naphthalene were the major products in high temperature pyrolysis. TG-FTIR and TG-MS results showed that CO, CO2, phenols, aldehydes, and ketones were released between 167ºC and 500ºC; at temperatures >500ºC, CO and CO2 were the main gaseous products.

  3. Exploratory studies on fast pyrolysis oil upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahfud, Farchad Husein

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a dark brown liquid which can be produced in high yield from different kind of biomass sources by means of fast pyrolysis. Pyrolysis oil is considered as a promising second generation energy carrier and may play an important role in the future of "biobased economies". The energy con

  4. Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Martynov, V.Y.; Chilachava, K.B.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900 {degree}C and contact time of 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbon, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component composition of the liquid products and pyrolysis gas were determined. The main groups of compounds in liquid products were analysed.

  5. Mild pyrolysis of P3HB/Switchgrass blends for the production of bio-oil enriched with crotonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mild pyrolysis of switchgrass/poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (P3HB) blends that mimic P3HB-producing switchgrass lines was studied in a pilot scale fluidized bed reactor with the goal of simultaneously producing crotonic acid and switchgrass-based bio-oil. Factors such as pyrolysis temperature, residenc...

  6. Pyrolysis GC-FTIR (Gas Chromatography-Fourier Transform-Infrared) Studies of a LOVA Propellant Formulation Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    final temperature. The pyrolysis products were then passed through the (splitless) injector into the capillary column, which separated the pyrolysis...22333-0001 4 Commander US Army Research Office Commander ATTN: R. Ghirardelli !s Army Laboratory Command D. Mann ATTN: AMqLC-DL R. Singleton \\ delphi , MP

  7. Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soncini, Ryan M; Means, Nicholas C; Weiland, Nathan T

    2013-10-01

    Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

  8. Relation between phase composition and photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} in a sulfoxide deoxygenation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, Alessandra, E-mail: alessandra.molinari@unife.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Bonino, Francesca; Magnacca, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Chimica, NIS and INSTM Reference Centre, Università di Torino, Via G. Quarello 15, I-10135 and Via P. Giuria 7, I-10125, Turin (Italy); Demaria, Francesca; Maldotti, Andrea [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università di Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2015-05-05

    In the present study we synthesize three TiO{sub 2} samples, TiO{sub 2}-500, TiO{sub 2}-750 and TiO{sub 2}-850, by a sol–gel procedure varying the rutile and anatase content by calcination at different temperatures. Characterization by XRD, NIR-Raman, UV-Raman, BET, DR-UV-Vis spectroscopy and SEM points out that TiO{sub 2}-500 consists mainly of anatase and TiO{sub 2}-850 of rutile. TiO{sub 2}-700 presents both phases on the surface that is the part of the photocatalyst interested by UV illumination. The photocatalysts are tested in the deoxygenation reaction of methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide to the corresponding sulfide using 2-propanol as hole scavenger. It is demonstrated that the presence of both anatase and rutile on the surface of TiO{sub 2}-700 is responsible of the increase of the photocatalytic activity. This is likely due to a more efficient charge separation process that increases lifetime of the charges giving availability of electrons and holes for the photocatalytic reaction. Methyl p-tolyl sulfide is formed with a selectivity of 100%. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} samples are synthesized via sol–gel varying the rutile and anatase composition. • TiO{sub 2}-700 (calcined at 700 °C) presents both anatase and rutile on the surface. • Efficient charges separation is allowed by the presence of anatase and rutile. • Spatial separation of charges renders TiO{sub 2}-700 the most active photocatalyst. • Methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide is transformed in sulfide with 100% selectivity.

  9. Product Characterization and Kinetics of Biomass Pyrolysis in a Three-Zone Free-Fall Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthaya Punsuwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of biomass including palm shell, palm kernel, and cassava pulp residue was studied in a laboratory free-fall reactor with three separated hot zones. The effects of pyrolysis temperature (250–1050°C and particle size (0.18–1.55 mm on the distribution and properties of pyrolysis products were investigated. A higher pyrolysis temperature and smaller particle size increased the gas yield but decreased the char yield. Cassava pulp residue gave more volatiles and less char than those of palm kernel and palm shell. The derived solid product (char gave a high calorific value of 29.87 MJ/kg and a reasonably high BET surface area of 200 m2/g. The biooil from palm shell is less attractive to use as a direct fuel, due to its high water contents, low calorific value, and high acidity. On gas composition, carbon monoxide was the dominant component in the gas product. A pyrolysis model for biomass pyrolysis in the free-fall reactor was developed, based on solving the proposed two-parallel reactions kinetic model and equations of particle motion, which gave excellent prediction of char yields for all biomass precursors under all pyrolysis conditions studied.

  10. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1991-12-31

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, [Pt(triphos)OPh]{sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l_brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r_brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

  11. Palladium Catalysts for Fatty Acid Deoxygenation: Influence of the Support and Fatty Acid Chain Length on Decarboxylation Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, JP; Immer, JG; Lamb, HH

    2012-03-29

    Supported metal catalysts containing 5 wt% Pd on silica, alumina, and activated carbon were evaluated for liquid-phase deoxygenation of stearic (octadecanoic), lauric (dodecanoic), and capric (decanoic) acids under 5 % H-2 at 300 A degrees C and 15 atm. On-line quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) was used to measure CO + CO2 yield, CO2 selectivity, H-2 consumption, and initial decarboxylation rate. Post-reaction analysis of liquid products by gas chromatography was used to determine n-alkane yields. The Pd/C catalyst was highly active and selective for stearic acid (SA) decarboxylation under these conditions. In contrast, SA deoxygenation over Pd/SiO2 occurred primarily via decarbonylation and at a much slower rate. Pd/Al2O3 exhibited high initial SA decarboxylation activity but deactivated under the test conditions. Similar CO2 selectivity patterns among the catalysts were observed for deoxygenation of lauric and capric acids; however, the initial decarboxylation rates tended to be lower for these substrates. The influence of alkyl chain length on deoxygenation kinetics was investigated for a homologous series of C-10-C-18 fatty acids using the Pd/C catalyst. As fatty acid carbon number decreases, reaction time and H-2 consumption increase, and CO2 selectivity and initial decarboxylation rate decrease. The increase in initial decarboxylation rates for longer chain fatty acids is attributed to their greater propensity for adsorption on the activated carbon support.

  12. Evaluation of deoxygenated oligosaccharide acceptor analogs as specific inhibitors of glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindsgaul, O; Kaur, K J; Srivastava, G; Blaszczyk-Thurin, M; Crawley, S C; Heerze, L D; Palcic, M M

    1991-09-25

    The glycosyltransferases controlling the biosynthesis of cell-surface complex carbohydrates transfer glycosyl residues from sugar nucleotides to specific hydroxyl groups of acceptor oligosaccharides. These enzymes represent prime targets for the design of glycosylation inhibitors with the potential to specifically alter the structures of cell-surface glycoconjugates. With the aim of producing such inhibitors, synthetic oligosaccharide substrates were prepared for eight different glycosyltransferases. The enzymes investigated were: A, alpha(1----2, porcine submaxillary gland); B, alpha(1----3/4, Lewis); C, alpha(1----4, mung bean); D, alpha(1----3, Lex)-fucosyltransferases; E, beta(1----4)-galactosyltransferase; F, beta(1----6)-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V; G, beta(1----6)-mucin-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase ("core-2" transferase); and H, alpha(2----3)-sialyltransferase from rat liver. These enzymes all transfer sugar residues from their respective sugar nucleotides (GDP-Fuc, UDP-Gal, UDP-GlcNAc, and CMP-sialic acid) with inversion of configuration at their anomeric centers. The Km values for their synthetic oligosaccharide acceptors were in the range of 0.036-1.3 mM. For each of these eight enzymes, acceptor analogs were next prepared where the hydroxyl group undergoing glycosylation was chemically removed and replaced by hydrogen. The resulting deoxygenated acceptor analogs can no longer be substrates for the corresponding glycosyltransferases and, if still bound by the enzymes, should act as competitive inhibitors. In only four of the eight cases examined (enzymes A, C, F, and G) did the deoxygenated acceptor analogs inhibit their target enzymes, and their Ki values (all competitive) remained in the general range of the corresponding acceptor Km values. No inhibition was observed for the remaining four enzymes even at high concentrations of deoxygenated acceptor analog. For these latter enzymes it is suggested that the reactive acceptor hydroxyl groups are

  13. Shock-tube pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons - Formation of soot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, M.; Hsu, J. P.; Miller, D. L.; Matula, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Soot formation in pyrolysis of chlorinated methanes, their mixtures with methane, and chlorinated ethylenes were studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. An additional single-pulse shock-tube study was conducted for the pyrolysis of methane, methyl chloride, and dichloromethane. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1300-3000 K, pressures of 0.4-3.6 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations of 1-5 x 10 to the 17th atoms cu cm. The amounts of soot produced in the pyrolysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons are larger than that of their nonchlorinated counterparts. The sooting behavior and product distribution can be generally explained in terms of chlorine-catalyzed chemical reaction mechanisms. The pathway to soot from chlorinated methanes and ethylenes with high H:Cl ratio proceeds via the formation of C2H, C2H2, and C2H3 species. For chlorinated hydrocarbons with low H:Cl ratio, the formation of C2 and its contribution to soot formation at high temperatures becomes significant. There is evidence for the importance of CHCl radical and its reactions in the pyrolysis of dichloromethane.

  14. Pyrolysis of a waste from the grinding of scrap tyres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.M. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Barriocanal, C., E-mail: carmenbr@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Alvarez, R. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The pyrolysis of reinforcing fibres obtained from scrap tyres has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results have been compared to scrap tyre granules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A higher temperature is needed for the total decomposition of the fibres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More compounds with heteroatoms (O, N) were found in the oil from the fibres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chars from the fibres exhibit lower BET surface and mesopore volume. - Abstract: The fibres that are used to reinforce tyres can be recovered as a waste in the process of grinding of scrap tyres. In this paper beneficiation through pyrolysis is studied since the fibres are made up of polymers with a small amount of rubber because the latter is difficult to separate. The experiments were performed at three temperatures (400, 550 and 900 Degree-Sign C) in a horizontal oven. The three products - gas, oil and char - obtained from the pyrolysis were investigated. The composition of the gas was analyzed by means of gas chromatography. The oil was studied by gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. The char porous structure was determined by N{sub 2} adsorption. In addition, the topography of the chars was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The products resulting from the pyrolysis of the fibres were compared with those obtained from scrap rubber.

  15. Spherical YAG:Ce3+ Phosphor Particles Prepared by Spray Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Faxin; Wang Haibo; Zhu Xianzhong

    2005-01-01

    Spherical YAG:Ce3+ phosphor particles with narrow size distribution were prepared by spray pyrolysis. The effects of the concentration of solution, the flow rate of carrier gas and the annealing temperature on the phosphor morphology were studied. The productivity of precursor particles shows a trend of drop after rising with the increase of concentration. Raising the flow rate of nitrogen can improve the productivity of the precursor particles. Phosphor prepared by spray pyrolysis has obviously higher emission intensity than that synthesized by solid state reaction, spray pyrolysis makes Ce3+ ions well distributed in the crystal lattice as the luminescent centers, and phosphor particles have regular sphericity and narrow size distribution.

