WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature noise

  1. Direct-reading dial for noise temperature and noise resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1967-01-01

    An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance.......An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance....

  2. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  3. High Temperature Acoustic Noise Reduction Materials Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is to use combustion synthesis techniques to manufacture ceramic-based acoustic liners capable of withstanding temperatures up to 2500?C....

  4. Measurement system for temperature dependent noise characterization of magnetoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nording, F.; Weber, S.; Ludwig, F.; Schilling, M.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors and sensor systems are used in a large variety of applications in the field of industrial automation, automotive business, aeronautic industries, and instrumentation. Different MR sensor technologies like anisotropic magnetoresistive, giant magnetoresistive, and tunnel magnetoresistive sensors show strongly varying properties in terms of magnetoresistive effect, response to magnetic fields, achievable element miniaturization, manufacturing effort, and signal-to-noise ratio. Very few data have been reported so far on the comparison of noise performance for different sensor models and technologies, especially including the temperature dependence of their characteristics. In this paper, a stand-alone measurement setup is presented that allows a comprehensive characterization of MR sensors including sensitivity and noise over a wide range of temperatures.

  5. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  6. Josephson noise thermometry with high temperature superconducting devices

    CERN Document Server

    Peden, D A

    2000-01-01

    High Temperature Superconducting devices for absolute Noise Thermometry are under development for the measurement of temperature in the 10-50 K range. This Thesis is concerned with two complementary methods which have been developed in parallel. The first technique, Josephson Linewidth Thermometry, uses a HTS Josephson junction shunted by a low resistance noble metal resistor. The conversion of thermal voltage fluctuations via the ac Josephson effect results in thermal broadening of the Josephson oscillation linewidth. Single and double junction HTS R-SQUIDs have been fabricated where a shunt resistance approx 25 mu OMEGA has been achieved. In the double junction R-SQUIDs, where the voltage across the terminals is modulated at the Josephson heterodyne frequency, the first reported observations of Josephson heterodyne oscillations in HTS R-SQUIDs have been made and the linearity of the voltage-frequency relationship established. The second approach, known as the Quantum Roulette Noise Thermometer, uses the the...

  7. Optimizing the Gain and Noise Temperature of Microstrip SQUID Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinion, Darin

    2009-03-01

    Micrrostrip SQUID amplifiers (MSA) offer near quantum-limited sensitivity and gains greater than 20 dB at frequencies around 1 GHz. These properties make them desirable for applications ranging from dark-matter axion detection to dispersive readout of superconducting qubits. The input of the MSA is a microstrip transmission line in the shape of a square spiral coil surrounding the hole in the SQUID washer that serves as the ground plane. Near the fundamental resonance, there is strong flux coupling between the input coil and SQUID. To obtain maximum performance it is necessary to know the complete set of complex scattering parameters. We present measurements of the scattering parameters of MSAs cooled to 4.2 K. The input impedance is found by measuring the reverse scattering parameter (S11) and is described well by a low-loss transmission line model. We map the low-loss transmission line model into an equivalent parallel RLC circuit that accurately predicts the observed gain given by the forward scattering parameter (S21). This information is used to optimize the input and output matching circuitry to achieve optimal noise temperature and gain. We will present results for the gain, dynamic range, linearity and noise temperature of these optimized MSAs at 30-500 mK as a function of frequency and SQUID bias. We will compare the results to the prediction of the circuit model and to the theoretical expectation that the lowest noise temperature occurs off-resonance. This work is in collaboration with John Clarke and a portion of this work was supported by DOE.

  8. High-Temperature Liners for Broadband Noise Reduction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Core noise will become a larger component of engine noise overall, as more efficient design trends of fan and jet noise reduction technologies are implemented. The...

  9. Measurements of effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I.A.; Lourie, S.L

    2002-11-25

    The results of measurements of the effective noise temperature in fused silica fiber violin modes are presented. In these measurements the fibers were stressed and value of the effective noise temperature was obtained by direct observation of oscillations in the fundamental violin modes of several samples. Measured values indicate that effective noise temperature does not exceed the room temperature significantly. This result is important for the design of the advanced gravitational wave antennae.

  10. Electrochemical noise measurements of stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis-Juarez, C.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares Km. 36.5, Carretera Federal Mexico-Toluca, Municipio de Ocoyoacac, C.P. 52045, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Malo, J.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, C.P. 62490, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)], E-mail: jmmalo@iie.org.mx; Uruchurtu, J. [Centro de Investigaciones en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    Corrosion in a high purity aqueous environment simulating a boiling water reactor (BWR) is addressed in this work. This condition necessitates autoclave experiments under high pressure and temperature. Long-term electrochemical noise measurements were explored as a mean to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. An experimental set up, designed to insulate the working electrode from external interference, made possible to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking in slow strain rate tests for sensitized and solution annealed 304 stainless steel at 288 {sup o}C. Time-series analysis showed variations in the signature of the current density series due to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC)

  11. Performance of a wideband GaAs low-noise amplifier at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toncich, S. S.; Bhasin, K. B.; Chen, T. K.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The gain and noise figure performance of a GaAs amplifier at cryogenic temperatures has been studied. Results obtained indicate that a lower noise figure and a higher gain are induced by decreasing the temperature, while no significant change in the input 1-dB compression point is observed. Repeated temperature cycling had no adverse effect on the amplifier performance.

  12. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  13. Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Gyroscope Noise Analysis and Scale Factor Characterization over Temperature Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ARL-TR-7718 ● JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Gyroscope Noise Analysis and Scale...JULY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Gyroscope Noise Analysis and Scale Factor Characterization...System (MEMS) Gyroscope Noise Analysis and Scale Factor Characterization over Temperature Variation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  14. Comparison of effective noise temperatures in YBa2BCu3O7-δ junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Gerd Michael; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1997-01-01

    The dc voltage response to 70 GHz radiation was measured for YBCO bicrystal junctions, step edge junctions and ramp edge junctions at temperatures from 4 K to 90 K. Employing the RSJ-model and assuming thermal noise, the Josephson radiation is about equal to the voltage difference of the voltage...... response to the small signal microwave irradiation. In the presence of excess noise, an effective noise temperature can be defined and is used as a figure of merit. In bicrystal grain boundary junctions with zero magnetic field the effective noise temperature was determined to be equal to the physical...

  15. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘C. PMID:27447637

  16. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Wolf

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array’s temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  17. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  18. SQUID-based current sensing noise thermometry for quantum resistors at dilution refrigerator temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbaum, Ethan; Shingla, Vidhi; Csáthy, G. A.

    2017-03-01

    We present a dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID)-based current amplifier with an estimated input referred noise of only 2.3 fA/√{Hz}. Because of such a low amplifier noise, the circuit is useful for Johnson noise thermometry of quantum resistors in the kΩ range down to mK temperatures. In particular, we demonstrate that our circuit does not contribute appreciable noise to the Johnson noise of a 3.25 kΩ resistor down to 16 mK. Our circuit is a useful alternative to the commonly used High Electron Mobility Transistor-based amplifiers, but in contrast to the latter, it offers a much reduced 1/f noise. In comparison to SQUIDs interfaced with cryogenic current comparators, our circuit has similar low noise levels, but it is easier to build and to shield from magnetic pickup.

  19. Noise characteristics of resistors buried in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolek, A; Dziedzic, A

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of noise properties of conventional thick film resistors prepared on alumina substrates and resistors embedded in low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCCs) is presented. Both types of resistors were prepared from commercially available resistive inks. Noise measurements of LTCC resistors below 1 kHz show Gaussian 1/f noise. This is concluded from the calculations of the second spectra as well as from studying the volume dependence of noise intensity. It has occurred that noise index of LTCC resistors on average is not worse than that of conventional resistors. A detailed study of co-fired surface resistors and co-fired buried resistors show that burying a resistor within LTCC substrate usually leads to (significant) enhancement of resistance but not of noise intensity. We interpret this behaviour as another argument in favour of tunnelling as the dominant conduction mechanism in LTCC resistors.

  20. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 1011 V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  1. Spatial noise-aware temperature retrieval from infrared sounder data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmgren-Hansen, David; Laparra, Valero; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2017-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) for dimensionality reduction, and study the compactness and information content of the extracted features. Assessment of the results is done on a big dataset covering many spatial and temporal situations. PCA is widely used...... for these purposes but our analysis shows that one can gain significant improvements of the error rates when using MNF instead. In our analysis we also investigate the relationship between error rate improvements when including more spectral and spatial components in the regression model, aiming to uncover the trade...

  2. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M., E-mail: msantos@ucm.es [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I., E-mail: ignacio.pastor@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fingerhuth, S., E-mail: sebastian.fingerhuth@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Ascencio, J., E-mail: j_ascencio21@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-05-15

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process.

  3. Temperature-stabilized differential amplifier for low-noise DC measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märki, P.; Braem, B. A.; Ihn, T.

    2017-08-01

    A tabletop low-noise differential amplifier with a bandwidth of 100 kHz is presented. Low voltage drifts of the order of 100 nV/day are reached by thermally stabilizing relevant amplifier components. The input leakage current is below 100 fA. Input-stage errors are reduced by extensive circuitry. Voltage noise, current noise, input capacitance, and input current are extraordinarily low. The input resistance is larger than 1 T Ω . The amplifiers were tested with and deployed for electrical transport measurements of quantum devices at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Influence of temperature on transit times and microwave noise performances of SiGe HBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Albarran, L. M.; Ramirez-Garcia, E.; Zerounian, N.; Aniel, F.; Rodriguez-Mendez, L. M.; Valdez-Perez, D.; Galaz-Larios, M. C.; Enciso-Aguilar, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of temperature (300 K and 40 K) on intrinsic transit times and microwave noise performances of silicon germanium (SiGe) heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) is investigated. At 300 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters and four noise parameters, and we found a good agreement. At 40 K, we compared measured and modelled S-parameters, and we deduced noise performances from the S-parameter measurements. The electric model includes correlated junction noise sources and a proper extraction of the transit times involved in these sources. Moreover, the microwave noise model considers all the physical phenomena that impact noise performances in SiGe HBTs. We analysed three devices having different Ge content (10%-20%, 10%-25% and 10%-30%). At 40 K, the device with 10%-25% reaches one of the lowest base transit times (τ B), the lowest minimum noise figure (NFmin), and the lowest equivalent noise resistance (R n), for operation frequencies up to the maximum device dynamic performances (f ≈ f T) These results demonstrate the excellent potential to develop cryogenic applications of SiGe HBTs.

  5. Noise Reduction on Nasal Skin Temperature Measured by Radiation Thermometer with Differential Revision Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Tota; Nozawa, Akio; Ide, Hideto

    This paper shows noise reduction on nasal skin temperature measured by a radiation thermometer with differential revision filtering. We evaluated and examined emotion stress from the nasal skin temperature fluctuation of the space-time with the radiation thermometer. The measured data with the radiation thermometer consists of three kind of factor, because of one point [24±3φ/m] measurement system. Three kinds of factors are temperature fluctuation dependent feelings stress, noise of the radiation thermometer and the other parts which it should measure as the subject moves. We make threshold processing on a change of an area in time of a measurement signal provided in a radiation thermometer. We suggested Differential Revision Filtering (DRF) that a new method use a measurement value of change of one second and a low pass filter go through. By using this method, we got the possibility that decrease movement of a measurement and a noise of measurement device.

  6. Dipole moment and polarizability of impurity doped quantum dots driven by noise: Influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-06-01

    Present study examines the pattern of variation of electric dipole moment (μ) and polarizability (αp) of impurity doped GaAs quantum dots (QDs) under combined presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries a Gaussian white character and it has been introduced to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of μ and αp have been monitored against the variations of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and the noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, application of noise prominently influences the above two properties. However, the extent of influence depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. The findings divulge feasible routes to control the dipole moment and polarizability of doped QD system through the interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  7. Mitigation of Temperature Induced Single Event Crosstalk Noise by Applying Adaptive Forward Body Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Pankaj

    Soft Errors due to Single Event (SE) Transients is one of the important reliability issues, which is becoming very prominent in advanced technology and in space applications. Increasing coupling effects among interconnects, on the other hand, can cause SE Transients to contaminate electronically unrelated circuit paths, which in turn can increase circuit sensitivity to radiation. Coupling capacitance increases due to reducing distances between interconnect lines making crosstalk noise more important. On the other hand, chips now experience higher temperatures due to environmental factors and high performance of chips. High-performance VLSI circuits consume more power and hence experience higher temperature due to high utilization factor. The increased temperature affects both interconnect resistance and driving strength of interconnect buffers. This work shows that thermal effects increase the amount of crosstalk noise observed on the victim line at nominal supply voltages. With thermally induced crosstalk contribution, total crosstalk noise may exceed the noise margin of the subsequent gate causing a wrong value to be propagated. The crosstalk prevention measures taken such as victim driver sizing may not be sufficient if thermal effects are not properly considered. This work aims to provide a mitigation method for thermally induced crosstalk noise using adaptive forward body bias. At high temperature, drain current reduces, and adaptive body biasing makes the CMOS recover the lost the drain current. A temperature sensor is proposed here to generate a necessary voltage at the CMOS body. A good temperature sensitivity is achieved with the tiny sensors that keep constant driving strength. Interconnect is modeled in using 10-pi modeling and 45nm technology was use for this simulation. Our proposed method mitigates 90% of temperature induced crosstalk contribution.

  8. ADC non-linear error corrections for low-noise temperature measurements in the LISA band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjuan, J; Lobo, A; Mateos, N [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC, Fac. de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J [Dep. Eng. Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. C4, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); DIaz-Aguilo, M, E-mail: sanjuan@ieec.fcr.e [Dep. Fisica Aplicada, UPC, Campus Nord, Ed. B4/B5, J Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-01

    Temperature fluctuations degrade the performance of different subsystems in the LISA mission. For instance, they can exert stray forces on the test masses and thus hamper the required drag-free accuracy. Also, the interferometric system performance depends on the stability of the temperature in the optical elements. Therefore, monitoring the temperature in specific points of the LISA subsystems is required. These measurements will be useful to identify the sources of excess noise caused by temperature fluctuations. The required temperature stability is still to be defined, but a figure around 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} from 0.1 mHz to 0.1 Hz can be a good rough guess. The temperature measurement subsystem on board the LISA Pathfinder mission exhibits noise levels of 10{mu}K Hz{sup -1/2} for f >0.1 mHz. For LISA, based on the above hypothesis, the measurement system should overcome limitations related to the analog-to-digital conversion stage which degrades the performance of the measurement when temperature drifts. Investigations on the mitigation of such noise will be here presented.

  9. Noise-modulated self-polarization effect of impurity doped quantum dots under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2017-10-01

    We explore the profiles of self-polarization effect (SPE) of doped GaAs QD under simultaneous presence of hydrostatic pressure (HP), temperature and in presence of noise. Noise term carries Gaussian white character and it has been administered to the system via two different pathways; additive and multiplicative. Profiles of SPE have been monitored as a function of HP, temperature and noise strength. Under a given condition of HP and temperature, noise marks its prominent signature on the SPE profile. However, the extent to which noise affects the SPE profile visibly depends on the noise strength and the pathway through which noise is introduced. As interesting observations we have found that SPE exhibits minimization at a pressure of ∼ 170 kbar in absence of noise and at ∼ 150 kbar when noise is present. Furthermore, in presence of multiplicative noise SPE exhibits a very faint decrease with increase in T up to T ∼ 420 K. However, beyond T ∼ 420 K, further increase in temperature causes abrupt fall of SPE in a highly sharp way. The findings highlight viable ways of tuning SPE of doped QD system through subtle interplay between HP, temperature and noise.

  10. Ultralow-Noise Room-Temperature Quantum Memory for Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Mehdi; Kupchak, Connor; Jordaan, Bertus; Shahrokhshahi, Reihaneh; Figueroa, Eden

    2017-09-01

    Here, we show an ultralow-noise regime of operation in a simple quantum memory in warm 87Rb atomic vapor. By modeling the quantum dynamics of four-level room-temperature atoms, we achieve fidelities >90 % for single-photon-level polarization qubits, surpassing any classical strategies exploiting the nonunitary memory efficiency. Additionally, we show experimental techniques capable of producing fidelities close to unity. Our results demonstrate the potential of simple, resource-moderate experimental room-temperature quantum devices.

  11. Geometry and temperature dependence of low-frequency flux noise in dc SQUIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, S. M.; Birenbaum, J. S.; O'Kelley, S. R.; Golubev, D. S.; Hilton, G. C.; Cho, H.-M.; Irwin, K. D.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Braje, D. A.; Fitch, G.; Neeley, M.; Johnson, R. C.; Oliver, W. D.; Wellstood, F. C.; Clarke, John

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on dc SQUIDs reveal a flux noise spectral density SΦ (f) =A2 /(f / 1 Hz) α . An analytic model assuming non-interacting spins localized at the surface of the SQUID loop predicts that the mean square noise scales as R/W--the radius and width of the loop, respectively. However, there are no established theories for the scaling of α with geometry or the dependences of A and α on temperature T. To test the predicted geometric scaling of this model experimentally, we measured flux noise in ten SQUIDs with systematically varying geometries. We find that, at fixed T, A2 scales approximately as R. From the measured values of A and α, we estimate the mean square flux noise, which does not scale with R. As T is lowered, α increases significantly and in such a way that the spectra ``pivot'' about an approximately fixed frequency. This phenomenon implies that the mean square noise is temperature-dependent, an effect not predicted by the analytic model. We discuss our attempts to reconcile these discrepancies by considering the locking together of spins to form clusters. This work was supported by ARO, IARPA, and the US Government.

  12. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  13. Probing Temperature Dependent Noise in Flux Qubits via Macroscopic Resonant Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, A. J.; Harris, R.; Johnson, M. W.; Johansson, J.; Bunyk, P.; Govorkov, S.; Thom, M. C.; Uchaikin, S.; Truncik, C. J. S.; Amin, M. H. S.; Han, S.; Bumble, B.; Fung, A.; Kaul, A.; Kleinsasser, A.; Averin, D. V.

    2008-03-01

    Macroscopic resonant tunneling between the two lowest lying states of a bistable RF-SQUID is used to characterize flux noise in a potential qubit. Detailed measurements of incoherent decay rates as a function of flux bias revealed that the Gaussian shaped tunneling rate is not peaked at the resonance point, but is shifted to a flux bias at which the initial well is higher than the target well. This observation indicates that the dominant low frequency (1/f) flux noise in this device is quantum mechanical in nature. The r.m.s. amplitude of the noise, which is proportional to decoherence rate 1/T^*2, was observed to be weakly dependent on temperature below 70 mK.

  14. A high sensitivity ultralow temperature RF conductance and noise measurement setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Mahé, A.; Denis, A.; Berroir, J.-M.; Glattli, D. C.; Plaçais, B.; Fève, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the realization of a high sensitivity RF noise measurement scheme to study small current fluctuations of mesoscopic systems at milli-Kelvin temperatures. The setup relies on the combination of an interferometric amplification scheme and a quarter-wave impedance transformer, allowing the measurement of noise power spectral densities with gigahertz bandwidth up to five orders of magnitude below the amplifier noise floor. We simultaneously measure the high frequency conductance of the sample by derivating a portion of the signal to a microwave homodyne detection. We describe the principle of the setup, as well as its implementation and calibration. Finally, we show that our setup allows to fully characterize a subnanosecond on-demand single electron source. More generally, its sensitivity and bandwidth make it suitable for applications manipulating single charges at GHz frequencies.

  15. Noise measurement system at electron temperature down to 20 mK with combinations of the low pass filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashisaka, Masayuki; Yamauchi, Yoshiaki; Chida, Kensaku; Nakamura, Shuji; Kobayashi, Kensuke; Ono, Teruo

    2009-09-01

    We developed a quantum noise measurement system in a dilution refrigerator by using three kinds of cryogenic low pass filters. One of them is a commercial low pass filter inserted into the noise measurement lines instead of the conventional powder filter, which assures well-defined circuit parameters necessary for the noise measurement at a finite frequency. We checked that this filter gives sufficiently large attenuation up to 20 GHz at room temperature, 77 and 4.2 K. The electron temperature of the mesoscopic device placed in the present system was confirmed to be down to around 20 mK by measuring the thermal noise of the device.

  16. Deriving Deep Ocean Temperature Changes From the Ambient Acoustic Noise Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambell, K.; Evers, L. G.; Snellen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Passively deriving the deep ocean temperature is a challenge. However, knowledge about changes in the deep ocean temperature are important in relation to climate change. In-situ observations are are and satellite observations are hardly applicable. Low-frequency sound waves of a few hertz can penetrate the deep oceans over long distances. As their propagation is temperature dependent, these waves contain valuable information that can be used for temperature monitoring. In this study, the use of interferometry is demonstrated by applying this technique to ambient noise measured at two hydrophone arrays located near Robinson Crusoe Island in the South Pacific Ocean. The arrays are separated by 40 km and are located at a depth of 800 m. Both arrays consist of three hydrophones with an interstation distance of 2 km. It is shown that the acoustic velocity, and with this the temperature variation, can be derived from measured hydro-acoustic data. Furthermore, the findings are supported by ocean models that describe the propagation of sound between the hydrophone arrays. This study shows the potential of using the ambient noise field for temperature monitoring in the deep ocean.

  17. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  18. Significance of coherent Rayleigh noise in fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing based on spontaneous Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, K.

    2006-05-01

    The temperature resolution of a fibre-optic distributed temperature sensor based on taking the ratio of the temperature sensitive backscattered spontaneous Brillouin signal to the corresponding Rayleigh signal depends on the optical signal-to-noise of the receiver system and the amplitude fluctuations in the Rayleigh signal. The amplitude fluctuations or coherent Rayleigh noise have been investigated experimentally as a function of detection bandwidth, source bandwidth and spatial resolution and showed good agreement with theory.

  19. A low-noise wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor with low and high temperatures resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Koichi; Adachi, Satoru; Tejada, Jose; Oshikubo, Hiromichi; Akahane, Nana; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2008-02-01

    A temperature-resistant 1/3 inch SVGA (800×600 pixels) 5.6 μm pixel pitch wide-dynamic-range (WDR) CMOS image sensor has been developed using a lateral-over-flow-integration-capacitor (LOFIC) in a pixel. The sensor chips are fabricated through 0.18 μm 2P3M process with totally optimized front-end-of-line (FEOL) & back-end-of-line (BEOL) for a lower dark current. By implementing a low electrical field potential design for photodiodes, reducing damages, recovering crystal defects and terminating interface states in the FEOL+BEOL, the dark current is improved to 12 e - /pixel-sec at 60 deg.C with 50% reduction from the previous very-low-dark-current (VLDC) FEOL and its contribution to the temporal noise is improved. Furthermore, design optimizations of the readout circuits, especially a signal-and noise-hold circuit and a programmable-gain-amplifier (PGA) are also implemented. The measured temporal noise is 2.4 e -rms at 60 fps (:36 MHz operation). The dynamic-range (DR) is extended to 100 dB with 237 ke - full well capacity. In order to secure the temperature-resistance, the sensor chip also receives both an inorganic cap onto micro lens and a metal hermetic seal package assembly. Image samples at low & high temperatures show significant improvement in image qualities.

  20. Finite-temperature field theory and quantum noise in an electrical network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garavaglia, T.

    1988-10-15

    Finite-temperature (0less than or equal toTnoise in an electrical network. Solutions for the finite second moments that satisfy the uncertainty principle bound are given for a dissipative quantum oscillator. A regularization method, based on the analysis of a semi-infinite low-pass filter, is employed, and it leads to results which differ from those of the Drude model. To illustrate the FTF method, an example is given using an ideal finite-temperature coherent state.

  1. An Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Model with Temperature and Nozzle Aspect Ratio Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cliff

    2015-01-01

    An empirical model for jet-surface interaction (JSI) noise produced by a round jet near a flat plate is described and the resulting model evaluated. The model covers unheated and hot jet conditions (1 less than or equal to jet total temperature ratio less than or equal to 2.7) in the subsonic range (0.5 less than or equal to M(sub a) less than or equal to 0.9), surface lengths 0.6 less than or equal to (axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)/nozzle exit diameter) less than or equal to 10, and surface standoff distances (0 less than or equal to (radial distance from jet lipline to surface (inches)/axial distance from jet exit to surface trailing edge (inches)) less than or equal to 1) using only second-order polynomials to provide predictable behavior. The JSI noise model is combined with an existing jet mixing noise model to produce exhaust noise predictions. Fit quality metrics and comparisons to between the predicted and experimental data indicate that the model is suitable for many system level studies. A first-order correction to the JSI source model that accounts for the effect of nozzle aspect ratio is also explored. This correction is based on changes to the potential core length and frequency scaling associated with rectangular nozzles up to 8:1 aspect ratio. However, more work is needed to refine these findings into a formal model.

  2. Microscopic origin of read current noise in TaOx-based resistive switching memory by ultra-low temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yue; Cai, Yimao; Liu, Yefan; Fang, Yichen; Yu, Muxi; Tan, Shenghu; Huang, Ru

    2016-04-01

    TaOx-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) attracts considerable attention for the development of next generation nonvolatile memories. However, read current noise in RRAM is one of the critical concerns for storage application, and its microscopic origin is still under debate. In this work, the read current noise in TaOx-based RRAM was studied thoroughly. Based on a noise power spectral density analysis at room temperature and at ultra-low temperature of 25 K, discrete random telegraph noise (RTN) and continuous average current fluctuation (ACF) are identified and decoupled from the total read current noise in TaOx RRAM devices. A statistical comparison of noise amplitude further reveals that ACF depends strongly on the temperature, whereas RTN is independent of the temperature. Measurement results combined with conduction mechanism analysis show that RTN in TaOx RRAM devices arises from electron trapping/detrapping process in the hopping conduction, and ACF is originated from the thermal activation of conduction centers that form the percolation network. At last, a unified model in the framework of hopping conduction is proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of both RTN and ACF noise, which can provide meaningful guidelines for designing noise-immune RRAM devices.

  3. Probing Temperature-Dependent Recombination Kinetics in Polymer:Fullerene Solar Cells by Electric Noise Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Landi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of solvent additives on the temperature behavior of both charge carrier transport and recombination kinetics in bulk heterojunction solar cells has been investigated by electric noise spectroscopy. The observed differences in charge carrier lifetime and mobility are attributed to a different film ordering and donor-acceptor phase segregation in the blend. The measured temperature dependence indicates that bimolecular recombination is the dominant loss mechanism in the active layer, affecting the device performance. Blend devices prepared with a high-boiling-point solvent additive show a decreased recombination rate at the donor-acceptor interface as compared to the ones prepared with the reference solvent. A clear correlation between the device performance and the morphological properties is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of the mobility-lifetime product.

  4. Noise-enhanced spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, M.; Carretero, M.; Bonilla, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    Physical systems exhibiting fast spontaneous chaotic oscillations are used to generate high-quality true random sequences in random number generators. The concept of using fast practical entropy sources to produce true random sequences is crucial to make storage and transfer of data more secure at very high speeds. While the first high-speed devices were chaotic semiconductor lasers, the discovery of spontaneous chaos in semiconductor superlattices at room temperature provides a valuable nanotechnology alternative. Spontaneous chaos was observed in 1996 experiments at temperatures below liquid nitrogen. Here we show spontaneous chaos at room temperature appears in idealized superlattices for voltage ranges where sharp transitions between different oscillation modes occur. Internal and external noises broaden these voltage ranges and enhance the sensitivity to initial conditions in the superlattice snail-shaped chaotic attractor thereby rendering spontaneous chaos more robust.

  5. Observation of distinct, temperature dependent flux noise near bicrystal grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-x films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, K. R.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde; Hansen, Jørn Bindslev

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the magnetic flux noise in high temperature superconducting thin-films of yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBa2Cu3O7) in the vicinity of artificial grain boundaries have been studied by means of a low critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID...

  6. Josephson oscillations and noise temperatures in YBa2Cu3O7-x grain-boundary junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ya. Divin; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1992-01-01

    The ac Josephson effect was studied in YBa2Cu3O7−x grain-boundary junctions (GBJ) in the temperature range from 4 to 90 K. The temperature dependence of the linewidth of millimeter-wave Josephson oscillations was measured and it is shown that the derived effective noise temperatures may be as low...... as the physical temperature in the temperature range investigated. In the millimeter-wave range, linewidths as low as 380 MHz were found at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  7. In situ electrochemical impedance and noise measurements of corroding stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macak, Jan [Power Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: macakj@vscht.cz; Sajdl, Petr [Power Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Kucera, Pavel [Power Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Novotny, Radek [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Vosta, Jan [Power Engineering Department, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-25

    An in situ corrosion study of austenitic stainless steel 08CH18N10T in high temperature water was performed. The material under study is used in the construction of steam generator of PWR (pressurized water reactor) nuclear power stations and is similar to AISI 321 stainless steel. In situ 300-h tests were performed under autoclave conditions at 280 deg. C and 8 MPa and consisted of impedance measurements, polarization measurements and electrochemical noise measurements. The experiments were performed in deionised water with the pH adjusted to 9.5, in the presence/absence of chlorides. An additional modification of corrosivity was achieved by changing oxygen concentration. A detailed analysis of the impedance data is presented identifying in the impedance spectra contributions of oxide, corrosion reaction, double layer and diffusion process. A good agreement was found between corrosion data from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and that from electrochemical noise (EN) measurements. It was confirmed that the oxide response cannot be attributed to the overall oxide layer but only to the part corresponding to the space charge layer, thus indicating the semi-conductive character of the oxide.

  8. The Scaling of Broadband Shock-Associated Noise with Increasing Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    A physical explanation for the saturation of broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) intensity with increasing jet stagnation temperature has eluded investigators. An explanation is proposed for this phenomenon with the use of an acoustic analogy. For this purpose the acoustic analogy of Morris and Miller is examined. To isolate the relevant physics, the scaling of BBSAN at the peak intensity level at the sideline ( = 90 degrees) observer location is examined. Scaling terms are isolated from the acoustic analogy and the result is compared using a convergent nozzle with the experiments of Bridges and Brown and using a convergent-divergent nozzle with the experiments of Kuo, McLaughlin, and Morris at four nozzle pressure ratios in increments of total temperature ratios from one to four. The equivalent source within the framework of the acoustic analogy for BBSAN is based on local field quantities at shock wave shear layer interactions. The equivalent source combined with accurate calculations of the propagation of sound through the jet shear layer, using an adjoint vector Green s function solver of the linearized Euler equations, allows for predictions that retain the scaling with respect to stagnation pressure and allows for the accurate saturation of BBSAN with increasing stagnation temperature. This is a minor change to the source model relative to the previously developed models. The full development of the scaling term is shown. The sources and vector Green s function solver are informed by steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions. These solutions are examined as a function of stagnation temperature at the first shock wave shear layer interaction. It is discovered that saturation of BBSAN with increasing jet stagnation temperature occurs due to a balance between the amplification of the sound propagation through the shear layer and the source term scaling.A physical explanation for the saturation of broadband shock-associated noise (BBSAN) intensity

  9. Temperature Control and Noise Reduction in our Compact ADR System for TES Microcalorimeter Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hishi, U.; Fujimoto, R.; Kamiya, K.; Kotake, M.; Ito, H.; Kaido, T.; Tanaka, K.; Hattori, K.

    2016-08-01

    We have been developing a compact adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, keeping ground application and future missions in mind. A salt pill fabricated in-house, a superconducting magnet with a passive magnetic shield around it, and a mechanical heat switch are mounted in a dedicated helium cryostat. The detector stage temperature is regulated by PID control of the magnet current, with a dI/dt term added to compensate the temperature rise due to parasitic heat. The temperature fluctuation of the detector stage is 1-2 \\upmu Krms, and the hold time was extended by about 15 % thanks to the dI/dt term. Bundle shields of the harnesses between the cryostat and the analog electronics boxes were connected to the chassis at both ends, and the analog electronics boxes were grounded to the cryostat through the bundle shields. This reduced the readout noise to 16 pA/√{Hz} in the 10-60 kHz range. Using this system, an energy resolution of 3.8 ± 0.2 eV (FWHM) was achieved at 5.9 keV.

  10. Identification of Si film traps in p-channel SOI FinFETs using low temperature noise spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, H.; Cretu, B.; Simoen, E.; Routoure, J.-M.; Carin, R.; Benfdila, A.; Aoulaiche, M.; Claeys, C.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the excess low frequency noise from 100 K up to room temperature in p-channel triple-gate standard and strained FinFET transistors fabricated on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates. The low frequency noise measurements as a function of temperature can be successfully used as a non-destructive device characterisation tool in order to evaluate the quality of the silicon film and to identify traps induced during the device processing. Several identified traps which can be related to boron and carbon, in particular for strained substrate devices, were observed.

  11. Random-Resistor-Random-Temperature Kirchhoff-Law-Johnson-Noise (RRRT-KLJN Key Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kish Laszlo B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two new Kirchhoff-law-Johnson-noise (KLJN secure key distribution schemes which are generalizations of the original KLJN scheme. The first of these, the Random-Resistor (RR- KLJN scheme, uses random resistors with values chosen from a quasi-continuum set. It is well-known since the creation of the KLJN concept that such a system could work in cryptography, because Alice and Bob can calculate the unknown resistance value from measurements, but the RR-KLJN system has not been addressed in prior publications since it was considered impractical. The reason for discussing it now is the second scheme, the Random Resistor Random Temperature (RRRT- KLJN key exchange, inspired by a recent paper of Vadai, Mingesz and Gingl, wherein security was shown to be maintained at non-zero power flow. In the RRRT-KLJN secure key exchange scheme, both the resistances and their temperatures are continuum random variables. We prove that the security of the RRRT-KLJN scheme can prevail at a non-zero power flow, and thus the physical law guaranteeing security is not the Second Law of Thermodynamics but the Fluctuation-Dissipation Theorem. Alice and Bob know their own resistances and temperatures and can calculate the resistance and temperature values at the other end of the communication channel from measured voltage, current and power-flow data in the wire. However, Eve cannot determine these values because, for her, there are four unknown quantities while she can set up only three equations. The RRRT-KLJN scheme has several advantages and makes all former attacks on the KLJN scheme invalid or incomplete.

  12. High Temperature Smart Structures for Engine Noise Reduction and Performance Enhancement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Noise mitigation for subsonic transports is a continuing high priority, and recent work has identified successful exhaust mixing enhancement devices (chevrons) that...

  13. High Temperature Smart Structures for Engine Noise Reduction and Performance Enhancement Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Noise mitigation for subsonic transports is a continuing high priority, and recent work has identified successful exhaust mixing enhancement devices that have...

  14. Combined influence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on interband emission energy of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore the profiles of interband emission energy (IEE) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) under the simultaneous influence of hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature (T) and in presence and absence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been incorporated to the system additively and multiplicatively. In this regard, modulation of IEE by the variation of several other relevant quantities such as electric field, magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential and aluminium concentration has also been investigated. Gradual alteration of HP and T affects IEE discernibly. Inclusion of noise has been found to enhance or deplete the IEE depending upon its mode of application. Moreover, under given conditions of temperature and pressure, the difference between the impurity-free ground state energy and the binding energy appears to be crucial in determining whether or not the profiles of IEE would resemble that of binding energy. The findings reveal fascinating role played by noise in tailoring the IEE of doped QD system under conspicuous presence of hydrostatic pressure and temperature.

  15. An internal reference model-based PRF temperature mapping method with Cramer-Rao lower bound noise performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Pan, Xinyi; Ying, Kui; Zhang, Qiang; An, Jing; Weng, Dehe; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-11-01

    The conventional phase difference method for MR thermometry suffers from disturbances caused by the presence of lipid protons, motion-induced error, and field drift. A signal model is presented with multi-echo gradient echo (GRE) sequence using a fat signal as an internal reference to overcome these problems. The internal reference signal model is fit to the water and fat signals by the extended Prony algorithm and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to estimate the chemical shifts between water and fat which contain temperature information. A noise analysis of the signal model was conducted using the Cramer-Rao lower bound to evaluate the noise performance of various algorithms, the effects of imaging parameters, and the influence of the water:fat signal ratio in a sample on the temperature estimate. Comparison of the calculated temperature map and thermocouple temperature measurements shows that the maximum temperature estimation error is 0.614 degrees C, with a standard deviation of 0.06 degrees C, confirming the feasibility of this model-based temperature mapping method. The influence of sample water:fat signal ratio on the accuracy of the temperature estimate is evaluated in a water-fat mixed phantom experiment with an optimal ratio of approximately 0.66:1. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Low Temperature Noise Measurement of an InAs/GaSb-based nBn MWIR Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    lack of fully passivated mesa sidewalls. An emerging infrared detector technology utilizing a unipolar, single-band barrier design, the so-called nBn ...Low Temperature Noise Measurement of an InAs/GaSb-based nBn MWIR Detector Vincent M. Cowan* 1 , Christian P. Morath 1 , Stephen Myers 2...2 Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87106, USA ABSTRACT Recent experiments on conventional p-on-n

  17. Influence of inductance induced noise in an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID at high operation temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, P. Å.; Claeson, T.; Hansen, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The voltage modulation depth of a high T(c) dc-SQUID was measured at temperatures close to T(c) and compared to a model by Enpuku et al. where the flux noise from the SQUID inductance is taken into account. The device was an YBa2Cu3O7 dc-SQUID made on a bicrystal substrate of SrTiO3. The design...

  18. The effect of signal to noise ratio on accuracy of temperature measurements for Brillouin lidar in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kun; Niu, Qunjie; Wu, Xiangkui; Xu, Jiaqi; Peng, Li; Zhou, Bo

    2017-09-01

    A lidar system with Fabry-Pérot etalon and an intensified charge coupled device can be used to obtain the scattering spectrum of the ocean and retrieve oceanic temperature profiles. However, the spectrum would be polluted by noise and result in a measurement error. To analyze the effect of signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the accuracy of measurements for Brillouin lidar in water, the theory model and characteristics of SNR are researched. The noise spectrums with different SNR are repetitiously measured based on simulation and experiment. The results show that accuracy is related to SNR, and considering the balance of time consumption and quality, the average of five measurements is adapted for real remote sensing under the pulse laser conditions of wavelength 532 nm, pulse energy 650 mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz, pulse width 8 ns and linewidth 0.003 cm-1 (90 MHz). Measuring with the Brillouin linewidth has a better accuracy at a lower temperature (15 °C), based on the classical retrieval model we adopt. The experimental results show that the temperature error is 0.71 °C and 0.06 °C based on shift and linewidth respectively when the image SNR is at the range of 3.2 dB-3.9 dB.

