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Sample records for temperature ph salinity

  1. Electrochemical behavior of titanium in saline environments: The effects of temperature, pH, and microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanVliet, K.J.; Wang, Z.F.; Briant, C.L.; Kumar, K.S. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Div. of Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research investigates the effects of temperature, pH, degree of salinity, galvanic coupling, microstructure, and composition on the electrochemical behavior of commercially pure titanium in a saline environment. Essentially, the findings establish that increased temperature, altered microstructure, decreased pH, and decreased purity of titanium all serve to increase the corrosion potential and cathodic reaction rate, thus making the metal more susceptible to hydrogen absorption. Further, the data indicate that galvanic coupling with certain metals such as naval brass and stainless steel can anodically polarize titanium, whereas coupling with metals such as aluminum, HY80 steel, and zinc catholically polarizes titanium, thus promoting hydrogen evolution on the titanium surface.

  2. Influence of Water Temperature and Salinity on PH During Dry Season in Lower Dong Nai River System, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung Dang Quoc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses the gvSIG 2.2.0 software, IDW interpolation method, river and stream network data, and 36 sampling sites to build the maps of three monitored parameters such as pH, water temperature, and salinity in the Lower Dong Nai River system (2009-2010 in dry season. Based on an analysis of these maps and statistical assessment by using the R software, the correlations between pH, temperature, and salinity are clarified. The results show that the pH and temperature values have a tendency to decrease, whereas the salinity tends to increase annually. The pH value has good and significant correlations with the water temperature and salinity in both simple and multiple linear regression models. The results aim to provide a scientific reference for further research on the water environment in this area.

  3. Effects of Temperature, Salinity, pH, and Light on Filtering and Grazing Rates of a Calanoid Copepod (Schmackeria dubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changling Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Calanoid copepods are key components of the marine food web and the food sources of many larval fishes and planktivores, and grazers of phytoplankton. Understanding the ranges of major environmental variables suitable for their growth is essential to maintain the balance between trophic links and resources protection. In this study, the effects of temperature, salinity, pH, and light intensity on the filtering and grazing rates of a herbivorous copepod (Schmackeria dubia were conducted in several control experiments. Our results indicated that experimental animals grazed normally at water temperatures between 15 and 35°C. The filtering and grazing rates increased by onefold at water temperatures from 15 to 25°C, with a peak at around 30°C. S. dubia fed normally at salinity ranging from 20 to 30 ppt, with significantly low filtering and grazing rates at salinity below 15 ppt and above 35 ppt. The filtering and grazing rates increased as pH increased, peaked at approximately 8.5, and then decreased substantially. Light intensity also displayed an important impact on the filtering and grazing rates. Filtering and grazing rates were high when light intensity was greater than 20 and less than 200 µmol m-2 s-1. S. dubia nearly stopped feeding at low light intensity (less than 20 µmol m-2 s-1.

  4. Regional acidification trends in Florida shellfish estuaries: A 20+ year look at pH, oxygen, temperature and salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Lisle, John T.

    2018-01-01

    Increasing global CO2 and local land use changes coupled with increased nutrient pollution are threatening estuaries worldwide. Local changes of estuarine chemistry have been documented, but regional associations and trends comparing multiple estuaries latitudinally have not been evaluated. Rapid climate change has impacted the annual and decadal chemical trends in estuaries, with local ecosystem processes enhancing or mitigating the responses. Here, we compare pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and salinity data from 10 Florida shellfish estuaries and hundreds of shellfish bed stations. Over 80,000 measurements, spanning from 1980 to 2008, taken on Atlantic Ocean and West Florida coast showed significant regional trends of consistent pH decreases in 8 out of the 10 estuaries, with an average rate of decrease on the Gulf of Mexico side estuaries of Florida of 7.3 × 10−4 pH units year−1, and average decrease on the Atlantic Coast estuaries of 5.0 × 10−4 pH units year−1. The rates are approximately 2–3.4 times slower than observed in pH decreases associated with ocean acidification in the Atlantic and Pacific. Other significant trends observed include decreasing dissolved oxygen in 9 out of the 10 estuaries, increasing salinity in 6 out of the 10, and temperature increases in 3 out of the 10 estuaries. The data provide a synoptic regional view of Florida estuary trends which reflect the complexity of changing climate and coastal ocean acidification superimposed on local conditions. These data provide context for understanding, and interpreting the past and predicting future of regional water quality health of shellfish and other organisms of commercial and ecological significance along Florida’s coasts.

  5. Equilibrium partitioning of organic compounds to OASIS HLB® as a function of compound concentration, pH, temperature and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoonah; Schäffer, Andreas; Smith, Kilian

    2017-05-01

    Oasis hydrophilic lipophilic balance® (Oasis HLB) is commonly employed in solid phase extraction (SPE) of environmental contaminants and within polar organic chemical integrative passive samplers (POCIS). In this study batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the relative affinity of a range of relevant organic pollutants to Oasis HLB in aqueous systems. The influence of sorbate concentration, temperature, pH, and salinity on the equilibrium sorption was investigated. Equilibrium partition ratios (KD) of 28 compounds were determined, ranging over three orders of magnitude from 1.16 × 103 L/kg (atenolol) to 1.07 × 106 L/kg (isoproturon). The Freundlich model was able to describe the equilibrium partitioning to Oasis HLB, and an analysis of the thermodynamic parameters revealed the spontaneous and exothermic nature of the partitioning process. Ionic strength had only a minor effect on the partitioning, whereas pH had a considerable effect but only for ionizable compounds. The results show that apolar interactions between the Oasis HLB and analyte mainly determine the equilibrium partitioning. These research findings can be used to optimize the application of SPE and POCIS for analyses of environmental contaminants even in complex mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen consumption in trilobite larvae of the mangrove horseshoe crab (Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda; Latreille, 1802): effect of temperature, salinity, pH, and light–dark cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srijaya, Thekkeparambil Chandrabose; Pradeep, Padmaja Jayaprasad; Hassan, Anuar; Chatterji, Anil; Shaharom, Faizah; Jeffs, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    .... rotundicauda was evaluated under laboratory conditions. The trilobite larvae were exposed to different levels of temperature (10, 20, 30 and 40 °C), salinity (10, 20, 30 and 40 ppt), pH (5, 6, 7, 8 and 9) and dark...

  7. Phosphorus sorption-desorption and effects of temperature, pH and salinity on phosphorus sorption in marsh soils from coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Junhong; Ye, Xiaofei; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Guangliang; Zhao, Qingqing; Cui, Baoshan; Liu, Xinhui

    2017-12-01

    Wetland soils act as a sink or source of phosphorus (P) to the overlaying water due to phosphorus sorption-desorption processes. Litter information is available on sorption and desorption behaviors of phosphorus in coastal wetlands with different flooding conditions. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate phosphorus sorption-desorption processes, fractions of adsorbed phosphorus, and the effects of salinity, pH and temperature on phosphorus sorption on soils in tidal-flooding wetlands (TW), freshwater-flooding wetlands (FW) and seasonal-flooding wetlands (SW) in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that the freshly adsorbed phosphorus dominantly exists in Occluded-P and Fe/AlP and their percentages increased with increasing phosphorus adsorbed. Phosphorus sorption isotherms could be better described by the modified Langmuir model than by the modified Freundlich model. A binomial equation could be properly used to describe the effects of salinity, pH, and temperature on phosphorus sorption. Phosphorus sorption generally increased with increasing salinity, pH, and temperature at lower ranges, while decreased in excess of some threshold values. The maximum phosphorus sorption capacity (Qmax) was larger for FW soils (256 mg/kg) compared with TW (218 mg/kg) and SW soils (235 mg/kg) (p water bodies through increasing P sorption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Independent Effects of Temperature, Salinity, Ammonium Concentration and pH on Nitrification Rate of the Ariake Seawater Above Mud Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIM ISNANSETYO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ariake Sea located in the west parts of Kyushu Island is a semi-closed and macro-tidal shallow sea, and has the largest tidal flat in Japan. A large mud tidal flat with a productive ecosystem found along the western shoreline of the sea makes this area ideal as a major production site of nori (Porphyra yezoensis in Japan. We determined the independent effect of temperature, salinity, ammonium concentration and pH on nitrification rates (NR in the Ariake seawater above the mud sediment. The NR was determined by measuring accumulation of NO2-N production after adding sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of NO2-N to NO3-N oxidation. NRs were relatively high at 20-35 °C (optimum at 29.5 °C, but the rates were very low at 5, 10, and 40 °C. NRs increased sharply when increasing the salinity from 13 to 20 ppt, but it decreased drastically at salinity levels more than 35 ppt (optimum at 19 ppt. The relationship between ammonium concentration and NR showed a typical kinetic curve of enzymatic reaction with the maximum NR (Vmax of 0.029 µM N.h−1 at 200 µM NH4-N (the half saturation constant (Ks = 35 µM NH4-N. High NRs were determined at pH 7.5-8.0 (optimum pH 7.8. This is the first report on the independent effects of temperature, pH, salinity and NH4-N concentration on the NR of seawater, specifically the Ariake seawater.

  9. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, silicate, nitrite, alkalinity, and pH data collected by multiple former Soviet Union institutions from Okhotsk Sea from 1981-09-23 to 1988-06-17 (NODC Accession 0081217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, silicate, nitrite, alkalinity, and pH data collected by multiple former Soviet Union institutions from Okhotsk...

  10. Atmospheric variables, nutrients, pH, salinity, and temperature collected by bottle and from meteorological stations in the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea from 01 July 1952 to 31 December 1998 (NODC Accession 0000032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atmospheric variables, nutrients, pH, salinity, and temperature data were collected using bottle casts in the Sea of Japan from 01 July 1952 to 31 December 1998....

  11. Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, Silicate, Nitrite, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the Black Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea and Western Basin from R/Vs GORIZONT and OKEANOGRAF, 1960 - 1969 (NODC Accession 0074609)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, Silicate, Nitrite, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the Black Sea, Tyrrhenian Sea and Western Basin of the Mediterranean...

  12. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, phosphate, nitrite, and pH data collected in Okhotsk Sea by multiple platforms from 1985-03-20 to 1989-09-07 (NODC Accession 0075740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, phosphate, nitrite, and pH data collected in the Okhotsk Sea by multiple Soviet Union platforms in March 1985 and...

  13. Sensitivity of Clay Suspension Rheological Properties to pH, Temperature, Salinity, and Smectite-Quartz Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Jun; Morisaki, Tomonori

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the rheological properties of clay suspensions is critical to assessing the behavior of sediment gravity flows such as debris flow or turbidity current. We conducted rheological measurements of composite smectite-quartz suspensions at a temperature of 7°C and a salt concentration of 0.6 M. This is representative of smectite-bearing sediments under conditions on the seafloor. The flow curves obtained were fitted by the Bingham fluid model, from which we determined the Bingham yield stress and dynamic viscosity of each suspension. At a constant smectite-quartz mixing ratio, the yield stress and the dynamic viscosity tend to increase as the solid/water ratio of the suspension is increased. In the case of a constant solid/water ratio, these values increase with increasing smectite content in the smectite-quartz mixture. Additional experiments exploring differing physicochemical conditions (pH 1.0-9.0; temperature 2-30°C; and electrolyte (NaCl) concentration 0.2-0.6 M) revealed that the influence of temperature is negligible, while pH moderately affects the rheology of the suspension. More significantly, the electrolyte concentration greatly affects the flow behavior. These variations can be explained by direct and/or indirect (double-layer) interactions between smectite-smectite particles as well as between smectite-quartz particles in the suspension. Although smectite is known as a frictionally weak material, our experimental results suggest that its occurrence can reduce the likelihood that slope failure initiates. Furthermore, smectite can effectively suppress the spreading distance once the slope has failed.

  14. Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the North Atlantic Ocean, Baltic Sea, Barents Sea, Greenland Sea, North Sea, Norwegian Sea and White Sea from R/Vs Artemovsk, Atlantida, Okeanograf, Professor Rudovits, and ice observations, 1957 - 1995 (NODC Accession 0073674)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen, Phosphate, pH and Alkalinity data collected in the North Atlantic Ocean, Baltic Sea, Barents Sea, Greenland Sea, North Sea, Norwegian...

  15. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite, pH, alkalinity, bottom depth, and meteorology data collected from Arctic Seas and North Western Pacific by various Soviet Union institutions from 1925-11-16 to 1989-05-18 (NODC Accession 0075099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrite, pH, alkalinity, bottom depth, and meteorology data collected from Arctic Seas and North Western Pacific...

  16. Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, pH, and meteorological data collected from Former Soviet Union platforms Lomonosov, Murmanets, and Akademik Shokalsky in 1933 - 1962 years from Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Bering Sea, Chukchi Sea, East Siberian Sea, Kara Sea, and Laptev Sea (NODC Accession 0108117)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, pH, and meteorological data collected from Former Soviet Union platforms Lomonosov,Murmanets, and Akademik Shokalsky in...

  17. Influence of temperature, salinity and pH on the growth of environmental Aeromonas and Vibrio species isolated from Mai Po and the Inner Deep Bay Nature Reserve Ramsar Site of Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Four environmental bacterial isolates including Aeromonas hydrophila MP-3, A. salmonicida MP-4, Vibrio vulnificus MP-2 and V. cholerae MP-1 isolated from sediment and water of Mai Po Nature Reserve of Hong Kong were examined for their responses to temperature, pH and salinity under laboratory conditions in this study. V. cholerae MP-1 was found to resist vibriostatic agent O/129 at concentration of 10 microg/ml. In addition, bacterial growth under test conditions was measured and the results were fitted into the Gompertz model to obtain important parameters related to bacterial growth, lag time (lambda), specific growth rate (mu(m)), and maximum biomass (A) for comparison. V. cholerae MP-1 did not show any apparent growth at 15 degrees C, but was adapted to a much wider environmental pH from 5.2 to 9.2 for growth while V. vulnificus MP-2 was more sensitive to pH changes yielding the highest biomass at pH 6.2. A. salmonicida MP-4 was surprisingly tolerant to salinity as high as 60.0 per thousand NaCl and grew almost equally well as under conditions of other treatments. All four bacterial isolates showed a wide spectrum of plasticity to the environmental conditions and they pose a potential threat to public health and animal health. ((c) 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim).

  18. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, total phosphorus, silicate, nitrite, pH, alkalinity measurements collected using bottle on multiple platforms in the Pacific, Atlantic, Arctic, Mediterranean from 1910 to 1982 (NODC Accession 0038350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, nutrients, oxygen, and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from the AGASSIZ; A., ALBACORE and other platforms in the Coastal N...

  19. Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) develops and maintains a global ocean temperature and salinity resource with data that are both up-to-date...

  20. Surface activity evaluation of an arabinose ester as water/oil demulsifier at severe conditions of temperature, salinity and pH; Avaliacao da atividade superficial de um ester de arabinose, como desemulsificante agua/oleo, em condicoes severas de temperatura, salinidade e pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Mauricio Rodrigues; Garcia, Rosangela Balaban; Santos, Jaciara Alves dos; Vieira, Mariane; Silva, Luciana Carvalho; Campos, Viviane de Oliveira; Silva, Rayane Araujo da; Santos, Telma Pitanga dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work had for objective to compare the superficial properties of an arabinose ester, no-ionic, nontoxic, biodegradable, with two commercial products: the first one based on sodium dodecyl sulfate and the second one based on poly-oxy alkylene phenol formaldehyde. The arabinose ester was synthesized on the Petroleum Research Laboratory - UFRN, through enzymatic catalysis by protease from Bacillus subtilis, using arabinose and vegetable oil, in organic medium. In previous work [1], this sugar ester was evaluated as a possible water/oil demulsifier and the results were compared with the results of the commercial product based on poly-oxy alkylene phenol formaldehyde, showing that, for certain reaction conditions, the sugar ester presented better acting (71%) that the commercial product (33%) as demulsifier. In this work, the stability of this arabinose ester was evaluated in severe conditions of temperature, salinity and pH, through superficial tests in a tensiometer, using Wilhelmy plate method and the results were compared with the results obtained for two commercial products above mentioned. (author)

  1. Etched FBG coated with polyimide for simultaneous detection the salinity and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong; Ma, Jianxun; Ibrahim, Zainah; Ismail, Zubaidah

    2017-06-01

    In marine environment, concrete structures can corrode because of the PH alkalinity of concrete paste; and the salinity PH is heavily related with the concentration of salt in aqueous solutions. In this study, an optical fiber salinity sensor is proposed on the basis of an etched FBG (EFBG) coated with a layer of polyimide. Chemical etching is employed to reduce the diameter of FBG and to excite Cladding Mode Resonance Wavelengths (CMRWs). CMRW and Fundamental Mode Resonance Wavelength (FMRW) can be used to measure the Refractive index (RI) and temperature of salinity. The proposed sensor is then characterized with a matrix equation. Experimental results show that FMRW and 5th CMRW have the detection sensitivities of 15.407 and 125.92 nm/RIU for RI and 0.0312 and 0.0435 nm/°C for temperature, respectively. The proposed sensor can measure salinity and temperature simultaneously.

  2. Ocean acidification alters temperature and salinity preferences in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistevos, Jennifer C A; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Rossi, Tullio; Connell, Sean D

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification alters the way in which animals perceive and respond to their world by affecting a variety of senses such as audition, olfaction, vision and pH sensing. Marine species rely on other senses as well, but we know little of how these might be affected by ocean acidification. We tested whether ocean acidification can alter the preference for physicochemical cues used for dispersal between ocean and estuarine environments. We experimentally assessed the behavioural response of a larval fish (Lates calcarifer) to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, including estuarine water of multiple cues for detecting settlement habitat. Larval fish raised under elevated CO 2 concentrations were attracted by warmer water, but temperature had no effect on fish raised in contemporary CO 2 concentrations. In contrast, contemporary larvae were deterred by lower salinity water, where CO 2 -treated fish showed no such response. Natural estuarine water-of higher temperature, lower salinity, and containing estuarine olfactory cues-was only preferred by fish treated under forecasted high CO 2 conditions. We show for the first time that attraction by larval fish towards physicochemical cues can be altered by ocean acidification. Such alterations to perception and evaluation of environmental cues during the critical process of dispersal can potentially have implications for ensuing recruitment and population replenishment. Our study not only shows that freshwater species that spend part of their life cycle in the ocean might also be affected by ocean acidification, but that behavioural responses towards key physicochemical cues can also be negated through elevated CO 2 from human emissions.

  3. Salinity Temperature and Roughness Remote Scanner (STARRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides spatially continuous high-resolution surface salinity imagery in a synoptic manner from small aircraft. Its output complements data collected from...

  4. Long term Milford Lab Temperature and Salinity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity of sea water entering the Milford NOAA Laboratory has been being collected since 1948. From 1948-1974 the temperature data was collected at...

  5. Sulfate reducing processes at extreme salinity and temperature. extending its application window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallero, M.V.G.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of various sulfate-rich wastewaters, such as temperature, pH and salinity, are determined by the (industrial) process from which they originate, and can be far from the physiological optima of the sulfur cycle microorganisms. The main goal of the research described in this thesis

  6. Effects of temperature and salinity on resting metabolism in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of temperature and salinity on resting metabolism in two South African rock pool fish: the resident gobiid Caffrogobius caffer and the transient sparid Diplodus sargus ... A significant positive relationship (P =0.03) between salinity and oxygen consumption was determined for D. sargus capensis, but not for C. caffer.

  7. Influence of salinity and temperature on the germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-16

    Feb 16, 2012 ... duxge@cau.edu.cn. individual plants inhabiting arid, saline environments as it ... n = 5) were collected from plants growing in sandy desert (38°34´N, ..... Influence of light, temperature, salinity and storage on seed germination of. Haloxylon ammodendron. J. Arid Environ. 55: 453-464. Jia SX (1987). Forage ...

  8. Influence of salinity and temperature on the larval development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of salinity and temperature on the larval development of the crown crab, Hymenosoma orbiculare (Crustacea: Brachyura: Hymenosomatidae). Isabelle Papadopoulos, Brent K Newman, Dave S Schoeman, Tris H Wooldridge ...

  9. Finescale Structure of the Temperature-Salinity Relationship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Polzin, Kurt L; Ferrari, Raffaele

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal of this project is to understand the processes that establish the temperature-salinity relationship in the ocean, with emphasis on the interplay between advection at the large scale...

  10. Salinity and Temperature Tolerance Experiments on Selected Florida Bay Mollusks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James B.; Wingard, G. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is to restore and preserve the unique ecosystems of South Florida, including the estuaries. Understanding the effect of salinity and temperature changes, beyond typical oscillations, on the biota of South Florida's estuaries is a necessary component of achieving the goal of restoring the estuaries. The U.S. Geological Survey has been actively involved in researching the history of the South Florida Ecosystem, to provide targets, performance measures, and baseline data for restoration managers. These experiments addressed two aspects of ecosystem history research: 1) determining the utility of using molluscan shells as recorders of change in water chemistry parameters, primarily salinity, and 2) enhancing our in situ observations on modern assemblages by exceeding typically observed aquatic conditions. This set of experiments expanded our understanding of the effects of salinity, temperature and other water chemistry parameters on the reproduction, growth and overall survivability of key species of mollusks used in interpreting sediment core data. Observations on mollusks, plants and microbes made as part of these experiments have further refined our knowledge and understanding of the effects of ecosystem feedback and the role salinity and temperature play in ecosystem stability. The results have demonstrated the viability of several molluscan species as indicators of atypical salinity, and possibly temperature, modulations. For example Cerithium muscarum and Bulla striata demonstrated an ability to withstand a broad salinity and temperature range, with reproduction occurring in atypically high salinities and temperatures. These experiments also provided calibration data for the shell biogeochemistry of Chione cancellata and the possible use of this species as a water chemistry recorder. Observations made in the mesocosms, on a scale not normally observable in the field, have led to new

  11. Influence of temperature and salinity on hydrodynamic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Escobar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to introduce an innovative approach to offshore engineering so as to take variations in sea temperature and salinity into account in the calculation of hydrodynamic forces. With this in mind, a thorough critical analysis of the influence of sea temperature and salinity on hydrodynamic forces on piles like those used nowadays in offshore wind farms will be carried out. This influence on hydrodynamic forces occurs through a change in water density and viscosity due to temperature and salinity variation. Therefore, the aim here is to observe whether models currently used to estimate wave forces on piles are valid for different ranges of sea temperature and salinity apart from observing the limit when diffraction or nonlinear effects arise combining both effects with the magnitude of the pile diameter. Hence, specific software has been developed to simulate equations in fluid mechanics taking into account nonlinear and diffraction effects. This software enables wave produced forces on a cylinder supported on the sea bed to be calculated. The study includes observations on the calculation model's sensitivity as to a variation in the cylinder's diameter, on the one hand and, on the other, as to temperature and salinity variation. This software will enable an iterative calculation to be made for finding out the shape the pressure wave caused when a wave passes over will have for different pile diameters and water with different temperature and salinity.

  12. Synoptic monthly gridded Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (GTSPP) water temperature and salinity from January 1990 to December 2009 (NCEI Accession 0138647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The synoptic gridded Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Programme (SG-GTSPP) provides world ocean 3D gridded temperature and salinity data in monthly increment...

  13. Effects of temperature and salinity on the seeds germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study consists of the elimination of tegumentary inhibition affecting seeds of Retama raetam by the chemical scarification. This pretreatment was carried out using pure sulfuric acid (98 %) and the seeds' germinative behavior was studied in the laboratory under controlled conditions of temperature and salinity.

  14. Influence of salinity and temperature on the germination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-16

    Feb 16, 2012 ... Table 1. A two-way ANOVA of the effects of salinity (S), temperature (T) and their interaction on germination of H. scoparium. Dependent variable. Independent variable. S. T. S×T. Percent germination. 653.61 ... the ecological adaptation of natural habitats of H. scoparium, in which seeds mature at the end of ...

  15. Effect of temperature and salinity on germination of Achillea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achillea fragrantissima and Moringa peregrina are dominant plants in the mountainous desert of Saudi Arabia. The two species suffer from intensive anthropogenic pressures as they have important medicinal uses. This paper aimed to evaluate the effect of temperature and salinity on germination of A. fragrantissima and M.

  16. pH and salinity evolution of Europa's brines: Raman spectroscopy study of fractional precipitation at 1 and 300 bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Iglesias, Victoria; Bonales, Laura J; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga

    2013-08-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of salty liquid water below the icy surface of the satellite Europa. Depending on the chemical composition of the original interior brines, minerals that precipitate will be varied as will be the resulting physicochemical parameters of the evolving solutions such as pH and salinity. These parameters are determinants apropos to the study of the possible habitability of the satellite. In this work, experiments of fractional precipitation by cooling of several brines with different chemical composition (acid, alkaline, and neutral) were performed at 1 and 300 bar. The gradual decrease in temperature leads to mineral precipitation and changes in salinity and pH values. During the experiment, Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze quantitatively the variation of the salt concentration in the aqueous solutions. The obtained laboratory data indicate the manner in which cryomagma differentiation might occur on Europa. These endogenous processes of differentiation require planetary energy, which seems to have been plentiful during Europa's geological history. Ultimately, the dissipation of part of that energy is translated to a higher complexity of the cryopetrology in Europa's crust. From the results, we conclude that fractional differentiation processes of briny cryomagmas produce several types of igneous salty mineral suites on icy moons.

  17. pH dependent salinity-boron interactions impact yield, biomass, evapotranspiration and boron uptake in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil pH is known to influence many important biochemical processes in plants and soils, however its role in salinity - boron interactions affecting plant growth and ion relations has not been examined. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the interactive effects of salinity, boron and soil ...

  18. Daytime variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen and ph in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daytime variations in temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH were investigated at 3-hourly intervals from 6a.m. to 6 p.m. January had the lowest temperature values, while at noon; September and January had the lowest air and pond water temperature values respectively.Dissolved oxygen increase from 6a.m.

  19. Effects of cyclic changes in pH and salinity on metals release from sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Seok; Kinney, Kerry A; Reible, Danny D

    2011-08-01

    The effects of dynamic changes in pH and salinity on metal speciation and release are investigated with sediments posed in a simulated estuarine environment. The release of Zn, Cd, Mn, and Fe was studied using sediment from the Anacostia River (Washington, DC, USA) spiked with freshly precipitated amorphous cadmium sulfide to increase Cd content. The sediment was exposed to salt water (high pH, ionic strength) and freshwater (neutral pH, minimal ionic strength) continuously and alternately (to mimic tidal changes) in small microcosms over 100 d. At the conclusion of the experiments, the vertical profiles of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) as well as porewater metals and anion concentrations were characterized. Acid volatile sulfide oxidation at the sediment surface led to a commensurate increase in dissolved metal species and metal release that was strongly dependent on the changes in the overlying water characteristics. Total Cd release was substantially higher during exposure to salt water, although, as a result of complexation, predicted dissolved Cd(2+) concentration in the overlying water was higher during exposure to freshwater. Total Zn release was little changed during exposure to salt water and freshwater, although the predicted dissolved Zn(2+) concentration was much higher during freshwater exposures. No significant iron was released because of the rapid oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) in aerobic surficial sediments and overlying water. The present study suggests that cyclic changes in pH and salinity in the overlying water can dramatically influence metal release from estuarine sediments. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  20. Influence of Microsprinkler Irrigation Amount on Water, Soil, and pH Profiles in a Coastal Saline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsprinkler irrigation is a potential method to alleviate soil salinization. After conducting a homogeneous, highly saline, clayey, and coastal soil from the Bohai Gulf in northern China in a column experiment, the results show that the depth of the wetting front increased as the water amount applied increased, low-salinity and low-SAR enlarged after irrigation and water redistribution, and the soil pH increased with an increase in irrigation amount. We concluded that a water amount of 207 mm could be used to reclaim the coastal saline soil in northern China.

  1. Temperature and pH sensors based on graphenic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, P; Calisi, N; Melai, B; Cortigiani, B; Mannini, M; Caneschi, A; Lorenzetti, G; Paoletti, C; Lomonaco, T; Paolicchi, A; Scataglini, I; Dini, V; Romanelli, M; Fuoco, R; Di Francesco, F

    2017-05-15

    Point-of-care applications and patients' real-time monitoring outside a clinical setting would require disposable and durable sensors to provide better therapies and quality of life for patients. This paper describes the fabrication and performances of a temperature and a pH sensor on a biocompatible and wearable board for healthcare applications. The temperature sensor was based on a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) layer that changed its electrical resistivity with the temperature. When tested in a human serum sample between 25 and 43°C, the sensor had a sensitivity of 110±10Ω/°C and an error of 0.4±0.1°C compared with the reference value set in a thermostatic bath. The pH sensor, based on a graphene oxide (GO) sensitive layer, had a sensitivity of 40±4mV/pH in the pH range between 4 and 10. Five sensor prototypes were tested in a human serum sample over one week and the maximum deviation of the average response from reference values obtained by a glass electrode was 0.2pH units. For biological applications, the temperature and pH sensors were successfully tested for in vitro cytotoxicity with human fibroblast cells (MRC-5) over 24h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synergistic effects of altered salinity and temperature on estuarine eelgrass (Zostera marina) seedlings and clonal shoots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Tiina Elina; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2014-01-01

    Salinity and temperature are among the most important factors determining eelgrass distribution and performance. Plants in estuarine environments experience large variations in both on a seasonal basis and exceptionally warm summers have caused massive die-backs of eelgrass in many areas. We...... investigated experimentally how different combinations of salinity and temperature affect the physiological performance of adult eelgrass (Zostera marina) shoots and seedlings. Plants were exposed to different combinations of salinity (salinity 5, 12.5 and 20) and temperature (15, 20 and 25 °C) in a 5-week...... aquarium experiment. Plants responded in general negatively to decreasing salinity and increasing temperature and the combination of high temperature and low salinity resulted in markedly higher mortality rates and lower leaf production when compared to plants held at more optimal combinations of salinity...

  3. Influence of temperature and salinity on heavy metal uptake by submersed plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritioff, A. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: fritioff@botan.su.se; Kautsky, L. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Greger, M. [Department of Botany, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-01-01

    Submersed plants can be useful in reducing heavy metal concentrations in stormwater, since they can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in their shoots. To investigate the effects of water temperature and salinity on the metal uptake of two submersed plant species, Elodea canadensis (Michx.) and Potamogeton natans (L.), these plants were grown in the presence of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb at 5, 11, and 20 deg. C in combination with salinities of 0, 0.5, and 5%o. The metal concentrations in the plant tissue increased with increasing temperature in both species; the exception was the concentration of Pb in Elodea, which increased with decreasing salinity. Metal concentrations at high temperature or low salinity were up to twice those found at low temperature or high salinity. Plant biomass affected the metal uptake, with low biomass plants having higher metal concentrations than did high biomass plants. - Metal concentrations increase with increasing temperature and decreasing salinity in two aquatic plants.

  4. Salinity and temperature tolerance of an emergent alien species, the Amazon fish Astronotus ocellatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrel, Silvia M M; Schofield, Pam; Prodocimo, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    Astronotus ocellatus (oscar), is native to the Amazon basin and, although it has been introduced to many countries, little is known regarding its tolerances for salinity and temperature. In this report, we provide data on the tolerance of A. ocellatus to abrupt and gradual changes in salinity, its high and low temperature tolerance, and information on how salinity, temperature, and fish size interact to affect survival. Fish were able to survive abrupt transfer to salinities as high as 16 ppt with no mortality. When salinity change was gradual (2 ppt/day), fish in the warm-temperature experiment (28°C) survived longer than fish in the cool-temperature experiment (18°C). Larger fish survived longer than smaller ones at the higher salinities when the temperature was warm, but when the temperature was cool fish size had little effect on survival. In the temperature-tolerance experiments, fish survived from 9 to 41°C for short periods of time. Overall, the species showed a wide range of temperature and salinity tolerance. Thus, in spite of the tropical freshwater origin of this species, physiological stress is not likely to hinder its dispersal to brackish waters, especially when temperatures are warm.

  5. Implications for toxicity tests with amphipod Gammarus aequicauda: effects of temperature and salinity on life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, E; Biandolino, F; Scardicchio, C

    2008-12-01

    This study explored the effect of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Gammarus aequicauda in order to establish temperature and salinity ranges advantageous for chronic toxicity testing. A broad range of salinity-temperature conditions (salinities of 10, 20 and 36 per thousand, and temperatures of 10, 18 and 24 degrees C combined in nine different treatments) significantly influenced various reproductive aspects of G. aequicauda reared in the laboratory, from newly released juveniles to first brood production by mature adults. There was a significant linear regression between the brood size and the body size of the female. The number of juveniles released per female was highest at 10 degrees C and lowest at 24 degrees C. The temperature and salinity variations had a significant effect on the fecundity of G. aequicauda. A high temperature led to a faster individual growth and a quicker sexual development than a lower temperature. A temperature acceptable for chronic toxicity tests can be 18 degrees C, at which an acceleration of the life cycle without a lowering of the amphipod's performance was observed. Regarding salinity, results from this study showed that salinities down to 36 per thousand may also be used in sediment toxicity tests with G. aequicauda, so providing a proper and gradual acclimation.

  6. Combined Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    Decapoda,. Grapsidae). Scient. Mar. 54: 55–60. Anger, K., Harms, J., Montú, M. & De Bakker, C. (1990) Effects of salinity on the larval development of a semiterrestrial tropical crab,. Sesarma angustipes (Decapoda: Grapsidae). Mar. Ecol. Prog.

  7. Improved statistical method for temperature and salinity quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourrion, Jérôme; Szekely, Tanguy

    2017-04-01

    Climate research and Ocean monitoring benefit from the continuous development of global in-situ hydrographic networks in the last decades. Apart from the increasing volume of observations available on a large range of temporal and spatial scales, a critical aspect concerns the ability to constantly improve the quality of the datasets. In the context of the Coriolis Dataset for ReAnalysis (CORA) version 4.2, a new quality control method based on a local comparison to historical extreme values ever observed is developed, implemented and validated. Temperature, salinity and potential density validity intervals are directly estimated from minimum and maximum values from an historical reference dataset, rather than from traditional mean and standard deviation estimates. Such an approach avoids strong statistical assumptions on the data distributions such as unimodality, absence of skewness and spatially homogeneous kurtosis. As a new feature, it also allows addressing simultaneously the two main objectives of an automatic quality control strategy, i.e. maximizing the number of good detections while minimizing the number of false alarms. The reference dataset is presently built from the fusion of 1) all ARGO profiles up to late 2015, 2) 3 historical CTD datasets and 3) the Sea Mammals CTD profiles from the MEOP database. All datasets are extensively and manually quality controlled. In this communication, the latest method validation results are also presented. The method has already been implemented in the latest version of the delayed-time CMEMS in-situ dataset and will be deployed soon in the equivalent near-real time products.

  8. The importance of pH and sand substrate in the revegetation of saline non-waterlogged peat fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor, Marilou B; Price, Jonathan; Rochefort, Line

    2015-11-01

    A partially peat-extracted coastal bog contaminated by seawater was barren and required revegetation as a wetland. Peat fields were rectangular in shape, cambered in cross-section profile, and separated by drainage ditches. Common to all peat fields were symmetrical patterns in micro-topography with slopes between differences in elevation. Saline non-waterlogged slopes of ∼5% occurred as a symmetrical pair on each side of the crest of the cambered profile, at one end of each peat field. Three rows were laid across this slope (Top, Middle, and Bottom rows) and transplanted with naturally-growing plant species with their sand substrate, in three experiments, and grown for a year. In the Spartina pectinata experiment, bare root stem sections were also planted. Another experiment was conducted to determine changes in the characteristics of a volume of sand when incubated in saline peat fields. We found the salinity of peat increased with moisture downslope, and pH decreased with increase in salinity. S. pectinata grew best when planted with its sand substrate compared with bare root stem section, and when planted in Bottom rows. Juncus balticus had excellent growth in all rows. Unexpectedly, Festuca rubra that was inconspicuous beneath the J. balticus canopy in the natural donor site grew densely within the J. balticus sods. Agrostis stolonifera grew well but seemed to show intolerance to the surrounding acidic peat by curling up its stolons. The pH of the incubated sand volume was much higher than the surrounding peat. These studies suggest that recognition of plant niches and pH manipulation are important in the revegetation of disturbed Sphagnum peatlands that are found abundantly in the northern hemisphere. Results are also relevant to the reclamation of other disturbed lands. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of increasing temperature and salinity on herbicide toxicity in estuarine phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Marie E; Danese, Loren E; Baird, Thomas D

    2013-07-01

    Ecological risk assessments are, in part, based on results of toxicity tests conducted under standard exposure conditions. Global climate change will have a wide range of effects on estuarine habitats, including potentially increasing water temperature and salinity, which may alter the risk assessment of estuarine pollutants. We examined the effects of increasing temperature and salinity on the toxicity of common herbicides (irgarol, diuron, atrazine, and ametryn) to the phytoplankton species Dunaliella tertiolecta. Static 96-h algal bioassays were conducted for each herbicide under four exposure scenarios: standard temperature and salinity (25°C, 20 ppt), standard temperature and elevated salinity (25°C, 40 ppt), elevated temperature and standard salinity (35°C, 20 ppt), and elevated temperature and elevated salinity (35°C, 40 ppt). The endpoints assessed were algal cell density at 96 h, growth rate, chlorophyll a content, lipid content, and starch content. Increasing exposure temperature reduced growth rate and 96-h cell density but increased the cellular chlorophyll and lipid concentrations of the control algae. Exposure condition did not alter starch content of control algae. Herbicides were found to decrease growth rate, 96 h cell density, and cellular chlorophyll and lipid concentrations, while starch concentrations increased with herbicide exposure. Herbicide effects under standard test conditions were then compared with those observed under elevated temperature and salinity. Herbicide effects on growth rate, cell density, and starch content were more pronounced under elevated salinity and temperature conditions. To encompass the natural variability in estuarine temperature and salinity, and to account for future changes in climate, toxicity tests should be conducted under a wider range of environmental conditions. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Independent Temperature and Salinity Reconstruction from Coral Skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Thiria, S.; Peron, C.

    2007-12-01

    Massive coral skeleton offers the best-suited material for reconstruction of tropical climate during the last century. Indeed, growth rate of some species is fast enough to provide high-resolution (monthly) sampling. The formation of a big colony may cover continuously several decades, even, several centuries. Chronology is made easy by annual growth layers. Finally, aragonite, which composes this skeleton, presents several proxies, such as isotopes and trace elements. However, the aragonite deposit is biologically controlled and all the proxies are influenced by both environmental and biologic factors. By example, temperature and light may affect both oxygen isotopes as well as Sr/Ca. Thus, these two parameters are difficult to separate from seasonal records. Such an effect may be neglected for annual averages or filtered records. Indeed, the difference of irradiation recorded during two consecutive years is much limited than between winter and summer (see PP24). It is the reason that annual and monthly reconstitutions will be conducted separately. In addition, it seems that other factors are the causes of the high variability shown by all the proxies. The common factor affecting them is related with metabolism. We suppose that proxies being measured from a powder collected from homogeneous material are fractionated by external factors through the same biologic filter during the time, but each of them differently because incorporated in the mineral by different ways. This is the reason that we used neural network (NN), which learns the behavior of several proxies submitted to one forcing during a known period. Then, the complex relationship recognized by neurons between the different proxies is used to "predict" the forcing during the past. The relationship between external factor and proxies remains hidden, but this could not be used for other colonies, even for other sampling from a same head. By this way, it is possible to calibrate temperature and salinity and

  11. High temperature and salinity enhance soil nitrogen mineralization in a tidal freshwater marsh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Gao

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen (N mineralization in wetlands is sensitive to various environmental factors. To compare the effects of salinity and temperature on N mineralization, wetland soils from a tidal freshwater marsh locating in the Yellow River Delta was incubated over a 48-d anaerobic incubation period under four salinity concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 35‰ and four temperature levels (10, 20, 30 and 40°C. The results suggested that accumulated ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N increased with increasing incubation time under all salinity concentrations. Higher temperatures and salinities significantly enhanced soil N mineralization except for a short-term (≈10 days inhibiting effect found under 35‰ salinity. The incubation time, temperature, salinity and their interactions exhibited significant effects on N mineralization (P0.05, while temperature exhibited the greatest effect (P<0.001. Meanwhile, N mineralization processes were simulated using both an effective accumulated temperature model and a one-pool model. Both models fit well with the simulation of soil N mineralization process in the coastal freshwater wetlands under a range of 30 to 40°C (R2 = 0.88-0.99, P<0.01. Our results indicated that an enhanced NH4+-N release with increasing temperature and salinity deriving from the projected global warming could have profound effects on nutrient cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems.

  12. Effect of temperature and salinity on phosphate sorption on marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Huang, Xiao-Lan

    2011-08-15

    Our previous studies on the phosphate sorption on sediments in Florida Bay at 25 °C in salinity 36 seawater revealed that the sorption capacity varies considerably within the bay but can be attributed to the content of sedimentary P and Fe. It is known that both temperature and salinity influence the sorption process and their natural variations are the greatest in estuaries. To provide useful sorption parameters for modeling phosphate cycle in Florida Bay, a systematic study was carried out to quantify the effects of salinity and temperature on phosphate sorption on sediments. For a given sample, the zero equilibrium phosphate concentration and the distribution coefficient were measured over a range of salinity (2-72) and temperature (15-35 °C) conditions. Such a suite of experiments with combinations of different temperature and salinity were performed for 14 selected stations that cover a range of sediment characteristics and geographic locations of the bay. Phosphate sorption was found to increase with increasing temperature or decreasing salinity and their effects depended upon sediment's exchangeable P content. This study provided the first estimate of the phosphate sorption parameters as a function of salinity and temperature in marine sediments. Incorporation of these parameters in water quality models will enable them to predict the effect of increasing freshwater input, as proposed by the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, on the seasonal cycle of phosphate in Florida Bay.

  13. High Temperature and Salinity Enhance Soil Nitrogen Mineralization in a Tidal Freshwater Marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haifeng; Bai, Junhong; He, Xinhua; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrogen (N) mineralization in wetlands is sensitive to various environmental factors. To compare the effects of salinity and temperature on N mineralization, wetland soils from a tidal freshwater marsh locating in the Yellow River Delta was incubated over a 48-d anaerobic incubation period under four salinity concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 35‰) and four temperature levels (10, 20, 30 and 40°C). The results suggested that accumulated ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) increased with increasing incubation time under all salinity concentrations. Higher temperatures and salinities significantly enhanced soil N mineralization except for a short-term (≈10 days) inhibiting effect found under 35‰ salinity. The incubation time, temperature, salinity and their interactions exhibited significant effects on N mineralization (P0.05), while temperature exhibited the greatest effect (Pwetlands under a range of 30 to 40°C (R2 = 0.88–0.99, PNH4+-N release with increasing temperature and salinity deriving from the projected global warming could have profound effects on nutrient cycling in coastal wetland ecosystems. PMID:24733366

  14. The effect of temperature and salinity on oxygen consumption in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aquatic oxygen consumption of the estuarine brachyuran crab, Cyclograpsus punctatus, was investigated after a 24-hour acclimation period at different temperature (12.5, 20, 30°C) and salinity (9, 17.5, 35, and 44‰) combinations . Salinity had no significant effect on oxygen consumption at 12.5 and 20°C in both large ...

  15. Temperature and salinity tolerance of adult hermit crabs, Diogenes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stimpson (Crustacea: Decapoda: Anomura). A.M. Avis. Departments of Plant Sciences and Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140 Republic of South Africa. Received 4 November 1987; accepted 4 July 1988. Diogenes brevirostris was found to be tolerant to low salinities (0,5 - 4,0 °/oo) at a wide ...

  16. Temperature, salinity, and other measurements collected using gliders in the Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0065238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Glider oceanographic data (temperature, salinity) collected in support of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event in the Gulf of Mexico (NODC Accession 0065238).

  17. NODC Standard Product: Global ocean temperature and salinity profiles (2 disc set) (NODC Accession 0098058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This set of CD-ROMs contains global ocean temperature and salinity profiles derived from NODC archive data files. It includes oceanographic station (bottle) data,...

  18. NODC Standard Product: Climatic Atlas of the Barents Sea 1998: Temperature, Salinity, Oxygen (NODC Accession 0000300)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NODC CD-ROM product (NODC-121) contains the time and space distribution of 74,256 ocean stations (temperature, salinity, and oxygen) occupied in the Barents Sea...

  19. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1912 to 1930 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  20. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1981 to 2005 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  1. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1956 to 1980 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  2. Aquarius L3 Polar-Gridded Weekly Brightness Temperature and Sea Surface Salinity V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set consists of weekly gridded Level-3 products of Aquarius L-band radiometer brightness temperature (TB) observations and Sea Surface Salinity (SSS)...

  3. Gulf of Maine - Water Salinity, Temperature and Sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This table contains water salinity, temperature and sigma t (density) data from 1931 to 1955 binned at 10 meter depth intervals (from 300 meters up to 0 meters) for...

  4. Temperature and saline stress on seedlings of Swietenia macrophylla: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Siddiqur; Akter, S; Al-Amin, M

    2013-12-01

    Physical responses of plants to change in climatic factors like temperature, precipitation and abiotic factors like salinity intrusion may lead positive or negative effects. Some factor may promulgate growth while other may stunts their vigour. Present study seeks growth of a plantation species at its early stage of life towards elevated temperature and saline water stresses. Growth records of Swietenia macrophylla seedlings were enumerated by measuring height, collar diameter and leaf number development of the replicates growing at an environment-controlled plant growth chamber. One experimented with merely elevated temperature while other tries to find results of combined effect of elevated temperature (30, 32 and 34 degrees C) and saline (0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 g L(-1) NaCl) to said species seedlings. Seedling replicates showed diverse response to elevated temperature and saline irrigation at height, collar diameter and leaf number development. Results depict that elevated temperature alone might be positive for S. macrophylla seedlings, rather most favourable for its growth in height, however, collar diameter and leaf number may remain unaffected. Saline treatment along with higher temperature stresses may lead seedlings toward stunted or very low growth. As saline intensity increases, species growth tends to decrease proportionally. Elevated temperature aided with higher salinity may direct further under development of S. macrophylla seedlings which is distressing to plantation establishment of this species in sites which are vulnerable to salinity intrusion due to climate change. However, S. macrophylla may be a promising plantation species in drier part of the globe in near future.

  5. Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human erythrocyte membranes was studied by incubating the membranes at different pH and temperatures and determining the bound bilirubin. At all pH values, the amount of membrane-bound bilirubin increased with the increase in bilirubin-to-albumin molar ratios ...

  6. Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of pH and temperature on the binding of bilirubin to human erythrocyte membranes was studied by incubating the mem- branes at different pH and temperatures and determining the bound bilirubin. At all pH values, the amount of membrane-bound bilirubin increased with the increase in bilirubin-to-albumin molar ...

  7. Structural adaptations of octaheme nitrite reductases from haloalkaliphilic Thioalkalivibrio bacteria to alkaline pH and high salinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Popinako

    Full Text Available Bacteria Tv. nitratireducens and Tv. paradoxus from soda lakes grow optimally in sodium carbonate/NaCl brines at pH range from 9.5 to 10 and salinity from 0.5 to 1.5 M Na+. Octaheme nitrite reductases (ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria of genus Thioalkalivibrio are stable and active in a wide range of pH (up to 11 and salinity (up to 1 M NaCl. To establish adaptation mechanisms of ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria a comparative analysis of amino acid sequences and structures of ONRs from haloalkaliphilic bacteria and their homologues from non-halophilic neutrophilic bacteria was performed. The following adaptation strategies were observed: (1 strategies specific for halophilic and alkaliphilic proteins (an increase in the number of aspartate and glutamate residues and a decrease in the number of lysine residues on the protein surface, (2 strategies specific for halophilic proteins (an increase in the arginine content and a decrease in the number of hydrophobic residues on the solvent-accessible protein surface, (3 strategies specific for alkaliphilic proteins (an increase in the area of intersubunit hydrophobic contacts. Unique adaptation mechanism inherent in the ONRs from bacteria of genus Thioalkalivibrio was revealed (an increase in the core in the number of tryptophan and phenylalanine residues, and an increase in the number of small side chain residues, such as alanine and valine, in the core.

  8. The influence of pH and salinity on the toxicity of heavy metals in sediment to the estuarine clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Inmaculada; DelValls, T Angel; Forja, Jesús M; Gómez-Parra, Abelardo

    2004-05-01

    An approach is presented for determining the influence of two key variables, pH and salinity (S), on the toxicity of four common heavy metals bound to sediments in estuaries. Two samples of environmental sediment taken from two estuaries in southern Spain (the Huelva estuary and the Guadalquivir River estuary), together with a dilution of toxic mud from the Aznalcóllar (Spain) mining spill (April 1998) were used to determine their toxicity at different values of pH (6.5, 7.5, and 8.5) and salinity (10, 20, and 30) on the estuarine clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Two different endpoints, sublethal, indicated by clam reburial (median effective burial time [ET50]), and relative mortality (median lethal concentration [LC50]), were used to quantify the toxicity associated with the heavy metals. Neither salinity nor pH was found to influence the toxic responses measured by the behavioral endpoint (ET50). However, a strong effect on the LC50 related to pH and salinity was detected, with the toxicity of the heavy metals being increased at low values of both variables (pH = 6.5 and S = 10). The mechanism of heavy metals uptake through water may explain this influence of pH and salinity on the lethal toxicity detected. The results show differences in the toxicity of these heavy metals bound to sediments depending on whether the origin of metal contamination is chronic or acute.

  9. Effect of salinity on the upper lethal temperature tolerance of early-juvenile red drum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Dusty; Bumguardner, Britt; Cason, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Previous work investigating the temperature tolerance of juvenile red drum ranging 18-50mm TL found evidence for positive size dependence (smaller fish less tolerant to higher temperatures) suggesting smaller size classes (<18mm TL) potentially may succumb to extreme summer water temperatures. Here, we explored the upper lethal temperature tolerance (ULT) in smaller-sized red drum which ranged from 10 to 20mm TL across multiple salinities to further understand the thermal limitations of this propagated game fish. In order to investigate the combined effect of temperature and salinity on ULT, temperature trials were conducted under three levels of salinity which commonly occur along the coast of Texas (25, 35, and 45ppt). The rate of temperature increase (+0.25°C/h) was designed to mimic a natural temperature increase of a summer day in Texas. We determined that the lethal temperature at 50% (LT50) did not differ between the three salinities examined statistically; median lethal temperature for individuals exposed to 25ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, 35ppt ranged from 36.4 to 37.7°C, and 45ppt ranged from 36.1 to 37.4°C. Further, LT50 data obtained here for early-juvenile red drum did not differ from data of a similar experiment examining 25mm TL sized fish. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Core temperature cooling in healthy volunteers after rapid intravenous infusion of cold and room temperature saline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tracy M; Callaway, Clifton W; Hostler, David

    2008-02-01

    Studies have suggested that inducing mild hypothermia improves neurologic outcomes after traumatic brain injury, major stroke, traumatic hemorrhage, and cardiac arrest. Although infusion of cold normal saline solution is a simple and inexpensive method for initiating hypothermia, human cold-defense mechanisms potentially make this route stressful or ineffective. We hypothesize that rapid infusion of 30 mL/kg of cold (4 degrees C, 39.2 degrees F) 0.9% saline solution during 30 minutes to healthy subjects (aged 27 [standard deviation (SD) 4] years) will reduce core body temperature to the therapeutic range of 33 degrees C to 35 degrees C (91.4 degrees F to 95 degrees F). Sixteen subjects were randomly assigned to receive either cold (4 degrees C, 39.2 degrees F) or room temperature (23 degrees C, 73.4 degrees F) normal saline solution. Subjects were not informed of their assignment, but blinding was not possible after initiation of the infusion. Core temperature, skin temperature, and vital signs were recorded every 2 minutes. Subjects indicated global discomfort during the infusion on a 100-mm visual analog scale at 5-minute intervals. Core temperature decreased in both the cold saline solution (1.0 degrees C [SD 0.4 degrees C]/1.8 degrees F [0.7 degrees F]) and room temperature saline solution (0.5 degrees C [SD 0.1 degrees C]/0.9 degrees F [0.2 degrees F]) groups, whereas skin temperature was unchanged. Slopes calculated from the core temperature cooling curves indicate that the majority of cooling occurred during the first half of the infusion. Examination of the core temperature cooling curves revealed a 2-phase temporal pattern in 30-minute cooling curves. The early phase, spanning 0 to 14 minutes, demonstrated rapid cooling in both groups, with a larger effect observed in subjects receiving cold saline solution. In this pilot study of healthy volunteers, rapid administration of cold saline solution to awake normothermic volunteers resulted in 1 degrees C (1

  11. Low pH, high salinity: too much for Microbial Fuel Cells?

    CERN Document Server

    Jannelli, Nicole; Cigolotti, Viviana; Minutillo, Mariagiovanna; Falcucci, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Twelve single chambered, air-cathode Tubular Microbial Fuel Cells (TMFCs) have been filled up with fruit and vegetable residues. The anodes were realized by means of a carbon fiber brush, while the cathodes were realized through a graphite-based porous ceramic disk with Nafion membranes (117 Dupont). The performances in terms of polarization curves and power production were assessed according to different operating conditions: percentage of solid substrate water dilution, adoption of freshwater and a 35mg/L NaCl water solution and, finally, the effect of an initial potentiostatic growth. All TMFCs operated at low pH (pH$=3.0 \\pm 0.5$), as no pH amendment was carried out. Despite the harsh environmental conditions, our TMFCs showed a Power Density (PD) ranging from 20 to 55~mW/m$^2 \\cdot$kg$_{\\text{waste}}$ and a maximum CD of 20~mA/m$^2 \\cdot$kg$_{\\text{waste}}$, referred to the cathodic surface. COD removal after a $28-$day period was about $45 \\%$. The remarkably low pH values as well as the fouling of Nafi...

  12. Effects of salinity and temperature on the development and survival of fish parasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.

    1978-04-01

    In brackish water the variety of marine and freshwater parasite species is considerably reduced. The distribution in brackish water of most marine endoparasites is restricted by the salinty tolerance of their hosts, most of the parasite species are more tolerant than their hosts. The influence of salinity and temperature of nine species has been examined; first stage larvae of Contracaecum aduncum develop in 0 to 32/sup 0///sub 00/ salinity; Cryptocotyle lingua proved to be infective at salinities down to 4/sup 0///sub 00/. The greatest resistance was found in Anisakis larvae from herring Clupea harengus, which survived for more than half a year. Parasites in the fish intestines appear to be unaffected by changing water salinities, as the osmolarity in the intestines stays nearly constant. Marine ectoparasites (Acanthochondria depressa, Lepeophtheirus pectoralis) survive about three times longer than freshwater species (Piscicola geometra, Argulus foliaceus) when salinity is 16/sup 0///sub 00/. High temperature increases the effects of adverse salinities on parasites. There is evidence that none of these ectoparasitic species can develop within the range of 7 to 20/sup 0///sub 00/ salinity.