  16. Effects of pyrolysis on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucukbayrak, S.; Kadioglu, E. (Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-10

    The effect of pyrolysis over the temperature range 300-1000{degree}C on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite has been studied and the experimental results are presented here. Seven lignite samples from different reserves in Turkey with particle diameters of 0.1-0.2 mm were subjected to pyrolysis. The volatile matter contents of the lignite samples decreased by about 90%. The fraction of the calorific value remaining in the coke produced varies from 51 to 75%. The oxygen and hydrogen content decrease the most during pyrolysis. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig.

  17. Pyrolysis of brown coal mixed with heavy products of coal and petroleum processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikhorev, A.A.; Syroezhko, A.M.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Akhmedov, N.A.

    1987-03-01

    Investigates effect of various additives on yield of liquid product from pyrolysis of Kansk-Achinsk (Berezovsk deposit) brown coal mixed with organic additives: waste from caprolactam plant consisting mostly of saturated oxygen containing compounds and mono- and di-carboxylic acid esters, waste from sabatic acid plant consisting predominantly of unsaturated acids, distillation residue of synthetic fatty acids, heavy residue from Arlansk oil refineries containing mainly condensed naphtheno-aromatic systems and heavy tar from rapid pyrolysis of Kansk-Achinsk coal. Finds that joint pyrolysis of brown coal with organic additives increases yield of liquid products and that intensive decomposition begins at lower temperatures. 4 refs.

  18. Bio-oil from pyrolysis of cashew nut shell - a near fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, P.; Ganesh, A. [Indian Inst. of technology, Mumbai (India). Energy Systems Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Cashew nut shell (CNS) has been studied for the product distribution in a packed bed vacuum pyrolysis unit. The effect of pyrolysis temperatures on the product yields is also studied. The oil-to-liquid ratio in the pyrolysis products was found to remain almost constant in the range between 400{sup o}C and 550{sup o}C. The properties of CNS oil has been found to be amazingly near to that of petroleum fuels with calorific value as high as 40 MJkg{sup -1}, the oil has a low ash content (0.01%) and water content is limited to 3-3.5 wt% of oil. (Author)

  19. Combustion characteristics of semicokes derived from pyrolysis of low rank bituminous coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Wei; Xie Qiang; Huang Yuyi; Dang Jiatao; Sun Kaidi; Yang Qian; Wang Jincao

    2012-01-01

    Various semicokes were obtained from medium-low temperature pyrolysis of Dongrong long flame coal.The proximate analysis,calorific value and Hardgrove grindability index (HGI) of semicokes were determined,and the ignition temperature,burnout temperature,ignition index,burnout index,burnout ratio,combustion characteristic index of semicokes were measured and analyzed using thermogravimetry analysis (TGA).The effects of pyrolysis temperature,heating rate,and pyrolysis time on yield,composition and calorific value of long flame coal derived semicokes were investigated,especially the influence of pyrolysis temperature on combustion characteristics and grindability of the semicokes was studied combined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of semicokes.The results show that the volatile content,ash content and calorific value of semicokes pyrolyzed at all process parameters studied meet the technical specifications of the pulverized coal-fired furnaces (PCFF) referring to China Standards GB/T 7562-1998.The pyrolysis temperature is the most influential factor among pyrolysis process parameters.As pyrolysis temperature increases,the yield,ignition index,combustion reactivity and burnout index of semicokes show a decreasing tend,but the ash content increases.In the range of 400 and 450 ℃,the grindability of semicokes is rational,especially the grindability of semicokes pyrolyzed at 450 ℃ is suitable.Except for the decrease of volatile content and increase of ash content,the decrease of combustion performance of semicokes pyrolyzed at higher temperature should be attributed to the improvement of the degree of structural ordering and the increase of aromaticity and average crystallite size of char.It is concluded that the semicokes pyrolyzed at the temperature of 450 ℃ is the proper fuel for PCFF.

  20. Zinc oxide films prepared by spray pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciąg Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we developed and tested spray pyrolysis system for layers deposition. In the system we have used ultrasonic apparatus (nebulizator as a sprayer. A zinc nitrate aqueous solution has been used as a precursor solution. The idea of the method is the decomposition of nitrate on a hot substrate according to the reaction Zn(NO32 → ZnO +2 NO2 +1/2O2. The layers were grown on glass, (001Si and KCl substrates at the temperatures 300 – 500°C. The thickness of the obtained layers was in the range 50 – 500 nm, depending on the growth time and rate. The influence of substrate temperature on the morphology of the layers has been studied by SEM method. The energy gap of the layers was found to be the range of 3.26-3.3 eV from their absorption spectra.

  1. Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandvold, Timothy A; Baird, Lance Awender; Frey, Stanley Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Methods and apparatuses for preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil are provided herein. In an embodiment, a method of preparing upgraded pyrolysis oil includes providing a biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream having an original oxygen content. The biomass-derived pyrolysis oil stream is hydrodeoxygenated under catalysis in the presence of hydrogen to form a hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream comprising a cyclic paraffin component. At least a portion of the hydrodeoxygenated pyrolysis oil stream is dehydrogenated under catalysis to form the upgraded pyrolysis oil.

  2. Bio-oil production from pyrolysis and steam pyrolysis of soybean-cake: product yields and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putun, A.E.; Apaydin, E.; Putun, E. [Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The slow pyrolysis of soybean cake in a fixed-bed reactor was investigated under three different atmospheres: static, for determining the effects of pyrolysis temperature and particle size, nitrogen and steam. The liquid yield of 33.78% was attained at 550{sup o}C pyrolysis temperature and 200 Cm{sup 3}/min sweeping gas flow rate with the soybean oil cake samples having 0.850 < D{sub p} < 1.250 mm particle size. And the liquid yield reached a maximum value of 42.79% with a steam velocity of 1.3 cm/s. Column chromatography was used to characterize the liquid product, bio-oil. The aliphatic subtractions of the oils were then analyzed by GC/MS. FTIR and {sup 1}H-NMR spectra were used to determine structural analysis of pyrolysis oils and aromatic and polar subtractions. The H/C ratios and the structure analysis of the fractions obtained from the biocrudes show that the fractions are quite similar to currently utilized transport fuels. (author)

  3. Pyrolysis of Cigarette Ingredients Labelled with Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stotesbury S

    2014-12-01

    mass spectra from the labelled compounds and their natural counterparts, the major degradation products from the labelled compounds could be readily identified in the chromatograms of the corresponding smoke extracts. Evidence of some degradation at above the transfer temperature was indicated for both additives. The amount of degradation was found to be less than 1% for p-anisaldehyde and only 0.1% for vanillin. This low level of degradation was acceptably consistent with the intact transfer values of 97% and 100%, respectively, obtained by pyrolysis.

  4. Study on the pyrolysis behavior of Shendong Shangwan coal and its macerals concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-lin LIN; Ke-jian LI; Xu-wen ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of Shendong Shangwan coal and its macerals concentrate were investigated using thermogravimetry (TG) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS).The evolved gases were analyzed online by MS spectroscopy.The results of TG/DTG (derivative thermogravimetry) show ths vitrinite concentrate has greater weight loss rate and higher volatile yield than the other two samples.More light hydrocarbons C1-C5 are released from the vitrinite concentrate than from the Shendong Shangwan coal and inertinite concentrated in the process of pyrolysis.Three samples have similar shape curves of evolved gases of C2-C5 with different intensities.When the pyrolysis temperature was lower than 418 ℃,the amount of C6H6 evolved in the process of pyrolysis of inertinite concentrated was higher than that of raw coal and vitrinite concentrate.As the temperature rising,the production rate of C6H6 increased.Below 672 ℃,C6H6 evolution rate of vitrinite concentrate was far greater than the other two samples; the main evolution temperature range of C7H8 was 400 ℃ to 700 ℃ for the three samples.The amount of H2 and H2O released first increased and then decreased with the temperature increase while more H2 released for pyrolysis of inertinite concentrated and more H2O released for the pyrolysis of vitrinite concentrate.

  5. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  6. The production and evaluation of bio-oils from the pyrolysis of sunflower-oil cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, Hasan Ferdi [Anadolu Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2002-10-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-oil cake pyrolysis experiments were achieved in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 48.69 wt% was obtained in nitrogen atmosphere with nitrogen flow rate of 100 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550 deg C with a heating rate of 5 deg Cs{sup -1}. Chromatographic and spectroscopic studies on the pyrolytic oil showed that the oil obtained from sunflower-oil cake can be used as a renewable fuel and chemical feedstocks. (Author)

  7. Stepwise Isothermal Fast Pyrolysis (SIFP of Biomass. Part III. SIFP of Olive Oil Industry Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia S. Luna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of olive oil industry wastes was carried out using stepwise isothermal fast pyrolysis (SIFP. SIFP consists of a succession of isothermal fast pyrolysis reactions in which the solid products obtained from the previous isothermal fast pyrolysis reaction become the substrates for subsequent reactions at higher temperatures. This article reports the results obtained from the SIFP of olive oil residue carried out between the temperatures of 300 and 500 °C using 100 °C intervals under reduced pressure (200 mm Hg. The maximum yield of liquid products occurred at 300 °C and consisted of around 35% bio-oil, which contained mainly phenols, furans, and fatty acid methyl esters (FAME. At 400 and 500 °C, FAME, which is derived from residual olive oil, was the major product.

  8. Investigating pyrolysis and combustion characteristics of torrefied bamboo, torrefied wood and their blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia; Hu, Wanhe; Wei, Penglian; Jiang, Zehui; Fei, Benhua

    2016-06-01

    Bamboo and masson pine was torrefied with 300°C of temperature for 2.0h of residence time using GSL 1600X tube furnace in the argon atmosphere. Torrefied bamboo and masson pine particles were uniform mixed with different weight ratios. Pyrolysis and combustion characteristics were investigated through thermogravimetry (TGA). The results showed that pyrolysis and combustion process of all samples included three steps even though their characteristics were different. Torrefied biomass had a higher pyrolysis and combustion temperature, due to moisture and volatile removal and thermal decomposition of hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignin during torrefaction process. Torrefaction also increased high heating value, ash content and C/H and C/O ratio of biomass. The synergy of torrefied bamboo and torrefied mason pine was not found during pyrolysis and combustion process of blends. The results from this research will be very important and helpful to develop and utilize the wastes of masson pine and bamboo for energy products.

  9. Fast pyrolysis of sunflower-pressed bagasse: effects of sweeping gas flow rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F.; Putun, E.