  19. Electronic characteristics of doped InAs/GaAs quantum dot photodetector: temperature dependent dark current and noise density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Chi; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Chiang; Chiang, Cheng-Der; Yang, San-Te; Su, Wen-Kuan

    2006-02-01

    The noise characteristics associated with dark current, photoconductive gain (PC), capture probability in doped InAs dots embedded in In 0.1Ga 0.9As/GaAs spacer layer have been proposed. The photoconductive and photovoltaic behaviors of the InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) from the intersubband transition measurements are also clearly observed. Through noise measurement in dynamic signal analyzer (HP35670A) 1, the electronic bandpass filter frequencies are set up ranging from 3 to 10 KHz in a low noise current preamplifier (SR570) 2. The lock-in amplifier (SR830) 3 can be also used to measure and calibrate the noise density by means of the mean average deviation (MAD) contrast with noise spectra from HP35670A. The InAs/GaAs QDIP studied in this work belongs to n +-n-n + structure with the top and free blocking barrier layers. It is observed that the owing blocking layer of QDIP not only suppress dark current successfully but also probably reduce the photocurrent 4-6. By systematically optoelectronic measurements and simulations, the modified model of noise current, photoconductive gain, and capture probability in the quantum devices have been proposed. It is shown that photoconductive gain is almost independent of bias under the lower bias, then increasing exponentially under higher bias and below the temperature of 80K. In contrast to quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), a higher photoconductive gain of the quantum dot infrared photodetector has been demonstrated and attributed to the longer lifetimes of excited carriers in quantum dots 7-10. At 80K, a photoconductive gain of tens of thousand is shown in the regions of higher biases. It is clear to note that the highest detectivity of the QDIP surprisingly approach to 3.0×10 12 cmHz 1/2/W at -0.6V under measured temperature 20 K. Under 80K, the average D* is obtained ~10 10 cmHz 1/2/W. To our knowledge, this is the one of highest D* data in the world.

  20. Radio-frequency tunnel-junction shot noise thermometry and its application to the study of thermal properties at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk

    2013-03-01

    We developed a radio-frequency broadband measurement setup for shot noise thermometry in the temperature range from 0.1 K to 300 K. The noise power from a metallic tunnel junction was measured at 1 GHz with a bandwidth of 400 MHz. Very small noise signal from the tunnel junction was amplified by a cryogenic HEMT amplifier. The signal was then amplified by a room temperature amplifiers followed by a diode detector that converts the noise power into voltage output. Broadband measurement technique enables a fast measurement of RF signal. The shot noise thermometer directly measures the electron temperature and our measurement uncertainty is less than 3% in the sub-Kelvin range. Because of the small size of the tunnel junction, local measurement of the temperature on a device is possible. Since we measure the electron temperature directly, we can apply this technique to the study of thermal properties at low temperature.We suggest a method of measuring electron temperature before and after a thermal process in a chip at low temperature, which will help understanding of the thermal properties of electron-phonon system at low temperature.

  1. In depth static and low-frequency noise characterization of n-channel FinFETs on SOI substrates at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, H.; Cretu, B.; Routoure, J.-M.; Carin, R.; Talmat, R.; Benfdila, A.; Simoen, E.; Claeys, C.

    2014-08-01

    The impact of cryogenic temperature operation (10 K) on the short channel effects and low frequency noise was analysed on strained and unstrained n-channel FinFET transistors fabricated on silicon on insulator (SOI) substrates in order to evaluate the devices static performances and to study the low frequency noise mechanisms. The main electrical parameters are investigated and it is evidenced that even at very low temperatures, the strain-engineering techniques boost the devices performances in terms of mobility, threshold voltage, access resistances and drain saturation currents. The DIBL effect, Early voltage and the intrinsic gain are ameliorated only for the short channel devices. A drawback, however, is that slightly improved turn-on capabilities may be noted for standard channel devices compared to strained ones. Low frequency noise measurements show that the carrier number fluctuations dominate the flicker noise in weak inversion even at 10 K operation. Access resistance noise contributions were evidenced in strong inversion.

  2. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  3. Radiation of Air-Borne Noise in Non-Homogeneous Wind and Temperature Fields using FEM Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Krenk, S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes analysis in the time domain of noise propagating in non-homogeneous mean wind or temperature fields. The analysis is based on a field equation for the velocity potential, which contains strong convection terms. In order to circumvent the problem of numerical instability and loss...... by a conventional Galerkin approach. The radiation condition is an impedance condition for wave propagation towards the artificial boundary at an oblique angle. The propagation angle is estimated geometrically with due consideration of the mean wind velocity. The method has been applied to a 2-dimensional point...

  4. Nano-Kelvin thermometry and temperature control: beyond the thermal noise limit

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wenle; Stace, Thomas M; Campbell, Geoff; Baynes, Fred N; Luiten, Andre N

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate thermometry with a resolution of 80 $\\mathrm{nK} / \\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$ using an isotropic crystalline whispering-gallery mode resonator based on a dichroic dual-mode technique. We simultaneously excite two modes that have a mode frequency ratio very close to two ($\\pm0.3$ppm). The wavelength- and temperature-dependence of the refractive index means that the frequency difference between these modes is an ultra-sensitive proxy of the resonator temperature. This approach to temperature sensing automatically suppresses sensitivity to thermal expansion and vibrationally induced changes of the resonator. We also demonstrate active suppression of temperature fluctuations in the resonator by controlling the intensity of the driving laser. The residual temperature fluctuations are shown to be below the limits set by fundamental thermodynamic fluctuations of the resonator material.

  5. Seawater Temperature and Wind Speed Dependences and Diurnal Variation of Ambient Noise at the Snapping Shrimp Colony in Shallow Water of Southern Sea of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seom-Kyu; Choi, Bok Kyoung; Kim, Bong-Chae; Kim, Byoung-Nam; Kim, Seong Hyeon; Park, Yosup; Lee, Yong-Kuk

    2012-07-01

    The seawater temperature and wind dependences and diurnal variation of the ambient noise at the snapping shrimp colony in shallow water of the southern sea of Korea were investigated. The ambient noise levels are significantly affected by the snapping shrimp sound, when the bottom seawater temperature increases and the wind speed decreases. However, they are not exceptively almost affected by the snapping shrimp sound when the wind speed decreases at low seawater temperatures (shrimp sound in the morning and night time zones. This study shows that the activity of the snapping shrimp affecting the variation in ambient noise level in shallow water can be related to the wind speed as well as the seawater temperature. This study also shows that the snapping shrimp in diurnal activity can be more active in the morning and night time zones.

  6. Reliability characterization of SiON and MGHK MOSFETs using flicker noise and its correlation with the bias temperature instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnakay, Rameez; Balandin, Alexander A.; Srinivasan, Purushothaman

    2017-09-01

    Bias temperature instability (BTI) is one of the critical device degradation mechanisms in poly-Si/SiON and metal gate/high-k complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. Using the pre- and post-BTI flicker noise measurements, we investigated the bulk trap density, Nt, in both of these technologies. The low-frequency noise spectra were predominantly of 1/fγ type with γ technologies, the lower VTH degradation due to PBTI was noticed while considerable VTH degradation was observed for NBTI in both SiON and MGHK technologies. Both MGHK and SiON pFETs show a clear increase in the effective volume trap density, Nt, after NBTI. The increase in Nt in MGHK n-MOSFETs during PBTI is markedly higher than that in MGHK p-MOSFETs during NBTI. From 2012-2016 he was a Research Assistant with the Nano-Device Laboratory at the University of California - Riverside, as well as a member of the Quality and Reliability engineering team at Globalfoundries, Inc. during the summer of 2014. He has currently authored or co-authored 10 journal publications and numerous conference presentations. His current research interests include 1/f noise in high-k dielectrics and fabricated 2D van der Waal thin-film devices Mr. Samnakay's awards and honors include the Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Award (University of California-Riverside) and induction into the IEEE-HKN honors society. He also serves as a reviewer for 6 journals including Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Nanotechnology journals.

  7. Dissecting the frog inner ear with Gaussian noise .2. Temperature dependence of inner ear function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanDijk, P; Wit, HP; Segenhout, JM

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the response of single primary auditory nerve fibers (n = 31) was investigated in the European edible frog, Rana esculenta (seven ears). Nerve fiber responses were analyzed with Wiener kernel analysis and polynomial correlation. The responses were described with a

  8. Low-noise and wide-bandwidth current readout at low temperatures using a superconducting-quantum-interference-device amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ngoc Thanh Mai; Okazaki, Yuma; Nakamura, Shuji; Ortolano, Massimo; Kaneko, Nobu-Hisa

    2017-04-01

    We report on the development of a current amplifier for measuring small currents from mesoscopic electronic devices at low temperatures down to the milli-Kelvin range. In our setup, a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) located at the mixing chamber stage of the dilution refrigerator is used as the first-stage current amplifier, thereby improving the noise floor down to 8 × 10-27 A2/Hz, which is one order of magnitude as low as those obtained by the conventional methods that utilize a semiconductor-based cryogenic current amplifier. We show the configuration of this setup and demonstrate the amplification of the current generated by a quantum point contact. This approach can open a new way to examine solid-state phenomena that are elusive owing to their small current.

  9. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was 10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  11. Investigations for low noise cooling by means of a pulse tube cooler for highly sensitive SQUID magnetometers from high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lienerth, C

    2000-01-01

    110fT/[Root]Hz at 10 Hz. For the discret peaks at the working frequency the vibration compensation is capable of reducing the cooler-generated peaks in the field noise spectrum by a factor of the order of 4. This noise level is low enough for applications such as nondestructive evaluation of materials. For identifying the origin of the remaining disturbances, one has to consider in addition to the residual vibrations also temperature oscillations and oscillating fields from eddy current at the SQUID location. The commercial acceptance of superconducting applications is closely associated with the availability of appropriate cryocoolers that enable continuous operation without the need to re-fill liquid cryogens. For cooling of highly-sensitive HT-SQUID sensors the cryocooler has to meet rather severe demands concerning interference from the cooler itself. In particular, cooler-generated noise from electromagnetic interference (EMI), mechanical vibrations and temperature fluctuations should be below the intrin...

  12. Measurement of low temperature thermal properties of microcalorimeters using Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Khadije

    Lithium-ion batteries are the power source of choice for portable electronics, power tools and electric-based transportation. This outstanding commercial success has spawned great international interest in applying this technology to systems that demand higher power, such as the electric component of hybrid, extended range, and electric vehicles. This would require new electrode materials that are less expensive, more energetic, and more environmentally friendly than the present ones. Of particular interest is the olivine-structured LiFePO 4 cathode developed by Goodenough and co-workers, which offers several appealing features, such as a high, flat voltage profile and relatively high theoretical specific capacity (170 mAhg-1), combined with low cost and low toxicity. However, the intrinsically poor electronic and ionic conductivities of LiFePO4 limit the delivery of high specific capacity at high discharge rates. Several strategies have been devised to overcome the inherent limitations of LiFePO4. Carbon coating is one of the remedies to improve the performance of LiFePO 4. We studied the effect of carbon coating on the performance of LiFePO 4. First, we synthesized carbon-coated LiFePO4 samples with different amount of surfactant, lauric acid that acts as carbon source. We were able to show that an optimized amount of carbon results in greatly improved room-temperature electrochemical performance. On the other hand, because the electrochemical properties are strongly dependent on the quality of deposited carbon, we did also study the effect of carbon sources: lauric acid, myristic acid and oleic acid. We successfully showed that the proper carbon sources and carbon content played a key role on improving the initial charge-discharge capacity of the LiFePO4/C cathode. In addition, we did also shed the light of the positive impact of excess of Li on the electrochemical performance of C-LiFePO4. Knowing that Fe-site doping is considered to be an effective way to

  13. A comparative study of 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance in multiwall and single-wall carbon nanotube bolometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rongtao; Kamal, Rayyan; Wu, Judy Z

    2011-07-01

    The 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) are investigated in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film bolometers since both affect the bolometer detectivity directly. A comparison is made between the MWCNT film bolometers and their single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) counterparts. The intrinsic noise level in the former has been found at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in the latter, which outweighs the moderately lower TCR absolute values in the former and results in higher bolometer detectivity in MWCNT bolometers. Interestingly, reduced noise and enhanced TCR can be obtained by improving the inter-tube coupling using thermal annealing in both SWCNT and MWCNT films, suggesting much higher detectivity may be achieved via engineering the inter-tube coupling.

  14. Noise prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  15. High-temperature superconducting quantum interference device with cooled LC resonant circuit for measuring alternating magnetic fields with improved signal-to-noise ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Longqing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I; Usoskin, Alexander

    2007-05-01

    Certain applications of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) require a magnetic field measurement only in a very narrow frequency range. In order to selectively improve the alternating-current (ac) magnetic field sensitivity of a high-temperature superconductor SQUID for a distinct frequency, a single-coil LC resonant circuit has been used. Within the liquid nitrogen bath, the coil surrounds the SQUID and couples to it inductively. Copper coils with different numbers of windings were used to cover the frequency range from circuit, the signal-to-noise ratio of measurements could be improved typically by one order of magnitude or more in a narrow frequency band around the resonance frequency exceeding a few kilohertz. The best attained equivalent magnetic field resolution was 2.5 fT/radicalHz at 88 kHz. The experimental findings are in good agreement with mathematical analysis of the circuit with copper coil.

  16. Application of SQUIDs to low temperature and high magnetic field measurements—Ultra low noise torque magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F.; Naumann, M.; Lühmann, Th.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Hassinger, E.

    2018-02-01

    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque resolving powers in excess of 104 are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers via Wheatstone-type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 200 mK. By using a two-stage superconducting-quantum interference device as a null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of Δm = 4 × 10-15 J/T at maximal field and 700 mK, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO2, was used to show the superior performance of our setup.

  17. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primarily to one’s overall health. Top of Page Health Effects Noise pollution adversely affects the lives of millions of people. ... its effect, disseminate information to the public regarding noise pollution and its adverse health effects, respond to inquiries on matters related to noise, ...

  18. UV superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with high efficiency, low noise, and 4 K operating temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Verma, V B; Beyer, A D; Briggs, R M; Korzh, B; Allmaras, J P; Marsili, F; Lita, A E; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W; Shaw, M D

    2017-10-30

    For photon-counting applications at ultraviolet wavelengths, there are currently no detectors that combine high efficiency (> 50%), sub-nanosecond timing resolution, and sub-Hz dark count rates. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have seen success over the past decade for photon-counting applications in the near-infrared, but little work has been done to optimize SNSPDs for wavelengths below 400 nm. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of UV SNSPDs operating at wavelengths between 250 and 370 nm. The detectors have active areas up to 56 μm in diameter, 70 - 80% efficiency at temperatures up to 4.2 K, timing resolution down to 60 ps FWHM, blindness to visible and infrared photons, and dark count rates of ∼ 0.25 counts/hr for a 56 μm diameter pixel. These performance metrics make UV SNSPDs ideal for applications in trapped-ion quantum information processing, lidar studies of the upper atmosphere, UV fluorescent-lifetime imaging microscopy, and photon-starved UV astronomy.

  19. Noise Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  20. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  1. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  2. 1/f Noise in Ceramic Superconductors and Granular Resistors

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Keiji; Mizunami, Toru; Okayama, Hideyuki; Shiyuan, Yang

    1990-01-01

    The authors have measured the current noise in some components of granular structure. The samples are ceramic superconductors, carbon-black graft-polymer resistors, and positive temperature coefficient(PTe) ceramics. All noise spectra are of the 1/! type. The temperature dependence of the noise level is measured and compared with the temperature dependence of the resistance, It is shown that in these components the temperature coefficient of the resistance is related to the noise level as pre...

  3. Noise Considerations in Resistance Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1963-01-01

    A signal-to-noise analysis is made of the Wheatstone bridge, where the unknown and standard resistors may be at different temperatures, a situation which occurs in resistance thermometry. The limiting condition is assumed to be dissipation in the unknown resistor. It is shown that the ratio arms......, namely, noise in the loss resistance of the step-up device, and grid current noise. There is therefore an optimum step-up ratio, which has been found. The step-up device is permitted to have a different temperature from the unknown and standard resistors, to evaluate the advantage of cooling it...... should be low in resistance compared with the unknown resistor, while the standard resistor should be high. This is true to an extreme degree when the unknown resistor is at liquid helium temperatures, and the standard resistor at room temperature. This factor is much less important in high temperature...

  4. Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the great technical challenges facing the Deep Space Network is receiving signals from a severely weight limited spacecraft hundreds of thousands to billions of kilometers from Earth. This weight limitation has always imposed strict limitations on the size of the spacecraft antenna and the amount of transmitter power radiated. The communication burden is placed upon the ground systems of the Deep Space Network which must recover an extremely weak signal in the presence of nearly overwhelming amounts of noise. Two key parameters that determine the signal to noise ratio of a received signal using a deep space station are the collecting area and efficiency of the antenna, and the amount of noise which is generated in, as well as allowed to enter in, the antenna-mounted receiver. These parameters are used to describe the relative ability of a deep space station to receive weak signals. As spacecraft to Earth communication distances have increased, the Deep Space Network engages in a relentless effort to increase the figure of merit through larger and more efficient antennas, higher frequencies, and lower system noise temperature.

  5. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  6. Low noise road surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bolčina, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Noise is everywhere. Noise is a sound that makes people stressful and irritate. It often couses sleep disorders and also health problems like different cardiovascular disorders, hearing loss…In most cases traffic noise is the most disturbing. There are different ways to prevent people from traffic noise like building noise barriers and insulation of facades. However noise barriers and insulation of facades do not prevent noise formation, but are lowering existing noise. Another disadvantage i...

  7. Study of thermal-field emission properties and investigation of temperature dependent noise in the field emission current from vertical carbon nanotube emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, S. P.; Patil, Sumati; Yoo, J. B.; Dharmadhikari, C. V.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well-defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD) in order to understand the effect of temperature on distribution of electron emission spots and ring like structures in Field Emission Microscope (FEM) image. The FEM images could be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 from FEM image is typically, 4.5 × 107 and the actual number emitters per cm2 present as per Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2 × 1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit non linear Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current were recorded at different temperatures and Fast Fourier transformed into temperature dependent power spectral density. The latter was found to obey power law relation S(f) = A(Iδ/fξ), where δ and ξ are temperature dependent current and frequency exponents respectively.

  8. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2017-05-05

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD), in order to understand the effect of temperature on electron emission spots in image morphology (as indicated by ring like structures) and electron emission spot intensity of the emitters. Moreover, the field electron emission images can be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 is 4.5x107 and, the actual number emitters per cm2 present for electron emission calculated from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2x1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics obey the Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current are recorded at different temperatures and, temperature dependence of power spectral density obeys power law relation s(f)=I2/f2 with that of emission current and frequency.

  9. Pavement noise measurements in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zofka, Ewa; Zofka, Adam; Mechowski, Tomasz

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of the On-Board Sound Intensity (OBSI) system to measure tire-pavement noise in Poland. In general, sources of noise emitted by the modern vehicles are the propulsion noise, aerodynamic resistance and noise generated at the tire-pavement interface. In order to capture tire-pavement noise, the OBSI system uses a noise intensity probe installed in the close proximity of that interface. In this study, OBSI measurements were performed at different types of pavement surfaces such as stone mastic asphalt (SMA), regular asphalt concrete (HMA) as well as Portland cement concrete (PCC). The influence of several necessary OBSI measurement conditions were recognized as: testing speed, air temperature, tire pressure and tire type. The results of this study demonstrate that the OBSI system is a viable and robust tool that can be used for the quality evaluation of newly built asphalt pavements in Poland. It can be also applied to generate reliable input parameters for the noise propagation models that are used to assess the environmental impact of new and existing highway corridors.

  10. Research of shot noise based on realistic nano-MOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofei Jia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental measurements and simulation results have shown that the dominant noise source of current noise changes from thermal noise to shot noise with scaling of MOSFET, and shot noise were suppressed by Fermi and Coulomb interactions. In this paper, Shot noise test system is established, and experimental results proved that shot noise were suppressed, and the expressions of shot noise in realistic nano-MOSFETs are derived with considering Fermi effect, Coulomb interaction and the combination of the both co-existence, respectively. On this basis, the variation of shot noise with voltage, temperature and source-drain doping were researched. The results we obtained are consistent with those from experiments and the theoretically explanation is given. At the same time, the shot noise test system is suitable for traditional nanoscale electronic components; the shot noise model is suitable for nanoscale MOSFET.

  11. Microwave noise modeling of FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Giovanni; Caddemi, Alina; Schreurs, Dominique M. M.-P.; Wiatr, Wojciech; Mercha, Abdelkarim

    2011-02-01

    The noise characteristics of advanced silicon semiconductor devices fabricated with FinFET technology are investigated and modeled at the probe tip reference planes in the microwave frequency range. The transistor noise model is obtained by assigning an equivalent temperature to each resistor of the small signal equivalent circuit. These temperatures are selected to be equal to the room temperature with the exception of the temperature values of the intrinsic output, feedback, and substrate resistances, which are selected in order to reproduce accurately the 50 Ω noise factor measurements over a broadband frequency range going from 0.5 GHz up to 26.5 GHz. Accurate model simulations are obtained at such high frequencies, thanks to the inclusion of the noise temperature associated to the feedback and substrate resistances representing non-quasi-static effects which cannot be neglected in the investigated frequency range.

  12. Spin versus charge noise from Kondo traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luis G. G. V. Dias; de Sousa, Rogério

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic and charge noise have a common microscopic origin in solid-state devices, as described by a universal electron trap model. In spite of this common origin, magnetic (spin) and charge noise spectral densities display remarkably different behaviors when many-particle correlations are taken into account, leading to the emergence of the Kondo effect. We derive exact frequency sum rules for trap noise and perform numerical renormalization-group calculations to show that while spin noise is a universal function of the Kondo temperature, charge noise remains well described by single-particle theory even when the trap is deep in the Kondo regime. We obtain simple analytical expressions for charge and spin noise that account for Kondo screening in all frequency and temperature regimes, enabling the study of the impact of disorder and the emergence of magnetic 1 /f noise from Kondo traps. We conclude that the difference between charge and spin noise survives even in the presence of disorder, showing that noise can be more manageable in devices that are sensitive to magnetic (rather than charge) fluctuations and that the signature of the Kondo effect can be observed in spin noise spectroscopy experiments.

  13. Occupational noise management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-06-15

    Occupational noise is a frequently encountered on-the-job health hazard. This guide presented the responsibilities and regulatory requirements related to business activities where noise above 80 decibels is present. The guide provided a definition of noise and discussed noise hazards, types of noise, and on-the-job noise exposure. A risk assessment to noise in the work environment was also discussed. A guide to a hearing conservation program was also included. The main purpose of a hearing conservation program is the prevention of noise induced hearing loss for employees exposed to occupational noise. The components of such a program were outlined, with particular reference to noise monitoring; noise exposure control; worker education and training; hearing (audiometric) testing; and annual program review and record keeping. It was concluded that in terms of record keeping, it can be very helpful to file noise exposure assessments, particularly personal exposure measurements, with hearing test records to facilitate for future reference. refs., appendices.

  14. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  15. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test.......A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  16. 1/f noise: diffusive systems and music

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.

    1975-11-01

    Measurements of the 1/f voltage noise in continuous metal films are reported. At room temperature, samples of pure metals and bismuth (with a carrier density smaller by 10/sup 5/) of similar volume had comparable noise. The results suggest that the noise arises from equilibrium temperature fluctuations modulating the resistance. Spatial correlation of the noise implied that the fluctuations obey a diffusion equation. The empirical inclusion of an explicit 1/f region and appropriate normalization lead to excellent agreement with the measured noise. If the fluctuations are assumed to be spatially correlated, the diffusion equation can yield an extended 1/f region in the power spectrum. The temperature response of a sample to delta and step function power inputs is shown to have the same shape as the autocorrelation function for uncorrelated and correlated temperature fluctuations, respectively. The spectrum obtained from the cosine transform of the measured step function response is in excellent agreement with the measured 1/f voltage noise spectrum. Spatially correlated equilibrium temperature fluctuations are not the dominant source of 1/f noise in semiconductors and metal films. However, the agreement between the low-frequency spectrum of fluctuations in the mean-square Johnson noise voltage and the resistance fluctuation spectrum measured in the presence of a current demonstrates that in these systems the 1/f noise is also due to equilibrium resistance fluctuations. Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch fluctuations in music also show the 1/f behavior. 1/f noise sources, consequently, are demonstrated to be the natural choice for stochastic composition. 26 figures, 1 table. (auth)

  17. Noise and oscillations in gold-doped germanium photodiodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolwijn, P.T.; Rijst, C. v. d.; Ast, W.G. van; Lam, T.

    Considerable noise effects in excess of shot noise and oscillations found in commercially available, gold-doped germanium photodiodes have been investigated. The noise and oscillation effects occur in the photocurrent of reversely biased diodes at temperatures below about 100°K. The dependence of

  18. Non-Markovian noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulinski, A. (Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1994-10-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the [delta] function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process.

  19. Tunnel diode amplifiers and their background noise as a function of the polarization point, the temperature, and the bandwidth; Amplificateurs a diode tunnel et leur bruit de fond, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozveaminian, K. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The author presents mathematical and graphical methods for the study of the stability of tunnel diode circuits. He gives an application to the realization of three amplifiers. Then he describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the noise of these amplifiers and of its variations with the bias, the temperature and the bandwidth. (author) [French] L'auteur presente deux methodes, l'une theorique l'autre graphique, pour l'etude de la stabilite des circuits a diode tunnel, dont il fait une application a la realisation de trois amplificateurs. Il effectue ensuite une etude theorique et experimentale du bruit de fond de ces amplificateurs, en fonction du point de polarisation, de la temperature et de la bande passante. (auteur)

  20. Shot-noise in resistive-diode mixers and the attenuator noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    The representation of a pumped exponential diode, operating as a mixer, by an equivalent lossy network, is reexamined. It is shown that the model is correct provided the network has ports for all sideband frequencies at which (real) power flow can occur between the diode and its embedding. The temperature of the equivalent network is eta/2 times the physical temperature of the diode. The model is valid only if the series resistance and nonlinear capacitance of the diode are negligible. Expressions are derived for the input and output noise temperature and the noise-temperature ratio of ideal mixers. Some common beliefs concerning noise-figure and noise-temperature ratio are shown to be incorrect.

  1. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This study examine. This study examined noise pollution pollution pollution from sawmillin from sawmillin using HD600 digital data l using HD600 digital data logging sound level me ogging sound level me designed to elicit noise related information. The res sawmills was 58.1 sawmills was 58.1-64.86 dB(A) while machine ...

  2. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments such as tinnitus (96.6%), headache (86.6%) se prevention and control strategies are suggested in additio. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. machine, workers, impacts. , particularly at global concern as strong some high-ranking health.

  3. Aircraft engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennepohl, F.

    An overview of the main aircraft engine noise sources is given. Special emphasis is devoted to turbomachinery/rotor noise, which plays an important role in all engine concepts appropriate to regional aircraft, such as turbofans, propellers, or new propfan engine concepts. The noise generating mechanisms, including propagation within the engine, and calculation methods used are described. Noise reduction methods are considered, with emphasis on cutoff design of turbomachines. Some noise features of counter rotating propellers and swept rotor blades are mentioned.

  4. Noise suppression via generalized-Markovian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2017-11-01

    It is by now well established that noise itself can be useful for performing quantum information processing tasks. We present results which show how one can effectively reduce the error rate associated with a noisy quantum channel by counteracting its detrimental effects with another form of noise. In particular, we consider the effect of adding on top of a purely Markovian (Lindblad) dynamics, a more general form of dissipation, which we refer to as generalized-Markovian noise. This noise has an associated memory kernel and the resulting dynamics are described by an integrodifferential equation. The overall dynamics are characterized by decay rates which depend not only on the original dissipative time scales but also on the new integral kernel. We find that one can engineer this kernel such that the overall rate of decay is lowered by the addition of this noise term. We illustrate this technique for the case where the bare noise is described by a dephasing Pauli channel. We analytically solve this model and show that one can effectively double (or even triple) the length of the channel, while achieving the same fidelity, entanglement, and error threshold. We numerically verify this scheme can also be used to protect against thermal Markovian noise (at nonzero temperature), which models spontaneous emission and excitation processes. A physical interpretation of this scheme is discussed, whereby the added generalized-Markovian noise causes the system to become periodically decoupled from the background Markovian noise.

  5. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  6. X-Band Ultra-Low Noise Maser Amplifier Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, G.; Johnson, D.; Ortiz, G.

    1993-01-01

    Noise temperature measurements of an 8440 MHz ultra-low noise maser amplifier (ULNA) have been performed at sub-atmospheric, liquid helium temperatures. The traveling wave maser operated while immersed in a liquid helium bath. The lowest input noise temperature measured was 1.23 plus or minus 0.16 K at a physical temperature of 1.60 kelvin. At this physical temperature the observed gain per unit length of ruby was 4.6 dB/cm, and the amplifier had a 3 dB-bandwidth of 76 MHz.

  7. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often becomes permanent. Some people react to loud noise with anxiety and irritability, an increase in pulse rate and blood pressure, or an increase in stomach acid. Very loud noise can reduce efficiency in performing difficult tasks by ...

  8. Shielded multi-stage EMI noise filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Fugate, David Lee

    2016-11-08

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise filter embodiments and methods for filtering are provided herein. EMI noise filters include multiple signal exclusion enclosures. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures contain filter circuit stages. The signal exclusion enclosures can attenuate noise generated external to the enclosures and/or isolate noise currents generated by the corresponding filter circuits within the enclosures. In certain embodiments, an output of one filter circuit stage is connected to an input of the next filter circuit stage. The multiple signal exclusion enclosures can be chambers formed using conductive partitions to divide an outer signal exclusion enclosure. EMI noise filters can also include mechanisms to maintain the components of the filter circuit stages at a consistent temperature. For example, a metal base plate can distribute heat among filter components, and an insulating material can be positioned inside signal exclusion enclosures.

  9. Low-noise cryogenic transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, D.

    1987-01-01

    New low-noise cryogenic input transmission lines have been developed for the Deep Space Network (DSN) at 1.668 GHz for cryogenically cooled Field Effect Transistors (FET) and High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifiers. These amplifiers exhibit very low noise temperatures of 5 K to 15 K, making the requirements for a low-noise input transmission line critical. Noise contribution to the total amplifier system from the low-noise line is less than 0.5 K for both the 1.668-GHz and 2.25-GHz FET systems. The 1.668-GHz input line was installed in six FET systems which were implemented in the DSN for the Venus Balloon Experiment. The 2.25-GHz input line has been implemented in three FET systems for the DSN 34-m HEF antennas, and the design is currently being considered for use at higher frequencies.

  10. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  11. Noise in mesoscopic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    This is a course on noise which covers some of the scattering theory for normal metals, Hanbury Brown and Twiss analogs for noise correlations with electrons, noise correlations in superconducting/normal metal junctions. Entanglement in such NS systems is described with a criterion for violating Bell inegalities. The last section is devoted to the perturbative derivation of noise in a particular one dimensional correlated electron system (Luttinger liquid): edge states in the fractional quant...

  12. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  13. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  14. Techniques of microwave noise measurement on cooled transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Eric C.

    Cooled low-noise microwave field effect transistor (FET) amplifiers are widely used in radio telescopes, satellite earth stations, and radar systems to minimize noise added to the signal by the receiver. In designing these amplifiers, the noise parameters of the FETs must be known. It is hard to obtain these parameters, especially at cryogenic temperatures. A load having an electronically controlled reflection coefficient (RC) and noise temperature was built and used to measure the noise parameters of a GaAs FET at 12 K at frequencies in the 1.2-1.6 GHz range. The electronic load simplified the measurement of noise parameters at cryogenic temperatures because its RC was adjusted from outside the cooling apparatus, and the RCs were repeatable. A number of novel techniques for measuring noise and for estimating the noise parameters of a noise measurement receiver and of the device under test were developed. Singular value decomposition was used to improve and analyze noise parameter estimation by least squares fitting. The measurement errors due to frequency errors and non-zero noise power measurement bandwidth were analyzed. A new notation was introduced to simplify the analysis of noisy linear circuits and was used to develop cascading and de-embedding equations for noisy linear two-ports, and was also used to develop some of the new measurement techniques.

  15. Study of 1/f noise in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvliet, K. M.; Chenette, E. R.

    1981-05-01

    A Hewlett-Packard digital fast Fourier transform spectral analyser was purchased and adapted for our purpose by writing several computer programs for the output display. Test jigs for devices under test and preamplifiers were built. Further, a real time dual channel correlation spectral analyzer was designed and partially built. Measurements involving temperature fluctuations and correlations in metal films and in integrated circuit transistors are described. The latter have been recently completed. It is conclusively shown that temperature fluctuations are not the cause of 1/f noise in these devices. Under the heading of theoretical work, an extensive analysis is presented of noise in diffusion systems. Several analytical models, not considered before, have been solved and the noise is presented. It is conclusively shown that volume (bulk) diffusion noise, whether based on the physical diffusion source or on Voss and Clarke's P-source, never leads to 1/f-type spectra. However, surface fluctuations as, e.g., caused by stochastic surface generation-recombination processes, can give rise to many decades of 1/f noise. This is worked out in detail for a MOSFET structure. We conclude, therefore, that the large noise observed in MOSFETs can be due to carrier number fluctuations subject to diffusion; at low frequencies the MacWhorter-van der Ziel model may be operative, whereas at higher frequencies our model takes over. Finally, in the theory section we present a novel derivation of quantum 1/f noise, occurring in emission processes.

  16. Noise analysis for CCD-based ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J; Hodgkinson, Jane; Saffell, John R; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-09-20

    We present the results of a detailed analysis of the noise behavior of two CCD spectrometers in common use, an AvaSpec-3648 CCD UV spectrometer and an Ocean Optics S2000 Vis spectrometer. Light sources used include a deuterium UV/Vis lamp and UV and visible LEDs. Common noise phenomena include source fluctuation noise, photoresponse nonuniformity, dark current noise, fixed pattern noise, and read noise. These were identified and characterized by varying light source, spectrometer settings, or temperature. A number of noise-limiting techniques are proposed, demonstrating a best-case spectroscopic noise equivalent absorbance of 3.5×10(-4)  AU for the AvaSpec-3648 and 5.6×10(-4)  AU for the Ocean Optics S2000 over a 30 s integration period. These techniques can be used on other CCD spectrometers to optimize performance.

  17. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  18. Ku band low noise parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    A low noise, K sub u-band, parametric amplifier (paramp) was developed. The unit is a spacecraft-qualifiable, prototype, parametric amplifier for eventual application in the shuttle orbiter. The amplifier was required to have a noise temperature of less than 150 K. A noise temperature of less than 120 K at a gain level of 17 db was achieved. A 3-db bandwidth in excess of 350 MHz was attained, while deviation from phase linearity of about + or - 1 degree over 50 MHz was achieved. The paramp operates within specification over an ambient temperature range of -5 C to +50 C. The performance requirements and the operation of the K sub u-band parametric amplifier system are described. The final test results are also given.

  19. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments impairment (71.9%). Therefore noi impairment (71.9%). Therefore noise prevention se prevention audiometric tests, training, education, and enforcem. Keywords: Keywords: .... marketing for local consumption or transportation to the northern ..... disorders in workers as well as those living within the vicinity of ...

  20. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  1. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  2. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  3. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  4. Noise in biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cox, Chris D; Allen, Michael S; McCollum, James M; Dar, Roy D; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and review many of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  6. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  7. Resistance noise in Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O$_{8+\\delta}$

    OpenAIRE

    Fruchter, L.; Raffy, H.; Li, Z. Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resistance noise in a Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O$_{8+\\delta}$ thin film is found to increase strongly in the underdoped regime. While the increase of the raw resistance noise with decreasing temperature appears to roughly track the previously reported pseudogap temperature for this material, standard noise analysis rather suggests that the additional noise contribution is driven by the proximity of the superconductor-insulator transition.

  8. Analysis of Electrical Transport and Noise Mechanisms in Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Amorphous silicon, Temperature Coefficient of Resistance , TCR, 1/f Noise , Variable Range...coefficient of resistance (TCR) with low noise is desired at a conductivity dictated by the IC design to minimize NEDT. Selecting a resistance range...associated with low resistivity and large pixel volume i.e., large number of carriers (Hooge’s noise model). To a certain extent, the transport

  9. Shot Noise Thermometry for Thermal Characterization of Templated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sayer, Robert A; Kim, Sunkook; Franklin, Aaron D; Mohammadi, Saeed; Fisher, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) thermometer that operates on the principles of electrical shot noise is reported. Shot noise thermometry is a self-calibrating measurement technique that relates statistical fluctuations in dc current across a device to temperature. A structure consisting of vertical, top, and bottom-contacted single-walled carbon nanotubes in a porous anodic alumina template was fabricated and used to measure shot noise. Frequencies between 60 and 100 kHz were observed to preclude sig...

  10. Noise in miniature microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  11. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  12. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...

  13. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  14. Ultra-low-noise microwave amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, R. C.; Trowbridge, D.

    1980-01-01

    The highlights of 20 years of maser use and development are presented. Masers discussed include cavity, traveling wave, K band, and S band. Noise temperatures measured since 1960 are summarized. Use of masers in the Deep Space Network is presented. Costs associated with the construction of masers systems are given.

  15. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  16. Investigation of structure of noise component in molecular spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibgatullin, M. E.; Galimullin, D. Z.; Kamalova, D. I.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2015-05-01

    In the work the noise component of molecular spectra is investigated by use the Hurst index which is the quantitative parameter of memory effects. It was shown that the low- frequency noise component predominates. The Hurst index is from 0.6 to 0.7 for the studied FTIR spectra registered at different temperatures.

