WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature monitoring

  1. Maine River Temperature Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We collect seasonal and annual temperature measurements on an hourly or quarter hourly basis to monitor habitat suitability for ATS and other species. Temperature...

  2. Temperature Measurement and Monitoring Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    feasibility based on potential usefulness in clinical medicine ’ias explored. All information herein wasn obtained from literature rrv’iew only. No...measurements, applications for temperature measuring devices, and description of several modern body temperature monitoring devices (techniques). Finally...gynecology, drug therapy, and ophthalmology. TEMPERATURE SENSING DEVICES Hippocrates is believed to be the first person Lo associate body temperature as

  3. Passive electronic identification with temperature monitoring. [Temperature monitor for cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, D.M.; Bobbett, R.E.; Koelle, A.R.; Landt, J.A.; Sanders, W.M.; Depp, S.W.; Seawright, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) have been supporting an electronic identification and temperature monitoring project at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since early 1973. The development, so far, indicates that a subdermally-implanted, electronic transponder (having no batteries) can be remotely activated and transmit temperature and identification information back to a receiver in a few tenths of a second. If this electronic identification and temperature monitoring system is developed into a commercially available product line, and is widely accepted by the cattle industry, it will enable them to carry out more extensive management practices. Better management can result in greater efficiency and productivity. The system will also enable regulatory agencies to trace the movements of diseased animals through commerce, and thus assist in disease control measures. Work so far has been concentrated primarily on determining the technical feasibility of the electronic concepts. (auth)

  4. Channel Islands, Kelp Forest Monitoring, Sea Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset from the Channel Islands National Park's Kelp Forest Monitoring Program has subtidal temperature data taken at permanent monitoring sites. Since 1993,...

  5. The design of remote temperature monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biqing; Li, Zhao; Wei, Liuren

    2017-08-01

    This design is made on the basis of the single-chip microcomputer remote temperature monitoring system. STC89C51RC is the main core part, this design use the sensor DHT11 of temperature or humidity and wireless transceiver NRF24L01 the temperature of the test site for long-range wireless measurement and monitoring. The design contains the main system and the small system, of which the main system can show the actual test site temperature and humidity values, voice broadcast, out of control and receive data alarm function; The small system has the function of temperature and humidity, temperature monitoring and sending data. After debugging, the user customizable alarm upper and lower temperature, when the temperature exceeds limit value, the main system of buzzer alarm immediately. The system has simple structure, complete functions and can alarm in time, it can be widely used remote temperature acquisition and monitoring of the site.

  6. Temperature Monitoring and Perioperative Thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I.

    2008-01-01

    Most clinically available thermometers accurately report the temperature of whatever tissue is being measured. The difficulty is that no reliably core-temperature measuring sites are completely non-invasive and easy to use — especially in patients not having general anesthesia. Nonetheless, temperature can be reliably measured in most patients. Body temperature should be measured in patients having general anesthesia exceeding 30 minutes in duration, and in patients having major operations under neuraxial anesthesia. Core body temperature is normally tightly regulated. All general anesthetics produce a profound dose-dependent reduction in the core temperature triggering cold defenses including arterio-venous shunt vasoconstriction and shivering. Anesthetic-induced impairment of normal thermoregulatory control, and the resulting core-to-peripheral redistribution of body heat, is the primary cause of hypothermia in most patients. Neuraxial anesthesia also impairs thermoregulatory control, although to a lesser extant than general anesthesia. Prolonged epidural analgesia is associated with hyperthermia whose cause remains unknown. PMID:18648241

  7. Temperature monitoring device and thermocouple assembly therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Noel P.; Bauer, Frank I.; Bengel, Thomas G.; Kothmann, Richard E.; Mavretish, Robert S.; Miller, Phillip E.; Nath, Raymond J.; Salton, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature monitoring device for measuring the temperature at a surface of a body, composed of: at least one first thermocouple and a second thermocouple; support members supporting the thermocouples for placing the first thermocouple in contact with the body surface and for maintaining the second thermocouple at a defined spacing from the body surface; and a calculating circuit connected to the thermocouples for receiving individual signals each representative of the temperature reading produced by a respective one of the first and second thermocouples and for producing a corrected temperature signal having a value which represents the temperature of the body surface and is a function of the difference between the temperature reading produced by the first thermocouple and a selected fraction of the temperature reading provided by the second thermocouple.

  8. Remote System of Temperature Monitoring and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Carvalho

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system capable of monitoring and control remotely the temperature of a physical space. This work was part of a final year graduation of the Industrial Informatics Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Cávado and Ave. It was developed by an undergraduate student using a LabVIEW custom application with a methodology of on-off control. The local user can use a touch screen display to configure the system setpoint temperature and for overall monitoring. For remote access it can be used any device supporting LabVIEW environment.

  9. Food storage temperatures monitored at retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Sarno

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the present work is to report data concerning the maintenance of the cold chain by retail food business operators. A total of 401 refrigerators and 105 freezers from 112 retails (big, medium, small size were monitored for display temperatures. In addition, the surface temperature of 341 stored food products was recorded. Storage temperatures were respected in the majority of retail markets, with the exception of small retails, where cold chain was not respected. Among all food samples, yogurt was stored at temperature higher than law limits. Our findings show that retailers, in particular those from small markets, are not always familiar with cold chain maintenance. In our opinion, much more attention should be paid in keeping food at cold temperature in order to ensure food safety.

  10. 21 CFR 882.5500 - Lesion temperature monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lesion temperature monitor. 882.5500 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5500 Lesion temperature monitor. (a) Identification. A lesion temperature monitor is a device used to monitor the tissue...