  13. Metrological challenges for measurements of key climatological observables: Oceanic salinity and pH, and atmospheric humidity. Part 1: Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feistel, R; Wielgosz, R; Bell, S A; Camões, M F; Cooper, J R; Dexter, P; Dickson, A G; Fisicaro, P; Harvey, A H; Heinonen, M; Hellmuth, O; Kretzschmar, H-J; Lovell-Smith, J W; McDougall, T J; Pawlowicz, R; Ridout, P; Seitz, S; Spitzer, P; Stoica, D; Wolf, H

    2016-02-01

    Water in its three ambient phases plays the central thermodynamic role in the terrestrial climate system. Clouds control Earth's radiation balance, atmospheric water vapour is the strongest "greenhouse" gas, and non-equilibrium relative humidity at the air-sea interface drives evaporation and latent heat export from the ocean. On climatic time scales, melting ice caps and regional deviations of the hydrological cycle result in changes of seawater salinity, which in turn may modify the global circulation of the oceans and their ability to store heat and to buffer anthropogenically produced carbon dioxide. In this paper, together with three companion articles, we examine the climatologically relevant quantities ocean salinity, seawater pH and atmospheric relative humidity, noting fundamental deficiencies in the definitions of those key observables, and their lack of secure foundation on the International System of Units, the SI. The metrological histories of those three quantities are reviewed, problems with their current definitions and measurement practices are analysed, and options for future improvements are discussed in conjunction with the recent seawater standard TEOS-10. It is concluded that the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, BIPM, in cooperation with the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam, IAPWS, along with other international organisations and institutions, can make significant contributions by developing and recommending state-of-the-art solutions for these long standing metrological problems in climatology.

  14. Responses of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) to salinity and temperature regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adolf, Verena Isabelle

    Water scarcity, soil salinity and high temperatures are the major causes of yield losses worldwide. The halophytic crop quinoa that originates in the South American Andes, provides very nutritious seeds and can tolerate high levels of soil salinity. It is therefore considered an option to sustain...... crop production in other salt affected areas worldwide. The large genetic variability within the species may allow the selection of varieties for cultivation under various climatic conditions. In the study, intra-species differences of quinoa’s tolerance to salinity in terms of biomass production...... and a number of physiological traits were assessed. The Mediterranean region increasingly suffers from soil salinization, and could therefore benefit from quinoa cultivation. However, highly salt tolerant quinoa cultivars originate in the cool Andean highland. Hence, for a successful production of quinoa...

  15. Behaviour and orcadian rhythm of the fish bathygobius soporator Valenciennes (Gobiidae under the influence of environmental salinity and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Fanta

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavioural patterns and their cireadian rhythms may be adaptive to the peculiar environmental conditions of subtropical brackish waters where Ba-thygobius soporator Valenciennes, 1837 live. Adult fish were caught at the southern Brazilian coast from mangrove rivers and rocky shores in a bay, where temperature and water salinity vary during the day and through the year. Observation on the behaviour of the animals was undertaken in salinity 8.5ppt, 17.0ppt, 25.5ppt and 34.0ppt, each one in temperatures of 18ºC and 28ºC. Temperature and salinity affect the frequency and intensity of some of the behavioural events, more than its pattern or rhythm. Swimming is rare, decreasing along the day and with temperature increase, being even lower at low salinity; aggressiveness is the highest in the morning being not affected by temperature, but by salinity, being higher the higher it is; territory defence decreases along the day and is lower at high temperature and extreme salinities; fish hide more at high temperature and with the decrease of salinity, but this is not rhythmical; a higher proportion of fish rest in vertical position when salinity and temperature are high, increasing slightly at the beginning of the afternoon; respiratory frequency increases with temperature, salinity and in the afternoon; the colour of the fish is mainly light with spots in all hours of the day and in all temperatures and different levels of salinity, but with a tendency of the presence of some dark fish during the morning and some light ones in the afternoon, showing a higher variability of colours at low temperature and extreme salinities. Besides temperature, salinity and light, feeding seems to be one of the determinant factors for the performance of the typical behaviour of B. soporator.

  16. Effect of concentration and temperature on surface tension of sodium hyaluronate saline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Walkiria; Mata, José Luis; Saramago, Benilde

    2007-06-19

    The effect of concentration and temperature on the surface tension of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) saline solutions was investigated using the technique of the shape of pendant drops. The decay rate of the surface tension with the increase of NaHA concentration was well-described by the empirical Hua-Rosen equation. Adsorption at the air-liquid interface was estimated using the Gibbs equation. The temperature dependence of a dilute solution and a semidilute entangled solution was numerically fitted with a second-order polynomial equation. The surface behavior of the NaHA saline solutions was interpreted in terms of their known viscoelastic properties.

  17. Temperature and salinity effects on cadmium toxicity on lethal and sublethal responses of Amphibalanus amphitrite nauplii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Veronica; Gambardella, Chiara; Canepa, Sara; Costa, Elisa; Faimali, Marco; Garaventa, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The official protocol of an ecotoxicological assay employing larvae of the crustacean Amphibalanus amphitrite as a model organism has recently been published by the Italian regulatory authority UNICHIM. Such assay is now one of the applicable tests for water quality assessment under Italian law. While specific temperature and salinity values are recommended by ecotoxicology bioassay protocols for test set up, little information is available on response changes in case of parameter variations. In particular, information is totally lacking for this innovative model organism. Under the standard test protocol, 20°C and 37‰ temperature and salinity, respectively, are required to be set in A. amphitrite bioassay. In order to evaluate the environmental relevance of the test, laboratory experiments simulating the effect on larval responses due to variations of temperature and salinity expected in field collected samples were carried out. The effect of temperature and salinity changes on different end-points, involving increasing sensitivity levels, has been investigated, with and without the presence of cadmium nitrate, Cd(NO3)2, as a reference toxicant, to determine the possible interactions between pollutants and environmental parameters fluctuations. Three end-points - mortality, immobilization, and swimming speed alteration - were measured in order to evaluate the impact of a wide range of temperature (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40°C) and salinity values (10, 20, 30, 37, 40, 50, 60, 70‰) on response variation after 24 and 48h of exposure. For each parameter, a Non-Effect Range (NER) - namely the limit values within which no effect related to environmental parameter changes is observed - has been defined. For both parameters, NER resulted to be wider for the less sensitive end-points - such as mortality and immobilization - and for shorter exposure time (24h). Later, the same end-points have been evaluated by exposing the same organisms to a reference toxic

  18. The Effects of Salinity and pH on Fertilization, Early Development, and Hatching in the Crown-of-Thorns Seastar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Allen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the influence of environmental factors on the development and dispersal of crown-of-thorns seastars is critical to predicting when and where outbreaks of these coral-eating seastars will occur. Outbreaks of crown-of-thorns seastars are hypothesized to be driven by terrestrial runoff events that increase nutrients and the phytoplankton food for the larvae. In addition to increasing larval food supply, terrestrial runoff may also reduce salinity in the waters where seastars develop. We investigated the effects of reduced salinity on the fertilization and early development of seastars. We also tested the interactive effects of reduced salinity and reduced pH on the hatching of crown-of-thorns seastars. Overall, we found that reduced salinity has strong negative effects on fertilization and early development, as shown in other echinoderm species. We also found that reduced salinity delays hatching, but that reduced pH, in isolation or in combination with lower salinity, had no detectable effects on this developmental milestone. Models that assess the positive effects of terrestrial runoff on the development of crown-of-thorns seastars should also consider the strong negative effects of lower salinity on early development including lower levels of fertilization, increased frequency of abnormal development, and delayed time to hatching.

  19. Seasonal salinity, temperature and density data for the Canadian Beaufort Sea shelf, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopky, G.E.; Chiperzak, D.B.; Lawrence, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains salinity, temperature and density (CTD) data collected in the waters of the Canadian Beaufort Sea Shelf during 1987. A major objective of such data collection is to identify and characterize estuarine and marine habitats of significance to the biological communities, primarily fish, with a view to provide background data for assessing the implications of hydrocarbon development and production on those habitats. Salinity and temperature profile data were measured using a Guildline Model 8870 probe deployed from the ice surface in March and May, and from a ship during July to September. Ice thickness and secchi depth were measured during periods of ice cover and open water, respectively. Salinity values for samples collected from bottle casts were measured with an Autosal Model 8400 salinometer. Density was calculated using salinity and temperature values. During the ice cover periods of March and May, CTD profiles were measured at five and nine stations, respectively. For the open water July to September period, CTD profiles were measured at 41 stations. One additional station was sampled using bottle casts. Replicate CTD profiling was conducted at a number of stations, on a seasonal basis. The maximum depths of profiles measured from the ice surface ranged from 3.1 to 23.5 dbar. Salinity and temperature measurements ranged from 0.00 to 31.70, and -1.74 to 0.02/sup 0/C, respectively. Maximum depths of profiles measured during the open water period ranged from 2.9 to 196.4 dbar. During this same period, profile measurements of salinity and temperature ranged from 0.08 to 33.94, and -1.62 to 16.51/sup 0/C, respectively. 4 refs., 60 figs., 57 tabs.

  20. Ontogenetic optimal temperature and salinity envelops of the copepod Eurytemora affinis in the Seine estuary (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dur, Gaël; Souissi, Sami

    2018-01-01

    Temperature and salinity are important factors shaping the habitats of estuarine ectotherms. Their respective effect varies along the life history moments of species with a complex life cycle. Estuarine species, particularly those living in the salinity gradient, are concerned by habitat changes that can reduce their fitness. Consequently, efforts to define the importance of those two environmental variables on developmental stages are required to enable forecasting estuarine species' future distributions. The present study focuses on the main component of the Seine estuary's zooplankton, i.e. the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis, and aims: (i) to establish the role of temperature and salinity in designing the habitat of E. affinis within the Seine estuary; and (ii) to model the habitat of three groups of E. affinis defined through the life cycle as follows: all larval instars (N1-N6), the first to fourth juvenile instars (C1-C4), and the pre-adult and adults instars (C5-Adults). For this purpose, data from intensive field studies of zooplankton sampling during 2002-2010 were used. The fine-scale data, i.e., every 10-20 min, on density and abiotic conditions (salinity, temperature) provided inputs for the computation. We established regions in salinity-temperature space where the three groups of developmental instars exhibit higher densities. The computed habitats differ between developmental groups. In general, the preferendum of salinity increases with ontogeny. The optima of temperature are rather constant between developmental stages (∼14 °C). Our model can be used to determine E. affinis functional habitat (i.e., the spatial relation with structuring factors), to carry out retrospective analysis, and to test future distributions. The present study also emphasizes the need of data from appropriate sampling strategies to conduct habitat definition.

  1. The effect of soil pH and temperature on Folsomia candida transcriptional regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, T.E.; Holmstrup, M.; van Straalen, N.M.; Roelofs, D.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in abiotic factors like temperature and soil pH can have a significant physiological impact on soil dwelling invertebrates and may confound results in ecotoxicological testing. In this study we exposed Folsomia candida to a range of two abiotic stress treatments (pH and temperature) for

  2. pH and Temperature Determine Performance of Oxygen Reducing Biocathodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; picot, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Barrière, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of oxygen reducing biocathodes for microbial fuel cells in relation to temperature and pH. Lower pH does likely improve biocatalytic activity and/or proton availability, and results in higher current. Lower temperature does reduce biocatalytic activity

  3. THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND pH ON BACTERIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    paint film scrap (PFS) contained approximately 28.2% to 37.3% of dry organic content (DOC), pH 6.6 to 8.3, optical density (OD) 2.5 to 3.9 and undetermined ... with a wide range of organic and inorganic constituents. The constituent provide different ..... Fungicide concentration gradient: A formulation Variable”, Modern paint ...

  4. The influence of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary force on the formation of methane hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhao Duan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present here a thermodynamic model for predicting multi-phase equilibrium of methane hydrate liquid and vapor phases under conditions of different temperature, pressure, salinity and pore sizes. The model is based on the 1959 van der Waals–Platteeuw model, angle-dependent ab initio intermolecular potentials, the DMW-92 equation of state and Pitzer theory. Comparison with all available experimental data shows that this model can accurately predict the effects of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary radius on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. Online calculations of the p–T conditions for the formation of methane hydrate at given salinities and pore sizes of sediments are available on: www.geochem-model.org/models.htm.

  5. Short-term salinity tolerance of northern pike, Esox lucius , fry, related to temperature and size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lene; Skov, Christian; Koed, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The short-term tolerances of northern pike, Esox lucius L., fry reared in a freshwater hatchery, to salinity were examined in the laboratory. Survival of two size groups of pike fry (mean length 21 +/- 2 mm SD and 37 +/- 4 mm SD) was examined over 72- to 96-h periods at 9-14 ppt salinity...... in combination with temperatures of 10, 14 and 18 degrees C. A parametric survival model found a significant correlation between survival of pike fry and temperature and salinity, respectively. L(C)50 values after 72 h were between 11.2 and 12.2 ppt, being lowest at 10 degrees C. Pike fry did not survive more...

  6. The Influence of pH on Prokaryotic Cell Size and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, D.; Gutierrez, F.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pH of a habitat is essential to an organism's growth and success in its environment. Although most organisms maintain a neutral internal pH, their environmental pH can vary greatly. However, little research has been done concerning an organism's environmental pH across a wide range of taxa. We studied pH tolerance in prokaryotes and its relationship with biovolume, taxonomic classification, and ideal temperature. We had three hypotheses: pH and temperature are not correlated; pH tolerance is similar within taxonomic groups; and extremophiles have small cell sizes. To test these hypotheses, we used pH, size, and taxonomic data from The Prokaryotes. We found that the mean optimum external pH was neutral for prokaryotes as a whole and when divided by domain, phylum, and class. Using ANOVA to test for pH within and among group variances, we found that variation of pH in domains, phyla, classes, and families was greater than between them. pH and size did not show much of a correlation, except that the largest and smallest sized prokaryotes had nearly neutral pH. This seems significant because extremophiles need to divert more of their energy from growth to maintain a neutral internal pH. Acidophiles showed a larger range of optimum pH values than alkaliphiles. A similar result was seen with the minimum and maximum pH values of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. While acidophiles were spread out and had some alkaline maximum values, alkaliphiles had smaller ranges, and unlike some acidophiles that had pH minimums close to zero, alkaliphile pH maximums did not go beyond a pH of 12. No statistically significant differences were found between sizes of acidophiles and alkaliphiles. However, optimum temperatures of acidophiles and alkaliphiles did have a statistically significant difference. pH and temperature had a negative correlation. Therefore, pH seems to have a correlation with cell size, temperature, and taxonomy to some extent.

  7. The pigment composition of Phaeocystis antarctica (Haptophyceae) under varius conditions of light, temperature, salinity, and iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, Maria A.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Stefels, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The pigment composition of Phaeocystis antarctica was monitored under various conditions of light, temperature, salinity, and iron. 19'-Hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin (Hex-fuco) always constituted the major light-harvesting pigment, with remarkably stable ratios of Hex-fuco-to-chl a under the various

  8. Influence of food concentration, temperature and salinity on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Kurian, J.

    Influence of food concentration (0.5, 1 and 2 x 10 sup(5) cell ml sup(-1) of Skeletonema costatum), temperature (20 and 30 degrees C) and salinity (15, 25 and 35 ppt) on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica...

  9. A new atlas of temperature and salinity for the North Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The most used temperature and salinity climatology for the world ocean, including the Indian Ocean, is the World Ocean Atlas (WOA) (Antonov et al 2006, 2010; Locarnini et al 2006, 2010) because of the vast amount of data used in its preparation. The WOA climatology does not, however, include all the available ...

  10. Effect of temperature, salinity, light and time of dehiscence on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calotropis procera (giant milkweed) is a hardy xerophytic plant, which is distributed globally in many countries and has important economic and ecological functions. The present study aimed at estimating the effect of temperature, salinity and time of fruit dehiscence on the seed germination and seedling morphology of giant ...

  11. The influence of temperature, light, salinity and seed pre-treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The germination of Sesbania sesban seeds was studied under controlled environmental conditions. Interactive effects of temperature and light, effects of salinity and effects of different pre-treatments of seeds were studied. Sesbania seeds were placed in Petri dishes with filtration paper and the germination and radical ...

  12. Application of kinetic model of bioaccumulation across a pH and salinity gradient for the prediction of cadmium uptake by the sediment dwelling Chironomidae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendell-Young, L.I. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1999-05-01

    A kinetic model for the prediction of metal concentrations in aquatic organisms was applied for the prediction of cadmium concentrations in the sediment dwelling dipertan larvae, Chironomidae. Cadmium concentrations were determined in Chironomidae sampled along two distinct environmental gradients: (1) an acidity gradient (from pH 5.0--6.5) and (2) a salinity gradient. Comparison of predicted and observed values indicated that the kinetic model was successful in predicting concentrations in chironomids sampled along the acidity gradient but not the salinity gradient. Separation of routes of cadmium uptake into food and solute sources indicated that ingested sediment accounted for 60--100% of total invertebrate cadmium concentrations, however, the relative importance of water increased as a function of decreasing acidity and salinity. These results support the refinement of a kinetic model for predicting cadmium concentrations in sediment-living invertebrates, such as Chironomidae. By allowing for uptake from food and water the model highlighted the potential for routes of cadmium uptake to be pH and salinity dependent. For monitoring purposes, both vectors and the potential for the relative importance for each vector to change needs to be considered when assessing the degree of metal exposure to sediment ingesting invertebrates which inhabit systems with either a natural or anthropogenically induced garment in key water chemistry variables such as salinity or pH.

  13. Air-water partitioning of 222Rn and its dependence on water temperature and salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Lieberman, Eric; Burnett, William C

    2012-04-03

    Radon is useful as a tracer of certain geophysical processes in marine and aquatic environments. Recent applications include detection of groundwater discharges into surface waters and assessment of air/sea gas piston velocities. Much of the research performed in the past decade has relied on continuous measurements made in the field using a radon stripping unit connected to a radon-in-air detection system. This approach assumes that chemical equilibrium is attained between the water and gas phases and that the resulting air activity can be multiplied by a partition coefficient to obtain the corresponding radon-in-water activity. We report here the results of a series of laboratory experiments that describes the dependence of the partition coefficient upon both water temperature and salinity. Our results show that the temperature dependence for freshwater closely matches results that were previously available. The salinity effect, however, has largely been ignored and our results show that this can result in an overestimation of radon concentrations, especially in cooler, more saline waters. Related overestimates in typical situations range between 10 (warmer less saline waters) and 20% (cooler, more saline waters).

  14. Impact of salinity and pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system: An investigation with pigment analysis by HPLC

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P; Acharyya, T.; Babu, P.V; Bandyopadhyay, D.

    An in vitro study was carried out to understand the effects of salinity shock and variation in pH on phytoplankton communities in a tropical freshwater system of the Godavari River (a major peninsular river in India). The distributions of...

  15. Plasma osmolality and oxygen consumption of perch Perca fluviatilis in response to different salinities and temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Emil Aputsiaq Flindt; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Steffensen, John Fleng

    2017-01-01

    with salinity at 10 and 20° C. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and aerobic scope was lowest at salinity of 15 at 5° C, yet at 20° C, they were lowest at a salinity of 0. A cost of osmoregulation (SMR at a salinity of 0 and 15 compared with SMR at a salinity of 10) could only be detected at a salinity of 15 at 20...... of osmoregulation (28%) at a salinity of 15 at 20° C indicates that the cost of osmoregulation in P. fluviatilis increases with temperature under hyperosmotic conditions and a power analysis showed that the cost of osmoregulation could be lower than 12·5% under other environmental conditions. The effect of salinity...

  16. Effects of Temperature and Salinity on the Survival and Egg Production of Gladioferens pectinatus Brady (Copepodas: Calanoida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. J.; Burns, C. W.

    2002-10-01

    The calanoid copepod Gladioferens pectinatus Brady occurs in Lake Waihola, New Zealand, a shallow, tidally-influenced lake. This lake experiences daily and seasonal fluctuations in salinity, and seasonal changes in temperature. To determine the potential contributions of salinity and temperature to observed seasonal population fluctuations, we tested the survival and egg production of G. pectinatus at two temperatures (10 °C and 20 °C) and in a range of ' salinities ' (20 to 2700 mg l -1 Cl). Adult survival was highest in 1000 mg l -1 Cl at 10 °C, when 50% still remained alive after 23 d. Increases in salinity and temperature decreased the survival time to less than 10 d. The salinities tolerated were well below the maximum of 2500 mg l -1 Cl recorded in the lake. There was no difference in adult survival between males and females. Eggs were produced in salinities of up to 600 mg l -1 Cl. Only in 20 mg l -1 Cl did an increase in temperature reduce clutch retention time, and increase the rate of egg production. The rate of increase in salinity did not affect copepod survival, but acclimation at an intermediate salinity increased survival at 10 °C. Our results suggest that high temperatures and salinities in summer may lower the fitness of this population of G. pectinatus.

  17. Interactive effects of incubation temperature and salinity on the early life stages of pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiumei; Sakurai, Yasunari; Jin, Xianshi; Wan, Ruijing; Gao, Tianxiang; Yamamoto, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The combined effects of incubation temperature and salinity on the early life stages of Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus were examined under controlled laboratory conditions. Data were collected from two synchronized experiments. Experiment 1 was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of incubation temperature and salinity on the hatchability of fertilized G. macrocephalus eggs. Experiment 2 was set up to evaluate the interactive effects of incubation temperature and salinity on the time from hatching to 50% mortality of the non-fed yolk-sac larvae (M50). The results show that temperature could significantly influence the development and hatchability of the larvae, as well as the hatching characteristics of G. macrocephalus. Viable hatch was significantly influenced by salinity when the upper and lower thermal limits were approached and shows the synergism of low salinity on egg development at low-temperatures and conversely inhibitory effects of low-salinity at high-temperatures. Data on developmental rates as influenced by temperature were presented at each tested salinity level. No influence of salinity was found at the temperature levels tested. Dome-shaped quadratic curves were fitted to the relationship between temperature and the incidence of larval size and yolk storage at hatch for most of the tested salinity levels. The effect of salinity across all temperatures, however, had a much smaller influence on larval size and no effect on yolk storage at hatch. The influence of temperature on larval duration (time from hatching to M50) could be described in all cases by an exponential power function. Evidence on the synergism of low salinity at low-temperatures and conversely inhibitory effects of low-salinity at high-temperatures was also observed. The results were discussed in reference to salinity modified temperature effects on the early life stages of G. macrocephalus. Maximum hatchability and larval size at hatch, and moderate salinity tolerance and

  18. Effect of salinity and temperature on marine leech, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis (De Silva) under laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kua, B C; Choong, F C; Leaw, Y Y

    2014-03-01

    The high prevalence (80-100%) of the marine leech Zeylanicobdella arugamensis (De Silva) on cage-cultured Asian sea bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) led us to investigate the percentage of juvenile leeches hatched from deposited cocoons, survival of juvenile and adult marine leeches at different salinity and temperature. The results showed that the hatching percentage of juvenile leeches was highest at salinity of 30 ppt (32.5 ± 2.8%) followed by 20 ppt (18.0 ± 4.3%) and 10 ppt (12.1 ± 1.4%), respectively. It was found that the adult and juvenile leeches could live up to an average range of 4-7 days at salinity ranging from 10 to 40 ppt. The juvenile leeches were able to hatch at temperature ranging from 25 to 35 °C but unable to hatch at 40 °C. The survival period of adult and juvenile leeches ranged from 11 to 16 days at 25 °C, which was comparatively longer than 5-13 days and 10 h--5 days at 27-30 °C and 35-40 °C, respectively. The study provided the information on the physical parameters of salinity and temperature which are most optimal for the marine leech Z. arugamensis to propagate. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Influence of pH and temperature on alunite dissolution rates and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Patricia; Hudson-Edwards, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is one of the main elements in most mining-affected environments, where it may influence the mobility of other elements and play a key role on pH buffering. Moreover, high concentrations of Al can have severe effects on ecosystems and humans; Al intake, for example, has been implicated in neurological pathologies (e.g., Alzheimer's disease; Flaten, 2001). The behaviour of Al in mining-affected environments is commonly determined, at least partially, by the dissolution of Al sulphate minerals and particularly by the dissolution of alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6), which is one of the most important and ubiquitous Al sulphates in mining-affected environments (Nordstrom, 2011). The presence of alunite has been described in other acid sulphate environments, including some soils (Prietzel & Hirsch, 1998) and on the surface of Mars (Swayze et al., 2008). Despite the important role of alunite, its dissolution rates and products, and their controlling factors under conditions similar to those found in these environments, remain largely unknown. In this work, batch dissolution experiments have been carried out in order to shed light on the rates, products and controlling factors of alunite dissolution under different pH conditions (between 3 and 8) and temperatures (between 279 and 313K) similar to those encountered in natural systems. The obtained initial dissolution rates using synthetic alunite, based on the evolution of K concentrations, are between 10-9.7 and 10-10.9 mol-m-2-s-1, with the lowest rates obtained at around pH 4.8, and increases in the rates recorded with both increases and decreases in pH. Increases of temperature in the studied range also cause increases in the dissolution rates. The dissolution of alunite dissolution is incongruent, as has been reported for jarosite (isostructural with alunite) by Welch et al. (2008). Compared with the stoichiometric ratio in the bulk alunite (Al/K=3), K tends to be released to the solution preferentially over Al

  20. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, pH, and chlorophyll data collected by bottle and CTD on two cruises in the Adriatic Sea, the North Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea from 3/2/1982 - 4/7/1990 (NODC Accession 0000087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle and CTD casts from DISCOVERY II and another platform in the Mediterranean Sea, Adriatic Sea,and...

  1. Effect of agrowastes, pH and temperature variation on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of pH and temperature variations on the growth of Volvariella volvacea cultivated on various agricultural wastes singly and in various combinations was studied. A pH range of 5.5 to 8.5 recorded the maximum mycelia yield and the highest mycelia weight was recorded at pH 6.5. The mycelia yield decreased at pH ...

  2. The effects of salinity on growth of Goldfish, Carassius auratus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adunet

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... more energy to regulate osmotic balance. Therefore, less ... Several other ions contribute to salinity (such as calcium .... Water osmolality, temperature and pH of goldfish in the four salinity treatments (mean±SD). Parameter.

  3. Effects of salinity and water temperature on the ecological performance of Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nejrup, Lars Brammer; Pedersen, Morten Foldager

    2008-01-01

    We tested the effects of salinity and water temperature on the ecological performance of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in culture-experiments to identify levels that could potentially limit survival and growth and, thus, the spatial distribution of eelgrass in temperate estuaries. The experiments...... included eight levels of salinity (2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35%) and seven water temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 27.5 and 30 8C). Low salinity (i.e. 5 and 2.5%) increased mortality (3-6-fold) and had a strong negative effect on shoot morphology (number of leaves per shoot reduced by 40% and shoot...... biomass reduced by 30-40%), photosynthetic capacity (Pmax-reduced by 30-80%) and growth (production of new leaves reduced by 50-60%, leaf elongation rate reduced by 60-70% and production of side-shoots reduced by 40-60%), whereas eelgrass performed almost equally well at salinities between 10 and 35...

  4. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 transcriptome: acclimation to temperature, salinity, oxidative stress and mixotrophic growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eLudwig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C

  5. Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002 Transcriptome: Acclimation to Temperature, Salinity, Oxidative Stress, and Mixotrophic Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A

    2012-01-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 is a unicellular, euryhaline cyanobacterium. It is a model organism for studies of cyanobacterial metabolism and has great potential for biotechnological applications. It exhibits an exceptional tolerance of high-light irradiation and shows very rapid growth. The habitats from which this and closely related strains were isolated are subject to changes in several environmental factors, including light, nutrient supply, temperature, and salinity. In this study global transcriptome profiling via RNAseq has been used to perform a comparative and integrated study of global changes in cells grown at different temperatures, at different salinities, and under mixotrophic conditions, when a metabolizable organic carbon source was present. Furthermore, the transcriptomes were investigated for cells that were subjected to a heat shock and that were exposed to oxidative stress. Lower growth temperatures caused relatively minor changes of the transcriptome; the most prominent changes affected fatty acid desaturases. A heat shock caused severe changes of the transcriptome pattern; transcripts for genes associated with major metabolic pathways declined and those for different chaperones increased dramatically. Oxidative stress, however, left the transcript pattern almost unaffected. When grown at high salinity, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 had increased expression of genes involved in compatible solute biosynthesis and showed increased mRNA levels for several genes involved in electron transport. Transcripts of two adjacent genes dramatically increased upon growth at high salinity; the respective proteins are putatively involved in coping with oxidative stress and in triggering ion channels. Only minor changes were observed when cells were grown at low salinity or when the growth medium was supplemented with glycerol. However, the transcriptome data suggest that cells must acclimate to excess reducing equivalents when a reduced C-source is present.

  6. Temperature and pH Responsive Microfibers for Controllable and Variable Ibuprofen Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toan Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun microfibers (MFs composed of pH and temperature responsive polymers can be used for controllable and variable delivery of ibuprofen. First, electrospinning technique was employed to prepare poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid (pNIPAM-co-MAA MFs containing ibuprofen. It was found that drug release rates from PCL MFs cannot be significantly varied by either temperature (22–40°C or pH values (1.7–7.4. In contrast, the ibuprofen (IP diffusion rates from pNIPAM-co-MAA MFs were very sensitive to changes in both temperature and pH. The IP release from pNIPAM-co-MAA MFs was highly linear and controllable when the temperature was above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST of pNIPAM-co-MAA (33°C and the pH was lower than the pKa of carboxylic acids (pH 2. At room temperature, however, the release rate was dramatically increased by nearly ten times compared to that at higher temperature and lower pH. Such a unique and controllable drug delivery system could be naturally envisioned to find many practical applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences such as programmable transdermal drug delivery.

  7. Impacts of Salinity and Temperature on the Thyroidogenic Effects of the Biocide Diuron in Menidia beryllina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Lucas Buruaem; Diamante, Graciel; Giroux, Marissa; Coffin, Scott; Xu, Elvis Genbo; Moledo de Souza Abessa, Denis; Schlenk, Daniel

    2018-02-13

    Diuron is a herbicide used in agricultural and urban settings and also as an antifouling agent. Recent studies have indicated sublethal responses of diuron in the endocrine system of fish and amphibians. Given the potential of climate change to also alter fish endocrinology, the combination of environmental stressors with diuron may contribute to its sublethal toxicity. In this study, the effects of temperature and salinity on thyroid targets of diuron were assessed in juveniles of the estuarine fish Menidia beryllina under different conditions of salinity (10 and 20‰) and temperature (10 and 20 °C). Environmentally relevant concentrations of diuron affected the growth, and the higher temperature reduced the condition factor of animals. Increased levels of T3 were observed in fish from all treatments, and at 10 °C, T4 levels were augmented at 10‰ but reduced at 20‰. Increased gene expression of deiodinases at 20‰ in both temperatures suggests the influence of salinity on the regulation of hormone imbalance via deiodination pathway activation. Decreased transcripts of thyroid and growth hormone receptors were also observed following diuron treatment. These results indicate that changes in environmental stressors may have significant impacts on the ecological risk of diuron in estuarine fish.

  8. Long-term rearing of Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus under different salinity regimes at constant temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, T; Gunnarsson, S; Imsland, A K; Thorarensen, H; Smáradóttir, H; Steinarsson, A; Gústavsson, A; Johansson, M; Björnsson, B Th

    2014-10-01

    Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus of the Hólar strain (mean ± s.e. body mass = 152·1 ± 3·1 g) were reared at four different salinity regimes at a constant temperature of 7·4° C. Two groups were given a three-month acclimation in salinity 18 before the salinity was increased to either 25 or 29 (groups called A25 and A29), and two groups were reared in salinities 25 or 29 over the full experimental period of 409 days (groups called F25 and F29). In the first 3 months, the A25 and A29 groups had the highest growth rates. By October 2011, there were no significant differences (two-way nested ANOVA, P > 0·05) in the mean body masses among A25, F25 and F29 (c. 1450 g), whereas A29 had a lower mean mass (1282 g). The growth in the last period from October 2011 to January 2012 was reduced by sexual maturation in the highest salinity regimes (A29 and F29), whereas fish in groups A25 and F25 showed high growth throughout the study. Males in all salinity groups had higher growth rates than females for the most part of the study, but the divergence between the sexes was most pronounced in the highest salinity regimes. All salinity groups showed distinct changes in Na(+) , K(+) -ATPase activity, with high activity in spring and summer, and lower activity in the autumn. Plasma sodium (Na(+) ) levels were stable indicating that none of the experimental groups had problems in maintaining hydromineral balance during the study. While plasma leptin levels were not affected by salinity regimes, it was noted that these levels were 13-30% higher in fish with empty guts compared with those having food in their gut at the time of sampling. This suggests a link between leptin levels and food intake, indicating that this hormone may play a role in food intake and energy allocation in fishes. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  9. The effects of temperature, salinity, and the carbonate system on Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber (white): A global sediment trap calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William R.; Weldeab, Syee; Lea, David W.; Rosenthal, Yair; Gruber, Nicolas; Donner, Barbara; Fischer, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    The Mg/Ca of planktic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white) is a widely applied proxy for tropical and sub-tropical sea-surface temperature. The accuracy with which temperature can be reconstructed depends on how accurately relationships between Mg/Ca and temperature and the multiple secondary controls on Mg/Ca are known; however, these relationships remain poorly quantified under oceanic conditions. Here, we present new calibrations based on 440 sediment trap/plankton tow samples from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, including 130 new samples from the Bay of Bengal/Arabian Sea and the tropical Atlantic Ocean. Our results indicate temperature, salinity and the carbonate system all significantly influence Mg/Ca in G. ruber (white). We propose two calibration models: The first model assumes pH is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.0 ± 0.8%/°C (2σ), a salinity sensitivity of 3.3 ± 2.2%/PSU and a pH sensitivity of - 8.3 ± 7.7%/0.1 pH units; The second model assumes carbonate ion concentration ([3 2-CO]) is the controlling carbonate system parameter. In this model, Mg/Ca has a temperature sensitivity of 6.7 ± 0.8%/°C, a salinity sensitivity of 5.0 ± 3.0%/PSU and a [3 2-CO] sensitivity of - 0.24 ± 0.11%/μmol kg-1. In both models, the temperature sensitivity is significantly lower than the widely-applied sensitivity of 9.0 ± 0.6%/°C. Application of our new calibrations to down-core data from the Last Glacial Maximum, considering whole ocean changes in salinity and carbonate chemistry, indicate a cooling of 2.4 ± 1.6°C in the tropical oceans if pH is the controlling parameter and 1.5 ± 1.4°C if [3 2-CO] is the controlling parameter.

  10. Growth response and toxin concentration of cultured Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum to varying salinity and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedaria, Alice Ilaya; Luckas, Bernd; Reinhardt, Katrin; Azanza, Rhodora V

    2007-09-15

    The growth and toxin production of a Philippine Pyrodinium bahamense isolate in nutrient replete batch cultures were investigated under conditions affected by varying salinity, temperature and combined effects of salinity and temperature. Early exponential growth stage was reached after 7 days with a cell division rate of 0.26 div day(-1). The toxin content reached a peak of 298 fmol cell-1 at mid exponential phase and rapidly declined to 54 fmol cell-1 as it approached the death phase. Only three sets of toxins composed of STX, dcSTX and B1 were detected in which STX made up to 85-98 mol%toxincell-1. P. bahamense was able to grow in salinities and temperatures ranging from 26 per thousand to 36 per thousand and 23 to 36 degrees C, respectively. The optimum growth under varying salinity and temperature conditions was observed at 36 per thousand and 25 degrees C. Toxin content reached a peak of 376 fmol cell-1 at 25 degrees C and was lower (80-116 fmol cell-1) at higher temperatures (32-35 degrees C). Combined effects of salinity and temperature showed that P. bahamense was not able to grow at low salinity and temperature (i.e. below 26 per thousand-28 degrees C). Optimum growth was observed in higher salinities at all temperature conditions.

  11. Effects of temperature and pH on the oxygen consumption Rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxygen consumption rate of a freshwatersub-terrestrial crab, Sudanonautes floweri in relation to different temperatures and pHwas investigated. The average temperatureand pH of the crab\\'s peaty stream habitat were 29.50C and 7.5 respectively. The lethal temperatures at pH 7.0 recorded for the species were 14.50C ...

  12. Impacts of the IOD-associated temperature and salinity anomalies on the intermittent equatorial undercurrent anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junde; Liang, Chujin; Tang, Youmin; Liu, Xiaohui; Lian, Tao; Shen, Zheqi; Li, Xiaojing

    2017-11-01

    The study of Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) has attracted a broad attention in recent years due to its strong response and feedback to the Indian Ocean Dipole. In this paper, we first produce a high-quality simulation of three-dimensional temperature, salinity and zonal current simulation from 1982 to 2014, using a high-resolution ocean general circulation model. On this basis, with two sensitivity experiments, we investigate the role of temperature and salinity anomalies in driving and enhancing the EUC during the positive IOD events by examining the variation of the EUC seasonal cycle and diagnosing the zonal momentum budget along the equatorial Indian Ocean. Our results show that during January-March, the EUC can appear along the entire equatorial Indian Ocean in all years, but during August-November, the EUC can appear and reach the eastern Indian Ocean only during the positive IOD events. The zonal momentum budget analysis indicates that the pressure gradient force contributes most to the variation of the eastward acceleration of zonal currents in the subsurface. During the positive IOD events, strong negative subsurface temperature anomalies exist in the eastern Indian Ocean, with negative surface salinity anomalies in the central and eastern Indian Ocean, resulting in a large pressure gradient force to drive EUC during the August-November. Further, the results of two sensitivity experiments indicate that the temperature anomalies significantly impact the pressure gradient force, playing a leading role in driving the EUC, while the surface salinity anomalies can secondarily help to intensify the eastward EUC through increasing the zonal density gradient in the eastern Indian Ocean and impacting the vertical momentum advection in the subsurface.

  13. Effects of temperature and salinity on survival, growth and DNA methylation of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ning; Liu, Xiao; Li, Junyuan; Mu, Wendan; Lian, Jianwu; Xue, Yanjie; Li, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Temperature and salinity are two of the most potent abiotic factors influencing marine mollusks. In this study, we investigated the individual and combined effects of temperature and salinity on the survival and growth of juvenile Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai Ino, and also examined the DNA methylation alteration that may underpin the phenotypic variation of abalone exposed to different rearing conditions. The single-factor data showed that the suitable ranges of temperature and salinity were 16-28°C at a constant salinity of 32, and 24-40 at a constant temperature of 20°C, respectively. The two-factor data indicated that both survival and growth were significantly affected by temperature, salinity and their interaction. The optimal temperature-salinity combination for juveniles was 23-25°C and 30-36. To explore environment-induced DNA methylation alteration, the methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique was used to analyze the genomic methylation profiles of abalone reared in optimal and adverse conditions. Neither temperature nor salinity induced evident changes in the global methylation level, but 67 and 63 differentially methylated loci were identified in temperature and salinity treatments, respectively. The between-group eigen analysis also showed that both temperature and salinity could induce epigenetic differentiation in H. discus hannai Ino. The results of our study provide optimal rearing conditions for juvenile H. discus hannai Ino, and represent the first step toward revealing the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of abalone in response to thermal and salt stresses.

  14. Impact of improved assimilation of temperature and salinity for coupled model seasonal forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Hendon, Harry H.; Alves, Oscar; Yin, Yonghong

    2014-05-01

    We assess the impact of improved ocean initial conditions for predicting El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) using the Bureau of Meteorology's Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia (POAMA) coupled seasonal prediction model for the period 1982-2006. The new ocean initial conditions are provided by an ensemble-based analysis system that assimilates subsurface temperatures and salinity and which is a clear improvement over the previous optimal interpolation system which used static error covariances and was univariate (temperature only). Hindcasts using the new ocean initial conditions have better skill at predicting sea surface temperature (SST) variations associated with ENSO than do the hindcasts initialized with the old ocean analyses. The improvement derives from better prediction of subsurface temperatures and the largest improvements come during ENSO-IOD neutral years. We show that improved prediction of the Niño3.4 SST index derives from improved initial depiction of the thermocline and halocline in the equatorial Pacific but as lead time increases the improved depiction of the initial salinity field in the western Pacific become more important. Improved ocean initial conditions do not translate into improved skill for predicting the IOD but we do see an improvement in the prediction of subsurface temperatures in the Indian Ocean (IO). This result reflects that the coupling between subsurface and surface temperature variations is weaker in the IO than in the Pacific, but coupled model errors may also be limiting predictive skill in the IO.

  15. The effect of ambient temperature on cold saline during simulated infusion to induce therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, T J

    2009-07-01

    This study was done to determine the effect of ambient temperature on cold saline during simulated infusion to induce therapeutic hypothermia. The study hypothesis was that cold saline would warm rapidly during simulated infusion and that an insulating SIGG neoprene pouch would slow the process. Paired 1-l bags of normal saline [with or without an insulating SIGG neoprene pouch (NEO+ and NEO- respectively)] were refrigerated together for at least 24h. With an ambient room temperature (RT) between 32 and 34 degrees C, the fluid was allowed to flow unrestricted through standard tubing connected to a 20-guage angiocath while the line reservoir temperature was monitored every 30s. The order of the bags was pre-determined and alternated for each session. During 5 sessions, ten 1-l bags were included (5 NEO+ and 5 NEO-). The data were analyzed descriptively using Stata SE v8.1 for Macintosh. The average ambient RT during the experimental sessions was 32.6 degrees C (StDev: 0.8 degrees C). The relative humidity was a constant 16%. The average low saline temperature at the beginning of infusion was 6.2 degrees C (StDev: 2.7 degrees C). The average rate of infusion was 48.2cm(3)/min (StDev: 3.7cm(3)/min). The average rise in saline temperature during the first 15min of the infusion was 2.9 degrees C (StDev: 1.2 degrees C). The average high saline temperature reached near the end of the infusion was 13.4 degrees C (StDev: 4.1 degrees C). The average temperature change during infusion was 7.2 degrees C (StDev: 3.5 degrees C). The baseline data for the NEO+ and NEO- samples were not statistically different. The average temperature change over the first 15min for the NEO+ group was 2.0 degrees C (95% CI: 1.4 degrees C and 2.5 degrees C) and for the NEO- group it was 3.9 degrees C (95% CI: 2.6 degrees C and 5.1 degrees C). The average change over the entire infusion for the NEO+ group was 4.3 degrees C (95% CI: 3.1 degrees C and 5.5 degrees C) and for the NEO- group it was 10

  16. Effects of saline lavage temperature on peritoneal fibrinolysis and adhesion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Yavuz Savaş; Tarhan, Ömer Rıdvan; Kaya, Selçuk; Gökçe Ceylan, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal lavage with saline at room temperature causes peritoneal hypothermia, vasoconstriction, hypoxia, and acidosis, which are effects that are known to reduce fibrinolysis. Decreased fibrinolysis causes permanent adhesions. Normothermic lavage may prevent this deleterious process and reduce peritoneal adhesions. A rat model of cecal abrasion was used. Control animals received no medication while hypothermic or normothermic saline lavage were administered intraperitoneally to the experimental groups (n=24 for each group). Cardinal parameters of peritoneal fibrinolysis (tissue plasminogen activator [tPA] and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 [PAI-1]) were determined in peritoneal tissue samples on postoperative day 1, 3, and 10. On postoperative day 10, adhesions were graded. In the sham group (n=8), following laparotomy, peritoneal samples were taken to determine basal values of tPA and PAI-1 in healthy peritoneum. Cecal abrasion increased PAI-1 levels about tenfold on postoperative day 1 and caused adhesions. Normothermic saline lavage prevented this traumatic PAI-1 increase and stabilized it to baseline values throughout the experiment and reduced peritoneal adhesion formation. Hypothermic lavage also caused an inhibition of PAI-1 rise but adhesion, prevention was not significant. Our results suggest that normothermic saline lavage reduces adhesions by improving peritoneal fibrinolysis.

  17. Physiological responses of dietary tryptophan fed Labeo rohita to temperature and salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, M S; Pal, A K; Sahu, N P; Ciji, A; Meena, D K; Das, P

    2013-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to elucidate the possible effects of dietary L-tryptophan (TRP) in Labeo rohita based on growth performance and physio-biochemical responses. In the experiment I, a 60-day feeding trial was carried out to elucidate the effects of dietary TRP enrichment on growth performance and physio-biochemical responses. In the experiment II, the TRP pre-fed L. rohita, from experiment I, was exposed to temperature and salinity stress to evaluate stress-mitigating efficacy of TRP. In L. rohita, dietary supplementation of TRP showed significant effect on weight gain percentage and feed conversion ratio but not on blood glucose. A significant increase in RNA content and RNA/DNA ratio upon TRP supplementation was observed and was positively correlated with growth performance. The results of experiment II indicated that weight gain percentage, serum T3 and T4 levels were significantly reduced in groups that were exposed to temperature and salinity stress and fed diets without TRP supplementation. However, dietary supplementation of TRP significantly augmented weight gain percentage in stress-exposed groups. Tryptophan supplementation helped in bringing back T3 and T4 levels comparable with control. A significant increase in superoxide dismutase, catalase, Adenosine triphosphatase, blood glucose and serum cortisol was observed in temperature- and salinity-exposed groups fed without TRP-supplemented diets. However, TRP supplementation was found to be effective in restoring the above parameters. The results of these experiments suggest that dietary TRP supplementation augments growth, lowers energy demand and helps in mitigating thermal and salinity stress in L. rohita. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Updating temperature and salinity mean values and trends in the Western Mediterranean: The RADMED project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Yáñez, M.; García-Martínez, M. C.; Moya, F.; Balbín, R.; López-Jurado, J. L.; Serra, M.; Zunino, P.; Pascual, J.; Salat, J.

    2017-09-01

    The RADMED project is devoted to the implementation and maintenance of a multidisciplinary monitoring system around the Spanish Mediterranean waters. This observing system is based on periodic multidisciplinary cruises covering the coastal waters, continental shelf and slope waters and some deep stations (>2000 m) from the Westernmost Alboran Sea to Barcelona in the Catalan Sea, including the Balearic Islands. This project was launched in 2007 unifying and extending some previous monitoring projects which had a more reduced geographical coverage. Some of the time series currently available extend from 1992, while the more recent ones were initiated in 2007. The present work updates the available time series up to 2015 (included) and shows the capability of these time series for two main purposes: the calculation of mean values for the properties of main water masses around the Spanish Mediterranean, and the study of the interannual and decadal variability of such properties. The data set provided by the RADMED project has been merged with historical data from the MEDAR/MEDATLAS data base for the calculation of temperature and salinity trends from 1900 to 2015. The analysis of these time series shows that the intermediate and deep layers of the Western Mediterranean have increased their temperature and salinity with an acceleration of the warming and salting trends from 1943. Trends for the heat absorbed by the water column for the 1943-2015 period, range between 0.2 and 0.6 W/m2 depending on the used methodology. The temperature and salinity trends for the same period and for the intermediate layer are 0.002 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1 respectively. Deep layers warmed and increased their salinity at a rate of 0.004 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1.

  19. Responsive Stabilization of Nanoparticles for Extreme Salinity and High-Temperature Reservoir Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Mikhil; Brown, Paul; Hatton, T Alan

    2015-09-09

    Colloidal stabilization of nanoparticles under extreme salinity and high temperature conditions is a key challenge in the development of next generation technologies for subsurface reservoir characterization and oil recovery. Polyelectrolytes have been investigated as nanoparticle stabilizers, but typically fail at high ionic strengths and elevated temperatures due to excessive charge screening and dehydration. We report an approach to nanoparticle stabilization that overcomes these limitations, and exploits the antipolyelectrolyte phenomenon, in which screening of intrachain electrostatic interactions causes a polyzwitterion chain to undergo a structural transition from a collapsed globule to a more open coil-like regime with increases in ionic strength and temperature. Small-angle neutron scattering on a model zwitterionic polymer in solution indicated an increase in both radius of gyration and excluded volume parameter of the polymer with increases in ionic strength and temperature. The model zwitterion was subsequently incorporated within a polymeric stabilizer for nanoparticles under harsh reservoir conditions, and used to functionalize hydrophilic (silica) as well as hydrophobic (polystyrene) nanoparticles. Long-term colloidal stability was achieved at salt concentrations up to 120,000 mg/dm3 at 90 °C, approximately twice the stability limit previously reported in the literature. The approach can be broadly generalized to a large class of synthetic polyzwitterions, and can be adapted to a wide variety of other colloidal systems in which demands placed by extreme salinity and temperature conditions must be met.

  20. The Impact of the Ozone Hole on the Temperature and Salinity of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, A. L.; Polvani, L. M.; Abernathey, R. P.; Smith, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Observations have revealed systematic changes in the temperature and salinity of the Southern Ocean since 1960. These trends reflect the evolving exchange of heat and momentum between atmosphere and ocean and are, in part, driven by anthropogenic emissions. The key question is: which emissions are most important, greenhouse gases or ozone depleting substances? We answer this question using CESM-WACCM, a comprehensive climate model with interactive stratospheric chemistry, coupled to state-of-the-art land, ocean and sea-ice components. In accord with recent observations, the model reproduces the recent warming and freshening of the upper 1000m of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, employing an ensemble of single forcing integrations allows us to attribute a third of the changes in temperature and salinity to the presence of a seasonal ozone hole. While the warming is caused by a local change in the surface energy budget, the trend in salinity results from a combination of melting sea-ice and changing ocean transport.

  1. Combined effects of salinity, temperature and hypoxia on Daphnia magna metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreta-Lara, Elba; Campos, Bruno; Barata, Carlos; Lacorte, Silvia; Tauler, Romà

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic changes of Daphnia magna pools due different abiotic factors linked to global climate change (salinity, temperature and hypoxia) were investigated using untargeted GC-MS and advanced chemometric strategies using a three factors two-level full factorial experimental design (DoE). Effects of these three factors and identity of the metabolites whose concentrations changed because of them were investigated. The simultaneous analysis of GC-MS data sets using Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) allowed the resolution of the elution and mass spectra profiles of a large number of D. magna metabolites. Changes in peak areas of these metabolites were then analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA), by ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis (ASCA) and by Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA), and the combined effects of the three investigated stressors were assessed. Results confirmed the strong influence of increasing environmental salinity levels on the D. magna metabolome. This impact was specially highlighted by changes on the cellular content of carbohydrates, fatty acids, organic acids and amino acid molecules. In contrast, these effects were less significant for the other two factors (temperature and hypoxia) at the moderate stressing experimental conditions investigated in this work when they were not combined with salinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of temperature and salinity on Acacia harpophylla (brigalow) (Mimosaceae) germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichman, S.M.; Bellairs, S.M.; Mulligan, D.R. [Lincoln University, Lincoln (New Zealand). Division of Agriculture & Life Science

    2006-07-01

    Some coal mining companies in central Queensland have become interested in providing habitat for the endangered bridle nail-tailed wallaby that lives in brigalow vegetation. However, there is little known about establishment techniques for brigalow on mine sites and other disturbed ground; an understanding of brigalow biology and ecology is required to assist in the conservation of this threatened vegetation community and for re-creation of bridled nail-tail wallaby habitat in the post mining landscape. Brigalow is an unusual species of Acacia because it is not hard-seeded and germinates readily without the need to break seed-coat imposed dormancy. Germination trials were undertaken to test the ability of brigalow seed to germinate with a range of temperatures and salinity levels similar to those experienced in coal mine spoil. Optimum germination was found to occur at temperatures from 15 to 38{sup o}C and no germination was recorded at 45{sup o}C. Brigalow was very tolerant of high salt levels and germinated at percentages greater than 50% up to the highest salinity tested, 30 dS/m. Germination of greater than 90% occurred up to an electrical conductivity of 20 dS/m. The results indicate brigalow seed can be sown in summer when rains are most likely to occur; however, shading of the seed with extra soil or mulch may ensure the ground surface does not become too hot for germination. Because of its ability to germinate at high salinity levels, brigalow may be suitable for use in saline mine wastes which are common on sites to be rehabilitated after mining.

  3. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the Zarnitsa in the Barents Sea (NODC Accession 0002235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data from the SCIENTIFIC ICHTIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF LENINGRAD (RUSSIA), digitized from "Bulletin of the Institute of Ichthyology,...

  4. Oceanographic temperature and salinity profiles collected between 2001 and 2007 in the Barents Sea (NODC Accession 0046620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the GS-440, DALNIYE ZELENTSY and other platforms in the Arctic and Coastal N Atlantic...

  5. Quality-controlled sea surface temperature, salinity and other measurements from the NCEI Global Thermosalinographs Database (NCEI-TSG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains global in-situ sea surface temperature (SST), salinity (SSS) and other measurements from the NOAA NCEI Global Thermosalinographs Database...

  6. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the LITKE in the Arctic in 1948 (NODC Accession 0001088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other profile data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar from Matishov, G., A. Zuyev, V. Golubev, N. Adrov, S. Timofeev,...

  7. NODC Standard Product: Experimental Compact Disk NODC-01 Pacific Ocean Temperature-Salinity Profiles (1900-1988) (NODC Accession 0086259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) created a compact disk containing over 1.3 million temperature-depth and salinity-depth profiles taken in the Pacific...

  8. Salinity tolerance of cultured Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis L.: Effects on growth and on survival as a function of temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overton, Julia Lynne; Bayley, M.; Paulsen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    Eurasian perch is generally only considered to be a candidate for freshwater aquaculture even though wild populations are found in estuarine and brackish water habitats. Little knowledge exists on two issues a) the effect of temperature on the salinity tolerance of perch and b) the long......-term effects of brackish water on their overall growth performance. The present study addresses these two questions. Firstly, the effect of temperature (12, 15, 20 and 25°C) on perch survival of a salinity challenge at either 13 or 18‰ was determined. Survival was unaffected by 13‰ at the two lowest...... temperatures whereas higher temperature and higher salinities had a dramatic detrimental effect (at 25°C, 50% mortality was reach at 62h and 39h for 13‰ and 18‰, respectively). Secondly, we examined the effect of salinity on growth, which was assessed by measuring standard length and body weight at regular...