  17. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing ... noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Read and comment ...

  18. Substation noise screening tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybee, Nigel; Everton, Pascal [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. (Canada)], email: nigel.maybee@hfpacoustical.com; Chow, Vincent [Altalink Management Ltd. (Canada)], email: Vincent.Chow@AltaLink.ca

    2011-07-01

    Alberta noise regulations require energy-related facilities to conduct predictions on sound levels, especially for large and medium noise sources. This is usually done with well-known modelling software, but that can be disadvantageous when assessing the noise impact of smaller noise sources, such as transformer substations. This paper focuses on the development of a spreadsheet substation noise screening tool to assess the noise impact of a small transformer substation with precision and ease-of-use. Three aspects must be considered: transformer sound levels, which can be provided by the manufacturer or extracted from accepted sound level references; sound power calculations, which depend on the substation size and operating regime; and sound propagation calculations, which take into account the distance of the receptor from the substation and sound absorption by the air and ground. Comparison of results obtained with this tool with results generated by standard sound modelling software shows the utility, accuracy and ease-of-use of this screening method for assessing the noise impact of transformer substations.

  19. Pneumatic muffler noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudworth, A L; Hanson, W J; Vuisting, W

    1978-11-01

    Sixty-five commercial pneumatic mufflers in the size range of 1/8 to 3/8-inch American Standard Taper Pipe Thread (NPT) were evaluated for noise level as a function of air supply pressure and back pressure. Also, typical directivity pattern and spectral content were determined. A rating system has been devised, as well as individual prediction formulas, to rank order the mufflers and provide a capability of calculating expected noise levels for a given supply pressure. As this study reveals, noise reductions in excess of 40 dBA may be achieved by employing an efficient pneumatic muffler.

  20. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  1. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Stefan J.; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W.

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  2. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T noise behavior switches between Gaussian and non-Gaussian over several hours, possibly arising from dynamically competing ground states. VO2 is one of the most widely studied strongly correlated oxides and is

  3. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  4. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  5. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  6. A low noise infrared spot scanner for testing detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetter, R. C.; Brissenden, P.; Casler, J.; Hier, R. G.; Jones, B.

    1984-01-01

    A low noise spot scanner has been built for use in testing the performance of infrared detector arrays for NASA's IR detector technology development program and the University of California's MICRO program. The scanner provides a convenient low noise detector test environment and a wide range of test conditions including versatile temperature control of the detector, ambient background, and blackbody source temperature and control of spot size, color, and brightness.

  7. Low frequency noise sources and mechanisms in semiconductor nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Collin James

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive candidates for use in future high-speed electronics, transparent/flexible devices, and chemical sensors. Among other materials, III-V semiconductors have gained considerable interest for their high bulk mobility and low band gap, making them promising for high-speed nanoscale devices. However, nanowire devices also exhibit high levels of low-frequency noise due to their low band gap and high surface-to-volume ratio. The sources and mechanisms of this noise must be understood and controlled in order to realize practical applications of nanowire electronics. This work seeks to understand the underlying noise mechanisms of nanowire transistors in order discover ways to reduce noise levels. It also demonstrates how noise can provide a spectroscopy for analyzing device quality. Most traditional noise studies tend to apply standard MOSFET models to nanowire noise and transport, which lump together all possible independent noise sources in a nanowire, ignoring effects of the contacts or multiple gates, and could lead to misestimation of the noise figures for a device. This work demonstrates how noise in a nanowire transistor can stem from the channel, ungated access regions, metal- semiconductor contacts, and tunnel barriers, all independently adding to the total noise. Each source of noise can contribute and may dominate the overall noise behavior under certain bias regimes and temperatures, as demonstrated in this work through various device structures and measurements. For example, the contacts can influence noise even below the threshold voltage under certain conditions, emphasizing the need for high-quality metal-semiconductor interface technology.

  8. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  9. Intrinsic autocorrelation time of picoseconds for thermal noise in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Sheng, Nan; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2014-10-02

    Whether thermal noise is colored or white is of fundamental importance. In conventional theory, thermal noise is usually treated as white noise so that there are no directional transportations in the asymmetrical systems without external inputs, since only the colored fluctuations with appropriate autocorrelation time length can lead to directional transportations in the asymmetrical systems. Here, on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the autocorrelation time length of thermal noise in water is ~10 ps at room temperature, which indicates that thermal noise is not white in the molecular scale while thermal noise can be reasonably assumed as white in macro- and meso-scale systems. The autocorrelation time length of thermal noise is intrinsic, since the value is almost unchanged for different temperature coupling methods. Interestingly, the autocorrelation time of thermal noise is correlated with the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, suggesting that the finite autocorrelation time length of thermal noise mainly comes from the finite lifetime of the interactions between neighboring water molecules.

  10. Surveying Infrasonic Noise on Oceanic Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, M. A. H.; Berger, J.; Vernon, F. L.

    - An essential step in the establishment of an International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound station is the site survey. The survey seeks a location with relatively low infrasonic noise and the necessary logistical support. This paper reports results from our surveys of two of the oceanic sites in the IMS - the Azores and Cape Verde. Each survey sampled infrasonic noise, wind velocity, air temperature and humidity for 3 weeks at 4 sites near the nominal IMS locations. The surveys were conducted on Sao Miguel (the main island in the Azores) and Maio (Cape Verde). Infrasonic noise was measured using the French MB2000 microbarometer.During our 3-week experiment in January the trade winds at Cape Verde varied little from an azimuth of 63°. Because of the unvarying wind azimuth, the experiment gave us an opportunity to examine the effectiveness of a forest at reducing both wind speed and infrasonic noise. We find that the thick Acacia forest on Maio reduces wind speeds at a 2m elevation by more than 50% but does not reduce infrasonic noise at frequencies below 0.25Hz. This forest serves as a high-frequency filter and clearly does not reduce long-period noise levels which are due to large-scale turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer above the forest. This is consistent with our observations in the Azores where the relationship between infrasonic noise and wind speed is more complex due to frequent changes in wind azimuth.In Cape Verde, wind speed and infrasonic noise are relatively constant. The diurnal variations are clearly seen however the microbarom is only rarely sensed. In the Azores, during our 3-week experiment in November and December of 1998, wind speed and infrasonic noise change rapidly. At this location, daily noise level swings of 40 to 50dB at 0.1Hz are not uncommon in the early winter and are due to changes in wind speed and atmospheric turbulence. The effectiveness of an infrasound station in the Azores will be strongly dependent on time during

  11. Stark shift of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Sk. Md.; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Anuja; Ghosh, Manas

    2018-02-01

    Present study makes a punctilious investigation of the profiles of Stark shift (SS) of doped GaAs quantum dot (QD) under the supervision of Gaussian white noise. A few physical parameters have been varied and the consequent variations in the SS profiles have been monitored. The said physical parameters comprise of magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential, noise strength, aluminium concentration (only for AlxGa1-x As alloy QD), position-dependent effective mass (PDEM), position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF), anisotropy, hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature. The SS profiles unfurl interesting features that heavily depend upon the particular physical quantity concerned, presence/absence of noise and the manner (additive/multiplicative) noise enters the system. The study highlights feasible means of maximizing SS of doped QD in presence of noise by suitable adjustment of several control parameters. The study deems importance in view of technological applications of QD devices where noise plays some prominent role.

  12. Surface noise analysis using a single-ion sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, N.; Gerber, S.; Bolloten, G.; Ramm, M.; Ransford, A.; Ulin-Avila, E.; Talukdar, I.; Häffner, H.

    2014-06-01

    We use a single-ion electric-field noise sensor in combination with in situ surface treatment and analysis tools, to investigate the relationship between electric-field noise from metal surfaces in vacuum and the composition of the surface. These experiments are performed in a setup that integrates ion trapping capabilities with surface analysis tools. We find that treatment of an aluminum-copper surface with energetic argon ions significantly reduces the level of room-temperature electric-field noise, but the surface does not need to be atomically clean to show noise levels comparable to those of the best cryogenic traps. The noise levels after treatment are low enough to allow fault-tolerant trapped-ion quantum information processing on a microfabricated surface trap at room temperature.

  13. Noise sensitivity and sleep disturbance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, H.E.; Janssen, S.A.; Babisch, W.; Hansell, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that noise induced health effects are strongly related to non-acoustical factors such as noise sensitivity. It is a stable personality trait and it can be conceptualised as a causal pathway confounder and/or effect modifier between noise and health. Furthermore noise sensitivity

  14. Community response to tramway noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Berg, R. van den

    1988-01-01

    A study concerning tramway noise is described and results are presented. The study consisted of a social survey and a noise measurement program. It appeared that tramway noise does not contribute to the annoyance of the total noise if tramway annoyance is substantially below road traffic annoyance

  15. Noise in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasfeldt-Hansen, Dorthe; Lærkner, Eva Ann; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    Because noise is a general stressor, noise in the OR should be avoided whenever possible. This article presents the results of a review of the research literature on the topic of noise in the OR. A systematic literature search was conducted. Eighteen relevant articles were identified...... and categorized as follows: noise levels, noise sources, staff performances, and patient’s perception of noise. Each study was assessed according to the strength of the evidence and the quality of the study. Noise levels in the OR in general exceed recommended levels, and the noise sources are related...... to equipment and staff behavior. The main effect of noise on staff performances is related to impaired communication, resulting in a negative effect on patient safety. The literature on patients’ perception of noise is both limited and inconsistent, and more research on this topic is needed....

  16. Combined Effects of Noise and Shift Work on Workers’ Physiological Parameters in a Chemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Motamedzade

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the combined effects of noise and shift work on physiological parameters including body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. This study was performed in a chemical industry in Tehran in 1993. The workers’ physiological parameters was recorded at the beginning and at the end of all work shifts. Groups under study included : day workers (n=115 , day workers with continuous noise exposure (n=44 , two-shift workers without noise exposure (n=180 , three-shift workers without noise exposure and three-shift workers with continous noise exposure (n=216. In workers with continuous noise exposure, noise dosimetry was performed using B & K noise dose meter type 4428. The results showed that noise and shift work hove more effects on systolic and diastolic blood pressure than body temperature. The statistical analysis showed that in 3-shift workers, combined effects of noise and shift work on systolic and diastolic blood pressure caused considerable differences between exposed and control group. In general, regarding research design of this study to determine probable combined effects of noise and shiftwork on physiological parameters, our findings confirmed the additive effects of noise and shiftwork on systolic and diastolic blood pressure in which the effect of noise was more significant. Our findings showed that combined exposure to shiftwork and noise may be regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases because it is responsible for increasing blood pressure in exposed workers.

  17. Resistive Switching Assisted by Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2013-01-01

    We extend results by Stotland and Di Ventra on the phenomenon of resistive switching aided by noise. We further the analysis of the mechanism underlying the beneficial role of noise and study the EPIR (Electrical Pulse Induced Resistance) ratio dependence with noise power. In the case of internal noise we find an optimal range where the EPIR ratio is both maximized and independent of the preceding resistive state. However, when external noise is considered no beneficial effect is observed.

  18. Extraaural effects of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marth, E.; Gruber, M.; Koeck, M.; Moese, J.R.; Gallasch, E.; Fueger, G.F.

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term exposition (15 sec) to an indifferent, broad spectrum of noise. Noise levels were set at 85 dB(A) and 110 dB(A). Stress mediators and compensatory mechanisms were studied in 30 test persons. The study was particularly concerned with the metabolic processes providing energy for fight or flight reactions. Most importantly triglycerides are hydrolysed in order to be able to produce the fatty acids that are released. This catabolism is a function of an ACTH-activated lipase. In 93% of the person tested, triglycerides decreased by 7 to 40% of the initial concentration. Blood sugar reaction can be described in two phases: Initially, there was a slight increase in the blood sugar concentration; at higher noise levels, it was followed by a slight decrease. This behaviour was even more characteristic of the insulin concentration. At 85 dB(A), no significant difference concentration was found compared with the levels previous to noise exposition. At 110 dB(A), there was a significant decrease in the insulin level. Vaso constriction of the peripheral blood vessels is a useful parameter for the stress caused by noise. This was shown by registering the finger pulse during the test.

  19. Noise and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Noise is widely understood to be something that interferes with a signal or process. Thus, it is generally thought to be destructive, obscuring signals and interfering with function. However, early in the 20th century, mechanical engineers found that mechanisms inducing additional vibration in mechanical systems could prevent sticking and hysteresis. This so-called "dither" noise was later introduced in an entirely different context at the advent of digital information transmission and recording in the early 1960s. Ironically, the addition of noise allows one to preserve information that would otherwise be lost when the signal or image is digitized. As we shall see, the benefits of added noise in these contexts are closely related to the phenomenon which has come to be known as stochastic resonance, the original version of which appealed to noise to explain how small periodic fluctuations in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit might be amplified in such a way as to bring about the observed periodic transiti...

  20. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  1. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Diesinger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as “noise gain” from operational amplifier (OpAmp design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  2. Cryogenic ultra-low-noise SiGe transistor amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, B I; Trgala, M; Grajcar, M; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2011-10-01

    An ultra-low-noise one-stage SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistor amplifier was designed for cryogenic temperatures and a frequency range of 10 kHz-100 MHz. A noise temperature T(N) ≈ 1.4 K was measured at an ambient temperature of 4.2 K at frequencies between 100 kHz and 100 MHz for a source resistance of ~50 Ω. The voltage gain of the amplifier was 25 dB at a power consumption of 720 μW. The input voltage noise spectral density of the amplifier is about 35 pV/√Hz. The low noise resistance and power consumption makes the amplifier suitable for readout of resistively shunted DC SQUID magnetometers and amplifiers.

  3. Road Traffic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  4. Noise and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus from the Latin word tinnire meaning ringing is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound. The most common cause is noise induced hearing loss. Tinnitus may be induced by an acoustic trauma or a permanent noise in the workplace. In case that Tinnitus is induced by acoustic trauma the site of lesion is commonly the base of the cochlea. Tinnitus in the senile population is mostly accompanying presbycusis. Although the incidence of permanent tinnitus following noise exposure is high, little is published about this issue. In the current article we are aimed at studying the prevalence of tinnitus in Minoo and other manufactures.

  5. Plasmonic mass and Johnson-Nyquist noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Jingyee; Yoon, Hosang; Qin, Ling; Ham, Donhee

    2015-09-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem relates the thermal noise spectrum of a conductor to its linear response properties, with the ohmic resistance arising from the electron scattering being the most notable linear response property. But the linear response also includes the collective inertial acceleration of electrons, which should in principle influence the thermal noise spectrum as well. In practice, this effect would be largely masked by the Planck quantization for traditional conductors with short electron scattering times. But recent advances in nanotechnology have enabled the fabrication of conductors with greatly increased electron scattering times, with which the collective inertial effect can critically affect the thermal noise spectrum. In this paper we highlight this collective inertial effect—that is, the plasmonic effect—on the thermal noise spectrum under the framework of semiclassical electron dynamics, from both fundamental microscopic and practical modeling points of view. In graphene, where non-zero collective inertia arises from zero single-electron effective mass and where both electron and hole bands exist together, the thermal noise spectrum shows rich temperature and frequency dependencies, unseen in traditional conductors.

  6. Analysis of ATMS striping noise from its Earth scene observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengkun; Zou, Xiaolei; Weng, Fuzhong

    2013-12-01

    differences between brightness temperature observations and simulated observations based on numerical weather predictions, i.e., O-B, for Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) temperature sounding channels exhibit a clear striping pattern [Bormann et al., 2013]. We propose to first use the principal component analysis to isolate scan-dependent features such as the cross-track striping from the atmospheric signal and then to use an Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) to extract the striping noise in ATMS Earth scene brightness temperature observations for both temperature and water vapor sounding channels. It is shown that the Principal Component (PC) coefficient of the first PC mode, which mainly describes a scan-dependent feature of cross-track radiometer measurements, captures the striping noise. The EEMD is then applied to the PC coefficient to extract the first three high-frequency intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), which are denoted as the PC1/IMF3 noise. When the PC1/IMF3 noise is removed from the data, the striping noise is imperceptible in the global distribution of O-B for ATMS temperature sounding channels 1-16. Using the same method, it is demonstrated that the striping noise is also present in ATMS water vapor sounding channels 17-22. The magnitude of the ATMS striping noise is about ±0.3 K for the temperature sounding channels and ±1.0 K for the moisture sounding channels. The same technique is also applied to Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), AMSU-B, and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS). The striping noise is undetectable for AMSU-A but present in AMSU-B and MHS data.

  7. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  8. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  9. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    all of these noise sources. 6 777-200 A330-300 MD-90-30 MD-11 A320-214 747-400 A300-600R 767-300ER 757 -200 MD-87 MD-82 B-747-300 A300B4-620...broadband shock noise; fluidic/particulate injection; flexible filaments (i.e., wires attached to the nozzle or tail cone ); offset nozzles to reduce...the introduction of the turbojet engine powered Boeing 707 beginning in 1958. Following a series of lawsuits in the United States and public outcry

  10. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available GepteMehek. WHY IS NOISE SO Our ears are used primarily to communicate with others. to give warning of danger and to absorb sensory pleasures such as from music. The degree of irritation is related to the extent to which a sound interferes with these uses... on aircraft that make too much noise. Motor cars, buses, buzz-bikes and vacuum deaners can be effectively quietened but until now the public has not been prepared to pay the price of legislation. Also, many young sports-car enthusiasts still think...

  11. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  12. Playback Experiments for Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holles, Sophie; Simpson, Stephen D; Lecchini, David; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Playbacks are a useful tool for conducting well-controlled and replicated experiments on the effects of anthropogenic noise, particularly for repeated exposures. However, playbacks are unlikely to fully reproduce original sources of anthropogenic noise. Here we examined the sound pressure and particle acceleration of boat noise playbacks in a field experiment and reveal that although there remain recognized limitations, the signal-to-noise ratios of boat playbacks to ambient noise do not exceed those of a real boat. The experimental setup tested is therefore of value for use in experiments on the effects of repeated exposure of aquatic animals to boat noise.

  13. Neuroanatomical substrate of noise sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliuchko, Marina; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja

    2018-01-01

    Recent functional studies suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. In the present work, we examined whether noise sensitivity could be related to the structural...... and hippocampus was measured as well. According to our findings, noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in the selected structures. Among those, we propose and discuss particular areas, previously linked to auditory perceptual, emotional and interoceptive processing, in which larger grey...... matter volume seems to be related to higher noise sensitivity....

  14. Impulse Noise Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philemon; Ho, Kevin; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-05-01

    The new Auditory 4.0 model has been developed for the assessment of auditory outcomes, expressed as temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS), from exposures to impulse noise for unprotected ears, including the prediction of TTS recovery. Auditory 4.0 is an empirical model, constructed from test data collected from chinchillas exposed to impulse noise in the laboratory. Injury outcomes are defined as TTS and PTS, and Auditory 4.0 provides the full range of TTS and PTS dose-response curves with the risk factor constructed from A-weighted sound exposure level. Human data from large weapons noise exposure was also used to guide the development of the recovery model. Guided by data, a 28-dBA shift was applied to the dose-response curves to account for the scaling from chinchillas to humans. Historical data from rifle noise tests were used to validate the dose-response curves. New chinchilla tests were performed to collect recovery data to construct the TTS recovery model. Auditory 4.0 is the only model known to date that provides the full TTS and PTS dose-response curves, including a TTS recovery model. The model shows good agreement with historical data. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Curing the noise epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  16. Wind turbine noise diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarz, W. [Aerocoustics Engineering Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Richarz, H.

    2009-07-01

    This presentation proposed a self-consistent model for broad-band noise emitted from modern wind turbines. The simple source model was consistent with the physics of sound generation and considered the unique features of wind turbines. Although the acoustics of wind turbines are similar to those of conventional propellers, the dimensions of wind turbines pose unique challenges in diagnosing noise emission. The general features of the sound field were deduced. Source motion and source directivity appear to be responsible for amplitude variations. The amplitude modulation is likely to make wind-turbine noise more audible, and may be partly responsible for annoyance that has been reported in the literature. Acoustic array data suggests that broad-band noise is emitted predominantly during the downward sweep of each rotor blade. Source motion and source directivity account for the observed pattern. Rotor-tower interaction effects are of lesser importance. Predicted amplitude modulation ranges from 1 dB to 6dB. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Noise: A Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Noise Abatement and Control.

    This booklet contains nine sections describing ways in which noise may endanger health and well-being. Secions are included on: (1) hearing loss; (2) heart disease; (3) other reactions by the body; (4) effects on the unborn; (5) special effects on children; (6) intrusion at home and work; (7) sleep disruption; (8) mental and social well-being; and…

  18. Quasi-thermal noise and shot noise spectroscopy on a CubeSat in Earth's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ronald; Cairns, Iver H.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the practicality of using quasi-thermal noise (QTN) and shot noise spectroscopy on a CubeSat in the Earth's ionosphere and constrain the satellite antenna length for optimal detection of these signals. The voltage spectra predicted for thermal Langmuir waves (QTN) and particle "shot noise" are modeled, and it is shown that the signals detected can provide two very good, independent, passive, in situ methods of measuring the plasma density and temperature in the ionosphere. The impact of the antenna potential ϕ is also discussed, and we show that the negative potential calculated for the ionosphere due to natural current flows has a significant impact on the voltage power level of the shot noise spectrum. The antenna configuration is also shown to play an important role in the shot noise, with a monopole configuration enhancing the spectrum significantly compared with a dipole. Antenna lengths on the order of 20-40 cm are found to be ideal for ionospheric plasma conditions, nicely matching CubeSat sizes and producing detectable thermal Langmuir waves and shot noise at the microvolt level. Further, with a continuous stream of data points at different latitudes and longitudes an orbiting CubeSat can produce a global picture for the ionospheric plasma density and temperature using QTN and shot noise signals. If implemented, especially in a constellation, these data would be more frequent and cover a much greater domain than current ground-based or single-satellite methods. This could lead to improved ionospheric models, such as the empirically based International Reference Ionosphere.

  19. Dual-mode self-validating resistance/Johnson noise thermometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Robert L.; Blalock, Theron V.; Roberts, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    A dual-mode Johnson noise and DC resistance thermometer capable of use in control systems where prompt indications of temperature changes and long term accuracy are needed. A resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC) tuned circuit produces a continuous voltage signal for Johnson noise temperature measurement. The RLC circuit provides a mean-squared noise voltage that depends only on the capacitance used and the temperature of the sensor. The sensor has four leads for simultaneous coupling to a noise signal processor and to a DC resistance signal processor.

  20. Tuned-circuit Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M. J.; Blalock, T. V.; Shepard, R. L.

    Three tuned circuits that can be used in Johnson noise thermometry have been analyzed; series resistance-inductance-capacitance (RLC), parallel RLC, and transformer coupled. Tuned circuits allow the temperature of the sensor to be determined by a single noise voltage, which is ideally independent of the resistance of the sensor, thereby reducing the complexity of temperature-measuring systems for space applications. Direct-coupled and transformer-coupled tuned circuits may offer advantage to the SP-100 system designer interfacing with data systems. A study was performed to establish whether the advantages of the ideal tuned circuits would be obtained with real, lossy inductive components and would provide a measurement system independent of aging and temperature effects on sensor resistance. Theoretical mean-squared output voltage dependence on sensor temperature and resistance, output capacitor value, and inductor temperature and resistance are derived for the series and parallel RLC cases. It is shown for tuned circuits using lossless inductors that the mean squared voltage is kT sub R/C, where T sub R is the sensor temperature and C is the capacitance of the capacitor. For lossy inductors and transformers, the mean-squared capacitor voltage is a function of sensor resistance, which may change in an unknown manner during an extended mission.

  1. Variation of aircraft noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the basis for increased sensitivity of people to noise during aircraft noise studies. This change in sensitivity could be attributed to either a physiological time-of-day effect (i.e., a circadian rhythm) or simply to the total number of aircraft noise events experienced during a laboratory test period. In order to investigate the time-of-day factor, noise sensitivity measures were obtained from subjects at home with cassette tape recorders/headsets over a 24 hour period. The effect of number of aircraft noise events on noise sensitivity was investigated within a laboratory. In these tests, measures of sensitivity to noise were obtained from subjects before and after their exposure to varying numbers of aircraft noise events. The 24 hour data showed no evidence that noise sensitivity is physiologically cyclical. Consequently, these data can not explain annoyance response variation to aircraft noise tests conducted during the daytime. However, the number of aircraft noise events did influence the subject's noise sensitivity. This effect completely accounts for the systematic increase in noise sensitivity during a laboratory test period.

  2. Noise management by molecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Bruggeman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in the copy number of key regulatory macromolecules ("noise" may cause physiological heterogeneity in populations of (isogenic cells. The kinetics of processes and their wiring in molecular networks can modulate this molecular noise. Here we present a theoretical framework to study the principles of noise management by the molecular networks in living cells. The theory makes use of the natural, hierarchical organization of those networks and makes their noise management more understandable in terms of network structure. Principles governing noise management by ultrasensitive systems, signaling cascades, gene networks and feedback circuitry are discovered using this approach. For a few frequently occurring network motifs we show how they manage noise. We derive simple and intuitive equations for noise in molecule copy numbers as a determinant of physiological heterogeneity. We show how noise levels and signal sensitivity can be set independently in molecular networks, but often changes in signal sensitivity affect noise propagation. Using theory and simulations, we show that negative feedback can both enhance and reduce noise. We identify a trade-off; noise reduction in one molecular intermediate by negative feedback is at the expense of increased noise in the levels of other molecules along the feedback loop. The reactants of the processes that are strongly (cooperatively regulated, so as to allow for negative feedback with a high strength, will display enhanced noise.

  3. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  4. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A system that rates noise on the basis of noise maps has been developed which is based on empirical exposure-response relationships, so that effects in the community will be lower if the system gives a better rating. It is consistent with noise metrics and effect endpoint chosen in the EU, i.e., it

  5. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  6. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  7. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard; Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two test subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  8. Wide Band CMOS Low-Noise Amplifier Exploiting Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    Well-known elementary wide band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise factor and source impedance matching, which limits their noise figure (NF) to values typically above 3dB. Negative feedback can be employed to break this trade-off, thus allowing lower noise figures,

  9. Reducing Environmental Noise Impacts: A USAREUR Noise Management Program Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    land use planning . Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are

  10. Acquired Resistance to Impulse Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, Donald

    1997-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that the mammalians auditory system can be made more resistant to the traumatic effects of noise exposure by having the subject exposed to a lower level, prophylactic noise...

  11. Noise sensitivity and hearing disability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marja Heinonen-Guzejev; Tapani Jauhiainen; Heikki Vuorinen; Anne Viljanen; Taina Rantanen; Markku Koskenvuo; Kauko Heikkilä; Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa; Jaakko Kaprio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise...

  12. Breatherlike excitations in discrete lattices with noise and nonlinear damping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri B.; Johansson, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    are included as multiplicative white noise and nonlinear damping. Numerical analysis shows that the lifetime of the breather is always finite and, in a large parameter regime, inversely proportional to the noise variance for fixed damping and nonlinearity. We also find that the decay rate of the breather...... decreases with increasing nonlinearity and with increasing damping. Using a collective-coordinate approximation, we show how the qualitative features of the numerical results can be analytically understood. Finally, in the dimer case we show that the multiplicative noise can be transformed into additive...... noise, and an exact stationary solution to the Fokker-Planck equation is obtained. From this solution, the dimer system is found to exhibit a noise (temperature) induced phase transition....

  13. Readout Circuits for Noise Compensation in ISFET Sensory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, M. P.; Bhuyan, M.; Talukdar, C.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents two different noise reduction techniques for ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) readout configuration and their comparison. The proposed circuit configurations are immune to the noise generated from the ISFET sensory system and particularly to the low frequency pH dependent 1/ f electrochemical noise. The methods used under this study are compensation of noise by differential OPAMP based and Wheatstone bridge circuit, where two identical commercial ISFET sensors were used. The statistical and frequency analysis of the data generated by this two methods were compared for different pH value ranging from pH 2 to 10 at room temperature, and it is found that the readout circuits are able to compensate the noise to a great extent.

  14. Low-noise parametric amplification at 35 GHz in a single Josephson tunnel junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.

    1979-01-01

    gain achieved, 11.6 dB, the noise temperature was 400 K. The noise temperature was reduced considerably by decreasing the gain. At 8 and 4 dB we found 165±25 K and 50±30 K, respectively. Applied Physics Letters is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  15. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and TlCa{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  16. The Signal Importance of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michael; Tsvetkova, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Noise is widely regarded as a residual category--the unexplained variance in a linear model or the random disturbance of a predictable pattern. Accordingly, formal models often impose the simplifying assumption that the world is noise-free and social dynamics are deterministic. Where noise is assigned causal importance, it is often assumed to be a…

  17. Weak localization of photon noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scalia, Paolo S.; Muskens, Otto L.; Lagendijk, Aart

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental study of coherent backscattering (CBS) of photon noise from multiple scattering media. We use a pseudothermal light source with a microsecond coherence time to produce a noise spectrum covering a continuous transition, from wave fluctuations to shot noise over several MHz.

  18. Noise mapping inside a car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, V. A.; Shaimuhametov, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new wireless sensor telemetry system designed to be mounted on different nodes of the car and record acoustic noises. The proposed system is mapping noise inside a car. The noise field is recorded at the ten control regions simultaneously.

  19. Swirling-flow jet noise suppressors for aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, I. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the effects of swirling the jet exhausts of small turbofan and turbojet engines have indicated significant progress towards predicting and attaining substantial jet noise abatement with minimum thrust losses in large aircraft engines. Systematic variations of the important swirl vane and swirling flow parameters were conducted to determine their effects on jet noise reduction and engine performance. Since swirling flow becomes more effective in reducing jet noise as the density and temperature gradients increase, the significant trends in noise reduction and engine performance that were established by these parametric studies could be projected into potentially greater reductions of sound pressure levels with minimum thrust losses by controlled swirling of the jets of high thrust engines. The density and temperature gradients in the jet exhausts of high thrust engines are larger by comparison with gradients in small engines.

  20. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    The contradictory and confusing results in noise research on humans may partly be due to individual differences between the subjects participating in different studies. This review is based on a twelve year research on the role of neuroticism, extroversion and subjective noise sensitivity during mental work in noisy environment. Neurotic persons might show enhanced "arousability" i.e. their arousal level increases more in stress. Additional unfavorable factors for neurotics are worrying and anxiety, which might prevent them coping successfully with noise, or some other stressors during mental performance. In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short periods of noise during performance. Correlation analyses have regularly revealed a highly significant negative relation between extroversion and noise annoyance during mental processing. Numerous studies have shown that people with high noise sensitivity may be prevented from achieving the same work results as other people in noisy environment, thus leading to psychosomatic, neurotic or other difficulties. Positive relation between noise annoyance and subjective noise sensitivity might be very strong. Our results have shown, after matching with the results of other relevant studies, that more stable personality, with extroversive tendencies and with a relatively lower subjective noise sensitivity measured with standard questionnaires, may be expected to better adapt to noise during mental performance, compared to people with opposite personality traits.

  1. White noise on bialgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Stochastic processes with independent increments on a group are generalized to the concept of "white noise" on a Hopf algebra or bialgebra. The main purpose of the book is the characterization of these processes as solutions of quantum stochastic differential equations in the sense of R.L. Hudsonand K.R. Parthasarathy. The notes are a contribution to quantum probability but they are also related to classical probability, quantum groups, and operator algebras. The Az ma martingales appear as examples of white noise on a Hopf algebra which is a deformation of the Heisenberg group. The book will be of interest to probabilists and quantum probabilists. Specialists in algebraic structures who are curious about the role of their concepts in probablility theory as well as quantum theory may find the book interesting. The reader should havesome knowledge of functional analysis, operator algebras, and probability theory.

  2. Ex / Noise / CERN / Deerhoof

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, SM18,

    2015-01-01

    Indie rockers Deerhoof battled with the noise of CERN’s magnet test facilities on 30 August 2015. The band visited CERN at the invitation of ATLAS physicist James Beacham, whose pilot project Ex/Noise/CERN collides experimental music artists with experimental particle physics. Credits: -Producer- CERN Video Productions James Beacham François Briard -Director- Noemi Caraban -Camera- Yann Krajewski Piotr Traczyk Noemi Caraban -Crane operator- Antonio Henrique Jorge-Costa -Live recording at CERN- Mixing at Rec studio/Geneva By Serge Morattel -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Deerhoof- John Dieterich Satomi Matsuzaki Ed Rodriguez Greg Saunier w/Deron Pulley SPECIAL THANKS TO: Michal Strychalski Marta Bajko Maryline Charrondiere Luca Bottura Christian Giloux Rodrigue Faes Mariane Catallon Georgina Hobgen Hailey Reissman Marine Bass

  3. Noise Analysis of MAIA System and Possible Noise Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svihlik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the noise analysis and noise suppression in a system for double station observation of the meteors now known as MAIA (Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyzer. The noise analysis is based on acquisition of testing video sequences in different light conditions and their further statistical evaluation. The main goal is to find a suitable noise model and subsequently determine if the noise is signal dependent or not. Noise and image model in the wavelet domain should be based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM or Generalized Laplacian Model (GLM and the model parameters should be estimated by moment method. Furthermore, noise should be modeled by GMM or GLM also in the space domain. GMM and GLM allow to model various types of probability density functions. Finally the advanced denoising algorithm using Bayesian estimator is applied and its performance is verified.

  4. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  5. Fusion of synthetic aperture radiometer and noise waveform SAR images

    OpenAIRE

    Lukin, Konstantin A.; Kudriashov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Noise waveform SAR generates 2D SAR images of a scene. Advanced radiometric SAR imaging provides information on the objects thermal radiation, angular coordinates and even range. The brightness temperatures of rough and smooth surfaces are different. An active, noise waveform, operating mode of bistatic radiometer, based on antennae with beam synthesis, is considered with respect to the roughness criteria. The optimal and quasi-optimal algorithms for fusion of radiometric and SAR images are p...

  6. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  7. Probing high-frequency noise with macroscopic resonant tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, T.; Amin, M. H. S.; Johnson, M. W.; Altomare, F.; Berkley, A. J.; Gildert, S.; Harris, R.; Johansson, J.; Bunyk, P.; Ladizinsky, E.; Tolkacheva, E.; Averin, D. V.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a method for extracting the high-frequency noise spectral density of an rf-SQUID flux qubit from macroscopic resonant tunneling (MRT) rate measurements. The extracted noise spectral density is consistent with that of an ohmic environment up to frequencies ~4 GHz. We have also derived an expression for the MRT line shape expected for a noise spectral density consisting of such a broadband ohmic component and an additional strongly peaked low-frequency component. This hybrid model provides an excellent fit to experimental data across a range of tunneling amplitudes and temperatures.

  8. Experimental research on mechanism of phase noise of laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Kun; Tang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Coherent combination of multiple laser amplifier is an important technique for high power and high beam quality laser. Laser amplifier uses master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration for narrow bandwidth and high beam quality laser. Then active phase control is used to make multiple laser amplifier phase synchronization for coherent spot in the far field. The center spot is N times brighter than the one of incoherent combination. At present, researchers have used this method to achieve 1.56kW coherent combination of nine fiber lasers and 105kW of seven slab lasers. The phase noise of the laser amplifier is an important factor affecting the coherent combination. There are two key technologies in the coherent combination. The one is fill factor of multiple laser spatial distribution, which determines main lobe energy of coherent spot. And the other is the phase noise of the laser amplifier, which decides stability of the coherent combination. The phase noise of laser amplifier is caused by many factors, mainly thermal disturbance and mechanical vibration. Due to the complexity of the phase noise generation, the research on phase noise is generally concentrated in the qualitative analysis. The phase noise is generally considered the time phase noise. It is phase dithering from variation refractive index by external disturbance. A variety of factors, such as temperature changes, mechanical vibrations, the pump power, affect phase noise. We establish an externally imposed discrete disturbance source on fiber laser amplifier and then analyze above-mentioned factors independently and quantitatively by the method. The experiments demonstrate space phase noise, dithering of beam direction, is simultaneously induced by either mechanical vibration or thermal disturbance. This experiment is significant for understanding mechanism of the phase noise and suppression of phase noise.

  9. Economical noise- and heat insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    All noise protection and heat insulations measures are interlinked. While noise abatement and insulation is primarily a task of health protection, the economically optimised heat insulation is rather a problem for financial mathematics. Parameters, influencing the heat insulation are subject to changes which will affect the profitability of heat insulation measures in turn. Several options for reducing the noise level are described and some standard values for material cost are supplied. Depending on the kind of noise different abatement methods are suitable which require materials with specific properties. Measures for heat insulation are described which to a great extent are identical will noise abatement measures.