  11. Temperature monitoring of tissue preparation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Erofeev, Andrew V.; Prikhodko, Constantin V.; Matyzhev, Gregory O.; Gerasimov, Roman V.

    1996-12-01

    This paper represents a complex of investigations concerned with temperature dynamics of pulp chamber for various temporal and power parameters of YAG:Ho laser. Comparison of overheating values at various modes of water cooling system operation is performed. Method of pulp chamber temperature measuring based on temperature monitoring of a checking point of a tooth surface is advanced. Moreover, the results of a special sub-research concentrated on thermal feedback signal at tooth tissues under YAG:Nd laser radiation treatment are offered also. Finally, method of recognizing of any diverse tooth tissue types, such as:bone, dentine, enamel and gum against a thermal response is demonstrated within the limits of this research.

  12. Temperature Monitoring System Based on PLC

    OpenAIRE

    Shoucheng Ding; Wenhui Li

    2013-01-01

    The programmable controller is an industrial control computer; it is the new automatic device inherited computer, automatic control technology and communication technology. System temperature signal detected by the temperature sensor. The temperature transmitter will be the temperature value converted into a voltage signal of 0-10V into PLC. PLC voltage signal setting compared to the temperature deviation after PID operation; the system will issue a temperature control signal to reach the ele...

  13. Real-time optoacoustic monitoring of temperature in tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larina, Irina V [Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States); Larin, Kirill V [Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States); Esenaliev, Rinat O [Center for Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0456 (United States)

    2005-08-07

    To improve the safety and efficacy of thermal therapy, it is necessary to map tissue temperature in real time with submillimetre spatial resolution. Accurate temperature maps may provide the necessary control of the boundaries of the heated regions and minimize thermal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Current imaging modalities fail to monitor tissue temperature in real time with high resolution and accuracy. We investigated a non-invasive optoacoustic method for accurate, real-time monitoring of tissue temperature during thermotherapy. In this study, we induced temperature gradients in tissue and tissue-like samples and monitored the temperature distribution using the optoacoustic technique. The fundamental harmonic of a Q-switched Nd : YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm) was used for optoacoustic wave generation and probing of tissue temperature. The tissue temperature was also monitored with a multi-sensor temperature probe inserted in the samples. Good agreement between optoacoustically measured and actual tissue temperatures was obtained. The accuracy of temperature monitoring was better than 1{sup 0}C, while the spatial resolution was about 1 mm. These data suggest that the optoacoustic technique has the potential to be used for non-invasive, real-time temperature monitoring during thermotherapy.

  14. Low-cost automatic station for compost temperature monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo D. L. Jordão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Temperature monitoring is an important procedure to control the composting process. Due to cost limitation, temperature monitoring is manual and with daily sampling resolution. The objective of this study was to develop an automatic station with US$ 150 dollars, able to monitor air temperature at two different points in a compost pile, with a 5-min time resolution. In the calibration test, the sensors showed an estimated uncertainty from ± 1 to ± 1.9 ºC. In the field validation test, the station guaranteed secure autonomy for seven days and endured high humidity and extreme temperature (> 70 °C.

  15. Tissue temperature monitoring using thermoacoustic and photoacoustic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Manojit; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Real-time temperature monitoring with high spatial resolution (~1 mm) and high temperature sensitivity (1 °C or better) is needed for the safe deposition of heat energy in surrounding healthy tissue and efficient destruction of tumor and abnormal cells during thermotherapy. A temperature sensing technique using thermoacoustic and photoacoustic measurements combined with a clinical Philips ultrasound imaging system (iU22) has been explored in this study. Using a tissue phantom, this noninvasive method has been demonstrated to have high temporal resolution and temperature sensitivity. Because both photoacoustic and thermoacoustic signal amplitudes depend on the temperature of the source object, the signal amplitudes can be used to monitor the temperature. The signal is proportional to the dimensionless Grueneisen parameter of the object, which in turn varies with the temperature of the object. A temperature sensitivity of 0.5 °C was obtained at a temporal resolution as short as 3.6 s with 50 signal averages.

  16. Fish product quality evaluation based on temperature monitoring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one kind of perishable food, fish product is at risk of suffering various damages during cold chain and temperature is the most important factor to affect the product quality. This research work on frozen tilapia fillet was aimed at evaluating the fish product quality and predict shelf-life through monitoring temperature change ...

  17. Application for temperature and humidity monitoring of data center environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ş.; Truşcǎ, M. R. C.; Soran, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The technology and computer science registered a large development in the last years. Most systems that use high technologies require special working conditions. The monitoring and the controlling are very important. The temperature and the humidity are important parameters in the operation of computer systems, industrial and research, maintaining it between certain values to ensure their proper functioning being important. Usually, the temperature is maintained in the established range using an air conditioning system, but the humidity is affected. In the present work we developed an application based on a board with own firmware called "AVR_NET_IO" using a microcontroller ATmega32 type for temperature and humidity monitoring in Data Center of INCDTIM. On this board, temperature sensors were connected to measure the temperature in different points of the Data Center and outside of this. Humidity monitoring is performed using data from integrated sensors of the air conditioning system, thus achieving a correlation between humidity and temperature variation. It was developed a software application (CM-1) together with the hardware, which allows temperature monitoring and register inside Data Center and trigger an alarm when variations are greater with 3°C than established limits of the temperature.

  18. The temperature and humidity monitoring system for PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuemmel, Miriam [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) of the PANDA detector to be constructed at FAIR consists of lead tungstate (PWO) crystals, which have a temperature dependent light yield. To achieve the design energy resolution, the EMC must be operated at -25 {sup circle} C, where temperature fluctuations of at most 0.1 {sup circle} C are acceptable. This results in high demands on the precision and resolution of the temperature monitoring. Ultra-thin platinum resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are needed to measure the temperature in the densely packed EMC. The RTDs are read out by the temperature and humidity monitoring system for PANDA (THMP). Both have been developed at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. Not only the RTDs, but also the readout electronics has to be calibrated individually to suffice the high demands. Both, the calibration procedure and improvements in the electronic read out system are presented.