  9. Immunomodulatory effects of temperature and pH of water in an Indian freshwater sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-07-01

    Eunapius carteri, a freshwater sponge of India, inhabits the ponds and lakes and experiences variations of temperature and pH of water throughout the year. Sponges bear evolutionary and ecological importance with limited information on their immunological attribute and adaptational resilience in a changing environment. This paper reports temperature and pH specific responses of immune related parameters in sponge maintained in the experimental conditions of laboratory. Innate immunological parameters like phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase activity were estimated in E. carteri at different environmentally realistic water temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) and pH (6.4, 7.4 and 8.4). Phagocytosis and cytotoxicity are established as important immune parameters of invertebrates. Calalase, an antioxidant enzyme and phosphatases are involved in pathogen destruction and are considered as components of innate immunity. Activities of catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatases were estimated in E. carteri at different thermal regimes and pH. Modulation of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses and the activities of catalase and phosphatases at different water temperatures and pH indicated temperature and pH specific immunological status of E. carteri. Present investigation deals with the effects of selected hydrological parameters on the fundamental immune related parameters in sponge indicating its adaptational plasticity. Immunological resilience of this species in the face of variation of water temperature and pH is thought to be a special adaptive feature of sponge, a reported "living fossil". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of crude oil-water and solid -water interfaces and adsorption / desorption properties of crude oil fractions: The effect of low salinity water and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farooq, Umer

    2010-09-15

    The reservoirs of conventional oil are rapidly depleting because of increased production and consumption of crude oil in the world. Mature and mostly depleted oil reservoirs require advanced recovery techniques to sustain the production rates. During the past years, a variety of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have been developed and implemented to increase the oil recovery from mature reservoirs. Low Salinity Waterflooding (LSW) is an emerging EOR process of injecting water containing low concentrations (<4000 ppm) of total dissolved solids into the reservoir. This moderate cost process yields relatively higher incremental recoveries than other water based recovery methods. Investigation of mechanisms for increased recovery is quite challenging because this process depends upon complex crude oil/water/rock properties. This work was done to study the surface chemistry of typical reservoir surfaces where LSW can be used for EOR. The oil water and solid-water interfaces were characterised in low salinity aqueous solutions and investigated how the electrolytes and pH of solutions affect the interfacial and surface properties. The influence of low saline aqueous solution on the desorption behaviour of different fractions (acid-free oil and base-free oil) of crude oils was also explored. Reservoir minerals are sensitive to small changes in solution properties and therefore model, outcrop and reservoir particles were characterized in low salinity aqueous solutions. The extent of ionic adsorption on the mineral surfaces was found by various techniques. Particles were also characterized with respect to their elemental compositions. Asphaltene adsorption/desorption on reservoir rock surfaces play an important role in EOR processes. Various injection sequences of low saline aqueous solution of Na +, Ca2+ and sea water were considered to study the desorption of asphaltenes from silica surfaces. Composition of the aqueous phase influenced the interfacial properties of

  11. Finding stable cellulase and xylanase: evaluation of the synergistic effect of pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinas, Cristiane S; Loyo, Marcel Moitas; Baraldo, Anderson; Tardioli, Paulo W; Neto, Victor Bertucci; Couri, Sonia

    2010-12-31

    Ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass has been recognized as one of the most promising alternatives for the production of renewable and sustainable energy. However, one of the major bottlenecks holding back its commercialization is the high costs of the enzymes needed for biomass conversion. In this work, we studied the enzymes produced from a selected strain of Aspergillus niger under solid state fermentation. The cellulase and xylanase enzymatic cocktail was characterized in terms of pH and temperature by using response surface methodology. Thermostability and kinetic parameters were also determined. The statistical analysis of pH and temperature effects on enzymatic activity showed a synergistic interaction of these two variables, thus enabling to find a pH and temperature range in which the enzymes have a higher activity. The results obtained allowed the construction of mathematical models used to predict endoglucanase, β-glucosidase and xylanase activities under different pH and temperature conditions. Optimum temperature values for all three enzymes were found to be in the range between 35°C and 60°C, and the optimum pH range was found between 4 and 5.5. The methodology employed here was very effective in estimating enzyme behavior under different process conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of temperature and pH variations on the surface tension of EDTA solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Zeliha; Aktemur, Sevinc; Buzoglu, Hatice Dogan; Gümüsderelioglu, Menemse

    2011-06-01

    Surface tension of a liquid is one of the major factors that affect the wetting of a solid. The reduction in surface tension could improve the contact of irrigants with the dentinal walls of the root canal system. This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate the effect of pH and temperature variations on the surface tension of EDTA solutions. Three solutions, 17% EDTA, REDTA, and EDTA-T, were prepared and adjusted to have a pH of 5.5, 7.5, and 10.5. The surface tension of the test solutions was measured at 22 °C by the pendant drop technique, and the measurement was repeated after heating the solution at 37 °C. Differences among the experimental groups were statistically analyzed using three-way analysis of variance followed by the Bonferroni test for pair-wise comparison. The results of this study showed that there were significant differences in the surface tension values of solutions depending on the pH and temperature (P surface tension level of the EDTA solution dramatically decreased when surfactant was added to the EDTA solution in both pH and temperature variations (P surface tension value at a pH of 5.5 of all EDTA solutions, at a pH of 7.5 of EDTA and REDTA solutions, and at a pH of 10.5 of only REDTA solution (P surface tension of EDTA with and without surfactant is influenced by pH and temperature. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of ph and temperature on the activity of phytase products used in broiler nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L de P Naves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The activity of three commercial microbial phytase (Aspergillus oryzae, A. niger, and Saccharomyces cerevisae products used in broiler nutrition was determined at different pH (2.0 to 9.0 and temperature (20 to 90°C values. Enzymatic activity was determined according to the reaction of the phytase with its substrate (sodium phytate, in four replicates, and was expressed in units of phytase activity (FTU. A. oryzae phytase exhibited optimal activity at pH 4.0 and 40°C, but its absolute activity was the lowest of the three phytases evaluated. A. niger phytase exhibited maximal activity close to pH 5.0 and 45ºC, whereas S. cerevisae phytase presented its highest activity at pH close to 4.5 and temperatures ranging between 50 and 60°C. It was concluded that A. niger and S. cerevisae phytase products exhibited the highest absolute activities in vitro at pH and temperature values (pH lower than 5.0 and 41ºC corresponding to the ideal physiological conditions of broilers, which would theoretically allow high hydrolysis rate of the phytate contained in the feed.

  14. Modeling the Effect of pH and Temperature for Cellulases Immobilized on Enzymogel Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Ashani; Kudina, Olena; Nahar, Nurun; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Minko, Sergiy; Voronov, Andriy; Pryor, Scott W

    2015-06-01

    Production costs of cellulosic biofuels can be lowered if cellulases are recovered and reused using particulate carriers that can be extracted after biomass hydrolysis. Such enzyme recovery was recently demonstrated using enzymogel nanoparticles with grafted polymer brushes loaded with cellulases. In this work, cellulase (NS50013) and β-glucosidase (Novozyme 188) were immobilized on enzymogels made of poly(acrylic acid) polymer brushes grafted to the surface of silica nanoparticles. Response surface methodology was used to model effects of pH and temperature on hydrolysis and recovery of free and attached enzymes. Hydrolysis yields using both enzymogels and free cellulase and β-glucosidase were highest at the maximum temperature tested, 50 °C. The optimal pH for cellulase enzymogels and free enzyme was 5.0 and 4.4, respectively, while both free β-glucosidase and enzymogels had an optimal pH near 4.4. Highest hydrolysis sugar concentrations with cellulase and β-glucosidase enzymogels were 69 and 53 % of those with free enzymes, respectively. Enzyme recovery using enzymogels decreased with increasing pH, but cellulase recovery remained greater than 88 % throughout the operating range of pH values less than 5.0 and was greater than 95 % at pH values below 4.3. Recovery of β-glucosidase enzymogels was not affected by temperature and had little impact on cellulase recovery.

  15. Effect of pH and phosphate on calcium carbonate polymorphs precipitated at near-freezing temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Yu-Bin; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter A.; Nehrke, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pH and phosphate on the precipitation of calcium carbonate polymorphs from aqueous solution were investigated. Experiments were carried out at near-freezing temperature and two different pH conditions (pH 13.4 and 9.0). At each pH condition, solutions having different concentrations

  16. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  17. Interactive effects of pH and temperature on the bacteriocin stability by response surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Belgacem, Z; Rehaiem, A; Fajardo Bernárdez, P; Manai, M; Pastrana Castro, L

    2012-01-01

    The combined influence of pH and temperature on bacteriocins produced by three lactic acid bacteria, Pediococcus pentosaceus MMZ26, Enterococcus faecium MMZ17 and Lactococcus lactis MMZ25, isolated from Tunisian traditional dry fermented meat was studied using a second order orthogonal factorial design and response-surface methodology (RSM). This method allows estimating the interactive effects of pH and temperature on the stability of each bacteriocin. The high heat stability of the three bacteriocins was demonstrated, with optimum values at light acidic pH around 5.0, temperature below 90 degrees C and short incubation times. This study contributes to a better understanding of relation between bacteriocins production and stability in order to enhance their, in situ, application as a food and feed biopreservative in fermented and/or heated food products.

  18. Selection of high temperature and salinity tolerant Trichoderma isolates with antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosapati, Sowmya; Ravulapalli, Prasad Durga; Tippirishetty, Navaneetha; Vishwanathaswamy, Dinesh Kumar; Chunduri, Sarada

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma isolates were collected from varied agro-climatic zones of India and screened for high temperature and salinity tolerance. Among all the isolates tested, T. asperellum, TaDOR673 was highly tolerant to heat shock of 52°C with a mean spore count (log c.f.u/ml) of 4.33. The isolate after recovery from heat shock possessed higher germination rate and biomass production compared to its wild counterpart, upon prolonged exposure to 37°C. Under stress, TaDOR673 accumulated >15% of trehalose and >5% of mannose and raffinose compared to the wild type strain signifying their role in stress tolerance. T. asperellum, TaDOR693 and T. asperellum, TaDORS3 were identified as superior salt-tolerant isolates. Interestingly, TaDOR673 also possessed similar tolerance levels to increasing saline concentrations as indicated by its improved colony growth under stress conditions. T. asperellum, TaDOR673 and T. asperellum, TaDOR7316 effectively controlled the collar rot disease in groundnut by 79.7% when screened in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the study identified a potential thermotolerant and saline tolerant strain of Trichoderma, TaDOR673 that could be used as potential bioagent in stressed soils.

  19. The assessment of temperature and salinity sampling strategies in the Mediterranean Sea: idealized and real cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Raicich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and salinity sampling strategies are studied and compared by means of the Observing System Simulation Experiment technique in order to assess their usefulness for data assimilation in the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System. Their impact in a Mediterranean General Circulation Model is quantified in numerical twin experiments via bivariate data assimilation of temperature and salinity profiles in summer and winter conditions, using the optimal interpolation algorithm implemented in the System for Ocean Forecasting and Analysis. The data impact is quantified by the error reduction in the assimilation run relative to the free run. The sampling strategies studied here include various combinations of temperature and salinity profiles collected along Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS tracks, by Mediterranean Multi-sensor Moored Arrays (M3A, a Glider and ARGO floating profilers. Idealized sampling strategies involving VOS data allow to recognize the impact of individual tracks. As a result, the most effective tracks are those crossing regions characterized by high mesoscale variability and the presence of frontal structures between water masses. Sampling strategies adopted in summer–autumn 2004 and winter 2005 are studied to assess the impact of VOS and ARGO data in real conditions. The combination of all available data allows to achieve up to 30% error reductions. ARGO data produce a small impact when alone, but represent the only continuous coverage of the basin and are useful as a complement to VOS data sets. Localized data sets, as those obtained by M3As and the Glider, seem to have an almost negligible impact in the basin-scale assessment, and are expected to be more effective at regional scale.

  20. Effects of temperature and salinity on the growth of Alexandrium (Dinophyceae) isolates from the Salish Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Brian D; Moore, Stephanie K; Hay, Levi R; Anderson, Donald M; Trainer, Vera L

    2016-04-01

    Toxin-producing blooms of dinoflagellates in the genus Alexandrium have plagued the inhabitants of the Salish Sea for centuries. Yet the environmental conditions that promote accelerated growth of this organism, a producer of paralytic shellfish toxins, is lacking. This study quantitatively determined the growth response of two Alexandrium isolates to a range of temperatures and salinities, factors that will strongly respond to future climate change scenarios. An empirical equation, derived from observed growth rates describing the temperature and salinity dependence of growth, was used to hindcast bloom risk. Hindcasting was achieved by comparing predicted growth rates, calculated from in situ temperature and salinity data from Quartermaster Harbor, with corresponding Alexandrium cell counts and shellfish toxin data. The greatest bloom risk, defined at μ >0.25 d(-1) , generally occurred from April through November annually; however, growth rates rarely fell below 0.10 d(-1) . Except for a few occasions, Alexandrium cells were only observed during the periods of highest bloom risk and paralytic shellfish toxins above the regulatory limit always fell within the periods of predicted bloom occurrence. While acknowledging that Alexandrium growth rates are affected by other abiotic and biotic factors, such as grazing pressure and nutrient availability, the use of this empirical growth function to predict higher risk time frames for blooms and toxic shellfish within the Salish Sea provides the groundwork for a more comprehensive biological model of Alexandrium bloom dynamics in the region and will enhance our ability to forecast blooms in the Salish Sea under future climate change scenarios. © 2016 Phycological Society of America This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. A Miniature Integrated Multimodal Sensor for Measuring pH, EC and Temperature for Precision Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Murata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Making several simultaneous measurements with different kinds of sensors at the same location in a solution is difficult because of crosstalk between the sensors. In addition, because the conditions at different locations in plant beds differ, in situ measurements in agriculture need to be done in small localized areas. We have fabricated a multimodal sensor on a small Si chip in which a pH sensor was integrated with electrical conductivity (EC and temperature sensors. An ISFET with a Si3N4 membrane was used for the pH sensor. For the EC sensor, the electrical conductivity between platinum electrodes was measured, and the temperature sensor was a p-n junction diode. These are some of the most important measurements required for controlling the conditions in plant beds. The multimodal sensor can be inserted into a plant bed for in situ monitoring. To confirm the absence of crosstalk between the sensors, we made simultaneous measurements of pH, EC, and temperature of a pH buffer solution in a plant bed. When the solution was diluted with hot or cold water, the real time measurements showed changes to the EC and temperature, but no change in pH. We also demonstrated that our sensor was capable of simultaneous in situ measurements in rock wool without being affected by crosstalk.

  2. A miniature integrated multimodal sensor for measuring pH, EC and temperature for precision agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagawa, Masato; Iwasaki, Taichi; Murata, Hiroaki; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2012-01-01

    Making several simultaneous measurements with different kinds of sensors at the same location in a solution is difficult because of crosstalk between the sensors. In addition, because the conditions at different locations in plant beds differ, in situ measurements in agriculture need to be done in small localized areas. We have fabricated a multimodal sensor on a small Si chip in which a pH sensor was integrated with electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature sensors. An ISFET with a Si(3)N(4) membrane was used for the pH sensor. For the EC sensor, the electrical conductivity between platinum electrodes was measured, and the temperature sensor was a p-n junction diode. These are some of the most important measurements required for controlling the conditions in plant beds. The multimodal sensor can be inserted into a plant bed for in situ monitoring. To confirm the absence of crosstalk between the sensors, we made simultaneous measurements of pH, EC, and temperature of a pH buffer solution in a plant bed. When the solution was diluted with hot or cold water, the real time measurements showed changes to the EC and temperature, but no change in pH. We also demonstrated that our sensor was capable of simultaneous in situ measurements in rock wool without being affected by crosstalk.

  3. Linear and nonlinear effects of temperature and precipitation on ecosystem properties in tidal saline wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Laura C.; Osland, Michael J.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Grace, James B.; Howard, Rebecca J.; Stagg, Camille L.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Krauss, Ken W.; Gabler, Christopher A.; Day, Richard H.; Rogers, Kerrylee

    2017-01-01

    Climate greatly influences the structure and functioning of tidal saline wetland ecosystems. However, there is a need to better quantify the effects of climatic drivers on ecosystem properties, particularly near climate-sensitive ecological transition zones. Here, we used climate- and literature-derived ecological data from tidal saline wetlands to test hypotheses regarding the influence of climatic drivers (i.e., temperature and precipitation regimes) on the following six ecosystem properties: canopy height, biomass, productivity, decomposition, soil carbon density, and soil carbon accumulation. Our analyses quantify and elucidate linear and nonlinear effects of climatic drivers. We quantified positive linear relationships between temperature and above-ground productivity and strong positive nonlinear (sigmoidal) relationships between (1) temperature and above-ground biomass and canopy height and (2) precipitation and canopy height. Near temperature-controlled mangrove range limits, small changes in temperature are expected to trigger comparatively large changes in biomass and canopy height, as mangrove forests grow, expand, and, in some cases, replace salt marshes. However, within these same transition zones, temperature-induced changes in productivity are expected to be comparatively small. Interestingly, despite the significant above-ground height, biomass, and productivity relationships across the tropical–temperate mangrove–marsh transition zone, the relationships between temperature and soil carbon density or soil carbon accumulation were not significant. Our literature review identifies several ecosystem properties and many regions of the world for which there are insufficient data to fully evaluate the influence of climatic drivers, and the identified data gaps can be used by scientists to guide future research. Our analyses indicate that near precipitation-controlled transition zones, small changes in precipitation are expected to trigger

  4. A new atlas of temperature and salinity for the North Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterjee, A.; Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Reddy, G.V.; Michael, G.S.; Ravichandran, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, E.P.R.; UdayaBhaskar, T.V.S.; Sanjeevan, V.N.

    profiles collected over a few decades, including the IIOE data from the 1960s, were interpolated to provide a ‘climatolog- ical’ view of the variability. Monthly plots of sea surface temperature (SST) and bimonthly plots of sea surface salinity (SSS) were...–August–September 4. Fall: October–November–December However, since the seasonal variability in the NIO, our region of interest, is dominated by the monsoonal cycle, we also redefined the Levitus sea- sons to create another set of seasonal and the corre- sponding...

  5. [Dynamics of seasonal plant growth in halophytic meadows taking into account the temperature factor and soil salinity level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pis'man, T I; Slosar', N A

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model has been constructed to describe the growth dynamics of various plant communities of halophytic meadows depending on the temperature factor and degree of soil salinity. Field investigation of the yields of halophytic meadow plant communities were performed in the coastal area of Kurinka Lake in the Altaiskii district of the Republic of Khakasia in 2004 and 2006. The results of field investigations and model studies show that there is a correlation between plant growth and air temperature for plant communities growing on soils with the lowest and medium salinity levels. It was proven in model studies that for the plant communities that grow on highly saline (3.58%) soils, not only air temperature but also the salinity level of the soil should be taken into account.

  6. Temperature sensitivity of organic substrate decay varies with pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K.; Lehmeier, C.; Ballantyne, F.; Billings, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer in soils and globally ubiquitous. It serves as a primary carbon source for myriad microbes able to release cellulases which cleave the cellulose into smaller molecules. For example, β-glucosidase, one type of cellulase, breaks down a terminal β-glycosidic bond of cellulose. The carbon of the liberated glucose becomes available for microbial uptake, after which it can then be mineralized and returned to the atmosphere via heterotrophic respiration. Thus, exoenzymes play an important role in the global cycling of carbon. Numerous studies suggest that global warming potentially increases the rate at which β-glucosidase breaks down cellulose, but it is not known how pH of the soil solution influences the effect of temperature on cellulose decomposition rates; this is important given the globally wide range of soil pH. Using fluorescence enzyme assay techniques, we studied the effect of temperature and pH on the reaction rate at which purified β-Glucosidase decays β-D-cellobioside (a compound often employed to simulate cellulose). We evaluated the temperature sensitivity of this reaction at five temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C) and six pH values (3.5, 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5)encompassing the naturally occurring range in soils, in a full-factorial design. First, we determined Vmax at 25°C and pH 6.5, standard conditions for measuring enzyme activities in many studies. The Vmax was 858.65 μmol h-1mg-1and was achieved at substrate concentration of 270 μM. At all pH values, the reaction rate slowed down at lower temperatures; at a pH of 3.5, no enzymatic activity was detected. The enzyme activity was significantly different between pH 4.5 and higher pHs. For example, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was significantly lower than that at 7.5 at 20 and 25°C (Bonferroni-corrected P =0.0006, 0.0004, respectively), but not at lower temperatures. Similarly, enzyme reactivity at pH 4.5 was lower than that at pH 8.5 at 10, 15

  7. Effects of temperature and salinity on metabolic rate of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bai-Cai; Li, Er-Chao; Du, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Run-Lan; Chen, Li-Qiao; Yu, Na

    2014-01-01

    The effects of temperature and salinity on the metabolism of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea (mollusca, Lamellibranchia) were studied experimentally. Firstly, three indexes of basal metabolism (oxygen consumption rate, OCR; ammonia excretion rate, AER; and CO2 emission rate, CER), patterns of diurnal rhythm and O: N ratios were measured for three size ranges (large: h = 25.54 ± 1.96 mm, medium: h = 22.07 ± 1.33 mm and small: h = 17.70 ± 1.43 mm) at two salinities (0.3‰ and 1.8‰). The results showed that: (1) three indexes decreased with increasing body size. (2) no significant difference was found between two salinities for the O: N ratios of the small and large size, but a significant difference was found for the medium-sized one; (3) however, there were similar and distinct diurnal rhythms of metabolic rate at two salinities over a 24 hour period in three size C. fluminea. N ratios and Q10 (temperature coefficient) of small-sized C. fluminea were measured across five water temperatures (4, 11, 18, 25 and 32°C) and two salinities (0.3‰ and 1.8‰) in the following experiments. Our results of the small C. fluminea were as follows: there was no significant difference in the O: N ratios among the five temperatures and two salinity treatments; and no significant difference of three indexes between both salinity levels were observed at same temperature controlled; and three indexes increased significantly with increasing temperature from 4°C to 25°C, while no significant difference was observed in the 25-32°C range; and the highest Q10 coefficients (Q10 = 1.825 at salinity of 0.3‰ and Q10 = 1.683 at salinity of 1.8‰) were observed at the 18-25°C temperature increase, and the low values were found in the 4-11°C, 11-18°C and 25-32°C interval. It indicates that there is not a synergetic effect of our temperature and salinity on the metabolic rate of small C. fluminea, and a temperature of 18-25°C may represent an optimum adequate metabolic

  8. Dynamics of pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duorarum) recruitment potential in relation to salinity and temperature in Florida Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, Joan A.; Zein-Eldin, Z.; Criales, Maria M.; Robblee, M.B.; Wong, S.; Jackson, Thomas L.; Johnson, D.

    2002-01-01

    Progress is reported in relating upstream water management and freshwater flow to Florida Bay to a valuable commercial fishery for pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duorarum), which has major nursery grounds in Florida Bay. Changes in freshwater inflow are expected to affect salinity patterns in the bay, so the effect of salinity and temperature on the growth, survival, and subsequent recruitment and harvest of this ecologically and economically important species was examined with laboratory experiments and a simulation model. Experiments were conducted to determine the response of juvenile growth and survival to temperature (15??C to 33??C) and salinity (2??? to 55???), and results were used to refine an existing model. Results of these experiments indicated that juvenile pink shrimp have a broad salinity tolerance range at their optimal temperature, but the salinity tolerance range narrows with distance from the optimal temperature range, 20-30??C. Acclimation improved survival at extreme high salinity (55???), but not at extremely low salinity (i.e., 5???, 10???). Growth rate increases with temperature until tolerance is exceeded beyond about 35??C. Growth is optimal in the mid-range of salinity (30???) and decreases as salinity increases or decreases. Potential recruitment and harvests from regions of Florida Bay were simulated based on local observed daily temperature and salinity. The simulations predict that potential harvests might differ among years, seasons, and regions of the bay solely on the basis of observed temperature and salinity. Regional differences in other characteristics, such as seagrass cover and tidal transport, may magnify regional differences in potential harvests. The model predicts higher catch rates in the September-December fishery, originating from the April and July settlement cohorts, than in the January-June fishery, originating from the October and January settlement cohorts. The observed density of juveniles in western Florida Bay

  9. Osmoregulatory capacity of the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei at different temperatures and salinities, and optimal culture environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fernando Bückle

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Osmoregulation in Litopenaeus vannamei was studied in a factorial experiment at four temperatures (20, 24, 28 and 32 °C and six salinities (10, 16, 22, 28, 34 and 40 ‰. The isosmotic related points for 20, 24, 28, and 32 °C were 754, 711, 822, and 763 mmol/kg, respectively. This species hyperregulates between at salinities of 10 and 20 ‰ and hyporegulates between 20 and 40 ‰. The isosmotic point in L. vannamei exposed to constant salinities changed in relation to temperature from 717 to 823 mmol/kg. For these experimental conditions, the T-S combination of 32 °C and 28 ‰ produced the best growth. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (3: 745-753. Epub 2006 Sept. 29.La respuesta osmorreguladora de Litopenaeus vannamei se estudió en un experimento factorial con cuatro temperaturas (20, 24, 28 y 32 ºC y seis salinidades (10, 16, 22, 28, 34 y 40 ‰. Los puntos isosmóticos relacionados para 20, 24, 28, y 32 ºC fueron 754, 711, 822, y 763 mmol/kg, respectivamente. Esta especie hiperregula dentro del intervalo de 10 y 20 ‰ e hiporegula entre 20 y 40 ‰. El punto isosmótico de L. vannamei expuesto a salinidades constantes cambia en relación a la temperatura desde 717 a 823 mmol/kg. Para estas condiciones experimentales, la combinación T-S de 32 ºC y 28 ‰ produjo el mejor crecimiento.

  10. Retrieving Marine Inherent Optical Properties from Satellites Using Temperature and Salinity-dependent Backscattering by Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, Paul J.; Franz, Bryan Alden; Lefler, Jason Travis; Robinson, Wayne D.; Boss, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Time-series of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs) from ocean color satellite instruments provide valuable data records for studying long-term time changes in ocean ecosystems. Semi-analytical algorithms (SAAs) provide a common method for estimating IOPs from radiometric measurements of the marine light field. Most SAAs assign constant spectral values for seawater absorption and backscattering, assume spectral shape functions of the remaining constituent absorption and scattering components (e.g., phytoplankton, non-algal particles, and colored dissolved organic matter), and retrieve the magnitudes of each remaining constituent required to match the spectral distribution of measured radiances. Here, we explore the use of temperature- and salinity-dependent values for seawater backscattering in lieu of the constant spectrum currently employed by most SAAs. Our results suggest that use of temperature- and salinity-dependent seawater spectra elevate the SAA-derived particle backscattering, reduce the non-algal particles plus colored dissolved organic matter absorption, and leave the derived absorption by phytoplankton unchanged.

  11. The effect of interpolation methods in temperature and salinity trends in the Western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. VARGAS-YANEZ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and salinity data in the historical record are scarce and unevenly distributed in space and time and the estimation of linear trends is sensitive to different factors. In the case of the Western Mediterranean, previous works have studied the sensitivity of these trends to the use of bathythermograph data, the averaging methods or the way in which gaps in time series are dealt with. In this work, a new factor is analysed: the effect of data interpolation. Temperature and salinity time series are generated averaging existing data over certain geographical areas and also by means of interpolation. Linear trends from both types of time series are compared. There are some differences between both estimations for some layers and geographical areas, while in other cases the results are consistent. Those results which do not depend on the use of interpolated or non-interpolated data, neither are influenced by data analysis methods can be considered as robust ones. Those results influenced by the interpolation process or the factors analysed in previous sensitivity tests are not considered as robust results.

  12. AVT guidelines for drum boilers and the pH at temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bursik, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    pH values measured at 25 C are used for controlling the boiler water treatment. The question arises as to whether this practice is correct. The paper shows that the difference between the actual pH and the neutral pH, both at the boiler water temperature, decreases extremely with increasing temperature in boilers operated on all-volatile treatment. Even slight anionic contamination may cause the pH(t) to move into the dangerous acidic region. In this connection, the VGB guideline AVT limit for the cation conductivity of the boiler water (< 3 {mu}S x cm {sup -1}) seems to be too high. Many examples demonstrate this statement. (orig.)

  13. Dynamic swelling behavior of interpenetrating polymer networks in response to temperature and pH

    OpenAIRE

    Slaughter, Brandon V.; Blanchard, Aaron T.; Maass, Katie F.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature responsive hydrogels based on ionic polymers exhibit swelling transitions in aqueous solutions as a function of shifting pH and ionic strength, in addition to temperature. Applying these hydrogels to useful applications, particularly for biomedical purposes such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine, is critically dependent on understanding the hydrogel solution responses as a function of all three parameters together. In this work, interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydr...

  14. Recent changes (2004-2016) of temperature and salinity in the Mediterranean outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Cristina; García-Lafuente, Jesús; Sammartino, Simone; Sánchez-Garrido, José C.; Sánchez-Leal, Ricardo; Jesús Bellanco, M.

    2017-06-01

    Temperature and salinity series near the seafloor at Espartel Sill (Strait of Gibraltar) have been used to analyze the thermohaline variability of the Mediterranean outflow. The series shows temperature drops by the end of most winters/early springs, which are the remote response to Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) formation events in the Gulf of Lion that uplift old WMDW nearby the strait. This process distorts the seasonal cycle of colder/warmer water flowing out in summer/winter likely linked to the seasonality of the Western Alborán Gyre. The series shows positive trends in agreement with previous values, which are largely increased after 2013. It is tentatively interpreted as the Western Mediterranean Transition (WMT) signature that started with the very cold winters of 2005 and 2006. It was only after the large new WMDW production of 2012 and 2013 harsh winters that WMT waters were made available to flow out of the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Effect of pH, temperature and water activity on the inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WiN 7

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Effect of pH, temperature and water activity on the inhibition of Botrytis cinerea by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolates. Hamdache Ahlem1, Ezziyyani Mohammed2, Alain Badoc3 and Lamarti Ahmed1*. 1Département de Biologie, Faculté des Sciences, Equipe de Biotechnologies Végétales. M‟hannech II ...

  16. Effects of dissolution medium, pH and temperature on the in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of dissolution medium, pH and temperature on the in vitro release properties of metronidazole, a commonly used antiprotozoal, from its tablet dosage forms have been studied. Metronidazole tablets were formulated using the conventional wet granulation technique. The standard tablet characteristics such as ...

  17. Effect of Temperature and PH on Biogas Production from Cow Dung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of feed, temperature and pH on biogas production was investigated using 500 ml small scale laboratory flasks. Feed containing cow dung and dog faeces produced the most biogas for small scale experiments. The combinations were scaled up to assess the feasibility of producing biogas from two 150 L ...

  18. The effects of pH and temperature on phosphate and nitrate uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... of carbon sources by other organisms. Despite the fact that protozoa are known to enhance the mineralization of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) in aquatic microcosms and in activated sludge, little is known on the effect of temperature and pH on their nutrient removal efficiency. This then forms the ...

  19. The effects of temperature and pH bacterial degradation of latex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to integrate the activities of paint deterioration of microbial communities (microcosms) on the basis of environmental factors. The effect of temperature and pH on bacterial degradation of latex paint under humid condition by bacterial isolates was studied. Results obtained revealed that paint ...

  20. Water temperature and pH influence olfactory sensitivity to pre ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This shows that circulatory androgens exert an activational effect on olfactory receptors of male fish. Wild caught tubercular males and androgen implanted juvenile males exhibit a high responsiveness to steroid sulphate at the water temperature and pH which fish experience during the pre-spawning phase. The male's ...

  1. Observation of temperature and pH during biogas production from water hyacinth and cow manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurfitri Astuti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is generated from biological process of organic material by bacterial engaged. Biogas can be derived from manure, municipal waste, agricultural waste and other biomass resources. In addition to the use of cow manure as raw material for biogas production, it can also be derived from biomass containing cellulose which one is water hyacinth as an organic material that contains quite large cellulose. The abundance of water hyacinth found in Rawapening causing several negative impacts. The purpose of this study is to observe  temperature and pH on the biogas production generated from water hyacinth of Rawapening and cow manure. Biogas production process begins by chopping the leaves and stems of water hyacinth, and then mixed with cow manure and water. The results of substrate variation of water hyacinth, cow manure and water reaches optimally at 40:80:480 respectively, which produce the highest point of  biogas amounted 176.33 ml on the day 20 in 1L sized digester, the temperature of the biogas production is at 32°C.  At the initial fermentation, digester temperature of 30°C has increased over the course of the fermentation process, a peak at day 20 and then decreased to 27°C at the end of fermentation. There is a decrease in pH starting from initial fermentation at pH 6-7 and then the pH began to decline until the end of fermentation as amount of pH 5.Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.22-25Citation:  Nurfitri Astuti, N., Tri Retnaningsih Soeprobowati, T.R., and  Budiyono. 2013. Observation of temperature and pH during biogas production from water hyacinth and cow manure. Waste Technology 1(1:1-5. Doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.12777/wastech.1.1.22-25

  2. Influence of Temperature, Oxygen, and pH on a Metalimnetic Population of Oscillatoria rubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, A

    1981-07-01

    Planktonic Oscillatoria spp. often inhabit depths of thermally stratified lakes in which gradients of physical and chemical factors occur. Measurements of photosynthetic rate or photosynthetic carbon metabolism were used to evaluate the importance of vertical gradients of temperature, oxygen, and pH upon Oscillatoria rubescens in Crooked Lake, Ind. At the low light intensities experienced in situ, neither photosynthetic rate nor relative incorporation of carbon dioxide into low-molecular-weight compounds, polysaccharide, or protein was affected by temperature. At a 10-fold-higher light intensity, the photosynthetic rate increased as temperature increased; most of the additional carbon accumulated as polysaccharide. Polysaccharide which was synthesized at high light intensity and temperature was respired when the organisms were placed in the dark, but was not used for protein biosynthesis. When O. rubescens was shifted from high light to low light, a fraction of the polysaccharide was metabolized into protein. Adaptation to growth at lower temperatures by O. rubescens cultures resulted in a decrease in the maximum photosynthetic rate. Oxygen inhibited photosynthesis by only 10 to 15% at concentrations typically found in the lake. The photosynthetic rates at pH values which occurred in Crooked Lake were all near the maximum. Thus, gradients of temperature, oxygen, or pH are not likely to significantly affect the distribution of O. rubescens in Crooked Lake, given the low light intensity at which O. rubescens grows and the range of values for those factors in the lake.

  3. The effect of pH, electrolytes and temperature on the rhizosphere geochemistry of phytosiderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M; Kraemer, S M; Schenkeveld, W D C

    2017-01-01

    Graminaceous plants are grown worldwide as staple crops under a variety of climatic and soil conditions. They release phytosiderophores for Fe acquisition (Strategy II). Aim of the present study was to uncover how the rhizosphere pH, background electrolyte and temperature affect the mobilization of Fe and other metals from soil by phytosiderophores. For this purpose a series of kinetic batch interaction experiments with the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA), a calcareous clay soil and a mildly acidic sandy soil were performed. The temperature, electrolyte concentration and applied electrolyte cation were varied. The effect of pH was examined by applying two levels of lime and Cu to the acidic soil. Fe mobilization by DMA increased by lime application, and was negatively affected by Cu amendment. Mobilization of Fe and other metals decreased with increasing ionic strength, and was lower for divalent than for monovalent electrolyte cations at equal ionic strength, due to higher adsorption of metal-DMA complexes to the soil. Metal mobilization rates increased with increasing temperature leading to a faster onset of competition; Fe was mobilized faster, but also became depleted faster at higher temperature. Temperature also affected biodegradation rates of metal-DMA complexes. Rhizosphere pH, electrolyte type and concentration and temperature can have a pronounced effect on Strategy II Fe acquisition by affecting the time and concentration 'window of Fe uptake' in which plants can benefit from phytosiderophore-mediated Fe uptake.

  4. Development and validation of a combined temperature, water activity, pH model for bacterial growth rate Lactobacillus curvatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Rombouts, F.M.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Riet, K. van 't; Zwietering, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    A model was established to predict growth rate as a function of temperature, pH and water activity. The model is based on two, earlier developed models, one for growth rate as a function of temperature and water activity and the other for growth rate as a function of temperature and pH. Based on the

  5. Development and validation of a combined temperature, water activity, pH model for bacterial growth rate of Lactobacillus curvatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, T.; Rombouts, F.M.; Kant-Muermans, M.L.T.; Riet, van 't K.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    A model was established to predict growth rate as a function of temperature, pH and water activity. The model is based on two, earlier developed models, one for growth rate as a function of temperature and water activity and the other for growth rate as a function of temperature and pH. Based on the

  6. Effects of temperature, pH, and ionic strength on the Henry's law constant of triethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Liu, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The Henry's law constants (KH) of triethylamine (TEA) in pure water and in 1-octanol were measured for the temperatures pertinent to the lower troposphere (278-298 K) using a bubble column system coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The KH values of TEA in water and 1-octanol at 298 K are 5.75 ± 0.86 mol L-1 atm-1 and 115.62 ± 5.78 mol L-1 atm-1. The KH values display strong dependence on temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The characteristic times for TEA to establish an equilibrium between gas and droplet with a size of 5.6 µm are ~33 s (298 K, pH = 5.6); ~8.9 × 102 s (278 K, pH = 5.6); ~1.3 × 103 s (298 K, pH = 4.0); and 3.6 × 104 s (278 K, pH = 4.0). The evaluation of TEA partitioning between gas phase and condensed phase implies that TEA predominantly resides in rainwater, and TEA loss to organic aerosol is negligible.

  7. Selective VFA production potential from organic waste streams: Assessing temperature and pH influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aguirre, Jon; Aymerich, Enrique; González-Mtnez de Goñi, Jaime; Esteban-Gutiérrez, Myriam

    2017-11-01

    This study explored the volatile fatty acid (VFA) production potential of seven waste streams from urban and agroindustrial sources. For that purpose, batch assays were performed under acidic (pH 5.5) and alkaline (pH 10) conditions at both mesophilic (35°C) and thermophilic (55°C) temperature. Overall, the VFA yield was influenced by temperature, and it was positively affected by pH, ranging between 220 and 677mgCODg-1CODfed for liquid waste streams and between 127 and 611mgCODg-1CODfed for solid waste streams and urban sludge. The highest VFA concentration and highest VFA/sCOD ratio was obtained during the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) fermentation, with 8,320mgCODL-1 and 94% at alkaline pH and mesophilic temperature. The results of this study suggest that selective VFA production, i.e. via propionic, butyric and acetic acid production, might be feasible for scaling-up purposes with specific waste streams by adjusting the process parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ecophysiological behavior of Caquetaia kraussii (Steindachner, 1878 (Pisces: Cichlidae exposed to different temperatures and salinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Segnini de Bravo

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropical river sardine, Caquetaia kraussii, captured from La Aguá lagoon (Sucre State, Venezuela were acclimatized for four weeks at 22, 24, 30 and 32ºC and at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 17 ‰ salinity. To evaluate effects of thermal response to acclimatization level, the fish were transferred suddenly from lower temperatures (22 and 24ºC to higher ones (32 and 30ºC respectively. Then thermal resistance time was measured at the lethal temperature of 40.9ºC for 30 days. We considered that acclimatization process completed when resistance time was stabilized at the new temperature regime. For the saline effect, the concentrations of sodium and potassium were measured in the tissues at each treatment: gills, white muscle, gut and heart. The results showed that thermal tolerance increased rapidly in 3 h with a 6ºC rise in temperature (from 24 to 30ºC and in 24 h with a 10ºC rise (22 to 32ºC. With decreasing temperatures, the acclimatization level reached its lowest in 11 days with a 6ºC decreases (from 30 to 24ºC and in 14 days with a 10ºC decrease (32 to 22ºC. Caquetaia kraussii regulates as much sodium as potassium in gills and white muscle tissues at all salinity levels tested; however, gut and heart tissues showed significantly different regulations among salinities examined.La sardina tropical de río, Caquetaia kraussii, capturada en la laguna La Aguá (Estado Sucre, Venezuela fue aclimatada durante cuatro semanas a la temperatura de 22, 24, 30 y 32ºC y a 0, 5, 10, 15 y 17 ‰ de salinidad. Para evaluar los efectos de respuestas térmicas a los niveles de aclimatación, los peces fueron transferidos abruptamente desde las temperaturas bajas (22 y 24ºC hasta las altas (32 y 30ºC respectivamente. Se midió entonces la resistencia térmica a la temperatura letal de 40.9ºC durante 30 días. Se consideró que los peces habían alcanzado completamente su aclimatación cuando se estabilizaba al nuevo régimen de temperatura. Para el efecto

  9. Effects of temperature and salinity on life history of the marine amphipod Gammarus locusta. Implications for ecotoxicological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuparth, T; Costa, F O; Costa, M H

    2002-02-01

    The life history of Gammarus locusta was analysed in the laboratory under the following temperature and salinity combinations: 20 degrees C-33/1000, 15 degrees C-20/1000 and 15 degrees C-33/1000 (reference condition). Life history analysis comprised survival, individual growth, reproductive traits and life table parameters. Compared to 15 degrees C, life history at 20 degrees C was characterised by at least a four-week reduction in the life-span, lower life expectancy, shorter generation time, faster individual growth, anticipation of age at maturity and higher population growth rate. These temperature effects constituted an acceleration and condensation of the life cycle, compared to the reference condition. Concerning salinity effects, with few exceptions, results show that overall this amphipod life history did not differ significantly between the salinity conditions tested. Regarding ecotoxicological testing implications, findings from this study indicate that the range of temperature and salinity conditions acceptable for testing was substantially expanded both for acute and chronic assays. A temperature of 20 degrees C or higher (for a salinity of 33/1000) is suggested for routine chronic sediment toxicity testing with G. locusta, in order to reduce the life cycle and consequently improve cost-effectiveness and standardisation. Results also suggest that a multiple-response approach, including survival, growth and reproduction, should be applied in chronic toxicity tests.

  10. Diatom cell size, coloniality and motility: trade-offs between temperature, salinity and nutrient supply with climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Svensson

    Full Text Available Reduction in body size has been proposed as a universal response of organisms, both to warming and to decreased salinity. However, it is still controversial if size reduction is caused by temperature or salinity on their own, or if other factors interfere as well. We used natural benthic diatom communities to explore how "body size" (cells and colonies and motility change along temperature (2-26°C and salinity (0.5-7.8 gradients in the brackish Baltic Sea. Fourth-corner analysis confirmed that small cell and colony sizes were associated with high temperature in summer. Average community cell volume decreased linearly with 2.2% per °C. However, cells were larger with artificial warming when nutrient concentrations were high in the cold season. Average community cell volume increased by 5.2% per °C of artificial warming from 0 to 8.5°C and simultaneously there was a selection for motility, which probably helped to optimize growth rates by trade-offs between nutrient supply and irradiation. Along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient cell size decreased with decreasing salinity, apparently mediated by nutrient stoichiometry. Altogether, our results suggest that climate change in this century may polarize seasonality by creating two new niches, with elevated temperature at high nutrient concentrations in the cold season (increasing cell size and elevated temperature at low nutrient concentrations in the warm season (decreasing cell size. Higher temperature in summer and lower salinity by increased land-runoff are expected to decrease the average cell size of primary producers, which is likely to affect the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels.

  11. Flux Balance Analysis of Escherichia coli under Temperature and pH Stress Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-05-12

    An interesting discovery in biology is that most genes in an organism are dispensable. That means these genes have minor effects on survival of the organism in standard laboratory conditions. One explanation of this discovery is that some genes play important roles in specific conditions and are essential genes under those conditions. E. coli is a model organism, which is widely used. It can adapt to many stress conditions, including temperature, pH, osmotic, antibiotic, etc. Underlying mechanisms and associated genes of each stress condition responses are usually different. In our analysis, we combined protein abundance data and mutant conditional fitness data into E. coli constraint-based metabolic models to study conditionally essential metabolic genes under temperature and pH stress conditions. Flux Balance Analysis was employed as the modeling method to analysis these data. We discovered lists of metabolic genes, which are E. coli dispensable genes, but conditionally essential under some stress conditions. Among these conditionally essential genes, atpA in low pH stress and nhaA in high pH stress found experimental evidences from previous studies. Our study provides new conditionally essential gene candidates for biologists to explore stress condition mechanisms.

  12. Measurement of pH, exudate composition and temperature in wound healing: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, G; Moore, Z; O'Connor, T

    2017-07-02

    To assess the potential of measurements of pH, exudate composition and temperature in wounds to predict healing outcomes and to identify the methods that are employed to measure them. A systematic review based on the outcomes of a search strategy of quantitative primary research published in the English language was conducted. Inclusion criteria limited studies to those involving in vivo and human participants with an existing or intentionally provoked wound, defined as 'a break in the epithelial integrity of the skin', and excluded in vitro and animal studies. Data synthesis and analysis was performed using structured narrative summaries of each included study arranged by concept, pH, exudate composition and temperature. The Evidence Based Literature (EBL) Critical Appraisal Checklist was implemented to appraise the quality of the included studies. A total of 23 studies, three for pH (mean quality score 54.48%), 12 for exudate composition (mean quality score 46.54%) and eight for temperature (mean quality score 36.66%), were assessed as eligible for inclusion in this review. Findings suggest that reduced pH levels in wounds, from alkaline towards acidic, are associated with improvements in wound condition. Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP), neutrophil elastase (NE) and albumin, in descending order, were the most frequently measured analytes in wounds. MMP-9 emerged as the analyte which offers the most potential as a biomarker of wound healing, with elevated levels observed in acute or non-healing wounds and decreasing levels in wounds progressing in healing. Combined measures of different exudate components, such as MMP/TIMP ratios, also appeared to offer substantial potential to indicate wound healing. Finally, temperature measurements are highest in non-healing, worsening or acute wounds and decrease as wounds progress towards healing. Methods used to measure pH, exudate composition and

  13. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Tiago; Guégan, Régis; Thiebault, Thomas; Le Milbeau, Claude; Muller, Fabrice; Teixeira, Vinicius; Giovanela, Marcelo; Boussafir, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Accepted Manuscript; International audience; Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental d...

  14. Influence of Temperature, Oxygen, and pH on a Metalimnetic Population of Oscillatoria rubescens

    OpenAIRE

    Konopka, Allan

    1981-01-01

    Planktonic Oscillatoria spp. often inhabit depths of thermally stratified lakes in which gradients of physical and chemical factors occur. Measurements of photosynthetic rate or photosynthetic carbon metabolism were used to evaluate the importance of vertical gradients of temperature, oxygen, and pH upon Oscillatoria rubescens in Crooked Lake, Ind. At the low light intensities experienced in situ, neither photosynthetic rate nor relative incorporation of carbon dioxide into low-molecular-weig...

  15. Electron spin resonance of melanin from hair. Effects of temperature, pH and light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, R.; Perbet, G. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)); Deflandre, A.; Lang, G. (Centre de Recherches de la Societe L' Oreal, Aulnay Sous Bois (France) Dept. de Chimie Generale)

    1983-08-01

    The variation with temperature, pH and light of the ESR signal of hydrated melanin powders from Japanese black hair has been studied. An explanation of the results is proposed on the basis of quinhydrone type complexes and of acid-base equilibria of melanin and its semiquinone radicals. During exposure to light of wavelengths 254-600 nm, both stable and unstable radicals have been observed. The action spectrum for the formation of stable melanin radicals has been determined.

  16. Temperature and pH effects on plant uptake of benzotriazoles by sunflowers in hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Sigifredo; Davis, Lawrence C; Erickson, Larry E

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a systematic approach to understanding the effect of environmental variables on plant uptake (phyto-uptake) of organic contaminants. Uptake (and possibly phytotransformation) of xenobiotics is a complex process that may differ from nutrient uptake. A specific group of xenobiotics (benzotriazoles) were studied using sunflowers grown hydroponically with changes of environmental conditions including solution volume, temperature, pH, and mixing. The response of plants to these stimuli was evaluated and compared using physiological changes (biomass production and water uptake) and estimated uptake rates (influx into plants), which define the uptake characteristics for the xenobiotic. Stirring of the hydroponic solution had a significant impact on plant growth and water uptake. Plants were healthier, probably because of a combination of factors such as improved aeration and increase in temperature. Uptake and possibly phytotransformation of benzotriazoles was increased accordingly. Experiments at different temperatures allowed us to estimate an activation energy for the reaction leading to triazole disappearance from the solution. The estimated activation energy was 43 kJ/mol, which indicates that the uptake process is kinetically limited. Culturing plants in triazole-amended hydroponic solutions at different pH values did not strongly affect the biomass production, water uptake, and benzotriazole uptake characteristics. The sunflowers showed an unexpected capacity to buffer the solution pH.

  17. Effect of temperature, light and salinity on seed germination and radicle growth of the geographically widespread halophyte shrub Halocnemum strobilaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiao-Xia; Huang, Zhen-Ying; Baskin, Jerry M; Baskin, Carol C

    2008-01-01

    The small leafy succulent shrub Halocnemum strobilaceum occurs in saline habitats from northern Africa and Mediterranean Europe to western Asia, and it is a dominant species in salt deserts such as those of north-west China. The effects of temperature, light/darkness and NaCl salinity were tested on seed germination, and the effects of salinity were tested on seed germination recovery, radicle growth and radicle elongation recovery, using seeds from north-west China; the results were compared with those previously reported on this species from 'salt steppes' in the Mediterranean region of Spain. Seed germination was tested over a range of temperatures in light and in darkness and over a range of salinities at 25 degrees C in the light. Seeds that did not germinate in the NaCl solutions were tested for germination in deionized water. Seeds from which radicles had barely emerged in deionized water were transferred to NaCl solutions for 10 d and then back to deionized water for 10 d to test for radicle growth and recovery. Seeds germinated to higher percentages in light than in darkness and at high than at low temperatures. Germination percentages decreased with an increase in salinity from 0.1 to 0.75 M NaCl. Seeds that did not germinate in NaCl solutions did so after transfer to deionized water. Radicle elongation was increased by low salinity, and then it decreased with an increase in salinity, being completely inhibited by > or = 2.0 M NaCl. Elongation of radicles from salt solutions desert of north-west China.

  18. Abrin Toxicity and Bioavailability after Temperature and pH Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina C. Tam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abrin, one of most potent toxins known to man, is derived from the rosary pea (jequirity pea, Abrus precatorius and is a potential bioterror weapon. The temperature and pH stability of abrin was evaluated with an in vitro cell free translation (CFT assay, a Vero cell culture cytotoxicity assay, and an in vivo mouse bioassay. pH treatment of abrin had no detrimental effect on its stability and toxicity as seen either in vitro or in vivo. Abrin exposure to increasing temperatures did not completely abrogate protein translation. In both the cell culture cytotoxicity model and the mouse bioassay, abrin’s toxic effects were completely abrogated if the toxin was exposed to temperatures of 74 °C or higher. In the cell culture model, 63 °C-treated abrin had a 30% reduction in cytotoxicity which was validated in the in vivo mouse bioassay with all mice dying but with a slight time-to-death delay as compared to the non-treated abrin control. Since temperature inactivation did not affect abrin’s ability to inhibit protein synthesis (A-chain, we hypothesize that high temperature treatment affected abrin’s ability to bind to cellular receptors (affecting B-chain. Our results confirm the absolute need to validate in vitro cytotoxicity assays with in vivo mouse bioassays.

  19. Effects of salinity, temperature and phosphorus concentration on the chemical composition of Gelidium crinale (Turner Lamouroux (Gelidiaceae, Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Rebello Dillenburg

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different culture conditions (temperature, salinity and dissolved inorganic phosphorus were investigated for seven days, under controlled conditions. The maximum production of proteins occurred in cultures where the temperature was 25°C, with concentrations of 5.0 and 10.0 µM of dissolved inorganic phosphorus and salinity between 15 and 20 psu, with values varying from 2.62 to 2.83% of algae dry weight. For carbohydrates, a third-order interaction was not observed in the statistical analysis; only a second order interaction was observed between temperature and inorganic phosphorus concentrations Efeito dos parâmetros abióticos em cultivo de G. crinale (P < 0.005 and between temperature and salinity (P < 0.000. The greatest phosphorus increase in the thalli (0.80 % occurred in the lowest temperature (15 °C, associated with low salinity (10 psu and high inorganic phosphorus concentration (10.0 µM. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed positive correlations (P < 0.001 among protein content, temperature and inorganic phosphorus available in the growth medium. For carbohydrates, correlations were positive with all three abiotic parameters. For tissue phosphorus, a positive correlation occurred only with dissolved inorganic phosphorus; with temperature and salinity, the correlations were negative. Among the chemical components present in the algae, proteins and carbohydrates showed a positive correlation, while tissue phosphorus presented a negative correlation with both, although this correlation was not significant with regard to protein.

  20. Short communication: impact of pH and temperature on the acidifying activity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edima, H C; Cailliez-Grimal, C; Revol-Junelles, A-M; Rondags, E; Millière, J-B

    2008-10-01

    The acidifying activity of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum LMA28, a strain isolated from French soft cheese, was studied in trypticase soy broth with yeast extract (TSB-YE) medium and in milk. In TSB-YE supplemented with lactose, glucose, or galactose, lactose and glucose were metabolized with a maximum growth rate of 0.32 h(-1) and galactose was not metabolized. During hydrolysis of lactose, the galactose moiety was not excreted. The major product was l(+) lactic acid, with no significant difference in the lactic acid yield. Glucose was not completely metabolized because cell growth stopped when pH values reached an average of 5.0. In sterilized UHT milk, the addition of 1 g/L of YE enhanced its coagulation. Compared with commercial starter lactic acid bacteria such as Lactococcus lactis DSMZ 20481 or Streptococcus thermophilus INRA 302, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum LMA 28 was shown to be a slow acidifying strain. However, in spite of this weak acidifying ability, C. maltaromaticum LMA 28 can sustain low pH values in coculture with Lc. lactis DSMZ 20481 or S. thermophilus INRA 302. The individual and interactive effects of initial pH values (5.2 to 8.0) and incubation temperatures (23 to 37 degrees C) on acidifying activity were studied by response surface methodology. The 3 strains displayed different behaviors depending on pH and temperature. The psychrotrophic lactic acid strain C. maltaromaticum LMA 28 was able to grow at alkaline pH values and during storage conditions. It could be used as a potential ripening flora in soft cheese.

  1. Brain temperature and pH measured by 1H chemical shift imaging of a thulium agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Daniel; Trubel, Hubert K.; Rycyna, Robert E.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2009-01-01

    Temperature and pH are two of the most important physiological parameters and are believed to be tightly regulated because they are intricately related to energy metabolism in living organisms. Temperature and/or pH data in mammalian brain are scarce, however, mainly due to lack of precise and non-invasive methods. At 11.7T, we demonstrate that a thulium-based macrocyclic complex infused through the blood stream can be used to obtain temperature and pH maps of rat brain in vivo by 1H chemical shift imaging (CSI) of the sensor itself in conjunction with a multi-parametric model that depends on several proton resonances of the sensor. Accuracies of temperature and pH determination with the thulium sensor – which has a predominantly extracellular presence – depend on stable signals during the course of the CSI experiment as well as redundancy for temperature and pH sensitivities contained within the observed signals. The thulium-based method compared well with other methods for temperature (1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of N-acetyl aspartate and water; copper-constantan thermocouple wire) and pH (31P MRS of inorganic phosphate and phosphocreatine) assessment, as established by in vitro and in vivo studies. In vitro studies in phantoms with two compartments of differing pH values observed under different ambient temperature conditions generated precise temperature and pH distribution maps. In vivo studies in α-chloralose anesthetized and renal-ligated rats revealed temperature (33–34 °C) and pH (7.3–7.4) distributions in the cerebral cortex which are in agreement with observations by other methods. These results demonstrate that the thulium sensor can be used to measure temperature and pH distributions in rat brain in vivo simultaneously and accurately with 1H CSI. PMID:19130468

  2. The Effects of In-Hospital Intravenous Cold Saline in Postcardiac Arrest Patients Treated with Targeted Temperature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppogu, Nissi; Panza, Gregory A; Kilic, Sena; Gowdar, Shreyas; Kallur, Kamala R; Jayaraman, Ramya; Lundbye, Justin; Fernandez, Antonio B

    2017-09-05

    Recent data suggest that rapid infusion of intravenous (IV) cold saline for Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) after cardiac arrest is associated with higher rates of rearrest, pulmonary edema, and hypoxia, with no difference in neurologic outcomes or survival when administered by Emergency Medical Services. We sought to determine the effects of IV cold saline administration in the hospital setting in postcardiac arrest patients to achieve TTM and its effect on clinical parameters and neurologic outcomes. A cohort of 132 patients who completed TTM after cardiac arrest in a single institution was retrospectively studied. Patients who did not receive cold saline were matched by age, gender, Glasgow coma scale, downtime, and presenting rhythm to patients who received cold saline. Demographics, cardiac rearrest, diuretic use, time to target temperature, and Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) scores were recorded among other variables. Patients who received cold saline achieved target temperature sooner (280 vs. 345 minutes, p = 0.05), had lower lactate levels on day 1 (4.2 ± 3.5 mM vs. 6.0 ± 4.9 mM, p = 0.019) and day 2 (1.3 ± 2.2 mM vs. 2.2 ± 3.2 mM, p = 0.046), increased incidence of pulmonary edema (51.5% vs. 31.8%, p = 0.006), and increased diuretic utilization (63.6% vs. 42.4%, p = 0.014). There was no significant difference in cardiac rearrest, arterial oxygenation, and CPC scores (ps > 0.05). Infusion of IV cold saline is associated with shorter time to target temperature, increased incidence of pulmonary edema, and diuretic use, with no difference in cardiac rearrest, survival, and neurologic outcomes.