    2002-05-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-pressed bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 52.85 wt% was obtained in a nitrogen atmosphere and a nitrogen flow rate of 50 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C and heating rate of 5{sup o}C s{sup -1}. The chemical characterization has shown that the oil obtained from sunflower-pressed bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (author)

  10. Production and characterization of pyrolysis liquids from sunflower-pressed bagasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F. [Anadolu University (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-11-01

    Pyrolysis experiments on sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-pressed bagasse were performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions were investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 52.10 wt.% was obtained in a nitrogen atmosphere with flow rate of 50 ml min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C with a heating rate of 5{sup o}C s{sup -1}. The chemical characterization results showed that the oil obtained from sunflower-pressed bagasse may be a potentially valuable source as fuel or chemical feedstocks. (author)

  11. The effect of a sweeping gas flow rate on the fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gercel, H.F.

    2002-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.)-pressed bagasse pyrolysis experiments were performed in a fixed-bed tubular reactor. The effects of nitrogen flow rate and final pyrolysis temperature on the pyrolysis product yields and chemical compositions have been investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield of 46.62 wt% was obtained in a nitrogen atmosphere with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 cm{sup 3}min{sup -1} and at a pyrolysis temperature of 550{sup o}C with a heating rate of 300{sup o}C min{sup -1}. The chemical characterization showed that the oil obtained from sunflower-pressed bagasse may be potentially valuable as fuel and chemical feedstocks. (author)

  12. Bio-oil production from fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Hyeon Su; Park, Hyun Ju; Park, Young-Kwon; Ryu, Changkook; Suh, Dong Jin; Suh, Young-Woong; Yim, Jin-Heong; Kim, Seung-Soo

    2010-01-01

    The amount of waste furniture generated in Korea was over 2.4 million tons in the past 3 years, which can be used for renewable energy or fuel feedstock production. Fast pyrolysis is available for thermo-chemical conversion of the waste wood mostly into bio-oil. In this work, fast pyrolysis of waste furniture sawdust was investigated under various reaction conditions (pyrolysis temperature, particle size, feed rate and flow rate of fluidizing medium) in a fluidized-bed reactor. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for increased yields of bio-oil was 450 degrees C. Excessively smaller or larger feed size negatively affected the production of bio-oil. Higher flow and feeding rates were more effective for the production of bio-oil, but did not greatly affect the bio-oil yields within the tested ranges. The use of product gas as the fluidizing medium had a potential for increased bio-oil yields.

  13. Correlation Between Pyrolysis Atmosphere and Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane Performance Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Kiyono, Mayumi

    2011-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes have attractive separation performance properties, greatly exceeding an "upper bound" trade-off curve of polymeric membrane performance. CMS membranes are prepared by pyrolyzing polymers, well above their glass transition temperatures. Multiple factors, such as polymer precursor and pyrolysis protocol, are known to affect the separation performance. In this study, a correlation observed between pyrolysis atmosphere and CMS separation performance properties is discussed. Specifically, oxygen exposure during the pyrolysis process is the focus. The theory and details of the oxygen exposure and development of a new CMS preparation method using oxygen as a "dopant" will be described with a strong correlation observed with separation performance for CMS membranes prepared with various polymer precursors. In addition, study of possible mass transfer limitations on the oxygen "doping" process will be described to clarify the basis for the equilibrium-based interpretation of doping data. The method is also explored by changing the pyrolysis temperature. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Can nitrogen cycle feedbacks lead to runaway denitrification and deoxygenation of the ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. S.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Over millennial timescales, the oceanic reservoir of fixed nitrogen (N) is regulated by a balance between N loss in sediments and low oxygen (O2) waters, and N2-fixation by diazotrophic phytoplankton. The two processes are coupled by selection for diazotrophs under N-limited conditions that arise from denitrification, although the spatial scale of this coupling is debated. A strong local coupling has been argued against because the export of newly fixed N would boost nearby denitrification rates, stimulating further N2-fixation in overlying water, resulting in runaway N loss and deoxygenation of the ocean. Using a global ocean circulation model with a prognostic ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, we show that no such runaway feedback arises. Even when the majority of N2-fixation occurs directly above suboxic zones, N sources and sinks quickly reach a stable equilibrium without widespread N depletion. Taking a systems dynamics approach, we derive a "feedback factor" (f) for the interaction of N inputs and losses, which depends on the stoichiometry of diazotroph biomass, ventilation of the tropical thermocline, and upwelling rate of denitrified waters. Under modern conditions of ocean circulation and O2 solubility, f is much lower than 1 - the value that separates stable and runaway amplification of a system response - and the oceanic N reservoir is remarkably insensitive to spatial proximity of N sources and sinks, as might accompany the alleviation of diazotroph Fe-limitation. Based on these parameters, we identify climatic conditions that might push the system into a runaway feedback regime, allowing for periods of catastrophic N loss and deoxygenation during Earth's history.

  15. Experimental and Modelling Studies of Biomass Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka Leung Lam; Adetoyese Olajire Oyedu~; Chi Wai Hui

    2012-01-01

    The analysis on the feedstock pyrolysis characteristic and the impacts of process parameters on pyrolysis outcomes can assist in the designing, operating and optimizing pyrolysis processes. This work aims to utilize both experimental and modelling approaches to perform the analysis on three biomass feedstocks--wood sawdust, bamboo shred and Jatropha Curcas seed cake residue, and to provide insights for the design_and operation of pyro-lysis processes. For the experimental part, the study investigated the effect of heating rate, final pyrolysis tempera- ture and sample size on pyrolysis using common thermal analysis techniques. For the modelling part, a transient mathematical model that integrates the feedstock characteristic from the experimental study was used to simulate the pyrolysis progress of selected biomass feedstock particles for reactor scenarios. The model composes of several sub-models that describe pyrolysis kinetic and heat flow, particle heat transfer, particle shrinking and reactor opera-tion. With better understanding of the effects of process conditions and feedstock characteristics on pyrolysis through both experimental and modelling studies, this work discusses on the considerations of and interrelation between feedstock size, pyrolysis energy usage, processing time and product quality for the design and operation of pyrolysis processes.

  16. Production, properties and utilisation of pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipilae, K.; Oasmaa, A.; Arpiainen, V.; Solantausta, Y.; Leppaemaeki, E.; Kuoppala, E.; Levander, J.; Kleemola, J.; Saarimaeki, P. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-01

    In this project VTT Energy co-ordinates the EU JOULE Project `Biofuel oil for power plants and boilers` supporting the development projects of Finnish enterprises, and participates in the Pyrolysis Project of IEA Bioenergy Agreement. Presently two pyrolysis devices with capacities of 150 g/h and 1 kg/h are used for the project. Hot gas filtering tests by using one ceramic candle equipment have been carried out with the 1 kg/h device for pyrolysis oil. The solids and alkali contents of the product oil were reduced clearly. Suitable conditions are being defined for continuous hot gas filtering. A PDU device of 20 kg/h is being commissioned. The main aim of the chemical characterisation of pyrolysis oil was to develop as simple a method as possible for differentiating pyrolysis oils and for finding correlations between the characteristics and behaviour of pyrolysis oils. Pyrolysis oils produced from various raw materials (hardwood, pine, straw) were analysed and compared with each other. VTT Energy participates in the pyrolysis network (EU/PYNE) of EU, the aim of which is to collect and disseminate research results of pyrolysis studies, i.e., through a journal with a wide circulation. VTT also participates in the pyrolysis activity of IEA (PYRA), the other partners being Great Britain, EU, Canada and the United States. I.e., quality criteria and improvement, occupational safety and pyrolysis kinetics are discussed in IEA/PYRA

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  18. Experimental toxicology of pyrolysis and combustion hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, H H; Hahn, K J; Barth, M L

    1975-06-01

    Data are presented on the acute toxicity (mortality only) of the thermal degradation products of polymers obtained by two methods of degradation. One system utilized a slowly increasing temperature (5 degrees C/min) and gradual degradation of the polymer with the rats being exposed to degradation products as they were evolved. In this system the more toxic polymers included wool, polypropylene, poly(vinyl chloride), and urethane foam. The second system utilized conditions of rapid combustion and exposure of rats to the total products of combustion for a period of 4 hr. In this system the more toxic materials included red oak, cotton, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and styrene-acrylonitrile. It is of interest to note that the natural product wool is among the least toxic under these rapid combustion conditions and among the most toxic under slow pyrolysis conditions. Other materials also vary in the comparative toxicity of their thermal degradation products, depending upon the conditions of degradation and animal exposure. The two experimental techniques presented here may well represent the two extreme conditions of rapid combustion versus slow pyrolysis. Intermediate types of fire situations might be expected to result in relative acute toxicities somewhere between these two extremes. This report deals with acute toxicity on the basis of mortality data only and does not include other parameters of toxicity such as organ weights and histopathology.

  19. Structural analysis of bio-oils from pyrolysis and steam pyrolysis of cottonseed cake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezbay, N. [Anadolu University, Career School of Bozueyuek, Bilecik (Turkey); Puetuen, A.E.; Puetuen, E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Anadolu University, Iki Eyluel Campus, 26470, Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2001-06-01

    Structural analysis and the effect of the water vapour on the structure of the products obtained by low temperature thermal destruction of biomass at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The liquid products were fractionated into pentane solubles and insolubles (Asphaltenes). Pentane solubles were then solvent fractionated into pentane, toluene, ether and methanol subfractions by fractionated column chromatograpy. The aliphatic subfractions of the oils were then analysed by capillary column gas-liquid chromatography and GC/MS. For further structural analysis, the pyrolysis oils and aromatic and polar subfractions were conducted using FTIR and 1H-NMR spectra.

  20. Morphological characteristics of waste polyethylene/polypropylene plastics during pyrolysis and representative morphological signal characterizing pyrolysis stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Chen, D; Yuan, G; Ma, X; Dai, X

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the morphological characteristics of waste polyethylene (PE)/polypropylene (PP) plastics during their pyrolysis process were investigated, and based on their basic image changing patterns representative morphological signals describing the pyrolysis stages were obtained. PE and PP granules and films were used as typical plastics for testing, and influence of impurities was also investigated. During pyrolysis experiments, photographs of the testing samples were taken sequentially with a high-speed infrared camera, and the quantitative parameters that describe the morphological characteristics of these photographs were explored using the "Image Pro Plus (v6.3)" digital image processing software. The experimental results showed that plastics pyrolysis involved four stages: melting, two stages of decomposition which are characterized with bubble formation caused by volatile evaporating, and ash deposition; and each stage was characterized with its own phase changing behaviors and morphological features. Two stages of decomposition are the key step of pyrolysis since they took up half or more of the reaction time; melting step consumed another half of reaction time in experiments when raw materials were heated up from ambient temperatures; and coke-like deposition appeared as a result of decomposition completion. Two morphological signals defined from digital image processing, namely, pixel area of the interested reaction region and bubble ratio (BR) caused by volatile evaporating were found to change regularly with pyrolysis stages. In particular, for all experimental scenarios with plastics films and granules, the BR curves always exhibited a slowly drop as melting started and then a sharp increase followed by a deep decrease corresponding to the first stage of intense decomposition, afterwards a second increase - drop section corresponding to the second stage of decomposition appeared. As ash deposition happened, the BR dropped to zero or very low

  1. Soot morphology in laser pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandu, Ion C.; Pasuk, I.; Morjan, Ion G.; Voicu, Ion N.; Alexandrescu, Rodica; Fleaca, Claudiu T.; Ciupina, Victor; Dumitrache, Florian V.; Soare, Iuliana; Ploscaru, Mihaela I.; Daniels, H.; Westwood, A.; Rand, B.

    2004-10-01

    Soots obtained by laser pyrolysis of different gaseous/vapor hydrocarbons were investigated. The morphology variation of carbon soot versus process parameters and nature of reactants was analyzed and discussed. The role of oxygen is essential in obtaining soot particles having considerable curved-layer content.