  19. Monitoring Temperature and Fan Speed Using Ganglia and Winbond Chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaffrey, Cattie; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Effective monitoring is essential to keep a large group of machines, like the ones at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), up and running. SLAC currently uses Ganglia Monitoring System to observe about 2000 machines, analyzing metrics like CPU usage and I/O rate. However, metrics essential to machine hardware health, such as temperature and fan speed, are not being monitored. Many machines have a Winbond w83782d chip which monitors three temperatures, two of which come from dual CPUs, and returns the information when the sensor command is invoked. Ganglia also provides a feature, gmetric, that allows the users to monitor their own metrics and incorporate them into the monitoring system. The programming language Perl is chosen to implement a script that invokes the sensors command, extracts the temperature and fan speed information, and calls gmetric with the appropriate arguments. Two machines were used to test the script; the two CPUs on each machine run at about 65 Celsius, which is well within the operating temperature range (The maximum safe temperature range is 77-82 Celsius for the Pentium III processors being used). Installing the script on all machines with a Winbond w83782d chip allows the SLAC Scientific Computing and Computing Services group (SCCS) to better evaluate current cooling methods.

  20. Design of temperature monitoring system based on CAN bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    2017-10-01

    The remote temperature monitoring system based on the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is designed to collect the multi-node remote temperature. By using the STM32F103 as main controller and multiple DS18B20s as temperature sensors, the system achieves a master-slave node data acquisition and transmission based on the CAN bus protocol. And making use of the serial port communication technology to communicate with the host computer, the system achieves the function of remote temperature storage, historical data show and the temperature waveform display.

  1. Adaptive ultrasound temperature imaging for monitoring radiofrequency ablation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Da Liu

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency ablation (RFA has been widely used as an alternative treatment modality for liver tumors. Monitoring the temperature distribution in the tissue during RFA is required to assess the thermal dosage. Ultrasound temperature imaging based on the detection of echo time shifts has received the most attention in the past decade. The coefficient k, connecting the temperature change and the echo time shift, is a medium-dependent parameter used to describe the confounding effects of changes in the speed of sound and thermal expansion as temperature increases. The current algorithm of temperature estimate based on echo time shift detection typically uses a constant k, resulting in estimation errors when ablation temperatures are higher than 50°C. This study proposes an adaptive-k algorithm that enables the automatic adjustment of the coefficient k during ultrasound temperature monitoring of RFA. To verify the proposed algorithm, RFA experiments on in vitro porcine liver samples (total n = 15 were performed using ablation powers of 10, 15, and 20 W. During RFA, a clinical ultrasound system equipped with a 7.5-MHz linear transducer was used to collect backscattered signals for ultrasound temperature imaging using the constant- and adaptive-k algorithms. Concurrently, an infrared imaging system and thermocouples were used to measure surface temperature distribution of the sample and internal ablation temperatures for comparisons with ultrasound estimates. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed adaptive-k method improved the performance in visualizing the temperature distribution. In particular, the estimation errors were also reduced even when the temperature of the tissue is higher than 50°C. The proposed adaptive-k ultrasound temperature imaging strategy has potential to serve as a thermal dosage evaluation tool for monitoring high-temperature RFA.

  2. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  3. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Processing Improvements. Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, Troy Casey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Daw, Joshua Earl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Al Rashdan, Ahamad [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are used as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Although thermocouples are typically used to provide real-time temperature indication in instrumented lead tests, other indicators, such as melt wires, are also often included in such tests as an independent technique of detecting peak temperatures incurred during irradiation. In addition, less expensive static capsule tests, which have no leads attached for real-time data transmission, often rely on melt wires as a post-irradiation technique for peak temperature indication. Melt wires are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that occurred during irradiation. As part of the process initiated to make SiC temperature monitors available at the ATR, post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors have been previously completed at the High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL selected the resistance measurement approach for determining irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors because it is considered to be the most accurate measurement. The current process involves the repeated annealing of the SiC monitors at incrementally increasing temperature, with resistivity measurements made between annealing steps. The process is time consuming and requires the nearly constant attention of a trained staff member. In addition to the expensive and lengthy post analysis required, the current process adds many potential sources of error in the measurement, as the sensor must be repeatedly moved from furnace to test fixture. This time-consuming post irradiation analysis is a significant portion of the total cost of using these otherwise inexpensive sensors. An additional consideration of this research is that, if the SiC post processing can be automated, it

  4. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  5. Dynamic time warping for temperature compensation in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Alexander; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses ultrasonic waves to identify changes in structures. To identify these changes, most guided wave methods require a pristine baseline measurement with which other measurements are compared. Damage signatures arise when there is a deviation between the baseline and the recorded measurement. However, temperature significantly complicates this analysis by creating misalignment between the baseline and measurements. This leads to false alarms of damage and significantly reduces the reliability of these systems. Several methods have been created to account for these temperature perturbations. Yet, most of these compensation methods fail in harsh, highly variable temperature conditions or require a prohibitive amount of prior data. In this paper, we use an algorithm known as dynamic time warping to compensate for temperature in these harsh conditions. We demonstrate that dynamic time warping is able to account for temperature variations whereas the more traditional baseline signal stretch method is unable to resolve damage under high temperature fluctuations.