  3. Preliminary study : optimization of pH and salinity for biosurfactant production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in diesel fuel and crude oil medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhwani, A. Z. N.; Nurlaila, H. S.; Ferdinand, F. D. K.; Fachria, R.; Hasan, A. E. Z.; Yani, M.; Setyawati, I.; Suryani

    2017-03-01

    Biosurfactant is secondary metabolite surface active compound produced by microorganisms which is nontoxic and eco-friendly. Microorganism producing biosurfactant that is quite potential to use in many applications is from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Good quality of biosurfactant production from microbes is supported by the suitable nutrients and environmental factors. The aim of this research was to obtain preliminary o data upon the optimum pH and salinity for the production of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in diesel fuel and crude oil medium. P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 cultured in diesel fuel and crude oil as carbon source showed biosurfactant activity. P.aeruginosa-derived biosurfactant was capable to form stable emulsion for 24 hours (EI24) in hydrocarbons n-hexane solutions. The particular biosurfactant showed EI24 highest value at pH 7 (31.02%) and 1% NaCl (24.00%) when P. aeruginosa was grown in 10% diesel fuel medium in mineral salt solution. As for the media crude oil, the highest EI24 value was at pH 6 (52.16%) and 1% NaCl (33.30%).

  4. Design, syntheses, and properties of tunable, dual-stimuli (temperature and pH) responsive copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manokruang, Kiattikhun

    polymer aggregates for each pH, rather than random/polydisperse structures. TEM images of the collapsed morphology showed polymer aggregates that included numerous small hydrophobic cores, demonstrating that the phase transition of these copolymers involved the formation of micelles with many hydrophobic clusters. Finally, these copolymers were used to prepare hollow microcapsules that provided an exceptional protection and a prolonged stability of an encapsulated matter at acidic conditions (pH 2) and a sharp and fast pH-triggered release at physiological conditions (pH 7). A second series of copolymers was synthesized to compose of ethylene glycol oligomers (EOm) connected in an alternating fashion with hydrophobic alkyls (EEn), (EOm-alt-EE n). Also, terpolymers were synthesized to compose of EOm connected in an alternating fashion with EEn and lysine ethyl ester (LyE), (EOm-alt-(EEn;LyE). Both copolymers and terpolymers demonstrated temperature responsive LCST phase behavior in aqueous solution, whose critical temperature is dictated by the thermodynamics of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance. In addition, the terpolymers' LCST can be further tuned by tailoring the ratio of EEn to LyE yielding dual responsive, viz. temperature and pH responsive, polymers upon conversion of LyE to ionizable Lysine (Lys). These last polymers that included ionizable units showed a reversible temperature and pH sensitive phase transition, allowing for such polymers to exhibit a phase separation with both-or-either temperature increase and pH-decrease. The extended phase diagrams, collected from turbidity measurements and modulated differential scanning callorimetry (MDSC), showed that the phase diagram remained a genuine LCST binodal throughout the complete concentration range. In addition, 1H-NMR provided additional strong evidence that the phase transition proceeded without micelle formation. Finally, hydrogels were prepared from EOm-alt-EEn, which exhibited reversible swelling

  5. How salinity and temperature combine to affect physiological state and performance in red knots with contrasting non-breeding environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez, J.S.; Soriano-Redondo, A.; Dekinga, A.; Villegas, A.; Masero, J.A.; Piersma, T.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes—with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species—and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these

  6. How salinity and temperature combine to affect physiological state and performance in red knots with contrasting non-breeding environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutiérrez, Jorge S; Soriano-Redondo, Andrea; Dekinga, Anne; Villegas, Auxiliadora; Masero, José A; Piersma, Theunis

    2015-01-01

    Migratory shorebirds inhabit environments that may yield contrasting salinity-temperature regimes-with widely varying osmoregulatory demands, even within a given species-and the question is: by which physiological means and at which organisational level do they show adjustments with respect to these

  7. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-07

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification.

  8. Predictive modeling of Pseudomonas fluorescens growth under different temperature and pH values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Dias dos Anjos Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Abstract Meat is one of the most perishable foods owing to its nutrient availability, high water activity, and pH around 5.6. These properties are highly conducive for microbial growth. Fresh meat, when exposed to oxygen, is subjected to the action of aerobic psychrotrophic, proteolytic, and lipolytic spoilage microorganisms, such as Pseudomonas spp. The spoilage results in the appearance of slime and off-flavor in food. In order to predict the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in fresh meat at different pH values, stored under refrigeration, and temperature abuse, microbial mathematical modeling was applied. The primary Baranyi and Roberts and the modified Gompertz models were fitted to the experimental data to obtain the growth parameters. The Ratkowsky extended model was used to determine the effect of pH and temperature on the growth parameter µmax. The program DMFit 3.0 was used for model adjustment and fitting. The experimental data showed good fit for both the models tested, and the primary and secondary models based on the Baranyi and Roberts models showed better validation. Thus, these models can be applied to predict the growth of P. fluorescens under the conditions tested.

  9. The effect of temperature, salinity and nitrogen products on food consumption of pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Wasielesky Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of temperature, salinity, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate on food consumption of pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis. Juveniles (0.2 - 0.4 g were acclimated for 15 days in seawater with different temperatures, salinities and concentrations of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. After the acclimation period, 20 shrimps per treatment were individualized in order to have their ration intake analyzed through the amount of ration offered and left over within a 24-hour period. Mean food consumption presented significant alterations (P0.05. According to the results obtained, temperature and nitrite affected F. paulensis food consumption. On the other hand, variables as salinity, ammonia and nitrate did not affect shrimp appetite. However, the possibility of this to happen over long periods, prejudicing the species culture in captivity, reinforced the necessity of regular water quality management.Nos cultivos de organismos aquáticos, a manutenção da qualidade da água é fundamental para o sucesso da atividade, tendo em vista que variações nos parâmetros físico-químicos implicam em alterações metabólicas. O consumo de alimento por parte dos camarões pode ser afetado por estas variações, o que interfere nas taxas de crescimento e conseqüentemente na biomassa final produzida. O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar o efeito da temperatura, salinidade, amônia, nitrito e nitrato sobre o consumo alimentar do camarão-rosa Farfantepenaeus paulensis. Desta forma, juvenis (0,2-0,4 g foram aclimatados por 15 dias em água do mar com diferentes temperaturas, salinidades, concentrações de amônia, nitrito e nitrato. Após o período de aclimatação, 20 camarões de cada tratamento foram individualmente analisados para observar a relação entre a quantidade de alimento oferecido e a quantidade de alimento ingerido, em um período de 24 horas. O consumo médio apresentou alterações significativas (p0

  10. Near-Real Time Monthly Global Temperature and Salinity Gridded Data from New Ocean Exploration by Argo Floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, P. C.; Sun, L.; Fan, C.

    2010-12-01

    New ocean exploration by Argo floats provides sufficient spatial and temporal coverage for sampling the global ocean temperature and salinity. Currently, there are 3193 Argo floats all over the world oceans. Combined with traditionally sampled data, they are included into the Global Temperature and Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP). To fully understanding the variability in ocean thermohaline structure and then its effects on climate variability needs a sufficient resolution in space and, especially, in time, gridded ocean temperature and salinity (T, S) dataset. We analyzed observational profiles (from Argo and traditional technologies) from the GTSPP and produced a T-S data set to meet the above need. GTSPP is a joint programme of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange committee (IODE) and the Joint Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM). IODE and JCOMM are technical committees of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and the World Meteorological Organization. The quality control procedures used in GTSPP were developed by the Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS), now the Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM), of Canada. The GTSPP handles all temperature and salinity profile data. This includes observations collected using water samplers, continuous profiling instruments such as Argo, CTDs, thermistor chain data and observations acquired using thermosalinographs. These data will reach data processing centres of the Program through the real-time channels of the IGOSS program or in delayed mode through the IODE system. Real-time data in GTSPP are acquired from the Global Telecommunications System in the bathythermal (BATHY) and temperature, salinity & current (TESAC) codes forms supported by the WMO. Delayed mode data are contributed directly by member states of IOC. Any variable (temperature, salinity, or velocity) can be decomposed into generalized Fourier series using the recently developed optimal

  11. Dynamic swelling behavior of interpenetrating polymer networks in response to temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Brandon V; Blanchard, Aaron T; Maass, Katie F; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2015-06-20

    Temperature responsive hydrogels based on ionic polymers exhibit swelling transitions in aqueous solutions as a function of shifting pH and ionic strength, in addition to temperature. Applying these hydrogels to useful applications, particularly for biomedical purposes such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine, is critically dependent on understanding the hydrogel solution responses as a function of all three parameters together. In this work, interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogels of polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were formulated over a broad range of synthesis variables using a fractional factorial design, and were examined for equilibrium temperature responsive swelling in a variety of solution conditions. Due to the acidic nature of these IPN hydrogels, usable upper critical solution temperature (UCST) responses for this system occur in mildly acidic environments. Responses were characterized in terms of maximum equilibrium swelling and temperature-triggered swelling using turbidity and gravimetric measurements. Additionally, synthesis parameters critical to achieving optimal overall swelling, temperature-triggered swelling, and sigmoidal temperature transitions for this IPN system were analyzed based on the fractional factorial design used to formulate these hydrogels.

  12. Salinity and temperature effects on the growth and chlorophyll-a content of some planktonic aigae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Siqueira Sigaud

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of salinity (0-40 %o and temperature (11-36ºC, at 5ºC intervals variations on maximum growth rate (div d-1, maximum yield (logio cell number and chlorophyll-α content (pg cell-1 of four planktonic algae was examined under laboratory conditions. Phaeodactylum tricornutum grew over the entire range of experimental salinities, at 11-26 ºC. The highest maximum growth rates ( 1.6 div d-1 occurred between 9-30 %o and 16-26 ºC. Optimum salinity range for maximum yield (7.0 was found at 9-35 %c, under 16 ºC. Tetraselmis gracilis reproduced from 4 to 40 %o at 11-31 ºC, with the highest values of maximum growth rate ( 1.6 div d-1 and maximum yield (6.1 occurring at salinities between 14-40 %o at 11-21 ºC and 11-16 ºC, respectively. Minutocellus polymorphic and Chaetoceros sp grew between 9-40 %o and 11-31 ºC. Their highest maximum growth rates (2.1 and 2.6 div d-1, respectively were found at 31ºC, between 20-35 %o and 20-40 %o, respectively. The highest maximum yields for AT. polymorphic (7.2 were recorded between 16-21 ºC at 20-40 %o and for Chaetoceros sp (6.8, between 25-40 %o at 16-31ºC. Chlorophyll-a content per cell was not conspicuously associated to temperature and salinity for the four species. At low salinity extremes, when cell division was inhibited, an increase in the amount of chlorophyll-a per cell was detected.Estudou-se o efeito de variações de salinidade (0-40 %o e temperatura (11-36ºC, em intervalos de 5ºC sobre a taxa máxima de crescimento (div d-1, o rendimento máximo (logio nº cel ml"¹ e o conteúdo de clorofíla-a (pg cel-1 de quatro espécies de algas planctónicas, sob condições de laboratório. Phaeodactylum tricornutum cresceu em toda a amplitude de salinidade experimental e entre 11-26ºC. As mais altas taxas de crescimento (1.6 div d-1 foram obtidas entre 9-30 %o e 16-26ºC. O ótimo de salinidade para o rendimento máximo (7.0 foi observado entre 9- 35%o, à 16ºC. Tetraselmis gracilis se

  13. Upper mixed layer temperature and salinity variability in the tropical boundary of the California Current, 1997-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Valdes, Jose; Jeronimo, Gilberto

    2009-03-01

    Spatial and temporal interannual variability of mixed layer (ML) temperature and ML salinity off Baja California are examined using empirical orthogonal functions analysis. Conductivity-temperature-depth data collected from October 1997 through January 2007 over a grid based on Mexican Research of the California Current quarterly survey cruises are analyzed. Net heat flux (NHF) and sea surface height anomaly (SSH) from satellite products are also analyzed. The first leading mode of both ML temperature and ML salinity show a single-signed loading pattern, in which the variability increases southward. Those patterns have been reported before, but they are lacking a quantitative explanation. ML temperature variability is mainly associated with NHF variability, while ML salinity variability is mainly associated with large-scale SSH variability. The principal component (PC) of ML salinity is correlated with North Pacific Gyre Oscillation and Warm Water Volume climate indices, while the PC of ML temperature is only correlated with the latter index. Those results indicate that the principal mode of ML salinity variability is a diagnostic variable of basin-scale process. An abrupt freshening (˜-0.7) and cooling (˜-4°C) event from January 1998 to January 1999 and an abrupt freshening (˜-0.5) event from January 2002 to January 2003 are conspicuous features in the mixed layer. The 1998-1999 events are associated with the major El Niño-La Niña cycle in the 10-year period. The 2002-2003 freshening is related to an enhancement of subarctic water into the equatorward flow that started during the summer of 2002 off Oregon (49°N).

  14. Effect of pH and temperature on antioxidant responses of the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Menghong; Li, Lisha; Sui, Yanming; Li, Jiale; Wang, Youji; Lu, Weiqun; Dupont, Sam

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the combined effects of seawater pH decrease and temperature increase on the activity of antioxidant enzymes in the thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus, an ecological and economic bivalve species widely distributed along the East China Sea. Mussels were exposed to three pH levels (8.1, 7.7 and 7.3) and two temperatures (25 °C and 30 °C) for 14 days. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione (GSH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) were measured in gills and digestive glands after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days of exposure. All enzymatic activities were significantly impacted by pH, temperature. Enzymatic activities at the high temperature were significantly higher than those at the low temperature, and the mussels exposed to pH 7.3 showed significantly higher activities than those under higher pH condition for all enzymes except ACP. There was no interaction between temperature and pH in two third of the measured activities suggesting similar mode of action for both drivers. Interaction was only consistently significant for GPX. PCA revealed positive relationships between the measured biochemical indicators in both gills and digestive glands. Overall, our results suggest that decreased pH and increased temperature induce a similar anti-oxidative response in the thick shell mussel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The initial freezing point temperature of beef rises with the rise in pH: a short communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, M M; Kemp, R M; Cartwright, S; North, M

    2013-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the initial freezing point temperature of meat is affected by pH. Sixty four bovine M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum were classified into two ultimate pH groups: low (6.2) and their cooling and freezing point temperatures were determined. The initial freezing temperatures for beef ranged from -0.9 to -1.5°C (∆=0.6°C) with the higher and lower temperatures associated with high and low ultimate pH respectively. There was a significant correlation (r=+0.73, Pfreezing point temperature in the present study. The outcome of this study has implications for the meat industry where evidence of freezing (ice formation) in a shipment as a result of high pH meat could result in a container load of valuable chilled product being downgraded to a lower value frozen product. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Salinity and water temperature data from the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from 01 March 2001 to 31 December 2001 (NODC Accession 0001142)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salinity and water temperature data were collected using conductivity sensor and temperature probe in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Orgen from March 1, 2001 to...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other parameters from bottle casts in the northeast Pacific Ocean from SWAN from 1965-10-30 to 1966-09-18 (NODC Accession 7000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data, barometric pressure, air temperature and surface winds measurements were collected during nine bottle cast at six stations in...

  18. Yield and cold storage of Trichoderma conidia is influenced by substrate pH and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Johanna M; Chomic, Anastasia; Nieto-Jacobo, Maria; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Hay, Amanda J; Braithwaite, Mark; Stewart, Alison

    2017-05-01

    In this study we examined the influence of the ambient pH during morphogenesis on conidial yield of Trichoderma sp. "atroviride B" LU132 and T. hamatum LU593 and storage at low temperatures. The ambient pH of the growth media had a dramatic influence on the level of Trichoderma conidiation and this was dependent on the strain and growth media. On malt-extract agar, LU593 yield decreased with increasing pH (3-6), whereas yield increased with increasing pH for LU132. During solid substrate production the reverse was true for LU132 whereby yield decreased with increasing pH. The germination potential of the conidia decreased significantly over time in cold storage and the rate of decline was a factor of the strain, pH during morphogenesis, growth media, and storage temperature. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biogeography of pelagic bacterioplankton across an antagonistic temperature-salinity gradient in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-12-01

    The Red Sea is a unique marine ecosystem with contrasting gradients of temperature and salinity along its north-to-south axis. It is an extremely oligotrophic environment that is characterized by perpetual year-round water column stratification, high annual solar irradiation, and negligible riverine and precipitation inputs. In this study, we investigated whether the contemporary environmental conditions shape community assemblages by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in surface water samples collected from the northeastern half of this water body. A combined total of 1855 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered from the \\'small-cell\\' and \\'large-cell\\' fractions. Here, a few major OTUs affiliated with Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria accounted for â93% of all sequences, whereas a tail of \\'rare\\' OTUs represented most of the diversity. OTUs allied to Surface 1a/b SAR11 clades and Prochlorococcus related to the high-light-adapted (HL2) ecotype were the most widespread and predominant sequence types. Interestingly, the frequency of taxa that are typically found in the upper mesopelagic zone was significantly elevated in the northern transects compared with those in the central, presumably as a direct effect of deep convective mixing in the Gulf of Aqaba and water exchange with the northern Red Sea. Although temperature was the best predictor of species richness across all major lineages, both spatial and environmental distances correlated strongly with phylogenetic distances. Our results suggest that the bacterial diversity of the Red Sea is as high as in other tropical seas and provide evidence for fundamental differences in the biogeography of pelagic communities between the northern and central regions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND pH OF MODIFICATION PROCESS ON THE PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED CASSAVA STARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Wicaksono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of cassava starch for excipient in the manufacturing of the tablet has some problems, especially on physical-mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the differentness of temperature and pH in the process of modification on the physical-mechanical properties of modified cassava starch. Modifications were performed by suspending cassava starch into a solution of 3 % (w/v PVP K30. The effect of the difference of temperature was observed at temperatures of 25; 45 and 65 0C, while the effect of the difference of pH was observed at pH of 4.0; 7.0 and 12.0. The results showed that the temperature and pH did not affect the physical-mechanical properties of the modified cassava starch. Modification of cassava starch at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 45 0C was produced modified cassava starch with the most excellent solubility, while the best swelling power were formed by the modification process at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 25 0C. Overall, the most excellent compression properties of modified cassava starch resulted from the modification process at pH 12.

  1. Modeling Diffusion as a Result of Observing Salinity, Water Temperature and Mixing of the Norwalk River into Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, A. L.; Gillotte, C. N.; Wooldridge, T. R.

    2016-02-01

    This project investigates the space and time variability of salinity and temperature in the lower Norwalk River using a one-dimensional numerical model. The project uses surface measurements taken at two locations, one at the Norwalk Maritime Museum (NMM) and the other at the mouth of the river as it drains into the Norwalk Islands region adjacent to Long Island Sound (LIS). The model covers a relatively small distance of 1-2km. The size of the upriver neck and the first buoy is approximately five times smaller than the mouth between the second buoy site and Peach Island. The instrumentation will be responsible for generally characterizing the thermal physics occurring at the river-ocean environment. A one-dimensional advection-diffusion model will be used to simulate results. The data points will measure the salinity, water temperature, and pressure during a series of deployments in the river during a three-season period between 2013 and 2014. Further processes will ultimately show the overall advection occurring in the river. The upriver site is maintained by the Norwalk River Museum. A YSI XXX attached to a tether buoy is used to measure salinity and temperature at the surface.Preliminary results suggest typical temperature range at the upriver site is greater than at the mouth of the Norwalk River, and the daily peak temperature lag depends upon several factors, such as tidal state. The phenomenon of a salt wedge will also be considered.

  2. Evaluation of Geostatistical Techniques for Mapping Spatial Distribution of Soil PH, Salinity and Plant Cover Affected by Environmental Factors in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad ZARE-MEHRJARDI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presented in this paper attempts to evaluate some interpolation techniques for mapping spatial distribution of soil pH, salinity and plant cover in Hormozgan province, Iran. The relationships among environmental factors and distribution of vegetation types were also investigated. Plot sampling was applied in the study area. Landform parameters of each plot were recorded and canopy cover percentages of each species were measured while stoniness and browsing damage were estimated. Results indicated that there was a significant difference in vegetation cover for high and low slope steepness. Also, vegetation cover was greater than other cases in the mountains with calcareous lithology. In general, there were no significant relationships among vegetation cover and soil properties such as pH, EC, and texture. Other soil properties, such as soil depth and gravel percentage were significantly affected by vegetation cover. Moreover, the geostatistical results showed that kriging and cokriging methods were better than inverse distance weighting (IDW method for prediction of the spatial distribution of soil properties. Also, the results indicated that all the concerned soil and plant parameters were better determined by means of a cokriging method. Land elevation, which was highly correlated with studied parameters, was used as an auxiliary parameter.

  3. Modelling the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of enzymes: the case of phytases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Greiner, R.; Biekman, E.S.A.; Konietzny, U.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the behavior of enzyme activity as a function of pH and temperature is modeled on the basis of fundamental considerations. A formulation is developed that includes the activation of enzymes with increasing temperatures and the deactivation of enzymes at higher temperature, together

  4. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Tiago; Guégan, Régis; Thiebault, Thomas; Milbeau, Claude Le; Muller, Fabrice; Teixeira, Vinicius; Giovanela, Marcelo; Boussafir, Mohammed

    2017-02-05

    Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental data obtained by a set of complementary techniques (X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and the use of Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevish equation models, reveal that organoclays show a good affinity to diclofenac which is enhanced as the temperature is under 35°C and for pH above 4.5 (i.e. >pKa of diclofenac) while the chemical nature of surfactant appears to play a minor role. The thermodynamic parameters derived from the fitting procedure point out the strong electrostatic interaction with organic cations adsorbed within the interlayer space in the organoclays for the adsorption of diclofenac. This study stress out the application of organoclays for the adsorption of a recalcitrant PPs in numerous aquatic compartments that can be used as a complement with activated carbon for waste water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of temperature and illumination on pyrite oxidation between pH 2 and 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoonen Martin

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat and illumination with visible light on the oxidation of pyrite with dissolved molecular oxygen in solutions between pH 2 and 6 has been investigated using a combination of surface science experiments and batch oxidation experiments. The rate of the oxidation of pyrite is strongly dependent on temperature. It is, however, not possible to cast the temperature dependence in a simple Arrhenius equation because the magnitude of the activation energy depends on the progress variable chosen. Activation energies based on proton release rate, sulfate release rate, and total iron release rate vary by as much as 40 kJ mol-1, suggesting that the oxidation mechanism of the sulfur and iron component of pyrite are largely independent of each other. This difference in mechanism can also explain why the reaction rates on the basis of these three different progress variables do not show the same pH dependence. Exposed to visible light, the rate of pyrite oxidation is under most conditions accelerated by less than a factor of two. Some of this acceleration may be accounted for by a light-induced heating of the pyrite surface. Surface science experiments employing photoelectron spectroscopy show no evidence for significant changes in the chemical composition of the surface as a function of exposure to visible light. The batch sorption experiments show, however, that the reaction stoichiometry changes somewhat, which indicates that there might be a change in reaction mechanism as a result of exposure to visible light.

  6. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  7. Effects of temperature, salinity and fish in structuring the macroinvertebrate community in shallow lakes: implications for effects of climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brucet

    Full Text Available Climate warming may lead to changes in the trophic structure and diversity of shallow lakes as a combined effect of increased temperature and salinity and likely increased strength of trophic interactions. We investigated the potential effects of temperature, salinity and fish on the plant-associated macroinvertebrate community by introducing artificial plants in eight comparable shallow brackish lakes located in two climatic regions of contrasting temperature: cold-temperate and Mediterranean. In both regions, lakes covered a salinity gradient from freshwater to oligohaline waters. We undertook day and night-time sampling of macroinvertebrates associated with the artificial plants and fish and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators within artificial plants and in pelagic areas. Our results showed marked differences in the trophic structure between cold and warm shallow lakes. Plant-associated macroinvertebrates and free-swimming macroinvertebrate predators were more abundant and the communities richer in species in the cold compared to the warm climate, most probably as a result of differences in fish predation pressure. Submerged plants in warm brackish lakes did not seem to counteract the effect of fish predation on macroinvertebrates to the same extent as in temperate freshwater lakes, since small fish were abundant and tended to aggregate within the macrophytes. The richness and abundance of most plant-associated macroinvertebrate taxa decreased with salinity. Despite the lower densities of plant-associated macroinvertebrates in the Mediterranean lakes, periphyton biomass was lower than in cold temperate systems, a fact that was mainly attributed to grazing and disturbance by fish. Our results suggest that, if the current process of warming entails higher chances of shallow lakes becoming warmer and more saline, climatic change may result in a decrease in macroinvertebrate species richness and abundance in shallow lakes.

  8. Asparagine deamidation dependence on buffer type, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Amanda L; Wong, Rita L; Zhang, Yonghua Taylor; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Wang, Y John

    2013-06-01

    The deamidation of asparagine into aspartate and isoaspartate moieties is a major pathway for the chemical degradation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). It can affect the shelf life of a therapeutic antibody that is not formulated or stored appropriately. A new approach to detect deamidation using ion exchange chromatography was developed that separates papain-digested mAbs into Fc and Fab fragments. From this, deamidation rates of each fragment can be calculated. To generate kinetic parameters useful in setting shelf life, buffers prepared at room temperature and then placed at the appropriate stability temperatures. Solution pH was not adjusted to the same at different temperatures. Deamidation rate at 40°C was faster in acidic buffers than in basic buffers. However, this trend is reversed at 5°C, attributed to the change in hydroxide ion concentration influenced by buffer and temperature. The apparent activation energy was higher for rates generated in an acidic buffer than in a basic buffer. The rate-pH profile for mAb1 can be deconvoluted to Fc and Fab. The Fc deamidation showed a V-shaped profile: deamidation of PENNY peptide is responsible for the rate at high-pH, whereas deamidation of a new site, Asn323, may be responsible for the rate at low-pH. The profile for Fab is a straight line without curvature. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The SeaDataNet data products: regional temperature and salinity historical data collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncelli, Simona; Coatanoan, Christine; Bäck, Orjan; Sagen, Helge; Scoy, Serge; Myroshnychenko, Volodymyr; Schaap, Dick; Schlitzer, Reiner; Iona, Sissy; Fichaut, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and Salinity (TS) historical data collections covering the time period 1900-2013 were created for each European marginal sea (Arctic Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, North Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea) within the framework of SeaDataNet2 (SDN) EU-Project and they are now available as ODV collections through the SeaDataNet web catalog at http://sextant.ifremer.fr/en/web/seadatanet/. Two versions have been published and they represent a snapshot of the SDN database content at two different times: V1.1 (January 2014) and V2 (March 2015). A Quality Control Strategy (QCS) has been developped and continuously refined in order to improve the quality of the SDN database content and to create the best product deriving from SDN data. The QCS was originally implemented in collaboration with MyOcean2 and MyOcean Follow On projects in order to develop a true synergy at regional level to serve operational oceanography and climate change communities. The QCS involved the Regional Coordinators, responsible of the scientific assessment, the National Oceanographic Data Centers (NODC) and the data providers that, on the base of the data quality assessment outcome, checked and eventually corrected anomalies in the original data. The QCS consists of four main phases: 1) data harvesting from the central CDI; 2) file and parameter aggregation; 3) quality check analysis at regional level; 4) analysis and correction of data anomalies. The approach is iterative to facilitate the upgrade of SDN database content and it allows also the versioning of data products with the release of new regional data collections at the end of each QCS loop. SDN data collections and the QCS will be presented and the results summarized.

  10. Average Winter and Summer Temperature and Salinity Profiles for the Deep Ocean Provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-08-01

    Mediterranean provinces (Y and Z) the less saline water blankets the more saline water. Atlantic inflow, precipitation and river run -off will cause the surface...isothermal from 4250m at 2.1 0 C 34.86 to 34.90 Nearly isohaline from 2000m at 34.90 R 2.3-4.8 1200m to 7000m Nearly isothermal from 5000m at 2.3 0 C

  11. Temperature effect on high salinity depuration of Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus from the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, A M; Rikard, F S; Walton, W C; Arias, C R

    2015-01-02

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) are opportunistic human pathogens naturally associated with the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. The abundances of both pathogens in oysters are positively correlated with temperature, thus ingestion of raw oysters during the warm summer months is a risk factor for contracting illness from these bacteria. Current post-harvest processing (PHP) methods for elimination of these pathogens are expensive and kill the oyster, changing their organoleptic properties and making them less appealing to some consumers. High salinity has proven effective in reducing Vv numbers in the wild and our research aims at developing an indoor recirculating system to reduce pathogenic Vibrios while maintaining the taste and texture of live oysters. The goal of this study was to determine the influence of temperature on the efficacy of high salinity depuration. Vv was enumerated as most probable number (MPN) per gram of oyster tissue using the FDA-approved modified cellobiose polymyxin colistin (mCPC) protocol and with an alternative Vibrio specific media CHROMagar™ Vibrio (CaV). CaV was also used to quantify Vp. Oysters were held at 35 psu for 10 days at three temperatures: low (20°C), mid (22.5°C) and high (25°C). There was no difference in MPN/g of Vv between media; however more Vv isolates were obtained from mCPC than CaV. There was no significant effect of temperature on reduction of Vv or Vp throughout depuration but there was a tendency for low temperatures to be less effective than the higher ones. High salinity resulted in a significant decrease in Vv by day 3 and again by day 10, and a decrease in Vp by day 3. Oyster condition indices were maintained throughout depuration and mortality was low (4% across three trials). Overall these results support the use of mCPC for Vv enumeration and demonstrate the promise of high salinity depuration for PHP of the Eastern oyster. The trend for lower temperatures to be less

  12. Milk pH as a function of CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure in a heat exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-12-01

    Raw skim milk, with or without added CO2, was heated, held, and cooled in a small pilot-scale tubular heat exchanger (372 ml/min). The experiment was replicated twice, and, for each replication, milk was first carbonated at 0 to 1 degree C to contain 0 (control), 600, 1200, 1800, and 2400 ppm added CO2 using a continuous carbonation unit. After storage at 0 to 1 degree C, portions of milk at each CO2 concentration were heated to 40, 56, 72, and 80 degrees C, held at the desired temperature for 30 s (except 80 degrees C, holding 20 s) and cooled to 0 to 1 degree C. At each temperature, five pressures were applied: 69, 138, 207, 276, and 345 kPa. Pressure was controlled with a needle valve at the heat exchanger exit. Both the pressure gauge and pH probe were inline at the end of the holding section. Milk pH during heating depended on CO2 concentration, temperature, and pressure. During heating of milk without added CO2, pH decreased linearly as a function of increasing temperature but was independent of pressure. In general, the pH of milk with added CO2 decreased with increasing CO2 concentration and pressure. For milk with added CO2, at a fixed CO2 concentration, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater at a higher temperature. At a fixed temperature, the effect of pressure on pH decrease was greater for milk with a higher CO2 concentration. Thermal death of bacteria during pasteurization of milk without added CO2 is probably due not only to temperature but also to the decrease in pH that occurs during the process. Increasing milk CO2 concentration and pressure decreases the milk pH even further during heating and may further enhance the microbial killing power of pasteurization.

  13. Methylation and cyclisation of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers as temperature and pH proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaga, C. I.; Reichart, G.-J.; Schouten, S.; Lotter, A.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2009-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing 0 to 2 cyclopentyl moieties were initially detected in peat deposits [1]. Through the analysis of a global set of soils samples Weijers et al. [2] showed that these GDGTs, probably of bacterial origin, are produced in situ in these soils. Rivers and direct run-off transport these compounds, together with other soil organic matter, to marine [3] and lake sediments [4, 5]. Recently, Weijers et al. [6] defined two indices that are based on branched GDGTs that are distinctively influenced by two environmental factors. The cyclisation ratio of the branched tetraethers (CBT) is related to soil pH and the methylation index of branched tetraethers (MBT) is related to temperature and soil pH. Lake sediments are often used for reconstructing past climatic changes. The presence of branched GDGTs in lake sediments potentially allows reconstruction of temperature and pH of the lake drainage area. We performed organic geochemical analyses on a series of surface sediments from 82 lakes characterised by variable amounts of soil organic matter and from different geographical locations to establish the application of the MBT/CBT as a continental palaeothermometer. Results show that in all of the 82 lakes substantial amounts of branched GDGTs are present (0.1-28% of total GDGTs). Besides the branched GDGTs crenarchaeol was also found in appreciable amounts (on average 23% of the total GDGTs). In the lakes from the northern hemisphere in fact the dominant GDGT is crenarchaeol (38% of total GDGTs) followed by the pentamethylated branched GDGT. In the southern hemisphere on the other hand we observe the hexamethylated branched GDGT as the dominant GDGT and crenarchaeol is here ten times less abundant then in the north (on average 3% of total GDGTs only). The CBT, as defined by Weijers et al. [6], for the entire data set ranges from values close to 0 (0.14 for Lake Ohrid) to 1.7 (Lake Nyos). The MBT ratio, also as defined

  14. Hydrodynamics, temperature/salinity variability and residence time in the Chilika lagoon during dry and wet period: Measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanty, M. M.; Mohanty, P. K.; Pattnaik, A. K.; Panda, U. S.; Pradhan, S.; Samal, R. N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigated the hydrodynamics, spatio-temporal variability of temperature/salinity and the residence time of tracer concentrations in a largest brackish water coastal lagoon in Asia, namely the Chilika lagoon, India. An integrated approach combined the measurement and 2D hydrodynamic-advection/dispersion model is used to simulate circulation and temperature/salinity, and estimated the water residence time in lagoon under different forcing mechanisms, such as tide, wind and freshwater discharge during the dry and wet periods. Water circulation inside the lagoon is simulated when wind is included with the tide only forcing during dry period, and freshwater influx is included with the tide and wind forcing during wet period. Under the realistic forcing conditions, the computed temporal variability of water temperature and salinity are well correlated with the measurements in both the periods. The spatial variations of water temperature within the lagoon is influenced by the meteorological conditions, tide and freshwater influx as well as the shallowness of the lagoon, whereas the salinity is spatially controlled by the freshwater influx from the riverine system and seawater intrusion through the tidal inlets. The numerical model results show that in the Chilika lagoon tidal and river influx affect significantly the residence time spatially, and is site specific. The residence time varies from values of 4-5 days in the outer channel (OC) and 132 days at the northern sector (NS) in the main body of lagoon. The current study represents a first attempt to use a combined model approach, which is therefore, a useful tool to support the ecological implication of the lagoon ecosystem.

  15. Rheological Study on ATBS-AM Copolymer-Surfactant System in High-Temperature and High-Salinity Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shahzad Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted to evaluate the rheological properties of surfactant-polymer (SP system. This SP system consists of a copolymer of acrylamide (AM and acrylamido tertiary butyl sulfonate (ATBS and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS surfactant. Effects of surfactant concentration, temperature, polymer concentration, and salinity on rheological properties of SP system were investigated by means of oscillation and shear measurements. Comparison with classical partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM was made. For the same temperature range, the viscosity drop for HPAM was about four times higher than the viscosity drop for ATBS-AM copolymer. In deionized water, viscosity of both polymers and SP systems was very high as compared to viscosity in saline water. Viscosity reduction of ATBS-AM copolymer was higher for salts having divalent cations. The SP system showed precipitation in presence of divalent cations. It worked well with monovalent cations even at relatively high salinities. The addition of 0.1% surfactant to the polymer resulted in a 60% decrease in the viscosity. Some interfacial rheological experiments were also carried out to investigate the behaviors on the interface between SP solutions and oil. Addition of 0.1% surfactant showed a 65% decrease in G′ at SP solution-oil interface. SP system consisting of ATBS-AM and SDS showed better performance at high temperature compared to HPAM-SDS system. Due to precipitation, the SP system should be restricted to environment having low divalent cations.

  16. Cereulide production by Bacillus weihenstephanensis strains during growth at different pH values and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, Alizée; Rønning, Helene Thorsen; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Clavel, Thierry; Broussolle, Véronique; Mahillon, Jacques; Granum, Per Einar; Nguyen-The, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    Besides Bacillus cereus, some strains of the psychrotolerant, potentially foodborne pathogen Bacillus weihenstephanensis can produce the emetic toxine (cereulide). This toxin is a heat- and acid-stable cyclic dodecadepsipeptide that causes food intoxication with vomiting. However, some severe clinical cases with lethal outcomes have been described. If cereulide can be produced during refrigerated storage, it will not be inactivated by reheating food, representing an important risk of food intoxication for consumers. In this paper, we determined the capacity of the B. weihenstephanensis strains BtB2-4 and MC67 to grow and produce cereulide on agar media at temperatures from 8 °C to 25 °C and at a pH from 5.4 to 7.0. At 8 °C, strain BtB2-4 produced quantifiable amounts of cereulide, whereas the limit of detection was reached for strain MC67. For BtB2-4, cereulide production increased 5-fold between 8 °C and 10-15 °C and by more than 100-fold between 15 °C and 25 °C. At temperatures of 10 °C and higher, cereulide concentrations were within the range of those reported by previous works in foods implicated in emetic poisoning. At 25 °C, decreasing the pH to 5.4 reduced cereulide production by strain BtB2-4 by at least 20-fold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Impact of surface temperature and salinity on the recruiting of the pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus duorarum (Decapoda: Penaeidae), in Sonda de Campeche, Gulf of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Mauricio; Arreguín-Sánchez, Francisco; Lluch-Belda, Daniel

    2006-12-01

    We studied the long term effects of two environmental variables, salinity and surface temperature, on the pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duorarum) population in the southern Gulf of Mexico, considering the relationship between recruiting and the concurrent shrimp stock depletion of the last two decades. Our data were collected from 1969 to 1991. Recruitment has been clearly declining, particularly in the 1970s, with an accentuated drop since the 1980s. Sea surface temperatures have steadily risen, particularly since 1972. The temperature difference between the mid 1970s and the late 1980s is 0.5 degree C. Salinity decreased throughout the period. From a long term perspective, recruitment is negatively correlated with temperature and positively correlated with salinity. The effects of temperature and salinity are statistically significant, explaining 52 % and 55 % of the variation in recruitment, respectively.

  18. Post-deposition annealing temperature dependence TiO{sub 2}-based EGFET pH sensor sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zulkefle, M. A., E-mail: alhadizulkefle@gmail.com; Rahman, R. A., E-mail: rohanieza.abdrahman@gmail.com; Yusoff, K. A., E-mail: khairul.aimi.yusof@gmail.com [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. F. H., E-mail: wanfaz@salam.uitm.edu.my [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Rusop, M., E-mail: rusop@salam.uitm.edu.my [NANO-Science Technology (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA - UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Herman, S. H., E-mail: hana1617@salam.uitm.edu.my [Core of Frontier Materials & Industry Applications, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    EGFET pH sensor is one type of pH sensor that is used to measure and determine pH of a solution. The sensing membrane of EGFET pH sensor plays vital role in the overall performance of the sensor. This paper studies the effects of different annealing temperature of the TiO{sub 2} sensing membranes towards sensitivity of EGFET pH sensor. Sol-gel spin coating was chosen as TiO{sub 2} deposition techniques since it is cost-effective and produces thin film with uniform thickness. Deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films were then annealed at different annealing temperatures and then were connected to the gate of MOSFET as a part of the EGFET pH sensor structure. The thin films now act as sensing membranes of the EGFET pH sensor and sensitivity of each sensing membrane towards pH was measured. From the results it was determined that sensing membrane annealed at 300 °C gave the highest sensitivity followed by sample annealed at 400 °C and 500 °C.

  19. The effects of temperature, pH, and ammonia concentration on the inactivation of Ascaris eggs in sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecson, Brian M; Barrios, José Antonio; Jiménez, Blanca Elena; Nelson, Kara L

    2007-07-01

    The reported inactivation of Ascaris eggs during alkaline sludge stabilization is highly variable. The objective of our research was to better understand the sources of this variability by quantifying the effects of temperature, pH, and ammonia concentration on the inactivation of indigenous Ascaris eggs in wastewater sludge. Primary sludge was supplemented with ammonia (0, 1000, and 5000 mg/l NH(3)-N) and Ca(OH)(2) and incubated in sealed bottles across the range of temperatures (20, 30, 40, and 50 degrees C) and pH (7 and 12) that may be encountered during treatment. Changes in egg viability over time were fit to a two-parameter kinetic model (shoulder and first-order region); to compare treatment conditions, the time for 99% inactivation (t(99)) was also calculated. Each 10 degrees C increase in temperature caused a significant decrease in t(99) at every pH and ammonia concentration tested. At 50 degrees C, the effect of temperature was dominant, such that no effect of pH or ammonia was observed. At 30 and 40 degrees C, raising the pH from 7 to 12 decreased t(99), but at 20 degrees C no pH effect was seen over 80 d (very little inactivation occurred). At 20, 30, and 40 degrees C, the addition of ammonia dramatically decreased t(99). The effect of pH could not be completely separated from that of ammonia, as the unamended sludge samples contained 100-200mg/l indigenous ammonia. Because temperature, pH, and ammonia all contributed to Ascaris egg inactivation, it is essential that these parameters are measured and accounted for when assessing the effectiveness of alkaline stabilization. Furthermore, inactivation by ammonia could be exploited to improve the effectiveness of alkaline sludge stabilization.

  20. Influence of pH and temperature on ziconotide stability in intrathecal analgesic admixtures in implantable pumps and syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Christophe; Poirier, Anne-Lise; Dupoiron, Denis

    2015-06-20

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of pH and temperature on the stability of ziconotide in analgesic admixtures containing morphine and ropivacaine. All admixtures were combined using a wide range of concentrations, in implantable pumps and syringes, using temperatures from 4°C to 37°C. Quantification was made thanks to a specific chromatographic technique. pH has also been measured throughout the study. Admixtures confirm excellent stability for morphine and ropivacaine. Concerning ziconotide, an acid hydrolysis has been observed, reducing the time of use of our admixtures in a significant way, but producing non-toxic degradation products. The degradation was linear in all conditions. Inside the implantable pumps at body temperature turned out to be the best conditions for lower protein breakdown. Finally the degradation process showed a high correlation with the pH and the morphine concentration with a median loss of concentration delay due to degradation of 3.5 days [3; 5] when pH<4.5 and 13 days [13; 24] when pH ≥ 4.5. Our admixtures showed different stability depending on the drug concentrations, pH and temperature. The great majority of mixtures in real life in our institution have stability highly compatible with our practice and with the delay between two pump refilling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Survival, growth and reproduction of non-indigenous Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus 1758). I. Physiological capabilities in various temperatures and salinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Pamela J.; Peterson, Mark S.; Lowe, Michael R.; Brown-Peterson, Nancy J.; Slack, William T.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological tolerances of non-native fishes is an integral component of assessing potential invasive risk. Salinity and temperature are environmental variables that limit the spread of many non-native fishes. We hypothesised that combinations of temperature and salinity will interact to affect survival, growth, and reproduction of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, introduced into Mississippi, USA. Tilapia withstood acute transfer from fresh water up to a salinity of 20 and survived gradual transfer up to 60 at typical summertime (30°C) temperatures. However, cold temperature (14°C) reduced survival of fish in saline waters ≥10 and increased the incidence of disease in freshwater controls. Although fish were able to equilibrate to saline waters in warm temperatures, reproductive parameters were reduced at salinities ≥30. These integrated responses suggest that Nile tilapia can invade coastal areas beyond their point of introduction. However, successful invasion is subject to two caveats: (1) wintertime survival depends on finding thermal refugia, and (2) reproduction is hampered in regions where salinities are ≥30. These data are vital to predicting the invasion of non-native fishes into coastal watersheds. This is particularly important given the predicted changes in coastal landscapes due to global climate change and sea-level rise.

  2. Radically new cellulose nanocomposite hydrogels: Temperature and pH responsive characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeish, A; Farag, S; Sharaf, S; Shaheen, Th I

    2015-11-01

    Innovation produced for synthesis of radically new stimuli-responsive hydrogels were described. The innovation is based on inclusion of cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW)-polyacrylamide (PAAm) copolymer in poly N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAm) semi interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogel. After being prepared as per free radical polymerization of AAm onto CNW, the as prepared copolymer was incorporated in a polymerization system, which comprises NIPAm monomer, bismethylene acrylamide (BMA) crosslinker, K2S2O8 initiator and TEMED accelerator, to yield CNW-PAAm-PNIPAm nanocomposite hydrogels. The latter address pH-responsive hydrogel as well as temperature-responsive. Hydrogels exhibit the highest equilibrium swelling ratio (ESR) in acidic medium (pH 4). Meanwhile they perform good swelling behavior and hydrophilicity at a temperature of 32°C. These hydrogels carry the characteristic features of CNW-PAAm copolymer as conducted from FTIR and TGA. The hydrogels are homogenous and well-proportioned network structure with highly connected irregular pores with a large size ranging from 30 to 100nm as concluded from SEM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of temperature and salinity on emergence of Gynaecotyla adunca cercariae from the intertidal gastropod Ilyanassa obsoleta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivnikar, J; Ellis, D; Shim, K C; Forbes, M R

    2014-04-01

    Fluctuating abiotic conditions within intertidal zones have been shown to affect the emergence of free-swimming trematode infectious stages (cercariae) from their gastropod first intermediate hosts, likely reflecting adaptations to maximize transmission in this marine environment. We investigated the influences of temperature (17 and 22 C) and salinity (25, 30, and 35 ppt) on the emergence of marine cercariae (Gynaecotyla adunca) from their mud snail first intermediate host ( Ilyanassa obsoleta ). Cercariae emerged in greater numbers at 22 C and the 2 lowest salinities, with a sharp decrease at the 35 ppt level, but there was no interactive effect. We discuss these patterns of G. adunca emergence as possible adaptations to facilitate transmission to its amphipod second intermediate host ( Corophium volutator ) in conditions common to the Upper Bay of Fundy.

  4. New insights into saline water evaporation from porous media: Complex interaction between evaporation rates, precipitation, and surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri-Kuehni, Salomé M. S.; Vetter, Thomas; Webb, Colin; Shokri, Nima

    2017-06-01

    Understanding salt transport and deposition patterns during evaporation from porous media is important in many engineering and hydrological processes such as soil salinization, ecosystem functioning, and land-atmosphere interaction. As evaporation proceeds, salt concentration increases until it exceeds solubility limits, locally, and crystals precipitate. The interplay between transport processes, crystallization, and evaporation influences where crystallization occurs. During early stages, the precipitated salt creates an evolving porous structure affecting the evaporation kinetics. We conducted a comprehensive series of experiments to investigate how the salt concentration and precipitation influence evaporation dynamics. Our results illustrate the contribution of the evolving salt crust to the evaporative mass losses. High-resolution thermal imaging enabled us to investigate the complex temperature dynamics at the surface of precipitated salt, providing further confirmation of salt crust contribution to the evaporation. We identify different phases of saline water evaporation from porous media with the corresponding dominant mechanisms in each phase and extend the physical understanding of such processes.

  5. Effect of pH and temperature on browning intensity of coconut sugar and its antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karseno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Coconut sugar is produced by heating coconut neera. The brown color of sugar is derived from non-enzymatic browning Maillard reaction. It is strongly influenced by pH and temperature. In this study, the effect of pH and temperature on browning intensity and antioxidant activity of coconut sugar were examined. The pH of coconut neera was adjusted at 6 and 8 and the temperature of its heating was 100ºC, 105 ºC, 110ºC, and 115ºC, respectively. The browning intensity of sugar was determined by spectrophotometrically at 420 nm. Total phenolic content of sugar was estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu method and antioxidant activity was expressed as DPPH scavenging activity. The results showed that browning intensity and antioxidant activity of sugars was increased with increasing pH of coconut neera and temperature. It was found that the effect of pH at 8 and temperature at 115ºC show highest total phenolics (0.48% and browning intensity (0.35 of sugar. The treatment also exhibited good antioxidant activity (DPPH scavenging activity as high as 40%. This result also indicates that there is a significant correlation between browning intensity and antioxidant activity of coconut sugar.

  6. Effective Control of Bioelectricity Generation from a Microbial Fuel Cell by Logical Combinations of pH and Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahuan Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a microbial fuel cell (MFC with switchable power release is designed, which can be logically controlled by combinations of the most physiologically important parameters such as “temperature” and “pH.” Changes in voltage output in response to temperature and pH changes were significant in which voltage output decreased sharply when temperature was lowered from 30°C to 10°C or pH was decreased from 7.0 to 5.0. The switchability of the MFC comes from the microbial anode whose activity is affected by the combined medium temperature and pH. Changes in temperature and pH cause reversible activation-inactivation of the bioanode, thus affecting the activity of the entire MFC. With temperature and pH as input signals, an AND logic operation is constructed for the MFC whose power density is controlled. The developed system has the potential to meet the requirement of power supplies producing electrical power on-demand for self-powered biosensors or biomedical devices.

  7. Different effects of temperature and salinity on permeability reduction by fines migration in Berea sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus; Riis, Jacob Fabricius

    2015-01-01

    Hot water injection into geothermal aquifers is considered in order to store energy seasonally. Berea sandstone is often used as a reference formation to study mechanisms that affect permeability in reservoir sandstones. Both heating of the pore fluid and reduction of the pore fluid salinity can...

  8. Quality of temperature and salinity data from Argo profiling floats in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, V.; Pankajakshan, T.; Rajkumar, M.; Prasannakumar, S.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Ravichandran, M.; Rao, R.R.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.

    on Argo-SPB could not identify any significant systematic bias/error, except for a single profile (cycle No 48) of float-4900675 In the case of Argo-N, significant error is found in most of the salinity profiles from the float-2900268....

  9. Salinity-dependent contact angle alteration in oil/brine/silicate systems : The effect of temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagh, Martin E.J.; Schilderink, Nathalie; Duits, Michel H.G.; Siretanu, Igor; Mugele, Frieder; Collins, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    To understand the success of low salinity water flooding in improving oil recovery, it is important to identify the molecular scale mechanisms that control the wettability and thus the adhesion between oil and rock. Previous experiments have attributed the wettability alteration in core flood

  10. Effects of temperature and salinity on the life cycle of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae) infecting farmed barramundi (Lates calcarifer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazenor, Alexander K; Hutson, Kate S

    2015-05-01

    Effective parasite management can be achieved through strategically timed treatments that break the life cycle. We examined the effects of temperature (2 °C increments from 22 to 34 °C) and salinity (0, 11, 22, 35, 40‰) on the life cycle (embryonation period, hatching success, oncomiracidia (larvae) longevity, infection success, and time to sexual maturity) of Neobenedenia sp. (Monogenea: Capsalidae), a harmful ectoparasite of farmed marine fishes. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions in the laboratory. The life cycle was faster in warm, high saline conditions compared to cooler conditions (10-13 days between 26-32 °C, 40‰; 15-16 days between 22-24 °C at 40‰). Warm seawater and high saline conditions (24-32 °C, 35-40‰) improved egg hatching success, reduced time to sexual maturity, and resulted in parasites reaching sexual maturity at a larger size (at 30-32 °C) compared to cooler conditions (22 °C). In contrast, cool, hypersaline conditions (22 °C, 40‰) increased oncomiracidia longevity and infection success. Linear and quantile regression models were used to construct an interactive, online parasite management interface to enable strategic treatment of parasites in aquaculture corresponding to observed temperature and salinity variation on farms in the tropics. It was recommended that farmers treat their stock more frequently during summer (27-31 °C) when parasites can complete their life cycle more quickly. Nevertheless, farmers should be aware of the potential for increased Neobenedenia sp. infections during winter months (21-26 °C) due to increased infection success.

  11. Temperature, salinity, and other data from buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993 (NODC Accession 9800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using buoy casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Beaufort Sea from 1948 to 1993. Data were collected by the...

  12. Profiles of temperature, salinity, and other measurements from CTD, XBT, and bottle samplers received from the Japan Oceanographic Data Center (NODC Accession 0054093)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profiles of temperature, salinity, and other measurements received from the Japan Oceanographic Data Center, Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department as a...

  13. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 08 February 1973 to 05 March 1973 (NODC Accession 0000288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 8, 1973 to March 5, 1973. These...

  14. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 February 1973 to 19 August 1980 (NODC Accession 0000289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 5, 1973 to August 19, 1980. These...

  15. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 10 September 1973 to 10 March 1976 (NODC Accession 0000287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from September 10, 1973 to March 10, 1976. Data...

  16. Oceanographic profile plankton, Temperature Salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from various platforms in the South Pacific Ocean from 1997 to 1998 (NODC Accession 0014651)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, and other measurements found in the bottle dataset taken from the SNP-1, HUAMANGA (fishing boat) and other platforms in the...

  17. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen and meteorology measurements collected using CTD from multiple ships in the Sea of Azov from 1999 to 2006 (NODC Accession 0037021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the ZODIAK (Motor boat), GROZA (Motor felucca) and other platforms in the Black Sea from...

  18. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen, and other measurements collected using bottle in the Arctic Ocean from 1956 to 1990 (NODC Accession 0014543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from the NICOLAI KNIPOVICH, and other platforms in the Arctic, Baltic Sea and other locations...

  19. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from the TEMP in the Arctic from 1947 to 1949 (NODC Accession 0001122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar from the personal library of Dr. Aleksey Zuyev, Murmansk Branch of the...

  20. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the STEFAN MALYGIN and SAMOED in the Arctic in 1931 (NODC Accession 0001090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and meteorology data received at NODC on 05/02/03 by Igor Smolyar from the personal library of Dr. Aleksey Zuyev, Murmansk Branch of the...

  1. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1970 through 1975 (NODC Accession 0002125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1970...

  2. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1977-1998 (NODC Accession 0002294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1977-1998. Profile data received at NODC...

  3. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1976 through 1982 (NODC Accession 0002126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1976...

  4. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, Norwegian Seas from 1965 - 1969 (NODC Accession 0002124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle in the Barents, Kara, Laptev, White, and Norwegian Seas from 1965...