  2. Investigation of pyrolysis gas chemistry in an inductively coupled plasma facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillson, Corey C.

    The pyrolysis mechanics of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) makes it a valued material for use in thermal protection systems for spacecraft atmospheric re-entry. The present study of the interaction of pyrolysis gases and char with plasma gases in the boundary layer over PICA and its substrate, FiberForm, extends previous work on this topic that has been done in the UVM 30 kW Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Torch Facility. Exposure of these material samples separately to argon, nitrogen, oxygen, air, and carbon dioxide plasmas, and combinations of said test gases provides insight into the evolution of the pyrolysis gases as they react with the different environments. Measurements done to date include time-resolved absolute emission spectroscopy, location-based temperature response, flow characterization of temperature, enthalpy, and enthalpy flux, and more recently, spatially resolved and high-resolution emission spectroscopy, all of which provide measure of the characteristics of the pyrolysis chemistry and material response. Flow characterization tests construct an general knowledge of the test condition temperature, composition, and enthalpy. Tests with relatively inert argon plasmas established a baseline for the pyrolysis gases that leave the material. Key pyrolysis species such as CN Violet bands, NH, OH and Hydrogen Alpha (Hα) lines were seen with relative repeatability in temporal, spectral, and intensity values. Tests with incremental addition, and static mixtures, of reactive plasmas provided a preliminary image of how the gases interacted with atmospheric flows and other pyrolysis gases. Evidence of a temporal relationship between NH and Hα relating to nitrogen addition is seen, as well as a similar relationship between OH and Hα in oxygen based environments. Temperature analysis highlighted the reaction of the material to various flow conditions and displayed the in depth material response to argon and air/argon plasmas. The development

  3. Pyrolysis as a key process in biomass combustion and thermochemical conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvero Petar M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomass is a fuel with a highly volatile content and due to that, pyrolysis as a part of the combustion process, has a dominant role in the overall process development, as well as on final products and the process efficiency. It is of key importance to investigate the influence of the process parameters; as temperature, furnace/reactor environment, fuel properties, type, particle size, geometry, and the structure of the pyrolysis process has an influence regards the design of the combustion/pyrolysis equipment and the final products of the processes. This paper gives some results of the investigation’s related to this problem, mainly focussing on wooden biomass as the most important biomass type, as well as a comparison with relevant documented literature. Besides that, pyrolysis based technologies are one of the key directions in synthetic fuels production based on biomass. Biomass pyrolysis process parameters are crucial in reactor design as well as the quantity and quality of the final products. This paper provides discussion dedicated to this aspect with a focus on slow pyrolysis, targeting charcoal as the key product, and fast pyrolysis, targeting synthetic gas as the key product.

  4. On-Line Analysis and Kinetic Behavior of Arsenic Release during Coal Combustion and Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fenghua; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Zhen; Dai, Jinxin

    2015-11-17

    The kinetic behavior of arsenic (As) release during coal combustion and pyrolysis in a fluidized bed was investigated by applying an on-line analysis system of trace elements in flue gas. This system, based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), was developed to measure trace elements concentrations in flue gas quantitatively and continuously. Obvious variations of arsenic concentration in flue gas were observed during coal combustion and pyrolysis, indicating strong influences of atmosphere and temperature on arsenic release behavior. Kinetic laws governing the arsenic release during coal combustion and pyrolysis were determined based on the results of instantaneous arsenic concentration in flue gas. A second-order kinetic law was determined for arsenic release during coal combustion, and the arsenic release during coal pyrolysis followed a fourth-order kinetic law. The results showed that the arsenic release rate during coal pyrolysis was faster than that during coal combustion. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to identify the forms of arsenic in vapor and solid phases during coal combustion and pyrolysis, respectively. Ca3(AsO4)2 and Ca(AsO2)2 are the possible species resulting from As-Ca interaction during coal combustion. Ca(AsO2)2 is the most probable species during coal pyrolysis.

  5. Influence of gas-phase reactions on the product yields obtained in the pyrolysis of polyethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzani, V.; Tognotti, L. [Univ. degli Studi di Pisa (Italy); Nicolella, C.; Rovatti, M. [Univ. degli Studi di Genova (Italy). Ist. di Ingegneria Chimica e di Processo G.B. Bonino

    1997-02-01

    The amount of plastic wastes is growing year after year, and the fraction of plastics in municipal solid wastes (MSW) and in refuse-derived fuels (RDF) is progressively increasing. Pyrolysis and gasification processes appear to be promising routes for the upgrading of solid wastes to more usable and energy dense materials such as gas fuel and/or fuel oil or to high-value feedstocks for the chemical industry. The characterization of the product fractions obtained from the pyrolysis of polyethylene (PE) in a laboratory-scale fixed bed reactor was performed. The experimental system allowed quantitative information to be obtained on the global tar, char, and gas yields. Pyrolysis runs were performed using reactor temperatures ranging between 500 and 800 C. The influence of the residence times in the reactor of the primary volatiles generated by the pyrolysis process was also discussed. The secondary reactivity of the tar originated from PE pyrolysis was examined. A lumped-parameters approach was used in order to evaluate the global kinetic parameters for the gas-phase tar-cracking process. PE tars resulted to be more refractory to thermal decomposition than those obtained in the pyrolysis of biomass and lignocellulosic materials, but more reactive than tars obtained in the pyrolysis of coal.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis characteristics of scrap printed circuit boards by TG-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunhu; Zhang, Xiaoping; Shi, Lin

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) was carried out in the coupling of Thermo Gravimetric Analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) under nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction temperature was increased from 30 to 700°C, while the heating rates were varied from 10 to 40°C/min. Experimental results show that the effect of catalyst on the WPCBs particles pyrolysis was significance. Compared with another two combustion-supporting agents (MgO, CaO), the whole pyrolysis process was optimized when the catalyst ZSM-5 was added into the WPCBs particles. The distributed activation energy model (DAEM) was used to analyze the kinetic parameters of the WPCBs pyrolysis. It was found that values of frequency factor (k0) changed with different activation energy (E) values during pyrolysis process. The activation energy values range from 129.15 to 280.53kJ/mol, and the frequency factor values range from 9.02×10(10) to 4.21×10(22)s(-1). The generated major products for the catalytic pyrolysis of WPCBs were H2, CO2, CO, H2O, phenols and aromatics.

  7. Applied thermal pyrolysis of cogongrass in twin screw reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promdee, K.; Vitidsant, T.

    2014-08-01

    Thermal pyrolysis by heat transfer model can be solved the control temperature in twin screw feeder for produce bio-oil from Cogongrass by novel continuous pyrolysis reactor. In this study, all yield were expressed on a dry and their values were taken as the average of the thermal controlled. Thermal of pyrolysis were carried out at 400-500°C. The products yield calculation showed that the liquid yield of Cogongrass by pyrolysis was higher than that solid and gas yield, as highest of 52.62%, at 500°C, and the other of liquid yield obtained from Cogongrass were 40.56, and 46.45%, at 400, and 450°C, respectively. When separate liquid phase be composed of the bio-oil was highest 37.39%, at 500°C. Indicated that biomass from Cogongrass had good received yields because of low solid yield average and gas yield and high liquid yield average. The compounds detected in bio-oil from Cogongrass showed the functional group, especially; Phenol, Phenol 2,5-dimethyl, Benzene 1-ethyl-4-methoxy, 2-Cyclopenten-1-one, 2,3-dimethyl, Benzene 1-ethyl-3-methyl.

  8. Pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles - experiments and mathematical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Andersen, S.; Thaaning Pedersen, S.; Goebel, B.; Houbak, N.; Henriksen, Ulrik [MEK - DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dall Bentzen, J. [COWI a/s, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    A simple, dynamic, l-dimensional model describing heating, drying and pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles with a l-dimensional geometry has been developed and implemented. The model output is the dynamic evolution of both the char yield and the amount of volatiles. The model is developed in such a simple and accessible way, that it easily can be implemented in a larger model for dimensioning and optimisation of applications where pyrolysis is a part of the overall process as for instance gasification. Experiments using a Thermo Gravimetric Analyser (TGA), built so pieces of wood can be fed into a hot atmosphere instantaneously, have been used to observe the influence of various parameters like temperature and size and wood types on the pyrolysis process. Results from the model have been compared with results from the experiments. The comparison showed good accordance when both wood particles with a well-defined geometry (a cylinder) and when beds of wood chips and wood pellets, respectively, were pyrolyzed. The model has proven that transport of heat to the wood; internal transport and accumulation of heat inside the wood and kinetics of pyrolysis are all important parameters. (au)

  9. Molten salt pyrolysis of milled beech wood using an electrostatic precipitator for oil collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi S. Nygård

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A tubular electrostatic precipitator (ESP was designed and tested for collection of pyrolysis oil in molten salt pyrolysis of milled beech wood (0.5-2 mm. The voltage-current (V-I characteristics were studied, showing most stable performance of the ESP when N2 was utilized as inert gas. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out in FLiNaK and (LiNaK2CO3 over the temperature range of 450-600 ℃. The highest yields of pyrolysis oil were achieved in FLiNaK, with a maximum of 34.2 wt% at 500 ℃, followed by a decrease with increasing reactor temperature. The temperature had nearly no effect on the oil yield for pyrolysis in (LiNaK2CO3 (19.0-22.5 wt%. Possible hydration reactions and formation of HF gas during FLiNaK pyrolysis were investigated by simulations (HSC Chemistry software and measurements of the outlet gas (FTIR, but no significant amounts of HF were detected.

  10. A steady state model of agricultural waste pyrolysis: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trninić, M; Jovović, A; Stojiljković, D

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural waste is one of the main renewable energy resources available, especially in an agricultural country such as Serbia. Pyrolysis has already been considered as an attractive alternative for disposal of agricultural waste, since the technique can convert this special biomass resource into granular charcoal, non-condensable gases and pyrolysis oils, which could furnish profitable energy and chemical products owing to their high calorific value. In this regard, the development of thermochemical processes requires a good understanding of pyrolysis mechanisms. Experimental and some literature data on the pyrolysis characteristics of corn cob and several other agricultural residues under inert atmosphere were structured and analysed in order to obtain conversion behaviour patterns of agricultural residues during pyrolysis within the temperature range from 300 °C to 1000 °C. Based on experimental and literature data analysis, empirical relationships were derived, including relations between the temperature of the process and yields of charcoal, tar and gas (CO2, CO, H2 and CH4). An analytical semi-empirical model was then used as a tool to analyse the general trends of biomass pyrolysis. Although this semi-empirical model needs further refinement before application to all types of biomass, its prediction capability was in good agreement with results obtained by the literature review. The compact representation could be used in other applications, to conveniently extrapolate and interpolate these results to other temperatures and biomass types.