  6. Fish product quality evaluation based on temperature monitoring in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper. Fish product quality evaluation based on temperature monitoring in cold chain. Wang Tingman1,2, Zhang Jian2,3 and Zhang Xiaoshuan1,2*. 1College of Information and Electrical Engineering, China Agricultural University, 100083, Beijing, China. 2Key Laboratory for Modern ...

  7. Monitoring of O2 and temperature in a pelletizing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstroem, Lars G.; Lundqvist, Stefan H.; Andersson, Torbjoern

    1999-10-01

    We will show the results from a Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) spectrometer installation monitoring the O2 concentration and the temperature in an olivine pellet production plant. The spectrometer has been operating continuously for more than two years. In the pelletizing process a reduction of magnetite and sintering takes place at a temperature around 1250 degree(s)C. To achieve a high and predictable quality of the produced pellets the oxygen concentration and the temperature has to be measured in-situ inside the process furnace. A specially designed high temperature sensor was mounted on the furnace wall and an optical fiber was used to carry the probing light from the TDL spectrometer to the measurement point. The TDL spectrometer operates at two absorption lines in the near infrared wavelength region to measure the oxygen concentration and the temperature simultaneously. The temperature is measured using the relative intensity of the two absorption lines and the concentration is calculated from the temperature compensated absorbance. The accuracy of the concentration and temperature measurements at 1 s response time was 0.1 vol.% and 50 degree(s)C, respectively. In order to validate the TDL measurements the pelletizing process furnace temperature was varied between 100 degree(s)C up to 1300 degree(s)C while the oxygen and temperature readings from the TDL spectrometer was recorded. The temperature measurements were also correlated with temperature measurements using thermocouples inside the furnace. The O2 absorption line parameters were determined in a controlled laboratory experiment using a heated measurement path. This work shows that it is possible to build and field a TDL spectrometer to measure O2 and temperature in-situ in a steel making process furnace.

  8. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA, notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monitoring of temperature inside a lithium-ion secondary battery must be developed. In this work, flexible micro temperature sensors were integrated into a lithium-ion secondary battery using the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS process for monitoring temperature in situ.

  9. High Temperature Transducers for Online Monitoring of Microstructure Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissenden, Cliff [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-30

    A critical technology gap exists relative to online condition monitoring (CM) of advanced nuclear plant components for damage accumulation; there are not capable sensors and infrastructure available for the high temperature environment. The sensory system, monitoring methodology, data acquisition, and damage characterization algorithm that comprise a CM system are investigated here. Thus this work supports the DOE mission to develop a fundamental understanding of advanced sensors to improve physical measurement accuracy and reduce uncertainty. The research involves a concept viability assessment, a detailed technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap.

  10. New cryogenic temperature monitor: PLT-HPT-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera Curbelo, Teodora Aleida; Martín-Fernández, Sergio Gonzáles; Hoyland, R.; Vega-Moreno, A.; Cozar Castellano, Juan; Gómez Reñasco, M. F.; Aguiar-González, M.; Pérez de Taoro, Angeles; Sánchez-de la Rosa, V.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Génova-Santos, R.

    2016-07-01

    The PLT-HPT-32, a new cryogenic temperature monitor, has been developed by the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC) and an external engineering company (Sergio González Martín-Fernandez). The PLT-HPT-32 temperature monitor offers precision measurement in a wide range of cryogenic and higher-temperature applications with the ability to easily monitor up to 32 sensor channels. It provides better measurement performance in applications where researchers need to ensure accuracy and precision in their low cryogenic temperature monitoring. The PLT-HPT-32 supports PTC RTDs such as platinum sensors, and diodes such as the Lake Shore DT-670 Series. Used with silicon diodes, it provides accurate measurements in cryo-cooler applications from 16 K to above room temperature. The resolution of the measurement is less than 0.1K. Measurements can be displayed in voltage units or Kelvin units. For it, two different tables can be used. One can be programmed by the user, and the other one corresponds to Lake Shore DT670 sensor that comes standard. There are two modes of measuring, the instantaneous mode and averaged mode. In this moment, all channels must work in the same mode but in the near future it expected to be used in blocks of eight channels. The instantaneous mode takes three seconds to read all channels. The averaged mode takes one minute to average twenty samples in all channels. Alarm thresholds can be configured independently for each input. The alarm events, come from the first eight channels, can activate the unit's relay outputs for hard-wired triggering of other systems or audible annunciators. Activate relays on high, low, or both alarms for any input. For local monitoring, "Stand-Alone Mode", the front panel of the PLT-HPT-32 features a bright liquid crystal display with an LED backlight that shows up to 32 readings simultaneously. Plus, monitoring can be done over a network "Remote Control Mode". Using the Ethernet port on the PLT-HPT-32, you

  11. Continuous monitoring of fumarole temperatures at Mount Etna (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonia, Paolo; Rizzo, Andrea L.; Diliberto, Iole S.; Favara, Rocco

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we present the first data of temperature continuously recorded in two fumarole fields (designated VOR and HOR) located in the summit area of Mount Etna volcano (Italy). The time series embraces two distinct periods: (1) October 2007 to November 2009, during which an effusive eruption occurred from May 2008 to July 2009, and (2) November 2011 to June 2012, characterized by the occurrence of strong paroxysms (fire fountains and lava flow). The analysis of the temperature signal in both the time and frequency domains, and its comparison with meteorological observations allowed us to separate the exogenous influences from the effects of variations in the activity state of the volcano. The acquired data were weakly affected by seasonal cycles of the air temperature and strongly affected by the rainfall. Optimization of site conditions (i.e., sensor depth and soil permeability) markedly reduced meteorological disturbances. The distance from the main degassing and/or eruptive fractures was crucial to maximizing the probability of the technical survival of the monitoring apparatus, which was seriously affected by the emission of acidic gases, tephra fallout, and lava flows. Apart from the exogenous influences, the most appreciable variation was observed at VOR, where a huge increase in fumarole temperature was detected immediately after the onset of the 2008-2009 eruption. Such an anomalous increase was attributed to the rapid ascent of magma feeding the eruptive fracture. Another abrupt increase in temperature was recorded at HOR in March and April 2012. During this period the frequency of paroxysm occurrence increased markedly, and this led us to hypothesize that the thermal anomaly was due to the intrusion of a new batch of magma in the conduits of the southeast crater. Medium- to long-term monitoring (weeks to months) of fumarole temperatures revealed variations that were attributed to pressurization/depressurization phases of the shallow volcanic system