  5. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottles from the KORABLESTROITEL and TUNETS in the Arctic and Coastal N Atlantic in 1948 (NODC Accession 0001089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, Salinity and meteorology data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar, from the personal library papers of Dr. Aleksey Zuyev, Murmansk...

  6. Oceanographic profile Temperature and Salinity measurements collected using bottle from various platforms in the Arctic Ocean from 1920 to 1934 (NODC Accession 0043759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data received at NODC from STATE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION; ROSGIDROMET (Moscow) , digitized by the submitting institute as part of the...

  7. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity and pressure measurements collected using moored buoy in the Indian Ocean from 2001-2006 (NODC Accession 0002733)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements in the Equatorial Indian from 2001 to 2006 from the TRITON (TRIANGLE TRANS-OCEAN BUOY NETWORK); JAPAN AGENCY FOR MARINE-EARTH...

  8. Temperature, salinity, sigma_t, pressure measurement collected using CTD from an unknown platform in the Min Fang Bay from 1984 to 1985 (NODC Accession 0048830)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Southern Ocean data - Min Fang Bay , temperature and salinity measurements collected using CTD from unknown platform in the Min Fang Bay from 1984 to 1985

  9. Temperature and salinity collected for MMS 'Deepwater Program: Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope Habitat and Benthic Ecology' from the Gulf of Mexico, 1999 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0002185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes profile data containing temperature and salinity collected in support of this research program to gain better knowledge of the benthic...

  10. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, and plankton measurements collected using bottle from the Parizeau in the North Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 0002242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen and other profile data received at NODC on 09/09/04 by Sydney Levitus from the Institute of Ocean Sciences (Sidney, B.C.), digitized...

  11. Water temperature and salinity profiles from CTD and XBT casts aboard multiple platforms from 1986-01-09 to 2011-01-29 (NCEI Accession 0103557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This water temperature and salinity profile data set is a product from the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) used to compare...

  12. Temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle from the ALIOT, ANCHAR, ALBATROS and other platforms in the North Atlantic from 1973 to 1982 (NODC Accession 0001875)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurements collected using bottle from the ALIOT, ANCHAR, ALBATROS and other platforms in the North Atlantic from 1973 to...

  13. Temperature and salinity measurements taken by instrumented elephant seals (SEaOS) from 2004-02-24 to 2007-01-17 (NODC Accession 0012881)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements taken from elephant seals in the Antarctic, Coastal South Indian Ocean and other locations from 2004 to 2006 (NODC Accession...

  14. Temperature and salinity data from bottle casts from Sweden multiple vessels from the Baltic Sea from the 11 November 1930 to 30 December 1942 (NCEI Accession 0154388)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected from bottle casts from Sweden multiple vessels from the Baltic Sea. Data were collected from November 11 1930 to...

  15. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and currents data from the Chesapeake Bay region from multiple platforms, July 1949 - July 1965 (NODC Accession 7000995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are currently only available in analog form. A digital scan of the pages containing measured values for temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen,...

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity data using Nansen bottles and MBT aboard the HMS Hydra on 23 August 1972, off the island of New Britain (NODC Accession 0118531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity data from 5 Nansen bottle casts and 5 Mechanical Bathythermograph (MBT) casts taken by the UK Navy hydrographic survey...

  17. Historical bottle temperature and salinity data collected globally by multiple platforms from 1868 to 1959, submitted by the German Data Center (BSH) (NODC Accession 0071062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical bottle temperature and salinity data from the German data center, Bundesamt fur Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (BSH) in Hamburg. The data contain...

  18. Temperature and salinity measurements taken from the WELLEM; JAN and SCHWABENLAND in the Coastal N Atlantic, North Atlantic and other locations from 1937 to 1939 (NODC Accession 0002127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data digitized from "Deutsche Antarktisce Expedition 1938/1939, mit dem Flugzeugstutzpunkt der Deutschen Lufthansa A.G.M.S....

  19. Oceanographic profile plankton, temperature, salinity collected using bottle from various unknown small boats in the South Pacific Ocean from 1981 to 1982 (NODC Accession 0002138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from unknown platform(s)in the Coastal S Pacific, Equatorial Pacific and other locations from...

  20. Temperature and salinity data from BT casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 July 1984 to 13 February 1991 (NODC Accession 0000322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and depth data were collected from multiple ships from July 31, 1984 to February 13, 1991. These data were collected using BT casts in the...

  1. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 December 1974 to 04 November 1984 (NODC Accession 0000284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from December 1, 1974 to November 4, 1984. Data were...

  2. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen measurements collected using bottle from multiple platforms in the Azov, Black Seas from 1924-1990 (NODC Accession 0002717)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen measurements collected using bottle from multiple platforms in the Azov, Black Seas from 1924-1990

  3. Temperature and salinity data from the TSUKUBA MARU using BT and MBT casts in the Indian Ocean from 16 May 1966 to 08 July 1976 (NODC Accession 0000279)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected from the TSUKUBA MARU from May 16, 1966 to July 8, 1976. These Data were collected using BT and MBT casts in the Indian...

  4. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data from multiple ships using CTD casts in the South Pacific Ocean from 26 March 1985 to 19 December 1997 (NODC Accession 0000286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data were collected from the ALMIRANTE MONTT, CARLOS PORTE, SANTA MARGARITA II, MELI PULLI, IZISHI MARU, STELLA MARIS,...

  5. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, and meteorology measurements collected using MRB from moored buoy in the Tropical Pacific, Tropical Atlantic from 2006 to 2008 (NODC Accession 0043260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset MRB in the Equatorial Pacific, Equatorial Atlantic and other locations from 2006 to 2008 as part of the...

  6. Physical characteristics of the coastal waters between Navapur and Umbharat, West coast of India. Part 2. Vertical homogeneity of temperature and salinity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.; Sarma, R.V.

    Vertical distribution of temperature and salinity at five stations in the coastal waters off Navapur-Umbharat (Maharashtra-Gujarat coast, India) was studied over different seasons during 1978. The results showed that inspite of large tidal...

  7. Temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients bottle and CTD data collected in the northern North Atlantic, Nordic and Arctic Seas from 1901 to 2011 (NODC Accession 0105532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen and nutrients bottle and CTD data collected in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, Greenland Sea, Kara Sea, North Atlantic Ocean,...

  8. Synoptic monthly gridded three dimensional (3D) World Ocean Database temperature and salinity from January 1945 to December 2014 (NCEI Accession 0140938)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The synoptic gridded WOD (SG-WOD) provides 3D world ocean gridded temperature and salinity data in monthly increment from WOD profiles using the Optimal Spectral...

  9. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, and other data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 October 1948 to 15 October 1951 (NODC Accession 0000218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, and other data were collected using bottle casts from the CARYN and ALBATROSS III in the North Atlantic Ocean from October...

  10. Temperature and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 02 June 1978 - 01 June 1979 (NODC Accession 8000499)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 2, 1978 to June 1, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  11. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and pressure measurements collected using CTD from the R/V Franklin in the Pacific during 2001 (NODC Accession 0043458)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the FRANKLIN (VJJF) in the South Pacific and Coastal S Pacific in 2001

  12. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and atmospheric pressure from surface underway survey in the North Pacific from January 1998 to January 2004 (NODC Accession 0045502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface pCO2, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and atmospheric pressure measurements collected in the North Pacific as part of the NOAA Office of...

  13. Profiles of temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and other measurements collected in the Sargasso Sea as part of the SYNOP project (NODC Accession 0046703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and other measurements collected in the Sargasso Sea as part of the SYNoptic Ocean Prediction (SYNOP) experiment. The...

  14. Arctic phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance, temperature and salinity measurements collected from multiple platforms from 1903-02-22 to 1970-09-30 (NODC Accession 0069178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Arctic phytoplankton and zooplankton abundance, temperature and salinity measurements collected from multiple platforms from 1903-02-22 to 1970-09-30 by Zoological...

  15. Nutrients, salinity, chemical, and temperature data were collected using bottle and CTD casts in the Norwegian Sea from 19 September 1959 to 23 October 1995 (NODC Accession 0000299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients, salinity, chemical, and temperature data were collected from the PROFESSOR MULTANOVSKYI, AKADEMIK SHULEYKIN, IVAN PETROV, and OTTO SCHMIDT from September...

  16. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, and nutrients measurements collected using bottle, CTD from various platforms in the North West Pacific from 1995-2005 (NODC Accession 0010565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and Chemical Oceanographic Time Series (Line-P) containing profiles for Nutrients, temperature, salinity near Ocean Station PAPA (50 deg N;145 deg W)....

  17. Oceanographic profile temperature and salinity measurements collected using bottle from the GEORGIY SEDOV in the Arctic from 1937 to 1940 (NODC Accession 0001123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profile data digitized at NODC on 05/02/03, received by Igor Smolyar from "Timofeev, B.T. 1951. Results of deep-sea observations. In:...

  18. Temperature and salinity data from moored seacat sensors of the Multi-disciplinary Ocean Sensors for Environmental Analyses and Networks (MOSEAN) project 2004-2007 (NODC Accession 0115703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected by seacat sensors from seven deployments within 2004-2007 on the HALE-ALOHA mooring, a location about 100 km north of...

  19. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen, transmissivity, and PAR measurements collected using CTD from NOAA Ship McArthur II during 2007 (NODC Accession 0034511)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen, transmissivity, and PAR measurements collected using CTD from NOAA Ship McArthur II during 2007 as part of PACOOS.

  20. Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes to Heat, Salinity and Low pH, after Habituation on Cherry Tomatoes and Lettuce Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poimenidou, Sofia V; Chatzithoma, Danai-Natalia; Nychas, George-John; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens found on fresh produce may encounter low temperatures, high acidity and limited nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of habituation of Listeria monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes or lettuce leaves on its subsequent response to inhibitory levels of acid, osmotic and heat stress. Habituation was performed by inoculating lettuce coupons, whole cherry tomatoes or tryptic soy broth (TSB) with a three-strains composite of L. monocytogenes, which were further incubated at 5°C for 24 hours or 5 days. Additionally, cells grown overnight in TSB supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE) at 30°C were used as control cells. Following habituation, L. monocytogenes cells were harvested and exposed to: (i) pH 3.5 adjusted with lactic acid, acetic acid or hydrochloric acid (HCl), and pH 1.5 (HCl) for 6 h; (ii) 20% NaCl and (iii) 60°C for 150 s. Results showed that tomato-habituated L. monocytogenes cells were more tolerant (P tomato-habituated cells were highly sensitized. Prolonged starvation on fresh produce (5 days vs. 24 h) increased resistance to osmotic and acid stress, but reduced thermotolerance, regardless of the pre-exposure environment (i.e., tomatoes, lettuce or TSB). These results indicate that L. monocytogenes cells habituated on fresh produce at low temperatures might acquire resistance to subsequent antimicrobial treatments raising important food safety implications.

  1. Effects of temperature, pH, water activity and CO2 concentration on growth of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL 2710.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparringa, R A; Kendall, M; Westby, A; Owens, J D

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the effects of temperature, pH, water activity (aw) and CO2 concentration on the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus NRRL 2710. Hyphal extension rates from mycelial and spore inocula were measured on media with different aw (approximately 1.0, 0.98 and 0.96) and pH (3.5, 5.5 and 7.5) incubated at 30, 37 or 42 degrees C in atmospheres containing 0.03, 12.5 or 25% (v/v) CO2. The effects of environmental conditions on hyphal extension rate were modelled using surface response methodology. The rate of hyphal extension was very sensitive to pH, exhibiting a pronounced optimum at pH 5.5-5.8. The hyphal extension rate was less sensitive to temperature, aw or CO2, exhibiting maximum rates at 42 degrees C, a(w) approximately 1.0 and 0.03% (v/v) CO2. The fastest hyphal extension rate (1.7 mm h(-1)) was predicted to occur at 42 degrees C, pH 5.85, a(w) approximately 1.0 and 0.03% CO2. The present work is the first to model the simultaneous effects of temperature, pH, aw and CO2 concentration on mould growth. The information relates to tempe fermentation and to possible control of the microflora in Tanzanian cassava heap fermentations.

  2. Simultaneous Triple Imaging with Two PARASHIFT Probes: Encoding Anatomical, pH and Temperature Information using Magnetic Resonance Shift Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Katie-Louise N A; Harnden, Alice C; Rogers, Nicola J; Senanayake, P Kanthi; Blamire, Andrew M; O'Hogain, Dara; Parker, David

    2017-06-12

    The chemical shift of paramagnetically shifted resonances in lanthanide(III) complexes encodes information about temperature and has also been made to report pH in parallel, through introduction of a single phosphonate group adjacent to the reporter tert-butyl resonance. The enhanced sensitivity of this new probe has allowed the simultaneous triple imaging of the water signal and the shifted tert-butyl signals of thulium and dysprosium complexes of a common ligand, separated by over 160 ppm. In parallel spectral imaging experiments, the temperature and pH dependence of the frequency of the Tm and Dy signals has been deconvoluted, allowing the pH and temperature in the liver, kidney and bladder to be measured. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Detailed conceptual design of a high temperature glass pH electrode for geothermal applications. Final report. Task II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.M.; Phelan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The performance of a pH sensor for use in hot geothermal brine was determined by laboratory tests simulating the expected conditions of use. Tests were conducted at temperatures from 21/sup 0/C to 260/sup 0/C and pressures from atmospheric to 5000 psi. Probes were constructed according to the design recommended. Deficiencies were found in the areas of seal, stem glass integrity and glass stability in hot simulated brine. Modifications of the design were made and tested, the improved versions overcoming the seal and stem glass cracking problems. A different pH glass formulation was used which improved sensor performance. Test results of the final design show that the sensor survived hot brine exposure at temperatures up to and including 200/sup 0/C, retaining its low temperature pH measuring capability. Exposure to 250/sup 0/C brine resulted in irreversible probe changes which caused sensor deterioration and failure. Comparative results are shown.

  4. Temperature and pH responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-unsaturated carboxylic acid) hydrogels synthesized by UV-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Kaetsu, Isao E-mail: kaetsu@ned.kindai.ac.jp; Nakayama, Masashi; Sutani, Kouichi; Uchida, Kumao; Yukutake, Kouji

    2003-07-01

    Stimuli-responsive polyampholyte hydrogels were synthesized by the copolymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAA) and acrylic acid (AAc) or itaconic acid (IAc) by UV-irradiation. Temperature and pH responsiveness of these hydrogels were studied. The temperature responsiveness of poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels shown in change of water content became dull compared to that of DMAA homo-polymer hydrogel. The water content of the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels showed a minimum at pH 8, and increased in more acidic and alkaline regions. This fact can be attributed to the coexistence of anions and cations in the poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels. The poly-(DMAA-co-AAc, IAc) hydrogels were polyampholyte having both temperature responsiveness and pH responsiveness.

  5. Effect of gender on physiological and behavioural responses of Gammarus roeseli (Crustacea Amphipoda) to salinity and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sornom, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.sornom@umail.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Felten, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.felten@univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Medoc, Vincent, E-mail: medoc@univ-metz.f [Universite de Bourgogne, Laboratoire de Biogeosciences, equipe Ecologie Evolutive, CNRS UMR 5561, 6 Bd Gabriel, 21000 Dijon (France); Sroda, Sophie, E-mail: sophie.sroda@umail.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Rousselle, Philippe, E-mail: rousselle@univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France); Beisel, Jean-Nicolas, E-mail: beisel@sciences.univ-metz.f [Universite de Metz, Laboratoire Interactions Ecotoxicologie Biodiversite Ecosystemes (LIEBE), CNRS UMR 7146, Avenue du General Delestraint, 57070 Metz (France)

    2010-05-15

    The importance of potentially interacting factors in organisms responses to a stress are often ignored or underestimated in ecotoxicology. In laboratory experiments we investigated how gender, temperature and age influence the behaviour and the physiology of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli under salinity stress. Our results revealed a significant higher sensitivity of females in survival, ventilation and ionoregulation whereas no inter-age differences were reported. Water temperature also exerted a significant effect in survival and ventilation of G. roeseli. Some of those factors appeared to interact significantly. This study provides evidence that gender can affect organisms responses to a stressor and consequently has to be considered while assessing a stress impact. We discussed the potential relationships between biological and behavioural responses. - Influence of gender, age and temperature in a gammarid responses to a stress.

  6. Effect of Temperature and pH on Formulating the Kinetic Growth Parameters and Lactic Acid Production of Lactobacillus bulgaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Aghababaie

    2014-09-01

    Results: Second order model for Xmax, μmax, P and K was significant but product formation parameters were almost constant. The optimum values of temperature and pH for attaining maximum biomass, maximum specific growth rate, and maximum acid production were obtained at 44 °C and 5.7, respectively. Conclusions: The attained empirical mathematical correlations of RSM alongside the kinetic equations could be used to determine growth conditions under predefined temperature and pH in the fermentation process. Keywords: Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Richards model, Response surface methodology, Lactic acid production, Luedeking-Piret model

  7. Short communication: Urea hydrolysis in dairy cattle manure under different temperature, urea, and pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, L E; Burgos, S A; DePeters, E J; Zhang, R; Fadel, J G

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study was to quantify the rate of urea hydrolysis in dairy cattle manure under different initial urea concentration, temperature, and pH conditions. In particular, by varying all 3 factors simultaneously, the interactions between them could also be determined. Fresh feces and artificial urine solutions were combined into a slurry to characterize the rate of urea hydrolysis under 2 temperatures (15°C and 35°C), 3 urea concentrations in urine solutions (500, 1,000, and 1,500 mg of urea-N/dL), and 3 pH levels (6, 7, and 8). Urea N concentration in slurry was analyzed at 0.0167, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 h after initial mixing. A nonlinear mixed effects model was used to determine the effects of urea concentration, pH, and temperature treatments on the exponential rate of urea hydrolysis and to predict the hydrolysis rate for each treatment combination. We detected a significant interaction between pH and initial urea level. Increasing urea concentration from 1,000 to 1,500 mg of urea-N/dL decreased the rate of urea hydrolysis across all pH levels. Across all pH and initial urea levels, the rate of urea hydrolysis increased with temperature, but the effect of pH was only observed for pH 6 versus pH 8 at the intermediate initial urea concentration. The fast rates of urea hydrolysis indicate that urea was almost completely hydrolyzed within a few hours of urine mixing with feces. The estimated urea hydrolysis rates from this study are likely maximum rates because of the thorough mixing before each sampling. Although considerable mixing of feces and urine occurs on the barn floor of commercial dairy operations from cattle walking through the manure, such mixing may be not as quick and thorough as in this study. Consequently, the urea hydrolysis rates from this study indicate the maximum loss of urea and should be accounted for in management aimed at mitigating ammonia emissions from dairy cattle manure under similar urea concentration, pH

  8. Bulk Dissolution Rates of Cadmium and Bismuth Tellurides As a Function of pH, Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Marc; Filella, Montserrat

    2016-05-03

    The toxicity of Cd being well established and that of Te suspected, the bulk, surface-normalized steady-state dissolution rates of two industrially important binary tellurides-polycrystalline cadmium and bismuth tellurides- were studied over the pH range 3-11, at various temperatures (25-70 °C) and dissolved oxygen concentrations (0-100% O2 in the gas phase). The behavior of both tellurides is strikingly different. The dissolution rates of CdTe monotonically decreased with increasing pH, the trend becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. Activation energies were of the order of magnitude associated with surface controlled processes; they decreased with decreasing acidity. At pH 7, the CdTe dissolution rate increased linearly with dissolved oxygen. In anoxic solution, CdTe dissolved at a finite rate. In contrast, the dissolution rate of Bi2Te3 passed through a minimum at pH 5.3. The activation energy had a maximum in the rate minimum at pH 5.3 and fell below the threshold for diffusion control at pH 11. No oxygen dependence was detected. Bi2Te3 dissolves much more slowly than CdTe; from one to more than 3.5 orders of magnitude in the Bi2Te3 rate minimum. Both will readily dissolve under long-term landfill deposition conditions but comparatively slowly.

  9. Responses of trophic structure and zooplankton community to salinity and temperature in Tibetan lakes: Implication for the effect of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuqi; Xu, Lei; Hou, Juzhi; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Han, Bo-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Warming has pronounced effects on lake ecosystems, either directly by increased temperatures or indirectly by a change in salinity. We investigated the current status of zooplankton communities and trophic structure in 45 Tibetan lakes along a 2300 m altitude and a 76 g/l salinity gradient. Freshwater to hyposaline lakes mainly had three trophic levels: phytoplankton, small zooplankton and fish/Gammarus, while mesosaline to hypersaline lakes only had two: phytoplankton and large zooplankton. Zooplankton species richness declined significantly with salinity, but did not relate with temperature. Furthermore, the decline in species richness with salinity in lakes with two trophic levels was much less abrupt than in lakes with three trophic levels. The structural variation of the zooplankton community depended on the length of the food chain, and was significantly explained by salinity as the critical environmental variable. The zooplankton community shifted from dominance of copepods and small cladoceran species in the lakes with low salinity and three trophic levels to large saline filter-feeding phyllopod species in those lakes with high salinity and two trophic levels. The zooplankton to phytoplankton biomass ratio was positively related with temperature in two-trophic-level systems and vice versa in three-trophic-level systems. As the Tibetan Plateau is warming about three times faster than the global average, our results imply that warming could have a considerable impact on the structure and function of Tibetan lake ecosystems, either via indirect effects of salinization/desalinization on species richness, composition and trophic structure or through direct effects of water temperature on trophic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An investigation of the distal histidyl hydrogen bonds in oxyhemoglobin: effects of temperature, pH, and inositol hexaphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ho, Nancy T; Ho, Chien

    2010-12-21

    On the basis of X-ray crystal structures and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, it has been inferred that the O(2) binding to hemoglobin is stabilized by the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen ligands and the distal histidines. Our previous study by multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has provided the first direct evidence of such H-bonds in human normal adult oxyhemoglobin (HbO(2) A) in solution. Here, the NMR spectra of uniformly (15)N-labeled recombinant human Hb A (rHb A) and five mutant rHbs in the oxy form have been studied under various experimental conditions of pH and temperature and also in the presence of an organic phosphate, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP). We have found significant effects of pH and temperature on the strength of the H-bond markers, i.e., the cross-peaks for the side chains of the two distal histidyl residues, α58His and β63His, which form H-bonds with the O(2) ligands. At lower pH and/or higher temperature, the side chains of the distal histidines appear to be more mobile, and the exchange with water molecules in the distal heme pockets is faster. These changes in the stability of the H-bonds with pH and temperature are consistent with the changes in the O(2) affinity of Hb as a function of pH and temperature and are clearly illustrated by our NMR experiments. Our NMR results have also confirmed that this H-bond in the β-chain is weaker than that in the α-chain and is more sensitive to changes in pH and temperature. IHP has only a minor effect on these H-bond markers compared to the effects of pH and temperature. These H-bonds are sensitive to mutations in the distal heme pockets but not affected directly by the mutations in the quaternary interfaces, i.e., α(1)β(1) and/or α(1)β(2) subunit interface. These findings provide new insights regarding the roles of temperature, hydrogen ion, and organic phosphate in modulating the structure and function of hemoglobin in solution.

  12. Adaptive Response of Listeria monocytogenes to Heat, Salinity and Low pH, after Habituation on Cherry Tomatoes and Lettuce Leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia V Poimenidou

    Full Text Available Pathogens found on fresh produce may encounter low temperatures, high acidity and limited nutrient availability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of habituation of Listeria monocytogenes on cherry tomatoes or lettuce leaves on its subsequent response to inhibitory levels of acid, osmotic and heat stress. Habituation was performed by inoculating lettuce coupons, whole cherry tomatoes or tryptic soy broth (TSB with a three-strains composite of L. monocytogenes, which were further incubated at 5°C for 24 hours or 5 days. Additionally, cells grown overnight in TSB supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSBYE at 30°C were used as control cells. Following habituation, L. monocytogenes cells were harvested and exposed to: (i pH 3.5 adjusted with lactic acid, acetic acid or hydrochloric acid (HCl, and pH 1.5 (HCl for 6 h; (ii 20% NaCl and (iii 60°C for 150 s. Results showed that tomato-habituated L. monocytogenes cells were more tolerant (P < 0.05 to acid or osmotic stress than those habituated on lettuce, and habituation on both foods resulted in more stress resistant cells than prior growth in TSB. On the contrary, the highest resistance to heat stress (P < 0.05 was exhibited by the lettuce-habituated L. monocytogenes cells followed by TSB-grown cells at 5°C for 24 h, whereas tomato-habituated cells were highly sensitized. Prolonged starvation on fresh produce (5 days vs. 24 h increased resistance to osmotic and acid stress, but reduced thermotolerance, regardless of the pre-exposure environment (i.e., tomatoes, lettuce or TSB. These results indicate that L. monocytogenes cells habituated on fresh produce at low temperatures might acquire resistance to subsequent antimicrobial treatments raising important food safety implications.

  13. Peritidal stromatolites at the convergence of groundwater seepage and marine incursion: Patterns of salinity, temperature and nutrient variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishworth, Gavin M.; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bornman, Thomas G.; Lemley, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Living peritidal stromatolites forming at the interface of coastal groundwater seepage and regular marine input are known from only a few locations globally, including South Africa, Western Australia and Northern Ireland. In contrast to modern stromatolites from exclusively fresh or marine waters, which persist due to high calcium carbonate saturation states or hypersaline and erosive conditions (which exclude organisms that might disrupt or out-compete the stromatolite-forming benthic microalgae), the factors supporting stromatolite formation at peritidal locations have not been well-documented. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the fine-scale physico-chemical parameters in terms of pool temperature, salinity and nutrient dynamics at three representative sites along the coastline near Port Elizabeth, South Africa. These parameters were assessed with reference to potential physical, meteorological and ocean drivers using a linear or linear mixed-effects modelling approach. Results demonstrate that nutrient inputs into the pools supporting the majority of stromatolite accretion (barrage pools) are driven by groundwater seepage site-specific properties related to anthropogenic occupation (dissolved inorganic nitrogen; DIN) as well as marine water incursion (dissolved inorganic phosphorus; DIP). Pool temperature is a function of seasonal ambient variability while salinity reflects regular state shifts from fresh to marine conditions, which are related to tidal amplitude and swell height. The regular marine incursions likely promote benthic primary biomass in the phosphorus-limited stromatolite pools, as well as preclude organisms which might otherwise outcompete or disrupt the stromatolite microalgae due to intolerances to extreme ( 1.5 to ≥ 30) salinity variability.

  14. Effects of pH, temperature and osmolality on the level and composition of soluble N in feedstuffs for ruminants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de L.H.; Spek, J.W.; Laar, van H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2009-01-01

    Solubility of N is an important parameter in many protein evaluation systems for ruminants. The influence of different rumen conditions, such as pH, osmolality and temperature of solvents, on solubility of N compounds in various animal feed ingredients was examined in two experiments. In the first

  15. Modelling growth and bacteriocin production by Pediococcus acidilactici PA003 as a function of temperature and pH value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Shan-na; Han, Ye; Zhou, Zhi-jiang

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the effect of pH and temperature on the cell growth and bacteriocin production of Pediococcus acidilactici PA003, a lactic acid bacterium isolated from traditionally fermented cabbage, the kinetic behaviour of P. acidilactici PA003 was simulated in vitro during laboratory fermentations by making use of MRS broth. Firstly, primary models were developed for cell growth, glucose consumption, lactic acid and bacteriocin production for a given set of environmental conditions. Based on primary models, further study was undertaken to fit secondary models to describe the influence of temperature and pH on microbial behaviour. The models were validated successfully for all components. The results from the cell yield coefficient for lactic acid production reflected the homofermentative nature of P. acidilactici PA003. Both cell growth and bacteriocin production were very much influenced by changes in temperature and pH. The optimal condition for specific growth rate and biomass concentration was almost the same at pH 6.5 and 35 °C. At 35 °C and pH 6.1, the maximal bacteriocin activity was also achieved. The kinetic models provide useful tools for elucidating the mechanisms of temperature and pH on the kinetic behaviour of P. acidilactici PA003. The information obtained in this paper may be very useful for the selection of suitable starter cultures for a particular fermentation process and is a first step in the optimization of food fermentation processes and technology as well.

  16. Distribution of typical freshwater bacterial groups is associated with pH, temperature and lake water retention time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindström, E.S.; Kamst-van Agterveld, M.P.; Zwart, G.

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of 15 typical freshwater bacterial groups in 15 diverse lakes in northern Europe was investigated using reverse line blot hybridization. Statistical evaluation of the data in relation to the characteristics of the lakes showed that pH, temperature, and the theoretical hydrological

  17. HYDROXYL RADICAL/OZONE RATIOS DURING OZONATION PROCESSES. II. THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, PH, ALKALINITY, AND DOM PROPERTIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of temperature, pH, alkalinity, and type and concentration of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate of ozone (O3) decomposition, O3-exposure, .OH-exposure and the ratio Rct of the concentrations of .OH and O3 has been studied. For a standardized single ozon...

  18. The Effects of Temperature and Salinity on Mg Incorporation in Planktonic Foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white): Results from a Global Sediment Trap Mg/Ca Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, W. R.; Weldeab, S.; Lea, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mg/Ca in Globigerinoides ruber is arguably the most important proxy for sea surface temperature (SST) in tropical and sub tropical regions, and as such guides our understanding of past climatic change in these regions. However, the sensitivity of Mg/Ca to salinity is debated; while analysis of foraminifera grown in cultures generally indicates a sensitivity of 3 - 6% per salinity unit, core-top studies have suggested a much higher sensitivity of between 15 - 27% per salinity unit, bringing the utility of Mg/Ca as a SST proxy into dispute. Sediment traps circumvent the issues of dissolution and post-depositional calcite precipitation that hamper core-top calibration studies, whilst allowing the analysis of foraminifera that have calcified under natural conditions within a well constrained period of time. We collated previously published sediment trap/plankton tow G. ruber (white) Mg/Ca data, and generated new Mg/Ca data from a sediment trap located in the highly-saline tropical North Atlantic, close to West Africa. Calcification temperature and salinity were calculated for the time interval represented by each trap/tow sample using World Ocean Atlas 2013 data. The resulting dataset comprises >240 Mg/Ca measurements (in the size fraction 150 - 350 µm), that span a temperature range of 18 - 28 °C and 33.6 - 36.7 PSU. Multiple regression of the dataset reveals a temperature sensitivity of 7 ± 0.4% per °C (p < 2.2*10-16) and a salinity sensitivity of 4 ± 1% per salinity unit (p = 2*10-5). Application of this calibration has significant implications for both the magnitude and timing of glacial-interglacial temperature changes when variations in salinity are accounted for.

  19. The effect of pH, temperature and plaque thickness on the hydrolysis of monofluorophosphate in experimental dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, E I F; Dibdin, G H

    2003-01-01

    Monofluorophosphate (MFP), an anti-caries agent commonly used in toothpaste, is known to be degraded to fluoride and orthophosphate by bacterial phosphatases in dental plaque. We have examined the effect of pH, temperature, plaque thickness and some ions on this process. Both natural plaque and artificial microcosm plaque incubated with purified MFP at pH 4-10 showed an optimum pH of approximately 8 for hydrolysis. Diffusion and concomitant hydrolysis were examined in an apparatus in which artificial plaque was held between rigid membranes separating two chambers. When MFP diffused through a plaque of 0.51-mm thickness over 4 h it was almost completely hydrolysed at pH 8, but hydrolysis on diffusion decreased as the pH deviated from 8. MFP in toothpaste extract showed a similar pH susceptibility to hydrolysis, according to the inherent pH of the toothpaste. Hydrolysis of MFP in the toothpaste was reduced by no more than 10% when compared with a matched-pH control, suggesting that other toothpaste ingredients had no major influence on hydrolysis. Transport was slower and hydrolysis at pH 6 more complete the thicker the plaque, but hydrolysis was not significantly slower at 23 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The addition of various potential activating or inhibiting ions at 0.1 and 1.0 mmol/l had small and non-significant effects on hydrolysis. The results suggest that MFP toothpaste should be formulated and used to maximise enzymic hydrolysis of this complex anion, and that plaque pH control is probably the most important factor. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. The effect of a pre-anesthetic infusion of amino acids on body temperature, venous blood pH, glucose, creatinine, and lactate of healthy dogs during anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark-Price, Stuart C; Dossin, Olivier; Ngwenyama, Thandeka R; O'Brien, Mauria A; McMichael, Maureen; Schaeffer, David J

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of preanesthetic, intravenous (IV) amino acids on body temperature of anesthetized healthy dogs. Randomized, experimental, crossover study. Eight mixed-breed dogs approximately 2 years of age weighing 20.7 ± 2.1 kg. Dogs received 10% amino acid solution (AA) or 0.9% saline (SA) IV at 5 mL kg(-1) over 60 minutes. Body temperature (BT) was recorded at 5 minute intervals during infusions. Dogs were then anesthetized with sevoflurane for 90 minutes. BT was recorded at 5 minute intervals during anesthesia. Jugular blood samples were analyzed for pH, glucose, creatinine, and lactate concentrations at baseline, after infusion, after anesthesia and after 24 hours. BT at conclusion of infusion decreased -0.34 ± 0.42 °C in group AA and -0.40 ± 0.38 °C in group SA and was not different between groups (p = 0.072). BT decreased 2.72 ± 0.37 °C in group AA and 2.88 ± 0.26 °C in group SA after anesthesia and was different between groups (p dogs, preanesthetic IV infusion of amino acids attenuated heat loss compared to controls, however, the amount attenuated may not be clinically useful. Further studies are warranted to determine if nutrient-induced thermogenesis is beneficial to dogs undergoing anesthesia. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  1. Physical and Chemical Stability of Curcumin in Aqueous Solutions and Emulsions: Impact of pH, Temperature, and Molecular Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharat, Mahesh; Du, Zheyuan; Zhang, Guodong; McClements, David Julian

    2017-03-01

    The utilization of curcumin as a nutraceutical in food and supplement products is often limited because of its low water solubility, poor chemical stability, and low oral bioavailability. This study examined the impact of pH, storage temperature, and molecular environment on the physical and chemical stability of pure curcumin in aqueous solutions and in oil-in-water emulsions. Unlike naturally occurring curcuminoid mixtures (that contain curcumin, demethoxy-curcumin, and bisdemethoxy-curcumin), pure curcumin was highly unstable to chemical degradation in alkaline aqueous solutions (pH ≥7.0) and tended to crystallize out of aqueous acidic solutions (pH emulsions (30% MCT, 1 mg curcumin/g MCT, d 32 ≈ 298 nm) improved its water dispersibility and chemical stability. After incubation at 37 °C for 1 month, >85% of curcumin was retained by emulsions stored under acidic conditions (pH emulsions stored at pH 7.0, 7.4, and 8.0, respectively. There was little change in the color of curcumin-loaded emulsions when stored under acidic conditions, but their yellow color faded when stored under alkaline conditions. There was no evidence of droplet aggregation or creaming in emulsions stored for 31 days at ambient temperature. These results suggest that emulsion-based delivery systems may be suitable for improving the water dispersibility and chemical stability of curcumin, which would facilitate its application in foods and supplements.

  2. Cytological Characteristics of Mucose Cell and Vaginal Temperature and pH During Estrous Cycle in Local Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Darodjah Rasad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to examine the characteristics cytology of mucous cell-,temperature- and pH vagina during estrous cycle in local sheep.  31local sheep were synchronized with vaginal sponge consist of 20  mg  progesterone hormone before carried out observations of cytology of cells from the vaginal mucose through vaginal swabs, temperature and pH of the vagina.  Vaginal swabs were collected daily at 7 am for a weeks.Vaginal temperature and pH measurement is carried out twice a day, at 07.00 am and 15.00 pm for a weeks after vaginal swabs. Smears of the swab were then prepared on glass slide and they were stained with Giemsa.  Vaginal epithelial cells; Parabasal, intermediate and superficial cells were counted and their percentages during pro-estrous, estrous and di-estrous were determined. Di-estrous was characterized by the absent of superficial cells in the epithelial vagina. Pro-estrous was characterized by the increasing progressively of intermediate/superficial cells in epithelial vagina, whereas estrous was characterized by the presence of superficial/cornification cells in most epithelial vagina. Based on the dominance of superficial cell, the number of sheep identified as estrous is highest on third day, with 52%.  Observation on vaginal temperature also resulting that the highest temperature values obtained on the third day of 39,08±0.28°C.  It could be effected of the vaginal pH during the observation. Underthe influence ofestrogen, the epithelial vaginalcellssynthesizeand accumulateglycogenin large quantitiesdepositedin the lumen ofvagina. Vaginal bacteriametabolizethe glycogenformlactic acid, which causesvaginal pHis low.The pH conditions prevent from pathogenic microorganisms and fungi. Increased estrogenal so cause cell proliferation through the thickening of the epithelium lining of the vagina so that the cells differentiate.Increasing of glycogenin the superficial cells, and  ceratin cells found in the cytoplasm of

  3. Change in coccolith size and morphology due to response to temperature and salinity in coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) isolated from the Bering and Chukchi seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Kazuko; Satoh, Manami; Harada, Naomi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Strains of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) collected from the subarctic North Pacific and Arctic oceans in 2010 were established as clone cultures and have been maintained in the laboratory at 15 °C and 32 ‰ salinity. To study the physiological responses of coccolith formation to changes in temperature and salinity, growth experiments and morphometric investigations were performed on two strains, namely MR57N isolated from the northern Bering Sea and MR70N at the Chukchi Sea. This is the first report of a detailed morphometric and morphological investigation of Arctic Ocean coccolithophore strains. The specific growth rates at the logarithmic growth phases in both strains markedly increased as temperature was elevated from 5 to 20 °C, although coccolith productivity (estimated as the percentage of calcified cells) was similar at 10-20 % at all temperatures. On the other hand, the specific growth rate of MR70N was affected less by changes in salinity in the range 26-35 ‰, but the proportion of calcified cells decreased at high and low salinities. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, coccolith morphotypes can be categorized into Type B/C on the basis of their biometrical parameters. The central area elements of coccoliths varied from thin lath type to well-calcified lath type when temperature was increased or salinity was decreased, and coccolith size decreased simultaneously. Coccolithophore cell size also decreased with increasing temperature, although the variation in cell size was slightly greater at the lower salinity level. This indicates that subarctic and arctic coccolithophore strains can survive in a wide range of seawater temperatures and at lower salinities with change in their morphology. Because all coccolith biometric parameters followed the scaling law, the decrease in coccolith size was caused simply by the reduced calcification. Taken together, our results suggest that calcification productivity may

  4. Laboratory Study on the Potential EOR Use of HPAM/VES Hybrid in High-Temperature and High-Salinity Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Dingwei Zhu; Jichao Zhang; Yugui Han; Hongyan Wang; Yujun Feng

    2013-01-01

    Polymer flooding represents one of the most efficient processes to enhance oil recovery, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) is a widely used oil-displacement agent, but its poor thermal stability, salt tolerance, and mechanical degradation impeded its use in high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoirs. In this work, a novel viscoelastic surfactant, erucyl dimethyl amidobetaine (EDAB), with improved thermal stability and salinity tolerance, was complexed with HPAM to overcome...

  5. Aerobically respiring prokaryotic strains exhibit a broader temperature-pH-salinity space for cell division than anaerobically respiring and fermentative strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jesse P; Dobinson, Luke; Freeman, Kenneth; McKenzie, Ross; Wyllie, Dale; Nixon, Sophie L; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-09-06

    Biological processes on the Earth operate within a parameter space that is constrained by physical and chemical extremes. Aerobic respiration can result in adenosine triphosphate yields up to over an order of magnitude higher than those attained anaerobically and, under certain conditions, may enable microbial multiplication over a broader range of extremes than other modes of catabolism. We employed growth data published for 241 prokaryotic strains to compare temperature, pH and salinity values for cell division between aerobically and anaerobically metabolizing taxa. Isolates employing oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor exhibited a considerably more extensive three-dimensional phase space for cell division (90% of the total volume) than taxa using other inorganic substrates or organic compounds as the electron acceptor (15% and 28% of the total volume, respectively), with all groups differing in their growth characteristics. Understanding the mechanistic basis of these differences will require integration of research into microbial ecology, physiology and energetics, with a focus on global-scale processes. Critical knowledge gaps include the combined impacts of diverse stress parameters on Gibbs energy yields and rates of microbial activity, interactions between cellular energetics and adaptations to extremes, and relating laboratory-based data to in situ limits for cell division. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to goethite and hematite as a function of pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Soumya; Hendry, M Jim; Essilfie-Dughan, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Under oxic aqueous conditions, two-line ferrihydrite gradually transforms to more thermodynamically stable and more crystalline phases, such as goethite and hematite. This temperature- and pH-dependent transformation can play an important role in the sequestration of metals and metalloids adsorbed onto ferrihydrite. A comprehensive assessment of the crystallization of two-line ferrihydrite with respect to temperature (25, 50, 75, and 100 °C) and pH (2, 7, and 10) as a function of reaction time (minutes to months) was conducted via batch experiments. Pure and transformed phases were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The rate of transformation of two-line ferrihydrite to hematite increased with increasing temperature at all pHs studied and followed first-order reaction kinetics. XRD and XANES showed simultaneous formation of goethite and hematite at 50 and 75 °C at pH 10, with hematite being the dominant product at all pHs and temperatures. With extended reaction time, hematite increased while goethite decreased, and goethite reaches a minimum after 7 days. Observations suggest two-line ferrihydrite transforms to hematite via a two-stage crystallization process, with goethite being intermediary. The findings of this study can be used to estimate rates of crystallization of pure two-line ferrihydrite over the broad range of temperatures and pH found in nature.

  7. Microbial Distributions Across pH, Temperature, and Temporal Conditions in Hot Springs of Tengchong, Yunnan Providence, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, B. R.; Brodie, E. L.; Tom, L. M.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Huang, Q.; Wang, S.; Hou, W.; Wu, G.; Peacock, J. P.; Huang, L.; Zhi, X.; Li, W.; Dodsworth, J. A.; Hedlund, B. P.; Zhang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Terrestrial geothermal springs contain a rich microbial diversity that has gained attention because of their potential analogue to early Earth habitats and biotechnological applications. Despite this attention, the distribution of thermophiles and the mechanisms that underlie those distributions have not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to identify microorganisms in hot springs in Tengchong, China, and to compare microbial composition across temperature, pH, and temporal gradients. The PhyloChip microarray detected 79 bacterial and 20 archaeal phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis was used to link the detected taxa to their distributions across temperature and pH conditions. The distributions of phyla (e.g. Aquificae, Crenarchaeota) identified by this analysis were consistent with previous culture-dependent and independent methods and provides new knowledge on the distributions of phyla that do not contain cultured representatives (e.g. candidate phyla OP11, GoM161, etc.). For example, low pH (85o C). Furthermore, temporal changes in the community composition were detected, with the rainy season containing higher diversity but lower relative abundance of archaea. These results expand our understanding of the distributions of hot spring microorganisms seasonally, and across environmental gradients such as temperature and pH.

  8. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera

    2017-01-01

    temperatures (Δ = + 4°C) and lower pH levels (Δ = - 0.4 pH units), acting alone or combined, on the bioaccumulation and elimination of emerging FRs (dechloranes 602, 603 and 604, and TBBPA), inorganic arsenic (iAs), and PFCs (PFOA and PFOS) in two estuarine bivalve species (Mytilus galloprovincialis...... of dechloranes, as well as enhanced iAs, PFOA and PFOS elimination. Data also suggests that, when both abiotic stressors are combined, bivalves' capacity to accumulate contaminants may be time-dependent, considering significantly drastic increase observed with Dec 602 and TBBPA, during the last 10 days...

  9. Climate response and spatial-temporal model on the inter-annual change of winter temperature-salinity in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-kun; Miao, Qing-sheng; Yang, Yang; Xu, Shan-shan

    2017-01-01

    Spatial distributions and time variation characteristics were analyzed using Rotated Empirical Orthogonal Function (REOF) and spectrum analysis methods using surface and bottom temperature and salinity data in February of 1976-2013 along 30°N section in the East China Sea. Result showed that temperature trends can be divided into western part and east part, salinity trend divided into western, middle and eastern part. The first mode of surface temperature presented a quasi-equilibrium trend and the range was higher in the near-shore than the offshores, first mode of bottom temperature presented a decreasing trend; surface salinity had a decreasing trend and the extent was higher in the near-shore than the offshores, the bottom salinity showed a decreasing trend in recent years. The temperature inter-annual variability related to El Niño closely; short-term shocks of salinity related to El Niño, and long-term changes had something to do with PDO.

  10. Equations for O2 and CO2 solubilities in saline and plasma: combining temperature and density dependences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmas, Kevin M; Bassingthwaighte, James B

    2017-05-01

    Solubilities of respiratory gasses in water, saline, and plasma decrease with rising temperatures and solute concentrations. Henry's Law, C = α·P, states that the equilibrium concentration of a dissolved gas is solubility times partial pressure. Solubilities in the water of a solution depend on temperature and the content of other solutes. Blood temperatures may differ more than 20°C between skin and heart, and an erythrocyte will undergo that range as blood circulates. The concentrations of O2 and CO2 are the driving forces for diffusion, exchanges, and for reactions. We provide an equation for O2 and CO2 solubilities, α, that allows for continuous changes in temperature, T, and solution density, ρ, in dynamically changing states:[Formula: see text]This two-exponential expression with a density scalar γ, and a density exponent β, accounts for solubility changes due to density changes of an aqueous solution. It fits experimental data on solubilities in water, saline, and plasma over temperatures from 20 to 40°C, and for plasma densities, ρsol up to 1.020 g/ml with ~0.3% error. The amounts of additional bound O2 (to Hb) and CO2 (bicarbonate and carbamino) depend on the concentrations in the local water space and the reaction parameters. During exercise, solubility changes are large; both ρsol and T change rapidly with spatial position and with time. In exercise hemoconcentration plasma, ρsol exceeds 1.02, whereas T may range over 20°C. The six parameters for O2 and the six for CO2 are constants, so solubilities are calculable continuously as T and ρsol change.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Solubilities for oxygen and carbon dioxide are dependent on the density of the solution, on temperature, and on the partial pressure. We provide a brief equation suitable for hand calculators or mathematical modeling, accounting for these factors over a wide range of temperatures and solution densities for use in rapidly changing conditions, such as extreme exercise or osmotic

  11. Effect of temperature, salinity, light and time of dehiscence on seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultivar differences. Grass Forage Sci. 53: 270-278. Perumal SA, Varghese B, Govender P, Ramdhani S, Berjak P (2014). Effects of elevated temperature on germination and effects of elevated temperatures on germination and subsequent seedling vigour in recalcitrant Trichilia emetica seeds. South Afr. J. Bot. 90: 153-162.

  12. EGFET pH Sensor Performance Dependence on Sputtered TiO2 Sensing Membrane Deposition Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairul Aimi Yusof

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 thin films were sputtered by radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering method and have been employed as the sensing membrane of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET for pH sensing detection application. The TiO2 thin films were deposited onto indium tin oxide (ITO coated glass substrates at room temperature and 200°C, respectively. The effect of deposition temperature on thin film properties and pH detection application was analyzed. The TiO2 samples used as the sensing membrane for EGFET pH-sensor and the current-voltage (I-V, hysteresis, and drift characteristics were examined. The sensitivity of TiO2 EGFET sensing membrane was obtained from the transfer characteristic (I-V curves for different substrate heating temperatures. TiO2 thin film sputtered at room temperature achieved higher sensitivity of 59.89 mV/pH compared to the one deposited at 200°C indicating lower sensitivity of 37.60 mV/pH. Moreover the hysteresis and the drift of TiO2 thin film deposited at room temperature showed lower values compared to the one at 200°C. We have also tested the effect of operating temperature on the performance of the EGFET pH-sensing and found that the temperature effect was very minimal.

  13. Effects of seawater pH and temperature on foraging behavior of the Japanese stone crab Charybdis japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangli; Wang, Ting; Cui, Shuaikang; Xie, Zhe; Dupont, Sam; Zeng, Jiangning; Gu, Huaxin; Kong, Hui; Hu, Menghong; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2017-07-15

    We examined prey selection and foraging behaviors of the crab Charybdis japonica exposed to four combinations of pH (7.3 and 8.1) and temperature (18°C and 25°C). The order of prey selection by C. japonica was Potamocorbula laevis, Ruditapes philippinarum, Tegillarca granosa and Mactra veneriformis. Under high pCO2, times for searching, breaking, eating and handling were all significantly longer than those at the normal pCO2, and the prey profitability and predation rate under high pCO2 were significantly lower than normal pCO2. Moreover, temperature significantly influenced the foraging behaviors, but its effects were not as strong as those of pH; times for searching, eating and handling under high temperature were significantly lower than the low temperature, and the prey predation rates under high temperature was significantly higher than low temperature. In conclusion, high pCO2 negatively affected the foraging behavior, but high temperature actively stimulated the foraging behaviors of crabs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Preparation of dual-stimuli-responsive liposomes using methacrylate-based copolymers with pH and temperature sensitivities for precisely controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Takumi; Yamazaki, Naoko; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yuba, Eiji; Harada, Atsushi; Kotaka, Aki; Shinde, Chiharu; Kumei, Takayuki; Sumida, Yasushi; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Munekata, Yuki; Maruyama, Keiichi; Kono, Kenji

    2017-07-01

    Dual-signal-sensitive copolymers were synthesized by copolymerization of methoxy diethylene glycol methacrylate, methacrylic acid, and lauroxy tetraethylene glycol methacrylate, which respectively provide temperature sensitivity, pH sensitivity, and anchoring to liposome surfaces. These novel copolymers, with water solubility that differs depending on temperature and pH, are soluble in water under neutral pH and low-temperature conditions, but they become water-insoluble and form aggregates under acidic pH and high-temperature conditions. Liposomes modified with these copolymers exhibited enhanced content release at weakly acidic pH with increasing temperature, although no temperature-dependent content release was observed in neutral conditions. Interaction between the copolymers and the lipid monolayer at the air-water interface revealed that the copolymer chains penetrate more deeply into the monolayer with increasing temperature at acidic pH than at neutral pH, where the penetration of copolymer chains was moderate and temperature-independent at neutral pH. Interaction of the copolymer-modified liposomes with HeLa cells demonstrated that the copolymer-modified liposomes were adsorbed quickly and efficiently onto the cell surface and that they were internalized more gradually than the unmodified liposomes through endocytosis. Furthermore, the copolymer-modified liposomes enhanced the content release in endosomes with increasing temperature, but no such temperature-dependent enhancement of content release was observed for unmodified liposomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of temperature and salinity on larval survival and development in the invasive shrimp Palaemon macrodactylus (Caridea: Palaemonidae) along the reproductive season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe Vázquez, M.; Bas, Claudia C.; Kittlein, Marcelo; Spivak, Eduardo D.

    2015-05-01

    The invasive shrimp Palaemon macrodactylus is associated mainly with brackish waters. Previous studies raised the question if tolerance to low salinities differs between larvae and adults. To answer this question, the combined effects of two temperatures (20 and 25 °C) and four salinities (5, 12, 23 and 34 psu) on survival and development of larvae that hatched at the beginning, in the midpoint and near the end of a reproductive season (denoted early, middle season and late larvae respectively) were examined. The three types of larvae were able to survive and reach juvenile phase at salinities between 12 and 34 psu and at both temperatures. At 5 psu all larvae died, but 45% molted at least once. Temperature and salinity to a lesser extent, had effects on the duration of development and on the number of larval stages in all larval types. Development was longer at the lower temperature, especially in middle season and late larvae. Most early larvae reached the juvenile phase through 5 larval stages; the number of larval stages of middle season and late larvae was higher at 20 °C and in late larvae also low salinity produced extra stages. Low salinity (12 psu) and, in early and middle season larvae, low temperature produced lighter and smaller individuals. Response of larvae to environmental factors seems to be related in part to the previous conditions (maternal effects and/or embryo development conditions). The narrower salinity tolerance of larvae compared to adults and the ability of zoea I to survive at least some days at 5 psu may be related with an export larval strategy.

  16. 2-D ocean temperature and salinity images from pre-stack seismic waveform inversion methods: an example from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, Amit; Mallick, Subhashis; Fortin, Will; Holbrook, W. Steven; Blacic, Tanya M.

    2015-08-01

    Seismic reflections from the oceanic water column contain information about ocean temperature and salinity. Even though seismic waveform inversion is effective for studying oceanic structure, its application is limited in the absence of sufficient direct temperature/velocity measurements. Here, two methods are developed to invert pre-stack seismic waveform data for temperature and salinity when independent temperature/velocity data are sparse or unavailable, allowing estimation of water-column temperature/salinity from any marine seismic reflection data set. The first method combines a genetic algorithm (GA) with non-linear least squares inversion, and the second method is a parallel implementation of a GA. Both methods produce results to an accuracy between 0 and 0.1 °C in estimating temperature when applied to a field data set from the South China Sea. Although the second approach is superior, it is computationally demanding and requires large parallel computers. The first approach runs extremely fast on parallel computers and can even be run on much smaller machines to provide results in a reasonable runtime. While both methods are viable choices for estimating temperature and salinity, the choice of one over the other will largely depend upon the available computational resources and the time frame within which the inversion needs to be completed.

  17. Influence of carbon source, pH, and temperature on the polygalacturonase activity of Kluyveromyces marxianus CCMB 322

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Queiroz Oliveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial pectinolytic enzymes are known to play a commercially important role in a number of industrial processes. Two kinds of yeast can be discerned regarding the production of enzymes. One group includes those which can produce enzymes in the absence of an inducer, and the other group comprises the yeasts that produce enzymes in the presence of an inducer. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of pectic substances, glucose, pH, and temperature on the polygalacturonase activity by Kluyveromyces marxianus CCMB 322. The yeast was grown in a fermentation broth containing different concentrations of glucose and pectic substances. The polygalacturonase activity was determined by the DNS method, and the pH and temperature were optimized using a central composite experimental design. The polygalacturonase secreted by K. marxianus CCMB 322 was partially constitutive showing optimum pH and temperature of 7.36 and 70 °C, respectively, and maintained approximately 93% of its original activity for 50 minutes at 50 °C. Thermal stability of the polygalacturonase enzyme was studied at different temperatures (50, 60, 70, and 80 °C and different incubation times (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes. This study showed that glucose can influence the regulation of the synthesis of polygalacturonase.