  11. Atmospheric Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Vapor by MoO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Guofeng; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Le, Duy Michael

    2016-01-01

    MoO3 has been tested as a catalyst in hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of both model compounds (acetone and guaiacol) and real biomass pyrolysis vapors under atmospheric pressure. The pyrolysis vapor was obtained by fast pyrolysis of wood or lignin in a continuous fast pyrolysis reactor at a fixed...... temperature of 500 °C, and it subsequently passed through a downstream, close coupled, fixed bed reactor containing the MoO3 catalyst. The influences of the catalyst temperature and the concentration of H2 on the HDO of the pyrolysis vapors were investigated. The level of HDO of the biomass pyrolysis vapors......, which is inactive in HDO. The catalyst experienced severe reduction at temperatures higher than 400 °C. The yields of coke relative to the fed biomass were in the range of 3–4 wt %daf for lignin and 5–6 wt %daf for wood. Compared to untreated bio-oil the upgraded lignin organic liquid showed improved...

  12. THE ROLE OF INTRAMOLECULAR TIES ENERGY IN THE PYROLYSIS PROCESS OF PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Iu. Salikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Recycling plastic waste to focus on. The main type of used products made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET is a container from the various types of beverages. There was considered a possibility of waste of PET (bottles, bottles, packaging containers by pyrolysis. Most of the proposed methods are not suitable for recycling (recycling of waste consumption contamination. Purpose - to develop technological foundations and optimum modes waste PET to obtain useful secondary products, taking into account the energy of chemical intramolecular bonds. Applied scientific basis of recycling PET into useful forms of secondary products, in particular the establishment of the collapse of the intramolecular bonds, depending on the temperature of the pyrolysis method of mathematical processing - differentiation of polynomial equations change in the degree of pyrolysis temperature-dependent. The optimum modes of processing. The block diagram of apparatus for processing contaminated waste PET pyrolysis methods of control processing in accordance with the specified composition of secondary products. The possibility of controlling the amount and types of fuel components of secondary products due to measurable parameters of the pyrolysis process. The effective temperature pyrolysis of waste PET with the CCA-tures energy intramolecular bonds.

  13. Chaos Transfer in Fluidized Beds Accompanied with Biomass Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐松涛; 李定凯; 吕子安; 沈幼庭

    2003-01-01

    Experiments of biomass pyrolysis were carried out in a fiuidized bed, and dynamic signals of pressure and temperature were recorded. Correlation dimension was employed to characterize the chaotic behavior of pressure and temperature signals. Both pressure and temperature signals exhibit chaotic behavior, and the chaotic behavior of temperature signals is always weaker than that of pressure signals. Chaos transfer theory was advanced to explain the above phenomena. The discussion on the algorithm of the correlation dimension shows that the distance definition based on rhombic neighborhood is a better choice than the traditional one based on spherical neighborhood. The former provides a satisfactory result in a much shorter time.

  14. Evaluation of pyrolysis curves for volatile elements in aqueous standards and carbon-containing matrices in electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, A.F. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, DelftChemTech, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands); Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Quimica, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Welz, B. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Departamento de Quimica, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, DelftChemTech, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.t.c.deloos-vollebregt@tudelft.nl

    2008-07-15

    Pyrolysis curves in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) and electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) have been compared for As, Se and Pb in lobster hepatopancreas certified reference material using Pd/Mg as the modifier. The ET AAS pyrolysis curves confirm that the analytes are not lost from the graphite furnace up to a pyrolysis temperature of 800 deg. C. Nevertheless, a downward slope of the pyrolysis curve was observed for these elements in the biological material using ETV-ICP-MS. This could be related to a gain of sensitivity at low pyrolysis temperatures due to the matrix, which can act as carrier and/or promote changes in the plasma ionization equilibrium. Experiments with the addition of ascorbic acid to the aqueous standards confirmed that the higher intensities obtained in ETV-ICP-MS are related to the presence of organic compounds in the slurry. Pyrolysis curves for As, Se and Pb in coal and coal fly ash were also investigated using the same Pd/Mg modifier. Carbon intensities were measured in all samples using different pyrolysis temperatures. It was observed that pyrolysis curves for the three analytes in all slurry samples were similar to the corresponding graphs that show the carbon intensity for the same slurries for pyrolysis temperatures from 200 deg. C up to 1000 deg. C.

  15. Effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose structural characteristics and pyrolysis behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shurong; Dai, Gongxin; Ru, Bin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Xiaoliu; Zhou, Jinsong; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-10-01

    The effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose characteristics and its pyrolysis behaviors were studied in detail. The oxygen content decreased significantly after torrefaction, leading to the increase of high heating value. Two-dimensional perturbation correlation analysis based on diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was performed to characterize the structural evolutions. It was found the dehydration of hydroxyls and the dissociation of branches were the main reactions at low torrefaction temperature. When the temperature further increased, the depolymerization of hemicellulose and the fragmentation of monosaccharide residues occurred. The distributed activation energy model with double Gaussian functions based on reaction-order model was used to investigate the pyrolysis kinetics. The results showed that torrefaction enhanced the activation energy for degradation reactions while lowered that for condensation reactions, and increased the devolatilization contribution of condensation reactions. Besides, torrefaction decreased the yields of typical pyrolytic products, such as acids, furans, alicyclic ketones and so on.

  16. PYROLYSIS KINETICS OF WASHED PRECIPITATED LIGNIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gustafsson

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the pyrolysis behavior of precipitated washed lignin in a Laminar Entrained Flow Reactor between 700 and 1000°C and at different residence times. Lignin was precipitated by acidification of softwood black liquor using CO2. After acid washing, the solid material was dried and sieved (80-100 μm. This material was then fed into the reactor at a rate of about 0.1 g/min. The formed gases were analyzed with respect to CO, CO2, and CH4, and char was collected and weighed. A traditional first order Arrhenius kinetic expression, based on the temperature of the particles with respect to residence time, was adapted to the experimental results. The activation energy was found to be 32.1 kJ/mol. The low ash content in the washed lignin gave a very low solid material residue after the reactor.

  17. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  18. Dissolved phosphorus speciation of flash carbonization, slow pyrolysis, and fast pyrolysis biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of waste biomass is a promising technology to produce sterile and renewable organic phosphorus fertilizers. Systematic studies are necessary to understand how different pyrolysis platforms influence the chemical speciation of dissolved (bioavailable) phosphorus. This study employed solut...

  19. Modelling of pyrolysis of peat and biomass under combustion and gasification; Pyrolyysimalli turpeen ja biomassan poltolle ja kaasutukselle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raiko, R.; Haukka, P.; Vehmaan-Kreula, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Technology

    1997-10-01

    In the model developed during the research the chemical kinetics of pyrolysis is described with `the two competing reactions model`. Heat transfer in particle consists of convection and conduction. With the help of the model all the kinetic parameters of the two pyrolysis reactions are fitted with measured values. Also simple correlations for pyrolysis of peat under fluidized bed and pulverised flame conditions are given. The effect of the heating rate can be taken into account by using two competing Arrhenius-type reactions. In this model pyrolysis is modelled by using two reactions; one for the low temperature level and the other for the high temperature level. Both of these reactions consume the same unreacted fuel and this model is able to describe the pyrolysis at different temperature levels. Pyrolysis takes place in the heating stage of the particle before heterogeneous combustion and therefore temperature and density profiles inside the particle have to be solved simultaneously. The energy and mass balance equations of the particle form a set of partial differential equations (PDE), which is solved numerically by using so called method of lines, by converting PDE into a set of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The final solution of ODEs is received by using LSODE algorithm of Hindmash. An user friendly interface for the pyrolysis model is programmed by using Visual Basic enabling convenient variation of the conditions and observation of the results

  20. CO-PYROLYSIS OF POLYPROPYLENE WITH PETROLEUM OF BACIA DE CAMPOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DE ASSUMPÇÃO, Luiz Carlos Fonte Nova; MARQUES, Mônica Regina da Costa; CARBONELL, Montserrat Motas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the process of co-pyrolysis of polypropylene (PP residues with gas-oil was evaluated, varying thetemperature and the amount of polypropylene fed to the reactor. The polypropylene samples and gas-oil weresubmitted to the thermal co-pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere, varying the temperature and the amount of PP.The influence of the gas-oil was evaluated carrying the co-pyrolysis in the absence of PP. The pyrolysed liquidsproduced by this thermal treatment were characterized by modified gaseous chromatography in order toevaluate the yield in the range of distillation of diesel. As a result, the increase of PP amount lead to a reductionin the yield of the pyrolytic liquid and to an increase of the amount of solid generated. The effect of temperatureincrease showed an inverse result. The results show that plastic residue co-pyrolysys is a potential method forchemical recycling of plastic products.

  1. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  2. Parameters for the Pyrolysis of Organic Material - Perchlorate Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ESA-lead Mars rover ExoMars (launch in 2018) will carry a suit of instruments, one of the in-struments is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer MOMA. Organic material in the Martian soil will be either pyrolyzed at temperatures of up to 1000°C and separated by gas chromatography or volatilized with the help of an UV-laser. A mass spectrometer will be the detector for both methods. Chlorinated organics have been detected in pyroly-sis GC-MS experiments on Mars two times. The first time during the Viking mission in 1976 and a second time with the Sample Analysis on Mars (SAM) in-strument onboard the Curiosity rover in 2012. [1] [2] The presence of perchlorates found by the Phoenix mission in 2008 [3] lead to the discovery that organic molecules not only get oxidized during pyrolysis, but also chlorinated organic compounds can be pro-duced. [4] The parameters used for pyrolysis and the sample composition especially the distribution of organics and perchlorates within the sample and the concentrations of organics and perchlorate have a huge influence on the products created. It is possible to change the condi-tions of the pyrolysis by spatially separating the organ-ics from the perchlorates that the chloromethanes get the major product of the pyrolysis. This might help to understand the results of the (SAM) instrument yield-ing mono-, di- and trichloromethane and a chlorinated 4-hydrocarbon molecule. References: [1] Biemann K et al. (1977) JGR, 82, 4641-4658. [2] Grotzinger J. P et al. (2011) AGU Fall Meeting U13A-01 [3] Hecht M. H., et al. (2009) Science, 325 64-67. [4] Steininger H., Goesmann F., Goetz W. (2011) Planet. & Space Sci., 71, 9-17. Acknowledgments: This work was funded by DLR (FKZ 50QX1001)

  3. Pyrolysis of polycyclic perhydroarenes. 2. 1-n-undecylperhydronaphthalene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizan, T.I.; Savage, P.E.; Perry, B. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-01-01

    1-n-Undecylperhydronaphthalene (UPN), a prototypical long-chain n-alkylperhydroarene, was pyrolyzed both neat and in benzene in batch microreactors at temperatures between 375 and 475{degree}C. The global reaction order for UPN disappearance was 1.00{+-}0.08, so UPN pyrolysis followed first-order kinetics. The Arrhenius parameters for the first order rate constant were A (s{sup -1}) = 10{sup 10.9{+-}2.6} and E = 46.5{+-}8.4 kcal/mol. All of the reported uncertainties are the 95% confidence intervals. An empirical structure-reactivity correlation in the literature, which was developed for the pyrolysis of saturated cyclic compounds with short n-alkyl chains, did not accurately predict the pyrolysis kinetics of UPN and other long-chain n-alkylperhydroarenes. UPN neat pyrolysis generated numerous primary products, and the primary products with the highest initial selectivities were octahydronaphalene plus n-undecane, methyleneperhydronaphthalene plus n-decane, and trans-decalin plus 1-undecene. These three product pairs accounted for about 40% of the primary product spectrum from UPN. The remaining 60% was apportioned in roughly equal selectivities among 18 other primary product pairs that consisted of either an n-alkane plus an alkenylperhydronaphthalene or a 1-alkene plus an n-alkylperhydronaphthalene. Secondary reactions included dehydrogenation of decalin and octahydronaphthalene, to form tetralin and eventually naphthalene, and thermal cracking of paraffins, olefins and other primary products. This product spectrum is consistent with a free radical chain reaction mechanism for UPN neat pyrolysis. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Characteristics and synergistic effects of co-pyrolysis of yinning coal and poplar sawdust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-process of biomass and coal is perceived as a way to enhance the energy utilization by virtue of the integrated and interactive effects between different types of carbonaceous fuels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the co-pyrolysis characteristics of Yining coal and poplar sawdust, and to determine whether there is any synergistic effect in pyrolytic product yields. The coal was blended with sawdust at a mass fraction of 9:1, 7:3, 5:5, 3:7 and 1:9 respectively. The change of char yields, maximum weight loss rate and the corresponding temperature of different coal/sawdust blends during pyrolysis were compared by thermogravimetric analysis (TG. The total tar yields during separate coal, sawdust as well as their blends pyrolysis were acquired from the low temperature aluminum retort distillation test. By compare the experimental and theoretical value of the char yields from TG and tar yields from carbonization test, it was observed that co-pyrolysis of coal/sawdust blends produced less char and tar than the total amount produced by separate coal and sawdust pyrolysis. The different product distribution suggested that there was synergy effect in gas product yields. The co-pyrolysis of demineralized and devolatilized sawdust with coal indicated that the ash in the sawdust was the main contributor to the synergistic effect.