  12. Precision temperature monitoring (PTM) and Humidity monitoring (HM) sensors of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    A major aspect for the ECAL detector control is the monitoring of the system temperature and the verification that the required temperature stability of the crystal volume and the APDs, expected to be (18 ± 0.05)C, is achieved. The PTM is designed to read out thermistors, placed on both the front and back of the crystals, with a relative precision better than 0.01 C. In total there are ten sensors per supermodule. The humidity level in the electronics compartment is monitored by the HM system and consists of one humidity sensor per module.

  13. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Jovanovic, A. [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  14. A New Wireless Biosensor for Intra-Vaginal Temperature Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel de la Torre

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Body Sensors for medical purposes offer valuable contributions to improve patients’ healthcare, including diagnosis and/or therapeutics monitoring. Body temperature is a crucial parameter in healthcare diagnosis. In gynecology and obstetrics it is measured at the skin’s surface, which is very influenced by the environment. This paper proposes a new intra-body sensor for long-term intra-vaginal temperature collection. The embedded IEEE 802.15.4 communication module allows the integration of this sensor in a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN for remote data access and monitoring. We present the sensor architecture, the construction of the corresponding testbed, and its performance evaluation. This sensor may be used in different medical applications, including preterm labor prevention and fertility and ovulation period detection. The features of the constructed testbed were validated in laboratory tests verifying its accuracy and performance.

  15. Noninvasive temperature monitoring using ultrasound tissue characterization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Petr; Pousek, Lubomir; Schreib, Petr; Peschke, Peter; Vrba, Jan; Zuna, Ivan

    2001-05-01

    Microwave thermotherapy (MT) is an oncological treatment. At present the invasive thermometer probes are clinically used for temperature measuring during an MT. Any invasive handling of tumors is of high-risk. A new method of noninvasive monitoring of temperature distribution in tissue has been developed. An MT treatment of the experimentally induced pedicle-tumors of the rat was prepared. It consists of an intelligent regulation loop controlling a high frequency (HF) generator according to the maximal measured temperature in the tissue and a special HF MT applicator. The loop is also equipped with an invasive thermometer (4 invasive probes). During the MT treatment the series of ultrasound B-mode images were obtained. The texture parameters were evaluated form the obtained ultrasound images. These parameters were correlated with the invasively measured temperature during the MT session. For 60 rat samples a strong correlation between the mean gray level in the ROIs in the ultrasound pictures and the invasively measured temperature in the range 37-44 degree(s)C (98.6-111.2 F) was found. The correlation coefficient of the mean gray level and the invasively measured temperature is 0.96+/- 0.05. A system for representation of changes of spatial temperature distribution of the whole tumor during MT will be presented.

  16. Engine Oil Condition Monitoring Using High Temperature Integrated Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Bird

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work contains two parts. In the first part, high temperature integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUTs made of thick piezoelectric composite films, were coated directly onto lubricant oil supply and sump lines of a modified CF700 turbojet engine. These piezoelectric films were fabricated using a sol-gel spray technology. By operating these IUTs in transmission mode, the amplitude and velocity of transmitted ultrasonic waves across the flow channel of the lubricant oil in supply and sump lines were measured during engine operation. Results have shown that the amplitude of the ultrasonic waves is sensitive to the presence of air bubbles in the oil and that the ultrasound velocity is linearly dependent on oil temperature. In the second part of the work, the sensitivity of ultrasound to engine lubricant oil degradation was investigated by using an ultrasonically equipped and thermally-controlled laboratory testing cell and lubricant oils of different grades. The results have shown that at a given temperature, ultrasound velocity decreases with a decrease in oil viscosity. Based on the results obtained in both parts of the study, ultrasound velocity measurement is proposed for monitoring oil degradation and transient oil temperature variation, whereas ultrasound amplitude measurement is proposed for monitoring air bubble content.

  17. High temperature integrated ultrasonic transducers for engine condition monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, M.; Jen, C.K. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, PQ (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.; Wu, K.T. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Bird, J.; Galeote, B. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Inst. for Aerospace Research; Mrad, N. [Department of National Defence, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Air Vehicles Research Station

    2009-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers (UTs) are used for real-time, in-situ or off-line nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of large metallic structures such as airplanes, automobiles, ships, pressure vessels and pipelines because of their subsurface inspection capability, fast inspection speed, simplicity and cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate effective integrated ultrasonic transducers (IUT) technology to perform non-intrusive engine NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM). High temperature IUTs made of bismuth titanate piezoelectric film greater than 50 {mu}m in thickness were coated directly onto a modified CF700 turbojet engine outer casing, oil sump and supply lines and gaskets using sol-gel spray technology. The assessment was limited to temperatures up to 500 degrees C. The center frequencies of the IUTs were approximately 10 to 17 MHz. Ultrasonic signals obtained in pulse/echo measurements were excellent. High temperature ultrasonic performance will likely be obtained in the transmission mode as well. The potential applications of the developed IUTs include non-intrusive real-time temperature, lubricant oil quality and metal debris monitoring within a turbojet engine environment. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  18. An analysis of spatial representativeness of air temperature monitoring stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suhua; Su, Hongbo; Tian, Jing; Wang, Weizhen