  18. Influence of temperature, pressure, and fluid salinity on the distribution of chlorine into serpentine minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruifang; Sun, Weidong; Zhan, Wenhuan; Ding, Xing; Zhu, Jihao; Liu, Jiqiang

    2017-09-01

    Serpentinization produces serpentine minerals that have abundant water and fluid-mobile elements (e.g., Ba, Cs, and Cl). The dehydration of serpentine minerals produces chlorine-rich fluids that may be linked with the genesis of arc magmas. However, the factors that control the distribution of chlorine into serpentine minerals remain poorly constrained. We performed serpentinization experiments at 80-500 °C and pressures from vapor saturated pressures to 20 kbar on peridotite, orthopyroxene, and olivine with salinity greatly decreased chlorine concentrations of olivine-derived serpentine produced at 400 °C and 3.0 kbar, which was associated with a decrease in silica mobility during serpentinization. By contrast, influence of fluid salinity at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar is minor. Moreover, chlorine distribution into serpentine can be influenced by primary minerals of serpentine. Serpentine formed in olivine-only experiments at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar had 0.08 ± 0.03 wt% Cl, which is significantly lower than chlorine concentrations of serpentine minerals (0.49 ± 0.36 wt%) produced in orthopyroxene-only experiments. By contrast, for experiments at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar, olivine- and orthopyroxene-derived serpentine had comparable amounts of chlorine. In particular, olivine-derived serpentine had 0.16 ± 0.09 wt% Cl that was slightly higher than chlorine concentrations of serpentine formed in olivine-only experiments, whereas orthopyroxene-derived serpentine had significantly lower chlorine concentrations than that formed in orthopyroxene-only experiments. The contrast may be associated with releases of aluminum and silica from pyroxene minerals, which possibly results in a decrease in chlorine concentrations of serpentine. The concentrations of chlorine in serpentine formed in experiments at 311 °C and 3.0 kbar were slightly lower than those in serpentine produced at 300 °C and 8.0 kbar, which may be associated with influence of pressure on the mobility of iron and silica

  19. Evaluation of the long-term variability of seawater salinity and temperature in response to natural and anthropogenic stressors in the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhakeem, Abubaker; Elshorbagy, Walid

    2013-11-15

    Evaluating the long-term variability of the seawater salinity and temperature due to climate change is a limiting economical and operational factor in planning the design of new and expansion of existing desalination plants. This need is amplified in the Arabian Gulf due to the natural arid climate and anthropological stresses related to energy exploration and ongoing major developments. The lack of data in this region further adds additional dimension to the problem. The present work represents a systematic innovative approach to evaluate the anticipated long-term changes in the seawater salinity and temperature under the stresses of projected climate change and massive industrial effluents using statistical correlation and hydrodynamic simulation. The proposed approach employs the direct relation between the net freshwater losses (evaporation) entrenched with the investigated stressors and the mean sea salinity and sea temperature variation of an inverse estuary to formulate the statistical correlation and the hydrodynamic simulation conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature Assisted in-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering Analysis of Ph-POSS/PC Polymer Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ramdayal; Naebe, Minoo; Wang, Xungai; Kandasubramanian, Balasubramanian

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic/organic nanofillers have been extensively exploited to impart thermal stability to polymer nanocomposite via various strategies that can endure structural changes when exposed a wide range of thermal environment during their application. In this abstraction, we have utilized temperature assisted in-situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to examine the structural orientation distribution of inorganic/organic nanofiller octa phenyl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (Ph-POSS) in Polycarbonate (PC) matrix from ambient temperature to 180 °C. A constant interval of 30 °C with the heating rate of 3 °C/min was utilized to guise the temperature below and above the glass transition temperature of PC followed by thermal gravimetric, HRTEM, FESEM and hydrophobic analysis at ambient temperature. The HRTEM images of Ph-POSS nano unit demonstrated hyperrectangular structure, while FESEM image of the developed nano composite rendered separated phase containing flocculated and overlapped stacking of POSS units in the PC matrix. The phase separation in polymer nanocomposite was further substantiated by thermodynamic interaction parameter (χ) and mixing energy (Emix) gleaned via Accelrys Materials studio. The SAXS spectra has demonstrated duplex peak at higher scattering vector region, postulated as a primary and secondary segregated POSS domain and followed by abundance of secondary peak with temperature augmentation.

  1. Peripartal changes in reticuloruminal pH and temperature in dairy cows differing in the susceptibility to subacute rumen acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, E; Ghareeb, K; Harder, H; Mickdam, E; Khol-Parisini, A; Zebeli, Q

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate changes in the reticuloruminal pH and temperature dynamics in periparturient dairy cows. Reticuloruminal pH and temperature measurements were conducted from 7 d before until 8 d after parturition using indwelling sensors. Nine Simmental and 4 Brown Swiss dairy cows were fed a close-up total mixed ration (52.5% neutral detergent fiber, 5.68MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter) with additional 1kg/cow per d concentrate mixture (29.5% neutral detergent fiber and 6.25MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter), starting from 2 wk before the estimated calving date. Postpartum, all cows had free access to the same close-up diet and were gradually fed increasing amounts of a concentrate-rich total mixed ration for early-lactation cows (32.7% neutral detergent fiber, 7.22MJ of net energy for lactation per kg of dry matter). Data showed depressed reticuloruminal pH early postpartum, but only in the group of cows defined as subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) susceptible (n=8), which had a higher duration time of pH 39.5°C abruptly dropped from d 2 to 1 before calving by 0.35°C and 430min/d, respectively. In conclusion, the strong inter-animal variation in reticuloruminal pH responses suggests the need for more careful monitoring and differentiated feeding management of cows during the transition period, whereby the SARA-susceptible cows may require particular attention regarding feeding management and diet composition. The abrupt decrease in reticuloruminal temperature the day before parturition may enable this noninvasive method as a management tool for prediction of parturition time. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Influence of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raijada, Dhara K; Singh, Saranjit; Bansal, Arvind K

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline pH, respectiv......The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline p......H, respectively. The samples without and with stressors were subjected for 3 months to (1) 0% RH, 25% RH, 75% RH, and 85% RH at 40 degrees C and also to (2) 60 degrees C, 80 degrees C, and 100 degrees C at 0% RH. In case of solid samples without stressors, the mixture of polymorphic and amorphous forms showed...... more degradation than the individual forms above critical relative humidity (85% RH). Similar higher degradation was observed between 75% RH and 85% RH in case of acid-stressed samples. In alkaline microenvironment, all the samples showed identical decomposition attributed to conversion of bisulfate...

  4. Batch dark fermentative hydrogen production from grass silage: The effect of inoculum, pH, temperature and VS ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, Outi; Lehtomaeki, Annimari; Rintala, Jukka [Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2008-01-15

    The potential for fermentative hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production from grass silage was evaluated in laboratory batch assays. First, two different inocula (from a dairy farm digester and digested sewage sludge) were studied with and without prior heat treatment and pH adjustment. Only the inoculum from the dairy farm digester produced H{sub 2} from grass silage. Without heat treatment, methane (CH{sub 4}) was mainly produced, but heat treatment efficiently inhibited CH{sub 4} production. pH adjustment to 6 further increased H{sub 2} production. The effects of initial pH (4, 5 and 6), temperature (35, 55 and 70 {sup circle} C) and the substrate to inoculum volatile solids (VS) ratio (henceforth VS ratio) (1:1; 1.5:1 and 2:1) on H{sub 2} production from grass silage were evaluated with heat-treated dairy farm digester sludge as inoculum. Optimal pH was found to be between 5 and 6, while at pH 4 no H{sub 2} was formed. The highest H{sub 2} yield was achieved at 70 {sup circle} C. H{sub 2} production also increased when the VS ratio was increased. However, the overall energy value of H{sub 2} compared to that of CH{sub 4} production remained low. (author)

  5. Effect of temperature of CO2 injection on the pH and freezing point of milks and creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y; Barbano, D M

    2003-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to measure the impact of CO2 injection temperature (0 degree C and 40 degrees C) on the pH and freezing point (FP) of (a) milks with different fat contents (i.e., 0, 15, 30%) and (b) creams with 15% fat but different fat characteristics. Skim milk and unhomogenized creams containing 15 and 30% fat were prepared from the same batch of whole milk and were carbonated at 0 and 40 degrees C in a continuous flow CO2 injection unit (230 ml/min). At 0 degree C, milk fat was mostly solid; at 40 degrees C, milk fat was liquid. At the same total CO2 concentration with CO2 injection at 0 degree C, milk with a higher fat content had a lower pH and FP, while with CO2 injection at 40 degrees C, milks with 0%, 15%, and 30% fat had the same pH. This indicated that less CO2 was dissolved in the fat portion of the milk when the CO2 was injected at 0 degree C than when it was injected at 40 degrees C. Three creams, 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% butter oil emulsion in skim milk, and 15% vegetable oil emulsion in skim milk were also carbonated and analyzed as described above. Vegetable oil was liquid at both 0 and 40 degrees C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C, the 15% vegetable oil emulsion had a slightly higher pH than the 15% butter oil emulsion and the 15% unhomogenized cream, indicating that the liquid vegetable oil dissolved more CO2 than the mostly solid milk fat and butter oil. No difference in the pH or FP of the 15% unhomogenized cream and 15% butter oil emulsion was observed when CO2 was injected at 0 degree C, suggesting that homogenization or physical dispersion of milk fat globules did not influence the amount of CO2 dissolved in milk fat at a CO2 injection temperature of 0 degree C. At a CO2 injection temperature of 40 degrees C and at the same total CO2 concentration, the 15% unhomogenized cream, 15% vegetable oil emulsion, and 15% butter oil emulsion had similar pH. At the same total concentration of CO2 in cream, injection

  6. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics along West Maui, Hawaii; PART IV: measurements of waves, currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity in Honolua Bay, Northwest Maui: 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, M. Kathy

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution measurements of waves, currents, water levels, temperature, salinity and turbidity were made in Honolua Bay, northwest Maui, Hawaii, during 2003 and 2004 to better understand coastal dynamics in coral reef habitats. Measurements were acquired through two different collection methods. Two hydrographic survey cruises were conducted to acquire spatially-extensive, but temporally-limited, three-dimensional measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity in the winter and summer of 2003. From mid 2003 through early 2004, a bottom-mounted instrument package was deployed in a water depth of 10 m to collect long-term, single-point high-resolution measurements of waves, currents, water levels, temperature, salinity and turbidity. The purpose of these measurements was to collect hydrographic data to learn how waves, currents and water column properties such as water temperature, salinity and turbidity vary spatially and temporally in a near-shore coral reef system adjacent to a major stream drainage. These measurements support the ongoing process studies being conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program's Coral Reef Project; the ultimate goal is to better understand the transport mechanisms of sediment, larvae, pollutants and other particles in coral reef settings. This report, the final part in a series, describes data acquisition, processing and analysis. Previous reports provided data and results on: Long-term measurements of currents, temperature, salinity and turbidity off Kahana (PART I), the spatial structure of currents, temperature, salinity and suspended sediment along West Maui (PART II), and flow and coral larvae and sediment dynamics during the 2003 summer spawning season (PART III).

  7. Development and health status of Centropomus undecimalisparasitized by Rhabdosynochus rhabdosynochus (Monogenea under different salinity and temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lemos de Mello

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the correlation of hematological parameters with the mean abundance of the monogenean helminth Rhabdosynochus rhabdosynochus in Centropomus undecimalis reared at different temperatures and salinities. The experimental conditions were: 28 °C/0 ppt (parts per thousand; 28 °C/15 ppt; 28 °C/32 ppt; 25 °C/0 ppt; 25 °C/15 ppt; and 25 °C/32 ppt. The prevalence was 100.0% in fish at 28 °C/15 ppt, 28 °C/32 ppt and 25 °C/15 ppt, which was significantly different (p < 0.05 from those at 25 °C/32 ppt. The red blood cell (RBC count, hematocrit and total leukocyte (WBC count were significantly higher in fish at 28 °C/15 ppt and 28 °C/32 ppt. The mean abundance of R. rhabdosynochus, hematocrit and RBC showed positive correlations (P < 0.05 with temperature (ρ= 0.3908; ρ= 0.4771 and ρ = 0.2812. Mean abundance showed negative correlations with hemoglobin (ρ= -0.3567 and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC (ρ = -0.2684. No correlation between abundance and salinity was detected among the experimental conditions (ρ = -0.0204. The low numbers of monogeneans recorded (min -1 and max -33 explain the few changes to fish health. This suggests that these experimental conditions may be recommended for development of rearing of C. undecimalis in Brazil, without any influence or economic losses from R. rhabdosynochus.

  8. Screening of whole yeast free-cells and optimization of pH and temperature for fructooligosaccharides production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Deffert

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Fructooligosaccharides are catalyzed by β–fructofuranosidase enzyme, produced by many microorganisms. However, in order to achieve a more profitable, low time-consuming process with lower cost, researchers have sought alternatives. This study aimed to select and identify yeasts able to produce fructooligosaccharides and evaluate the influence of pH and temperature on their synthesis. Yeast suspensions, solutions of 500 g L-1 sucrose and three values of pH (4.5, 5.5, and 6.5 and temperature (40, 50, and 60ºC were tested. Yeast species were identified by molecular techniques. Among 141 yeast isolates from grapes, 65 were able to synthesize fructooligosaccharides. The maximum concentration of fructooligosaccharides was 4.8% (w v-1, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae 222 produced 1-kestose and nystose.

  9. The effects of dietary nitrate, pH and temperature on nitrate reduction in the human oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Bojić Danijela V.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Perović Jelica M.

    2004-01-01

    Dietary nitrate is metabolized to nitrite by bacterial flora on the posterior surface of the tongue leading to increased salivary nitrite concentrations. In the acidic environment in the stomach, nitrite forms nitrous acid, a potent nitro sating agent. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dietary nitrate, pH and temperature on nitrate reduction in the human oral cavity. Nitrate reduction was monitored by nitrate reduction assay based on incubation of nitrate test solutions in t...

  10. Hematocrit and plasma osmolality values of young-of-year shortnose sturgeon following acute exposures to combinations of salinity and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegeweid, J.R.; Black, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the physiological capabilities of young-of-year (YOY) shortnose sturgeon. In this study, plasma osmolality and hematocrit values were measured for YOY shortnose sturgeon following 48-h exposures to 12 different combinations of salinity and temperature. Hematocrit levels varied significantly with temperature and age, and plasma osmolalities varied significantly with salinity and age. Plasma osmolality and hematocrit values were similar to previously published values for other sturgeons of similar age and size in similar treatment conditions. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  11. EFFECT OF PARTICLE SIZE AND BACTERIAL INOCULANT ON THE TEMPERATURE, DENSITY AND pH OF PEARL MILLET SILAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANÍBAL COUTINHO DO RÊGO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the temperature at different depths of the stack silo and strata front profile before and after the removal of silage. Also, the pH values in the upper and lower profile and the silage density of the fresh materials (FM and dry matter (DM in pearl millet silages with particle sizes of 5 or 20 mm, with or without inoculant, were assessed, using corn silage as controls. There was an interaction (P<0.05 silage × stratum profile and silage × depth profile for the temperatures before the removal of silage, and the pearl millet silages had lower temperatures in the upper stratum compared to corn. The temperature gradient between the silage and environment pearl millet and corn silos were smaller in the lower stratum profile. The temperature gradient after the removal of the silage was less than 50 cm deep at all the pearl millet silos. There were no differences in the densities of the FM and DM of the studied silages. The pH values of the silages before their removal were higher in the upper stratum and lower stratum in the bottom of all the pearl millet silages, in contrast with corn silage. The pearl millet silos had lower pH values in the lower stratum of the silo. Silages with 5 mm particle size provide lower temperatures in the middle portion of the panel before the removal of the silage. The use of bacterial inoculant in this study did not change the characteristics evaluated.

  12. Introducing global peat-specific temperature and pH calibrations based on brGDGT bacterial lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naafs, B. D. A.; Inglis, G. N.; Zheng, Y.; Amesbury, M. J.; Biester, H.; Bindler, R.; Blewett, J.; Burrows, M. A.; del Castillo Torres, D.; Chambers, F. M.; Cohen, A. D.; Evershed, R. P.; Feakins, S. J.; Gałka, M.; Gallego-Sala, A.; Gandois, L.; Gray, D. M.; Hatcher, P. G.; Honorio Coronado, E. N.; Hughes, P. D. M.; Huguet, A.; Könönen, M.; Laggoun-Défarge, F.; Lähteenoja, O.; Lamentowicz, M.; Marchant, R.; McClymont, E.; Pontevedra-Pombal, X.; Ponton, C.; Pourmand, A.; Rizzuti, A. M.; Rochefort, L.; Schellekens, J.; De Vleeschouwer, F.; Pancost, R. D.

    2017-07-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are membrane-spanning lipids from Bacteria and Archaea that are ubiquitous in a range of natural archives and especially abundant in peat. Previous work demonstrated that the distribution of bacterial branched GDGTs (brGDGTs) in mineral soils is correlated to environmental factors such as mean annual air temperature (MAAT) and soil pH. However, the influence of these parameters on brGDGT distributions in peat is largely unknown. Here we investigate the distribution of brGDGTs in 470 samples from 96 peatlands around the world with a broad mean annual air temperature (-8 to 27 °C) and pH (3-8) range and present the first peat-specific brGDGT-based temperature and pH calibrations. Our results demonstrate that the degree of cyclisation of brGDGTs in peat is positively correlated with pH, pH = 2.49 × CBTpeat + 8.07 (n = 51, R2 = 0.58, RMSE = 0.8) and the degree of methylation of brGDGTs is positively correlated with MAAT, MAATpeat (°C) = 52.18 × MBT5me‧ - 23.05 (n = 96, R2 = 0.76, RMSE = 4.7 °C). These peat-specific calibrations are distinct from the available mineral soil calibrations. In light of the error in the temperature calibration (∼4.7 °C), we urge caution in any application to reconstruct late Holocene climate variability, where the climatic signals are relatively small, and the duration of excursions could be brief. Instead, these proxies are well-suited to reconstruct large amplitude, longer-term shifts in climate such as deglacial transitions. Indeed, when applied to a peat deposit spanning the late glacial period (∼15.2 kyr), we demonstrate that MAATpeat yields absolute temperatures and relative temperature changes that are consistent with those from other proxies. In addition, the application of MAATpeat to fossil peat (i.e. lignites) has the potential to reconstruct terrestrial climate during the Cenozoic. We conclude that there is clear potential to use brGDGTs in peats and lignites to

  13. Predicting Thermodynamic Behaviors of Non-Protein Amino Acids as a Function of Temperature and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2016-03-01

    Why does life use α-amino acids exclusively as building blocks of proteins? To address that fundamental question from an energetic perspective, this study estimated the standard molal thermodynamic data for three non-α-amino acids (β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and ɛ-aminocaproic acid) and α-amino- n-butyric acid in their zwitterionic, negative, and positive ionization states based on the corresponding experimental measurements reported in the literature. Temperature dependences of their heat capacities were described based on the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. The obtained dataset was then used to calculate the standard molal Gibbs energies ( ∆G o) of the non-α-amino acids as a function of temperature and pH. Comparison of their ∆G o values with those of α-amino acids having the same molecular formula showed that the non-α-amino acids have similar ∆G o values to the corresponding α-amino acids in physiologically relevant conditions (neutral pH, <100 °C). In acidic and alkaline pH, the non-α-amino acids are thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding α-ones over a broad temperature range. These results suggest that the energetic cost of synthesis is not an important selection pressure to incorporate α-amino acids into biological systems.

  14. Laccase Production from a Temperature and pH Tolerant Fungal Strain of Trametes hirsuta (MTCC 11397

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum Dhakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laccase production by a temperature and pH tolerant fungal strain (GBPI-CDF-03 isolated from a glacial site in Indian Himalayan Region (IHR has been investigated. The fungus developed white cottony mass on potato dextrose agar and revealed thread-like mycelium under microscope. ITS region analysis of fungus showed its 100% similarity with Trametes hirsuta. The fungus tolerated temperature from 4 to 48°C ± 2 (25°C opt. and pH 3–13 (5–7 opt.. Molecular weight of laccase was determined approximately 45 kDa by native PAGE. Amplification of laccase gene fragment (corresponding to the copper-binding conserved domain contained 200 bp. The optimum pH for laccase production, at optimum growth temperature, was determined between 5.5 and 7.5. In optimization experiments, fructose and ammonium sulfate were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively, for enhancing the laccase production. Production of laccase was favored by high carbon/nitrogen ratio. Addition of CuSO4 (up to 1.0 mM induced laccase production up to 2-fold, in case of 0.4 mM concentration. Addition of organic solvents also induced the production of laccase; acetone showed the highest (2-fold induction. The study has implications in bioprospecting of ecologically resilient microbial strains.

  15. STABILITY OF BETACYANIN PIGMENTS FROM RED PURPLE PITAYA FRUIT (Hylocereus polyrhizus : INFLUENCE OF PH, TEMPERATURE, METAL IONS AND ASCORBIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang, C.S Tang, C.S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Betacyanin pigments from red-purple pitaya fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus could be an attractive source of red colourant for food application. This paper presents results on the extraction of betacyanin pigments from pitaya fruits grown locally in Malaysia. Both the flesh of the fruit and its mesocarp were investigated and it was found that the flesh had higher pigment contents compared to its peel component. The concentration of betacyanins expressed as betanin equivalents per 100 g of flesh and peel were 10.1 ± 0.6 mg and 6.7 ± 0.2 mg, respectively when 80% methanol was used.  The stability of betacyanin pigments were investigated at different pH, temperature and in presence of different concentrations of metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ and ascorbic acid. The results showed that the pigment was most stable at pH range between 5 and 6. However, it forfeited its stability to the heat induced at elevated temperatures. Metal ions (Cu2+ and Fe2+ proved to be capable of accelerating betacyanin degradation, with Cu2+ exhibiting the greatest effect. By contrast, supplementation with ascorbic acid could enhance the pigment stability against the detrimental effects caused by pH, temperature and metal ions. Nevertheless, if the concentration of ascorbic acid exceeds 0.7 %, it may change its role from pigment stabilizer to become a pro-oxidant.    Keywords: Betacyanin, pigments, pitaya fruit, Hylocereus polyrhizus, ascorbic acid

  16. Perfluorooctane sulfonate adsorption on powder activated carbon: Effect of phosphate (P) competition, pH, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Shen, Mengmeng; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Li, Kun; Liu, Jingjing; Lu, Bianhe; Tian, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC), as an adsorbent, was applied to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Laboratory batch experiments were performed to investigate the influences of phosphate (P) competition, temperature, and pH for PFOS adsorption onto PAC. The results showed that higher temperature favored PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems. The kinetic data fitted very well to the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamically, the endothermic enthalpy of the PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems were 125.07 and 21.25 kJ mol -1 , respectively. The entropy of the PFOS adsorption in single and binary systems were 0.479 and 0.092 kJ mol -1  K -1 , respectively. And the Gibbs constants were negative. These results indicated that the adsorption processes were spontaneous. The adsorption isotherms of PFOS agreed well with the Langmuir model. In the single system, PFOS adsorption decreased with increased pH value. The difference in the amount of PFOS adsorption between the single and binary systems increased at higher pH. Frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR) demonstrated that P competition increased the hydrophilicity of the PAC and the electrostatic repulsion between PFOS and PAC, then the PFOS adsorption amount decreased. It also demonstrated that, at higher temperature, increased PFOS adsorption was mainly due to the higher diffusion rate of PFOS molecules and greater number of active sites opened on the PAC surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Storage Temperature, pH and Time on Urinary Albumin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Significant decreases (p< 0.05) were observed in urinary albumin levels at 40C at the 4th week. Significant changes were seen at the 10th week in samples stored at -200C in pH unadjusted samples. Vortex mixing or centrifuging of sample of did not restore decreases in albumin level. No significant difference was observed ...

  18. Low powdered activated carbon concentrations to improve MBR sludge filterability at high salinity and low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remy, M.J.J.; Temmink, B.G.; Brink, van den P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that powdered activated carbon (PAC), when applied at very low dosages and long SRTs, reduces membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBRs). This effect was related to stronger flocs which are less sensitive to shear. Low temperature and high salt concentration

  19. Effects of salinity and temperature on respiratory metabolism of Salicornia utahensis from a Great Basin playa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyneen C. Harris; M. Ajmal Khan; Jiping Zou; Bruce N. Smith; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Plants that live in the desert playas of the Great Basin must simultaneously tolerate very high concentrations of salt and high temperature. This study characterizes the respiratory metabolism of one species growing in this environment. An isothermal calorimetric method was used to measure the dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) of stem tissue...

  20. Pengaruh Variasi pH dan Temperatur Sintering Terhadap Nilai Sensitivitas Material TiO2 Sebagai Sensor Gas CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Silviana Widianti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan berbagai macam pengupayaan untuk mengoptimalkan potensi Titanium dioksida (TiO2 sebagai sensor gas, mengingat TiO2 merupakan semikonduktor metal oksida. Pada penelitian ini digunakan TiO2 dalam bentuk serbuk, dengan pelarutnya H2SO4 yang diencerkan dengan air distilasi sehingga terbentuk variasi pH 1, 3, dan 5. Metode sol-gel dilakukan dengan perendaman dan dilanjutkan stiring selama 2,5 jam, kecepatan 700 rpm, dan temperatur 200ºC . Drying dilakukan selama 2 jam pada temperatur 350ºC, selanjutnya serbuk dikompaksi pada tekanan 200 bar agar terbentuk pellet. Pelet kemudian disintering pada temperatur 700,800, dan 900ºC selama 1 jam. Karakterisasi material dilakukan dengan Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM dan X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Sedangkan untuk luas permukaan spesifik sampel TiO2 diuji dengan BET Analyser. Morfologi TiO2 yang dihasilkan dari proses sol-gel berbentuk bulat (spherical dan memiliki fase stabil anatase. Nilai sensitivitas didapatkan dari pengujian pada temperatur operasi 100ºC dan variasi volume gas CO 5L, 12,5L, 25L. Respon tercepat adalah material TiO2 pH 3 yang disinter dengan temperatur 900ºC, serta memiliki ukuran pori 50,83 nm

  1. Investigation of pH and Temperature Profiles in the GI Tract of Fasted Human Subjects Using the Intellicap(®) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziolek, Mirko; Grimm, Michael; Becker, Dieter; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Zou, Hans; Shimizu, Jeff; Wanke, Christoph; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Weitschies, Werner

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) pH and temperature profiles under fasted-state conditions were investigated in two studies with each 10 healthy human subjects using the IntelliCap(®) system. This telemetric drug delivery device enabled the determination of gastric emptying time, small bowel transit time, and colon arrival time by significant pH and temperature changes. The study results revealed high variability of GI pH and transit times. The gastric transit of IntelliCap(®) was characterized by high fluctuations of the pH with mean values ranging from pH 1.7 to pH 4.7. Gastric emptying was observed after 7-202 min (median: 30 min). During small bowel transit, which had a duration of 67-532 min (median: 247 min), pH values increased slightly from pH 5.9-6.3 in proximal parts to pH 7.4-7.8 in distal parts. Colonic pH conditions were characterized by values fluctuating mainly between pH 5 and pH 8. The pH profiles and transit times described in this work are highly relevant for the comprehension of drug delivery of solid oral dosage forms comprising ionizable drugs and excipients with pH-dependent solubility. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. Characterization of protease and effects of temperature and salinity on the biochemical changes during fermentation of Antarctic krill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan; Tian, Lili; Xue, Yong; Li, Zhaojie; Hou, Hu; Xue, Changhu

    2017-08-01

    Despite their abundance, Antarctic krill are underutilized because of numerous difficulties in their commercial processing. Ideally, fermentation technology can be applied to transform them into a popular condiment. In addition to the exploration of protease properties, the present study aimed to evaluate proteinase activity, pH, amino nitrogen, and histamine formation during fermentation at different temperatures and salt treatments. Even though the activity of Antarctic krill protease reached a maximum at 40 °C and pH 7, it was stable at 30 °C and pH 7-9. Among the metal ions tested, Ca2+ , Mg2+ and K+ increased protease activity, in contrast to Zn2+ and Cu2+ . Within each treatment, the highest protease activity and amino nitrogen content, as well as the lowest histamine level, were observed on day 12 of fermentation. Treatment at 35 °C with 180 g kg-1 salt led to the production of maximum amino nitrogen (0.0352 g kg-1 ) and low histamine (≤0.0497 g kg-1 ). Krill paste fermented for 12 days at 35 °C with 180 g kg-1 salt exhibited the optimal quality and properties, suggesting an efficient method for fermentation of Antarctic krill and other aquatic resources. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Fuzzy control of dissolved oxygen, pH and temperature of bubble column bioreactor for Candida utilis biomass production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Arteaga Miñano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An automatic control system by dissolved oxygen (DO fuzzy logic, pH and temperature in a bubble column bioreactor (BCB for Candida utilis CECT 10704 biomass production was implemented. Their performance was compared with the classical proportional control. A data acquisition card for the control was designed, built and programmed, using the 4.14 Eagle software for the design and the 3.0 Microcode Studio Plus for programming. A program in 6.0 Visual Basic, which linked up with 7.0 MatLab for fuzzy control was developed; using Mandani inference, membership functions of input and output trapezoidal and triangular; 4 rules for the DO, 3 for pH and 3 for temperature, with connector and type and for defuzzifying the centroid method. Evaluation of biomass production was performed by determining dry weight and growth kinetics with the Gompertz model.The fuzzy control performance of DO, pH and temperature showed superiority in proportional control, characterized by a very close control to set point and a low standard deviation. DO Fuzzy control at 6 ppm, pH of 6 and 30°C, allowed to have the greatest dry weight of 7.65±0.02 g/L and the highest maximum growth of 1.51±0.2, the lowest adaptation phase of 0.27±0.01 h and the greatest specific speed of Candida utilis growth rate of 0.7±0.01 h-1.

  4. Adsorption of divalent lead ions by zeolites and activated carbon: effects of pH, temperature, and ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kelly B; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2004-01-01

    Lead alloy bullets used at the 2600 military small arm ranges and 9000 nonmilitary outdoor shooting ranges in the United States are a source of mobilized lead ions under conditions of low pH, significant changes in ionic strength, changes in the reduction oxidation potential (redox), and through binding metal ions to soil organic matter. Once mobile, these lead ions can contaminate adjacent soil and water. Batch adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies were conducted to compare and evaluate different types of adsorbents for lead ion removal from aqueous media. The effects on lead ion absorption from pH changes, competing ions, and temperature increases were also investigated. Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and naturally occurring zeolites (clinoptilolite and chabazite) were selected because of their relative low cost and because the zeolites are potential point-of-use materials for mitigating wastewater runoff. Molecular sieves, Faujasite (13X) and Linde type A (5A) were selected because they provide a basis for comparison with previous studies and represent well-characterized materials. The relative rate for lead ion adsorption was: 13X > chabazite > clinoptilolite > 5A > activated carbon. Modeling lead ion adsorption by these adsorbents using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm expressions determined the adsorbents' capacity for lead ion removal from aqueous media. 13X, 5A, and activated carbon best fit the Langmuir isotherm expression; chabazite and clinoptilolite best fit the Freundlich isotherm. Applications of chabazite would require pH values between 4 and 11, clinoptilolite between 3 and 11, while activated carbon would operate at a pH above 7. Ionic competition reduced lead ion removal by the zeolites, but enhanced activated carbon performance. Increasing temperature improved adsorption performance for the zeolites; activated carbon lead ion adsorption was temperature independent.

  5. The Influence of Environmental Salinity, Temperature, Ionizing Irradiation and Yellow or Silver Stage on Lipid Metabolism in the Gills of the European Eel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Abraham, S.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the incorporation of [32P]phosphate and [14C]acetate into gill lipids in vivo depends also on environmental salinity. - 2. Ionizing irradiation (1000 r) results in a relatively enhanced incorporation of [32P]phosphate into phosphatidyl choline and of [14C]acetate i......The influence of temperature on the incorporation of [32P]phosphate and [14C]acetate into gill lipids in vivo depends also on environmental salinity. - 2. Ionizing irradiation (1000 r) results in a relatively enhanced incorporation of [32P]phosphate into phosphatidyl choline and of [14C......]acetate into triglycerides and wax esters in vivo. - 3. When gill tissue is removed from the animal and incubated in vitro, a pronounced dependence of lipid metabolism on previous environmental salinity is not observed...

  6. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pančić, M.; Hansen, Peter Juul; Tammilehto, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5 and 8 °C...... the variation observed due to the whole range of changes in either pH or temperature. Climate change may therefore not affect the species as such, but may lead to changes in the population structure of the species, with the strains exhibiting high phenotypic plasticity, in terms of temperature and pH tolerance...

  7. The effects of pH and temperature on phosphate and nitrate uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed optimum pH ranges for the uptake of phosphate and nitrate to be 7 to 9 and 5 to 7, respectively. Maximum nutrient uptake was found to occur at 25oC with phosphate concentration decreasing from 64.74 to 10.21 mg/l, 63.09 to 8.54 mg/l and 64.47 to 6.36 mg/l, for isolates 'A', 'B' and 'C', respectively.

  8. Relationships Between Temperature, pH, and Crusting on Mg/Ca Ratios in Laboratory-Grown Neogloboquadrina Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine V.; Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S.; Hill, Tessa M.; Russell, Ann D.; Spero, Howard J.

    2017-11-01

    Mg/Ca ratio paleothermometry in foraminifera is an important tool for the reconstruction and interpretation of past environments. However, existing Mg/Ca:temperature relationships for planktic species inhabiting middle- and high-latitude environments are limited by a lack of information about the development and impact of low-Mg/Ca ratio "crusts" and the influence of the carbonate system on Mg/Ca ratios in these groups. To address this, we cultured individual specimens of Neogloboquadrina incompta and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma in seawater across a range of temperature (6°-12°C) and pH (7.4-8.2). We found by laser ablation inductively couple mass spectrometry analyses of shells that culture-grown crust calcite in N. incompta had a lower Mg/Ca ratio than ontogenetic calcite formed at the same temperature, suggesting that temperature is not responsible for the low-Mg/Ca ratio of neogloboquadrinid crusts. The Mg/Ca:temperature relationship for ontogenetic calcite in N. incompta was consistent with the previously published culture-based relationship, and no significant relationship was found between Mg/Ca ratios and pH in this species. However, the Mg/Ca ratio in laboratory-cultured N. pachyderma was much higher than that reported in previous core top and sediment trap samples, due to lack of crust formation in culture. Application of our ontogenetic calcite-specific Mg/Ca:temperature relationships to fossil N. pachyderma and N. incompta from five intervals in cores from the Santa Barbara Basin and the Bering Sea shows that excluding crust calcite in fossil specimens may improve Mg/Ca-based temperature estimates.

  9. Salinization and Saline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  10. Evaluation of pH, alkalinity and temperature during air stripping process for ammonia removal from landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Juacyara Carbonelli; Moura, Denise; Costa, Ana Paula; Yokoyama, Lidia; Araujo, Fabiana Valeria da Fonseca; Cammarota, Magali Christe; Cardillo, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the air stripping technology for the removal of ammonia from landfill leachates. In this process, pH, temperature, airflow rate and operation time were investigated. Furthermore, the relationship between the leachate alkalinity and the ammonia removal efficiency during the process was studied. The leachate used in the tests was generated in the Gramacho Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil). The best results were obtained with a temperature of 60(o)C, and they were independent of the pH value for 7 h of operation (the ammonia nitrogen removal was greater than 95%). A strong influence of the leachate alkalinity on the ammonia nitrogen removal was observed; as the alkalinity decreased, the ammonia concentration also decreased because of prior CO2 removal, which increased the pH and consequently favored the NH3 stripping. The air flow rate, in the values evaluated (73, 96 and 120 L air.h(-1).L(-1) of leachate), did not influence the results.

  11. Brain temperature changes during selective cooling with endovascular intracarotid cold saline infusion: simulation using human data fitted with an integrated mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimark, Matthew Aaron Harold; Konstas, Angelos Aristeidis; Lee, Leslie; Laine, Andrew Francis; Pile-Spellman, John; Choi, Jae

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of rapid cerebral hypothermia induction in humans with intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI) was investigated using a hybrid approach of jugular venous bulb temperature (JVBT) sampling and mathematical modeling of transient and steady state brain temperature distribution. This study utilized both forward mathematical modeling, in which brain temperatures were predicted based on input saline temperatures, and inverse modeling, where brain temperatures were inferred based on JVBT. Changes in ipsilateral anterior circulation territory temperature (IACT) were estimated in eight patients as a result of 10 min of a cold saline infusion of 33 ml/min. During ICSI, the measured JVBT dropped by 0.76±0.18°C while the modeled JVBT decreased by 0.86±0.18°C. The modeled IACT decreased by 2.1±0.23°C. In the inverse model, IACT decreased by 1.9±0.23°C. The results of this study suggest that mild cerebral hypothermia can be induced rapidly and safely with ICSI in the neuroangiographical setting. The JVBT corrected mathematical model can be used as a non-invasive estimate of transient and steady state cerebral temperature changes.

  12. High-density genetic map and identification of QTLs for responses to temperature and salinity stresses in the model brown alga Ectocarpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avia, Komlan; Coelho, Susana M.; Montecinos, Gabriel J.; Cormier, Alexandre; Lerck, Fiona; Mauger, Stéphane; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Cock, J. Mark; Boudry, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture of adaptation of brown algae to environmental stresses such as temperature and salinity is of evolutionary as well as of practical interest. The filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus sp. is a model for the brown algae and its genome has been sequenced. As sessile organisms, brown algae need to be capable of resisting the various abiotic stressors that act in the intertidal zone (e.g. osmotic pressure, temperature, salinity, UV radiation) and previous studies have shown that an important proportion of the expressed genes is regulated in response to hyposaline, hypersaline or oxidative stress conditions. Using the double digest RAD sequencing method, we constructed a dense genetic map with 3,588 SNP markers and identified 39 QTLs for growth-related traits and their plasticity under different temperature and salinity conditions (tolerance to high temperature and low salinity). GO enrichment tests within QTL intervals highlighted membrane transport processes such as ion transporters. Our study represents a significant step towards deciphering the genetic basis of adaptation of Ectocarpus sp. to stress conditions and provides a substantial resource to the increasing list of tools generated for the species. PMID:28256542

  13. Effects of salinity and temperature on inactivation and repair potential of Enterococcus faecalis following medium- and low-pressure ultraviolet irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P-Y; Chu, X-N; Liu, L; Hu, J-Y

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the medium-pressure (MP) and low-pressure (LP) Ultraviolet (UV) susceptibility and the repair potential of Enterococcus faecalis (DSM 20478) after UV treatment. A range of UV doses from 4 to 19 mJ cm(-2) was selected in this study. Photoreactivation and dark repair performance were investigated under fluorescent light or in the dark respectively. The inactivation and repair performance of UV disinfection under a range of salinities (0, 1%, 3%) and temperature (4 and 25°C) were compared. Results indicated that MP UV exposure resulted in higher inactivation efficiency against Ent. faecalis than LP UV exposure. For repair potential, LP UV resulted in a greater level of light repair than MP UV. Effect of salinity on the inactivation and repair of Ent. faecalis was correlated with UV sources, whereas low temperature generally adversely affected the inactivation efficiency and final repair levels after both MP and LP UV exposure. Both salinity and temperature demonstrated to play an important role in the inactivation and repair capability when UV light was used to treat ballast water. Considering that UV-treated ballast water is exposed or discharged to marine water environment in many countries with various temperature and salinity conditions, results of this study provide significant implications for the management of public health associated with ballast water treatment and discharge. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Low temperature lignocellulose pretreatment: effects and interactions of pretreatment pH are critical for maximizing enzymatic monosaccharide yields from wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Johansen, Katja S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The recent development of improved enzymes and pentose-using yeast for cellulosic ethanol processes calls for new attention to the lignocellulose pretreatment step. This study assessed the influence of pretreatment pH, temperature, and time, and their interactions on the enzymatic...... C for 10 min. The maximal enzymatic glucose and xylose yields from the solid, pretreated wheat straw fraction were obtained after pretreatments at the most extreme pH values (pH 1 or pH 13) at the maximum pretreatment temperature of 140 degrees C. Surface response models revealed significantly...... correlating interactions of the pretreatment pH and temperature on the enzymatic liberation of both glucose and xylose from pretreated, solid wheat straw. The influence of temperature was most pronounced with the acidic pretreatments, but the highest enzymatic monosaccharide yields were obtained after...

  15. Transcriptomic Analysis of Metabolic Pathways in Milkfish That Respond to Salinity and Temperature Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yau-Chung Hu

    Full Text Available Milkfish (Chanos chanos, an important marine aquaculture species in southern Taiwan, show considerable euryhalinity but have low tolerance to sudden drops in water temperatures in winter. Here, we used high throughput next-generation sequencing (NGS to identify molecular and biological processes involved in the responses to environmental changes. Preliminary tests revealed that seawater (SW-acclimated milkfish tolerated lower temperatures than the fresh water (FW-acclimated group. Although FW- and SW-acclimated milkfish have different levels of tolerance for hypothermal stress, to date, the molecular physiological basis of this difference has not been elucidated. Here, we performed a next-generation sequence analysis of mRNAs from four groups of milkfish. We obtained 29669 unigenes with an average length of approximately 1936 base pairs. Gene ontology (GO analysis was performed after gene annotation. A large number of genes for molecular regulation were identified through a transcriptomic comparison in a KEGG analysis. Basal metabolic pathways involved in hypothermal tolerance, such as glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism, amino acid catabolism and oxidative phosphorylation, were analyzed using PathVisio and Cytoscape software. Our results indicate that in response to hypothermal stress, genes for oxidative phosphorylation, e.g., succinate dehydrogenase, were more highly up-regulated in SW than FW fish. Moreover, SW and FW milkfish used different strategies when exposed to hypothermal stress: SW milkfish up-regulated oxidative phosphorylation and catabolism genes to produce more energy budget, whereas FW milkfish down-regulated genes related to basal metabolism to reduce energy loss.

  16. Effects of temperature, salinity, and irradiance on the growth of harmful algal bloom species Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae) isolated from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Huang, Bozhu; Hu, Zhangxi; Tang, Yingzhong; Duan, Shunshan; Zhang, Chengwu

    2017-05-01

    Blooms of Phaeocystis globosa have been frequently reported in Chinese coastal waters, causing serious damage to marine ecosystems. To better understand the ecological characteristics of P. globosa in Chinese coastal waters that facilitate its rapid expansion, the effects of temperature, salinity and irradiance on the growth of P. globosa from the South China Sea were examined in the laboratory. The saturating irradiance for the growth of P. globosa ( I s) was 60 μmol/(m2•s), which was lower than those of other harmful algal species (70-114 μmol/(m2•s)). A moderate growth rate of 0.22/d was observed at 2 μmol/(m2•s) (the minimum irradiance in the experiment), and photo-inhibition did not occur at 230 μmol/(m2•s) (the maximum irradiance in the experiment). Exposed to 42 different combinations of temperatures (10-31°C) and salinities (10-40) under saturating irradiance, P. globosa exhibited its maximum specific growth rate of 0.80/d at the combinations of 24°C and 35, and 27°C and 40. The optimum growth rates (>0.80/d) were observed at temperatures ranging from 24 to 27°C and salinities from 35 to 40. While P. globosa was able to grow well at temperatures from 20°C to 31°C and salinities from 20 to 40, it could not grow at temperatures lower than 15°C or salinities lower than 15. Factorial analysis revealed that temperature and salinity has similar influences on the growth of this species. This strain of P. globosa not only prefers higher temperatures and higher salinity, but also possesses a flexible nutrient competing strategy, adapted to lower irradiance. Therefore, the P. globosa population from South China Sea should belong to a new ecotype. There is also a potentially high risk of blooms developing in this area throughout the year.

  17. Five Year Field Evaluation of Prosopis alba Clones on pH 9–10 Soils in Argentina Selected for Growth in the Greenhouse at Seawater Salinities (45 dS m−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Ewens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Prosopis alba seedlings, that grew at the 45 dS m−1 salinity level in a previous study of growth and survival of Argentine and Peruvian Prosopis, were propagated by rooting cuttings and established in a seed orchard/long term evaluation trial on soils with low salinity (EC 5.1–7.5 dS m−1 but high pH (8.9 to 10.2. A pH gradient occurred in the field with values ranging from pH 9.4 in block 1 to pH 10.3 in block 5. After five years growth, almost all of the clones had a mean height greater than 4 m and one clone was more than 5 m. Ten of the 21 tested clones had significantly greater biomass growth than the three seed propagated check varieties. The broad-sense (i.e., clone mean heritability was estimated to be 0.45 for biomass, 0.53 for diameter and 0.59 for height indicating that strong genetic gains should be possible by selecting and vegetatively propagating the best genotypes. In the block with the highest pH values, two clones that appear to be P. alba × P. ruscifolia hybrids (i.e., P. vinallilo had the greatest biomass. Correlations between growth during the last two months in the high salinity hydroponic greenhouse selection system and growth in the field were significant (R2 = 0.262 and positive, although the relationship was negative for putative P. vinallilo clones (R2 = 0.938. The several fold increase in biomass of some of the clones over the three check varieties, suggests that the greenhouse screen was successful in identifying superior salt tolerant clones. Apparently whether the greenhouse seedlings had lesser (~1 cm to greater (~3 cm height growth was not as important as just having a healthy live apical meristem. The observed salt tolerance of the putative P. vinalillo clones may prove useful as rootstocks for recently described high pod producing P. alba clones.

  18. The effect of temperature and pH on biomass and bioactive compound production in Silybum marianum hairy root cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Rahimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The seed extract of Silybum marianum contains seven flavonolignans known collectively as silymarin. These metabolites can be produced in hairy root cultures of S. marianum. The effect of different physical factors can change root biomass and silymarin production which has been investigated in the present study. Methods: The effect of different physical factors of temperature (30 ºC/25 ºC, 25 ºC/25 ºC and 15 ºC/20 ºC in 16 h/8 h cycle and pH (5, 5.7, 6 and 7 were evaluated with respect to the root biomass and silymarin production in hairy root cultures of the plant. Results: Incubation temperature, 25 ºC /25 ºC promoted the silymarin production in 4-week old hairy roots (0.18 mg/g DW as compared with the cultures treated with 15 ºC/20 ºC and 30 ºC/25 ºC (0.13 and 0.12 mg/g DW, respectively. Maximal increases in biomass and silymarin accumulation occurred in the root cultures grown in pH 5 and 25 ºC/25 ºC (0.45 g and 0.26 mg/g DW. The content of silybin, isosilybin, silychristin, silydianin were 0.025, 0.024, 0.061 and 0.095 mg/g DW, respectively which were higher than those grown in higher pH. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that 25 ºC/25 ºC and acidic environment of medium are beneficial for silymarin production using hairy root cultures. Furthermore, lipoxygenase (LOX activity was strongly affected by pH which suggested that acidic environment may act as inducing signal for LOX activity and subsequently greater silymarin production.

  19. Temperature, but not pH, compromises sea urchin fertilization and early development under near-future climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Maria; Ho, Melanie; Selvakumaraswamy, Paulina; Nguyen, Hong D.; Dworjanyn, Symon A.; Davis, Andy R.

    2009-01-01

    Global warming is causing ocean warming and acidification. The distribution of Heliocidaris erythrogramma coincides with the eastern Australia climate change hot spot, where disproportionate warming makes marine biota particularly vulnerable to climate change. In keeping with near-future climate change scenarios, we determined the interactive effects of warming and acidification on fertilization and development of this echinoid. Experimental treatments (20–26°C, pH 7.6–8.2) were tested in all combinations for the ‘business-as-usual’ scenario, with 20°C/pH 8.2 being ambient. Percentage of fertilization was high (>89%) across all treatments. There was no difference in percentage of normal development in any pH treatment. In elevated temperature conditions, +4°C reduced cleavage by 40 per cent and +6°C by a further 20 per cent. Normal gastrulation fell below 4 per cent at +6°C. At 26°C, development was impaired. As the first study of interactive effects of temperature and pH on sea urchin development, we confirm the thermotolerance and pH resilience of fertilization and embryogenesis within predicted climate change scenarios, with negative effects at upper limits of ocean warming. Our findings place single stressor studies in context and emphasize the need for experiments that address ocean warming and acidification concurrently. Although ocean acidification research has focused on impaired calcification, embryos may not reach the skeletogenic stage in a warm ocean. PMID:19324767

  20. Effect of temperature, sodium chloride, and pH on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in cabbage juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, D E; Brackett, R E; Beuchat, L R

    1986-01-01

    Human illness and death have resulted from the consumption of milk, cheese, and cole slaw contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Since the effects of temperature, NaCl, and pH on the growth of the organism in cabbage were unknown, a series of experiments was designed to investigate these factors. Two strains (LCDC 81-861 and Scott A, both serotype 4b) were examined. At 30 degrees C, the viable population of the LCDC 81-861 strain increased in sterile unclarified cabbage juice (CJ) containing 0 to 1.5% NaCl; a decrease in the population of both strains occurred in juice containing greater than or equal to 2% NaCl. At 5 degrees C, the population of the Scott A strain in CJ containing up to 5% NaCl was reduced by about 90% over a 70-day period; the LCDC 81-861 strain was more sensitive to refrigeration but remained viable in CJ containing less than or equal to 3.5% NaCl for 70 days. Growth in CJ at 30 degrees C resulted in a decrease in pH from 5.6 to 4.1 within 8 days. Death of L. monocytogenes occurred at 30 degrees C when the organism was inoculated into sterile CJ adjusted to pH less than or equal to 4.6 with lactic acid. No viable cells were detected after 3 days at pH less than or equal to 4.2. At 5 degrees C, the rate of death at pH less than or equal to 4.8 was slower than at 30 degrees C.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3089158

  1. Interactive effects of pH, temperature and light during ammonia toxicity events in Elodea canadensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, J.J.C.; Heide, van der T.; Smolders, A.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Increased nutrient loading threatens many freshwater ecosystems. Elevated temperatures may increase the sensitivity to eutrophication in these ecosystems. Higher concentrations of possibly toxic reduced nitrogen (NHx) in the water layer may be expected as production and anaerobic breakdown rates

  2. NCEI-TSG: A Global in situ Sea-surface Salinity and Temperature Database of Thermosalinograph (TSG) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. M.; Wang, Z.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E. J.; Biddle, M.; Baker-Yeboah, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) has constructed a Global Thermosalinograph Database (NCEI-TSG) to facilitate access to these in situ sea-surface salinity and temperature measurements. This database provides a comprehensive set of quality-controlled in situ sea-surface salinity (SSS) and temperature (SST) measurements collected from over 200 vessels during the period 1989 to the present. Compared to other TSG datasets, these data have several advantages. 1) The NCEI-TSG is the world's most complete TSG dataset, containing all data from the different TSG data assembly centers, e.g. Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS), Global Ocean Surface Underway Data (GOSUD) and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), with more historical data from NCEI's archive to be added. 2) When different versions of a dataset are available, the dataset with the highest resolution is always chosen. 3) All data are converted to a common NetCDF format, employing enhanced metadata, following Attribute Convention for Dataset Discovery (ACDD) and Climate and Forecast (CF) conventions, to increase the overall quality and searchability of both the data and metadata. 4) All data are processed using the same 11-step quality control procedures and criteria and flagged using a two-level flag system to provide a well-organized, uniformly quality-controlled TSG dataset for the user community. The NCEI-TSG, a unique dataset for in situ sea-surface observations, serves as a significant resource for establishing match-ups with satellite SST and SSS observations for validation and comparisons. The NCEI-TSG database will significantly contribute to the in situ component of the NOAA Satellite SSS Quality Monitor (4SQM) project (under development). This dataset facilitates assessments of global SST and SSS variability and the analysis of patterns and trends at various regional and temporal scales, enabling new insights in climate

  3. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  4. Improvement of the Method for Reconstructing the Temperature and Salinity Three-Dimensional Fields of the Black Sea Based on Insufficient Measurements and Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Knysh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the results of two special numerical experiments aimed at improving the previously proposed procedure of reconstructing salinity and temperature three-dimensional fields based on the altimetry data and the insufficient measurements performed at the stations and the Argo buoys in 2012. In the Experiment 1, the monthly average coefficients of sea level linear dependence and depths where the salinity values of the “zero” gradation altimetry level profile lie within the salinity profiles of positive and negative gradations are applied. The procedure for calculating the daily average coefficients of the depth linear trends is realized in the Experiment 2. It is shown that the thermohaline fields reconstructed in the Experiment 2 for the deepwater area are more accurate; on the horizons of the 100–500 m layer their values range smoothly from one day to another. The Black Sea hydrophysical fields are reconstructed by assimilation in the model of three-dimensional thermohaline parameters in the reanalysis for 2012. It is revealed that, as compared to the observations on the overwhelming majority of horizons in the 0–500 m layer (the Experiment 2, the standard root-mean-square deviations of temperature and salinity are lower than those in Experiment 1. The root of the measured salinity field dispersion exceeds the standard deviations on all the horizons within 0–500 m, inclusive. Application of the daily average coefficients of the linear trends for reconstructing three-dimensional fields of temperature and salinity, and their subsequent assimilation in the model is preferable. It is revealed that the model of the upper 0–100 m layer thermodynamics requires improvement.

  5. Aqueous singlet oxygen reaction kinetics of furfuryl alcohol: effect of temperature, pH, and salt content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appiani, Elena; Ossola, Rachele; Latch, Douglas E; Erickson, Paul R; McNeill, Kristopher

    2017-04-19

    The rate constant for the reaction between furfuryl alcohol (FFA) and singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) in aqueous solution was measured as a function of temperature, pH and salt content employing both steady-state photolysis (β value determination) and time-resolved singlet oxygen phosphorescence methods. The latter provided more precise and reproducible data. The reaction rate constant, k rxn,FFA , had a relatively small temperature dependence, no pH dependence and showed a small increase in the presence of high salt concentrations (+19% with 1 M NaCl). A critical review of the available literature suggested that the widely used value of 1.2 × 10 8 M -1 s -1 is likely overestimated. Therefore, we recommend the use of 1.00 × 10 8 M -1 s -1 for reactions performed in low ionic strength aqueous solutions (freshwater) at 22 °C. Furthermore, corrections are provided that should be applied when working at higher or lower temperatures, and/or at high salt concentrations (seawater).

  6. Change in coccolith morphology by responding to temperature and salinity in coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) isolated from the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, K.; Satoh, M.; Harada, N.; Suzuki, I.; Shiraiwa, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Strains of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) collected from the subarctic North Pacific and Arctic Oceans during the R/V MIRAI cruise in 2010 (MR10-05) were established as clone cultures and have been maintained in the laboratory at 15 °C and 32 ‰ salinity. To study the physiological responses of coccolith formation to changes in temperature and salinity, growth experiments and morphometric investigations were performed on two strains of MR57N isolated from the northern Bering Sea (56°58' N, 167°11' W) and MR70N at the Chukchi Sea (69°99' N, 168° W). This is the first report of a detailed morphometric and morphological investigation of Arctic Ocean coccolithophore strains. The specific growth rates at the logarithmic growth phases in both strains markedly increased as temperature was elevated from 5 to 20 °C, although coccolith productivity (the percentage of calcified cells) was similar at 10-20 % at all temperatures. On the other hand, the specific growth rate of strain MR70N was affected less by changes in salinity in the range 26-35 ‰, but the proportion of calcified cells decreased at high and low salinities. According to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, coccolith morphotypes can be categorized into Type B/C on the basis of their biometrical parameters, such as length of the distal shield (LDS), length of the inner central area (LICA), and the thickness of distal shield elements. The central area elements of coccoliths varied from grilled type to closed type when temperature was increased or salinity was decreased, and coccolith size decreased simultaneously. Coccolithophore cell size also decreased with increasing temperature, although the variation in cell size was slightly greater at the lower salinity level. This indicates that subarctic and arctic coccolithophore strains can survive in a wide range of seawater temperatures and at lower salinities due to their marked morphometric adaptation ability. Because all

  7. Degradation kinetics of fisetin and quercetin in solutions affected by medium pH, temperature and co-existed proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of medium pH, temperature and coexisted proteins on the degradation of two flavonoids fisetin and quercetin were assessed by spectroscopic method in the present study. Based on the measured degradation rate constants (k, fisetin was more stable than quercetin in all cases. Increasing medium pH from 6.0 to 7.5 at 37°C enhanced respective k values of fisetin and quercetin from 8.30x10−3 and 2.81x10−2 to 0.202 and 0.375 h-1 (P<0.05. In comparison with their degradation at 37°C, fisetin and quercetin showed larger k values at higher temperature (0.124 and 0.245 h−1 at 50°C, or 0.490 and 1.42 h−1 at 65°C. Four protein products in medium could stabilize the two flavonoids (P<0.05, as these proteins at 0.10 g L-1 decreased respective k values of fisetin and quercetin to 2.28x10−2-2.98x10−2 and 4.37´10−2-5.97x10−2 h−1. Hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and the two flavonoids was evidenced responsible for the stabilization, as sodium dodecyl sulfate could destroy the stabilization significantly (P<0.05. Casein and soybean protein provided greater stabilization than whey protein isolate. It is thus concluded that higher temperature and alkaline pH can enhance flavonoid loss, whereas coexisted proteins as flavonoid stabilizers can inhibit flavonoid degradation.