  5. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough.

  6. Multisteps Global Kinetic Analysis of MSW Slow Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Aries Himawanto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to find relationships between single components slow pyrolysis characteristics and mixed component slow pyrolysis characteristics of segregated municipal solid wastes (MSW. The material of this research consists of organic wastes (bamboo wastes and banana leaves wastes and inorganic wastes (styrofoam wastes and snack wrapping wastes. The materials which used to study were the unprosessing waste. The samples were collected, dried and crushed until passing 20 mesh shieves then characterized in self manufactured macro balance. The thermogravimetry analyses were done to find the MSW slow pyrolysis characteristics. The 20 gram sample was placed in the furnace whose temperature is increased with 10 0C/min heating rate until reached 400 0 final temperature and held for 30 minutes before the sample is cooled into room temperature. One hundred ml/min nitrogen introduced from the bottom of furnace as a swept gas. The results of the research show that the global kinetic method could be used to predict the MSW single component activation energy but it should be modified to calculate the mixed sample activation energy . The predictive activation energy values which calculated based on weighed sum of single component have 18.5 % deviations if compared with experimental result.

  7. Application of pyrolysis process in processing of mixed food wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grycová Barbora

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The food industry produces large amounts of solid and also liquid wastes. Different waste materials and their mixtures were pyrolysed in the laboratory pyrolysis unit to a final temperature of 800°C with a 10 minute delay at the final temperature. After the pyrolysis process of the selected wastes a mass balance of the resulting products, off-line analysis of the pyrolysis gas and evaluation of solid and liquid products were carried out. The highest concentration of methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide were analyzed during the 4th gas sampling at a temperature of approx. 720–780°C. The concentration of hydrogen was measured in the range from 22 to 40 vol.%. The resulting iodine numbers of samples CHFO, DS, DSFW reach values that indicate the possibility of using them to produce the so-called “disposable sorbents” in wastewater treatment. The WC condensate can be directed to further processing and upgrading for energy use.

  8. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  9. Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group composition of the liquid products were determined. The total analysis of the major groups of compounds present in the liquid products was performed, and the optimal conditions of pyrolysis, from the viewpoint of preparation of particular compounds, were recommended.

  10. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Almeida; Maria de Fátima Marques

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolit...

  11. Study on co-pyrolysis characteristics of rice straw and Shenfu bituminous coal blends in a fixed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Aibin; Wang, Li; Yu, Guangsuo

    2014-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis behaviors of rice straw and Shenfu bituminous coal were studied in a fixed bed reactor under nitrogen atmosphere. The pyrolysis temperatures were 700°C, 800°C and 900°C, respectively. Six different biomass ratios were used. Gas, tar components were analyzed by a gas chromatograph and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry respectively. Under co-pyrolysis conditions, the gas volume yields are higher than the calculated values. Co-pyrolysis tar contains more phenolics, less oxygenate compounds than calculated values. The addition of biomass changes the atmosphere during the pyrolysis process and promotes tar decomposition. The SEM results show that the differences between the blended char and their parents char are not significant. The results of char yields and ultimate analysis also show that no significant interactions exist between the two kinds of particles. The changes of gas yield and components are caused by the secondary reactions and tar decomposition.

  12. Production of phenol-rich bio-oil during catalytic fixed-bed and microwave pyrolysis of palm kernel shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoriyekomwan, Joy Esohe; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic fixed-bed and microwave pyrolysis of palm kernel shell using activated carbon (AC) and lignite char (LC) as catalysts and microwave receptors are investigated. The effects of process parameters including temperature and biomass:catalyst ratio on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products were studied. The addition of catalyst increased the bio-oil yield, but decreased the selectivity of phenol in fixed-bed. Catalytic microwave pyrolysis of PKS significantly enhanced the selectivity of phenol production. The highest concentration of phenol in bio-oil of 64.58 %(area) and total phenolics concentration of 71.24 %(area) were obtained at 500°C using AC. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicated that concentration of OH, CH, CO and CO functional groups in char samples decreased after pyrolysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis clearly indicated the development of liquid phase in biomass particles during microwave pyrolysis, and the mechanism is also discussed.

  13. Production and Characterization of Bio-Char from the Pyrolysis of Empty Fruit Bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad A. Sukiran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The palm oil industry generates an abundance of oil palm biomass such as the Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB, shell, frond, trunk and Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME. For 88 million tones of Fresh Fruit Bunch (FFB processed in 2008, the amount of oil palm biomass was more than 26 million tones. Studies about production of bio-char from oil palm biomass are still lacking in Malaysia. So, this study was aimed to: (i determine the effect of pyrolysis temperatures on bio-char yield (ii characterize the bio-char obtained under different pyrolysed temperatures. Approach: In this study, pyrolysis of EFB was conducted using a fluidized fixed bed reactor. The effect of pyrolysis temperatures on bio-char yield was investigated. The pyrolysis temperature used ranged from 300-700°C. The elemental analysis, calorific value, surface area and total pore volume of the bio-char were determined. Results: The highest bio char yield of 41.56% was obtained at an optimum pyrolysis temperature of 300°C with particle size of 91-106 μm and the heating rate of 30°C min-1. The calorific values of bio-char ranged from 23-26 MJ kg-1. Conclusion: It was found that the bio-char products can be characterized as carbon rich, high calorific value and potential solid biofuels.

  14. Acute survivorship of the deep-sea coral Lophelia pertusa from the Gulf of Mexico under acidification, warming, and deoxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    Lunden, Jay J.; McNicholl, Conall G.; Sears, Christopher R.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Cordes, Erik E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing global climate due to anthropogenic emissions of CO2 are driving rapid changes in the physical and chemical environment of the oceans via warming, deoxygenation, and acidification. These changes may threaten the persistence of species and populations across a range of latitudes and depths, including species that support diverse biological communities that in turn provide ecological stability and support commercial interests. Worldwide, but particularly in the North Atlantic and deep ...

  15. The effect of inspiratory muscle training on respiratory and limb locomotor muscle deoxygenation during exercise with resistive inspiratory loading.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Louise; Tecklenburg-Lund, S.L.; Chapman, R.; Shei, R.J.; Wilhite, D.P.; Mickleborough, T.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 mi...

  16. The Effect of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory and Limb Locomotor Muscle Deoxygenation During Exercise with Resistive Inspiratory Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L A; Tecklenburg-Lund, S L; Chapman, R; Shei, R-J; Wilhite, D P; Mickleborough, T

    2016-07-01

    We investigated how inspiratory muscle training impacted respiratory and locomotor muscle deoxygenation during submaximal exercise with resistive inspiratory loading. 16 male cyclists completed 6 weeks of either true (n=8) or sham (n=8) inspiratory muscle training. Pre- and post-training, subjects completed 3, 6-min experimental trials performed at ~80%  ˙VO2peak with interventions of either moderate inspiratory loading, heavy inspiratory loading, or maximal exercise imposed in the final 3 min. Locomotor and respiratory muscle oxy-, deoxy-, and total-haemoglobin and myoglobin concentration was continuously monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy. Locomotor muscle deoxygenation changes from 80%  ˙VO2peak to heavy inspiratory loading were significantly reduced pre- to post-training from 4.3±5.6 µM to 2.7±4.7 µM. Respiratory muscle deoxygenation was also significantly reduced during the heavy inspiratory loading trial (4.6±3.5 µM to 1.9±1.5 µM) post-training. There was no significant difference in oxy-, deoxy-, or total-haemoglobin and myoglobin during any of the other loading trials, from pre- to post-training, in either group. After inspiratory muscle training, highly-trained cyclists exhibited decreased locomotor and respiratory muscle deoxygenation during exercise with heavy inspiratory loading. These data suggest that inspiratory muscle training reduces oxygen extraction by the active respiratory and limb muscles, which may reflect changes in respiratory and locomotor muscle oxygen delivery.

  17. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  18. A pyrolysis study for the thermal and kinetic characteristics of an agricultural waste with two different plastic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çepelioğullar, Özge; Pütün, Ayşe E

    2014-10-01

    In this study, thermochemical conversion of plastic wastes (PET and PVC) together with an agricultural waste (hazelnut shell) was investigated. In order to determine the thermal and kinetic behaviours, pyrolysis experiments were carried out from room temperature to 800 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C min(-1) in the presence of a N2 atmosphere in a thermogravimetric analyzer. With the obtained thermogravimetric data, an appropriate temperature was specified for the pyrolysis of biomass-plastic wastes in a fixed-bed reactor. At the second step, pyrolysis experiments were carried out at the same conditions with the thermogravimetric analyzer, except the final temperature which was up to 500 °C in this case. After pyrolysis experiments, pyrolysis yields were calculated and characterization studies for bio-oil were investigated. Experimental results showed that co-pyrolysis has an important role in the determination of the pyrolysis mechanism and the process conditions while designing/implementing a thermochemical conversion method where biomass-plastic materials were preferred as raw materials.