    2017-04-01

    Surface air temperature is an essential variable for monitoring the atmosphere, and it is generally acquired at meteorological stations that can provide information about only a small area within an r m radius (r-neighborhood) of the station, which is called the representable radius. In studies on a local scale, ground-based observations of surface air temperatures obtained from scattered stations are usually interpolated using a variety of methods without ascertaining their effectiveness. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate the spatial representativeness of ground-based observations of surface air temperature before conducting studies on a local scale. The present study used remote sensing data to estimate the spatial distribution of surface air temperature using the advection-energy balance for air temperature (ADEBAT) model. Two target stations in the study area were selected to conduct an analysis of spatial representativeness. The results showed that one station (AWS 7) had a representable radius of about 400 m with a possible error of less than 1 K, while the other station (AWS 16) had the radius of about 250 m. The representable radius was large when the heterogeneity of land cover around the station was small.

  19. Application of displacement monitoring system on high temperature steam pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffar, M. H. A.; Husin, S.; Baek, J. E.

    2017-10-01

    High-energy piping systems of power plants such as Main Steam (MS) pipe or Hot Reheat (HR) pipe are operating at high temperature and high pressure at base and cyclic loads. In the event of transient condition, a pipe can be deflected dramatically and caused high stress in the pipe, yielding to failure of the piping system. Periodic monitoring and walk down can identify abnormalities but limitations exist in the standard walk down practice. This paper provides a study of pipe displacement monitoring on MS pipe of coal-fired power plant to continuously capture the pipe movement behaviour at different load using 3-Dimensional Displacement Measuring System (3DDMS). The displacement trending at Location 5 and 6 (north and south) demonstrated pipes displace less than 25% to that of design movement. It was determined from synchronisation analysis that Location 7 (north) and Location 8 (south) pipe actual movement difference has exceeded the design movement difference. Visual survey at specified locations with significant displacement trending reveals issues of hydraulic snubber and piping interferences. The study demonstrated that the displacement monitoring is able to capture pipe movement at all time and allows engineer to monitor pipe movement behaviour, aids in identifying issue early for remedy action.

  20. Temperature monitored on the cuff surface of an endotracheal tube reflects body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugk, Moritz; Stratil, Peter; Sterz, Fritz; Krizanac, Danica; Testori, Christoph; Uray, Thomas; Koller, Julia; Behringer, Wilhelm; Holzer, Michael; Herkner, Harald

    2010-07-01

    When treating patients with cardiac arrest with mild therapeutic hypothermia, a reliable and easy-to-use temperature probe is desirable. This study was conducted to investigate the accuracy and safety of tracheal temperature as a measurement of body temperature. Observational cohort study. Emergency department of a tertiary care university hospital. Patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest intended for mild hypothermia therapy. Intubation was performed with a newly developed endotracheal tube that contains a temperature sensor inside the cuff surface. During the cooling, mild hypothermia maintenance, and rewarming phases, the temperature was recorded minute by minute. These data were compared with the temperature assessed by esophageal and blood temperature probes. Thereafter, tracheoscopy was performed to evaluate the condition of the tracheal mucosa. Approximately 2000 measurements per temperature sensor per patient were recorded in 21 patients. The mean bias between the blood temperature and the tracheal temperature was -0.16 degrees C (limits of agreement: -0.36 degrees C to 0.04 degrees C). The mean bias between the esophageal and tracheal temperatures was -0.22 degrees C (limits of agreement: -0.49 degrees C to 0.07 degrees C). Agreement between temperature probes investigated by the Bland-Altman method showed a mean bias of less than -(1/4) degrees C, and time lags assessed graphically by hysteresis plots were negligible. No clinically relevant injury to the tracheal mucosa was detected. Temperature monitoring at the cuff surface of an endotracheal tube is safe and provides accurate and reliable data in all phases of therapeutically induced mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest.

  1. The Influence of Logger Bias on Reported Temperature Trends: Implications for Temperature Monitoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, I.; Fryer, R. J.; Bacon, P. J.; Stirling, D.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in river temperature monitoring and research in recent years. This has been driven by factors including a greater awareness of the importance of river temperature for freshwater ecology, the potential for detrimental extremes under climate change and the availability of increasingly affordable dataloggers. A number of studies have attempted to collate and analyse pre-existing long-term (decadal) datasets to assess for evidence of temporal trends. These studies require considerable care given the magnitude of temporal trends (often manufacturer reported accuracy with consequences for the reliability and interpretation of findings. This study assessed the potential influence of logger bias on reported temperature trends in the Girnock Burn, Scotland over > 25 years. The bias of temperature measurements made by different dataloggers (two makes and five models) was determined through cross-calibration against a reference datalogger. Long-term trends in stream temperature metrics (daily mean, max, min) were characterised using Generalised Additive Mixed Models (GAMM). Models were fitted to (1) the raw data and (2) data corrected for logger bias. Significant non-linear temporal trends were observed in the raw data. These trends were accentuated when corrected for logger bias. Given the potential to accentuate or remove long-term trends, it is suggested that robust internal and external calibration and quality control procedures should be established for new temperature networks. Such approaches are capable of removing logger bias and improving accuracy by an order of magnitude over manufacturer stated values.