  8. Modeling growth of three bakery product spoilage molds as a function of water activity, temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Onno, Bernard; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of water activity, pH and storage temperature on the growth of Eurotium repens, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium corylophilum, isolated from spoiled bakery products. Moreover, the behaviors of these three mold species were compared to assess whether a general modeling framework may be set and re-used in future research on bakery spoilage molds. The mold growth was modeled by building two distinct Gamma-type secondary models: one on the lag time for growth and another one on the radial growth rate. A set of 428 experimental growth curves was generated. The effect of temperature (15-35 °C), water activity (0.80-0.98) and pH (3-7) was assessed. Results showed that it was not possible to apply the same set of secondary model equations to the three mold species given that the growth rate varied significantly with the factors pH and water activity. In contrast, the temperature effect on both growth rate and lag time of the three mold species was described by the same equation. The equation structure and model parameter values of the Gamma models were also compared per mold species to assess whether a relationship between lag time and growth rate existed. There was no correlation between the two growth responses for E. repens, but a slight one for A. niger and P. corylophilum. These findings will help in determining bakery product shelf-life and guiding future work in the predictive mycology field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined, short-term exposure to reduced seawater pH and elevated temperature induces community shifts in an intertidal meiobenthic assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevenkamp, Lisa; Ong, Ee Zin; Van Colen, Carl; Vanreusel, Ann; Guilini, Katja

    2018-02-01

    In future global change scenarios the surface ocean will experience continuous acidification and rising temperatures. While effects of both stressors on marine, benthic communities are fairly well studied, consequences of the interaction of both factors remain largely unknown. We performed a short-term microcosm experiment exposing a soft-bottom community from an intertidal flat in the Westerscheldt estuary to two levels of seawater pH (ambient pH T  = 7.9, reduced pH T  = 7.5) and temperature (10 °C ambient and 13 °C elevated temperature) in a crossed design. After 8 weeks, meiobenthic community structure and nematode staining ratios, as a proxy for mortality, were compared between treatments and structural changes were related to the prevailing abiotic conditions in the respective treatments (pore water pH T , sediment grain size, total organic matter content, total organic carbon and nitrogen content, phytopigment concentrations and carbonate concentration). Pore water pH T profiles were significantly altered by pH and temperature manipulations and the combination of elevated temperature and reduced pH intensified the already more acidic porewater below the oxic zone. Meiofauna community composition was significantly affected by the combination of reduced pH and elevated temperature resulting in increased densities of predatory Platyhelminthes, reduced densities of Copepoda and Nauplii and complete absence of Gastrotricha compared to the experimental control. Furthermore, nematode staining ratio was elevated when seawater pH was reduced pointing towards reduced degradation rates of dead nematode bodies. The observed synergistic interactions of pH and temperature on meiobenthic communities and abiotic sediment characteristics underline the importance of multistressor experiments when addressing impacts of global change on the marine environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  11. Temperature and pH responsive behaviours of CMC/AAc hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, Abdel Wahab M. [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)]. E-mail: ab_nagga@yahoo.com; Alla, Safaa G. Abd [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Said, Hossam M. [Department of Radiation Chemistry, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, P.O. Box 29, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt)

    2006-01-10

    The temperature and pH-responsive characters of hydrogels prepared from aqueous solutions containing 4.2 and 25% (w/v) carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and acrylic acid (AAc), respectively under the effect of accelerated electrons was investigated. Even though the initial content of hydrogels solution is constant, the swelling in water and responsive characters were greatly dependent on electron beam irradiation dose. In this regard, the percentage swelling in water of the hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy is relatively higher than that prepared at 80 kGy. However, both hydrogels displayed super water absorbing behaviour at room temperature in the range of {approx}3500-4000%. The hydrogels exhibit a relatively low tendency to swell in methanol with respect to water, in which the overall swelling in water is {approx}12 times that in methanol. The deswelling of the hydrogels at 40 deg. C in water from the equilibrium swelling state at 25 deg. C showed a lower rate than the swelling process. The results showed that the CMC/AAc hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy has a temperature-response character within the temperature range 25 + 15 deg. C at any time of swelling, while the hydrogel prepared at 80 kGy, does not show this character within this range of temperature. While the swelling of CMC/AAc hydrogel prepared at 50 kGy was found to substantially increase with increasing pH values from 3 to 10, the hydrogel prepared at 80 kGy was found to display pH responsive character below and above 7.

  12. Chlorite, Biotite, Illite, Muscovite, and Feldspar Dissolution Kinetics at Variable pH and Temperatures up to 280 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lammers, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Summary Sheet silicates and clays are ubiquitous in geothermal environments. Their dissolution is of interest because this process contributes to scaling reactions along fluid pathways and alteration of fracture surfaces, which could affect reservoir permeability. In order to better predict the geochemical impacts on long-term performance of engineered geothermal systems, we have measured chlorite, biotite, illite, and muscovite dissolution and developed generalized kinetic rate laws that are applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature for each mineral. This report summarizes the rate equations for layered silicates where data were lacking for geothermal systems.

  13. The effects of temperature, pH and redox state on the stability of glutamic acid in hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Namhey; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Cody, George D.; Hazen, Robert M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural hydrothermal vent environments cover a wide range of physicochemical conditions involving temperature, pH and redox state. The stability of simple biomolecules such as amino acids in such environments is of interest in various fields of study from the origin of life to the metabolism of microbes at the present day. Numerous previous experimental studies have suggested that amino acids are unstable under hydrothermal conditions and decompose rapidly. However, previous studies have not effectively controlled the redox state of the hydrothermal fluids. Here we studied the stability of glutamate with and without reducing hydrothermal conditions imposed by 13 mM aqueous H2 at temperatures of 150, 200 and 250 °C and initial (25 °C) pH values of 6 and 10 in a flow-through hydrothermal reactor with reaction times from 3 to 36 min. We combined the experimental measurements with theoretical calculations to model the in situ aqueous speciation and pH values. As previously observed under hydrothermal conditions, the main reaction involves glutamate cyclizing to pyroglutamate through a simple dehydration reaction. However, the amounts of decomposition products of the glutamate detected, including succinate, formate, carbon dioxide and ammonia depend on the temperature, the pH and particularly the redox state of the fluid. In the absence of dissolved H2, glutamate decomposes in the sequence glutamate, glutaconate, α-hydroxyglutarate, ketoglutarate, formate and succinate, and ultimately to CO2 and micromolar quantities of H2(aq). Model speciation calculations indicate the CO2, formate and H2(aq) are not in metastable thermodynamic equilibrium. However, with 13 mM H2(aq) concentrations, the amounts of decomposition products are suppressed at all temperatures and pH values investigated. The small amounts of CO2 and formate present are calculated to be in metastable equilibrium with the H2. It is further proposed that there is a metastable equilibrium between glutamate

  14. Decadally-resolved sea surface temperature and salinity records of the East Sea (Japan Sea) over the last 2000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. E.; Park, W.; Rhee, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    The East Asia monsoon is an important component of Earth's climate system, yet its dynamical processes are not sufficiently understood. Previous studies indicate a strong coupling between monsoon circulation and northern hemisphere climate change on interannual to decadal time scales. However, our understanding of monsoon variability and teleconnections to high- and low-latitude mechanisms on longer time scale remains insufficient. In this study, decadally-resolved continuous sea surface temperature and salinity records over the last 2000 years from alkenone and planktonic foraminiferal oxygen isotope ratio analyses of East Sea (Japan Sea) marine sediments have been reconstructed to investigate East Asia monsoon variability. The results show that during the Medieval Climate Anomaly, East Asia was characterized by surface warming with a strengthened summer monsoon. Summer monsoon-related precipitation increased and pluvials possibly dominated in the region at that time. On the other hand, Asia monsoon failure and severe drought is characteristic of the Little Ice Age. Comparisons of the records with other paleoclimate records indicate a possible connection between changes in the mid-latitude East Asia monsoon, Arctic Oscillation (AO)/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) over the period.

  15. Involvement of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation of the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus to low temperature and high salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prymaczok, Natalia C; Pasqualino, Valeria M; Viau, Verónica E; Rodríguez, Enrique M; Medesani, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    This study was aimed at determining the role of the crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the physiological compensation to both saline and thermal stress, in the freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. By determining the expression of the CHH gene in the eyestalk of juvenile crayfish, we found that maximal induction of CHH was induced at high salinity (10 g/L) and low temperature (20 °C). In order to investigate the role of CHH in the physiological compensation to such stressful conditions, recombinant CHH was supplied to stressed animals. CHH-injected crayfish showed increased hemolymphatic levels of glucose, in accordance with a significant utilization of glycogen reserves from the hepatopancreas. Furthermore, CHH administration allowed stressed animals to regulate hemolymphatic sodium and potassium at more constant levels than controls. Taken together, these results suggest a relevant role of CHH in increasing the energy available intended for processes involved in the physiological compensation of C. quadricarinatus to both saline and thermal stress.

  16. Optimized coagulation of high alkalinity, low temperature and particle water: pH adjustment and polyelectrolytes as coagulant aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianfeng; Wang, Dongsheng; Yan, Mingquan; Ye, Changqing; Yang, Min; Ge, Xiaopeng

    2007-08-01

    The Yellow River in winter as source water is characterized as high alkalinity, low temperature and low particle concentrations, which have brought many difficulties to water treatment plants. This study fully examines the optimized coagulation process of the Yellow River by conventional and pre-polymerized metal coagulants, pH adjustment and polyelectrolytes as the primary coagulants or coagulant aids. For all the metal coagulants, polyaluminum chlorides are superior to traditional metal coagulants due to their stable polymeric species and low consumption of alkalinity. The removal of natural organic matter by monomeric metal coagulants can be improved through pH adjustment, which is in accordance with the higher concentration of polymeric species formed at corresponding pH value. With the addition of polyelectrolytes as coagulant aids, the coagulation performance is significantly improved. The effective removal of dissolved organic matter is consistent with high charge density, while molecular weight is relatively important for removing particles, which is consistent with polyelectrolytes as primary coagulants. These results suggest that the coagulation mechanisms in the removal of dissolved organic matter and particles are different, which may be exploited for optimized coagulation for the typical source water in practice.

  17. Effect of temperature and pH on ethanol production by a putative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ojes PC2

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... weevil larva were studied. Peptone water was used as the growth medium and granulated sugar ... temperature of the fermenting medium are, therefore, necessary for maximum ethanol production by the organism. Key words: .... Saccharomyces cerevisiae by different mechanisms. J. Am. Soc. Brew. Chem.

  18. The ecological coherence of temperature and salinity tolerance interaction and pigmentation in a non-marine vibrio isolated from Salar de Atacama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karem Gallardo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of microorganisms from the Vibrio genus in saline lakes from northern Chile had been evidenced using Numerical Taxonomy decades before and, more recently, by phylogenetic analyses of environmental samples and isolates. Most of the knowledge about this genus came from marine isolates and showed temperature and salinity to be integral agents in shaping the niche of the Vibrio populations. The stress tolerance phenotypes of Vibrio sp. Teb5a1 isolated from Salar de Atacama was investigated. It was able to grow without NaCl and tolerated up to 100 g/L of the salt. Furthermore, it grew between 17° and 49°C (optimum 30°C in the absence of NaCl, and the range was expanded into cold temperature (4-49°C in the presence of the salt. Other additional adaptive strategies were observed in response to the osmotic stress: pigment production, identified as the known antibacterial prodigiosin, swimming and swarming motility and synthesis of a polar flagellum. It is possible to infer that environmental congruence might explain the cellular phenotypes observed in Vibrio sp. considering that coupling between temperature and salinity tolerance, the production of antibacterial agents at higher temperatures, flagellation and motility increase the chance of Vibrio sp. to survive in salty environments with high daily temperature swings and UV radiation.

  19. The Ecological Coherence of Temperature and Salinity Tolerance Interaction and Pigmentation in a Non-marine Vibrio Isolated from Salar de Atacama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Karem; Candia, Jonathan E; Remonsellez, Francisco; Escudero, Lorena V; Demergasso, Cecilia S

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of microorganisms from the Vibrio genus in saline lakes from northern Chile had been evidenced using Numerical Taxonomy decades before and, more recently, by phylogenetic analyses of environmental samples and isolates. Most of the knowledge about this genus came from marine isolates and showed temperature and salinity to be integral agents in shaping the niche of the Vibrio populations. The stress tolerance phenotypes of Vibrio sp. Teb5a1 isolated from Salar de Atacama was investigated. It was able to grow without NaCl and tolerated up to 100 g/L of the salt. Furthermore, it grew between 17° and 49°C (optimum 30°C) in the absence of NaCl, and the range was expanded into cold temperature (4-49°C) in the presence of the salt. Other additional adaptive strategies were observed in response to the osmotic stress: pigment production, identified as the known antibacterial prodigiosin, swimming and swarming motility and synthesis of a polar flagellum. It is possible to infer that environmental congruence might explain the cellular phenotypes observed in Vibrio sp. considering that coupling between temperature and salinity tolerance, the production of antibacterial agents at higher temperatures, flagellation and motility increase the chance of Vibrio sp. to survive in salty environments with high daily temperature swings and UV radiation.

  20. High temperature and vapor pressure deficit aggravate architectural effects but ameliorate non-architectural effects of salinity on dry mass production of tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Wei eChen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is an important vegetable crop and often cultivated in regions exposed to salinity and high temperatures (HT which change plant architecture, decrease canopy light interception and disturb physiological functions. However, the long-term effects of salinity and HT combination (S+HT on plant growth are still unclear. A dynamic functional-structural plant model (FSPM of tomato was parameterized and evaluated for different levels of S+HT combinations. The evaluated model was used to quantify the contributions of morphological changes (architectural effects and physiological disturbances (non-architectural effects on the reduction of shoot dry mass under S+HT. The model predicted dynamic plant architecturale variables with high accuracy (> 85%, which ensured the reliability of the model analyses. HT enhanced architectural effects but reduced non-architectural effects of salinity on dry mass production. The stronger architectural effects of salinity under HT could not be counterbalanced by the smaller non-architectural effects. Therefore, long-term influences of HT on shoot dry mass under salinity were negative at the whole plant level. Our model analysis highlights the importance of plant architecture at canopy level in studying the plant responses to the environments and shows the merits of dynamic FSPMs as heuristic tools.

  1. Degradation kinetics of anthocyanins from European cranberrybush (Viburnum opulus L.) fruit extracts. Effects of temperature, pH and storage solvent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moldovan, Bianca; David, Luminiţa; Chişbora, Cristian; Cimpoiu, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    ..., stored under darkness for 7 days at different temperatures (2 °C, 37 °C and 75 °C) and pH values (pH = 3 and 7), was studied here. The lowest stability was showed by the anthocyanins from the water extract stored at 75...

  2. Combined effect of nisin and carvacrol at different pH and temperature levels on the viability of different strains of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periago, P.M.; Moezelaar, R.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of pH and temperature on the bactericidal action of nisin and carvacrol on vegetative cells of different Bacillus cereus strains was studied. The five strains tested showed significant differences in sensitivity towards nisin, at pH 7.0 and 30°C. Carvacrol concentrations of 0.3 mmol

  3. Influence of pH, Temperature and Sample Size on Natural and Enforced Syneresis of Precipitated Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wilhelm

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of silica is performed by mixing an inorganic, silicate-based precursor and an acid. Monomeric silicic acid forms and polymerizes to amorphous silica particles. Both further polymerization and agglomeration of the particles lead to a gel network. Since polymerization continues after gelation, the gel network consolidates. This rather slow process is known as “natural syneresis” and strongly influences the product properties (e.g., agglomerate size, porosity or internal surface. “Enforced syneresis” is the superposition of natural syneresis with a mechanical, external force. Enforced syneresis may be used either for analytical or preparative purposes. Hereby, two open key aspects are of particular interest. On the one hand, the question arises whether natural and enforced syneresis are analogous processes with respect to their dependence on the process parameters: pH, temperature and sample size. On the other hand, a method is desirable that allows for correlating natural and enforced syneresis behavior. We can show that the pH-, temperature- and sample size-dependency of natural and enforced syneresis are indeed analogous. It is possible to predict natural syneresis using a correlative model. We found that our model predicts maximum volume shrinkages between 19% and 30% in comparison to measured values of 20% for natural syneresis.

  4. Influence of pH, light cycle, and temperature on ecotoxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides towards Lemna gibba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke Tjørnhøj; Cedergreen, Nina; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    to tenfold for the four SUs when pH was increased from 6 to 9. Decreasing the temperature from 24 to 15 °C or introducing a dark:light cycle did not cause any trends in changes in toxicity. The results show that test conditions can have an effect on the toxicity and this should be considered when......-chemical properties but is also affected by test conditions. It is therefore important to study the effect of changes in test conditions in order to get reliable input ecotoxicity data for assessing the potential risk posed by a compound. The objective of this study was to investigate the implications of changing...... test conditions on the toxicity of four sulfonylurea herbicides (SUs). The toxicity of the four SUs towards Lemna gibba was investigated at three pH levels (6, 7.5 and 9), at two temperatures (15 and 24 °C) and two light regimes (continuous and 12:12 h light:dark cycle) The EC50 increased twofold...

  5. Pinctada margaritifera responses to temperature and pH: Acclimation capabilities and physiological limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moullac, Gilles; Soyez, Claude; Latchere, Oihana; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Fremery, Juliette; Saulnier, Denis; Lo Yat, Alain; Belliard, Corinne; Mazouni-Gaertner, Nabila; Gueguen, Yannick

    2016-12-01

    The pearl culture is one of the most lucrative aquacultures worldwide. In many South Pacific areas, it depends on the exploitation of the pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera and relies entirely on the environmental conditions encountered in the lagoon. In this context, assessing the impact of climatic stressors, such as global warming and ocean acidification, on the functionality of the resource in terms of renewal and exploitation is fundamental. In this study, we experimentally addressed the impact of temperature (22, 26, 30 and 34 °C) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 (294, 763 and 2485 μatm) on the biomineralization and metabolic capabilities of pearl oysters. While the energy metabolism was strongly dependent on temperature, results showed its independence from pCO2 levels; no interaction between temperature and pCO2 was revealed. The energy metabolism, ingestion, oxygen consumption and, hence, the scope for growth (SFG) were maximised at 30 °C and dramatically fell at 34 °C. Biomineralization was examined through the expression measurement of nine mantle's genes coding for shell matrix proteins involved in the formation of calcitic prisms and/or nacreous shell structures; significant changes were recorded for four of the nine (Pmarg-Nacrein A1, Pmarg-MRNP34, Pmarg-Prismalin 14 and Pmarg-Aspein). These changes showed that the maximum and minimum expression of these genes was at 26 and 34 °C, respectively. Surprisingly, the modelled thermal optimum for biomineralization (ranging between 21.5 and 26.5 °C) and somatic growth and reproduction (28.7 °C) appeared to be significantly different. Finally, the responses to high temperatures were contextualised with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections, which highlighted that pearl oyster stocks and cultures would be severely threatened in the next decade.

  6. Influence of culture media, pH and temperature on growth and bacteriocin production of bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, En; Fan, Lihua; Yan, Jinping; Jiang, Yueming; Doucette, Craig; Fillmore, Sherry; Walker, Bradley

    2018-01-24

    There has been continued interest in bacteriocins research from an applied perspective as bacteriocins have potential to be used as natural preservative. Four bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains of Lactobacillus curvatus (Arla-10), Enterococcus faecium (JFR-1), Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei (JFR-5) and Streptococcus thermophilus (TSB-8) were previously isolated and identified in our lab. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal growth conditions for both LAB growth and bacteriocins production. In this study, various growth conditions including culture media (MRS and BHI), initial pH of culture media (4.5, 5.5, 6.2, 7.4 and 8.5), and incubation temperatures (20, 37 and 44 °C) were investigated for LAB growth measured as optical density (OD), bacteriocin activity determined as arbitrary unit and viability of LAB expressed as log CFU ml-1. Growth curves of the bacteriocinogenic LAB were generated using a Bioscreen C. Our results indicated that Arla-10, JFR-1, and JFR-5 strains grew well on both MRS and BHI media at growth temperature tested whereas TSB-8 strain, unable to grow at 20 °C. LAB growth was significantly affected by the initial pH of culture media (p Bacteriocin activity was significantly different in MRS versus BHI (p bacteriocins was determined in MRS broth, pH 6.2 at 37 °C. This study provides useful information on potential application of bacteriocinogenic LAB in food fermentation processes.

  7. Survival and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis in membrane-processed liquid egg white with pH, temperature, and storage conditions as controlling factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Ukuku, Dike; Phillips, John G; Juneja, Vijay K

    2012-01-01

    .... A study was undertaken to determine the effects of variations in solution pH and process temperature on the removal and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in liquid egg white (LEW...

  8. The influence of temperature and salinity on mortality of recently recruited blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, naturally infected with Hematodinium perezi (Dinoflagellata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchin-Mian, Juan Pablo; Small, Hamish J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2018-02-01

    The parasitic dinoflagellate Hematodinium perezi is highly prevalent in juvenile blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, along the eastern seaboard of the USA. Although the parasite is known to kill adult crabs, the mortality rate of naturally infected juvenile crabs remains unknown. We analyzed the influence of temperature and salinity on the mortality of recently recruited blue crabs that were naturally infected with H. perezi. Over 492 juvenile crabs (infected, n = 282; uninfected controls, n = 210) were held individually in six-well plates and held at six temperatures (4, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C) or three salinities (5, 15, and 30 psu) for a maximum of 90 days. Mortality of infected crabs was 10 times higher at elevated temperatures (25 and 30 °C) and salinity (30 psu) compared to uninfected control treatments. By contrast, infected crabs exposed to mild temperatures (10, 15, and 20 °C) showed a high survival (>80%), no different than uninfected control treatments. Infected crabs at the lowest temperature (4 °C) exhibited a high mortality, but the intensity of infection was lower than in the other temperature treatments. In addition, this study revealed the optimal temperature (25 °C) and salinity (30 psu) for H. perezi to progress in its life cycle leading to sporulation in juvenile crabs; 31.6% (19/60) of crabs held under these conditions released dinospores of H. perezi after 10 days. Crabs held at other temperatures did not release dinospores over the time course of the experiment. Infected crabs were capable of molting and in most cases molted at the same frequency as uninfected crabs serving as controls. The mortality observed in this study indicates that early benthic juveniles will experience significant mortality due to H. perezi with increasing ocean temperatures and that this mortality may be a significant factor in the recruitment of blue crabs to high salinity regions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Deformities in larvae and juvenile European lobster (Homarus gammarus) exposed to lower pH at two different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnalt, A.-L.; Grefsrud, E. S.; Farestveit, E.; Larsen, M.; Keulder, F.

    2013-12-01

    The ongoing warming and acidification of the world's oceans are expected to influence the marine ecosystems, including benthic marine resources. Ocean acidification may especially have an impact on calcifying organisms, and the European lobster (Homarus gammarus) is among those species at risk. A project was initiated in 2011 aiming to investigate long-term effects of ocean acidification on the early life-cycle of lobster under two temperatures. Larvae were exposed to pCO2 levels of ambient water (water intake at 90 m depth), medium 750 (pH = 7.79) and high 1200 μatm pCO2 (pH = 7.62) at temperatures 10 and 18 °C. The water parameters in ambient water did not stay stable and were very low towards the end of the experiment in the larval phase at 10 °C,with pH between 7.83 and 7.90. At 18°, pH in ambient treatment was even lower, between 7.76 and 7.83, i.e. close to medium pCO2 treatment. Long-term exposure lasted 5 months. At 18 °C the development from stage 1 to 4 lasted 14 to 16 days, as predicted under optimal water conditions. Growth was very slow at 10 °C and resulted in three larvae reaching stage 4 in high pCO2 treatment only. There were no clear effects of pCO2 treatment, on either carapace length or dry weight. However, deformities were observed in both larvae and juveniles. The proportion of larvae with deformities increased with increasing pCO2 exposure, independent of temperature. In the medium treatment about 23% were deformed, and in the high treatment about 43% were deformed. None of the larvae exposed to water of pH >7.9 developed deformities. Curled carapace was the most common deformity found in larvae raised in medium pCO2 treatment, irrespective of temperature, but damages in the tail fan occurred in addition to a bent rostrum. Curled carapace was the only deformity found in high pCO2 treatment at both temperatures. Occurrence of deformities after five months of exposure was 33 and 44% in juveniles raised in ambient and low pCO2 levels

  10. Growth of Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797 in tanks in the Ebro Delta (NE Spain: effects of temperature, salinity and culture density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Delgado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available To assess the possibility of O. vulgaris ongrowing using tanks or cages in the bays of the Ebro Delta, we performed several growth trials of common octopus held in tanks. Effects of environmental factors (temperature and salinity and zootechnical aspects (culture density were studied. The thermal ranges that defined positive growth periods in the bays of the Ebro Delta were 19.5ºC to 23ºC (spring-summer and 23.5ºC to 12.3ºC (autumn-winter, the latter being the most suitable period for ongrowing. Salinity did not affect survival (100% or growth within the range tested (34-29 psu, though feeding rates (AFR, SFR were directly related to salinity. On the other hand, after 60 days, final culture density increased three-fold (D1: 12.36 → 44.37 kg m–3; D2: 24.13 → 67.76 kg m–3, with optimal survival results ( > 90% for the two densities tested. Growth and feeding rates showed a slight inverse relationship with density. Finally, growth and feeding rates showed a clear dependence on temperature in the two experiments (density and salinity. Our results conclude that industrial production of O. vulgaris in tanks is promising: this system offers an alternative to cages and allows for a more exhaustive control of culture.

  11. Laboratory Study on the Potential EOR Use of HPAM/VES Hybrid in High-Temperature and High-Salinity Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingwei Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer flooding represents one of the most efficient processes to enhance oil recovery, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM is a widely used oil-displacement agent, but its poor thermal stability, salt tolerance, and mechanical degradation impeded its use in high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoirs. In this work, a novel viscoelastic surfactant, erucyl dimethyl amidobetaine (EDAB, with improved thermal stability and salinity tolerance, was complexed with HPAM to overcome the deficiencies of HPAM. The HPAM/EDAB hybrid samples were studied in comparison with HPAM and EDAB in synthetic brine regarding their rheological behaviors and core flooding experiments under simulated high-temperature and high-salinity oil reservoir conditions (T: 85°C; total dissolved solids: 32,868 mg/L; [Ca2+] + [Mg2+]: 873 mg/L. It was found that the HPAM/EDAB hybrids exhibited much better heat- and salinity-tolerance and long-term thermal stability than HPAM. Core flooding tests showed that the oil recovery factors of HPAM/EDAB hybrids are between those of HPAM and EDAB. These results are attributed to the synergistic effect between HPAM and EDAB in the hybrid.

  12. Effects of temperature and salinity on prevalence and intensity of infection of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, by Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Timothy J; Neigel, Joseph E

    2018-01-01

    Coastal marine and estuarine environments are experiencing higher average temperatures, greater frequency of extreme temperature events, and altered salinities. These changes are expected to stress organisms and increase their susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, beyond these generalities, little is known about how environmental factors influence host-pathogen relationships in the marine realm. We investigated the prevalence and intensity of infections by Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus in blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, from Louisiana saltmarshes in relation to temperature and salinity. We evaluated relationships for single measurements taken at the time of collection and for more complex measurements representing accumulated exposure to physiologically-stressful environmental conditions for up to 31 days prior to collection. We found that: (1) prevalence of infection varied across the Louisiana coast, (2) prevalence of all three Vibrio species was influenced by temperature and salinity, and (3) measurements that represent accumulated exposure to extreme conditions are useful predictors of infection prevalence and can provide insights into underlying biological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apple Pui Yi Chui

    Full Text Available With projected changes in the marine environment under global climate change, the effects of single stressors on corals have been relatively well studied. However, more focus should be placed on the interactive effects of multiple stressors if their impacts upon corals are to be assessed more realistically. Elevation of sea surface temperature is projected under global climate change, and future increases in precipitation extremes related to the monsoon are also expected. Thus, the lowering of salinity could become a more common phenomenon and its impact on corals could be significant as extreme precipitation usually occurs during the coral spawning season. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of temperature [24, 27 (ambient, 30, 32°C] and salinity [33 psu (ambient, 30, 26, 22, 18, 14 psu] on larval settlement, post-settlement survival and early growth of the dominant coral Platygyra acuta from Hong Kong, a marginal environment for coral growth. The results indicate that elevated temperatures (+3°C and +5°C above ambient did not have any significant effects on larval settlement success and post-settlement survival for up to 56 days of prolonged exposure. Such thermal tolerance was markedly higher than that reported in the literature for other coral species. Moreover, there was a positive effect of these elevated temperatures in reducing the negative effects of lowered salinity (26 psu on settlement success. The enhanced settlement success brought about by elevated temperatures, together with the high post-settlement survival recorded up to 44 and 8 days of exposure under +3°C and +5°C ambient respectively, resulted in the overall positive effects of elevated temperatures on recruitment success. These results suggest that projected elevation in temperature over the next century should not pose any major problem for the recruitment success of P. acuta. The combined effects of higher temperatures and lowered salinity (26 psu could

  14. High tolerance to temperature and salinity change should enable scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta from marginal environments to persist under future climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Apple Pui Yi; Ang, Put

    2017-01-01

    With projected changes in the marine environment under global climate change, the effects of single stressors on corals have been relatively well studied. However, more focus should be placed on the interactive effects of multiple stressors if their impacts upon corals are to be assessed more realistically. Elevation of sea surface temperature is projected under global climate change, and future increases in precipitation extremes related to the monsoon are also expected. Thus, the lowering of salinity could become a more common phenomenon and its impact on corals could be significant as extreme precipitation usually occurs during the coral spawning season. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of temperature [24, 27 (ambient), 30, 32°C] and salinity [33 psu (ambient), 30, 26, 22, 18, 14 psu] on larval settlement, post-settlement survival and early growth of the dominant coral Platygyra acuta from Hong Kong, a marginal environment for coral growth. The results indicate that elevated temperatures (+3°C and +5°C above ambient) did not have any significant effects on larval settlement success and post-settlement survival for up to 56 days of prolonged exposure. Such thermal tolerance was markedly higher than that reported in the literature for other coral species. Moreover, there was a positive effect of these elevated temperatures in reducing the negative effects of lowered salinity (26 psu) on settlement success. The enhanced settlement success brought about by elevated temperatures, together with the high post-settlement survival recorded up to 44 and 8 days of exposure under +3°C and +5°C ambient respectively, resulted in the overall positive effects of elevated temperatures on recruitment success. These results suggest that projected elevation in temperature over the next century should not pose any major problem for the recruitment success of P. acuta. The combined effects of higher temperatures and lowered salinity (26 psu) could even be beneficial

  15. Remote sensing of salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21 cm wavelength, and sea water salinity can be determined by a measurement of emissivity at 21 cm along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and one helicopter experiments using two different 21 cm radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Single or multiple ground truth measurements were used to calibrate the data in each experiment. It is inferred from these experiments that accuracies of 1 to 2%/OO are possible with a single surface calibration point necessary only every two hours if the following conditions are met--water temperatures above 20 C, salinities above 10%/OO, and level plane flight. More frequent calibration, constraint of the aircraft's orientation to the same as it was during calibration, and two point calibration (at a high and low salinity level) rather than single point calibration may give even better accuracies in some instances.

  16. Modelling the effect of temperature, water activity and pH on the growth of Serpula lacrymans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, S; Coroller, L; Debaets, S; Vasseur, V; Le Floch, G; Barbier, G

    2011-12-01

    To predict the risk factors for building infestation by Serpula lacrymans, which is one of the most destructive fungi causing timber decay in buildings. The growth rate was assessed on malt extract agar media at temperatures between 1.5 and 45°C, at water activity (a(w)) over the range of 0.800-0.993 and at pH ranges from 1.5 to 11.0. The radial growth rate (μ) and the lag phase (λ) were estimated from the radial growth kinetics via the plots radius vs time. These parameters were then modelled as a function of the environmental factors tested. Models derived from the cardinal model (CM) were used to fit the experimental data and allowed an estimation of the optimal and limit values for fungal growth. Optimal growth rate occurred at 20°C, at high a(w) level (0.993) and at a pH range between 4.0 and 6.0. The strain effect on the temperature parameters was further evaluated using 14 strains of S. lacrymans. The robustness of the temperature model was validated on data sets measured in two different wood-based media (Quercus robur L. and Picea abies). The two-step procedure of exponential model with latency followed by the CM with inflection gives reliable predictions for the growth conditions of a filamentous fungus in our study. The procedure was validated for the study of abiotic factors on the growth rate of S. lacrymans. This work describes the usefulness of evaluating the effect of physico-chemical factors on fungal growth in predictive building mycology. Consequently, the developed mathematical models for predicting fungal growth on a macroscopic scale can be used as a tool for risk assessment of timber decay in buildings. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera; Alves, Ricardo; Anacleto, Patrícia; Fogaça, Fabiola; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, Michiel; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Rasmussen, Rie R; Sloth, Jens J; Aznar-Alemany, Òscar; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Marques, António

    2018-02-01

    Emerging chemical contaminants [e.g. toxic metals speciation, flame retardants (FRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), among others], that have not been historically recognized as pollutants nor their toxicological hazards, are increasingly more present in the marine environment. Furthermore, the effects of environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) on bioaccumulation and elimination mechanisms of these emerging contaminants in marine biota have been poorly studied until now. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the effect of warmer seawater temperatures (Δ = + 4°C) and lower pH levels (Δ = - 0.4 pH units), acting alone or combined, on the bioaccumulation and elimination of emerging FRs (dechloranes 602, 603 and 604, and TBBPA), inorganic arsenic (iAs), and PFCs (PFOA and PFOS) in two estuarine bivalve species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ruditapes philippinarum). Overall, results showed that warming alone or combined with acidification promoted the bioaccumulation of some compounds (i.e. dechloranes 602, 604, TBBPA), but also facilitated the elimination of others (i.e. iAs, TBBPA). Similarly, lower pH also resulted in higher levels of dechloranes, as well as enhanced iAs, PFOA and PFOS elimination. Data also suggests that, when both abiotic stressors are combined, bivalves' capacity to accumulate contaminants may be time-dependent, considering significantly drastic increase observed with Dec 602 and TBBPA, during the last 10 days of exposure, when compared to reference conditions. Such changes in contaminants' bioaccumulation/elimination patterns also suggest a potential increase of human health risks of some compounds, if the climate continues changing as forecasted. Therefore, this first study pointed out the urgent need for further research on the effects of abiotic conditions on emerging contaminants kinetics, to adequately estimate the potential toxicological hazards associated to these compounds and

  18. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part I: Impact of Salinity, Initial pH and Initial Zn(II Concentration in Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of inorganic elements on carbonate minerals is well known in strictly controlled conditions which limit the impact of other phenomena such as dissolution and/or precipitation. In this study, we evidence the behavior of Zn(II (initially in solution and two trace elements, Mn(II and Sr(II (released by carbonate dissolution in the context of a leakage from a CO2 storage site. The initial pH chosen are either equal to the pH of the water-CO2 equilibrium (~ 2.98 or equal to the pH of the water-CO2-calcite system (~ 4.8 in CO2 storage conditions. From this initial influx of liquid, saturated or not with respect to calcite, the batch experiments evolve freely to their equilibrium, as it would occur in a natural context after a perturbation. The batch experiments are carried out on two natural carbonates (from Lavoux and St-Emilion with PCO2 = 10−3.5 bar, with different initial conditions ([Zn(II]i from 10−4 to 10−6 M, either with pure water or 100 g/L NaCl brine. The equilibrium regarding calcite dissolution is confirmed in all experiments, while the zinc sorption evidenced does not always correspond to the two-step mechanism described in the literature. A preferential sorption of about 10% of the concentration is evidenced for Mn(II in aqueous experiments, while Sr(II is more sorbed in saline conditions. This study also shows that this preferential sorption, depending on the salinity, is independent of the natural carbonate considered. Then, the simulations carried out with PHREEQC show that experiments and simulations match well concerning the equilibrium of dissolution and the sole zinc sorption, with log KZn(II ~ 2 in pure water and close to 4 in high salinity conditions. When the simulations were possible, the log K values for Mn(II and Sr(II were much different from those in the literature obtained by sorption in controlled conditions. It is shown that a new conceptual model regarding multiple Trace Elements (TE sorption is

  19. Effects of temperature, salinity and composition of the dinoflagellate assemblage on the growth of Gambierdiscus carpenteri isolated from the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Leanne; Momigliano, Paolo; Russ, Garry R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2017-05-01

    Increases in reported incidence of ciguatera fish poisoning (hereafter ciguatera) have been linked to warmer sea temperatures that are known to trigger coral bleaching events. The drivers that trigger blooms of ciguatera-causing dinoflagellates on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of increased temperatures and lowered salinities, often associated with environmental disturbance events, on the population growth of two strains of the potentially ciguatera-causing dinoflagellate, Gambierdiscus carpenteri (NQAIF116 and NQAIF380). Both strains were isolated from the central GBR with NQAIF116 being an inshore strain and NQAIF380 an isolate from a stable environment of a large coral reef aquarium exhibit in ReefHQ, Townsville, Australia. Species of Gambierdiscus are often found as part of a mixed assemblage of benthic toxic dinoflagellates on macroalgal substrates. The effect of assemblage structure of dinoflagellates on the growth of Gambierdiscus populations has, however, not been explored. The study, therefore investigated the growth of G. carpenteri within mixed assemblages of benthic dinoflagellates. Population growth was monitored over a period of 28days under three salinities (16, 26 and 36) and three temperature (24, 28 and 34°C) conditions in a fully crossed experimental design. Temperature and salinity had a significant effect on population growth. Strain NQAIF380 exhibited significantly higher growth at 28°C compared to strain NQAIF116, which had highest growth at 24°C. When strain NQAIF116 was co-cultured with the benthic dinoflagellates, Prorocentrum lima and Ostreopsis sp., inhibitory effects on population growth were observed at a salinity of 36. In contrast, growth stimulation of G. carpenteri (strain NQAIF116) was observed at a salinity of 26 and particularly at 16 when co-cultured with Ostreopsis-dominated assemblages. Range expansion of ciguatera-causing dinoflagellates could lead to higher

  20. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, pressure, and current data collected in the Sub Tropical North Atlantic Ocean, SPURS-1 (NCEI Accession 0125198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SPURS field campaign consisted of a variety of observing assets. SPURS-1 (Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study - North Atlantic Field Campaign)...

  1. Near-surface temperature and salinity stratification as observed with dual-sensor Lagrangian drifters deployed during SPURS-2 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Denis; Dong, Shenfu; Goni, Gustavo; Lumpkin, Rick; Foltz, Greg

    2017-04-01

    to measure temperature and salinity near the surface ( 20 cm) and at 5 m depth. The main objectives of this deployment were (i) to validate the satellite SSS retrievals and to investigate the causes for the satellite-Argo SSS bias in the precipitation-dominated SPURS-2 region, and (ii) to explore salinity stratification in the upper 5 m and processes that determine it, in particular in relation to rain events. Throughout the experiment, we have observed systematic differences of 0.01-0.02 psu between the near-surface and 5 m salinity. Rain and low wind events have caused salinity differences of up to 2 psu. Strong evaporation on sunny and low wind days has caused the surface to be saltier than the 5-m depth layer by up to 0.4 psu. The mixing time scale between the surface and 5-m depth has been less than a day. Overall, the drifter observations have shown that the bias between Argo and satellite retrievals in the precipitation-dominated region can be largely due to the surface-subsurface salinity differences.

  2. Effect of soil fungi communities on the growth of damping-off pathogens in relation to incubation temperature and medium pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kacprzak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Four communities of saprotrophic fungi from a forest nursery soil were tested for their effect on the in vitro growth of damping-off pathogens: Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. oxysporum and F. solani in relation to incubation temperature (5, 10, 15, 20 or 25°C and medium pH (4.3; 5.6 or 7.5. The soil fungi communities weakly suppressed the growth of pathogens studied only at the lower temperatures (5 or 10°C. At the higher temperatures the communities tested supported the growth of all pathogens. The supporting effct was increasing with the increase of temperature, independently of pH. The effect was highly dependent on incubation temperature and not dependent on medium pH (P

  3. A gold nanocluster-based fluorescent probe for simultaneous pH and temperature sensing and its application to cellular imaging and logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Tse; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar; Tseng, Wei-Bin; Hiseh, Ming-Mu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-05-01

    Metal nanocluster-based nanomaterials for the simultaneous determination of temperature and pH variations in micro-environments are still a challenge. In this study, we develop a dual-emission fluorescent probe consisting of bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) as temperature- and pH-responsive fluorescence signals. Under single wavelength excitation the FITC/BSA-AuNCs exhibited well-separated dual emission bands at 525 and 670 nm. When FITC was used as a reference fluorophore, FITC/BSA-AuNCs showed a good linear response over the temperature range 1-71 °C and offered temperature-independent spectral shifts, temperature accuracy, activation energy, and reusability. The possible mechanism for high temperature-induced fluorescence quenching of FITC/BSA-AuNCs could be attributed to a weakening of the Au-S bond, thereby lowering the charge transfer from BSA to AuNCs. Additionally, the pH- and temperature-responsive properties of FITC/BSA-AuNCs allow simultaneous temperature sensing from 21 to 41 °C (at intervals of 5 °C) and pH from 6.0 to 8.0 (at intervals of 0.5 pH unit), facilitating the construction of two-input AND logic gates. Three-input AND logic gates were also designed using temperature, pH, and trypsin as inputs. The practicality of using FITC/BSA-AuNCs to determine the temperature and pH changes in HeLa cells is also validated.Metal nanocluster-based nanomaterials for the simultaneous determination of temperature and pH variations in micro-environments are still a challenge. In this study, we develop a dual-emission fluorescent probe consisting of bovine serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) and fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) as temperature- and pH-responsive fluorescence signals. Under single wavelength excitation the FITC/BSA-AuNCs exhibited well-separated dual emission bands at 525 and 670 nm. When FITC was used as a reference fluorophore, FITC/BSA-AuNCs showed a

  4. Survival and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis in membrane-processed liquid egg white with pH, temperature, and storage conditions as controlling factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Ukuku, Dike; Phillips, John G; Juneja, Vijay K

    2012-07-01

    Processing temperature and pH are known to influence the lethality and cell injury in many microbial interventions. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of variations in solution pH and process temperature on the removal and growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in liquid egg white (LEW) by microfiltration (MF) membrane process. The effects of various storage conditions on the growth of Salmonella in membrane-separated LEW were evaluated. Pretreated and pH-adjusted (pH 6 to pH 9) LEW was inoculated with a five-strain composite of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis at ca. 7 log CFU/ml, microfiltered at 25 or 40°C, and stored at 4 or 10°C. Temperature had a greater influence on Salmonella reduction than did pH. The maximum reduction of Salmonella and background microflora in LEW by MF was observed at 40°C and pH 8 and 9. However, the influence of temperature on permeate flow was less than that of pH. The mean permeate flow increased by 180% at 25°C as the pH decreased from 9 to 6, while flow increased merely by 18% at pH 6 as temperature increased from 25 to 40°C. Salmonella populations in processed LEW at 4°C storage remained quite stable (0.01 to 0.55 log CFU/ml), irrespective of MF experimental conditions. At 10°C the population was greater, but no major outgrowth was observed. Findings from this study would be advantageous to liquid egg processing industries.

  5. Solubilization properties of nonionic surfactants. Part 1. Evolution of the ternary phase diagrams with temperature, salinity, HLB (hydrophile-lipophile balance), and ACN (alkane carbon number)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzier, M.; Ravey, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    From investigations of ternary systems with nonionic polyoxyethylene glycol alkyl ethers, brine, and alkanes, a classification of the oil-water solubilization properties of these surfactants can be made in terms of the evolution of the whole of the ternary diagrams. A simple relation between the different parameters characterizing the systems is proposed which uses the concepts of the equivalence between temperature and other parameters (HLB, alcane carbon number, salinity). 30 references.

  6. Effects of salinity, temperature and food type on the uptake and elimination rates of cd, cr, and zn in the asiatic clam corbicula fluminea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Suk; Lee, Byeong-Gweon

    2005-06-01

    Laboratory radiotracer experiments were conducted to determine assimilation efficiencies (AE) from ingested algal food and oxic sediment particles, uptake rates from the dissolved phase, and the efflux rates of Cd, Cr and Zn in the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. Among three elements, AE from both algal and sediment food was greatest for Cd, followed by Zn and Cr. The AEs of tested elements from algal food (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) were consistently higher than those from sediments at a given salinity and temperature. The influence of salinity (0, 4 and 8 psu) and temperature (5, 13 and 21¼) on the metal AEs was not evident for most tested elements, except Cd AEs from sediment. The rate constant of metal uptake from the dissolved phase ( k u was greatest for Cd, followed by Zn and Cr in freshwater media. However, in saline water, the k u of Zn were greater than those of Cd. The influx rate of all tested metals increased with temperature. The efflux rate constant was greatest for Cr (0.02 d-1), followed by Zn (0.010~0.017 d-1) and Cd (0.006 d-1). The efflux rate constant for Zn in clam tissues depurated in 0 psu (0.017 d-1) was faster than that in 8 psu (0.010 d-1). Overall results showed that the variation of salinity and temperature in estuarine systems can considerably influence the metal bioaccumulation potential in the estuarine clam C. fluminea. The relatively high Cd accumulation capacity of C. fluminea characterized by the high AE, high dissolved influx rate and low efflux rate, suggested that this clam species can be used as an efficient biomonitor for the Cd contamination in freshwater and estuarine environments.

  7. Structural Properties of Cruciferin and Napin of Brassica napus (Canola) Show Distinct Responses to Changes in pH and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Suneru P.; McIntosh, Tara C.; Wanasundara, Janitha P. D.

    2016-01-01

    The two major storage proteins identified in Brassica napus (canola) were isolated and studied for their molecular composition, structural characteristics and the responses of structural features to the changes in pH and temperature. Cruciferin, a complex of six monomers, has a predominantly β-sheet-containing secondary structure. This protein showed low pH unstable tertiary structure, and distinctly different solubility behaviour with pH when intact in the seed cellular matrix. Cruciferin structure unfolds at pH 3 even at ambient temperature. Temperature-induced structure unfolding was observed above the maximum denaturation temperature of cruciferin. Napin was soluble in a wider pH range than cruciferin and has α-helices dominating secondary structure. Structural features of napin showed less sensitivity to the changes in medium pH and temperature. The surface hydrophobicity (S0) and intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue appear to be good indicators of cruciferin unfolding, however they were not the best to demonstrate structural changes of napin. These two storage proteins of B. napus have distinct molecular characteristics, therefore properties and functionalities they provide are contrasting rather than complementary. PMID:27618118

  8. Groundwater dynamic, temperature and salinity response to the tide in Patagonian marshes: Observations on a coastal wetland in San José Gulf, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, María del Pilar; Carol, Eleonora; Hernández, Mario A.; Bouza, Pablo J.

    2015-10-01

    The processes regulating the relationship between tidal flows and shallow groundwater dynamics, temperature and salinity in a coastal wetland in an arid climate are analysed in a detailed field study carried out in the marsh located at Playa Fracasso (Argentina). The continuous records of groundwater level, temperature and electrical conductivity from a transect perpendicular to the coastline were studied during a period ranging from summer to winter, together with the information obtained in hydrogeomorphological field surveys and soil profiles. An assessment of the processes conditioning marsh hydrology was carried out contemplating seasonal (summer-winter) and periodical variations caused by tidal flows. The study showed that the dynamics of groundwater in relation to tidal flows depends almost exclusively on the infiltration of tidal water when the marsh is flooded during spring tides (syzygy), with an increase in the groundwater discharge level at the onset of syzygy. The differences in temperature between sea and continental water were very useful in defining the origin of the different contributions. Groundwater salinity is mainly associated with the leaching of the soil salts that enter with the sea water infiltrating during flood events. The presence of saline soils in the marsh is regulated by the evapotranspiration predominating in arid zones. The conceptual hydrological model suggested may help in the understanding of the hydrological processes in other similar marshes of Patagonia, as well as in coastal wetlands of arid zones worldwide.

  9. A comparative study of byssogenesis on zebra and quagga mussels: the effects of water temperature, salinity and light-dark cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutters, Bart M C; Verhofstad, Michiel J J M; van der Velde, Gerard; Rajagopal, Sanjeevi; Leuven, Rob S E W

    2012-01-01

    The quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) and zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) are invasive freshwater bivalves in Europe and North America. The distribution range of both Dreissena species is still expanding and both species cause major biofouling and ecological effects, in particular when they invade new areas. In order to assess the effect of temperature, salinity and light on the initial byssogenesis of both species, 24 h re-attachment experiments in standing water were conducted. At a water temperature of 25°C and a salinity of 0.2 psu, the rate of byssogenesis of D. polymorpha was significantly higher than that of D. rostriformis bugensis. In addition, byssal thread production by the latter levelled out between 15°C and 25°C. The rate of byssogenesis at temperaturessalinities of 4 psu or higher. At a salinity of 1 psu and a water temperature of 15°C, D. polymorpha produced significantly more byssal threads than D. rostriformis bugensis. There was no significant effect of the length of illumination on the byssogenesis of either species. Overall, D. polymorpha produced slightly more byssal threads than D. rostriformis bugensis at almost all experimental conditions in 24 h re-attachment experiments, but both species had essentially similar initial re-attachment abilities. The data imply that D. rostriformis bugensis causes biofouling problems identical to those of D. polymorpha.

  10. Cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on autotrophic denitrification process with sulphide as electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Carmen; Mora, Mabel; Fernández, Isaac; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; Campos, José Luis; Méndez, Ramón

    2014-02-01

    Autotrophic denitrification is a suitable technology to simultaneously remove oxidised nitrogen compounds and reduced sulphur compounds yielding nitrogen gas, sulphur and sulphate as the main products. In this work, several batch tests were conducted to investigate the cross effect of temperature, pH and free ammonia on the autotrophic denitrification. Denitrification efficiencies above 95% were achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5-8.0 with maximum specific autotrophic denitrifying activities up to 188mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1). Free ammonia did not show any effect on denitrification at concentrations up to 53mg NH3-NL(-1). Different sulphide concentrations were also tested with stoichiometric nitrite and nitrate concentrations. Sulphide inhibited denitrification at concentrations higher than 200mgS(2-)L(-1). A 50% inhibition was also found at nitrite concentrations above 48mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The maximum specific activity decreased until a value of 25mgN2g(-1) VSSd(-1) at 232mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The Haldane model was used to describe denitrification inhibition caused by nitrite. Kinetic parameters determined from the fitting of experimental data were rmax=176mgN2g(-1)VSSd(-1), Ks=10.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1) and Ki=34.7mg NO2(-)-NL(-1). The obtained model allowed optimising an autotrophic denitrification process by avoiding situations of inhibition and thus obtaining higher denitrification efficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Volatile fatty acids production from food waste: effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Kaimin; Wang, Quan; Gong, Changxiu; Li, Menglu

    2013-09-01

    The effects of pH, temperature, and organic loading rate (OLR) on the acidogenesis of food waste have been determined. The present study investigated their effects on soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), volatile solids (VS), and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N). Both the concentration and yield of VFAs were highest at pH 6.0, acetate and butyrate accounted for 77% of total VFAs. VFAs concentration and the VFA/SCOD ratio were highest, and VS levels were lowest, at 45 °C, but the differences compared to the values at 35 °C were slight. The concentrations of VFAs, SCOD, and NH4(+)-N increased as OLR increased, whereas the yield of VFAs decreased from 0.504 at 5 g/Ld to 0.306 at 16 g/Ld. Acetate and butyrate accounted for 60% of total VFAs. The percentage of acetate and valerate increased as OLR increased, whereas a high OLR produced a lower percentage of propionate and butyrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between pH and temperature in the ruminal fluid of cows, based on a radio-transmission pH-measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Sato, Shigeru; Kato, Takuma; Ikuta, Kentaro; Yamagishi, Norio; Okada, Keiji; Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Ito, Kazunori

    2012-08-01

    To assess the relationship between pH and temperature in the ruminal bottom fluid, circadian changes were monitored using cows fed a control diet (C diet) or a rumen acidosis-inducing diet (RAI diet) by using a wireless radio-transmission pH- measurement system. These two parameters were measured simultaneously at 10-min intervals on day 14 after commencement of feeding. Compared to the mean ruminal pH for 60 min immediately after the morning feeding (0 hr), significantly lower pH was noted 3-13 hr later (P<0.05) and 4-19 hr later (P<0.01) in cows fed the C and RAI diets, respectively, although the reduction in the latter was much higher than that in the former. In contrast, significantly higher ruminal temperature was found at 8 and 12-14 hr later (P<0.05) and 6, 8, and 10-19 hr later (P<0.01) in cows fed the C and RAI diets, respectively. A significant negative correlation was observed between the lowest ruminal pH and its corresponding ruminal temperature in cows fed the C and RAI diets (r=-0.722 and -0.650, P<0.01, respectively), suggesting active fermentation and volatile fatty acid production in the rumen. However, ruminal pH profiles may not be predictable by measuring only ruminal temperature because decreases in ruminal pH were preceded by increases in ruminal temperature, and circadian changes in pH and temperature were associated with ruminal fermentation.