  10. [Noise in intensive care units. Noise reduction by modification of gas humidification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, P W; Stuttmann, R; Doehn, M

    1997-10-01

    Today, noise pollution is an evident and ubiquitous problem even in intensive care units. Noise can disturb the physiological and psychological balance in patients and staff. Especially intubated patients and those breathing spontaneously through a T-piece are exposed to the noise emitted by the nebuliser used to humidity the respiratory gas. This may make patients feel uncomfortable. To reduce noise pollution in the ICU a modified T-piece has been developed and investigated. In order to heat and humidity the respiratory gas a Conchaterm III unit (Kendall company) and a thermo flow cylinder (De Vilbiss company) is necessary. While respiratory gas is flowing, water is sucked out of the heated thermoflow cylinder and nebulised according to the Venturi-Bernoulli principle. To adjust the oxygen concentration of the respiratory gas a plastic ring must be turned to either close (98% oxygen) or open a valve allowing room air to mix (40% oxygen). Noise pollution of the unit varies with admixture of room air. With a new device--a special oxygen-air mixing chamber--the oxygen concentration of the respiratory gas can be adjusted outside the thermoflow cylinder, hardly producing any noise pollution. Therefore the principle of nebulisation could be changed to humidification. A thermoflow cylinder without the nebulisation unit allows the respiratory gas to flow through the thermoflow cylinder over heated and evaporating water, hardly causing any noise pollution. In both types of T-pieces the temperature of the respiratory gas is controlled and corrected by the Conchaterm unit. As the result of these modifications, noise pollution has been reduced from 70 dB(A) to 55 dB(A). In the modified T-piece, the quality of humidification has been evaluated with a fresh gas flow of 22 l/min and at a gas temperature of 37 degrees C, not only collecting condensed water but also lost water. The modified T-piece allows a physiological humidification of the respiratory gas. The modified T

  11. Road traffic noise: self-reported noise annoyance versus GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Matthias; Ivina, Olga; von Klot, Stephanie; Babisch, Wolfgang; Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    self-reported road traffic noise annoyance is commonly used in epidemiological studies for assessment of potential health effects. Alternatively, some studies have used geographic information system (GIS) modelled exposure to road traffic noise as an objective parameter. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between noise exposure due to neighbouring road traffic and the noise annoyance of adults, taking other determinants into consideration. parents of 951 Munich children from the two German birth cohorts GINIplus and LISAplus reported their annoyance due to road traffic noise at home. GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure (L(den), maximum within a 50 m buffer) from the noise map of the city of Munich was available for all families. GIS-based calculated distance to the closest major road (≥10,000 vehicles per day) and questionnaire based-information about family income, parental education and the type of the street of residence were explored for their potential influence. An ordered logit regression model was applied. The noise levels (L(den)) and the reported noise annoyance were compared with an established exposure-response function. the correlation between noise annoyance and noise exposure (L(den)) was fair (Spearman correlation r(s) = 0.37). The distance to a major road and the type of street were strong predictors for the noise annoyance. The annoyance modelled by the established exposure-response function and that estimated by the ordered logit model were moderately associated (Pearson's correlation r(p) = 0.50). road traffic noise annoyance was associated with GIS modelled neighbouring road traffic noise exposure (L(den)). The distance to a major road and the type of street were additional explanatory factors of the noise annoyance appraisal.

  12. Acoustics of Jet Surface Interaction - Scrubbing Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Concepts envisioned for the future of civil air transport consist of unconventional propulsion systems in the close proximity to the structure or embedded in the airframe. While such integrated systems are intended to shield noise from the community, they also introduce new sources of sound. Sound generation due to interaction of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated here using the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore-Brown equation. The propagation Green's function is solved numerically for a high aspect-ratio rectangular jet starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. It is shown the magnitude of the Green's function decreases with increasing source frequency and/or jet temperature. The phase remains constant for a rigid surface, but varies with source location when subject to an impedance type boundary condition. The Green's function in the absence of the surface, and flight effects are also investigated

  13. Low noise constant current source for bias dependent noise measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, D.; Bose, Suvendu; Bardhan, K. K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chakraborty, R. K. [Bidhannagar College, EB - 2, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-01-15

    A low noise constant current source used for measuring the 1/f noise in disordered systems in ohmic as well as nonohmic regime is described. The source can supply low noise constant current starting from as low as 1 {mu}A to a few tens of milliampere with a high voltage compliance limit of around 20 V. The constant current source has several stages, which can work in a standalone manner or together to supply the desired value of load current. The noise contributed by the current source is very low in the entire current range. The fabrication of a low noise voltage preamplifier modified for bias dependent noise measurements and based on the existing design available in the MAT04 data sheet is also described.

  14. Emission and absorption quantum noise measurement with an on-chip resonant circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, J; Bouchiat, H; Deblock, R

    2010-10-15

    Using a quantum detector, a superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction, we probe separately the emission and absorption noise in the quantum regime of a superconducting resonant circuit at equilibrium. At low temperature the resonant circuit exhibits only absorption noise related to zero point fluctuations, whereas at higher temperature emission noise is also present. By coupling a Josephson junction, biased above the superconducting gap, to the same resonant circuit, we directly measure the noise power of quasiparticles tunneling through the junction at two resonance frequencies. It exhibits a strong frequency dependence, consistent with theoretical predictions.

  15. When noise becomes voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; McCarthy, John

    2014-01-01

    space in competition with their rivals. The more noise and movement they make, the more screen real estate they gain. BannerBattle therefore enabled us to explore the emergence of imitative and at times inventive behavior in enriched crowd experience, by augmenting and supporting spectator performance...... are distinctive because of the spontaneous, uninhibited behavior exhibited. In crowds, extreme soci- ality and the experience of performing identity in public emerge spontaneously. By bridging crowd theory and pragmatics of experience, we establish an understanding of crowd experience as a distinct sociality...

  16. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact : Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  17. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact: Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  18. {1}/{f} noise and electromigration in multilayered via structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik-Butler, Z.; Zhang, R.; Patel, N.

    1996-02-01

    {Al-Cu-Si}/{TiW} multilayered via electromigration behavior was researched using the low frequency noise method. Noise measurements were performed with ambient temperature ranging from 100 to 200°C and applied current density from 5.3 × 10 5 to 3.3 × 10 6 A cm -2, corresponding to sample temperatures up to 276°C. The noise spectral density was found to be in the form of {1}/{f γ} with 0.95≤ γ≤1.15, which corresponds to {1}/{f} noise. The noise magnitude was independent of the electron flow direction at relatively low current densities and temperatures. However, for J ≥ 2.6 × 10 6 A cm -2 and Tambient ≥ 180°C ( Tsample≥228°C), the noise for electron flow out of the via was higher than that for electron flow into the via. At low current densities, the noise spectrum showed a quadratic dependence on current for both electron flow directions. However, at high current densities, the current exponent depended on the direction of electron flow. The average activation energy, Ea, was found to be 0.11 eV when noise measurements were done on the same via sample for both current directions. When different samples were used for different current directions, a 0.23 eV activation energy value was observed. We interpret the first case as a very low-frequency pseudo-a.c. measurement, and the second case as a true d.c. measurement. In both cases, the activation energy did not depend on the direction of the electron flow. These activation energy values are small compared to the results obtained by the median time-to-failure method. The results are interpreted in terms of the electron mobility fluctuations due to fluctuations in the number of migrating vacancies.

  19. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    .... In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short...

  20. Noise and Mental Performance: Personality Attributes and Noise Sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belojevic G; Jakovljevic B; Slepcevic V

    2003-01-01

    .... In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short...

  1. Noise-induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska; Adrian Davis

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medic...

  2. Assessment of Traffic Noise Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe Husted; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2004-01-01

    the true social benefit of infrastructure plans. The paper presents a noise assessment model for the Copenhagen region, which brings together GIS technology and non-linear hedonic regression models to reveal the implicit costs of traffic noise measured as the marginal percentage loss in property values...... with respect to the decibel traffic noise. The model distinguishes between houses and apartments and shows that the ability to include refined accessibility variables have significant impact on estimated prices....

  3. Impulse Detectors for Noised Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lukac

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on a problem of impulse detection in thedynamic image environments corrupted by impulse noise. Using a proposedarchitecture that includes an impulse detector and the median filter,the effective methods can be designed. Thus, the image points areclassified into two classes such as a class of noise free samples and aclass of noised image points. In the case of impulse detection theestimate is performed by a median filter whereas a noise free sample ispassed on the output without the change i.e. system works as anidentity filter.

  4. Noise management of industrial parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senden, Virgini [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp (Canada)], email: virgini.senden@hfpacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    Because of industrial development, more noise-producing facilities are being built, with negative noise impacts on local residents' lives and comfort. The question raised by this paper is which way would be the best to ensure both acceptable noise impact, and efficient industrial facilities operations? The author presents two approaches: the {sup r}egional noise management plan{sup ,} adopted in Alberta, leaves the different industries present in the region in charge of noise emissions, working both together and individually to maintain acceptable noise pollution levels. The zoned industrial parks approach, in effect in the Netherlands, where industrial parks are situated within a noise zone, outside of which noise impact should be reduced to levels that do not disturb residents. Both approaches are effective, but demand a great deal of effort to achieve noise efficiency. The Alberta approach, thanks to its specificity and the collaborative work of all actors involved, facilitates continuous improvement while the Dutch approach is more rigid, but better suited to industry realities and the space that is available in the Netherlands.

  5. Optical noise and temporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavel, P.

    1980-08-01

    Previous articles have been devoted to the study of optical noise as a function of spatial coherence. The present one completes this study by considering temporal coherence. Noise arising from defects in the pupil plane and affecting the high spatial frequencies of an image is notably reduced by white-light illumination. Temporal coherence has little effect on noise arising from defects in the object plane. However, impulse noise due to small isolated defects is reduced in size. Physical arguments are presented to explain these phenomena and a mathematical study of partially coherent imaging in the presence of random defects is given.

  6. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  7. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  8. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before.......Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  9. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  10. Light and noise pollution interact to disrupt interspecific interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Taegan A; Rohr, Jason R; Bernal, Ximena E

    2017-05-01

    Studies on the consequences of urbanization often examine the effects of light, noise, and heat pollution independently on isolated species providing a limited understanding of how these combined stressors affect species interactions. Here, we investigate how these factors interact to affect parasitic frog-biting midges (Corethrella spp.) and their túngara frog (Engystomops pustulosus) hosts. A survey of túngara frog calling sites revealed that frog abundance was not significantly correlated with urbanization, light, noise, or temperature. In contrast, frog-biting midges were sensitive to light pollution and noise pollution. Increased light intensity significantly reduced midge abundance at low noise levels. At high noise intensity, there were no midges regardless of light level. Two field experiments controlling light and noise levels to examine attraction of the midges to their host and their feeding behavior confirmed the causality of these field patterns. These findings demonstrate that both light and noise pollution disrupt this host-parasite interaction and highlight the importance of considering interactions among species and types of pollutants to accurately assess the impacts of urbanization on ecological communities. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  12. Predictions of Supersonic Jet Mixing and Shock-Associated Noise Compared With Measured Far-Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Milo D.

    2010-01-01

    Codes for predicting supersonic jet mixing and broadband shock-associated noise were assessed using a database containing noise measurements of a jet issuing from a convergent nozzle. Two types of codes were used to make predictions. Fast running codes containing empirical models were used to compute both the mixing noise component and the shock-associated noise component of the jet noise spectrum. One Reynolds-averaged, Navier-Stokes-based code was used to compute only the shock-associated noise. To enable the comparisons of the predicted component spectra with data, the measured total jet noise spectra were separated into mixing noise and shock-associated noise components. Comparisons were made for 1/3-octave spectra and some power spectral densities using data from jets operating at 24 conditions covering essentially 6 fully expanded Mach numbers with 4 total temperature ratios.

  13. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques.

  14. Wideband Low Noise Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) are commonly used to amplify signals that are too weak for direct processing for example in radio or cable receivers. Traditionally, low noise amplifiers are implemented via tuned amplifiers, exploiting inductors and capacitors in resonating LC-circuits. This can render

  15. An anechoic chamber facility for investigating aerodynamic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massier, P. F.; Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic noise facility was designed to be used primarily for investigating the noise-generating mechanisms of high-temperature supersonic and subsonic jets. The facility consists of an anechoic chamber, an exhaust jet silencer, instrumentation equipment, and an air heater with associated fuel and cooling systems. Compressed air, when needed for jet noise studies, is provided by the wind tunnel compressor facility on a continuous basis. The chamber is 8.1 m long, 5.0 m wide, and 3.0 m high. Provisions have been made for allowing outside air to be drawn into the anechoic chamber in order to replenish the air that is entrained by the jet as it flows through the chamber. Also, openings are provided in the walls and in the ceiling for the purpose of acquiring optical measurements. Calibration of the chamber for noise reflections from the wall was accomplished in octave bands between 31.2 Hz and 32 kHz.

  16. Effects of Meteorological Conditions on Reactions to Noise Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor); Fields, James M.

    2004-01-01

    More than 80,000 residents' responses to transportation noise at different times of year provide the best, but imprecise, statistical estimates of the effects of season and meteorological conditions on community response to noise. Annoyance with noise is found to be slightly statistically significantly higher in the summer than in the winter in a seven-year study in the Netherlands. Analyses of 41 other surveys drawn from diverse countries, climates, and times of year find noise annoyance is increased by temperature, and may be increased by more sunshine, less precipitation, and reduced wind speeds. Meteorological conditions on the day of the interview or the immediately preceding days do not appear to have any more effect on reactions than do the conditions over the immediately preceding weeks or months.

  17. Low Noise Amplifiers and Receivers for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; hide

    2011-01-01

    The study of atmospheric dynamics and climatology depend on accurate and frequent measurements of temperature and humidity profiles of the atmosphere. These measurements furthermore enable highly accurate measurements of ocean topography by providing total column water vapour data for radar path delay correction. The atmospheric temperature profile is characterised at the oxygen molecule absorption frequencies (60 and 118 GHz) and the humidity profile at the water molecule absorption frequencies (23 and 183 GHz). Total column measurements can be achieved by comparing measured radiometric temperatures at atmospheric window channels, such as 90, 130 and 166 GHz. The standard receiver technology for these frequencies was diode mixers with MMIC LNAs being applied at the lower frequencies. The sensitivity of millimetre wave receivers improved significantly with the introduction of the low noise 35 nm gate length InP MMIC amplifiers. We currently achieve 3 dB noise figure at 180 GHz and 2 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurement campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography altimetry.

  18. 32-GHz cryogenically cooled HEMT low-noise amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, K. H. George; Kopp, William F.; Ho, Pin; Chao, Pane-Chane; Ko, Ming-Yih; Smith, Phillip M.; Ballingall, James M.; Bautista, J. Javier; Ortiz, Gerardo G.

    1989-01-01

    The cryogenic noise temperature performance of a two-stage and a three-stage 32 GHz high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier was evaluated. The amplifiers employ 0.25 micrometer conventional AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT devices, hybrid matching input and output microstrip circuits, and a cryogenically stable dc biasing network. The noise temperature measurements were performed in the frequency range of 31 to 33 GHz over a physical temperature range of 300 K down to 12 K. Across the measurement band, the amplifiers displayed a broadband response, and the noise temperature was observed to decrease by a factor of 10 in cooling from 300 to 15 K. The lowest noise temperature measured for the two-stage amplifier at 32 GHz was 35 K with an associated gain of 16.5 dB, while the three-stage amplifier measured 39 K with an associated gain of 26 dB. It was further observed that both amplifiers were insensitive to light.

  19. On 32-GHz cryogenically cooled HEMT low-noise amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, J. J.; Ortiz, G. G.; Duh, K. H. G.; Kopp, W. F.; Ho, P.; Chao, P. C.; Kao, M. Y.; Smith, P. M.; Ballingall, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The cryogenic noise temperature performance of a two-stage and a three-stage 32 GHz High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) amplifier was evaluated. The amplifiers employ 0.25 micrometer conventional AlGaAs/GaAs HEMT devices, hybrid matching input and output microstrip circuits, and a cryogenically stable dc biasing network. The noise temperature measurements were performed in the frequency range of 31 to 33 GHz over a physical temperature range of 300 K down to 12 K. Across the measurement band, the amplifiers displayed a broadband response, and the noise temperature was observed to decrease by a factor of 10 in cooling from 300 K to 15 K. The lowest noise temperature measured for the two-stage amplifier at 32 GHz was 35 K with an associated gain of 16.5 dB, while the three-stage amplifier measured 39 K with an associated gain of 26 dB. It was further observed that both amplifiers were insensitive to light.

  20. Origins of 1/f noise in nanostructure inclusion polymorphous silicon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we report that the origins of 1/f noise in pm-Si:H film resistors are inhomogeneity and defective structure. The results obtained are consistent with Hooge's formula, where the noise parameter, αH, is independent of doping ratio. The 1/f noise power spectral density and noise parameter αH are proportional to the squared value of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR. The resistivity and TCR of pm-Si:H film resistor were obtained through linear current-voltage measurement. The 1/f noise, measured by a custom-built noise spectroscopy system, shows that the power spectral density is a function of both doping ratio and temperature.

  1. Origins of 1/f noise in nanostructure inclusion polymorphous silicon films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shibin; Jiang, Yadong; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Jiang; Ying, Zhihua; Wang, Zhiming; Li, Wei; Salamo, Gregory

    2011-04-04

    In this article, we report that the origins of 1/f noise in pm-Si:H film resistors are inhomogeneity and defective structure. The results obtained are consistent with Hooge's formula, where the noise parameter, αH, is independent of doping ratio. The 1/f noise power spectral density and noise parameter αH are proportional to the squared value of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). The resistivity and TCR of pm-Si:H film resistor were obtained through linear current-voltage measurement. The 1/f noise, measured by a custom-built noise spectroscopy system, shows that the power spectral density is a function of both doping ratio and temperature.

  2. A review and tutorial discussion of noise and signal-to-noise ratios in analytical spectrometry—III. Multiplicative noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Snelleman, W.; Boutilier, G.D.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, signal-to-noise ratios are discussed in a tutorial fashion for the case of multiplicative noise. Multiplicative noise is introduced simultaneously with the analyte signal and is therefore much more difficult to reduce than additive noise. The sources of noise, the mathematical

  3. Transient noise suppression algorithm in speech system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Keyu; Wang, Mingjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, I mainly introduce the algorithm of transient noise suppression in speech system. Firstly, it divides into impulsive noise and other types of transient noise according to the characteristics of transient noise. In the impulse noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the averaging energy threshold method to detect the impulse noise, and then I use the amplitude threshold method to reduce the impulse noise which was detected. In the other types of transient noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the Optimally Modified-Log Spectral Amplitude estimation (OM-LSA) algorithm and the Minimum Control Recursive Average (MCRA) algorithm to suppress the transient noise.

  4. An inexpensive sensor for noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Laura; Tatum, Marcus; Thomas, Geb; Sousan, Sinan; Koehler, Kirsten; Peters, Thomas

    2018-02-08

    Noise is a pervasive workplace hazard that varies spatially and temporally. The cost of direct-reading instruments for noise hampers their use in a network. The objectives for this work were to (1) develop an inexpensive noise sensor (noise sensors for use in an inexpensive sensor network. The inexpensive noise sensor consists of an electret condenser microphone, an amplifier circuit, and a microcontroller with a small form factor (28 mm by 47 mm by 9 mm) than can be operated as a stand-alone unit. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate 50 of the new sensors at 5 sound levels: (1) ambient sound in a quiet office; (2) a pink noise test signal from 65 to 85 dBA in 10 dBA increments; and (3) 94 dBA using a SLM calibrator. Ninety-four percent of the noise sensors (n = 46) were within ± 2 dBA of the SLM for sound levels from 65 dBA to 94 dBA. As sound level increased, bias decreased, ranging from 18.3% in the quiet office to 0.48% at 94 dBA. Overall bias of the sensors was 0.83% across the 75 dBA to 94 dBA range. These sensors are available for a variety of uses and can be customized for many applications, including incorporation into a stationary sensor network for continuous monitoring of noise in manufacturing environments.

  5. White noise and sleep induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J A; Moran, D J; Lee, A; Talbert, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied two groups of 20 neonates, between 2 and 7 days old, in a randomised trial. Sixteen (80%) fell asleep within five minutes in response to white noise compared with only five (25%) who fell asleep spontaneously in the control group. White noise may help mothers settle difficult babies.

  6. Measuring Excess Noise in SDL's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kowitz, H. R.; Rowland, C. W.; Shull, T. A.; Ruggles, S. L.; Matthews, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument gives quantitive information on "excess noise" in semiconductor-diode laser (SDL's). By proper selection of detector, instrument tests any SDL from visible wavelengths through thermal infrared. Lasers determine excess noise in SKL source by measuring photocurrent generated in photodetector exposed first to reference laser then to SKL under test.

  7. Noise exposure and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier-Vermeer, W.; Passchier, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and

  8. Noise pollution: a modem plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goines, Lisa; Hagler, Louis

    2007-03-01

    Noise is defined as unwanted sound. Environmental noise consists of all the unwanted sounds in our communities except that which originates in the workplace. Environmental noise pollution, a form of air pollution, is a threat to health and well-being. It is more severe and widespread than ever before, and it will continue to increase in magnitude and severity because of population growth, urbanization, and the associated growth in the use of increasingly powerful, varied, and highly mobile sources of noise. It will also continue to grow because of sustained growth in highway, rail, and air traffic, which remain major sources of environmental noise. The potential health effects of noise pollution are numerous, pervasive, persistent, and medically and socially significant. Noise produces direct and cumulative adverse effects that impair health and that degrade residential, social, working, and learning environments with corresponding real (economic) and intangible (well-being) losses. It interferes with sleep, concentration, communication, and recreation. The aim of enlightened governmental controls should be to protect citizens from the adverse effects of airborne pollution, including those produced by noise. People have the right to choose the nature of their acoustical environment; it should not be imposed by others.

  9. Fast High-Quality Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Wyvill, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the noise functions available in a graphics programmer's toolbox are either slow to compute or they involve grid-line artifacts making them of lower quality. In this paper we present a real-time noise computation with no grid-line artifacts or other regularity problems. In other wor...

  10. En Route Jet Aircraft Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Most research into commercial noise is primarily focused on reducing the community noise, noise that the local population near an airport experiences as aircraft takeoff and land. While this type of noise may be a main driver for the noise that commu...

  11. Filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2010-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  12. A filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2006-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  13. The Effects of Noise on Pupil Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Barbara Ruth

    Effects of school noise conditions on student written task performance were studied. Three noise levels were examined--(1) irregular interval noise, 75-90 decibels, (2) average or normal noise, and (3) quiet condition, 45-55 decibels. An attempt was made to reproduce noise conditions typical of the school environment. A second controlled…

  14. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. The following general... may be affected by noise from construction of the project. The identification is to be performed...

  15. Railroad Noise: Economic Valuation and Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, M.R.E.; Nijkamp, P.; Pels, E.; Rietveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    In developed countries noise annoyance is an important source of environmental concern. Research on noise annoyance caused by railroad traffic is relatively underdeveloped. Here, a causal chain model is presented in which railroad traffic density, noise emission, noise immission and noise annoyance

  16. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Imke; Burgdorf, Martin; John, Viju O.; Mittaz, Jonathan; Buehler, Stefan A.

    2017-12-01

    The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs) of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT) as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT Fidelity and Uncertainty in Climate data records from Earth Observation (FIDUCEO).

  17. Heterogeneous noise enhances spatial reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has identified the heterogeneity as crucial for the evolution of cooperation in spatial population. However, the influence of heterogeneous noise is still lack. Inspired by this interesting question, in this work, we try to incorporate heterogeneous noise into the evaluation of utility, where only a proportion of population possesses noise, whose range can also be tuned. We find that increasing heterogeneous noise monotonously promotes cooperation and even translates the full defection phase (of the homogeneous version) into the complete cooperation phase. Moreover, the promotion effect of this mechanism can be attributed to the leading role of cooperators who have the heterogeneous noise. These type of cooperators can attract more agents penetrating into the robust cooperator clusters, which is beyond the text of traditional spatial reciprocity. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in the society.

  18. Cold Noise Testing of a Microseismometer for Planetary and Terrestrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, T.; Pike, W. T.; Calcutt, S. B.; Bowles, N. E.; Temple, J.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the seismic payload for the Insight mission to Mars, a three axis set of microseismometers, known as SP, have been successfully integrated into the seismometer package. A set of performance tests on each flight sensor has been performed at the University of Oxford prior to integration. These tests demonstrate the minimum noise performance of the sensor is below 0.5ng/rtHz over a wide range of tilt angles at room temperature. Recently a flight spare sensor has been used to show the minimum noise performance is still below 0.5ng/rtHz over the range of expected temperatures on the Martian surface (from the expected Mars minimum of -60C to a maximum of +60C). Direct measurements of cold noise performance are difficult because of seismic noise from the cooling system, however a novel cold noise setup has been developed that allows for the direct measurement of performance at low temperatures.

  19. Low Noise Amplifier Receivers from Millimeter Wave Atmospheric Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Gaier, Todd; Tanner, Alan; Varonen, Mikko; Samoska, Lorene; Brown, Shannon; Lambrigsten, Bjorn; Reising, Steven; Tanabe, Jordan; hide

    2012-01-01

    We currently achieve 3.4 dB noise figure at 183GHz and 2.1 dB noise figure at 90 GHz with our MMIC low noise amplifiers (LNAs) in room temperature. These amplifiers and the receivers we have built using them made it possible to conduct highly accurate airborne measurement campaigns from the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, develop millimeter wave internally calibrated radiometers for altimeter radar path delay correction, and build prototypes of large arrays of millimeter receivers for a geostationary interferometric sounder. We use the developed millimeter wave receivers to measure temperature and humidity profiles in the atmosphere and in hurricanes as well as to characterize the path delay error in ocean topography altimetry.

  20. Realization of nonequilibrium thermodynamic processes using external colored noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Pau; Martinez, Ignacio A; Ortiz-Ambriz, Antonio; Rica, Raul A; Roldan, Edgar

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the dynamics of single microparticles immersed in water that are driven out of equilibrium in the presence of an additional external colored noise. As a case study, we trap a single polystyrene particle in water with optical tweezers and apply an external electric field with flat spectrum but a finite bandwidth of the order of kHz. The intensity of the external noise controls the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position of the particle and therefore of its effective temperature. Here we show, in two different nonequilibrium experiments, that the fluctuations of the work done on the particle obey the Crooks fluctuation theorem at the equilibrium effective temperature, given that the sampling frequency and the noise cutoff frequency are properly chosen.

  1. Resistivity and low-frequency noise characteristics of epoxy-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    PralgauskaitÄ--, Sandra; Matukas, Jonas; Tretjak, Marina; Macutkevic, Jan; Banys, Juras; Selskis, Algirdas; Cataldo, Antonino; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Noise and electrical transport properties of composites based on epoxy resin filled with various carbon inclusions (single-walled carbon nanotubes, high surface area carbon black, and exfoliated graphite) were investigated in depth. The temperature dependence of resistivity shows that Mott's hopping and tunneling between conductive carbon particles dominate the charge carrier transport at low temperature, whereas a positive temperature coefficient effect occurs at higher temperature. Low-frequency noise spectra of the investigated materials comprise 1/fα type components. The noise level is the highest for composites close to the percolation threshold. The percolation threshold value of the system also strongly impacts both the temperature dependence of the noise level and the resistivity. Close to the percolation threshold, the noise level increases due to the carrier tunneling throughout the polymer matrix and decreases due to the rapid expansion of the polymer matrix. In contrast, the latter has almost no influence on the noise level far above the percolation threshold, and the small kink in the temperature dependence of the noise level indicates a crossover between tunneling and thermally activated electron transport mechanisms.

  2. Empirical source noise prediction method with application to subsonic coaxial jet mixing noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, W. E.; Weir, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    A general empirical method, developed for source noise predictions, uses tensor splines to represent the dependence of the acoustic field on frequency and direction and Taylor's series to represent the dependence on source state parameters. The method is applied to prediction of mixing noise from subsonic circular and coaxial jets. A noise data base of 1/3-octave-band sound pressure levels (SPL's) from 540 tests was gathered from three countries: United States, United Kingdom, and France. The SPL's depend on seven variables: frequency, polar direction angle, and five source state parameters: inner and outer nozzle pressure ratios, inner and outer stream total temperatures, and nozzle area ratio. A least-squares seven-dimensional curve fit defines a table of constants which is used for the prediction method. The resulting prediction has a mean error of 0 dB and a standard deviation of 1.2 dB. The prediction method is used to search for a coaxial jet which has the greatest coaxial noise benefit as compared with an equivalent single jet. It is found that benefits of about 6 dB are possible.

  3. Relationship between noise annoyance from road traffic noise and cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Ndrepepa; Dorothee Twardella

    2011-01-01

    Road traffic noise is an important source of noise annoyance in the community. We performed a meta-analysis to assess whether there is an association between noise annoyance from road traffic noise and cardiovascular diseases...

  4. Note: cryogenic low-noise dc-coupled wideband differential amplifier based on SiGe heterojunction bipolar transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beev, Nikolai; Kiviranta, Mikko

    2012-06-01

    Silicon-germanium heterojunction bipolar transistors can be used to construct low-noise cryogenic amplifiers. We present a dc-coupled differential amplifier capable of operating down to 10 K. In this temperature regime it has bandwidth of 15 MHz and noise temperature as low as 1.3 K. When operated at liquid nitrogen temperature of 77 K, the measured noise temperature is lower than 3 K. The amplifier is based on the commercially available transistors NESG3031 and operational amplifier OPA836 and is capable of standalone operation without any additional stages at room temperature.

  5. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Mark Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-x, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x, Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox, and TlCa2Ba2Cu3Ox are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa2Cu3O7-x shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  6. A matrix formulation for noise transduction as a general case of noise measure

    OpenAIRE

    Hallgren, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noise characteristics of an active device or circuit are given by the minimum noise figure, the optimum source reflection coefficient, and a noise resistance. The noise measure proposed extends the noise figure to include the available gain of the network, for the case of a conjugate output match, and gives values that minimize the noise power available from the network consistent with maximum available gain. Noise transduction follows as a general case of the noise measure by us...

  7. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  8. Noise properties of dc-SQUID with quasiplanar YBa2Cu3O7 Josephson junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faley, M.I.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Hilgenkamp, Johannes W.M.; Hemmes, Herman K.; Aarnink, W.A.M.; Aarnink, W.; Flokstra, Jakob; Rogalla, Horst

    1995-01-01

    We describe the noise performance of dc SQUIDs fabricated with quasiplanar ramp‐type Josephson junctions on the basis of c‐axis‐oriented YBa2Cu3O7/PrBa2Cu3O7 thin‐film heterostructures. The noise spectrum of the dc SQUIDs was measured with dc‐ and ac‐bias schemes at different temperatures and showed

  9. The Effect of Ambient Noise on Cooperation in Public Good Games

    OpenAIRE

    Diederich, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stressors such as noise, pollution, extreme temperatures, or crowding can pose relevant externalities in the economy if certain conditions are met. This paper presents experimental evidence that exposure to acute ambient noise decreases cooperative behavior in a standard linear public good game.

  10. Flicker noise in degenerately doped Si single crystals near the metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we report some of the important results of experimental investigations of the flicker noise near the metal–insulator (MI) transition in doped silicon single crystals. This is the first comprehensive work to study low-frequency noise in heavily doped Si over an extensive temperature range (2 K T. 500 K).

  11. Noise exposure in oil mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G V Prasanna; Dewangan, K N; Sarkar, Amaresh

    2008-04-01

    Noise of machines in various agro-based industries was found to be the major occupational hazard for the workers of industries. The predominant noise sources need to be identified and the causes of high noise need to be studied to undertake the appropriate measures to reduce the noise level in one of the major agro-based industries, oil mills. To identify the predominant noise sources in the workrooms of oil mills. To study the causes of noise in oil mills. To measure the extent of noise exposure of oil mill workers. To examine the response of workers towards noise, so that appropriate measures can be undertaken to minimize the noise exposure. A noise survey was conducted in the three renowned oil mills of north-eastern region of India. Information like output capacity, size of power source, maintenance condition of the machines and workroom configurations of the oil mills was collected by personal observations and enquiry with the owner of the mill. Using a Sound Level Meter (SLM) (Model-824, Larson and Davis, USA), equivalent SPL was measured at operator's ear level in the working zone of the workers near each machine of the mills. In order to study the variation of SPL in the workrooms of the oil mill throughout its operation, equivalent SPL was measured at two appropriate locations of working zone of the workers in each mill. For conducting the noise survey, the guidelines of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) were followed. Grid points were marked on the floor of the workroom of the oil mill at a spacing of 1 m x 1 m. SPL at grid points were measured at about 1.5 m above the floor. The direction of the SLM was towards the nearby noisy source. To increase accuracy, two replications were taken at each grid point. All the data were recorded for 30 sec. At the end of the experiment, data were downloaded to a personal computer. With the help of utility software of Larson and Davis, USA, equivalent SPL and noise spectrum at each reading was

  12. Highway renewable energy : photovoltaic noise barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Highway photovoltaic noise barriers (PVNBs) represent the combination of noise barrier systems and photovoltaic systems in order to mitigate traffic noise while simultaneously producing renewable energy. First deployed in Switzerland in 1989, PVNBs a...

  13. CERL Noise Monitoring and Warning System 98

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sachs, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    .... This report documents the design and construction of this new noise monitor. The heart of wind-noise resistance is a two- microphone array and special signal processing to identify and separate blast sounds from pseudo- wind noise...

  14. The Assessment of Noise Exposure and Noise Annoyance at a Petrochemical Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farhang Dehghan

    2013-12-01

    .Conclusion: Based on the obtained results of investigating the noise level (objective exposure as well as the noise annoyance (subjective exposure at the studied company, it is necessary to adopt the management –technical noise reduction measures at manufacturing sectors as the personal noise exposure and environmental noise exposure and also noise personal exposure of administrative staff can be decreased.

  15. The role of Urbis' noise and noise effects maps in local policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    An important aspect of the EU noise policy is mapping of noise and noise effects and the formulation of noise action plans. In the Netherlands, due to the new policy on noise (MIG), the municipalities will be responsible for the formulation of a local noise policy. An instrument for the assessment

  16. [Auditory threshold for white noise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrat, R; Thillier, J L; Durivault, J

    1975-01-01

    The liminal auditory threshold for white noise and for coloured noise was determined from a statistical survey of a group of 21 young people with normal hearing. The normal auditory threshold for white noise with a spectrum covering the whole of the auditory field is between -- 0.57 dB +/- 8.78. The normal auditory threshold for bands of filtered white noise (coloured noise with a central frequency corresponding to the pure frequencies usually employed in tonal audiometry) describes a typical curve which, instead of being homothetic to the usual tonal curves, sinks to low frequencies and then rises. The peak of this curve is replaced by a broad plateau ranging from 750 to 6000 Hz and contained in the concavity of the liminal tonal curves. The ear is therefore less sensitive but, at limited acoustic pressure, white noise first impinges with the same discrimination upon the whole of the conversational zone of the auditory field. Discovery of the audiometric threshold for white noise constitutes a synthetic method of measuring acuteness of hearing which considerably reduces the amount of manipulation required.

  17. Destruction of noise in biotelemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraden, J

    1979-01-01

    The difference in statistical characteristics between physiological signals and noise creates the possibility of designing a selective circuit to separate signals from noise. Analysis shows that by an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio before the pulse conditioner in a biotelemetry system, the mixture of normal and spurious pulses are present at the demodulator input. The system of noise destruction analyzes the sequential distances between two following pulses and blanks all spurious pulses using the criteria of high autocorrelation of physiological signals in short intervals. Evaluation of the circuit demonstrates a dramatic increase in accuracy in the presence of strong interference because the system of noise destruction performs a linear extrapolation of free-of-noise parts of pulse flow into destroyed spaces. The equations to calculate selective thresholds and output errors are delineated. The noise destructor is especially useful in long-term monitoring and automatic data analysis because it prevents a formation of sharp noisy spikes at the biotelemetry system's output.

  18. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English, which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  19. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  20. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  1. Spin noise amplification and giant noise in optical microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S. [Spin-Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kavokin, A. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Spin-Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lagoudakis, P. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-14

    When studying the spin-noise-induced fluctuations of Kerr rotation in a quantum-well microcavity, we have found a dramatic increase of the noise signal (by more than two orders of magnitude) in the vicinity of anti-crossing of the polariton branches. The effect is explained by nonlinear optical instability of the microcavity giving rise to the light-power-controlled amplification of the polarization noise signal. In the framework of the developed model of built-in amplifier, we also interpret the nontrivial spectral and intensity-related properties of the observed noise signal below the region of anti-crossing of polariton branches. The discovered effect of optically controllable amplification of broadband polarization signals in microcavities in the regime of optical instability may be of interest for detecting weak oscillations of optical anisotropy in fundamental research and for other applications in optical information processing.

  2. Target noise in overlay metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligson, Joel L.; Adel, Mike E.; Izikson, Pavel; Levinski, Vladimir; Yaffe, Dan

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a method for calculating the statistical effects of spatial noise on the overlay measurement extracted from a given overlay target. The method has been applied to two kinds of overlay targets on three process layers, and the new metric, Target Noise, has been shown to correlate well to the random component of Overlay Mark Fidelity. A significant difference in terms of robustness has been observed between AIM targets and conventional Frame-in-Frame targets. The results fit well into the spatial noise hierarchy presented in this paper.

  3. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  4. Entangled light from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  5. Model of aircraft noise adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Coates, G. D.; Cawthorn, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Development of an aircraft noise adaptation model, which would account for much of the variability in the responses of subjects participating in human response to noise experiments, was studied. A description of the model development is presented. The principal concept of the model, was the determination of an aircraft adaptation level which represents an annoyance calibration for each individual. Results showed a direct correlation between noise level of the stimuli and annoyance reactions. Attitude-personality variables were found to account for varying annoyance judgements.

  6. Hearing through the noise: Biologically inspired noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tyler Paul

    Vocal communication in the natural world demands that a listener perform a remarkably complicated task in real-time. Vocalizations mix with all other sounds in the environment as they travel to the listener, arriving as a jumbled low-dimensional signal. A listener must then use this signal to extract the structure corresponding to individual sound sources. How this computation is implemented in the brain remains poorly understood, yet an accurate description of such mechanisms would impact a variety of medical and technological applications of sound processing. In this thesis, I describe initial work on how neurons in the secondary auditory cortex of the Zebra Finch extract song from naturalistic background noise. I then build on our understanding of the function of these neurons by creating an algorithm that extracts speech from natural background noise using spectrotemporal modulations. The algorithm, implemented as an artificial neural network, can be flexibly applied to any class of signal or noise and performs better than an optimal frequency-based noise reduction algorithm for a variety of background noises and signal-to-noise ratios. One potential drawback to using spectrotemporal modulations for noise reduction, though, is that analyzing the modulations present in an ongoing sound requires a latency set by the slowest temporal modulation computed. The algorithm avoids this problem by reducing noise predictively, taking advantage of the large amount of temporal structure present in natural sounds. This predictive denoising has ties to recent work suggesting that the auditory system uses attention to focus on predicted regions of spectrotemporal space when performing auditory scene analysis.