  2. Ultrasonic Approach to Nonivasive Temperature Monitoring During Microwave Thermotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vrba

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave thermotherapy (MT is an oncological treatment. At presentthe invasive thermometer probes are clinically used for temperaturemeasuring during an MT. Any invasive handling of tumors is ofhigh-risk. A new possible method of noninvasive monitoring oftemperature distribution in tissue has been developed. An MT treatmentof the experimentally induced pedicle-tumors of the rat was prepared.For 100 rat samples a strong correlation between the mean gray level inthe ROIs in the ultrasound pictures and the invasively measuredtemperature in the range 37-44 °C was found. The correlationcoefficient of the mean gray level and the invasively measuredtemperature is 0.96a0.05. A system for representation of changes ofspatial temperature distribution of the whole tumor during MT ispresented.

  3. Evaluation and Monitoring of Jpss Land Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y.; Yu, P.; Liu, Y.; Csiszar, I. A.

    2016-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is one of environmental data records (EDRs) produced operationally through the U.S. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) mission. LST is an important parameter for understanding climate change, modeling the hydrological and biogeochemical cycles, and is a prime candidate for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) assimilation models. Recently, the international LST and Emissivity Working Ggroup (ILSTE-WG) is promoting to the inclusion of the LST as essential climate variable (ECV) in the Global Climate Observation System (GCOS) of the Word Meteorological Organization (WMO). At the Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) of National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA), we, are as a science team, are responsible to for the science of JPSS LST production. In this work, we present our activities and accomplishments on the JPSS LST evaluation and monitoring since the launch of the first JPSS satellite, i.e. S-NPP, satellite. Beta version, provisional version, and validated stage 1 version of the S-NPP LST products which were announced in May 2013, July 2014, and March 2015, respectively. Evaluation of the LST products have been performed versus ground measurements and other polar-orbiting satellite LST data (e,g. MODIS LSTs); some results will be illustrated. A daily monitoring system of the JPSS LST production has been developed, which presents daily, weekly and monthly global LST maps and inter-comparison results on the STAR JPSS program website. Further, evaluation of the enterprise LST algorithm for JPSS mission which is in development at STAR currently are presented in this work. Finally, evaluation and monitoring plan of the LST production for the JPSS-1 satellite are also presented.

  4. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS, an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  5. An Evaluation of Portable Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Monitor Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Earl; Grundstein, Andrew; Rosen, Adam; Miles, Jessica; Ko, Jupil; Curry, Patrick

    2017-12-01

      Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) is the gold standard for assessing environmental heat stress during physical activity. Many manufacturers of commercially available instruments fail to report WBGT accuracy.   To determine the accuracy of several commercially available WBGT monitors compared with a standardized reference device.   Observational study.   Field test.   Six commercially available WBGT devices.   Data were recorded for 3 sessions (1 in the morning and 2 in the afternoon) at 2-minute intervals for at least 2 hours. Mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean bias error (MBE), and the Pearson correlation coefficient ( r) were calculated to determine instrument performance compared with the reference unit.   The QUESTemp° 34 (MAE = 0.24°C, RMSE = 0.44°C, MBE = -0.64%) and Extech HT30 Heat Stress Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Meter (Extech; MAE = 0.61°C, RMSE = 0.79°C, MBE = 0.44%) demonstrated the least error in relation to the reference standard, whereas the General WBGT8778 Heat Index Checker (General; MAE = 1.18°C, RMSE = 1.34°C, MBE = 4.25%) performed the poorest. The QUESTemp° 34 and Kestrel 4400 Heat Stress Tracker units provided conservative measurements that slightly overestimated the WBGT provided by the reference unit. Finally, instruments using the psychrometric wet bulb temperature (General, REED Heat Index WBGT Meter, and WBGT-103 Heat Stroke Checker) tended to underestimate the WBGT, and the resulting values more frequently fell into WBGT-based activity categories with fewer restrictions as defined by the American College of Sports Medicine.   The QUESTemp° 34, followed by the Extech, had the smallest error compared with the reference unit. Moreover, the QUESTemp° 34, Extech, and Kestrel units appeared to offer conservative yet accurate assessments of the WBGT, potentially minimizing the risk of allowing physical activity to continue in stressful heat environments. Instruments using the

  6. 78 FR 65306 - Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AGENCY Best Practices for Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams AGENCY... Continuous Monitoring of Temperature and Flow in Wadeable Streams'' (EPA/600/R-13/170). The EPA also is... Development. The report describes best practices for the deployment of continuous temperature and flow sensors...

  7. Using distributed temperature sensing to monitor field scale dynamics of ground surface temperature and related substrate heat flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bense, V.F.; Read, T.; Verhoef, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present one of the first studies of the use of distributed temperature sensing (DTS) along fibre-optic cables to purposely monitor spatial and temporal variations in ground surface temperature (GST) and soil temperature, and provide an estimate of the heat flux at the base of the canopy layer

  8. Stream Temperature Monitoring on Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 2001-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Stream temperature was monitored at 18 sites on 14 rivers in Togiak National Wildlife Refuge between 2001 and 2012. Temperature was recorded on an hourly basis using...

  9. Pilot study to monitor body temperature of dairy cows with a rumen bolus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ipema, A.H.; Goense, D.; Hogewerf, P.H.; Houwers, H.W.J.; Roest, H.I.J.

    2008-01-01

    A bolus containing a mote (temperature sensor, processor and radio) was placed in the rumen of a fistulated cow to monitor body temperature. Rumen temperature was measured every minute and stored in the internal buffer of the mote. The measured temperature was also transmitted to a base station by

  10. Temperature monitoring: the consequences and prevention of mild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homeothermic species require a nearly constant internal body temperature. Significant deviations from “normal” internal temperature cause the metabolic function to deteriorate. Usually, the human thermoregulatory system maintains a core body temperature within 0.2°C of normal, near 37°C. Hypothermia results from ...