  13. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  14. Co-adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and phosphate on boehmite: Influence of temperature, phosphate initial concentration and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Shen, Mengmeng; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Hu, Jing; Hou, Jun; Ao, Yanhui; Zheng, Hao; Li, Kun; Liu, Jingjing

    2017-03-01

    The co-presence of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and phosphate in wastewater of various industries has been detected. Removing PFOS and phosphate simultaneously before discharging sewage into natural water can decrease effectively the environmental risk caused by the combined pollution of PFOS and phosphate. In this study, laboratory batch experiments were conducted for investigating the co-adsorption of PFOS and phosphate on boehmite and the influences of temperature, phosphate initial concentration and pH on the co-adsorption. The adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics of PFOS and phosphate on boehmite were also investigated completely and systematically. The results showed that lower temperature favored the co-adsorptions of PFOS and phosphate. The adsorption of PFOS and phosphate on boehmite agreed well with the Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption parameters of thermodynamics are ΔH=-16.9 and -20.0kJmol -1 (PFOS and phosphate), ΔS=-5.69 and -7.63Jmol -1 K -1 (PFOS and phosphate) and ΔG adsorption of PFOS and phosphate on boehmite is a spontaneously exothermic process. Moreover, the co-adsorption process can be described well by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. With increasing phosphate initial concentration, more phosphate could be adsorbed on boehmite, while the adsorption of PFOS decreased at phosphate initial concentration of less than 30mgL -1 and increased at that of larger than 30mgL -1 . In the co-adsorption process, the adsorption amount of PFOS decreased with pH increasing, but that of phosphate changed little. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Effect of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic acid and temperature on Zn(II) sorption onto γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jiang; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xia; Chen, Yuantao [Qinghai Normal University, Qinghai (China); Zhao, Lanping [Education Training Center of Ningxia Electric Power Company, Ningxia (China)

    2014-02-15

    The sorption of Zn(II) on γ-alumina was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, solid amount, humic acid (HA) and temperature by using batch technique. The results indicated that the sorption of Zn(II) onto γ-alumina was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. The sorption of Zn(II) increased slowly with increasing pH at pH 2-5, then increased sharply with pH increasing from 5 to 8.5, and at last maintained a maximum value at pH>8.5. A positive effect of HA on Zn(II) sorption was found at pH<7, whereas a negative effect was observed at pH>7. The thermodynamic data (ΔG{sup 0}, ΔS{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0}) were calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms, and the results suggested that the sorption of Zn(II) on γ-alumina was endothermic and spontaneous. The sorption results revealed that the γ-alumina can be as a cost-effective sorbent for pre-concentration of Zn(II) from large volumes of aqueous solutions in environmental pollution cleanup.

  16. Resilience to temperature and pH changes in a future climate change scenario in six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pancic, Marina; Hansen, Per Juel; Tammilehto, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The effects of ocean acidification and increased temperature on physiology of six strains of the polar diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus from Greenland were investigated. Experiments were performed under manipulated pH levels (8.0, 7.7, 7.4, and 7.1) and different temperatures (1, 5, and 8...... the strains was larger than the variation observed due to the whole range of changes in either pH or temperature. Climate change may therefore not affect the species as such, but may lead to changes in the population structure of the species, with the strains exhibiting high phenotypic plasticity, in terms...

  17. The influence of temperature and alkaline pH on the labeling of free and conjugated MAG{sub 3} with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, D.J.; Chang, F.; Lei, K.; Qu, T.; Rusckowski, M. [Massachusetts Univ., Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1997-05-01

    Benzoyl-protected mercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-benzoyl MAG{sub 3}) is radiolabeled by tartrate transchelation at elevated temperatures or basic pH. The object of this investigation was to establish whether the same {sup 99}mTc labeled species are formed when S-acetyl (S-acetyl MAG{sub 3})-conjugated compounds are radiolabeled by tartrate transchelation at ambient temperature and neutral pH in contrast to labeling at 95{sup o}C and pH 11. S-acetyl MAG{sub 3} was conjugated to biocytin and to the amine-derivatized oligomers DNA and PNA. Along with free S-acetyl MAG{sub 3}, these were radiolabeled under the different conditions. Although labeling efficiencies were always lower when labeled at ambient temperature and neutral pH relative to labeling at 95{sup o} C or pH 11 (free S-acetyl MAG{sub 3} could not be labeled at all), size exclusion and reverse phase HPLC showed no difference with labeling conditions in the radiochemical profiles for labeled DNA and biocytin. In the case of DNA, a cysteine challenge also failed to demonstrate a difference. However, in the case of PNA, some important differences were observed in the size exclusion HPLC radiochromatograms. In addition, PNA labeled at ambient temperature and neutral pH was less stable to transchelation to cysteine. In conclusion, S-acetyl MAG{sub 3} conjugated compounds may be radiolabeled at ambient temperature and neutral pH. In most cases, the radiochemical species produced appear to be identical to those formed when labeling is accomplished at 95{sup o}C or pH 11. (author).

  18. Comparison of coral δ18O with pseudocorals derived from in situ sea surface salinity and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, K. L.; Chaichi, N.; Maupin, C. R.; Richey, J. N.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Paleoclimatologists use pseudocorals and forward modeling of coral oxygen isotopes (δ18O) to assess δ18O variations for comparison with climate model output in order to understand past tropical oceanic-atmospheric variability. Oxygen isotopic (δ18Ocoral) variability in shallow water coral skeletons is dependent on sea surface temperature (SST) and δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), which varies with sea surface salinity (SSS). However, measurements of δ18Osw and SSS are sparse; therefore, simulated SSS (e.g., SODA) is typically used in pseudocoral investigations. Our study site is the Dry Tortugas National Park (DRTO; 24º42'N, 82º48'W) in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where hourly SST and SSS measurements are available from NOAA buoys (1992-2002) and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS; 2011-2014). Here we use bivariate forward modeling of monthly average buoy SSS and SST to develop a time series of pseudocoral δ18O (δ18Op = -0.22(‰/ºC)SST + 0.11(‰/psu)SSS) for DRTO that are compared with δ18Ocoral variations from three Siderastrea siderea coral colonies growing in close proximity within the park. We use the relationship for δ18Osw and SSS determined for Flower Garden Banks coral reef in the northern GOM (27º52'N, 93º49'W) since no measurements of δ18Osw are currently available for DRTO. δ18Op co-varies with δ18Ocoral (r2 = 0.59) with a root mean square error (RMSE = 0.32‰) greater than the intercolony δ18Ocoral variability (r2 = 0.80; RSME = 0.07‰). Discrepancies between δ18Op and δ18Ocoral may be related to the lack of a local SSS-δ18Osw relationship for DRTO or uncertainties in subannual time assignment for δ18Ocoral. A new source of SSS is the NASA satellite Aquarius (2012-2014), which may be useful in future pseudocoral studies, that is evaluated along with high resolution simulated SSS (Global Ocean Physics Reanalysis GLORYS2V3; 1993-2012). We find similar correlation between Aquarius-derived SSS and FKNMS SSS (r2

  19. Coastal Changes in Temperature and Salinity Observed during Hurricane Isaac Recorded and Downloaded by NASA DRIFTERs Moored in Heron Bay and at Half Moon Island, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcic, Maria; Iturriaga, Rodolfo H.; Kuper, Philip D.; O'Neal, Stanford Duane; Underwood, Lauren; Fletcher, Rose

    2012-01-01

    Major changes in salinity (approx.14 ppt.) and temperature (approx.40C) were continuously registered by two prototype NASA DRIFTERs, surface moored floaters, that NASA's Applied Science and Technology Project Office (ASTPO) has developed. The DRIFTER floating sensor module is equipped with an Arduino open-source electronics prototyping platform and programming language (http://www.arduino.cc), a GPS (Global Positioning System) module with antenna, a cell phone SIM (Subscriber Identity Module) card and a cellular antenna which is used to transmit data, and a probe to measure temperature and conductivity (from which salinity can be derived). The DRIFTER is powered by a solar cell panel and all the electronic components are mounted and sealed in [ waterproof encasement. Position and measurement data are transmitted via short message service (SMS) messaging to a Twitter site (DRIFTER 002@NASADRIFTER_002 and DRIFTER 004@NASADRIFTER_004), which provides a live feed. These data are the imported into a Google spreadsheet where conductivity is converted to salinity, and graphed in real-time. The spreadsheet data will be imported into a webpage maintained by ASTPO, where it will be displayed available for dO\\\\1lload.

  20. Effect of pH and temperature on the global compactness, structure, and activity of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from Trichoderma harzianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Francieli; Garcia, Wanius; Rosseto, Flávio Rodolfo; de Mello, Bruno Luan Soares; de Oliveira Neto, Mário; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Due to its elevated cellulolytic activity, the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum) has considerable potential in biomass hydrolysis application. Cellulases from Trichoderma reesei have been widely used in studies of cellulose breakdown. However, cellulases from T. harzianum are less-studied enzymes that have not been characterized biophysically and biochemically as yet. Here, we examined the effects of pH and temperature on the secondary and tertiary structures, compactness, and enzymatic activity of cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from T. harzianum (Th Cel7A) using a number of biophysical and biochemical techniques. Our results show that pH and temperature perturbations affect Th Cel7A stability by two different mechanisms. Variations in pH modify protonation of the enzyme residues, directly affecting its activity, while leading to structural destabilization only at extreme pH limits. Temperature, on the other hand, has direct influence on mobility, fold, and compactness of the enzyme, causing unfolding of Th Cel7A just above the optimum temperature limit. Finally, we demonstrated that incubation with cellobiose, the product of the reaction and a competitive inhibitor, significantly increased the thermal stability of Th Cel7A. Our studies might provide insights into understanding, at a molecular level, the interplay between structure and activity of Th Cel7A at different pH and temperature conditions.

  1. Effect of temperature and pH on the kinetics of methane production, organic nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the batch anaerobic digestion process of cattle manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, E. [Consultores Ambientales (CONAM), Havanna (Cuba); Borja, R. [Instituto de la Grasa (C.S.I.C.)., Sevilla (Spain); Weiland, P. [Institute of Technology, Federal Research Center of Agriculture (FAL), Braunschweig (Germany); Travieso, L. [Departamento de Estudios sobre Contaminacion Ambiental (DECA-CNIC), Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas (CNIC), La Habana (Cuba); Martin, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Cordoba (Spain)

    2000-03-01

    A study of the effect of temperature and pH on the kinetics of methane production and organic nitrogen and phosphorus degradation in the anaerobic digestion process of cattle manure was carried out. Two laboratory-scale batch completely mixed reactors, operating at 35 C (mesophilic temperature), and other two, operating at 60 C (thermophilic temperature) were used. For each temperature selected, the influent pH values were 7.6 (initial pH of the waste used) and 7.0. The apparent kinetic constants of the biomethanization process increased 2.3 times when the initial pH of the influent was increased from 7.0 to 7.6 at mesophilic temperature. The values found at thermophilic temperature were similar. The kinetic constants of methane production decreased 2.6 and 7.2 times when the operating temperature increased from 35 C to 60 C for the experiments carried out at initial pH of 7.0 and 7.6, respectively. The methane yield coefficient (l CH{sub 4} STP/g VS removed) also decreased when the temperature increased from 35 C to 60 C for the two initial pH values studied. This behaviour agreed with the major inhibition level observed at thermophilic temperature as a result of the higher organic nitrogen removal and ammonia nitrogen production observed at 60 C. Specifically, the specific rate constants for organic nitrogen removal and ammonia nitrogen production increased 3.6 and 12 times when the temperature was increased from 35 C to 60 C for the experiments carried out at initial pH values of 7.0 and 7.6, respectively. In the same way, the values of the kinetic constant for phosphorus removal were 44% and 80% higher than those obtained at 35 C for the two initial pH values above-mentioned, respectively. Finally, the experimental values of organic nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were reproduced with deviations equal to or less than 10% and 15% in every case, respectively. (orig.)

  2. Optimizing isothiocyanate formation during enzymatic glucosinolate breakdown by adjusting pH value, temperature and dilution in Brassica vegetables and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanschen, Franziska S.; Klopsch, Rebecca; Oliviero, Teresa; Schreiner, Monika; Verkerk, Ruud; Dekker, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of glucosinolate-rich Brassicales vegetables is associated with a decreased risk of cancer with enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates playing a key role. However, formation of health-promoting isothiocyanates is inhibited by the epithiospecifier protein in favour of nitriles and epithionitriles. Domestic processing conditions, such as changes in pH value, temperature or dilution, might also affect isothiocyanate formation. Therefore, the influences of these three factors were evaluated in accessions of Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Mathematical modelling was performed to determine optimal isothiocyanate formation conditions and to obtain knowledge on the kinetics of the reactions. At 22 °C and endogenous plant pH, nearly all investigated plants formed nitriles and epithionitriles instead of health-promoting isothiocyanates. Response surface models, however, clearly demonstrated that upon change in pH to domestic acidic (pH 4) or basic pH values (pH 8), isothiocyanate formation considerably increases. While temperature also affects this process, the pH value has the greatest impact. Further, a kinetic model showed that isothiocyanate formation strongly increases due to dilution. Finally, the results show that isothiocyanate intake can be strongly increased by optimizing the conditions of preparation of Brassicales vegetables.

  3. Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR (VLHJ) in the Coastal S Pacific, Equatorial Pacific and other locations from 2003 to 2006 (NODC Accession 0043461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, chemical, and other data were collected using CTD casts from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Iceland Sea and North / South Pacific Ocean. Data...

  4. Current direction, temperature, depth, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 July 1980 - 01 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8000498)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, depth, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 1, 1980 to August 1, 1980....

  5. Nutrients, temperature, and salinity from bottle cats in the North Pacific Ocean by the Pacific Research Institute of Fisheries and Oceanography from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997 (NODC Accession 0000843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nutrients, temperature, and salinity data were collected using bottle casts in the North Pacific Ocean from 27 August 1950 to 17 November 1997. Data were submitted...

  6. Temperature, salinity, and other data collected using bottle, CTD, and XBT casts in the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean from 12 April 1960 to 27 October 1999 (NODC Accession 0000214)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and other data were collected using bottle, CTD, and XBT casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean and North/South Pacific Ocean from April 12,...

  7. Temperature and Salinity in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii 2005 - 2007 in Support of Fresh Water Plume Studies Performed by the Department of Oceanography at the Univesity of Hawaii (NODC Accession 0039532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Freshwater plumes from rain run-off into Kaneohe Bay are the focus for the investigation. Measurements of temperature and salinity from a moored, fixed-level CTD and...

  8. Temperature and salinity profiles from CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 August 1976 to 14 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7601779)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 03 August 1976 to 14 September 1976. Data were collected by...

  9. Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and meteorological data collected in the Arctic Ocean and Atlantic Ocean by various countries from 20 Jul 1870 to 17 Jul 1995 (NODC Accession 0085914)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and meteorological data collected in the Arctic Ocean and Atlantic Ocean by various countries from 1870 to 1995,...

  10. Seawater temperature and salinity observed from the CORC1 and CORC2 moorings in the southern California Current (NE Pacific) from 2008-09-20 to 2012-11-14 (NCEI Accession 0137858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity observations from instruments on the CORC1 and CORC2 moorings in the southern California Current, part of the CORC project (Consortium on...

  11. Temperature, salinity, nutrients, and other data from bottle and CTD casts from a world-wide distribution from the POSEYDON and other platforms from 27 February 1958 to 28 February 1991 (NODC Accession 0000205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts from the POSEYDON and other platforms. Data were collected from a...

  12. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, and phosphate data collected in Pacific Ocean from Monterey Submarine Canyon Station by Stanford University from 1951-01-02 to 1955-12-31 (NODC Accession 0093160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, and phosphate data collected in Pacific Ocean from Montery Submarine Canyon Station by Stanford University from 1951-01-02...

  13. Sea surface temperatures and salinities from platforms in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and the South China Sea (Nan Hai) from 1896-1950 (NODC Accession 0000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface temperatures and salinities were collected in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and South China Sea (Nan Hai)...

  14. Current direction, wind direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 February 1981 - 01 February 1981 (NODC Accession 8100516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 1, 1981 to...

  15. Temperature and salinity profiles from STD casts in the Bering Sea from the SILAS BENT as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 September 1975 to 26 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600747)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from STD casts in the Bering Sea from the SILAS BENT. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks...

  16. NCEI ocean heat content, temperature anomalies, salinity anomalies, thermosteric sea level anomalies, halosteric sea level anomalies, and total steric sea level anomalies from 1955 to present calculated from in situ oceanographic subsurface profile data (NCEI Accession 0164586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains ocean heat content change, oceanic temperature and salinity changes, and steric sea level change (change in volume without change in mass),...

  17. Temperature and salinity measurements taken from the BLUE, PENOBSCOT and other Slocum glider platforms in the Coastal N Atlantic, Coastal S Atlantic and other locations from 2012 to 2014 (NCEI Accession 0123079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity measurements found in dataset IOOS taken from the BLUE (Slocum glider; WMO 4801504; operated by Univ. of Massachusetts Dartmouth), PENOBSCOT...

  18. Water temperature, salinity, and sound speed data collected by CTD and XBT from the R/V Falkor in the NW Hawaiian Islands 2014-03 to 2014-06 (NCEI Accession 0137765)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical parameters (water temperature, salinity, and sound speed) were measured as high-resolution profiles at select locations and times using CTD and XBT...

  19. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data collected from North Atlantic Ocean, White Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, and Sea of Azov from 1924-03-19 to 1989-11-19 by multiple Soviet Union institutes (NODC Accession 0077413)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and nutrients data collected from North Atlantic Ocean, White Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, and Sea of Azov from 1924-03-19 to 1989-11-19...

  20. Oceanographic profile plankton, Temperature Salinity and other measurements collected using bottle from VICTORIA 1 FISHING BOAT), ALEJERO HUMBOLDT and other platforms in the South Pacific, Coastal S Pacific and other locations from 1980 to 1982 (NODC Accession 0002083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from the VICTORIA 1(FISHING BOAT), ALEJERO HUMBOLDT and other platforms in the South...

  1. Temperature and salinity profiles from bottle and STD casts in the Bering Sea from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1974 to 10 July 1974 (NODC Accession 7601138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from bottle and STD casts in the Bering Sea from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  2. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1982-10-18 to 1983-08-01 (NODC Accession 8400010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from October 18, 1982 to August 1, 1983. Data...

  3. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1981-02-07 to 1982-06-01 (NODC Accession 8300040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 7, 1981 to June 1, 1982. Data...

  4. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-08-17 to 1980-05-01 (NODC Accession 8100541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 17, 1979 to May 1, 1980. Data...

  5. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 January 1981 - 01 January 1981 (NODC Accession 8100474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from January 1, 1981 to January 1, 1981. Data...

  6. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1979-09-10 to 1981-03-31 (NODC Accession 8100554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 10, 1979 to March 31, 1981....

  7. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Topographic Features project, 1979-01-16 to 1982-05-01 (NODC Accession 8400120)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from January 16, 1979 to May 1, 1982. Data...

  8. Temperature, salinity, and current direction data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1978-05-01 to 1979-06-01 (NODC Accession 8000245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and current direction data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 1, 1978 to June 1, 1979. Data were...

  9. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1980-09-18 to 1981-03-01 (NODC Accession 8100555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 18, 1980 to March 1, 1981....

  10. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 1983-08-31 to 1984-10-01 (NODC Accession 8500021)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 31, 1983 to October 1, 1984. Data...

  11. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 21 November 1982 - 01 August 1983 (NODC Accession 8400005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from November 21, 1982 to August 1, 1983....

  12. Temperature and salinity data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 September 1977 - 15 March 1978 (NODC Accession 7800901)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22, 1977 to March 15, 1978. Data were...

  13. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 June 1983 - 01 September 1983 (NODC Accession 8400050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 1, 1983 to September 1, 1983. Data...

  14. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 15 May 1979 - 01 October 1980 (NODC Accession 8000620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from May 15, 1979 to October 1, 1980. Data...

  15. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 21 April 1981 - 01 November 1982 (NODC Accession 8300122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from April 21, 1981 to November 1, 1982. Data...

  16. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 08 November 1979 - 30 September 1981 (NODC Accession 8200002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from November 8, 1979 to September 30, 1981....

  17. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 16 May 1982 - 01 December 1983 (NODC Accession 8400073)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from May 16, 1982 to December 1, 1983. Data...

  18. Current direction, temperature, salinity, and taxonomic code data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 18 August 1979 - 21 January 1981 (NODC Accession 8100502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, current direction, and taxonomic data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from August 18, 1979 to January...

  19. Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 01 December 1980 - 01 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8100457)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, wind direction, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 1, 1980 to December 1, 1980. Data...

  20. Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the BARUNA JAYA VIII (FRV; call sign YFZQ; built 08.1998; IMO9155171) in the Coastal Equatorial Pacific, South Indian and other locations in 2005 (NODC Accession 0044407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity and other measurements found in dataset CTD taken from the BARUNA JAYA VIII (FRV; call sign YFZQ; built 08.1998; IMO9155171) in the Coastal...

  1. Global distribution of temperature and salinity profiles from profiling floats as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) project, from 1994-11-07 to 2002-01-19 (NCEI Accession 0000936)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature-Salinity profile and pressure data were collected by using profiling floats in a world-wide distribution from 07 November 1994 to 19 January 2002. Data...

  2. Historical temperature and salinity data collected from 1896-04-22 to 1961-03-26 from the World Ocean and provided by United Kingdom hydrographic office (NODC Accession 0073673)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature and salinity data collected from 1896-04-22 to 1961-03-26 from the World Ocean. Data were digitized from cards provided by United Kingdom...

  3. Temperature and salinity data collected at moorings in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, 2005 - 2007 in support of fresh water plume studies performed by the Department of Oceanography at the University of Hawaii (NODC Accession 0039532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Freshwater plumes from rain run-off into Kaneohe Bay are the focus for the investigation. Measurements of temperature and salinity from a moored, fixed-level CTD and...

  4. Current direction, temperature, and salinity data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico during the Brine Disposal project, 11 May 1984 - 01 August 1984 (NODC Accession 8400216)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and salinity data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 11, 1984 to August 1, 1984. Data...

  5. Temperature and salinity profile data collected from CTD casts by NOAA Ship BAY HYDROGRAPHER in the Chesapeake Bay during survey operations along the NE US coast from 2006-01-05 to 2006-08-28 (NCEI Accession 0014614)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pressure, salinity, and temperature data were collected from CTD casts from the NOAA Survey Vessel BAY HYDROGRAPHER. Data were collected in the Chesapeake Bay from...

  6. Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, and meteorological data collected by various Russian and former Soviet Union institutions from North Pacific Ocean and Okhotsk Sea from 1930-07-23 to 2004-04-18 (NODC Accession 0083635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients, and meteorological data collected by various Russian and former Soviet Union institutions from North Pacific...

  7. Temperature, salinity, and nutrients profiles from bottle and CTD casts from a world-wide distribution from the OCEANIA and other platforms from 01 January 1928 to 31 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000204)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, and nutrients profiles were collected from bottle and CTD casts from the OCEANIA from 01 January 1928 to 31 December 1999. Data were collected...

  8. Salinity, sigma-t, and temperature data from moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 August 1981 - 07 December 1981 (NODC Accession 8300048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salinity, sigma-t, and temperature data were collected using moored current meter and CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 29, 1981 to December 7, 1981....

  9. Temperature and salinity profiles from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 September 1975 to 22 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  10. Time-series current measurements, temperature, and salinity data from CTD, moored buoy, and current meter casts from the Norton Sound Alaska from 14 July 1985 to 22 July 1985 (NODC Accession 0000368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Time-series current measurements, temperature, and salinity data were collected from fixed platforms at the Bering Sea - Norton Sound from July 14, 1985 to July 22,...

  11. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients measurements collected using bottle from the LCM Red in the Alaskan Coastal waters, from the Gerda in the Atlantic Ocean, and from DeSteiguer in the Pacific Ocean (NODC Accession 0002231)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen and other profile data received at NODC on 06/10/04 by Olga Baranova, digitized from "William J. Teague, Zachariah R. Hallock, Jan M....

  12. Temperature, salinity and associated variables collected for MMS Deepwater Program: Northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Slope Habitat and Benthic Ecology from the Gulf of Mexico, 1999 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0002099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes profile data containing temperature, salinity and associated variables collected in support of this research program to gain better...

  13. Indicators: Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  14. Modelling growth and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 in response to temperature and pH values used for European sausage fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messens, Winy; Verluyten, Jurgen; Leroy, Frédéric; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-02-25

    Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage, produces the antilisterial bacteriocin curvacin A. Its biokinetics of cell growth and bacteriocin production as a function of temperature (20-38 degrees C) and pH (4.8-7.0) were investigated in vitro during laboratory fermentations using de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) medium. A predictive, successfully validated model was set up to describe the influence of temperature and pH on the microbial behavior. Both cell growth and bacteriocin activity were influenced by changes in temperature and pH. The optimum temperature value for cell growth, 34.5 degrees C, did not correspond with the optimum temperature for curvacin A production (20-27 degrees C). Interestingly, the pH range for growth and curvacin A production was broad. Thus, Lb. curvatus LTH 1174 seems to be a promising bacteriocin-producing strain for use in European sausage fermentations that are performed at temperatures near 25 degrees C.

  15. Influence of temperature and pH on production of two bacteriocins by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides FR52 during batch fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krier, F; Revol-Junelles, A M; Germain, P

    1998-09-01

    The influence of temperature and pH on growth of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides FR52 and production of its two bacteriocins, mesenterocin 52A and mesenterocin 52B, was studied during batch fermentation. Temperature and pH had a strong influence on the production of the two bacteriocins which was stimulated by slow growth rates. The optimal temperature was 20 degrees C for production of mesenterocin 52A and 25 degrees C for mesenterocin 52B. Optimal pH values were 5.5 and 5.0 for production of mesenterocin 52A and mesenterocin 52B respectively. Thus, by changing the culture conditions, production of one bacteriocin can be favoured in relation to the other. The relationship between growth and specific production rates of the two bacteriocins, as a function of the culture conditions, showed different kinetics of production and the presence of several peaks in the specific production rates during growth.

  16. Temperature-, pH- and CO2-Sensitive Poly(N-isopropylacryl amide-co-acrylic acid Copolymers with High Glass Transition Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Tarng Shieh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PNIPAAm-co-PAA random copolymers were synthesized through free radical copolymerization in MeOH. The incorporation of the acrylic acid units into PNIPAAm tended to enhance the glass transition temperature (Tg, due to strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the amide groups of PNIPAAm and the carboxyl groups of PAA, as observed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analyses. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST increased upon increasing the pH of the aqueous solution containing PNIPAAm-co-PAA because the COOH groups of the PAA segment dissociated into COO− groups, enhancing the solubility of the copolymer. In addition, high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the LCSTs of all the aqueous solutions of the copolymers decreased upon increasing the pressure of CO2, suggesting that CO2 molecules had displaced H2O molecules around the polar CONH and COOH groups in PNIPAAm-co-PAA, thereby promoting the hydrophobicity of the copolymers in the aqueous solution. In addition, the values of Tg of a film sample increased upon treatment with supercritical CO2, implying that intermolecular interactions in the copolymer had been enhanced after such treatment.

  17. Combined effects of fermentation temperature and pH on kinetic changes of chemical constituents of durian wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuyun; Voon, Marilyn Kai Wen; Huang, Dejian; Lee, Pin-Rou; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of temperature (20 and 30 °C) and pH (pH 3.1, 3.9) on kinetic changes of chemical constituents of the durian wine fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Temperature significantly affected growth of S. cerevisiae EC-1118 regardless of pH with a higher temperature leading to a faster cell death. The pH had a more significant effect on ethanol production than temperature with higher production at 20 °C (5.95%, v/v) and 30 °C (5.56%, v/v) at pH 3.9, relative to that at pH 3.1 (5.25 and 5.01%, v/v). However, relatively higher levels of isobutyl alcohol and isoamyl alcohol up to 64.52 ± 6.39 and 56.27 ± 3.00 mg/L, respectively, were produced at pH 3.1 than at pH 3.9 regardless of temperature. In contrast, production of esters was more affected by temperature than pH, where levels of ethyl esters (ethyl esters of octanoate, nonanoate, and decanoate) and acetate esters (ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate) were significantly higher up to 2.13 ± 0.23 and 4.61 ± 0.22 mg/L, respectively, at 20 °C than at 30 °C. On the other hand, higher temperature improved the reduction of volatile sulfur compounds. This study illustrated that temperature control would be a more effective tool than pH in modulating the resulting aroma compound profile of durian wine.

  18. Effect of pH on temperature controlled degradation of reactive oxygen species, heat shock protein expression, and mucosal immunity in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullian Klanian, Mariel; Terrats Preciat, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pH on the activity of antioxidant and immune enzymes in the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus exposed to different temperatures. The organisms (530 ±110 g) were exposed to 16, 20, 24, 28, 30, 34 and 36°C for 6 h to evaluate thermal limits at two water pH values (treatment = 7.70; control = 8.17). For the thermal tolerance experiment, the organisms were exposed to sublethal temperature of 34°C for 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. I. badionotus showed signs of thermal stress by synthesizing heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) at the cold (16°C) and warm thermal limits (34°C). The glutathione peroxidase (GPx) showed a negative correlation with superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in modulating the effect of oxidative stress at different temperature levels. Specifically, GPx activity was maximal at the extremes of the cold and warm temperatures (16, 20, and 36°C) tested, while contrarily, the SOD activity increased significantly in the narrow range of temperature between 28 and 30°C, as a part of a reaction to offset oxidative damage. The effect of pH on the expression of hsp70 was not significant, whereas the antioxidant enzymes activity was stimulated at pH 7.70. Mucosal immunity, evidenced by the activation of the phenoloxidase (PO) system, increased above the basal level at pH 7.70 and at 28, 30, and 34°C. Independent of pH, the temperature of 34°C was identified as the 12 h-sublethal upper limit for I. badionotus.

  19. Association between skin surface pH, temperature and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in dogs with immunomodulatory-responsive lymphocytic-plasmacytic pododermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breathnach, Rory M; Quinn, Patrick J; Baker, Kenneth P; McGeady, Thomas; Strobl, Eric; Abbott, Yvonne; Jones, Boyd R

    2011-08-01

    Secondary bacterial infection is a frequent complication in lesional skin of dogs with immunomodulatory-responsive lymphocytic-plasmacytic pododermatitis (ImR-LPP). However, the influence of skin pH and temperature in determining the composition of the cutaneous microflora at lesional sites has not been investigated. The association between ImR-LPP and pedal skin temperature, pH and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates was thus evaluated. Temperature and pH were measured in 20 dogs with ImR-LPP and in 30 clinically healthy control dogs, and S. pseudintermedius was cultured from interdigital and palmoplantar swabs in both groups and scored semi-quantitatively for bacterial growth. In the ImR-LPP group, mean skin pH was slightly, but significantly, higher at both interdigital and palmoplantar sites. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated more frequently, and scores for bacterial growth were also significantly higher. However, mean skin temperatures were not significantly different from those in the control group. The isolation of S. pseudintermedius was significantly associated with ImR-LPP, with the single exception of isolates on Columbia blood agar from the palmoplantar region. However, pH and temperature were not significantly associated with the disease, and were not associated with the isolation of S. pseudintermedius at most sites sampled. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was not isolated from all feet sampled in dogs with ImR-LPP. Taken together, these data would suggest that S. pseudintermedius infection is most likely to be a secondary phenomenon in dogs with ImR-LPP, and that changes in skin pH and temperature are not significant risk factors for this disease. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in strawberry juice and acidified media at different pH values and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Linton, R H

    2004-11-01

    Survival and growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in strawberry juice and acidified media at different pH levels (pH 3.4 to 6.8) and temperatures were studied. Sterile strawberry juice (pH 3.6) and acidified trypticase soy broth (TSB) media (pH 3.4 to 6.8) were inoculated with approximately 6.7 log CFU/ml E. coli O157:H7 or 7.3 log CFU/ ml L. monocytogenes, incubated for 3 days at 4 and 37 degrees C. Bacterial levels were determined after 2 h, 1 day, and 3 days using surface plating nonselectively on tryptic soy agar and selectively on sorbitol MacConkey agar for E. coli O157:H7 or modified Oxford agar for L. monocytogenes. A spectrophotometer (660 nm) was also used to study growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes in different TSB and strawberry juice media (pH 3.4 to 7.3). E. coli O157:H7 survived well at pH values of 3.4 to 6.8 at 4 degrees C, but the number of injured cells increased as pH decreased and incubation time increased. At 37 degrees C, E. coli O157:H7 was inactivated at pH of monocytogenes was quickly injured at pH of monocytogenes survived well at pH 6.8 at 4 degrees C and grew well at 37 degrees C. Growth of L. monocytogenes at 37 degrees C was inhibited in TSB by 1% citric acid and 0.5% malic acids at pH 3.4 or by 50% strawberry juice at pH 4.7. Bacterial injury and inactivation appeared to be induced by the acids in strawberry juice. The acids, pH value, temperature, and time were important factors for bacterial survival, inactivation, and growth in the media tested.

  1. Biogas production in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor by using tequila vinasses: effect of pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreola-Vargas, J; Jaramillo-Gante, N E; Celis, L B; Corona-González, R I; González-Álvarez, V; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic digestion has been recognized as a suitable alternative for tequila vinasses treatment due to its high energy recovery and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency. However, key factors such as the lack of suitable monitoring schemes and the presence of load disturbances, which may induce unstable operating conditions in continuous systems, have limited its application at full scale. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (AnSBR) configuration in order to provide a low cost and easy operation alternative for the treatment of these complex effluents. In particular, the AnSBR was evaluated under different pH-temperature combinations: 7 and 32 °C; 7 and 38 °C; 8 and 32 °C and 8 and 38 °C. Results showed that the AnSBR configuration was able to achieve high COD removal efficiencies (around 85%) for all the tested conditions, while the highest methane yield was obtained at pH 7 and 38 °C (0.29 L/g COD added). Furthermore, high robustness was found in all the AnSBR experiments. Therefore, the full-scale application of the AnSBR technology for the treatment of tequila vinasses is quite encouraging, in particular for small and medium size tequila industries that operate under seasonal conditions.

  2. DGGE analysis of buffalo manure eubacteria for hydrogen production: effect of pH, temperature and pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillo, Petronia; Carotenuto, Claudia; Di Cristofaro, Filomena; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Lubritto, Carmine; Minale, Mario; Morrone, Biagio; Papa, Stefania; Woodrow, Pasqualina

    2012-12-01

    Buffalo dung is a low-cost substrate with plenty of carbohydrates, an optimal carbon/nitrogen ratio, and a rich microbial flora, and could become a valuable source of biogas. Therefore, in the present study we compared the type and amount of specific eubacteria to the different configurations of pH, temperature and thermal pretreatment after fermentation in batch reactors in order to understand the suitability of buffalo manure for hydrogen production. The phylogenetic structure of the microbial community in fermentation samples was studied using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to generate fingerprints of 16S rRNA genes. The sequences analysis revealed abundance of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and in particular of the order Clostridiales. Very active hydrogen producing bacteria belonging to Clostridium cellulosi species were identified demonstrating the suitability of this substrate to produce hydrogen. Moreover, a large fraction of 16S-rDNA amplicons could not be assigned to lower taxonomic ranks, demonstrating that numerous microorganisms involved in anaerobic fermentation in digesters or bioreactors are still unclassified or unknown.

  3. Increasing aridity, temperature and soil pH induce soil C-N-P imbalance in grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Feng; Shi, Xin-Rong; Han, Feng-Peng; Yuan, Zhi-You

    2016-01-01

    Due to the different degrees of controls exerted by biological and geochemical processes, climate changes are suggested to uncouple biogeochemical C, N and P cycles, influencing biomass accumulation, decomposition and storage in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the possible extent of such disruption in grassland ecosystems remains unclear, especially in China’s steppes which have undergone rapid climate changes with increasing drought and warming predicted moving forward in these dryland ecosystems. Here, we assess how soil C-N-P stoichiometry is affected by climatic change along a 3500-km temperate climate transect in Inner Mongolia, China. Our results reveal that the soil from more arid and warmer sites are associated with lower soil organic C, total N and P. The ratios of both soil C:P and N:P decrease, but soil C:N increases with increasing aridity and temperature, indicating the predicted decreases in precipitation and warming for most of the temperate grassland region could lead to a soil C-N-P decoupling that may reduce plant growth and production in arid ecosystems. Soil pH, mainly reflecting long-term climate change in our sites, also contributes to the changing soil C-N-P stoichiometry, indicating the collective influences of climate and soil type on the shape of soil C-N-P balance.

  4. Linking the solution viscosity of an IgG2 monoclonal antibody to its structure as a function of pH and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiqiang; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Jain, Nishant Kumar; He, Feng; Kerwin, Bruce A; Volkin, David B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2013-12-01

    Although the viscosity of concentrated antibody solutions has been the focus of many recent studies, less attention has been concentrated on how changes in protein structure impact viscosity. This study examines viscosity profiles of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) 2 monoclonal antibody at 150 mg/mL as a function of temperature and pH. Although the structure of the antibody at pH 4.0-7.0 was comparable at lower temperatures as measured by second derivative UV absorbance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differences in 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence intensity indicated small structural alterations as a function of pH. Below the structural transition onset temperature, the viscosity profiles were pH dependent and linearly correlated with fluorescence intensity, and followed semilogarithmic behavior as a function of temperature. The transitions of the viscosity profiles correlated well with the major structure transitions at a protein concentration of 150 mg/mL. The viscosity correlated particularly well with ANS fluorescence intensity at 0.2 mg/mL below and above the structural transition temperatures. These results suggest: (1) ANS can be an important measure of the overall structure and (2) hydrophobic interactions and charge-charge interactions are the two major physical factors that contribute collectively to the high viscosity of concentrated IgG solutions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. Comparative Study of Effects of CO 2 Concentration and pH on Microbial Communities from a Saline Aquifer, a Depleted Oil Reservoir, and a Freshwater Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, Djuna M.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2016-10-01

    Injected CO2 from geologic carbon storage is expected to impact the microbial communities of proposed storage sites, such as depleted oil reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, as well as overlying freshwater aquifers at risk of receiving leaking CO2. Microbial community change in these subsurface sites may affect injectivity of CO2, permanence of stored CO2, and shallow subsurface water quality. The effect of CO2 concentration on the microbial communities in fluid collected from a depleted oil reservoir and a freshwater aquifer was examined at subsurface pressures and temperatures. The community was exposed to 0%, 1%, 10%, and 100% pCO2 for 56 days. Bacterial community structure was analyzed through 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and total bacterial abundance was estimated through quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Changes in the microbial community observed in the depleted oil reservoir samples and freshwater samples were compared to previous results from CO2-exposed deep saline aquifer fluids. Overall, results suggest that CO2 exposure to microbial communities will result in pH-dependent population change, and the CO2-selected microbial communities will vary among sites. This is the first study to compare the response of multiple subsurface microbial communities at conditions expected during geologic carbon storage, increasing the understanding of environmental drivers for microbial community changes in CO2-exposed environments.

  6. Betaine removal during thermo- and mesophilic aerobic batch biodegradation of beet molasses vinasse: influence of temperature and pH on the progress and efficiency of the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibis, Edmund; Ryznar-Luty, Agnieszka; Krzywonos, Małgorzata; Lutosławski, Krzysztof; Miśkiewicz, Tadeusz

    2011-07-01

    The key issue in achieving a high extent of biodegradation of beet molasses vinasse is to establish the conditions for the assimilation of betaine, which is the main pollutant in this high-strength industrial effluent. In the present study, aerobic batch biodegradation was conducted over the temperature range of 27-63°C (step 9°C), at a pH of 6.5 and 8.0, using a mixed culture of bacteria of the genus Bacillus. Betaine was assimilated at 27-54°C and the pH of 8.0, as well as at 27-45°C and the pH of 6.5. The processes where betaine was assimilated produced a high BOD(5) removal, which exceeded 99.40% over the temperature range of 27-45°C at the pH of 8.0, as well as at 27°C and the pH of 6.5. Maximal COD removal (88.73%) was attained at 36°C and the pH of 6.5. The results indicate that the process can be applied on an industrial scale as the first step in the treatment of beet molasses vinasse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Review of Temperature, pH, and Other Factors that Influence the Survival of Salmonella in Mayonnaise and Other Raw Egg Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilini Piushani Keerthirathne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is one of the main causes of foodborne illnesses worldwide, with outbreaks predominately linked to contamination of eggs and raw egg products, such as mayonnaise. This review explores previous studies that have investigated Salmonella control mechanisms utilized in the production of raw egg mayonnaise and other food products. Apart from the use of pasteurized eggs, the main control mechanism identified is the pH of the raw egg products, which plays an important role in the consistency and stability while affecting the survival of Salmonella spp. However, currently there is no consensus regarding the critical pH limit for the control of Salmonella. The effectiveness of pH as a control mechanism is influenced by the type of acid used, with the effectiveness of lemon juice compared with vinegar highly debated. Additionally, Salmonella susceptibility to pH stresses may also be influenced by storage temperature (in some studies refrigeration temperatures protected Salmonella spp. from acidulants and is further complicated by the development of Salmonella cross-tolerance-induced responses, pH homeostasis achieved by the cellular antiport and symport systems, and acid tolerance response (ATR. These mechanisms all provide Salmonella with an added advantage to ensure survival under various pH conditions. Other confounding factors include the fat content, and the addition of NaCl, garlic and plant essential oils (PEOs from mint, cinnamon, cardamom and clove.

  8. Effects of temperature and salinity on the survival rates of coxicerberus ramosae (Albuquerque, 1978, an interstitial isopod of a Sandy Beach on the coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Figueiredo Albuquerque

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance to the combined effects of temperature and salinity was investigated in the interstitial isopod Coxicerberus ramosae (Albuquerque, 1978, a species of intertidal zone of sandy beaches in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The animals were collected on Praia Vermelha Beach. The experiments lasted 24 h and nine salinities and seven temperatures were used for a total of 63 combinations. Thirty animals were tested in each combination. The species showed high survival in most of the combinations. The temperature of 35 ºC was lethal and at 5 ºC, the animals tolerated only a narrow range of salinities. The statistical analyses showed that the effects of temperature and salinity were significant on the survival, which confirmed the euryhalinity and eurythermy of this species.A resistência aos efeitos combinados de temperatura e salinidade foi investigada no isópode intersticial Coxicerberus ramosae (Albuquerque, 1978 encontrado comumente na zona intertidal de praias arenosas do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Os exemplares foram coletados na Praia Vermelha. Os experimentos tiveram a duração de 24 horas e nove salinidades e sete temperaturas foram utilizadas, perfazendo um total de 63 combinações. Em cada combinação de T e S foram testados 30 animais. A espécie mostrou um grande percentual de sobrevivência na maior parte das combinações. A temperatura de 35ºC foi letal e na temperatura de 5ºC a espécie resistiu a uma faixa estreita de salinidades. As análises estatísticas mostraram que tanto os efeitos da temperatura como da salinidade e da interação entre estes fatores foram significativos na sobrevivência da espécie.O alto percentual de sobrevivência da espécie nas diferentes combinações de temperatura e salinidade, confirma, portanto, a eurialinidade e a euritermia da espécie, características comuns das espécies intersticiais litorais.

  9. Water-, pH- and temperature relations of germination for the extreme xerophiles Xeromyces bisporus (FRR 0025), Aspergillus penicillioides (JH06THJ) and Eurotium halophilicum (FRR 2471).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Andrew; Hamill, Philip G; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Hallsworth, John E

    2017-03-01

    Water activity, temperature and pH are determinants for biotic activity of cellular systems, biosphere function and, indeed, for all life processes. This study was carried out at high concentrations of glycerol, which concurrently reduces water activity and acts as a stress protectant, to characterize the biophysical capabilities of the most extremely xerophilic organisms known. These were the fungal xerophiles: Xeromyces bisporus (FRR 0025), Aspergillus penicillioides (JH06THJ) and Eurotium halophilicum (FRR 2471). High-glycerol spores were produced and germination was determined using 38 media in the 0.995-0.637 water activity range, 33 media in the 2.80-9.80 pH range and 10 incubation temperatures, from 2 to 50°C. Water activity was modified by supplementing media with glycerol+sucrose, glycerol+NaCl and glycerol+NaCl+sucrose which are known to be biologically permissive for X. bisporus, A. penicillioides and E. halophilicum respectively. The windows and rates for spore germination were quantified for water activity, pH and temperature; symmetry/asymmetry of the germination profiles were then determined in relation to supra- and sub-optimal conditions; and pH- and temperature optima for extreme xerophilicity were quantified. The windows for spore germination were ~1 to 0.637 water activity, pH 2.80-9.80 and > 10 and < 44°C, depending on strain. Germination profiles in relation to water activity and temperature were asymmetrical because conditions known to entropically disorder cellular macromolecules, i.e. supra-optimal water activity and high temperatures, were severely inhibitory. Implications of these processes were considered in relation to the in-situ ecology of extreme conditions and environments; the study also raises a number of unanswered questions which suggest the need for new lines of experimentation. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. The effect of saline coolant on temperature levels during decortication with a Midas Rex: An in vitro model using sheep cervical vertebrae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher eLivingston

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Decortication of bone with a high speed burr in the absence of coolant may lead to local thermal necrosis and decreased healing ability which may negatively impact clinical outcome. Little data is available on the impact of applying a coolant during the burring process. This study aims to establish an in vitro model to quantitatively assess peak temperatures during endplate preparation with a high speed burr.Six sheep cervical vertebrae were dissected and mounted. Both end plates were used to give a total of 12 sites. Two thermocouples were inserted into each vertebra, 2mm below the end plate surface and a thermal-camera set up to measure surface temperature. A high speed burr (Midas Rex, Medtronic, Fort Worth, TX was used to decorticate the bone in a side to side sweeping pattern, using a matchstick burr (M-8/9MH30 with light pressure. This procedure was repeated while dripping saline onto the burr and bone. Data was compared between groups using a student t-test.Application of coolant at the bone-burr interface during decortication resulted in a significant decrease in final temperature. Without coolant, maximum temperatures 2mm from the surface were not sufficient to cause thermal osteonecrosis, although peak surface temperatures would cause local damage. The use of a high speed burr provides a quick and effective method of vertebral end plate preparation. Thermal damage to the bone can be minimised through the use of light pressure and saline coolant. This has implications for any bone preparation performed with a high speed burr.

  11. The Effect of Saline Coolant on Temperature Levels during Decortication with a Midas Rex: An in Vitro Model Using Sheep Cervical Vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Asher; Wang, Tian; Christou, Chris; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R

    2015-01-01

    Decortication of bone with a high-speed burr in the absence of coolant may lead to local thermal necrosis and decreased healing ability, which may negatively impact clinical outcome. Little data are available on the impact of applying a coolant during the burring process. This study aims to establish an in vitro model to quantitatively assess peak temperatures during endplate preparation with a high-speed burr. Six sheep cervical vertebrae were dissected and mounted. Both end plates were used to give a total of 12 sites. Two thermocouples were inserted into each vertebra, 2 mm below the end plate surface and a thermal camera set up to measure surface temperature. A 3 mm high-pneumatic speed burr (Midas Rex, Medtronic, Fort Worth, TX, USA) was used to decorticate the bone in a side to side sweeping pattern, using a matchstick burr (M-8/9MH30) with light pressure. This procedure was repeated while dripping saline onto the burr and bone. Data were compared between groups using a Student's t-test. Application of coolant at the bone-burr interface during decortication resulted in a significant decrease in final temperature. Without coolant, maximum temperatures 2 mm from the surface were not sufficient to cause thermal osteonecrosis, although peak surface temperatures would cause local damage. The use of a high-speed burr provides a quick and an effective method of vertebral end plate preparation. Thermal damage to the bone can be minimized through the use of light pressure and saline coolant. This has implications for any bone preparation performed with a high-speed burr.

  12. Modelling Growth and Bacteriocin Production by Lactobacillus plantarum BC-25 in Response to Temperature and pH in Batch Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kang; Zeng, Yi-Ting; Han, Xin-Feng; Liu, Shu-Liang

    2015-07-01

    The use of bacteriocin-producing probiotics to improve food fermentation processes seems promising. However, lack of fundamental information about their functionality and specific characteristics may hinder their industrial use. Predictive microbiology may help to solve this problem by simulating the kinetics of bacteriocin-producing strains and optimising the cell growth and production of beneficial metabolites. In this study, a combined model was developed which could estimate, from a given initial condition of temperature and pH, the growth and bacteriocin production of Lactobacillus plantarum BC-25 in MRS broth. A logistic model was used to model the growth of cells, and the Luedeking-Piret model was used to simulate the biomass and bacteriocin production. The parameters generated from these primary models were used in a response surface model to describe the combined influence on cell growth, biomass and bacteriocin production. Both the temperature and pH influenced cell and bacteriocin production significantly. The optimal temperature and pH for cell growth is 35 °C and 6.8, and the optimal bacteriocin production condition is a range dependent on two growth-associated constants (YA/X and K), where temperature is from 27 to 34 °C, and pH is 6.35 to 6.65. The developed model is consistent with similar studies and could be a useful tool to control and increase the production of lactic acid bacteria in bioreactors.

  13. Effects of temperature, pH and nutrient concentration on branched GDGT distributions in East African lakes: Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loomis, S.E.; Russell, J.M.; Eggermont, H.; Verschuren, D.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs) are membrane lipids found in soils and sediments and their relative abundance correlates with temperature and pH, enabling them to be used as proxies in reconstructing past climatic and environmental conditions. However, the potential for

  14. Characterization of Alternaria and Penicillium species from similar substrata based on growth at different temperature, pH and water activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2002-01-01

    Fifty-eight Alternaria isolates representing 10 species or species-groups and 66 Penicillium isolates representing 18 species were examined for their growth response to the combined effects of water activity, temperature and pH in an extended Central Composite Design. Growth responses were recorded...

  15. Effects of temperature and pH on mycelium growth of Phoma sorghina (Sacc.) Boerema Dorenbosch and Van Kesteren in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schémaeza, Bonzi; Somda, Irénée; Sereme, Paco; Adam, Toudou; Ouedraogo, R Adèle

    2013-12-15

    Abstract: The effects of temperatures 22, 28, 32, 36 and 40 degrees C and those of pH 5, 6.5 and 6 were evaluated on 11 isolates of P. sorghina on malt agar medium. The optimal mycelium growth of the most isolates is noted at 28 degrees C. At 32 degrees C, we have recorded a significant reduction of mycelium growth of all the isolates tested when compared with the control at 22 degrees C. At this same temperature, P. sorghina isolates can be group on sensitive isolates, on moderately isolates and on resistant isolates to temperature. The mycelium growth of all the isolates is inhibited at 36 degrees C. On the other hand, the temperature of 40 degrees C kills the mycelium of all the isolates of P. sorghina. The results of our work also show that, least variation of pH (6.5-6) significantly reduced the mycelium growth of P. sorghina isolates at 22 and 28 degrees C. At pH 5 most of the isolates tested are well adapted and the mycelium growth is more important when compare with that at pH 6.

  16. Modelling the effect of temperature, carbon dioxide, water activity and pH on growth and histamine formation by Morganella psychrotolerans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emborg, Jette; Dalgaard, Paw

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed to predict growth and histamine formation by Morganella psychrotolerans depending on temperature (0-20 degrees C), atmosphere (0-100% CO2), NaCl (0.0-6.0%) and pH (5.4-6.5). Data from experiments with both sterile tuna meat and Luria Bertani broth was used...

  17. Water-, pH- and temperature relations of germination for the extreme xerophiles Xeromyces bisporus (FRR 0025), Aspergillus penicillioides (JH06THJ) and Eurotium halophilicum (FRR 2471)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Andrew; Hamill, Philip G; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Hallsworth, John E

    2016-01-01

    Water activity, temperature and pH are determinants for biotic activity of cellular systems, biosphere function and, indeed, for all life processes. This study was carried out at high concentrations of glycerol, which concurrently reduces water activity and acts as a stress protectant, to

  18. Water-, pH- and temperature relations of germination for the extreme xerophiles Xeromyces bisporus (FRR 0025), Aspergillus penicillioides (JH06THJ) and Eurotium halophilicum (FRR 2471)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevenson, Andrew; Hamill, Philip G; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Hallsworth, John E

    Water activity, temperature and pH are determinants for biotic activity of cellular systems, biosphere function and, indeed, for all life processes. This study was carried out at high concentrations of glycerol, which concurrently reduces water activity and acts as a stress protectant, to

  19. pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on novel cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymeric vaginal delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Kaoxiang; Mu, Hongjie; Tang, Mingtan; Liang, Rongcai; Wang, Aiping; Zhou, Shasha; Sun, Haijun; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Jianwen; Liu, Wanhui

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel based on a novel cleavable hydrazone-based pH-sensitive methoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-hydrazone-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (mPEG-Hz-CHEMS) polymer was used for vaginal administration. Methods The pH-sensitive, cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS was designed as a modified pH-sensitive liposome that would selectively degrade under locally acidic vaginal conditions. The novel pH-sensitive liposome was engineered to form a thermogel at body temperature and to degrade in an acidic environment. Results A dual-sensitive liposome gel with a high encapsulation efficiency of arctigenin was formed and improved the solubility of arctigenin characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The dual-sensitive liposome gel with a sol-gel transition at body temperature was degraded in a pH-dependent manner, and was stable for a long period of time at neutral and basic pH, but cleavable under acidic conditions (pH 5.0). Arctigenin encapsulated in a dual-sensitive liposome gel was more stable and less toxic than arctigenin loaded into pH-sensitive liposomes. In vitro drug release results indicated that dual-sensitive liposome gels showed constant release of arctigenin over 3 days, but showed sustained release of arctigenin in buffers at pH 7.4 and pH 9.0. Conclusion This research has shed some light on a pH and temperature dual-sensitive liposome gel using a cleavable mPEG-Hz-CHEMS polymer for vaginal delivery. PMID:22679372

  20. Effect of temperature, water activity, and pH on growth and production of ochratoxin A by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius from Brazilian grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamani, Fabiana Reinis Franca; Hernandes, Thais; Lopes, Noelly Alves; Bastos, Sabrina Carvalho; Santiago, Wilder Douglas; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2014-11-01

    The growth of ochratoxigenic fungus and the presence of ochratoxin A (OTA) in grapes and their derivatives can be caused by a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological factors. The determination of interactions between these factors and fungal species from different climatic regions is important in designing models for minimizing the risk of OTA in wine and grape juice. This study evaluated the influence of temperature, water activity (aw), and pH on the development and production of OTA in a semisynthetic grape culture medium by Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus niger strains. To analyze the growth conditions and production of OTA, an experimental design was conducted using response surface methodology as a tool to assess the effects of these abiotic variables on fungal behavior. A. carbonarius showed the highest growth at temperatures from 20 to 33°C, aw between 0.95 and 0.98, and pH levels between 5 and 6.5. Similarly, for A. niger, temperatures between 24 and 37°C, aw greater than 0.95, and pH levels between 4 and 6.5 were optimal. The greatest toxin concentrations for A. carbonarius and A. niger (10 μg/g and 7.0 μg/g, respectively) were found at 15°C, aw 0.99, and pH 5.35. The lowest pH was found to contribute to greater OTA production. These results show that the evaluated fungi are able to grow and produce OTA in a wide range of temperature, aw, and pH. However, the optimal conditions for toxin production are generally different from those optimal for fungal growth. The knowledge of optimal conditions for fungal growth and production of OTA, and of the stages of cultivation in which these conditions are optimal, allows a more precise assessment of the potential risk to health from consumption of products derived from grapes.