  7. Low-frequency noise characteristics of lamellar ferrielectric crystal CuInP2S6 at the phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaraite, I.; Matukas, J.; Pralgauskaite, S.; Vysochanskii, Yu.; Banys, J.; Dziaugys, A.

    2017-07-01

    The detailed investigations of low-frequency noise characteristics of a ferrielectric CuInP2S6 crystal are presented at the vicinity of phase transition. The white noise spectra are observed at room temperature. Voltage noise spectra are characterized by 1/f noise above the phase transition temperature. Lorentzian-type spectra were applied to investigate the normalized voltage fluctuation density, in order to obtain a deeper insight into the phenomenon of 1/f noise in the CuInP2S6 crystal. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the source of the 1/f noise in the CuInP2S6 crystal is the carrier number fluctuation due to the recombination between defect levels. The obtained results indicate noise spectroscopy as being a reliable, sensitive, and non-destructive tool complementary to the other measurement techniques for the characterization of ferroelectric materials.

  8. Noise evaluation of automotive A/C compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, Sameh M.; Khalil, Mohamed I.; Abouel-seoud, Shawki A. [Automotive and Tractors Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-07-01

    Passenger compartment's interior noise and thermal performance are essential criteria for the driving comfort of vehicles. The air-conditioning system influences both field of comfort. It creates comfortable thermal conditions. On the other hand, the noise radiation of the air-condition system's components can be annoying. The blower, the air distribution ducts and the registers affect air rush noise. In some cases, the refrigerant flow creates hissing noise. Such noise has a great influence on vehicle acoustical comfort and on overall quality perception of a vehicle Therefore, the acoustic performance of air-condition compressors become more important for passenger comfort. At engine idling and at extreme temperatures the air-condition compressor can be audible as the significant sound source. However, the aim of this paper is to quantify air-borne noise characteristics of vehicle air-condition compressor. A simulated experimental model comprises a small wooden box with dimensions of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m represented the principle of hemi-anechoic room was designed and acoustic characteristics of the sound field inside the box were determined. The air-condition compressor characteristics parameters considered in this paper are fan position and electric motor speed. In addition, a single number of the air column natural frequency is calculated. The results indicate that significant information can be obtained in order to investigate the vehicle air-condition compressor and consequently improve the vehicle interior quietness.

  9. Time reversal of noise sources in a reverberation room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribay, Guillemette; de Rosny, Julien; Fink, Mathias

    2005-05-01

    Usually, time reversal is studied with pulsed emissions. Here, the properties of time reversal of the acoustic field emitted by noise sources in a reverberation room are studied numerically, theoretically, and experimentally. A time domain numerical simulation of a two-dimensional enclosure shows that the intensity of a time-reversed noise is strongly enhanced right on the initial source position. A theory based on the link that exists between time reversal of noise and the "well-known" time reversal of short pulse is developed. One infers that the focal spot size equals half a wavelength and the signal to noise ratio only depends on the number of transceivers in the time reversal mirror. This last property is characteristic of the time reversal of noise. Experimental results are obtained in a 5 X 3 X 3 m3 reverberation room. The working frequency range varies from 300 Hz to 2 kHz. The ability of the time reversal process to physically reconstruct the image of two noise sources is studied. To this end, care is given to the technique to separate two close random sources, and also to the influence of temperature fluctuations on the focusing quality.

  10. Speech production in amplitude-modulated noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Ewen N; Raufer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    the consequences of temporally fluctuating noise. In the present study, 20 talkers produced speech in a variety of noise conditions, including both steady-state and amplitude-modulated white noise. While listening to noise over headphones, talkers produced randomly generated five word sentences. Similar...... to previous studies, talkers raised the level of their voice in steady-state noise. While talkers also increased the level of their voice in amplitude-modulated noise, the increase was not as large as that observed in steady-state noise. Importantly, for the 2 and 4 Hz amplitude-modulated noise conditions...

  11. Cooling a low noise amplifier with a micromachined cryogenic cooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H S; Witvers, R H; Vanapalli, S; Holland, H J; ter Brake, H J M

    2013-10-01

    The sensitivity of antenna systems increases with increasing active area, but decreases at higher noise figure of the low-noise amplifier (LNA). Cooling the LNA locally results in significant improvement in the gain and in lowering the noise figure of the LNA. Micromachined Joule-Thomson (JT) coolers can provide a cryogenic environment to the LNA. They are attractive because they have no cold moving parts and can be scaled down to match the size and the power consumption of LNAs. The performance of a LNA mounted on a JT microcooler with dimensions of 60.0 × 9.5 × 0.72 mm(3) is reported in this paper. The microcooler is operated with nitrogen gas and the cold-end temperature is controlled at 115 K. The measured net cooling power of the microcooler is about 43 mW when the LNA is not operating. The power dissipation of the LNA is 26 mW, with a supply voltage of 2 V. At room temperature the noise figure of the LNA is 0.83 dB and the gain lies between 17.9 and 13.1 dB, in the frequency range of 0.65 and 1.05 GHz. Upon cooling to 115 K, the noise figure drops to 0.50 dB and the increase in gain varies in the range of 0.6-1.5 dB.

  12. Cosmological flux noise and measured noise power spectra in SQUIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2016-06-20

    The understanding of the origin of 1/f magnetic flux noise commonly observed in superconducting devices such as SQUIDs and qubits is still a major unsolved puzzle. Here we discuss the possibility that a significant part of the observed low-frequency flux noise measured in these devices is ultimately seeded by cosmological fluctuations. We consider a theory where a primordial flux noise field left over in unchanged form from an early inflationary or quantum gravity epoch of the universe intrinsically influences the phase difference in SQUIDs and qubits. The perturbation seeds generated by this field can explain in a quantitatively correct way the form and amplitude of measured low-frequency flux noise spectra in SQUID devices if one takes as a source of fluctuations the primordial power spectrum of curvature fluctuations as measured by the Planck collaboration. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with recent low-frequency flux noise measurements of various experimental groups. Magnetic flux noise, so far mainly considered as a nuisance for electronic devices, may thus contain valuable information about fluctuation spectra in the very early universe.

  13. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearing Loss Homepage Facts Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis Types of Hearing Loss About Sound Treatment & Intervention Services Learning Language Bacterial Meningitis Studies Data & Statistics EHDI Annual Data 2015 ...

  14. Noise measurements on Si sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Peisert, Anna; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Prouskas, C; Triantis, F A; Tzoulis, N; Aspell, P; Barney, D; Bloch, P; Kloukinas, K; Reynaud, S; Go, A; Elsha, V; Zubarev, E

    2002-01-01

    Developing silicon strip sensors for the CMS Preshower detector we have noticed that some strips have a noise higher than the average and not correlated to a high leakage current. In order to investigate this effect we have developed a set-up for noise measurement on wafers and diced sensors that does not require bonding. The set-up is based on the DeltaStream chip coupled to a probe card. We have tested 45 sensors and found that the strips with an above average noise have a higher relative current increase as a function of voltage, DeltaI /(IDeltaV). We also observed that, on these strips, the breakdown occurs within about 60 V from the voltage at which the noise is observed. We describe our measurement method and present the results.

  15. Noise exposure and hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempest, W.

    1978-03-01

    Current standards for occupational noise exposure are discussed briefly. Previously published data from two major surveys are used to derive noise-induced hearing loss audiograms for workers of average, and above average, sensitivity who have spent a working life of 40 yr exposed to noise at the maximum levels currently recommended; estimates of the percentage risk of hearing loss are quoted. A number of individual cases, in which claimants have been exposed to noise levels close to the current criteria, are described. It is concluded that the standards currently in use do not provide anything like complete protection especially to the more sensitive workers, and may leave employers open to common law actions for damages.

  16. Calibration of an audio frequency noise generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1966-01-01

    it is used for measurement purposes. The spectral density of a noise source may be found by measuring its rms output over a known noise bandwidth. Such a bandwidth may be provided by a passive filter using accurately known elements. For example, the parallel resonant circuit with purely parallel damping has...... a noise bandwidth Bn = π/2 × (3dB bandwidth). To apply this method to low audio frequencies, the noise bandwidth of the low Q parallel resonant circuit has been found, including the effects of both series and parallel damping. The method has been used to calibrate a General Radio 1390-B noise generator......A noise generator of known output is very convenient in noise measurement. At low audio frequencies, however, all devices, including noise sources, may be affected by excess noise (1/f noise). It is therefore very desirable to be able to check the spectral density of a noise source before...

  17. External noise distinguishes attention mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Dosher, B A

    1998-05-01

    We developed and tested a powerful method for identifying and characterizing the effect of attention on performance in visual tasks as due to signal enhancement, distractor exclusion, or internal noise suppression. Based on a noisy Perceptual Template Model (PTM) of a human observer, the method adds increasing amounts of external noise (white gaussian random noise) to the visual stimulus and observes the effect on performance of a perceptual task for attended and unattended stimuli. The three mechanisms of attention yield three "signature" patterns of performance. The general framework for characterizing the mechanisms of attention is used here to investigate the attentional mechanisms in a concurrent location-cued orientation discrimination task. Test stimuli--Gabor patches tilted slightly to the right or left--always appeared on both the left and the right of fixation, and varied independently. Observers were cued on each trial to attend to the left, the right, or evenly to both stimuli, and decide the direction of tilt of both test stimuli. For eight levels of added external noise and three attention conditions (attended, unattended, and equal), subjects' contrast threshold levels were determined. At low levels of external noise, attention affected threshold contrast: threshold contrasts for non-attended stimuli were systematically higher than for equal attention stimuli, which were, in turn, higher than for attended stimuli. Specifically, when the rms contrast of the external noise is below 10%, there is a consistent 17% elevation of contrast threshold from attended to unattended condition across all three subjects. For higher levels of external noise, attention conditions did not affect threshold contrast values at all. These strong results are characteristic of a signal enhancement, or equivalently, an internal additive noise reduction mechanism of attention.

  18. Quantum noise and superluminal propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segev, Bilha [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, (Israel); Milonni, Peter W. [Theoretical Division (T-4), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Babb, James F. [Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Chiao, Raymond Y. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Causal ''superluminal'' effects have recently been observed and discussed in various contexts. The question arises whether such effects could be observed with extremely weak pulses, and what would prevent the observation of an ''optical tachyon.'' Aharonov, Reznik, and Stern (ARS) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2190 (1998)] have argued that quantum noise will preclude the observation of a superluminal group velocity when the pulse consists of one or a few photons. In this paper we reconsider this question both in a general framework and in the specific example, suggested by Chiao, Kozhekin, and Kurizki (CKK) [Phys. Rev. 77, 1254 (1996)], of off-resonant, short-pulse propagation in an optical amplifier. We derive in the case of the amplifier a signal-to-noise ratio that is consistent with the general ARS conclusions when we impose their criteria for distinguishing between superluminal propagation and propagation at the speed c. However, results consistent with the semiclassical arguments of CKK are obtained if weaker criteria are imposed, in which case the signal can exceed the noise without being ''exponentially large.'' We show that the quantum fluctuations of the field considered by ARS are closely related to superfluorescence noise. More generally, we consider the implications of unitarity for superluminal propagation and quantum noise and study, in addition to the complete and truncated wave packets considered by ARS, the residual wave packet formed by their difference. This leads to the conclusion that the noise is mostly luminal and delayed with respect to the superluminal signal. In the limit of a very weak incident signal pulse, the superluminal signal will be dominated by the noise part, and the signal-to-noise ratio will therefore be very small. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Noise Optimization in Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Narayan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Euro 6 norms emphasize on reduction of emissions from the engines. New injection methods are being adopted for homogenous mixture formation in diesel engines. During steady state conditions homogenous combustion gave noise levels in lower frequencies. In this work noise produced in a 440 cc diesel engine has been investigated. The engine was run under various operating conditions varying various injection parameters.

  20. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    the signal to noise by contributing significantly to the overall system temperature. The power spectrum is ... the input of the circulator, the second term represents the thermal noise contribution from the feed assembly .... calibrated platinum resistance thermometer is estimated to give the temperature of liquid nitrogen baths ...

  1. Noise annoys: effects of noise on breeding great tits depend on personality but not on noise characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naguib, M.; Van Oers, K.; Braakhuis, A.; Griffioen, M.; De Goede, P.; Waas, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise can have serious implications for animals, especially when they communicate acoustically. Yet, the impacts of noise may depend not only on noise characteristics but also on an individual's coping style or personality. We tested whether noise is more disturbing if it masks

  2. Low-Noise Amplifier for 100 to 180 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Pukala, David; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard; Deal, William

    2009-01-01

    A three-stage monolithic millimeter-wave integrated-circuit (MMIC) amplifier designed to exhibit low noise in operation at frequencies from about 100 to somewhat above 180 GHz has been built and tested. This is a prototype of broadband amplifiers that have potential utility in diverse applications, including measurement of atmospheric temperature and humidity and millimeter-wave imaging for inspecting contents of opaque containers. Figure 1 depicts the amplifier as it appears before packaging. Figure 2 presents data from measurements of the performance of the amplifier as packaged in a WR-05 waveguide and tested in the frequency range from about 150 to about 190 GHz. The amplifier exhibited substantial gain throughout this frequency range. Especially notable is the fact that at 165 GHz, the noise figure was found to be 3.7 dB, and the noise temperature was found to be 370 K: This is less than half the noise temperature of the prior state of the art.

  3. Noise measurements on the helicopter BK 117 design. Weighted noise levels and influence of airspeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splettstoesser, Wolf R.; Anders, Klaus P.; Spiegel, Karl-Heinz

    1986-11-01

    Noise measurements on the prototype helicopter BK 117 were performed in strict compliance with the proposed international Civil Aviation Organization regulations for noise certification of helicopters. Measurement procedure, noise data acquisition, analysis and reduction as well as applied correction procedures are described. Effective perceived noise levels (EPNL) and other noise descriptors were evaluated and related to the proposed noise limits. Additional level flyover tests with variable airspeed were conducted to investigate the resulting effect on the EPNL and other noise measures.

  4. Assessment of auditory impression of the coolness and warmness of automotive HVAC noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Hotehama, Takuya; Kamiya, Masaru

    2017-07-01

    Noise induced by a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system in a vehicle is an important factor that affects the comfort of the interior of a car cabin. Much effort has been devoted to reduce noise levels, however, there is a need for a new sound design that addresses the noise problem from a different point of view. In this study, focusing on the auditory impression of automotive HVAC noise concerning coolness and warmness, psychoacoustical listening tests were performed using a paired comparison technique under various conditions of room temperature. Five stimuli were synthesized by stretching the spectral envelopes of recorded automotive HVAC noise to assess the effect of the spectral centroid, and were presented to normal-hearing subjects. Results show that the spectral centroid significantly affects the auditory impression concerning coolness and warmness; a higher spectral centroid induces a cooler auditory impression regardless of the room temperature.

  5. Evaluating noise reduction techniques while considering anatomical noise in dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allec, Nicholas; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Scott, Chris C; Karim, Karim S; Lewin, John M

    2013-05-01

    The authors describe modifications to previously developed cascaded systems analysis to include the anatomical noise in evaluation of dual-energy noise reduction techniques. Previous models have ignored the anatomical noise in theoretical analysis of noise reduction techniques. The inclusion of anatomical noise leads to more accurate estimation of potential noise reduction improvements and optimization. The model is applied to dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography. The effect of linear noise reduction filters on the anatomical noise is taken into account using cascaded systems analysis. The noise model is included in the ideal observer detectability for performance evaluation of the noise reduction techniques. Dual-energy image noise with and without including the effect of anatomical noise in noise reduction technique analysis is reported. The theoretical model is compared with clinical images from a previous dual-energy contrast enhanced mammography clinical study and good agreement is observed. The results suggest that the inclusion of anatomical noise in the evaluation and comparison of noise reduction techniques is highly warranted for more accurate analysis. This work establishes a useful extension to dual-energy cascaded systems analysis for maximizing image quality using noise reduction techniques. The extension includes the effect of linear image filtering, such as that used for noise reduction, on anatomical noise. The results suggest that the inclusion of anatomical noise in the evaluation of noise reduction techniques can lead to more accurate optimization, noise, and performance estimations.

  6. The influence of white noise on sleep in subjects exposed to ICU noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchina, Michael L; Abu-Hijleh, Muhanned; Chaudhry, Bilal K; Carlisle, Carol C; Millman, Richard P

    2005-09-01

    There is disagreement in the literature about the importance of sleep disruption from intensive care unit (ICU) environmental noise. Previous reports have assumed that sleep disruption is produced by high-peak noise. This study aimed to determine whether peak noise or the change in noise level from baseline is more important in inducing sleep disruption. We hypothesized that white noise added to the environment would reduce arousals by reducing the magnitude of changing noise levels. Four subjects underwent polysomnography under three conditions: (1) baseline, (2) exposure to recorded ICU noise and (3) exposure to ICU noise and mixed-frequency white noise, while one additional subject completed the first two conditions. Baseline and peak noise levels were recorded for each arousal from sleep. A total of 1178 arousals were recorded during these studies. Compared to the baseline night (13.3+/-1.8 arousals/h) the arousal index increased during the noise (48.4+/-7.6) but not the white noise/ICU noise night (15.7+/-4.5) (Pnoise and white noise/ICU noise condition (17.7+/-0.4 versus 17.5+/-0.3 DB, P=0.65). Peak noise was not the main determinant of sleep disruption from ICU noise. Mixed frequency white noise increases arousal thresholds in normal individuals exposed to recorded ICU noise by reducing the difference between background noise and peak noise.

  7. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Tyre/Road Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    In modern society, traffic noise has become an important issue for mental health. A significant contributor to this noise pollution is exterior tyre/road noise, which is caused by the interaction between tyre and road surface and. In order to reduce tyre/road noise at the source, accurate numerical

  9. Estimates of Small Signal/Noise Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, L. D.

    1985-01-01

    Signal/Noise Ratio Meter measures ratio of signal power to noise power in input that contains both signal and noise. Signal and noise first filtered and normalized in analog circuitry, then digitized and sampled. Performance of SNR meter determined by statistical algorithm chosen for analysis of samples.

  10. Noise-Reduction Circuit For Imaging Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Luis J.; Pain, Bedabrata; Staller, Craig; Hickok, Roger W.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental correlated-triple-sampling circuit suppresses capacitor reset noise and attenuates low frequency noise in integrated-and-sampled circuits of multiplexed photodiode arrays. Noise reduction circuit part of Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument to fly aboard Cassini spacecraft to explore Saturn and its moons. Modified versions of circuit also useful for reducing noise in terrestrial photosensor instruments.

  11. 32 CFR 989.32 - Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Noise. 989.32 Section 989.32 National Defense... ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.32 Noise. Aircraft noise data files used for analysis during EIAP will be... System for Aircraft Noise for military training routes and military operating areas. Guidance on...

  12. Collaborative noise data collected from smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Bocher

    2017-10-01

    The noise data that are acquired by volunteers around the world (citizen observations, are organized in three files, containing the path of measures (a set of points, standardized noise indicators, noise description and other useful variables (GPS accuracy, speed…. These data can be very relevant later to propose an environmental noise evaluation, through simple or complex treatments.

  13. Implementasi Metode Kombinasi Mean Filter Dan Median Filter Untuk Mereduksi Gaussian Noise, Salt And Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, Dan Exponential Noise Pada Citra Digital

    OpenAIRE

    Fadillah, Azhar

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of image as form of information is currently increasing. Poor quality of image can reduce its information contained in image. For example, the image contains noise so the information that contained in the image are not clear. Noise on the digital image can be either Gaussian noise, Salt and Pepper Noise, Speckle Noise, and Exponential Noise. One of the mechanisms used to reduce the noise is filtering. Mean Filter method and Median Filter method are a very good method to redu...

  14. Health Effects of Noise Exposure in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, Stephen; Clark, Charlotte

    2015-06-01

    Environmental noise exposure, such as road traffic noise and aircraft noise, is associated with a range of health outcomes in children. Children demonstrate annoyance responses to noise, and noise is also related to lower well-being and stress responses, such as increased levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Noise does not cause more serious mental health problems, but there is growing evidence for an association with increased hyperactivity symptoms. Studies also suggest that noise might cause changes in cardiovascular functioning, and there is some limited evidence for an effect on low birth weight. There is robust evidence for an effect of school noise exposure on children's cognitive skills such as reading and memory, as well as on standardised academic test scores. Environmental noise does not usually reach levels that are likely to affect children's hearing; however, increasing use of personal electronic devices may leave some children exposed to harmful levels of noise.

  15. Underwater noise modelling for environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcas, Adrian [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Thompson, Paul M. [Lighthouse Field Station, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cromarty IV11 8YL (United Kingdom); Merchant, Nathan D., E-mail: nathan.merchant@cefas.co.uk [Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Assessment of underwater noise is increasingly required by regulators of development projects in marine and freshwater habitats, and noise pollution can be a constraining factor in the consenting process. Noise levels arising from the proposed activity are modelled and the potential impact on species of interest within the affected area is then evaluated. Although there is considerable uncertainty in the relationship between noise levels and impacts on aquatic species, the science underlying noise modelling is well understood. Nevertheless, many environmental impact assessments (EIAs) do not reflect best practice, and stakeholders and decision makers in the EIA process are often unfamiliar with the concepts and terminology that are integral to interpreting noise exposure predictions. In this paper, we review the process of underwater noise modelling and explore the factors affecting predictions of noise exposure. Finally, we illustrate the consequences of errors and uncertainties in noise modelling, and discuss future research needs to reduce uncertainty in noise assessments.

  16. Noise Residual Learning for Noise Modeling in Distributed Video Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luong, Huynh Van; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm which exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The noise model is one of the inherently difficult challenges in DVC. This paper considers Transform Domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes...... noise residual learning techniques that take residues from previously decoded frames into account to estimate the decoding residue more precisely. Moreover, the techniques calculate a number of candidate noise residual distributions within a frame to adaptively optimize the soft side information during...... decoding. A residual refinement step is also introduced to take advantage of correlation of DCT coefficients. Experimental results show that the proposed techniques robustly improve the coding efficiency of TDWZ DVC and for GOP=2 bit-rate savings up to 35% on WZ frames are achieved compared with DISCOVER....

  17. Probing Noise in Flux Qubits via Macroscopic Resonant Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Johnson, M. W.; Han, S.; Berkley, A. J.; Johansson, J.; Bunyk, P.; Ladizinsky, E.; Govorkov, S.; Thom, M. C.; Uchaikin, S.; Bumble, B.; Fung, A.; Kaul, A.; Kleinsasser, A.; Amin, M. H. S.; Averin, D. V.

    2008-09-01

    Macroscopic resonant tunneling between the two lowest lying states of a bistable rf SQUID is used to characterize noise in a flux qubit. Measurements of the incoherent decay rate as a function of flux bias revealed a Gaussian-shaped profile that is not peaked at the resonance point but is shifted to a bias at which the initial well is higher than the target well. The rms amplitude of the noise, which is proportional to the dephasing rate 1/τφ, was observed to be weakly dependent on temperature below 70 mK. Analysis of these results indicates that the dominant source of low energy flux noise in this device is a quantum mechanical environment in thermal equilibrium.

  18. Construction noise induces hypercoagulability and elevated plasma corticosteroids in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukh, Mazen; Gordon, Sheila P; Othman, Maha

    2014-10-01

    Although animals housed for research purposes are strictly monitored for lighting, temperature, and humidity, the acoustic environment receives less attention. In a retrospective study, we investigated the effect of construction-induced noise on coagulation using thromboelastography in a group of healthy control rats. Animals were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction in the vicinity of the animal care facility where these rats were housed. We compared the results to those of age-, gender-matched nonexposed rats. There was a significant shortening of the reaction (R) time (P = .009) and a trend toward an increase in coagulation index (CI; P = .09), indicating hypercoagulability. The short R time and increase in CI were correlated with an elevated plasma cortisol and corticosterone, indicating that the hypercoagulability seen in these rats is stress induced. Noise is a stress factor for which animals need to be monitored, particularly if those animals are selected as controls for hemostasis studies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  19. Noise map of cities and agglomerations

    OpenAIRE

    N.A. Lapteva; I.I. Bogolepov

    2010-01-01

    Noise map of city is an instrument for noise control. There are noise levels on all main roads, in people habitation and recreation areas, on the territory of industrial and other enterprises, and around isolated noisy objects. At present time in Russia and abroad the main problem of noise maps is as before the indefinite precision and reliability of indicated value of noise levels. With using of variance analysis method of probability theory and mathematical statistics the authors propose a ...

  20. Noise Exposure Assessment in a Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Thitiworn Choosong; Wandee Kaimook; Ratchada Tantisarasart; Puwanai Sooksamear; Satith Chayaphum; Chanon Kongkamol; Wisarut Srisintorn; Pitchaya Phakthongsuk

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. Methods: A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the...

  1. Noise mapping inside a car cabin

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Kim; Sjøj, Sidsel Marie Nørholm; Jacobsen, Finn; Haddad, Karim; Hald, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay-and-sum beamforming and spherical harmonics beamforming. These methods have a poor spatial esolution at low frequencies, and since much noise generated in cars is dominated by low frequencies the methods are not opti...

  2. Simulations on Active Fan Noise Control

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Helen

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Noise reduction by active noise control in jet engines and its prediction is of high interest, since the acoustic goals of flightpath 2050 can hardly be achieved by passive acoustic treatments. Numerous former test campaigns showed that significant noise reduction is possible by active noise control. Simulations are needed for further understanding of test results and in order to predict the noise reduction and possibly impact on the performance of future jet engines. ...

  3. Heterogeneous Superconducting Low-Noise Sensing Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Penanen, Konstantin I.; Ho Eom, Byeong

    2008-01-01

    A heterogeneous material construction has been devised for sensing coils of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers that are subject to a combination of requirements peculiar to some advanced applications, notably including low-field magnetic resonance imaging for medical diagnosis. The requirements in question are the following: The sensing coils must be large enough (in some cases having dimensions of as much as tens of centimeters) to afford adequate sensitivity; The sensing coils must be made electrically superconductive to eliminate Johnson noise (thermally induced noise proportional to electrical resistance); and Although the sensing coils must be cooled to below their superconducting- transition temperatures with sufficient cooling power to overcome moderate ambient radiative heat leakage, they must not be immersed in cryogenic liquid baths. For a given superconducting sensing coil, this combination of requirements can be satisfied by providing a sufficiently thermally conductive link between the coil and a cold source. However, the superconducting coil material is not suitable as such a link because electrically superconductive materials are typically poor thermal conductors. The heterogeneous material construction makes it possible to solve both the electrical- and thermal-conductivity problems. The basic idea is to construct the coil as a skeleton made of a highly thermally conductive material (typically, annealed copper), then coat the skeleton with an electrically superconductive alloy (typically, a lead-tin solder) [see figure]. In operation, the copper skeleton provides the required thermally conductive connection to the cold source, while the electrically superconductive coating material shields against Johnson noise that originates in the copper skeleton.

  4. From noise mapping to interactive noise planning: Experiences with urban strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Salomons, E.M.; Lohman, W.J.A.; Klerkx, R.T.; Zhou, H.; Miedema, H.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    For management of environmental noise, insight in the current noise situation is needed. An important source of information is provided by strategic noise maps, which can be implemented in a policy cycle on noise. However, the planning of noise measures in an urban environment is complex. Besides

  5. Aero-acoustic noise of wind turbines. Noise prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B. [ed.

    1997-12-31

    Semi-empirical and CAA (Computational AeroAcoustics) noise prediction techniques are the subject of this expert meeting. The meeting presents and discusses models and methods. The meeting may provide answers to the following questions: What Noise sources are the most important? How are the sources best modeled? What needs to be done to do better predictions? Does it boil down to correct prediction of the unsteady aerodynamics around the rotor? Or is the difficult part to convert the aerodynamics into acoustics? (LN)

  6. Investigation of Noise in Solids at Low Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Effects .... ............ 77 Design of the Milli-Kelvin Cryostat ..... ................... 75 Magnetic Levitation ...polished and coated with a metal, then a capacitor transducer and FET preamp can be used to obtain the above a and C2. If coated with a superconductor ...without the noisy interruption of adding cryoliquids. I . 83 MAGNETIC LEVITATION In order to isolate the crystals under investigation as much as

  7. TEMPERATURE, RADIOACTIVE TRACER, AND NOISE LOGGING FOR INJECTION WELL INTEGRITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulations of the Environmental Protection Agency require that an injection well exhibit both internal and external mechanical integrity. The external mechanical integrity consideration is that there is no significant fluid movement into an underground source of drinking water ...

  8. Measurement of noise from toys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altkorn, Robert; Milkovich, Scott M.; Rider, Gene

    2005-09-01

    Noise from toys is an issue receiving increasing attention in the toy and consumer product safety communities. Concern over loud toys is motivated both by reports of increasing hearing loss among children (the U.S. CDC estimated in 2001 that 12.5% of U.S. children 6 to 19 years old have permanent or temporary noise induced threshold shift in one or both ears) and by technological advances enabling sound and noise producing toys of increased play value at lower and lower cost. Consumer watchdog groups such as PIRG routinely identify excessively loud toys in their yearly lists of most dangerous toys. In 2003 ASTM revised its toy safety standard (F963-03) to include A and C weighted sound pressure level measurements and specific play or use dependent measurement geometries. RAM Consulting measures noise from toys as part of a comprehensive product safety program. Sound measurement equipment, geometries, and procedures used at RAM for different types of toys will be discussed. Unusual problems in noise measurement will be considered, as will the appropriateness of A and C weighting for the youngest age groups.

  9. Estimating the coherence of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Joel

    To harness the advantages of quantum information processing, quantum systems have to be controlled to within some maximum threshold error. Certifying whether the error is below the threshold is possible by performing full quantum process tomography, however, quantum process tomography is inefficient in the number of qubits and is sensitive to state-preparation and measurement errors (SPAM). Randomized benchmarking has been developed as an efficient method for estimating the average infidelity of noise to the identity. However, the worst-case error, as quantified by the diamond distance from the identity, can be more relevant to determining whether an experimental implementation is at the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum computation. The best possible bound on the worst-case error (without further assumptions on the noise) scales as the square root of the infidelity and can be orders of magnitude greater than the reported average error. We define a new quantification of the coherence of a general noise channel, the unitarity, and show that it can be estimated using an efficient protocol that is robust to SPAM. Furthermore, we also show how the unitarity can be used with the infidelity obtained from randomized benchmarking to obtain improved estimates of the diamond distance and to efficiently determine whether experimental noise is close to stochastic Pauli noise.

  10. Aircraft en route noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from a laboratory experiment conducted in order to quantify the annoyance experienced by people on the ground in response to en route noise (ERN) generated by aircraft at cruise conditions. Objectives included the comparison of annoyance responses to ERN with the annoyance responses to takeoff and landing noise; the comparison of the annoyance responses to advanced turboprop aircraft ERN with those of the turbofan ERN; and also the ability of aircraft noise measurement procedures and corrections to predict annoyance to ERN. Tests were conducted at the Langley Acoustics Research Laboratory on 32 human subjects selected at random. Subjects judged the annoyance level of 24 Propfan Test Assessment advanced turboprop ERN stimuli, 18 conventional turbofan ERN stimuli, and 60 conventional turboprop and turbofan takeoff and landing noise stimuli. Analysis of resulting data compared annoyance responses to different aircraft types and operations, examined the ability of current noise measurement and correction procedures to predict annoyance ERN, and calculated optimum duration correction magnitudes for ERN.

  11. Noise exposure under hyperbaric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Objective evidence exists that divers demonstrate a hearing deficit greater than would be expected from ageing effects alone. Deafness in divers may be caused by a number of factors other than exposure to excessive noise levels, eg barotrauma, ear infection etc. This review concentrates on the concern that exposure of commercial divers to noise while at work may cause a hearing deficit. Sound pressure levels recorded both underwater and in diving chambers often exceed those allowable to workers onshore. However, the sound perceived by the diver is modified both in amplitude and in frequency when he is either underwater or in pressurised chambers. Broadly the effect of this modification is to attenuate the sound and thus offer some protection from high noise levels. The degree of attentuation varies with the frequency of the sound, however it is also possible under specific conditions associated with gas density for the sensitivity to particular frequencies to be amplified above that for normal atmospheric air. The levels of sound observed from some underwater tools are of concern even after allowing for a significant de-sensitisation of the divers` hearing. Reports of tinnitus and temporary hearing loss following a dive are sure signs that the noise levels have been harmful. It is not possible at present to describe risk criteria for hearing damage due to noise exposure associated with diving. (author)

  12. Noise induced oscillations and coherence resonance in a generic model of the nonisothermal chemical oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, David S. A.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2013-08-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are common in biological systems and they also occur in artificial non-biological systems. Generally, these reactions are subject to random fluctuations in environmental conditions which translate into fluctuations in the values of physical variables, for example, temperature. We formulate a mathematical model for a nonisothermal minimal chemical oscillator containing a single negative feedback loop and study numerically the effects of stochastic fluctuations in temperature in the absence of any deterministic limit cycle or periodic forcing. We show that noise in temperature can induce sustained limit cycle oscillations with a relatively narrow frequency distribution and some characteristic frequency. These properties differ significantly depending on the noise correlation. Here, we have explored white and colored (correlated) noise. A plot of the characteristic frequency of the noise induced oscillations as a function of the correlation exponent shows a maximum, therefore indicating the existence of autonomous stochastic resonance, i.e. coherence resonance.

  13. Noise performance of microwave humidity sounders over their lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave humidity sounders Special Sensor Microwave Water Vapor Profiler (SSMT-2, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS to date have been providing data records for 25 years. So far, the data records lack uncertainty information essential for constructing consistent long time data series. In this study, we assess the quality of the recorded data with respect to the uncertainty caused by noise. We calculate the noise on the raw calibration counts from the deep space views (DSVs of the instrument and the noise equivalent differential temperature (NEΔT as a measure for the radiometer sensitivity. For this purpose, we use the Allan deviation that is not biased from an underlying varying mean of the data and that has been suggested only recently for application in atmospheric remote sensing. Moreover, we use the bias function related to the Allan deviation to infer the underlying spectrum of the noise. As examples, we investigate the noise spectrum in flight for some instruments. For the assessment of the noise evolution in time, we provide a descriptive and graphical overview of the calculated NEΔT over the life span of each instrument and channel. This overview can serve as an easily accessible information for users interested in the noise performance of a specific instrument, channel and time. Within the time evolution of the noise, we identify periods of instrumental degradation, which manifest themselves in an increasing NEΔT, and periods of erratic behaviour, which show sudden increases of NEΔT interrupting the overall smooth evolution of the noise. From this assessment and subsequent exclusion of the aforementioned periods, we present a chart showing available data records with NEΔT  <  1 K. Due to overlapping life spans of the instruments, these reduced data records still cover without gaps the time since 1994 and may therefore serve as a first step for constructing long time

  14. Noise Reduction Potential of Cellular Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Hinze

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rising numbers of flights and aircrafts cause increasing aircraft noise, resulting in the development of various approaches to change this trend. One approach is the application of metallic liners in the hot gas path of aero-engines. At temperatures of up to 600 °C only metallic or ceramic structures can be used. Due to fatigue loading and the notch effect of the pores, mechanical properties of porous metals are superior to the ones of ceramic structures. Consequently, cellular metals like metallic foams, sintered metals, or sintered metal felts are most promising materials. However, acoustic absorption depends highly on pore morphology and porosity. Therefore, both parameters must be characterized precisely to analyze the correlation between morphology and noise reduction performance. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between pore morphology and acoustic absorption performance. The absorber materials are characterized using image processing based on two dimensional microscopy images. The sound absorption properties are measured using an impedance tube. Finally, the correlation of acoustic behavior, pore morphology, and porosity is outlined.

  15. OPTIMAL AUTOMOBILE MUFFLER VIBRATION AND NOISE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Kumar Jha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The muffler is the main part of the Automobile Exhaust System, consisting of fibrous and porous materials to absorb noise and vibrations. The exhaust gas mass coming from the engine can produce resonance, which may be the source of fatigue failure in the exhaust pipe due to the presence of continuous resonance. The modes on the muffler should be located away from the engine’s operating frequencies in order to minimise the resonance. The objective of this paper is to determine the frequencies that appear at the modes, which have the more adverse effect during the operation of the automobile. An impact test has been conducted by applying the force using a hard head hammer, and data generated have been used for plotting a graph of the transfer functions using MATLAB. Six points have been selected, namely 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 11 on the muffler for the impact test. The collected data from theses six points have been analysed for the addition of damping. Results suggests that increasing the mass increases the damping and lowers the modes of the transfer function. Further research will identify higher strength materials that can withstand the higher gas temperatures as well as the corrosion and erosion by the gas emitted from the engine. muffler, noise, vibration,modal analysis,

  16. Low Noise Camera for Suborbital Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Holloway, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost, commercial-off-the-shelf- (COTS-) based science cameras are intended for lab use only and are not suitable for flight deployment as they are difficult to ruggedize and repackage into instruments. Also, COTS implementation may not be suitable since mission science objectives are tied to specific measurement requirements, and often require performance beyond that required by the commercial market. Custom camera development for each application is cost prohibitive for the International Space Station (ISS) or midrange science payloads due to nonrecurring expenses ($2,000 K) for ground-up camera electronics design. While each new science mission has a different suite of requirements for camera performance (detector noise, speed of image acquisition, charge-coupled device (CCD) size, operation temperature, packaging, etc.), the analog-to-digital conversion, power supply, and communications can be standardized to accommodate many different applications. The low noise camera for suborbital applications is a rugged standard camera platform that can accommodate a range of detector types and science requirements for use in inexpensive to mid range payloads supporting Earth science, solar physics, robotic vision, or astronomy experiments. Cameras developed on this platform have demonstrated the performance found in custom flight cameras at a price per camera more than an order of magnitude lower.