  19. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetics of Methyl Oleate Based on TG-FTIR Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xuechun; Fang Jianhua; Chen Boshui; Wang Jiu; Wu Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition characteristics of methyl oleate were preliminarily investigated under nitrogen atmo-sphere by a thermogravimetric analyzer when the ester was heated at a heating rate of 10℃/min from room temperature to 600℃. Furthermore, the pyrolytic and kinetic characteristics of methyl oleate were intensively studied at different heating rates. The gaseous species obtained during thermal decomposition were also identiifed by the TG-FTIR coupling analysis. The results showed that the pyrolysis of methyl oleate proceeded in three stages, viz. the drying stage, the main pyrolysis stage and the residual pyrolysis stage. The initial decomposition temperature, the maximum weight loss temperature, the peak decomposition temperature and the rate of maximum weight loss of methyl oleate increased with the increasing heat-ing rates. Gaseous CO, CO2 and H2O were the typical decomposition products from pyrolysis of methyl oleate. In addition, a kinetic model for thermal decomposition of methyl oleate was built up based on the experimental results using the Coats-Redfern integral method and the multiple-linear regression method. The activation energy, the pre-exponential factor, the reaction order and the kinetic equation for thermal decomposition of methyl oleate were obtained. Comparison of the ex-perimental data with the calculated ones and analysis of statistical errors of pyrolysis ratios demonstrated that the kinetic model was reliable for studying the pyrolysis of methyl oleate. Finally, the kinetic compensation effect between the pre-exponential factors and the activation energy in the pyrolysis of methyl oleate was also conifrmed.

  20. Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide as adsorbent for cadmium ions removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Du, Hongyan; Yuan, Shaowei; He, Wanxia; Yan, Pengju; Liu, Zhanhong

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline deoxygenated graphene oxide (aGO) was prepared through alkaline hydrothermal treatment and used as adsorbent to remove Cd(II) ions from aqueous solutions for the first time. The characterization results of transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra indicate that aGO was successfully synthesized. The batch adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption kinetics could be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the isotherms equilibrium data were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cd(II) on aGO was 156 mg/g at pH 5 and T=293 K. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption process was a spontaneous and endothermic reaction. The mainly adsorption mechanism speculated from FT-IR results may be attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Cd2+ and negatively charged groups (-CO-) of aGO and cation-π interaction between Cd2+ and the graphene planes. The findings of this study demonstrate the potential utility of the nanomaterial aGO as an effective adsorbent for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions.

  1. Modelling solid-convective flash pyrolysis of straw and wood in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Niels; Larsen, Morten Boberg; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2009-01-01

    Less than a handful of solid-convective pyrolysis reactors for the production of liquid fuel from biomass have been presented and for only a single reactor a detailed mathematical model has been presented. In this article we present a predictive mathematical model of the pyrolysis process...... in the Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor, a novel solid-convective flash pyrolysis reactor. The model relies on the original concept for ablative pyrolysis of particles being pyrolysed through the formation of an intermediate liquid compound which is further degraded to form liquid organics, char, and gas. To describe...... that the reacting particle continuously shed the formed char layer....

  2. Experimental and Chemical Kinetic Modeling Study of Dimethylcyclohexane Oxidation and Pyrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    Eldeeb, Mazen A.

    2016-08-30

    A combined experimental and chemical kinetic modeling study of the high-temperature ignition and pyrolysis of 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (13DMCH) is presented. Ignition delay times are measured behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1049–1544 K and pressures of 3.0–12 atm. Pyrolysis is investigated at average pressures of 4.0 atm at temperatures of 1238, 1302, and 1406 K. By means of mid-infrared direct laser absorption at 3.39 μm, fuel concentration time histories are measured under ignition and pyrolytic conditions. A detailed chemical kinetic model for 13DMCH combustion is developed. Ignition measurements show that the ignition delay times of 13DMCH are longer than those of its isomer, ethylcyclohexane. The proposed chemical kinetic model predicts reasonably well the effects of equivalence ratio and pressure, with overall good agreement between predicted and measured ignition delay times, except at low dilution levels and high pressures. Simulated fuel concentration profiles agree reasonably well with the measured profiles, and both highlight the influence of pyrolysis on the overall ignition kinetics at high temperatures. Sensitivity and reaction pathway analyses provide further insight into the kinetic processes controlling ignition and pyrolysis. The work contributes toward improved understanding and modeling of the oxidation and pyrolysis kinetics of cycloalkanes.

  3. The effect of mixing ratio on co-pyrolysis of lignite and rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onay, O [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Porsuk Vocational School; Usta, C.; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of lignite on the yield and chemical structure of bio-oil produced from rapeseed using a fast pyrolysis technique. The rapeseed and lignite mixtures were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed reactor. Heating rates and temperatures were controlled by a PID controller. Char yield after pyrolysis was determined from the overall weight losses of the reactor tube, while the liquid phase was collected in a glass liner. Experiments were conducted using a range of blending ratios. While final pyrolysis temperatures were set at 550 degrees C. An elemental analyzer was used to characterize the rapeseed and pyrolysis bio-oils. Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) was used to conduct functional group compositional analyses. The study showed that conversion degree increased with temperature increases. Yields of both conversion and oil increased with biomass concentration. However, distribution between conversion and oil was influenced by the blending ratio. A maximum yield of oil was obtained with a 5 per cent blending ratio of lignite. It was concluded that the co-pyrolysis of rapeseed and coal at a temperature of 550 degrees C increases production by more than 11 per cent. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Altering bio-oil composition by catalytic treatment of pinewood pyrolysis vapors over zeolites using an auger - packed bed integrated reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshi Krishna Guda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pine wood pyrolysis vapors were catalytically treated using Zeolite catalysts. An auger fed reactor was used for the pinewood pyrolysis while a packed bed reactor mounted on the top of the auger reactor housed the catalyst for the treatment of pinewood pyrolytic vapors. The pyrolytic vapors produced at 450 oC were passed through zeolite catalysts maintained at 425 oC at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV of 12 h-1. Five zeolites, including ZSM-5, mordenite, ferrierite, Zeolite-Y, and Zeolite-beta (all in H form, were used to study the effect of catalyst properties such as acidity, pore size, and pore structure on catalytic cracking of pinewood pyrolysis vapors. Product bio-oils were analyzed for their chemical composition using GC-MS, water content, density, viscosity, acid value, pH, and elemental compositions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to analyze the extent of coking on zeolite catalysts. Application of catalysis to biomass pyrolysis increased gas product yields at the expense of bio-oil yields. While all the zeolites deoxygenated the pyrolysis vapors, ZSM-5 was found to be most effective. The ZSM-5 catalyzed bio-oil, rich in phenolics and aromatic hydrocarbons, was less viscous, had relatively lower acid number and high pH, and possessed oxygen content nearly half that of un-catalyzed bio-oil. Brønsted acidity, pore size, and shape-selective catalysis of ZSM-5 catalyst proved to be the determining factors for its activity. TGA results implied that the pore size of catalysts highly influenced coking reactions. Regeneration of the used catalysts was successfully completed at 700 oC.

  5. A study of paint sludge deactivation by pyrolysis reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniz L.A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of large quantities of paint sludge is a serious environmental problem. This work evaluates the use of pyrolysis reaction as a process for deactivating paint sludge that generates a combustible gas phase, a solvent liquid phase and an inert solid phase. These wastes were classified into three types: water-based solvent (latex resin and solvents based on their resins (alkyd and polyurethane. An electrically heated stainless steel batch reactor with a capacity of 579 mL and a maximum pressure of 30 atm was used. Following the reactor, a flash separator, which was operated at atmospheric pressure, partially condensed and separated liquid and gas products. Pressure and temperature were monitored on-line by a control and data acquisition system, which adjusted the heating power supplied to the pyrolysis reactor. Reactions followed an experimental design with two factors (reaction time and temperature and three levels (10, 50 and 90 minutes; 450, 550 and 650degreesC. The response variables were liquid and solid masses and net heat of combustion. The optimal operational range for the pyrolysis process was obtained for each response variable. A significant reduction in total mass of solid waste was obtained.

  6. Effect of heating rate on the pyrolysis yields of rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-05-15

    The pyrolysis yields of rapeseed were investigated applying thermogravimetric analysis technique. The pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 1273K at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50K/min in a dynamic nitrogen flow of 40cc/min. Effects of heating rate on the mass losses from the rapeseed were examined using the derivative thermogravimetric analysis profiles. This study showed that important differences on the pyrolytic behavior of rapeseed are observed when heating rate is changed. At the lower heating rates, the maximum rates of mass losses were relatively low. When the heating rate was increased, maximum rates of mass losses also increased. These variations were interpreted by the heterogeneous structure of biomass. Heating rates also concluded to affect the shape of the peaks. Increase in the heating rate shifted the main peak on the DTG profile to the lower temperatures. At low heating rates, there is probably resistance to mass or heat transfer inside the biomass particles. However, increase in heating rate overcame these restrictions, and led to higher conversion rates. The final pyrolysis temperatures were also affected from the variation of the heating rate. Activation energy values were first increased and then decreased depending on the heating rates. (author)

  7. Simulation of coal pyrolysis in plasma jet by CPD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y.; Xie, K.; Zhu, S.; Fletcher, T.H. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of C1 Chemistry and Technology

    2001-12-01

    Reaction of coal in a plasma jet is complex and extremely rapid, and acetylene and carbon monoxide are the main products in the pyrolysis gas. Coal pyrolysis is assumed as the first step reaction when coal is injected into hot plasma jet with initial average temperature of 3700 K. Chemical percolation devolatalization (CPD) is employed first to simulate this procedure in mechanism. The calculation results indicate coal pyrolysis rate in plasma jet is very fast and the retention time of coal staying in reactor is only several milliseconds. Comparing the calculation with experiment result, it was concluded that the CPD agree with the experiment well when the coal feed rate is larger than about 2.0 g s{sup -1}. As the coal feed rate was increased, the average temperature of coal particle during staying in reactor was reduced and the residual time became long, but it was not found that the residual time influenced the coal conversion evidently. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF BIO-OIL FROM PALM KERNEL SHELL PYROLYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of palm kernel shell in a fixed-bed reactor was studied in this paper. The objectives were to investigate the effect of pyrolysis temperature and particle size on the products yield and to characterize the bio-oil product. In order to get the optimum pyrolysis parameters on bio-oil yield, temperatures of 350, 400, 450, 500 and 550 °C and particle sizes of 212–300 µm, 300–600 µm, 600µm–1.18 mm and 1.18–2.36 mm under a heating rate of 50 °C min-1 were investigated. The maximum bio-oil yield was 38.40% at 450 °C with a heating rate of 50 °C min-1 and a nitrogen sweep gas flow rate of 50 ml min-1. The bio-oil products were analysed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR and gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GCMS. The FTIR analysis showed that the bio-oil was dominated by oxygenated species. The phenol, phenol, 2-methoxy- and furfural that were identified by GCMS analysis are highly suitable for extraction from the bio-oil as value-added chemicals. The highly oxygenated oils need to be upgraded in order to be used in other applications such as transportation fuels.