  17. Jet Surface Interaction-Scrubbing Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Generation of sound due to scrubbing of a jet flow past a nearby solid surface is investigated within the framework of the generalized acoustic analogy theory. The analysis applies to the boundary layer noise generated at and near a wall, and excludes the scattered noise component that is produced at the leading or the trailing edge. While compressibility effects are relatively unimportant at very low Mach numbers, frictional heat generation and thermal gradient normal to the surface could play important roles in generation and propagation of sound in high speed jets of practical interest. A general expression is given for the spectral density of the far-field sound as governed by the variable density Pridmore- Brown equation. The propagation Green's function should be solved numerically starting with the boundary conditions on the surface and subject to specified mean velocity and temperature profiles between the surface and the observer. The equivalent sources of aerodynamic sound are associated with non-linear momentum flux and enthalpy flux terms that appear in the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. These multi-pole sources should be modeled and evaluated with input from a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver with an appropriate turbulence model.

  18. Uncorrelated Noise in Turbulence Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Leif; Lenschow, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    of atmospheric variability. The authors assume that the measured signal is a representation of a variable that is continuous on the scale of interest in the atmosphere. Uncorrelated noise affects the autovariance function (or, equivalently, the structure function) only between zero and the first lag, while its......We show that the error variance contributed by random uncorrelated measurement noise can be merged with the error variance contributed by real variation in the atmosphere to obtain a single expression for the total error variance when the sampling time is much less than the integral scale...... effect is smeared across the entire power spectrum. For this reason, quantities such as variance dissipation may be more conveniently estimated from the structure function than from the spectrum. The modeling results are confirmed by artificially modifying a test time series with Poisson noise...

  19. Influence of Transportation Noise and Noise Sensitivity on Annoyance: A Cross-Sectional Study in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Joo Hyun Sung; Jiho Lee; Kyoung Sook Jeong; Soogab Lee; Changmyung Lee; Min-Woo Jo; Chang Sun Sim

    2017-01-01

    Environmental noise is known to cause noise annoyance. Since noise annoyance is a subjective indicator, other mediators?such as noise sensitivity?may influence its perception. However, few studies have thus far been conducted on noise annoyance in South Korea that consider noise sensitivity and noise level simultaneously. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between noise sensitivity or noise level and noise annoyance on a large scale in South Korea. This study estimated the...

  20. Quantum Noise from Reduced Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-07-01

    We consider the description of quantum noise within the framework of the standard Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics applied to a composite system environment setting. Averaging over the environmental degrees of freedom leads to a stochastic quantum dynamics, described by equations complying with the constraints arising from the statistical structure of quantum mechanics. Simple examples are considered in the framework of open system dynamics described within a master equation approach, pointing in particular to the appearance of the phenomenon of decoherence and to the relevance of quantum correlation functions of the environment in the determination of the action of quantum noise.

  1. Sleep, noise and health: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Zaharna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a physiologic recuperative state that may be negatively affected by factors such as psychosocial and work stress as well as external stimuli like noise. Chronic sleep loss is a common problem in today′s society, and it may have significant health repercussions such as cognitive impairment, and depressed mood, and negative effects on cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune function. This article reviews the definition of disturbed sleep versus sleep deprivation as well as the effects of noise on sleep. We review the various health effects of chronic partial sleep loss with a focus on the neuroendocrine/hormonal, cardiovascular, and mental health repercussions.

  2. Detection of signals in noise

    CERN Document Server

    Whalen, Anthony D; Declaris, Nicholas

    1971-01-01

    Detection of Signals in Noise serves as an introduction to the principles and applications of the statistical theory of signal detection. The book discusses probability and random processes; narrowband signals, their complex representation, and their properties described with the aid of the Hilbert transform; and Gaussian-derived processes. The text also describes the application of hypothesis testing for the detection of signals and the fundamentals required for statistical detection of signals in noise. Problem exercises, references, and a supplementary bibliography are included after each c

  3. Removing Noise From Pyrosequenced Amplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Russell J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many environmental genomics applications a homologous region of DNA from a diverse sample is first amplified by PCR and then sequenced. The next generation sequencing technology, 454 pyrosequencing, has allowed much larger read numbers from PCR amplicons than ever before. This has revolutionised the study of microbial diversity as it is now possible to sequence a substantial fraction of the 16S rRNA genes in a community. However, there is a growing realisation that because of the large read numbers and the lack of consensus sequences it is vital to distinguish noise from true sequence diversity in this data. Otherwise this leads to inflated estimates of the number of types or operational taxonomic units (OTUs present. Three sources of error are important: sequencing error, PCR single base substitutions and PCR chimeras. We present AmpliconNoise, a development of the PyroNoise algorithm that is capable of separately removing 454 sequencing errors and PCR single base errors. We also introduce a novel chimera removal program, Perseus, that exploits the sequence abundances associated with pyrosequencing data. We use data sets where samples of known diversity have been amplified and sequenced to quantify the effect of each of the sources of error on OTU inflation and to validate these algorithms. Results AmpliconNoise outperforms alternative algorithms substantially reducing per base error rates for both the GS FLX and latest Titanium protocol. All three sources of error lead to inflation of diversity estimates. In particular, chimera formation has a hitherto unrealised importance which varies according to amplification protocol. We show that AmpliconNoise allows accurate estimates of OTU number. Just as importantly AmpliconNoise generates the right OTUs even at low sequence differences. We demonstrate that Perseus has very high sensitivity, able to find 99% of chimeras, which is critical when these are present at high

  4. Noise properties of graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nan; Liu, Xinyu; Arnold, Gerald; Ruggiero, Steven; Department of Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    We present results for the noise characteristics of graphene flakes on SiO2 as a function of gate bias. Our results are in accord with a new tunnel/trap model based on the interaction of graphene carriers with the underlying substrate, which incorporates trap position, energy, and barrier height for tunneling into a given trap, along with the band-structure of the graphene. We will also discuss recent work on the properties of MBE-grown GaAs on graphene, in the context of noise in spin transport.

  5. The Problems with "Noise Numbers" for Wind Farm Noise Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Human perception responds primarily to sound character rather than sound level. Wind farms are unique sound sources and exhibit special audible and inaudible characteristics that can be described as modulating sound or as a tonal complex. Wind farm compliance measures based on a specified noise number alone will fail to address problems with noise…

  6. Relationship between exposure to multiple noise sources and noise annoyance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Relationships between exposure to noise [metric: day-night level (DNL) or day-evening-night level (DENL)] from a single source (aircraft, road traffic, or railways) and annoyance based on a large international dataset have been published earlier. Also for stationary sources relationships have been

  7. Is freight traffic noise more annoying than passenger traffic noise?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, R.G. de; Miedema, H.M.E.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands a new freight-only railway route, the "Betuweroute", is being planned to carry freight traffic from Rotterdam harbour east into Germany. Inhabitants of areas near the future route are concerned about noise and vibration, and question the relevance of current legislation for a

  8. An empirical method for predicting the mixing noise levels of subsonic circular and coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    An empirical method for predicting the static free field source noise levels of subsonic circular and coaxial jet flow streams is presented. The method was developed from an extensive data base of 817 jet tests obtained from five different government and industry sources in three nations. The prediction method defines the jet noise in terms of four components which are overall power level, power spectrum level, directivity index, and relative spectrum level. The values of these noise level components are defined on a grid consisting of seven frequency parameter values (Strouhal numbers) and seven directivity angles. The value of the noise level at each of these grid points is called a noise level coordinate and was defined as a function of five jet exhaust flow state parameters which are equivalent jet velocity, equivalent jet total temperature, the velocity ratio (outer stream to inner stream), temperature ratio, and area ratio. The functions were obtained by curve fitting in a least squares sense the noise level coordinates from the data base in a five dimensional flow state space using a third order Taylor series. The noise level coordinates define the component noise levels for all frequencies and directivities through a bicubic spline function.

  9. Technical noise supplement : TeNS : a technical supplement to the Traffic Noise Analysis Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this Technical Noise Supplement (TeNS) is to provide technical background : information on transportation-related noise in general and highway traffic noise in : particular. It is designed to elaborate on technical concepts and procedu...

  10. Investigation of Diesel’s Residual Noise on Predictive Vehicles Noise Cancelling using LMS Adaptive Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arttini Dwi Prasetyowati, Sri; Susanto, Adhi; Widihastuti, Ida

    2017-04-01

    Every noise problems require different solution. In this research, the noise that must be cancelled comes from roadway. Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive is one of the algorithm that can be used to cancel that noise. Residual noise always appears and could not be erased completely. This research aims to know the characteristic of residual noise from vehicle’s noise and analysis so that it is no longer appearing as a problem. LMS algorithm was used to predict the vehicle’s noise and minimize the error. The distribution of the residual noise could be observed to determine the specificity of the residual noise. The statistic of the residual noise close to normal distribution with = 0,0435, = 1,13 and the autocorrelation of the residual noise forming impulse. As a conclusion the residual noise is insignificant.

  11. Adaptive Noise Suppression Using Digital Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozel, David; Nelson, Richard

    1996-01-01

    A signal to noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction algorithm is developed to eliminate noise from noise corrupted speech signals. The algorithm determines the signal to noise ratio and adjusts the spectral subtraction proportion appropriately. After spectra subtraction low amplitude signals are squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both eh noise corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoice frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Applications include the emergency egress vehicle and the crawler transporter.

  12. Noise in time-discrete analog filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroemer, B.; Mueller, R.; Stegherr, M.; Klar, H.; Ulbrich, W.

    The most important noise sources in time-discrete analog filters which can be monolithically integrated as CCD and switched-capacitor structures are described. In CCD filters, these sources are thermal kTC noise of the input and output levels and unloading processes at the surface attraction sites. Attainable signal-to-noise ratios and optimization possibilities are stated. For SC filters, the most important noise sources are kTC noise and l/f noise. On-chip clock jitter noise can be suppressed by differential processing. The present measurements on integrated MOS switching transistors with small areas confirm the thermal kTC noise limit and show that there is no additional l/f contribution to the noise from the switches. For the integrator, good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment when an operational amplifier with finite unity-gain frequency is included.

  13. Noise mapping inside a car cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kim; Sjøj, Sidsel Marie Nørholm; Jacobsen, Finn

    The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay-and-sum beamform......The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay......-and-sum beamforming and spherical harmonics beamforming. These methods have a poor spatial esolution at low frequencies, and since much noise generated in cars is dominated by low frequencies the methods are not optimal. In the present paper the mapping is done by solving an inverse problem with a transfer matrix...

  14. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  15. Aircraft and background noise annoyance effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate annoyance of multiple noise sources, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment, which used 48 subjects, was designed to establish annoyance-noise level functions for three community noise sources presented individually: jet aircraft flyovers, air conditioner, and traffic. The second experiment, which used 216 subjects, investigated the effects of background noise on aircraft annoyance as a function of noise level and spectrum shape; and the differences between overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance. In both experiments, rated annoyance was the dependent measure. Results indicate that the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for traffic is significantly different from that of flyover and air conditioner noise and that further research was justified to determine the influence of the two background noises on overall, aircraft, and background noise annoyance (e.g., experiment two). In experiment two, total noise exposure, signal-to-noise ratio, and background source type were found to have effects on all three types of annoyance. Thus, both signal-to-noise ratio, and the background source must be considered when trying to determine community response to combined noise sources.

  16. Noise, anti-noise and fluid flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J E Ffowcs

    2002-05-15

    This paper celebrates Thomas Young's discovery that wave interference was responsible for much that is known about light and colour. A substantial programme of work has been aimed at controlling the noise of aerodynamic flows. Much of that field can be explained in terms of interference and it is argued in this paper that the theoretical techniques for analysing noise can also be seen to rest on interference effects. Interference can change the character of wave fields to produce, out of well-ordered fields, wave systems quite different from the interfering wave elements. Lighthill's acoustic analogy is described as an example of this effect, an example in which the exact model of turbulence-generated noise is seen to consist of elementary interfering sound waves; waves that are sometimes heard in advance of their sources. The paper goes on to describe an emerging field of technology where sound is suppressed by superimposing on it a destructively interfering secondary sound; one designed and manufactured specifically for interference. That sound is known as anti-sound, or anti-noise when the sound is chaotic enough. Examples are then referred to where the noisy effect to be controlled is actually a disturbance of a linearly unstable system; a disturbance that is destroyed by destructive interference with a deliberately constructed antidote. The practical benefits of this kind of instability control are much greater and can even change the whole character of flows. It is argued that completely unnatural unstable conditions can be held with active controllers generating destructively interfering elements. Examples are given in which gravitational instability of stratified fluids can be prevented. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of shear flows can also be avoided by simple controls. Those are speculative examples of what might be possible in future developments of an interference effect, which has made anti-noise a useful technology.

  17. Towards a practical Johnson noise thermometer for long-term measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenen, Adam; Pearce, Jonathan [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW, (United Kingdom); Cruickshank, David; Bramley, Paul [Metrosol Limited, Plum Park Estate, Watling Street, Paulerspury, Northamptonshire, NN12 6LQ, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The impact of mechanical and chemical changes in conventional sensors such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers can be avoided by instead using temperature sensors based on fundamental thermometry. A prime example of this is Johnson noise thermometry, which is based on measurement of the fluctuations in the voltage of a resistor arising from thermal motion of charge carriers - i.e. the 'Johnson noise'. A Johnson noise thermometer never needs calibration and is insensitive to the condition of the sensor material. It is therefore ideally suited to long-term temperature measurements in harsh environments, such as nuclear reactor coolant circuits, in-pile measurements, nuclear waste management and storage, and severe accident monitoring. There have been a number of previous attempts to develop a Johnson noise thermometer for the nuclear industry, but none have reached commercial exploitation because of technical problems in practical implementation. The main challenge is to extract the tiny Johnson noise signal from ambient electrical noise influences, both from the internal amplification electronics, and from external electrical noise sources. Recent advances in electronics technology and digital signal processing techniques have opened up new possibilities for developing a viable, practical Johnson noise thermometer. We describe a project funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (now Innovate UK) 'Developing the nuclear supply chain' call, currently underway, to develop a practical Johnson noise thermometer that makes use of innovative electronics for ultralow noise amplification and signal processing. The new electronics technology has the potential to help overcome the problems encountered with previous attempts at constructing a practical Johnson noise thermometer. An outline of the new developments is presented, together with an overview of the current status of the project. (authors)

  18. Noise characteristics of stacked CMOS active pixel sensor for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunihiro, Takuya E-mail: kunihiro@geo.titech.ac.jp; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Takayanagi, Isao; Nakamura, Junichi; Kosaka, Koji; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2001-09-11

    The noise characteristics of a stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) for incident charged particles have been analyzed under 4.5 keV Si{sup +} ion irradiation. The source of SCAPS dark current was found to change from thermal to electron leakage with decreasing device temperature. Leakage current at charge integration part in a pixel has been reduced to 0.1 electrons s{sup -1} at 77 K. The incident ion signals are computed by subtracting reset frame values from each frame using a non-destructive readout operation. With increase of irradiated ions, the dominant noise source changed from read noise, and shot noise from the incident ions, to signal frame fixed-pattern noise from variations in sensitivity between pixels. Pixel read noise is equivalent to ten incident ions. The charge of an incident ion is converted to 1.5 electrons in the pixel capacitor. Shot noise corresponds to the statistical fluctuation of incident ions. Signal frame fixed-pattern noise is 0.7% of the signal. By comparing full well conditions to noise floor, a dynamic range of 80 dB is achieved. SCPAS is useful as a two-dimensional detector for microanalyses such as stigmatic secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  19. The Effects of Ambient Conditions on Helicopter Harmonic Noise Radiation: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of ambient atmospheric conditions, air temperature and density, on rotor harmonic noise radiation are characterized using theoretical models and experimental measurements of helicopter noise collected at three different test sites at elevations ranging from sea level to 7000 ft above sea level. Significant changes in the thickness, loading, and blade-vortex interaction noise levels and radiation directions are observed across the different test sites for an AS350 helicopter flying at the same indicated airspeed and gross weight. However, the radiated noise is shown to scale with ambient pressure when the flight condition of the helicopter is defined in nondimensional terms. Although the effective tip Mach number is identified as the primary governing parameter for thickness noise, the nondimensional weight coefficient also impacts lower harmonic loading noise levels, which contribute strongly to low frequency harmonic noise radiation both in and out of the plane of the horizon. Strategies for maintaining the same nondimensional rotor operating condition under different ambient conditions are developed using an analytical model of single main rotor helicopter trim and confirmed using a CAMRAD II model of the AS350 helicopter. The ability of the Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustics Modeling from Experiments (FRAME) technique to generalize noise measurements made under one set of ambient conditions to make accurate noise predictions under other ambient conditions is also validated.

  20. Speech perception of noise with binary gains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, DeLiang; Kjems, Ulrik; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    2008-01-01

    For a given mixture of speech and noise, an ideal binary time-frequency mask is constructed by comparing speech energy and noise energy within local time-frequency units. It is observed that listeners achieve nearly perfect speech recognition from gated noise with binary gains prescribed by the i......For a given mixture of speech and noise, an ideal binary time-frequency mask is constructed by comparing speech energy and noise energy within local time-frequency units. It is observed that listeners achieve nearly perfect speech recognition from gated noise with binary gains prescribed...

  1. Air-moving device noise: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maling, George C., Jr.

    This paper presents a review of published information on the noise emission of small blowers and fans. The design is given for a noise meter for air-movement devices. The summary of research on noise sources and noise reduction includes information on axial-flow fans and centrifugal blowers. Sound reduction methods discussed include the introduction of obstructions and dampening plates and grilles. References are given for information on environmetal effects of fan noise. Design criteria and scaling laws are presented for minimal noise production. The paper identifies issues where further research is needed.

  2. Several rotor noise sources and treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangler, J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Noise has been a design consideration in the development of advanced blades and turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. During atmospheric testing associated with these efforts various types of aeroacoustic noise have been encountered. This presentation discusses several of these noise sources and treatments used to mitigate or eliminate the noise. Tonal noise resulting from tip-vortex/trailing-edge interaction and laminar separation bubbles was found to be easily eliminated. Impulsive noise resulting from blade/vortex interaction for rotors that furl and that due to tower shadow can be mitigated by various means. (au)

  3. Kurtosis corrected sound pressure level as a noise metric for risk assessment of occupational noises

    OpenAIRE

    Goley, G. Steven; Song, Won Joon; Kim, Jay H.

    2011-01-01

    Current noise guidelines use an energy-based noise metric to predict the risk of hearing loss, and thus ignore the effect of temporal characteristics of the noise. The practice is widely considered to underestimate the risk of a complex noise environment, where impulsive noises are embedded in a steady-state noise. A basic form for noise metrics is designed by combining the equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) and a temporal correction term defined as a function of kurtosis of the noise. Sev...

  4. A Low Noise Electronic Circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Anne J.; Leenaerts, Dominicus M.W.; de Vreede, Petrus W.H.

    2002-01-01

    An electronic circuit, which can be used as a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA), comprises two complementary Field Effect Transistors (M1, M2; M5, M6), each having a gate, a source and a drain. The gates are connected together as a common input terminal, and the drains are connected together as a

  5. Low noise ICR detection electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.A.; Bruce, J.E.; Hofstadler, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    FTICR signal detection offers many challenges; both wide bandwidth and low noise performance are required. Since, the input impedance of the amplifier is a very critical parameter, optimal performance of the preamplifier involves a careful balance of input impedance and noise performance through circuit design and component selection. The FTICR cell and its connections to the preamplifier are another critical parameter in FTICR detection sensitivity. This work has investigated signal detection electronics for improved FTICR detection sensitivity. Amplifier noise sources are identified and their effect on detection sensitivity are evaluated. A high sensitivity, low noise preamplifier, developed in this laboratory, is presented and its performance is evaluated and contrasted with different preamplifier configurations. The detection circuit is analyzed and the effect of cell and wiring capacitance is discussed. The circuit sensitivity is calculated and compared with measured results. Component selection criteria are discussed and the present state-of-the-art components are evaluated. The effect of preamplifier cooling is also investigated and the results are presented. Different detection frequency ranges result in different circuit optimization; these effects are analyzed and optimal component values and circuit configurations are shown for different frequency ranges.

  6. RADIO NOISE ADVANCES SEXUAL MATURITY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ansistf-lewis

    Supplementary radio noise advances sexual maturity in domestic pullets exposed to 7-h photoperiods. P.D. Lewis. #. , B.A. Middleton. 1 and R.M. Gous. Animal and Poultry Science, School of Agricultural Sciences and Agribusiness, University of KwaZulu-Natal,. Scottsville 3209, South Africa. 1 School of Biomedical and ...

  7. Sound localization and occupational noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro de Lemos Menezes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of occupational noise on sound localization in different spatial planes and frequencies among normal hearing firefighters. METHOD: A total of 29 adults with pure-tone hearing thresholds below 25 dB took part in the study. The participants were divided into a group of 19 firefighters exposed to occupational noise and a control group of 10 adults who were not exposed to such noise. All subjects were assigned a sound localization task involving 117 stimuli from 13 sound sources that were spatially distributed in horizontal, vertical, midsagittal and transverse planes. The three stimuli, which were square waves with fundamental frequencies of 500, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, were presented at a sound level of 70 dB and were randomly repeated three times from each sound source. The angle between the speaker's axis in the same plane was 45°, and the distance to the subject was 1 m. RESULT: The results demonstrate that the sound localization ability of the firefighters was significantly lower (p<0.01 than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: Exposure to occupational noise, even when not resulting in hearing loss, may lead to a diminished ability to locate a sound source.

  8. Noise Exposure Model (MOD 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-08-01

    The purpose of this report is threefold: : 1. To record the results of efforts at the Transportaiton Systems Center to refine and expand the Noise Exposure Model, which have specifically resulted in the MOD 4 ver described herein; : 2. To serve as an...

  9. Noise Exposures of Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humann, Michael; Sanderson, Wayne; Flamme, Greg; Kelly, Kevin M.; Moore, Genna; Stromquist, Ann; Merchant, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This project was conducted to characterize the noise exposure of adolescents living in rural and agricultural environments. Methods: From May to October, 25 adolescents ages 13 through 17, living either on a farm or a rural nonfarm, were enrolled in the study. Subjects received training on the correct operation and use of personal noise…

  10. Ground Attenuation of Railroad Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makarewicz, R.; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Kokowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of ground effect on railroad noise is described using the concept of the peak A-weighted sound exposure level, and A-weighted sound exposure level. The train is modelled by a continuous line of incoherent point sources that have a cosine directivity. The ground effect is included...

  11. Reykjanes ambient noise reflection interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdel, Arie; Wedemeijer, Harry; Paap, B; Vandeweijer, Vincent; Weemstra, C.; Jousset, Philippe; Franke, Steven; Blanck, Hanna; Águstsson, K.; Hersir, Gylfi Páll

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the application of ambient noise seismic interferometry (ANSI) to data that were recorded continuously in 2014 and 2015 at Iceland’s peninsula Reykjanes. The objective of this study is the retrieval of reflected body waves (P-waves) that provide high-resolution

  12. Introduction: Unsolved Problems on Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriols, X.; Ciliberto, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper is an introduction to the special issue of the 7th Int. Conf. on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) that took place at Casa Convalescència in Barcelona (Spain) in July 2015. The aim of the UPoN conferences is to provide a forum for researchers working on different fields of noise, fluctuations and variability, where they present their scientific problems which resist solutions. The papers of this Special Issue reflect the interdisciplinary topics (physics, biology, circuits, financial markets, psychology, technology, etc) presented at the UPoN conference. Noise is not only a hindrance to signal detection, but it is indeed a valuable source of information (not present in the signal) that help us to get a deeper understanding on how Nature works. This special issue of the 7th International Conference on Unsolved Problems on Noise (UPoN) is dedicated to Laszlo Kish in the occasion of his 60th birthday. He organized the first edition of these UPoN conferences in Szeged (Hungary) in 1996. Many of us have greatly benefited from his ‘volcanic imagination in tackling new problems from unconventional points of views’.

  13. Noise reduction by wavelet thresholding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansen, Maarten

    2001-01-01

    .... I rather present new material and own insights in the que stions involved with wavelet based noise reduction . On the other hand , the presented material does cover a whole range of methodologies, and in that sense, the book may serve as an introduction into the domain of wavelet smoothing. Throughout the text, three main properties show up ever again: spar...

  14. Cryogenic MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, S.; Gaier, T.; Fernandez, J.; Erickson, N.; Wielgus, J.

    2000-01-01

    Monolithic (MMIC) and discrete transistor (MIC) low noise amplifiers are compared on the basis of performance, cost, and reliability. The need for cryogenic LNA's for future large microwave arrays for radio astronomy is briefly discussed and data is presented on a prototype LNA for the 1 to 10 GZH range along with a very wideband LNA for the 1 to 60 GHz range.

  15. Using noise to shape motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Elias B; Kording, Konrad P; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2017-02-01

    Each of our movements is selected from any number of alternative movements. Some studies have shown evidence that the central nervous system (CNS) chooses to make the specific movements that are least affected by motor noise. Previous results showing that the CNS has a natural tendency to minimize the effects of noise make the direct prediction that if the relationship between movements and noise were to change, the specific movements people learn to make would also change in a predictable manner. Indeed, this has been shown for well-practiced movements such as reaching. Here, we artificially manipulated the relationship between movements and visuomotor noise by adding noise to a motor task in a novel redundant geometry such that there arose a single control policy that minimized the noise. This allowed us to see whether, for a novel motor task, people could learn the specific control policy that minimized noise or would need to employ other compensation strategies to overcome the added noise. As predicted, subjects were able to learn movements that were biased toward the specific ones that minimized the noise, suggesting not only that the CNS can learn to minimize the effects of noise in a novel motor task but also that artificial visuomotor noise can be a useful tool for teaching people to make specific movements. Using noise as a teaching signal promises to be useful for rehabilitative therapies and movement training with human-machine interfaces. Many theories argue that we choose to make the specific movements that minimize motor noise. Here, by changing the relationship between movements and noise, we show that people actively learn to make movements that minimize noise. This not only provides direct evidence for the theories of noise minimization but presents a way to use noise to teach specific movements to improve rehabilitative therapies and human-machine interface control. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. High-frequency filtering for low-temperature thermal transport studies in nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Torgovkin, Andrii

    2012-01-01

    Filtering of external unwanted RF-noise and thermal noise generated at the high-temperature parts of the measuring circuit is essential for successful measurements of thermal transport of nanostructures at low temperatures. This is because of thermal decoupling of the systems, i.e. the extreme weakness of thermal conduction at sub-Kelvin temperatures, leading easily to overheating even with excess power in sub pW range. We have started to improve the noise filtering in our cryogenic diluti...

  17. Mapping Urban Environmental Noise Using Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Zuo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Noise mapping is an effective method of visualizing and accessing noise pollution. In this paper, a noise-mapping method based on smartphones to effectively and easily measure environmental noise is proposed. By using this method, a noise map of an entire area can be created using limited measurement data. To achieve the measurement with certain precision, a set of methods was designed to calibrate the smartphones. Measuring noise with mobile phones is different from the traditional static observations. The users may be moving at any time. Therefore, a method of attaching an additional microphone with a windscreen is proposed to reduce the wind effect. However, covering an entire area is impossible. Therefore, an interpolation method is needed to achieve full coverage of the area. To reduce the influence of spatial heterogeneity and improve the precision of noise mapping, a region-based noise-mapping method is proposed in this paper, which is based on the distribution of noise in different region types tagged by volunteers, to interpolate and combine them to create a noise map. To validate the effect of the method, a comparison of the interpolation results was made to analyse our method and the ordinary Kriging method. The result shows that our method is more accurate in reflecting the local distribution of noise and has better interpolation precision. We believe that the proposed noise-mapping method is a feasible and low-cost noise-mapping solution.

  18. [Health effects of environmental noise exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röösli, Martin

    2013-12-01

    In the EU 27 countries about 100 million persons are exposed to road traffic noise above 55 dB (LDEN) according to the European Environment Agency. Exposure to railway noise affects 16 million individuals, aircraft noise 4 million and industry noise 1 million persons. Although the proportion of people reporting to be annoyed by noise exposure is substantial, health effects of noise is rarely an issue in general practitioners' consultations. According to stress models chronic noise exposure results in an increased allostatic load by direct physiological responses as well as psychological stress responses including sleep disturbances. In relation to acute and chronic noise exposure an increase of blood pressure was observed in epidemiological studies. An association between ischemic heart diseases and noise exposure was observed in various studies. However, the data is less consistent for other cardiovascular diseases and for cognitive effects in children. The association between metabolic syndrome and noise has rarely been investigated so far. Recently an association between road traffic noise and diabetes was observed in a Danish cohort study. Given the plausibility for a noise effect, general practitioners should consider noise exposure in patients with increased cardiometabolic risk.

  19. Noise and health in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfeld, S; Haines, M; Brown, B

    2000-01-01

    Noise, including noise from transport, industry, and neighbors, is a prominent feature of the urban environment. This paper reviews the effects of environmental noise on the non-auditory aspects of health in urban settings. Exposure to transport noise disturbs sleep in the laboratory, but generally not in field studies, where adaptation occurs. Noise interferes with complex task performance, modifies social behavior, and causes annoyance. Studies of occupational noise exposure suggest an association with hypertension, whereas community studies show only weak relations between noise and cardiovascular disease. Aircraft and road-traffic noise exposure are associated with psychological symptoms and with the use of psychotropic medication, but not with the onset of clinically defined psychiatric disorders. In carefully controlled studies, noise exposure does not seem to be related to low birth weight or to congenital birth defects. In both industrial studies and community studies, noise exposure is related to increased catecholamine secretion. In children, chronic aircraft noise exposure impairs reading comprehension and long-term memory and may be associated with increased blood pressure. Noise from neighbors causes annoyance and sleep and activity interference health effects have been little studied. Further research is needed for examining coping strategies and the possible health consequences of adaptation to noise.

  20. Dental drill noise reduction using a combination of active noise control, passive noise control and adaptive filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Kaymak, E; Atherton, MA; Rotter, K; Millar, B

    2007-01-01

    Dental drills produce a characteristic high frequency, narrow band noise that is uncomfortable for patients and is also known to be harmful to dentists under prolonged exposure. It is therefore desirable to protect the patient and dentist whilst allowing two-way communication. A solution is to use a combination of the three main noise control methods, namely, Passive Noise Control (PNC), Adaptive Filtering (AF) and Active Noise Control (ANC). This paper discusses the application of the three ...

  1. Noise characterization of oil and gas operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Cameron; Autenrieth, Daniel A; Lipsey, Tiffany; Brazile, William J

    2017-08-01

    In cooperation with The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, researchers at Colorado State University performed area noise monitoring at 23 oil and gas sites throughout Northern Colorado. The goals of this study were to: (1) measure and compare the noise levels for the different phases of oil and gas development sites; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of noise barriers; and (3) determine if noise levels exceeded the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission noise limits. The four phases of oil and gas development include drilling, hydraulic fracturing, completion and production. Noise measurements were collected using the A- and C-weighted sound scales. Octave band analysis was also performed to characterize the frequency spectra of the noise measurements.  Noise measurements were collected using noise dosimeters and a hand-held sound-level meter at specified distances from the development sites in each cardinal direction. At 350 ft (107 m), drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion sites without noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise levels for residential and commercial zones (55 dBA and 60 dBA, respectively). In addition, drilling and hydraulic fracturing sites with noise barriers exceeded the maximum permissible noise level for residential zones (55 dBA). However, during drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and completion operations, oil producers are allowed an exception to the noise permissible limits in that they only must comply with the industrial noise limit (80 dBA). It is stated in Rule 604.c.(2)A. that: "Operations involving pipeline or gas facility installation or maintenance, the use of a drilling rig, completion rig, workover rig, or stimulation is subject to the maximum permissible noise levels for industrial zones (80dBA)." [8] Production sites were within the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission permissible noise level criteria for all zones. At 350 ft (107 m) from the noise source, all drilling

  2. Non-Gaussian resistance noise in misfit layer compounds: Bi-Se-Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lintao; Freedman, Alex; Clarke, Samantha; Freedman, Danna; Grayson, M.

    Misfit layer ternary compounds Bi-Se-Cr have been synthesized and structurally and magnetically characterized. However, the nature of the magnetic ordering below the transition temperature remains debatable between ferromagnetic and spin-glass. These misfit layer compounds consist of two alternating chalcogenide layers of CrSe2 and BiSe along the c-axis. Whereas the a-axis is lattice matched, the lattice mismatch along the b-axis introduces non-periodic modulation of atomic position leading to quasi-crystalline order along the b-axis alone. We explore unconventional electrical transport properties in the noise spectrum of these compounds. After thinning down the compounds to nanoscale, Van der Pauw devices are fabricated with standard electron beam lithography process. Large resistance noise was observed at temperature below the Cure temperature. The magnitude of resistance noise is much greater than trivial intrinsic noises like thermal Johnson noise and increases as temperature decreases. The probability density function of the relative noise shows 2-4 peaks among different observations which indicate strong non-Gaussian statistic property suggesting glassy behaviors in this material.

  3. A matrix formulation for noise transduction as a general case of noise measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallgren, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noise characteristics of an active device or circuit are given by the minimum noise figure, the optimum source reflection coefficient, and a noise resistance. The noise measure proposed extends the noise figure to include the available gain of the network, for the case of a conjugate...... output match, and gives values that minimize the noise power available from the network consistent with maximum available gain. Noise transduction follows as a general case of the noise measure by using the transducer gain with any output load. A new noise equation is derived that is solved...... for the minimum transduced noise, the optimum source impedance, and the optimum load impedance. These equations minimize the noise power delivered to the load impedance consistent with a maximum in the transducer gain...

  4. A community survey of helicopter noise annoyance conducted under controlled noise exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, J. M.; Powell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Reactions to low numbers of helicopter noise events (less than 50 per day) were studied in a community setting. Community residents were repeatedly interviewed about daily noise annoyance reactions on days when helicopter noise exposures were, without the residents' knowledge, controlled. The effects of maximum noise level and number of noise events on helicopter noise annoyance are consistent with the principles contained in LEQ-based noise indices. The effect of the duration of noise events is also consistent with LEQ-based indices. After removing the effect of differences in noise levels (LEQ) there is not an important difference between reactions to impulsive and nonimpulsive types of helicopters. EPNL, where corrected for number of overflights, and LEQ are approximately equally successful in representing the characteristics of noise which are related to human response. The new type of design provided estimates of the parameters in a noise reaction model which would not obtained with a similar degree of precision from conventional study designs.

  5. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps within the framework of the Environmental Noise Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the need for noise measures as well as the improvement that can be obtained with different measures, there is a need for a system that rates environmental noise on the basis of noise maps. Based on empirical exposure-response relationships, a rating system and a stepwise

  6. EFFECT OF THE SUN UPON ANTENNA TEMPERATURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    temperature distributions over the sun at several frequencies are presented. The method by which antenna temperature is evaluated, using the Philco...calculate the variation of carrier-to-noise ratio as an antenna scans toward the sun while receiving signals from a deep-space probe and from a random-orbit satellite.

  7. The associations between noise sensitivity, reported physical and mental health, perceived environmental quality, and noise annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenberg, Dirk; Griefahn, Barbara; Meis, Markus

    2010-01-01

    One hundred and ninety residents around Frankfurt Airport (46% female; 17-80 years) were interviewed concerning noise annoyance due to transportation noise (aircraft, road traffic), perceived mental and physical health, perceived environmental quality, and noise sensitivity. The aim of the analyses was to test whether noise sensitivity reflects partly general environmental sensitivity and is associated with an elevated susceptibility for the perception of mental and physical health. In this study, the reported physical and mental health variables were not associated with noise exposure but with noise annoyance, and were interpreted to reflect nonspecific codeterminants of annoyance rather than noise effects. Noise sensitivity was found to influence total noise annoyance and aircraft noise annoyance but to a lesser degree annoyance due to road traffic noise. Noise sensitivity was associated with reported physical health, but not with reported mental health. Noise-sensitive persons reported poorer environmental quality in their residential area than less sensitive persons in particular with regard to air traffic (including the facets noise, pollution, and contaminations) and quietness. Other aspects of the perceived quality of the environment were scarcely associated with noise sensitivity. This indicates that noise sensitivity is more specific and a reliable predictor of responses to noise from the dominant source (in this case air traffic) rather than a predictor of the individual perception of the environmental quality in general.

  8. The associations between noise sensitivity, reported physical and mental health, perceived environmental quality, and noise annoyance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Schreckenberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and ninety residents around Frankfurt Airport (46% female; 17-80 years were interviewed concerning noise annoyance due to transportation noise (aircraft, road traffic, perceived mental and physical health, perceived environmental quality, and noise sensitivity. The aim of the analyses was to test whether noise sensitivity reflects partly general environmental sensitivity and is associated with an elevated susceptibility for the perception of mental and physical health. In this study, the reported physical and mental health variables were not associated with noise exposure but with noise annoyance, and were interpreted to reflect nonspecific codeterminants of annoyance rather than noise effects. Noise sensitivity was found to influence total noise annoyance and aircraft noise annoyance but to a lesser degree annoyance due to road traffic noise. Noise sensitivity was associated with reported physical health, but not with reported mental health. Noise-sensitive persons reported poorer environmental quality in their residential area than less sensitive persons in particular with regard to air traffic (including the facets noise, pollution, and contaminations and quietness. Other aspects of the perceived quality of the environment were scarcely associated with noise sensitivity. This indicates that noise sensitivity is more specific and a reliable predictor of responses to noise from the dominant source (in this case air traffic rather than a predictor of the individual perception of the environmental quality in general.

  9. Thermal noise reduction and absorption optimization via multimaterial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Hough, Jim; Krüger, Christoph; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) such as Advanced LIGO upgrades and the Einstein Telescope are planned to operate at cryogenic temperatures using crystalline silicon (cSi) test-mass mirrors at an operation wavelength of 1550 nm. The reduction in temperature in principle provides a direct reduction in coating thermal noise, but the presently used coating stacks which are composed of silica (SiO2) and tantala (Ta2O5) show cryogenic loss peaks which results in less thermal noise improvement than might be expected. Due to low mechanical loss at low temperature amorphous silicon (aSi) is a very promising candidate material for dielectric mirror coatings and could replace Ta2O5. Unfortunately, such an aSi /SiO2 coating is not suitable for use in GWDs due to high optical absorption in aSi coatings. We explore the use of a three material based coating stack. In this multimaterial design the low absorbing Ta2O5 in the outermost coating layers significantly reduces the incident light power, while aSi is used only in the lower bilayers to maintain low optical absorption. Such a coating design would enable a reduction of Brownian thermal noise by 25%. We show experimentally that an optical absorption of only (5.3 ±0.4 ) ppm at 1550 nm should be achievable.

  10. Noise-based approximation to thermal spin-injection in Fe/GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Haigh, J. A.; Olejník, K.; Irvine, A. C.; Novák, V.; Wunderlich, J.

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the prospects for thermal spin-injection from iron into gallium arsenide via the application of electrical noise. By estimating the applied effective temperature-equivalent gradients, we characterize the magnitude of any electrical part of the thermal spin-injection efficiency or the spin-dependent Seebeck effect. The magnitude of the non-local spin signal associated with this effect suggests that temperature differences on the order of ˜100 K would be needed for true thermal spin-injection experiments. The large size of the effective temperature gradients induced by the noise-based method means that even very small thermo-electric effects can be quantified.

  11. The High Price of Noise Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Hearing Disorders The High Price of Noise Exposure Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... the less time it takes to cause harm. Exposure to loud noise also can cause tinnitus, a continuous ringing, roaring, ...

  12. Identification and Reduction of Turbomachinery Noise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communities near airports are often exposed to high noise levels due to low flying aircraft in the takeoff and landing phases of flight. Propulsion source noise is...

  13. Construction Noise Decreases Reproductive Efficiency in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Skye; Glickman, Gary; Norinsky, Rada; Quimby, Fred W; Tolwani, Ravi J

    2009-01-01

    Excessive noise is well known to impair rodent health. To better understand the effect of construction noise and to establish effective noise limits during a planned expansion of our vivarium, we analyzed the effects of construction noise on mouse gestation and neonatal growth. Our hypothesis was that high levels of construction noise would reduce the number of live births and retard neonatal growth. Female Swiss Webster mice were individually implanted with 15 B6CBAF1/J embryos and then exposed to 70- and 90-dBA concrete saw cutting noise samples at defined time points during gestation. In addition, groups of mice with litters were exposed to noise at 70, 80, or 90 dBA for 1 h daily during the first week after parturition. Litter size, birth weight, incidence of stillborn pups, and rate of neonatal weight gain were analyzed. Noise decreased reproductive efficiency by decreasing live birth rates and increasing the number of stillborn pups. PMID:19653943

  14. Low noise SQUID based NDE with non-magnetic scanning system in unshielded environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatami, Y; Alavi, M; Sarreshtedari, F; Fardmanesh, M [Electrical Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vesaghi, M [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Banzet, M; Schubert, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)], E-mail: fardmanesh@sharif.edu

    2008-02-01

    A Non-magnetic scanning Robotic system with special EMC considerations has been designed for SQUID-Based NDE of room temperature stationary samples in unshielded environment. Considerable efforts have been made to cancel out noise of the system which resulted in detection of two major noise sources. Characterizing the noise contribution of the involved parts, a minor noise component was found to be due to the robot and the other due to liquid nitrogen bubbling in some frequencies which could be avoided by choosing proper excitation frequency. Using our NDE system we performed a NDE scan of hidden cracks in aluminum plates with white noise level of 50 {mu}{phi}{sub 0}/Hz{sup -1/2}.

  15. Simplified phase noise model for negative-resistance oscillators and a comparison with feedback oscillator models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Jeremy; Xu, Min; Bale, Simon

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a greatly simplified model for the prediction of phase noise in oscillators which use a negative resistance as the active element. It is based on a simple circuit consisting of the parallel addition of a noise current, a negative admittance/resistance, and a parallel (Qlimited) resonant circuit. The transfer function is calculated as a forward trans-resistance (VOUT/IIN) and then converted to power. The effect of limiting is incorporated by assuming that the phase noise element of the noise floor is kT/2, i.e., -177 dBm/Hz at room temperature. The result is the same as more complex analyses, but enables a simple, clear insight into the operation of oscillators. The phase noise for a given power in the resonator appears to be lower than in feedback oscillators. The reasons for this are explained. Simulation and experimental results are included.

  16. Low Noise Amplifiers for 140 Ghz Wide-Band Cryogenic Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkoski, Patricia V.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Samoska, Lorene; Lai, Richard; Sarkozy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We report S-parameter and noise measurements for three different Indium Phosphide 35-nanometer-gate-length High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) designs operating in the frequency range centered on 140 gigahertz. When packaged in a Waveguide Rectangular-6.1 waveguide housing, the LNAs have an average measured noise figure of 3.0 decibels - 3.6 decibels over the 122-170 gigahertz band. One LNA was cooled to 20 degrees Kelvin and a record low noise temperature of 46 Kelvin, or 0.64 decibels noise figure, was measured at 152 gigahertz. These amplifiers can be used to develop receivers for instruments that operate in the 130-170 gigahertz atmospheric window, which is an important frequency band for ground-based astronomy and millimeter-wave imaging applications.

  17. Compensation of a Primary Transducer Resistance Alteration by Changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics of a Noise-Thermometer Input Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan STADNYK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Method of compensation for the influence of a primary transducer resistance temperature alteration upon the determination of a noise-voltage square mean value, proportional to the measured temperature, by changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics (AFCh of a noise-thermometer input circle.

  18. Underwater radiated noise from modern commercial ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan F; Ross, Donald; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Underwater radiated noise measurements for seven types of modern commercial ships during normal operating conditions are presented. Calibrated acoustic data (Stern aspect noise levels are 5 to 10 dB higher than bow aspect noise levels. Collectively, these results emphasize the importance of including modern ship-types in quantifying shipping noise for predictive models of global, regional, and local marine environments. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  19. Optimal Gaussian Filter for Effective Noise Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopparapu, Sunil; Satish, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show that the knowledge of noise statistics contaminating a signal can be effectively used to choose an optimal Gaussian filter to eliminate noise. Very specifically, we show that the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) contaminating a signal can be filtered best by using a Gaussian filter of specific characteristics. The design of the Gaussian filter bears relationship with the noise statistics and also some basic information about the signal. We first derive a relationship...

  20. The social side of noise annoyance

    OpenAIRE

    Maris, Eveline

    2008-01-01

    Unfairness increases noise annoyance Noise annoyance increases due to unfair sound management. Fair sound management reduces annoyance, however only when the sound pressure level is high, concludes Eveline Maris based on two laboratory experiments. Being exposed to man-made sound is more than mere exposure: it is a social experience, too: You expose Me. This social hypothesis of noise annoyance has been confirmed in two laboratory experiments. Participants were exposed to aircraft noise (soun...

  1. Phase Noise in RF and Microwave Amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in numerous fields of engineering and physics, like oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunications, radars, spectroscopy, in the emerging domain of microwave photonics, and in more exotic domains like radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. This article analyzes the two main types of phase noise in amplifiers, white and flicker. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum around the carrier. For a ...

  2. Investigation and optimization of low-frequency noise performance in readout electronics of dc superconducting quantum interference device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Yong-Ho; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    We investigated and optimized the low-frequency noise characteristics of a preamplifier used for readout of direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). When the SQUID output was detected directly using a room-temperature low-voltage-noise preamplifier, the low-frequency noise of a SQUID system was found to be dominated by the input current noise of the preamplifiers in case of a large dynamic resistance of the SQUID. To reduce the current noise of the preamplifier in the low-frequency range, we investigated the dependence of total preamplifier noise on the collector current and source resistance. When the collector current was decreased from 8.4 mA to 3 mA in the preamplifier made of 3 parallel SSM2220 transistor pairs, the low-frequency total voltage noise of the preamplifier (at 0.1 Hz) decreased by about 3 times for a source resistance of 30 Ω whereas the white noise level remained nearly unchanged. Since the relative contribution of preamplifier's input voltage and current noise is different depending on the dynamic resistance or flux-to-voltage transfer of the SQUID, the results showed that the total noise of a SQUID system at low-frequency range can be improved significantly by optimizing the preamplifier circuit parameters, mainly the collector current in case of low-noise bipolar transistor pairs.

  3. Quantum noise correlations and amplifiers in mesoscopic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work deals with a range of superconducting devices operated near the fundamental performance limits set by quantum mechanics along with the nature of quantum vacuum itself when perturbed by such devices. These devices are operated in a dilution refrigerator cooled down to sub-Kelvin temperatures. Low temperature is absolutely essential for quantum behavior of these devices and the minimal inherent noise contribution. Biased, selectively damped superconducting tunnel junction, (als...

  4. Clustering of noise-induced oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Fomin, A I; Postnov, D E

    2001-01-01

    The subject of our study is clustering in a population of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise and with randomly distributed coupling strength. The cluster state is frequency-locked state in which all functional units run at the same noise-induced frequency. Cooperative dynamics...... of this regime is described in terms of effective synchronization and noise-induced coherence....

  5. Noise Analysis of Switched-Current Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur

    1998-01-01

    The understanding of noise in analog sampled data systems is vital for the design of high resolution circuitry. In this paper a general description of sampled and held noise is presented. The noise calculations are verified by measurements on an analog delay line implemented using switched...

  6. Sampled Noise in Switched Current Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Herald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur

    1997-01-01

    The understanding of noise in analog sampled data systems is vital for the design of high resolution circuitry. In this paper a general description of sampled and held noise is presented. The noise calculations are verified by measurements on an analog delay line implemented using switched...

  7. 14 CFR 36.801 - Noise measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noise measurement. 36.801 Section 36.801 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT NOISE STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT TYPE AND AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION Helicopters § 36.801 Noise measurement. For primary, normal...

  8. Noise from windmills; Stoey fra vindmoeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, Sigurd [KILDE Akustikk, (Norway)

    2000-07-01

    The report gives a technical description of noise from windmills. Characteristic levels of noise and noise calculations is described. The influence of wind in the area 5-15 m/s is surveyed. Rules and regulations in five other countries are summarized. (author)

  9. Underwater noise generated by offshore pile driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsouvalas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise emission in the marine environment has always been an environmental issue of serious concern. In particular, the noise generated during the installation of foundation piles is considered to be one of the most significant sources of underwater noise pollution. This is mainly

  10. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  11. Classroom Noise and Teachers' Voice Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena M.; Hakala, Suvi; Holmqvist, Sofia; Sala, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to research the associations between noise (ambient and activity noise) and objective metrics of teachers' voices in real working environments (i.e., classrooms). Method: Thirty-two female and 8 male teachers from 14 elementary schools were randomly selected for the study. Ambient noise was measured during breaks…

  12. Wind noise under a pine tree canopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspet, Richard; Webster, Jeremy

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that infrasonic wind noise levels are lower for arrays placed in forests and under vegetation than for those in open areas. In this research, the wind noise levels, turbulence spectra, and wind velocity profiles are measured in a pine forest. A prediction of the wind noise spectra from the measured meteorological parameters is developed based on recent research on wind noise above a flat plane. The resulting wind noise spectrum is the sum of the low frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-shear interaction near and above the tops of the trees and higher frequency wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction near the ground within the tree layer. The convection velocity of the low frequency wind noise corresponds to the wind speed above the trees while the measurements showed that the wind noise generated by the turbulence-turbulence interaction is near stationary and is generated by the slow moving turbulence adjacent to the ground. Comparison of the predicted wind noise spectrum with the measured wind noise spectrum shows good agreement for four measurement sets. The prediction can be applied to meteorological estimates to predict the wind noise under other pine forests.

  13. 75 FR 44046 - Noise Exposure Map Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Acceptance ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the... on the noise exposure maps is June 1, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward S. Gabsewics, CEP...

  14. Acute noise stress impairs feedback processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banis, Stella; Lorist, Monicque M.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the impact of acute noise stress on the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and whether this effect depended on stressor predictability. Participants performed a gambling task in a silence and a noise condition with either predictable or unpredictable noise. FRN amplitude was measured in

  15. AMBIENT NOISE STUDIES OFF BIMINI, BAHAMAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long periods of observations of ambient noise, wind speed and wind direction were made during 1962 in an area off Bimini in the Bahamas. Noise from...is described which will sequentially record ambient noise along with severaloceanographic parameters, automatically process this information, and

  16. Image upconversion, a low noise infrared sensor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for detection of infrared images. Silicon cameras have much smaller intrinsic noise than their IR counter part- some models even offer near single photon detection capability. We demonstrate that an ordinary CCD camera combined with a low noise upconversion has superior noise characteristics when compared...

  17. Tracking of Nonstationary Noise Based on Data-Driven Recursive Noise Power Estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, J.S.; Heusdens, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers estimation of the noise spectral variance from speech signals contaminated by highly nonstationary noise sources. The method can accurately track fast changes in noise power level (up to about 10 dB/s). In each time frame, for each frequency bin, the noise variance estimate is

  18. Interference effect of impulse noise on noise immunity of communication and control channels in underground structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyboldin, Yu K.; Borisov, S. V.

    2017-10-01

    The interference effect of impulse noise on the noise immunity of underground communication systems is investigated. A comparative analysis of the noise immunity of an optimal demodulator of the discrete FM signals and of the system “wide band – limiter – narrow band”, in the presence of impulse noise, has been carried out.

  19. 75 FR 11990 - Chicago Executive Airports Noise Exposure Map Approval and Noise Compatibility Program Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Chicago Executive Airports Noise Exposure Map Approval and Noise... Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by the... noise exposure map, and that this program will be approved or disapproved on or before October 1, 2010...

  20. 78 FR 19355 - Noise Exposure Map Notice: Receipt of Noise Compatibility Program and Request for Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice: Receipt of Noise Compatibility Program and... Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Tucson... noise exposure map, and that this program will be approved or disapproved on or before September 16...

  1. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  2. Sleep, noise and health: Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mia Zaharna; Christian Guilleminault

    2010-01-01

    Sleep is a physiologic recuperative state that may be negatively affected by factors such as psychosocial and work stress as well as external stimuli like noise. Chronic sleep loss is a common problem in today′s society, and it may have significant health repercussions such as cognitive impairment, and depressed mood, and negative effects on cardiovascular, endocrine, and immune function. This article reviews the definition of disturbed sleep versus sleep deprivation as well as the effects of...

  3. Procefual Non Uniform Cellular Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Jonchier, Théo; Salvati, Marc; Derouet-Jourdan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Procedural cellular textures have been widely used in movie production to reproduce various natural and organic looks. The advantage of procedural texture is to trade memory for computer power and obtain potentially unlimited resolution. In this paper, we propose to compute non-uniform density cellular noise by using a procedural quad-tree. We will explain how to efficiently traverse the tree recursively (CPU) and iteratively (CPU and GPU).

  4. Aircraft noise prediction program theoretical manual: Rotorcraft System Noise Prediction System (ROTONET), part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Donald S.; Jumper, Stephen J.; Burley, Casey L.; Golub, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the theoretical methods used in the rotorcraft noise prediction system (ROTONET), which is a part of the NASA Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP). The ANOPP code consists of an executive, database manager, and prediction modules for jet engine, propeller, and rotor noise. The ROTONET subsystem contains modules for the prediction of rotor airloads and performance with momentum theory and prescribed wake aerodynamics, rotor tone noise with compact chordwise and full-surface solutions to the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings equations, semiempirical airfoil broadband noise, and turbulence ingestion broadband noise. Flight dynamics, atmosphere propagation, and noise metric calculations are covered in NASA TM-83199, Parts 1, 2, and 3.

  5. A general approach to low noise readout of terahertz imaging arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisum, Jonathan D; Grossman, Erich N; Popović, Zoya

    2011-06-01

    This article describes the theory and design of an ultra-low noise electronic readout circuit for use with room temperature video-rate terahertz imaging arrays. First, the noise characteristics of various imaging detectors, including low resistance bolometers and high resistance diodes are discussed. Theoretical approaches to white and 1/f noise mitigation are examined, and a corresponding low-noise readout circuit is designed, built, and tested. It is shown that the circuit is capable of achieving detector limited noise performance for use in room temperature terahertz imaging systems. A thorough noise analysis of the circuit provides the necessary information for applying the readout circuit to any type of imaging detector, and more generally, any measurement of small signals from various source impedances in the presence of white and 1/f noise. W-band measurements of an 8-element, high-resistance detector array, and a 32-element, low-resistance detector array demonstrate the usefulness of the readout circuit. Finally, recommended circuit configurations for various detectors in the literature are provided, with theoretical performance metrics summarized. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  6. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  7. Measurement Sensitivity Improvement of All-Optical Atomic Spin Magnetometer by Suppressing Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyuan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum manipulation technology and photoelectric detection technology have jointly facilitated the rapid development of ultra-sensitive atomic spin magnetometers. To improve the output signal and sensitivity of the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF atomic spin magnetometer, the noises influencing on the output signal and the sensitivity were analyzed, and the corresponding noise suppression methods were presented. The magnetic field noises, including the residual magnetic field noise and the light shift noise, were reduced to approximately zero by employing the magnetic field compensation method and by adjusting the frequency of the pump beam, respectively. With respect to the operation temperature, the simulation results showed that the temperature of the potassium atomic spin magnetometer realizing the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime was 180 °C. Moreover, the fluctuation noises of the frequency and the power were suppressed by using the frequency and the power stable systems. The experimental power stability results showed that the light intensity stability was enhanced 10%. Contrast experiments on the sensitivity were carried out to demonstrate the validity of the suppression methods. Finally, a sensitivity of 13 fT/Hz1/2 was successfully achieved by suppressing noises and optimizing parameters.

  8. Combined Effects of Noise and Shift Work on Workers’ Physiological Parameters in a Chemical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    M. Motamedzade; S. Ghazaiee

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the combined effects of noise and shift work on physiological parameters including body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure. This study was performed in a chemical industry in Tehran in 1993. The workers’ physiological parameters was recorded at the beginning and at the end of all work shifts. Groups under study included : day workers (n=115) , day workers with continuous noise exposure (n=44) , two-shift workers without...

  9. The Effect of Blade Aeroelasticity and Turbine Parameters on Wind Turbine Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the demand for wind energy has dramatically increased as well as the number and size of commercial wind turbines. These large turbines are loud and can cause annoyance to nearby communities. Therefore, the prediction of large wind turbine noise over long distances is critical. The wind turbine noise prediction is a very complex problem since it has to account for atmospheric conditions (wind and temperature), ground absorption, un-even terrain, turbine wake, and blade deforma...

  10. Complexity in White Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Takeyuki

    We restrict our attention to random complex systems and discuss degree their degree of complexity based on a white noise. The white noise is realized as the time derivative of a Brownian motion B(t), and denoted by Ḃ(t). The collection {Ḃ(t)}, is a system of idealized elementary variables and at the same time the system is a stochastic representation of the time t, in other words it is time-oriented. Having expressed the given evolutional random phenomena in question in terms of the Ḃ(t), we introduce the notion of spectral multiplicity, which describes how much the phenomena are complex. The multiplicity is the number of cyclic subspaces that are spanned by the given random phenomena. Each cyclic subspace has further structure. Typical property is multiple Markov property, although this property appears only particular cases. As a related property, in fact as a characteristic of a complex system, one can speak of the time reversibility and irreversibility of certain random phenomena in terms of the white noise. We expect an irreversible random complex system may be decomposed into reversible systems.

  11. Current noise in tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, Moritz; Grabert, Hermann [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Strasse 3, 79104, Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We study current fluctuations in tunnel junctions driven by a voltage source. The voltage is applied to the tunneling element via an impedance providing an electromagnetic environment of the junction. We use circuit theory to relate the fluctuations of the current flowing in the leads of the junction with the voltage fluctuations generated by the environmental impedance and the fluctuations of the tunneling current. The spectrum of current fluctuations is found to consist of three parts: a term arising from the environmental Johnson-Nyquist noise, a term due to the shot noise of the tunneling current and a third term describing the cross-correlation between these two noise sources. Our phenomenological theory reproduces previous results based on the Hamiltonian model for the dynamical Coulomb blockade and provides a simple understanding of the current fluctuation spectrum in terms of circuit theory and properties of the average current. Specific results are given for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Background Noise Reduction Using Adaptive Noise Cancellation Determined by the Cross-Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Fuller, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Background noise due to flow in wind tunnels contaminates desired data by decreasing the Signal-to-Noise Ratio. The use of Adaptive Noise Cancellation to remove background noise at measurement microphones is compromised when the reference sensor measures both background and desired noise. The technique proposed modifies the classical processing configuration based on the cross-correlation between the reference and primary microphone. Background noise attenuation is achieved using a cross-correlation sample width that encompasses only the background noise and a matched delay for the adaptive processing. A present limitation of the method is that a minimum time delay between the background noise and desired signal must exist in order for the correlated parts of the desired signal to be separated from the background noise in the crosscorrelation. A simulation yields primary signal recovery which can be predicted from the coherence of the background noise between the channels. Results are compared with two existing methods.

  13. Noise Equivalent Power of Graphene-Superconductor-Based Optical Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghda, B. Afkhami; Moftakharzadeh, A.; Hosseini, M.

    In this paper, the noise equivalent power (NEP) of optical sensors based on graphene-superconductor junctions in the voltage bias operation mode has been calculated. The effects of device parameters such as temperature, magnetic field and device resistance on the NEP of these detectors have been thoroughly investigated. By solving the related equations, graphene specific heat, thermal conductivity, electron-phonon interaction and responsivity of the detector have been obtained. Using the calculated parameters, the NEP of the device was obtained. The results show that at constant magnetic field the NEP will increase linearly by increasing device temperature. On the other hand, at constant temperature the behavior of NEP versus magnetic field is first increasing and then decreasing. Our calculations show that the optimal resistance of the device has a direct relation with respect to the device temperature, while in the investigated operating range the optimal resistance of device is almost independent of the magnetic field.

  14. Noise Analysis of Switched-Current Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur

    1999-01-01

    The understanding of noise in analog sampled data systems is vital for the design of high resolution circuitry in the discrete time domain. In this paper a general description of sampled and held noise is presened. The noise calculations are verified by measurements on an analog delay line...... implemented using switched-current (SI) technique. The SI delay line is based on a new topology current copier (CCOP). For the verification of the theory a new measurement technique is used. This technique enables one to measure the power spectral density of sampled and held noise which is below...... the continuous time noise floor....

  15. On the noise performance of pt electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Demosthenous, Andreas; Donaldson, Nick

    2007-01-01

    We measured the noise and impedance from Pt electrode pairs in a frequency band from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, containing the ENG band (500 Hz 5 kHz). The results show that the Pt electrode noise is the same as the thermal noise from the real part of the electrode impedance, which is a summation of the polarisation resistance and the access resistance. This differs from Ag-AgCl electrodes for which the electrode noise has been reported to be higher than the thermal noise. Our study shows that Pt electrodes are suitable for neural recording.

  16. Indirect combustion noise of auxiliary power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Xu, Jun; Schuster, Bill

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in noise suppression technology have significantly reduced jet and fan noise from commercial jet engines. This leads many investigators in the aeroacoustics community to suggest that core noise could well be the next aircraft noise barrier. Core noise consists of turbine noise and combustion noise. There is direct combustion noise generated by the combustion processes, and there is indirect combustion noise generated by the passage of combustion hot spots, or entropy waves, through constrictions in an engine. The present work focuses on indirect combustion noise. Indirect combustion noise has now been found in laboratory experiments. The primary objective of this work is to investigate whether indirect combustion noise is also generated in jet and other engines. In a jet engine, there are numerous noise sources. This makes the identification of indirect combustion noise a formidable task. Here, our effort concentrates exclusively on auxiliary power units (APUs). This choice is motivated by the fact that APUs are relatively simple engines with only a few noise sources. It is, therefore, expected that the chance of success is higher. Accordingly, a theoretical model study of the generation of indirect combustion noise in an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is carried out. The cross-sectional areas of an APU from the combustor to the turbine exit are scaled off to form an equivalent nozzle. A principal function of a turbine in an APU is to extract mechanical energy from the flow stream through the exertion of a resistive force. Therefore, the turbine is modeled by adding a negative body force to the momentum equation. This model is used to predict the ranges of frequencies over which there is a high probability for indirect combustion noise generation. Experimental spectra of internal pressure fluctuations and far-field noise of an RE220 APU are examined to identify anomalous peaks. These peaks are possible indirection combustion noise. In the case of the

  17. NOISE POLLUTION OF KONYA METROPOLITAN AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celalettin ÖZDEMİR

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Novadays, one of the environmental pollution which effects the human health is noise pollution. Researches on this subject result in that noise pollution has become important public health problems recently. In this research study, first comprehensive survey (Hamilton Ankesiyete Test was performed on 200 people who are in different ages and deal with different jobs. Noise Amplitude were measured at 66 test locations in Konya metropolitan area. The results showed that there are several locations which have noise amplitude value higher than reference limiting values. According to the test results noise pollution map of Konya were drawn.

  18. Quest for absolute zero in the presence of external noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrontegui, E; Kosloff, R

    2013-09-01

    A reciprocating quantum refrigerator is analyzed with the intention to study the limitations imposed by external noise. In particular we focus on the behavior of the refrigerator when it approaches the absolute zero. The cooling cycle is based on the Otto cycle with a working medium constituted by an ensemble of noninteracting harmonic oscillators. The compression and expansion segments are generated by changing an external parameter in the Hamiltonian. In this case the force constant of the harmonic oscillators mω^{2} is modified from an initial to a final value. As a result, the kinetic and potential energy of the system do not commute causing frictional losses. By proper choice of scheduling function ω(t) frictionless solutions can be obtained in the noiseless case. We examine the performance of a refrigerator subject to noise. By expanding from the adiabatic limit we find that the external noise, Gaussian phase, and amplitude noises reduce the amount of heat that can be extracted but nevertheless the zero temperature can be approached.

  19. Amplification and Attenuation across USArray using Ambient Noise Wavefront Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Bowden, Daniel C.

    2017-11-15

    As seismic travel-time tomography continues to be refined using data from the vast USArray dataset, it is advantageous to also exploit the amplitude information carried by seismic waves. We use ambient noise cross correlation to make observations of surface-wave amplification and attenuation at shorter periods (8 – 32 seconds) than can be observed with only traditional teleseismic earthquake sources. We show that the wavefront tracking approach of [Lin et al., 2012a] can be successfully applied to ambient noise correlations, yielding results quite similar to those from earthquake observations at periods of overlap. This consistency indicates that the wavefront tracking approach is viable for use with ambient noise correlations, despite concerns of the inhomogeneous and unknown distribution of noise sources. The resulting amplification and attenuation maps correlate well with known tectonic and crustal structure; at the shortest periods, our amplification and attenuation maps correlate well with surface geology and known sedimentary basins, while our longest period amplitudes are controlled by crustal thickness and begin to probe upper mantle materials. These amplification and attenuation observations are sensitive to crustal materials in different ways than travel-time observations and may be used to better constrain temperature or density variations. We also value them as an independent means of describing the lateral variability of observed Rayleigh-wave amplitudes without the need for 3D tomographic inversions.

  20. Property Prices and Exposure to Multiple Noise Sources: Hedonic Regression with Road and Railway Noise

    OpenAIRE

    ANDERSSON Henrik; JONSSON Lina; OGREN Mikael

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the effect of road and railway noise on property prices. It uses the hedonic regression technique on a Swedish data set that contains information about both road and railway noise for each property, and finds that road noise has a larger negative impact on the property prices than railway noise. This is in line with the evidence from the acoustical literature which has shown that individuals are more disturbed by road than railway noise, but contradicts recent ...

  1. Tire-pavement and environmental traffic noise research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In response to an interest in traffic noise, particularly tirepavement noise, CDOT elected to conduct tirepavement : noise research. Following a rigid set of testing protocols, data was collected on highway traffic : noise characteristics along wi...

  2. STUDY NOISE POLLUTION TYUMEN USING GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dobryakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most harmful factors of environment of the city is the noise, and its weight among the factors adversely affecting the life and health of the population has been increasing steadily [Sheina and etc., 2007; Polovinkina and etc., 2012]. Today, most major cities of the Russian Federation (70% have a high noise pollution problem. The system of support for the monitoring and control of acoustic situation in the city can be considered noise pollution electronic cards made using geographic information systems (GIS. There are two fundamentally different approaches to the selection of software for creation of noise maps. According to the first of them, use universal multifunctional complexes GIS (ArcGIS, MapInfo. According to the distribution of data points on the noise characteristics is created TIN model. A second approach to create noise maps using highly specialized software (MapNoise, SoundPLAN, Mitha, Cadna, ExNOISE et al.. To calculate noise propagation area is divided on the grid with a certain step, the most relevant mapping purposes. Calculation of noise levels is carried out in a grid cell by measurements based on diffraction and reflection of sound barriers and absorbing underlying surface. Noise pollution is also displayed using contour lines.

  3. Chicago transit authority train noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Linh T; Jones, Rachael M

    2017-06-01

    To characterize noise exposure of riders on Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) trains, we measured noise levels twice on each segment of 7 of the 8 CTA train lines, which are named after colors, yielding 48 time-series measurements. We found the Blue Line has the highest noise levels compared to other train lines, with mean 76.9 dBA; and that the maximum noise level, 88.9 dBA occurred in the tunnel between the Chicago and Grand stations. Train segments involving travel through a tunnel had significantly higher noise levels than segments with travel on elevated and ground level tracks. While 8-hr doses inside the passenger cars were not estimated to exceed occupational exposure limits, train operators ride in a separate cab with operational windows and may therefore have higher noise exposures than riders. Despite the low risk of hearing loss for riders on CTA trains, in part because transit noise accounts for a small part of total daily noise exposure, 1-min average noise levels exceeded 85 dBA at times. This confirms anecdotal observations of discomfort due to noise levels, and indicates a need for noise management, particularly in tunnels.

  4. Noise estimation for remote sensing image data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qian

    2004-01-01

    Noise estimation does not receive much attention in remote sensing society. It may be because normally noise is not large enough to impair image analysis result. Noise estimation is also very challenging due to the randomness nature of the noise (for random noise) and the difficulty of separating the noise component from the signal in each specific location. We review and propose seven different types of methods to estimate noise variance and noise covariance matrix in a remotely sensed image. In the experiment, it is demonstrated that a good noise estimate can improve the performance of an algorithm via noise whitening if this algorithm assumes white noise.

  5. Helicopter Flight Procedures for Community Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric

    2017-01-01

    A computationally efficient, semiempirical noise model suitable for maneuvering flight noise prediction is used to evaluate the community noise impact of practical variations on several helicopter flight procedures typical of normal operations. Turns, "quick-stops," approaches, climbs, and combinations of these maneuvers are assessed. Relatively small variations in flight procedures are shown to cause significant changes to Sound Exposure Levels over a wide area. Guidelines are developed for helicopter pilots intended to provide effective strategies for reducing the negative effects of helicopter noise on the community. Finally, direct optimization of flight trajectories is conducted to identify low noise optimal flight procedures and quantify the magnitude of community noise reductions that can be obtained through tailored helicopter flight procedures. Physically realizable optimal turns and approaches are identified that achieve global noise reductions of as much as 10 dBA Sound Exposure Level.

  6. Amperometric noise at thin film band electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Simon T; Heien, Michael L; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-09-18

    Background current noise is often a significant limitation when using constant-potential amperometry for biosensor application such as amperometric recordings of transmitter release from single cells through exocytosis. In this paper, we fabricated thin-film electrodes of gold and conductive polymers and measured the current noise in physiological buffer solution for a wide range of different electrode areas. The noise measurements could be modeled by an analytical expression, representing the electrochemical cell as a resistor and capacitor in series. The studies revealed three domains; for electrodes with low capacitance, the amplifier noise dominated, for electrodes with large capacitances, the noise from the resistance of the electrochemical cell was dominant, while in the intermediate region, the current noise scaled with electrode capacitance. The experimental results and the model presented here can be used for choosing an electrode material and dimensions and when designing chip-based devices for low-noise current measurements.

  7. 11th International Workshop on Railway Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, David; Gautier, Pierre-Etienne; Iida, Masanobu; Nelson, James; Thompson, David; Tielkes, Thorsten; Towers, David; Vos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The book reports on the 11th International Workshop on Railway Noise, held on 9 – 13 September, 2013, in Uddevalla, Sweden. The event, which was jointly organized by the Competence Centre Chalmers Railway Mechanics (CHARMEC) and the Departments of Applied Mechanics and Applied Acoustics at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, covered a broad range of topics in the field of railway noise and vibration, including: prospects, legal regulations and perceptions; wheel and rail noise; prediction, measurements and monitoring; ground-borne vibration; squeal noise and structure-borne noise; and aerodynamic noise generated by high-speed trains. Further topics included: resilient track forms; grinding, corrugation and roughness; and interior noise and sound barriers. This book, which consists of a collection of peer-reviewed papers originally submitted to the workshop, not only provides readers with an overview of the latest developments in the field, but also offers scientists and engineers essent...

  8. Spin relaxation 1/f noise in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, S.; Guimarães, M. H. D.; Kaverzin, A.; van Wees, B. J.; Vera-Marun, I. J.

    2017-02-01

    We report the first measurement of 1/f type noise associated with electronic spin transport, using single layer graphene as a prototypical material with a large and tunable Hooge parameter. We identify the presence of two contributions to the measured spin-dependent noise: contact polarization noise from the ferromagnetic electrodes, which can be filtered out using the cross-correlation method, and the noise originated from the spin relaxation processes. The noise magnitude for spin and charge transport differs by three orders of magnitude, implying different scattering mechanisms for the 1/f fluctuations in the charge and spin transport processes. A modulation of the spin-dependent noise magnitude by changing the spin relaxation length and time indicates that the spin-flip processes dominate the spin-dependent noise.

  9. Noise Hazard Evaluation Sound Level Data on Noise Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Doo 300, Snowmobile 90 80. Ski -Doo Alpine 399 ER, Snovnnobile 80 81. Ski -Doo Elan, Sno.mobil-e 80 82. Ski -Doo Nordic 375, Snowmobile 86 83. Ski -Doo...ACCESION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitae) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED NOISE HAZARD EVALUATION, SOUND LEVEL DATA OF...are not practically suitable to the threshold criterion presented in paragraph III B. 3. Winen the daily exposure is composed of two or more periods of

  10. Farmers' work-day noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Brumby, Susan; Calvano, Adrian; Hatherell, Tracey; Mason, Heidi; Mercer-Grant, Cate; Hogan, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to understand the extent of farmers' exposure to hazardous noise, and trial and test the ability of an on-farm noise audit report to improve awareness and preventative action towards farm based noise hazards. Visits were made to working farms where noise and dosimetry measurements undertaken. During return visits, the noise measurements were explained in a brief report. A follow-up questionnaire was implemented gathering feedback on the use or otherwise of the report. Working farms in Western Victoria and SE Queensland including dairy, beef, wool, prime lamb and cropping. Participants were 14 female and 37 male farm workers. Noise exposure assessment of daily activities through dosimetry; measurements of noisy tasks and machinery; supply and interpretation of a noise audit report. Participants were supplied with a 'noise report' of their workplace together with an explanation of the report's meaning to farm workers. Men and women have similar at risk exposures. The average noise exposure was 1.09 Pa(2)h (LAeq,8h  = 85.3 dB). This implies 163 000 Australian agricultural workers are at risk from hazardous noise. On-farm noise audit reports were a relevant and valuable feedback to farmers in relation to their potential noise hazards. Of those measured 51%, and by extrapolation 163 000 Australian agricultural workers, have noise exposure levels greater than the recommended Australian Standard of 1.01 Pa(2)h (85 dB). Men and women are equally exposed. On-farm noise audit reports are an effective feedback to increase awareness and improve hearing health. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  11. Noise exposure assessment in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosong, Thitiworn; Kaimook, Wandee; Tantisarasart, Ratchada; Sooksamear, Puwanai; Chayaphum, Satith; Kongkamol, Chanon; Srisintorn, Wisarut; Phakthongsuk, Pitchaya

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the dental services clinic and at the dental laboratory. A noise dosimeter was set following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria and then attached to the subjects' collar to record personal noise dose exposure during working periods. The peaks of the noise spectrum of dental instruments were at 1,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz which depended on the type of instrument. The differences in working areas and job positions had an influence on the level of noise exposure (p personal hearing zone found that the laboratory technicians were exposed to the highest impulsive noise levels (137.1 dBC). The dentists and dental assistants who worked at a pedodontic clinic had the highest percent noise dose (4.60 ± 3.59%). In the working areas, the 8-hour time-weighted average of noise levels ranged between 49.7-58.1 dBA while the noisiest working area was the dental laboratory. Dental personnel are exposed to noise intensities lower than occupational exposure limits. Therefore, these dental personnel may not experience a noise-induced hearing loss.

  12. Activity disturbances caused by different environmental noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åhrlin, U.

    1988-12-01

    An analysis was made of data obtained in investigations performed on annoyance reactions due to noise from aircraft, trains and road traffic. The aims of the analysis were to study the covariation between the extent of activity disturbances and general annoyance, to compare different noise sources with reference to activity disturbances caused, and to study the relation between the extent of annoyance reactions and noise exposure. The activity disturbances studied were speech interference effects, adverse effects on rest and sleep and awakening. Common to all three noise sources is that the extent of all activity disturbances increased with increased general annoyance. However, the rank order between the effects was different. In areas exposed to aircraft and train noise, speech interference was the effect reported by the largest proportion of respondents. Road traffic noise primarily disturbed rest and sleep. As regards train noise, it was demonstrated that although the extent of activity disturbances was comparatively high, the extent of general annoyance was lower on the whole than the extent of activity disturbances. These differences in responses may be due to differences in attitudes towards the noise sources. Even though actual noise-related effects were experienced, the degree of subjective annoyance may be determined by the type of noise source causing the effects. The dose-response relationship established for aircraft and train noise demonstrated that the extent of general annoyance varied although the noise conditions were similar. The differences were further accentuated with increasing dB(A) levels. The results from the analysis demonstrated that the use of response indices based upon different activity interferences must take into account the variations that are present between different noise sources. Weighting all activity interferences into an index and applying this universally for all noises will decrease the precision of the response

  13. Noise Pollution in Irbid City — Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odat, Sana'A.

    2015-09-01

    Noise defined as any sound that annoys or disturbs humans or that causes or tends to cause an adverse psychological and physiological effect on humans. Irbid is one of the most populated cities in Jordan. It is environmentally noise polluted due to the rapid and widespread introduction of mechanical methods for production and for their transportation. L10, L50, L90 and LAeq noise levels were measured during the day time and night time to assess and evaluate the noise levels from mosques, schools, celebration halls, streets, building works, industrial areas and commercial areas. The results of the investigation showed that the measured noise levels from all the selected sources were high during the day time and the noise problem is not only limited to day time, but continues in night time in this city. These noise levels were higher than those set by Jordanian limits during day time and night time. A significant correlation between the measured statistical noise levels L10, L50 and L90 and equivalent continuous noise level LAeq were also detected. The mean value of industrial noise source was motors of large vehicles and engines. Whereas the presence of slow moving vehicles, low speed and honking of horns during traffic ingestion periods lead to an increase in noise levels in commercial areas. The noise from building machines and equipment (dredges, concrete mixers, concrete pumps and jackhammers) is quite different from that of traditional equipment. The construction machines have engines that produce a loud, fluctuating noise with varying frequencies that can propagate the sound for a long distance. The noise produced by these engines is particularly disturbing due to the wide variations in frequency and volume.