  9. Pyrolysis kinetics of algal consortia grown using swine manure wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharara, Mahmoud A; Holeman, Nathan; Sadaka, Sammy S; Costello, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    In this study, pyrolysis kinetics of periphytic microalgae consortia grown using swine manure slurry in two seasonal climatic patterns in northwest Arkansas were investigated. Four heating rates (5, 10, 20 and 40 °C min(-1)) were used to determine the pyrolysis kinetics. Differences in proximate, ultimate, and heating value analyses reflected variability in growing substrate conditions, i.e., flocculant use, manure slurry dilution, and differences in diurnal solar radiation and air temperature regimes. Peak decomposition temperature in algal harvests varied with changing the heating rate. Analyzing pyrolysis kinetics using differential and integral isoconversional methods (Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose) showed strong dependency of apparent activation energy on the degree of conversion suggesting parallel reaction scheme. Consequently, the weight loss data in each thermogravimetric test was modeled using independent parallel reactions (IPR). The quality of fit (QOF) for the model ranged between 2.09% and 3.31% indicating a good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. An analytical model for pyrolysis of a single biomass particle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi Bidabadi; Mohammad Rastegar Moghaddam; Seyed Alireza Mostafavi; Farzad Faraji Dizaji; Hossein Beidaghy Dizaji

    2015-01-01

    Decreasing in emissions of greenhouse gases to confront the global warming needs to replace fossil fuels as the main doer of the world climate changes by renewable and clean fuels produced from biomass like wood waste which is neutral on the amount of CO2. An analytical and engineering model for pyrolysis process of a single biomass particle has been presented. Using a two-stage semi global kinetic model which includes both primary and secondary reactions, the effects of parameters like shape and size of particle as well as porosity on the particle temperature profile and product yields have been investigated. Comparison of the obtained results with experimental data shows that our results are in a reasonable agreement with previous researchers’ works. Finally, a sensitivity analysis is done to determine the importance of each parameter on pyrolysis of a single biomass particle which is affected by many constant parameters.

  11. Co-pyrolysis characteristic of biomass and bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuaidan; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Aibin; Wang, Li; Yu, Guangsuo

    2015-03-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of biomass and bituminous coal have been studied in this work. The temperature was up to 900°C with the heating rates of 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C/min. Rice straw, saw dust, microcrystalline cellulose, lignin and Shenfu bituminous coal were chosen as samples. Six different biomass ratios were used. The individual thermal behavior of each sample was obtained. The experimental weight fractions of the blended samples and the calculated values were compared. The results show that the weight fractions of the blended samples behave differently with calculated ones during the co-pyrolysis process. With the increasing biomass ratio, relative deviations between experimental weight fractions and calculated ones are larger. H/C molar ratio, heat transfer properties of biomass would affect to the interaction between biomass and coal. The maximum degradation rates are slower than the calculated ones. The activation energy distributions also changed by adding some biomass into coal.

  12. Pyrolysis decomposition of tamarind seed for alternative fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, M A; Islam, M R; Parveen, M; Haniu, H; Takai, K

    2013-12-01

    The conversion of tamarind seed into bio-oil by pyrolysis has been taken into consideration in the present work. The major components of the system were fixed bed fire-tube heating reactor, liquid condenser and collector. The crushed tamarind seed in particle form was pyrolyzed in an electrically heated fixed bed reactor. The products were liquid, char and gasses. The parameters varied were reactor temperature, running time, gas flow rate and feed particle size. The maximum liquid yield was 45 wt% at 400°C for a feed size of 3200 μm diameter at a gas flow rate of 6l/min with a running time of 30 min. The obtained pyrolysis liquid at these optimum process conditions were analyzed for physical and chemical properties to be used as an alternative fuel. The results show the potential of tamarind seed as an important source of alternative fuel and chemicals as well.

  13. Effect of Catalytic Pyrolysis Conditions Using Pulse Current Heating Method on Pyrolysis Products of Wood Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sensho Honma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of catalysts on the compositions of char and pyrolysis oil obtained by pyrolysis of wood biomass with pulse current heating was studied. The effects of catalysts on product compositions were analyzed using GC-MS and TEM. The compositions of some aromatic compounds changed noticeably when using a metal oxide species as the catalyst. The coexistence or dissolution of amorphous carbon and iron oxide was observed in char pyrolyzed at 800°C with Fe3O4. Pyrolysis oil compositions changed remarkably when formed in the presence of a catalyst compared to that obtained from the uncatalyzed pyrolysis of wood meal. We observed a tendency toward an increase in the ratio of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the pyrolysis oil composition after catalytic pyrolysis at 800°C. Pyrolysis of biomass using pulse current heating and an adequate amount of catalyst is expected to yield a higher content of specific polyaromatic compounds.

  14. Thermo-Catalytic Pyrolysis of Waste Plastics from End of Life Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskolczi Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of waste plastics is widely used recycling method. Owing to the end-of-life vehicles regulations, 95% of passenger cars and vehicles must reused/recovered after the dismantling. Pyrolysis of waste polyethylene and polypropylene obtained from end-of-life vehicles was investigated in a continuously stirred batch reactor using 500 and 600°C temperatures. To ensure the pyrolysis reactions the tested catalysts (5% of ZSM-5, HZSM-5, Ni-ZSM-5 and Fe-ZSM-5 were added directly to the mixtures of raw materials. Products of pyrolysis were separated into gases, pyrolysis oil and heavy oil, which was further analyzed by gas-chromatography, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and other standardized methods. Based on the results it was concluded, that the catalysts significantly increase the yields of volatile products, and modify their composition. Especially the alkane/alkene ratio, the methane concentration and the concentration of branched hydrocarbon could be affected by the applied catalysts. Ni-ZSM-5 catalyst had the highest activity in methane production, while HZSM-5 catalyst proved effective in isomerization reactions. Using H-ZSM-5, Ni-ZSM-5, and Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst notably decreased average molecular weight of pyrolysis oils and significantly higher aromatic content was observed.

  15. STEPWISE ISOTHERMAL FAST PYROLYSIS (SIFP OF BIOMASS PART I. SIFP OF PINE SAWDUST

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    Patricia López Rivilli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis of pine wood sawdust was carried out using stepwise isothermal fast pyrolysis (SIFP, focusing on the search of reaction conditions to obtain chemicals in good yields from biomass. SIFP consists of successive isothermal fast pyrolysis reactions, where solid products obtained in the previous isothermal fast pyrolysis become the substrate of the subsequent reaction at a higher temperature. This article reports results obtained by SIFP of pine sawdust between 200 and 600°C using 100°C intervals under vacuum (0.2 mm, using nitrogen as carrier gas. Both sets of reactions made it possible to obtain most of the compounds that have been previously described in conventional fast pyrolysis experiments; however this system produces a smaller number of chemical compounds in each isothermal FP, making it easier to obtain determined chemicals with industrial or research value. Maximum yield of liquid products occurred at 300°C, giving around 30% of bio-oil, which contained mainly phenols and furan derivatives. Liquid-Liquid extraction led to a rich mixture of phenol derivatives. Results showed that SIFP is an interesting technique to obtain enriched fractions of products derived from biomass pyrolysis.

  16. Catalytic gasification of char from co-pyrolysis of coal and biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Wenkui [State key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex system, the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Song, Wenli; Lin, Weigang [State key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex system, the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2008-09-15

    The catalytic gasification of char from co-pyrolysis of coal and wheat straw was studied. Alkali metal salts, especially potassium salts, are considered as effective catalysts for carbon gasification by steam and CO{sub 2}, while too expensive for industry application. The herbaceous type of biomass, which has a high content of potassium, may be used as an inexpensive source of catalyst by co-processing with coal. The reactivity of chars from co-pyrolysis of coal and straw was experimentally examined. The chars were prepared in a spout-entrained reactor with different ratios of coal to straw. The gasification characteristics of chars were measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The co-pyrolysis chars revealed higher gasification reactivity than that of char from coal, especially at high level of carbon conversion. The influence of the alkali in the char and the pyrolysis temperature on the reactivity of co-pyrolysis char was investigated. The experimental results show that the co-pyrolysis char prepared at 750 C have the highest alkali concentration and reactivity. (author)

  17. Co-pyrolysis of a Ukrainian low-grade coal (brown) with plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.N. Shevkoplyas [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine)

    2003-07-01

    An effective pathway of the wastes plastics utilization can be its co-pyrolysis with a low-grade (brown) coal. The Dneprovsky deposit brown coal (Ukraine) and waste plastics as a polyethyleneterephthalate in this investigation were taken. The brown coal-plastics mixed used: 19:1; 9:1 and 4:1 ratio that was as 5, 10 and 20 % plastics additive to the brown coal. The co-pyrolysis mix prepared in the temperature region 450-800{sup o}C in a fixed bed reactor has been carried out. The process time was 0, 60 and 120 min., heating rate - 25{sup o}C/min. The influence plastics additive on the co-pyrolysis yield has been estimated. The influence of the co-pyrolysis isothermal time on the yield and properties of the tars produced has been studied. The mass balances of co-pyrolysis brown coal with plastics have been calculated. It was concluded that the co-pyrolysis brown coal with plastics is a way to utilize organic pollutants. 3 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  18. Pyrolysis and gasification of typical components in wastes with macro-TGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Aihong; Chen, Shen; Long, Yanqiu; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Yanguo; Li, Qinghai

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis and gasification of typical components of solid waste, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were performed and compared in a macro thermogravimetric analyzer (macro-TGA). Three model biomasses, poplar stem, orange peel and Chinese cabbage, were applied to pyrolysis and gasification simulation by their components based on TG curves. Compared to those from TGA, peaks temperature of the differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves of each samples pyrolysis on macro-TGA delayed 30-55°C due to heat transferring effect. CO2 promoted the thermal decomposition of hemicellulose, lignin, starch, pectin and model biomasses significantly by Boudouard reaction, and enhanced slightly the decomposition of PET. The activation energy (AE) of biomass components pyrolysis on macro-TGA was 167-197 kJ/mol, while that of plastic samples was 185-235 kJ/mol. The activation energy of 351-377 kJ/mol was corresponding to the Boudouard reaction in CO2 gasification. All overlap ratios in pseudo-components simulation were higher than 0.98 to indicate that pseudo-components model could be applied to both pyrolysis and CO2 gasification, and the mass fractions of components derived from pyrolysis and gasification were slightly different but not brought in obvious difference in simulating curves when they were applied across.

  19. FAST PYROLYSIS – EFFECT OF WOOD DRYING ON THE YIELD AND PROPERTIES OF BIO-OIL

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    Eriks Samulis

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The composition and properties of the products of fast pyrolysis of hardwood, obtained in a two-chamber (drying and pyrolytic ablation type reactor in the temperature range 450-600ºС, were investigated. It has been found that, upon the additional drying of wood at 200ºС and subsequent pyrolysis, the quality of bio-oil is improved owing to the decrease in the amount of water and acids. It has been shown that the increase of the drying temperature to 240ºС decreases the yield of the main product. Optimum parameters of the drying conditions and the temperature of the pyrolysis of wood, at which the bio-oil yield exceeds 60% and its calorific value makes up 17-20 МJ/kg, have been determined.

  20. Online upgrading of organic vapors from the fast pyrolysis of biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-yu; YAN Yong-jie; REN Zheng-wei

    2008-01-01

    The online upgrading process that combined the fast pyrolysis of biomass and catalytic cracking of bio-oil was developed to produce a high quality liquid product from the biomass. The installation consisted of a fluidized bed reactor for pyrolysis and a packed bed reactor for upgrading. The proper pyrolysis processing conditions with a temperature of 500℃ and a flow rate of 4m3·h-1 were determined in advance. Under such conditions, the effects of temperature and weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) on both the liquid yields and the oil qualities of the online catalytic cracking process were investigated. The results showed that such a combined process had the superiority of increasing the liquid yield and improving the product quality over the separate processes. Furthermore, when the temperature was 500℃, with a WHSV of 3h-1, the liquid yield reached the maximum and the oxygenic compounds also decreased obviously.