  14. Electrical conduction noise and its correlation with structural properties of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair Ansari, Mohd; Munjal, Sandeep; Kumar, Vikram; Khare, Neeraj

    2016-07-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films have been deposited by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapor deposition in a single step process at different substrate temperatures and structural, morphological, electrical and conduction noise characteristics of the CZTS thin films have been studied. Single phase CZTS thin films are formed at 275 °C and 325 °C deposition temperatures, whereas the CZTS thin film deposited at 375 °C showed secondary phase also. The crystallinity of the films improves and resistivity decreases with the increases of the deposition temperature. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity of the films reveals that in the temperature range 300-250 K, thermally activated conduction is observed. The conduction noise in the CZTS thin films, exhibits 1/f noise in the low frequency region and found to be strongly dependent on the film deposition temperatures. The film deposited at 275 °C and 375 °C shows larger conduction noise, whereas the film deposited at 325 °C shows smaller noise. For the low frequency 1/f noise, the value of α is also found to be the minimum for the film deposited at 325 °C. The higher value of conduction noise in the film deposited at 275 °C is related to poor crystallinity and less compact morphology. For the film deposited at 375 °C, crystallinity and compactness improves, but the presence of the secondary phases seems to be responsible for generating higher noise. The smallest conduction noise of the film deposited at 325 °C is due to single phase film with better crystallinity and smaller trap density ˜5.1 × 1015 cm-2 eV-1.

  15. Noise sensitivity in relation to baseline arousal, physiological response and psychological features to noise exposure during task performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    White, K.; Hofman, W.F.; van Kamp, I.

    2010-01-01

    People who consider themselves sensitive to noise, experience more noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and reduced daytime performance. Besides psychological factors, an association with cardiovascular reactions during noise has been established in noise sensitives. Decreased efficiency of the

  16. Effect of high energy electron irradiation on low frequency noise in 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Palmour, J. W.

    2017-03-01

    The low-frequency noise in high voltage Ni/4H-SiC Schottky diodes irradiated with high energy (0.9 MeV) electrons was studied in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 50 kHz, temperature interval 295-410 K, and irradiation dose Φ from 0.2 × 1016 cm-2 to 7 × 1016 cm-2. The noise amplitude was found monotonically increasing with the irradiation dose. With the irradiation dose increase, the noise spectra on the linear part of the current voltage characteristic transform from the 1/f noise to the generation recombination noise of at least two trap levels. One of these levels can be classified as Z1/2 with the capture cross section determined from the noise measurements to be ˜10-15 cm2.

  17. Diffusion of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an internal white noise and an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise are investigated through numerical simulation. In contrast to the case when the bias force is smaller or absent, the diffusion coefficient exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the correlation time of the external noise when bias force is large. A mechanism different from locked-to-running transition theory is presented for the diffusion enhancement by a bias force in intermediate to large damping. In the underdamped regime and the presence of external noise, the diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of low temperature rather than a nonmonotonic function when external noise is absent. The diffusive process undergoes four regimes when bias force approaches but is less than its critical value and noises intensities are small. These behaviors can be attributed to the locked-to-running transition of particles.

  18. Generation, propagation and annoyance of the noise of wind power plants; Tuulivoimaloiden melun synty, eteneminen ja haeiritsevyys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uosukainen, S.

    2010-02-15

    The most remarkable noise source of wind power plants is the rotor blades of turbines generating mainly aerodynamic broadband noise. In that noise there occurs an amplitude modulation of +- 2-3 dB, having typically a modulation frequency of about 1 Hz. Other noise sources are the various parts of the generation system, the most remarkable of which is the gearbox. The propagation of the noise from a power plant is essentially affected by, besides the geometrical attenuation, the wind conditions, the temperature profile especially in the vertical direction, and the thermal stability of the atmosphere. Above ground surface, the propagation is also affected by the height differences and the surface profile of the terrain, and the materials and the vegetation of the ground surface. The noise of wind power plants causes annoyance to a greater amount of people that could be deduced from the annoyance-noise exposure dependence of the transportation noise. This is considered to be due to the interaction of the visual and aural perceptions, and the especially disturbing properties of the noise of wind power plants, mainly due to the amplitude modulation of the noise. (orig.)

  19. Spin noise spectroscopy in GaAs (110) quantum wells: access to intrinsic spin lifetimes and equilibrium electron dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Georg M; Römer, Michael; Schuh, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Hübner, Jens; Oestreich, Michael

    2008-11-14

    In this Letter, the first spin noise spectroscopy measurements in semiconductor systems of reduced effective dimensionality are reported. The nondemolition measurement technique gives access to the otherwise concealed intrinsic, low temperature electron spin relaxation time of n-doped GaAs (110) quantum wells and to the corresponding low temperature anisotropic spin relaxation. The Brownian motion of the electrons within the spin noise probe laser spot becomes manifest in a modification of the spin noise line width. Thereby, the spatially resolved observation of the stochastic spin polarization uniquely allows to study electron dynamics at equilibrium conditions with a vanishing total momentum of the electron system.

  20. Statistical mechanics of influence maximization with thermal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christopher W.; Lee, Daniel D.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of optimally distributing a budget of influence among individuals in a social network, known as influence maximization, has typically been studied in the context of contagion models and deterministic processes, which fail to capture stochastic interactions inherent in real-world settings. Here, we show that by introducing thermal noise into influence models, the dynamics exactly resemble spins in a heterogeneous Ising system. In this way, influence maximization in the presence of thermal noise has a natural physical interpretation as maximizing the magnetization of an Ising system given a budget of external magnetic field. Using this statistical mechanical formulation, we demonstrate analytically that for small external-field budgets, the optimal influence solutions exhibit a highly non-trivial temperature dependence, focusing on high-degree hub nodes at high temperatures and on easily influenced peripheral nodes at low temperatures. For the general problem, we present a projected gradient ascent algorithm that uses the magnetic susceptibility to calculate locally optimal external-field distributions. We apply our algorithm to synthetic and real-world networks, demonstrating that our analytic results generalize qualitatively. Our work establishes a fruitful connection with statistical mechanics and demonstrates that influence maximization depends crucially on the temperature of the system, a fact that has not been appreciated by existing research.

  1. Effects of colored noise and noise delay on a calcium oscillation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yin, Zhixiang

    2013-10-01

    As a calcium oscillations system is in steady state, the effects of colored noise and noise delay on the system is investigated using stochastic simulation methods. The results indicate that: (1) the colored noise can induce coherence bi-resonance phenomenon. (2) there exist three peaks in the R-τ0 (R is the reciprocal coefficient of variance, and τ0 is the self-correlation time of the colored noise) curves. For the same noise intensity Q=1, the Gaussian colored noise can induce calcium spikes but the white noise cannot do this. (3) the delay time can improve noise induced spikes regularity as τ0 is small, and R has a significant minimum with increasing τ as τ0 is large. (4) large values of ζ reduce noise induced spikes regularity.

  2. NOISE ESTIMATION USING STANDARD DEVIATION OF THE FREQUENCY MAGNITUDE SPECTRUM FOR MIXED NON-STATIONARY NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Indumathi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noise estimation and suppression is very important for improving the quality of speech signal. Noises exist in almost all places. In reality, more than one noise degrades the speech signal. It is hard to find and supress various types of noise that affect the speech quality. This paper proposed a method for noise estimation of mixed non-stationary noisy speech signal. This method uses Spectral properties of the noisy speech signal to detect the frequency regions of noise signal. Highest frequency of speech signal is calculated and it is considered as the threshold value for separating noise signal and clean speech signal. Using Spectral subtraction, Standard deviation of noise spectrum is subtracted with noisy spectrum to acquire enhanced speech signal. Performance of the method is evaluated using SNR and Spectrogram. The main focus of this paper is to propose an independent method which estimates the noise of any type and nature.

  3. Kurtosis corrected sound pressure level as a noise metric for risk assessment of occupational noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goley, G Steven; Song, Won Joon; Kim, Jay H

    2011-03-01

    Current noise guidelines use an energy-based noise metric to predict the risk of hearing loss, and thus ignore the effect of temporal characteristics of the noise. The practice is widely considered to underestimate the risk of a complex noise environment, where impulsive noises are embedded in a steady-state noise. A basic form for noise metrics is designed by combining the equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) and a temporal correction term defined as a function of kurtosis of the noise. Several noise metrics are developed by varying this basic form and evaluated utilizing existing chinchilla noise exposure data. It is shown that the kurtosis correction term significantly improves the correlation of the noise metric with the measured hearing losses in chinchillas. The average SPL of the frequency components of the noise that define the hearing loss with a kurtosis correction term is identified as the best noise metric among tested. One of the investigated metrics, the kurtosis-corrected A-weighted SPL, is applied to a human exposure study data as a preview of applying the metrics to human guidelines. The possibility of applying the noise metrics to human guidelines is discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  4. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  5. Highway traffic noise prediction based on GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianghua; Qin, Qiming

    2014-05-01

    Before building a new road, we need to predict the traffic noise generated by vehicles. Traditional traffic noise prediction methods are based on certain locations and they are not only time-consuming, high cost, but also cannot be visualized. Geographical Information System (GIS) can not only solve the problem of manual data processing, but also can get noise values at any point. The paper selected a road segment from Wenxi to Heyang. According to the geographical overview of the study area and the comparison between several models, we combine the JTG B03-2006 model and the HJ2.4-2009 model to predict the traffic noise depending on the circumstances. Finally, we interpolate the noise values at each prediction point and then generate contours of noise. By overlaying the village data on the noise contour layer, we can get the thematic maps. The use of GIS for road traffic noise prediction greatly facilitates the decision-makers because of GIS spatial analysis function and visualization capabilities. We can clearly see the districts where noise are excessive, and thus it becomes convenient to optimize the road line and take noise reduction measures such as installing sound barriers and relocating villages and so on.

  6. Active Chevrons for Jet Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depuru-Mohan, N. K.; Doty, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Jet noise is often a dominant component of aircraft noise, particularly at takeoff. To meet the stringent noise regulations, the aircraft industry is in a pressing need of advanced noise reduction concepts. In the present study, the potential of piezoelectrically-activated chevrons for jet noise reduction was experimentally investigated. The perturbations near the nozzle exit caused by piezoelectrically-activated chevrons could be used to modify the growth rate of the mixing layer and thereby potentially reduce jet noise. These perturbations are believed to increase the production of small-scale disturbances at the expense of large-scale turbulent structures. These large-scale turbulent structures are responsible for the dominant portion of the jet mixing noise, particularly low-frequency noise. Therefore, by exciting the static chevron geometry through piezoelectric actuators, an additional acoustic benefit could possibly be achieved. To aid in the initial implementation of this concept, several flat-faced faceted nozzles (four, six, and eight facets) were investigated. Among the faceted nozzles, it was found that the eight-faceted nozzle behaves very similarly to the round nozzle. Furthermore, among the faceted nozzles with static chevrons, the four-faceted nozzle with static chevrons was found to be most effective in terms of jet noise reduction. The piezoelectrically-activated chevrons reduced jet noise up to 2 dB compared to the same nozzle geometry without excitation. This benefit was observed over a wide range of excitation frequencies by applying very low voltages to the piezoelectric actuators.

  7. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  8. Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygna, Karin; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Aamodt, Geir; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun Hjertager

    2014-05-01

    This study examines the relationship between road traffic noise, self-reported sleep quality and mental health. The study is cross-sectional and based on data from a survey conducted in Oslo, Norway, in 2000. Psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, HSCL-25) was measured along with self-reported somatic health, sleep quality, noise sensitivity and socioeconomic variables. Questionnaire data were combined with modeled estimates of noise exposure. The total study sample consisted of 2898 respondents. After adjustment for potential confounders and stratifying for sleep quality, we found a positive, but not statistically significant association between noise exposure and symptoms of psychological distress among participants with poor sleep quality (slope=0.06, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.13, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). In the same sleep quality group, we found a borderline statistically significant association between noise exposure and a symptom level indicating a probable mental disorder (HSCL≥1.55) (odds ratio=1.47, 95% CI: 0.99-1.98, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). We found no association between road traffic noise and mental health among subjects reporting good and medium sleep quality. The results suggest that road traffic noise may be associated with poorer mental health among subjects with poor sleep. Individuals with poor sleep quality may be more vulnerable to effects of road traffic noise on mental health than individuals with better sleep quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Restoration for Noise Removal in Quantum Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-09-01

    Quantum computation has become increasingly attractive in the past few decades due to its extraordinary performance. As a result, some studies focusing on image representation and processing via quantum mechanics have been done. However, few of them have considered the quantum operations for images restoration. To address this problem, three noise removal algorithms are proposed in this paper based on the novel enhanced quantum representation model, oriented to two kinds of noise pollution (Salt-and-Pepper noise and Gaussian noise). For the first algorithm Q-Mean, it is designed to remove the Salt-and-Pepper noise. The noise points are extracted through comparisons with the adjacent pixel values, after which the restoration operation is finished by mean filtering. As for the second method Q-Gauss, a special mask is applied to weaken the Gaussian noise pollution. The third algorithm Q-Adapt is effective for the source image containing unknown noise. The type of noise can be judged through the quantum statistic operations for the color value of the whole image, and then different noise removal algorithms are used to conduct image restoration respectively. Performance analysis reveals that our methods can offer high restoration quality and achieve significant speedup through inherent parallelism of quantum computation.

  10. ”Sound [signal] noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnsten, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the intricate relationship between sound and signification through notions of noise. The emergence of new fields of sonic artistic practices has generated several questions of how to approach sound as aesthetic form and material. During the past decade an increased attention...... has been paid to, for instance, a category such as ‘sound art’ together with an equally strengthened interest in phenomena and concepts that fall outside the accepted aesthetic procedures and constructions of what we traditionally would term as musical sound – a recurring example being ‘noise’....

  11. Noise and fluctuations an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, D K C

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of fluctuations and their role is both useful and fundamental to the study of physics. This concise study of random processes offers graduate students and research physicists a survey that encompasses both the relationship of Brownian Movement with statistical mechanics and the problem of irreversible processes. It outlines the basics of the physics involved, without the strictures of mathematical rigor.The three-part treatment starts with a general survey of Brownian Movement, including electrical Brownian Movement and ""shot-noise,"" Part two explores correlation, frequency

  12. Low Noise Interband Cascade Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    and nBn SL detectors. The achievable Johnson-noise limited D* is actually higher than what is shown in Fig. 6, since R0 increases with biases more...II SL detectors [9] and nBn SL detectors [10]. More details are reported in Ref. 3. -10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 -0.6 -0.5 -0.4 -0.3 -0.2...Infrared Technology and Applications XXXVII (SPIE Conference 8012), April 25-29, 2011, Orlando, FL, USA. (in Proc. SPIE 7587, paper 80122U). 7. R. Q

  13. Individual daytime noise exposure in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ute; Breitner, Susanne; Hampel, Regina; Wolf, Kathrin; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Gu, Jianwei; Radon, Katja; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies showed that chronic noise exposure modeled through noise mapping is associated with adverse health effects. However, knowledge about real individual noise exposure, emitted by several sources, is limited. To explain the variation in individual daytime noise exposure regarding different microenvironments, activities and individual characteristics. In a repeated measures study in Augsburg, Germany (March 2007-December 2008), 109 individuals participated in 305 individual noise measurements with a mean duration of 5.5h. Whereabouts and activities were recorded in a diary. One-minute averages of A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leq) were determined. We used mixed additive models to elucidate the variation of Leq by diary-based information, baseline characteristics and time-invariant variables like long-term noise exposure. Overall noise levels were highly variable (median: 64 dB(A); range: 37-105 dB(A)). Highest noise levels were measured in traffic during bicycling (69 dB(A); 49-97 dB(A)) and lowest while resting at home (54 dB(A); 37-94 dB(A)). Nearly all diary-based information as well as physical activity, sex and age-group had significant influences on individual noise. In an additional analysis restricted to times spent at the residences, long-term noise exposure did not improve the model fit. Individual exposures to day-time noise were moderate to high and showed high variations in different microenvironments except when being in traffic. Individual noise levels were greatly determined by personal activities but also seemed to depend on environmental noise levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Noise Pollution and Impact on Children Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Alok; Gupta, Anant; Jain, Khushbu; Gupta, Sweta

    2018-01-09

    With rapid urbanization and life style changes, loud noise is omnipresent and has become a part of life. Indoor and outdoor environmental noise pollution have been documented as a serious health hazard with increasing adverse effects on fetus, infants, children, adolescents and adults. Noise induced hearing loss and non-auditory adverse effects due to noise pollution, are being increasingly diagnosed in all age groups including the fetus. Outdated motorized vehicles, machinery, increasing traffic, congested residential areas, crowded educational institutions and workplaces, unregulated commercial and industrial noise have become a source of noise pollution with long-term disability. Areas of noise pollution must be identified and corrective measures be taken. Toys, personal, domestic, commercial, industrial equipment should be within the safe sound intensity. Loudspeakers and vehicular horns should be banned except in emergencies. Nocturnal noise pollution must be avoided near residential areas as sleep disturbances have serious long-term health consequences. Pregnant women, fetus, newborns, infants and children are most susceptible to noise induced health hazards and should be given utmost protection. Educational institutions, workplaces, commercial and industrial areas should be regularly monitored for noise levels and protective ear muffs and plugs be used. Public be educated repeatedly regarding health hazards of noise. Traffic noise should be regulated to be within safe limits. Bus-stands, railway stations and airports should be moved away from residential areas. Houses should be sound proofed suitably. Long term studies should be conducted in pregnant women, newborn children and adults to have more data on hazards of noise pollution.

  15. Topography and biological noise determine acoustic detectability on coral reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Cagua, Edgar F.

    2013-08-19

    Acoustic telemetry is an increasingly common tool for studying the movement patterns, behavior and site fidelity of marine organisms, but to accurately interpret acoustic data, the variability, periodicity and range of detectability between acoustic tags and receivers must be understood. The relative and interactive effects of topography with biological and environmental noise have not been quantified on coral reefs. We conduct two long-term range tests (1- and 4-month duration) on two different reef types in the central Red Sea to determine the relative effect of distance, depth, topography, time of day, wind, lunar phase, sea surface temperature and thermocline on detection probability. Detectability, as expected, declines with increasing distance between tags and receivers, and we find average detection ranges of 530 and 120 m, using V16 and V13 tags, respectively, but the topography of the reef can significantly modify this relationship, reducing the range by ~70 %, even when tags and receivers are in line-of-sight. Analyses that assume a relationship between distance and detections must therefore be used with care. Nighttime detection range was consistently reduced in both locations, and detections varied by lunar phase in the 4-month test, suggesting a strong influence of biological noise (reducing detection probability up to 30 %), notably more influential than other environmental noises, including wind-driven noise, which is normally considered important in open-water environments. Analysis of detections should be corrected in consideration of the diel patterns we find, and range tests or sentinel tags should be used for more than 1 month to quantify potential changes due to lunar phase. Some studies assume that the most usual factor limiting detection range is weather-related noise; this cannot be extrapolated to coral reefs. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. A variational Bayesian method to inverse problems with impulsive noise

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Bangti

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel numerical method for solving inverse problems subject to impulsive noises which possibly contain a large number of outliers. The approach is of Bayesian type, and it exploits a heavy-tailed t distribution for data noise to achieve robustness with respect to outliers. A hierarchical model with all hyper-parameters automatically determined from the given data is described. An algorithm of variational type by minimizing the Kullback-Leibler divergence between the true posteriori distribution and a separable approximation is developed. The numerical method is illustrated on several one- and two-dimensional linear and nonlinear inverse problems arising from heat conduction, including estimating boundary temperature, heat flux and heat transfer coefficient. The results show its robustness to outliers and the fast and steady convergence of the algorithm. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Line-of-sight extrapolation noise in dust polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poh, Jason; Dodelson, Scott

    2017-05-19

    The B-modes of polarization at frequencies ranging from 50-1000 GHz are produced by Galactic dust, lensing of primordial E-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by intervening large scale structure, and possibly by primordial B-modes in the CMB imprinted by gravitational waves produced during inflation. The conventional method used to separate the dust component of the signal is to assume that the signal at high frequencies (e.g., 350 GHz) is due solely to dust and then extrapolate the signal down to lower frequency (e.g., 150 GHz) using the measured scaling of the polarized dust signal amplitude with frequency. For typical Galactic thermal dust temperatures of about 20K, these frequencies are not fully in the Rayleigh-Jeans limit. Therefore, deviations in the dust cloud temperatures from cloud to cloud will lead to different scaling factors for clouds of different temperatures. Hence, when multiple clouds of different temperatures and polarization angles contribute to the integrated line-of-sight polarization signal, the relative contribution of individual clouds to the integrated signal can change between frequencies. This can cause the integrated signal to be decorrelated in both amplitude and direction when extrapolating in frequency. Here we carry out a Monte Carlo analysis on the impact of this line-of-sight extrapolation noise, enabling us to quantify its effect. Using results from the Planck experiment, we find that this effect is small, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the current uncertainties. However, line-of-sight extrapolation noise may be a significant source of uncertainty in future low-noise primordial B-mode experiments. Scaling from Planck results, we find that accounting for this uncertainty becomes potentially important when experiments are sensitive to primordial B-mode signals with amplitude r < 0.0015 .

  18. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise...

  19. Lightweight Superconducting Magnets for Low Temperature Magnetic Coolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future science missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require efficient, very low temperature coolers for low noise detector...

  20. Highly Effective Thermal Regenerator for Low Temperature Cryocoolers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, low-temperature cryocoolers for low-noise detector systems. We...

  1. Optical signal to noise ratio improvement through unbalanced noise beating in phase-sensitive parametric amplifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A.; Olsson, S. L. I.; Andrekson, P.A.; Karlsson, M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the beating of signal and idler waves, which have imbalanced signal to noise ratios, in a phase-sensitive parametric amplifier. Imbalanced signal to noise ratios are achieved in two ways; first by imbalanced noise loading; second by varying idler to signal input power ratio. In the case of imbalanced noise loading the phase-sensitive amplifier improved the signal to noise ratio from 3 to 6 dB, and in the case of varying idler to signal input power ratio, the signal to noise rat...

  2. Cortical signal-in-noise coding varies by noise type, signal-to-noise ratio, age, and hearing status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamor, Nashrah; Billings, Curtis J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of noise type, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), age, and hearing status on cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech sounds. This helps to explain the hearing-in-noise difficulties often seen in the aging and hearing impaired population. Continuous, modulated, and babble noise types were presented at varying SNRs to 30 individuals divided into three groups according to age and hearing status. Significant main effects of noise type, SNR, and group were found. Interaction effects revealed that the SNR effect varies as a function of noise type and is most systematic for continuous noise. Effects of age and hearing loss were limited to CAEP latency and were differentially modulated by energetic and informational-like masking. It is clear that the spectrotemporal characteristics of signals and noises play an important role in determining the morphology of neural responses. Participant factors such as age and hearing status, also play an important role in determining the brain's response to complex auditory stimuli and contribute to the ability to listen in noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Theoretical and Numerical Evaluation of the MTC Noise Estimate in 2-D 2-group Heterogeneous Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaziere, Christophe [Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Reactor Pysics

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a heterogeneous distribution of the temperature noise on the MTC estimation by noise analysis is investigated. This investigation relies on the 2-group diffusion theory, and all the calculations are performed in a 2-D realistic heterogeneous core. It is shown, similarly to the 1-D case, that the main reason of the MTC underestimation by noise analysis compared to its design-predicted value lies with the fact that the temperature noise might not be homogeneous in the core, and therefore using the local temperature noise in the MTC noise estimation gives erroneous results. A new MTC estimator, which was previously proposed for 1-D 1-group homogeneous cases and which is able to take this heterogeneity into account, was extended to 2-D 2- group heterogeneous cases. It was proven that this new estimator is always able to give a correct MTC estimation with an accuracy of 4%. This small discrepancy comes from the fact that the reactor does not behave in a point-kinetic way, contrary to the assumptions used in the noise estimators. This discrepancy is however quite small. One quantitative result of the present work is a measure of the underestimation of the traditional method as a function of the correlation length of the temperature fluctuations. It is found that the underestimation is larger in 2-D for the same correlation length as in the 1-D case. An underestimation with a factor 5 in the present model is obtained with a radial correlation length of 150 cm. Comparisons with measurements will be possible to make in measurements to be performed in Ringhals.

  4. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  5. Noise Properties of CMOS Current Conveyors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1996-01-01

    The definition of the current conveyor is presented and it is shown how different generations of current conveyors can all be combined into a single definition of a multiple-output second generation current conveyor (CCII). Next, noise sources are introduced into the model, and a general noise...... model for the current conveyor is established. This model is used for the analysis of selected examples of current conveyor based operational amplifier configurations and the relative merits with respect to the noise performance of these configurations are discussed. Finally, the noise model...... is developed for a CMOS current conveyor implementation, and optimization strategies for noise reduction are discussed. It is concluded that a class AB implementation provides more flexibility than does a class A configuration. In both cases it is essential to design low noise current mirrors and current...

  6. Amperometric Noise at Thin Film Band Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon T.; Heien, Michael L.; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    ; for electrodes with low capacitance, the amplifier noise dominated, for electrodes with large capacitances, the noise from the resistance of the electrochemical cell was dominant, while in the intermediate region, the current noise scaled with electrode capacitance. The experimental results and the model......Background current noise is often a significant limitation when using constant-potential amperometry for biosensor application such as amperometric recordings of transmitter release from single cells through exocytosis. In this paper, we fabricated thin-film electrodes of gold and conductive...... polymers and measured the current noise in physiological buffer solution for a wide range of different electrode areas. The noise measurements could be modeled by an analytical expression, representing the electrochemical cell as a resistor and capacitor in series. The studies revealed three domains...

  7. Phase Noise Compensation for OFDM Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Amir; Yemini, Michal

    2017-11-01

    We describe a low complexity method for time domain compensation of phase noise in OFDM systems. We extend existing methods in several respects. First we suggest using the Karhunen-Lo\\'{e}ve representation of the phase noise process to estimate the phase noise. We then derive an improved datadirected choice of basis elements for LS phase noise estimation and present its total least square counterpart problem. The proposed method helps overcome one of the major weaknesses of OFDM systems. We also generalize the time domain phase noise compensation to the multiuser MIMO context. Finally we present simulation results using both simulated and measured phased noise. We quantify the tracking performance in the presence of residual carrier offset.

  8. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Basner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is defined as “unwanted sound.” Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in the vicinity of airports. In some airports, noise constrains air traffic growth. This consensus paper was prepared by the Impacts of Science Group of the Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil Aviation Organization and summarizes the state of the science of noise effects research in the areas of noise measurement and prediction, community annoyance, children’s learning, sleep disturbance, and health. It also briefly discusses civilian supersonic aircraft as a future source of aviation noise.

  9. Advanced turboprop aircraft flyover noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Results from recent laboratory experiments in which human subjects were exposed to synthetic sounds simulating the flyover noise emitted by advanced turbofan aircraft engines are briefly summarized. The Aircraft Noise Synthesis System described by McCurdy et al. (1987) is used to simulate the noise from (1) a conventional turboprop engine, (2) a jet engine, (3) a single-rotating turbofan engine, and counterrotating turbofans with (4) equal or (5) unequal numbers of blades on the two rotors. The measured annoyance levels are compared with effective perceived noise levels in a graph. For a given noise level, the annoyance levels for (3) are shown to be slightly lower than those for all the other engine types, especially if the tone/broadband noise ratio is relatively high.

  10. Complex diffusion process for noise reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadernejad, Ehsan; Barari, A.

    2014-01-01

    Signal de-noising and restoration is an essential step for many signal processing algorithms and applications. One of the most common problems is the removal of some interesting structures in the signal during the restoration process. The capability of methods based on partial differential...... equations (PDEs) in image restoration and de-noising prompted many researchers to search for an improvement in the technique. In this paper, a new method is presented for signal de-noising, based on PDEs and Schrodinger equations, named as complex diffusion process (CDP). This method assumes that variations...... for signal de-noising. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a number of experiments have been performed using Sinusoid, multi-component and FM signals cluttered with noise. The results indicate that the proposed method outperforms the approaches for signal de-noising known in prior art....

  11. Cardiovascular effects of environmental noise exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso; Babisch, Wolfgang; Basner, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The role of noise as an environmental pollutant and its impact on health are being increasingly recognized. Beyond its effects on the auditory system, noise causes annoyance and disturbs sleep, and it impairs cognitive performance. Furthermore, evidence from epidemiologic studies demonstrates that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Both observational and experimental studies indicate that in particular night-time noise can cause disruptions of sleep structure, vegetative arousals (e.g. increases of blood pressure and heart rate) and increases in stress hormone levels and oxidative stress, which in turn may result in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension. This review focuses on the cardiovascular consequences of environmental noise exposure and stresses the importance of noise mitigation strategies for public health. PMID:24616334

  12. Aviation Noise Impacts: State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basner, Mathias; Clark, Charlotte; Hansell, Anna; Hileman, James I.; Janssen, Sabine; Shepherd, Kevin; Sparrow, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Noise is defined as “unwanted sound.” Aircraft noise is one, if not the most detrimental environmental effect of aviation. It can cause community annoyance, disrupt sleep, adversely affect academic performance of children, and could increase the risk for cardiovascular disease of people living in the vicinity of airports. In some airports, noise constrains air traffic growth. This consensus paper was prepared by the Impacts of Science Group of the Committee for Aviation Environmental Protection of the International Civil Aviation Organization and summarizes the state of the science of noise effects research in the areas of noise measurement and prediction, community annoyance, children’s learning, sleep disturbance, and health. It also briefly discusses civilian supersonic aircraft as a future source of aviation noise. PMID:29192612

  13. Self-heating and microwave noise in AlGaN/GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardaravicius, L.; Liberis, J.; Matulionis, A. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, A. Gostauto 11, 2600 Vilnius (Lithuania); Eastman, L.F.; Shealy, J.R.; Vertiatchikh, A. [Cornell University, 425 Philips Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Equivalent noise temperature and spectral intensity of current fluctuations at 10 GHz frequency are investigated for Al{sub 0.15}Ga{sub 0.85}N/GaN channels. Dependence on electric field strength and voltage pulse duration is studied, channel self-heating effects on noise are shown. The lattice temperature is estimated to reach 730 K at 14.1 kV/cm electric field, the heat drain time is found to be 400 ns. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Influence of Transportation Noise and Noise Sensitivity on Annoyance: A Cross-Sectional Study in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Joo Hyun; Lee, Jiho; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Soogab; Lee, Changmyung; Jo, Min-Woo; Sim, Chang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Environmental noise is known to cause noise annoyance. Since noise annoyance is a subjective indicator, other mediators—such as noise sensitivity—may influence its perception. However, few studies have thus far been conducted on noise annoyance in South Korea that consider noise sensitivity and noise level simultaneously. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between noise sensitivity or noise level and noise annoyance on a large scale in South Korea. This study estimated the level of noise exposure based on a noise map created in 2014; identified and surveyed 1836 subjects using a questionnaire; and assessed the impact of transportation noise and noise sensitivity on noise annoyance. The result showed that noise exposure level and noise sensitivity simultaneously affect noise annoyance, and noise sensitivity has a relatively larger impact on noise annoyance. In conclusion, when study subjects were exposed to a similar level of noise, the level of noise annoyance differed depending on the noise sensitivity of the individual. PMID:28335543

  15. Road-Traffic Noise: Annoyance, Risk Perception, and Noise Sensitivity in the Finnish Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enembe Oku Okokon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to road-traffic noise commonly engenders annoyance, the extent of which is determined by factors not fully understood. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of road-traffic noise annoyance and noise sensitivity in the Finnish adult population, while comparing the perceptions of road-traffic noise to exhausts as environmental health problems. Using a questionnaire that yielded responses from 1112 randomly selected adult Finnish respondents, we estimated road-traffic noise- and exhausts-related perceived exposures, health-risk perceptions, and self-reported annoyance on five-point scales, while noise sensitivity estimates were based on four questions. Determinants of noise annoyance and sensitivity were investigated using multivariate binary logistic regression and linear regression models, respectively. High or extreme noise annoyance was reported by 17% of respondents. Noise sensitivity scores approximated a Gaussian distribution. Road-traffic noise and exhausts were, respectively, considered high or extreme population-health risks by 22% and 27% of respondents. Knowledge of health risks from traffic noise, OR: 2.04 (1.09–3.82 and noise sensitivity, OR: 1.07 (1.00–1.14 were positively associated with annoyance. Knowledge of health risks (p < 0.045 and positive environmental attitudes (p < 000 were associated with higher noise sensitivity. Age and sex were associated with annoyance and sensitivity only in bivariate models. A considerable proportion of Finnish adults are highly annoyed by road-traffic noise, and perceive it to be a significant health risk, almost comparable to traffic exhausts. There is no distinct noise-sensitive population subgroup. Knowledge of health risks of road-traffic noise, and attitudinal variables are associated with noise annoyance and sensitivity.

  16. Road-Traffic Noise: Annoyance, Risk Perception, and Noise Sensitivity in the Finnish Adult Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokon, Enembe Oku; Turunen, Anu W.; Ung-Lanki, Sari; Vartiainen, Anna-Kaisa; Tiittanen, Pekka; Lanki, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to road-traffic noise commonly engenders annoyance, the extent of which is determined by factors not fully understood. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of road-traffic noise annoyance and noise sensitivity in the Finnish adult population, while comparing the perceptions of road-traffic noise to exhausts as environmental health problems. Using a questionnaire that yielded responses from 1112 randomly selected adult Finnish respondents, we estimated road-traffic noise- and exhausts-related perceived exposures, health-risk perceptions, and self-reported annoyance on five-point scales, while noise sensitivity estimates were based on four questions. Determinants of noise annoyance and sensitivity were investigated using multivariate binary logistic regression and linear regression models, respectively. High or extreme noise annoyance was reported by 17% of respondents. Noise sensitivity scores approximated a Gaussian distribution. Road-traffic noise and exhausts were, respectively, considered high or extreme population-health risks by 22% and 27% of respondents. Knowledge of health risks from traffic noise, OR: 2.04 (1.09–3.82) and noise sensitivity, OR: 1.07 (1.00–1.14) were positively associated with annoyance. Knowledge of health risks (p noise sensitivity. Age and sex were associated with annoyance and sensitivity only in bivariate models. A considerable proportion of Finnish adults are highly annoyed by road-traffic noise, and perceive it to be a significant health risk, almost comparable to traffic exhausts. There is no distinct noise-sensitive population subgroup. Knowledge of health risks of road-traffic noise, and attitudinal variables are associated with noise annoyance and sensitivity. PMID:26016432

  17. High internal noise and poor external noise filtering characterize perception in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woon Ju; Schauder, Kimberly B; Zhang, Ruyuan; Bennetto, Loisa; Tadin, Duje

    2017-12-14

    An emerging hypothesis postulates that internal noise is a key factor influencing perceptual abilities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Given fundamental and inescapable effects of noise on nearly all aspects of neural processing, this could be a critical abnormality with broad implications for perception, behavior, and cognition. However, this proposal has been challenged by both theoretical and empirical studies. A crucial question is whether and how internal noise limits perception in ASD, independently from other sources of perceptual inefficiency, such as the ability to filter out external noise. Here, we separately estimated internal noise and external noise filtering in ASD. In children and adolescents with and without ASD, we computationally modeled individuals' visual orientation discrimination in the presence of varying levels of external noise. The results revealed increased internal noise and worse external noise filtering in individuals with ASD. For both factors, we also observed high inter-individual variability in ASD, with only the internal noise estimates significantly correlating with severity of ASD symptoms. We provide evidence for reduced perceptual efficiency in ASD that is due to both increased internal noise and worse external noise filtering, while highlighting internal noise as a possible contributing factor to variability in ASD symptoms.

  18. Noise variance estimation for Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniak, Ryszard; Gudzenko, Oleksandr; Pyka, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm that evaluates noise variance with a numerical integration method. For noise variance estimation, we use Krogh method with a variable integration step. In line with common practice, we limit our study to fourth-order method. First, we perform simulation tests for randomly generated signals, related to the transition state and steady state. Next, we formulate three methodologies (research hypotheses) of noise variance estimation, and then compare their efficiency.

  19. EFFECT OF NOISE DISTURBANCES ON THE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Alwan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work studies the effect of noise on the dynamic response of pH, conductivity and thermocouple sensors which used into several industrial processes.Thermocouple would be proven had more stability against noise than conductivity and pH meter. The effect of noise on process signals could be condensate as low as possible by using suitable model of filter especially when the sensors were implemented to a digital computer. 

  20. Ocean Remote Sensing Using Ambient Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Remote Sensing Using Ambient Noise Michael G...approximation to the transient Green’s function G(xA|xB, t) between locations xA and xB is estimated by cross-correlating records of ambient noise...Williams, N. A. Zabotin, L. Zabotina and G. J. Banker, 2014, Acoustic Green’s function extraction from ambient noise in a coastal ocean environment