  11. Warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system design based on Kingview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yanghui; Wang, Xifu; Liu, Jingyun

    2017-04-01

    Storage is the key link of modern logistics. Warehouse environment monitoring is an important part of storage safety management. To meet the storage requirements of different materials, guarantee their quality in the greatest extent, which has great significance. In the warehouse environment monitoring, the most important parameters are air temperature and relative humidity. In this paper, a design of warehouse multipoint temperature and humidity monitoring system based on King view, which realizes the multipoint temperature and humidity data real-time acquisition, monitoring and storage in warehouse by using temperature and humidity sensor. Also, this paper will take the bulk grain warehouse as an example and based on the data collected in real-time monitoring, giving the corresponding expert advice that combined with the corresponding algorithm, providing theoretical guidance to control the temperature and humidity in grain warehouse.

  12. Simulation study based on the single-point temperature monitoring system of LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongling; Yang, Na; Liu, Shuping; Pan, Xiaohui; Wang, Wenjiang

    2014-12-01

    This paper takes LabVIEW2012 as a development platform, creating a J-type thermocouple sensor and the NI USB-6229 data acquisition card and other hardware emulation circuitry which combined with the PC designed a single-point temperature monitoring system. Through simulation experiments, the system has a collection interval, the sampling rate per channel sampling on the temperature limit set by the user function and it also has the function of real-time display the current temperature, the temperature limit alarm, maximum temperature, minimum temperature display and a temperature history data query. This system can be used for temperature monitoring of life, research, industrial control, environmental monitoring, biomedical, tobacco processing, greenhouse cultivation, livestock breeding and other fields, which has important significance and practical value.

  13. Large-Scale Wireless Temperature Monitoring System for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Storage Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwen Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature distribution is a critical indicator of the health condition for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG storage tanks. In this paper, we present a large-scale wireless temperature monitoring system to evaluate the safety of LPG storage tanks. The system includes wireless sensors networks, high temperature fiber-optic sensors, and monitoring software. Finally, a case study on real-world LPG storage tanks proves the feasibility of the system. The unique features of wireless transmission, automatic data acquisition and management, local and remote access make the developed system a good alternative for temperature monitoring of LPG storage tanks in practical applications.

  14. Design and evaluation of an inexpensive radiation shield for monitoring surface air temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary A. Holden; Anna E. Klene; Robert F. Keefe; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2013-01-01

    Inexpensive temperature sensors are widely used in agricultural and forestry research. This paper describes a low-cost (~3 USD) radiation shield (radshield) designed for monitoring surface air temperatures in harsh outdoor environments. We compared the performance of the radshield paired with low-cost temperature sensors at three sites in western Montana to several...

  15. Sensor programming and concept implementation of a temperature monitoring system, using Arduino as prototyping platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sbîrnă, Sebastian; Søberg, Peder Veng; Sbîrnă, Liana Simona

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports the programming paradigms that have been developed for a temperature monitoring system able to provide accurate data regarding food temperatures inside refrigerated vehicles and alert the driver accordingly, in relation to which temperature states are encountered. The men...

  16. Monitoring on internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding fiber Bragg grating for early diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Tang, Ming

    2017-04-01

    The abnormal temperature rise is the precursor of the defective composite insulator in power transmission line. However no consolidated techniques or methodologies can on line monitor its internal temperature now. Thus a new method using embedding fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rod is adopted to monitor its internal temperature. To correctly demodulate the internal temperature of FRP rod from the Bragg wavelength shift of FBG, the conversion coefficient between them is deduced theoretically based on comprehensive investigation on the thermal stresses of the metal-composite joint, as well as its material and structural properties. Theoretical model shows that the conversion coefficients of FBG embedded in different positions will be different because of non-uniform thermal stress distribution, which is verified by an experiment. This work lays the theoretical foundation of monitoring the internal temperature of composite insulator with embedding FBG, which is of great importance to its health structural monitoring, especially early diagnosis.

  17. Monitoring and modeling temperature variations inside silage stacks using novel wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, O.; Nadimi, E.S.; Blanes-Vidal, V.

    2009-01-01

    By monitoring silage temperature at different locations inside silage stacks, it is possible to detect any significant increases in temperature occurring during silage decomposition. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop novel noninvasive wireless sensor nodes for measuring...... the temperature inside silage stacks; (2) to design a suitable sensor protection housing that prevents physical and chemical damage to the sensor: and (3) to mathematically model temperature variations inside a silage stack, using system identification techniques. The designed wireless nodes were used to monitor...... temperatures in a full-sized silage stack over 53 days. Results showed that the wireless sensor nodes accurately monitored the temperature inside the silage stack at depths of 25 and 50cm and reliably transmitted the measured data through the network; between 98.9% and 99.4% of the packets disseminated from...

  18. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Water Temperature Data from Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STRs) deployed at coral reef sites in the Pacific Remote Island Areas from 2011 to 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water temperature data are collected using subsurface temperature recorders (STRs) that aid in the monitoring of seawater temperature variability at permanent coral...

  19. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Water Temperature Data from Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STRs) deployed at coral reef sites in American Samoa from 2012 to 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water temperature data are collected using subsurface temperature recorders (STRs) that aid in the monitoring of seawater temperature variability at permanent coral...

  20. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Water Temperature Data from Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STRs) deployed at coral reef sites in the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2010 to 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water temperature data are collected using subsurface temperature recorders (STRs) that aid in the monitoring of seawater temperature variability at permanent coral...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Water Temperature Data from Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STRs) deployed at coral reef sites in the Marianas Archipelago from 2011 to 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water temperature data are collected using subsurface temperature recorders (STRs) that aid in the monitoring of seawater temperature variability at permanent coral...

  2. Photoacoustic temperature measurements for monitoring of thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiou-Han; Wei, Chen-Wei; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Li, Pai-Chi

    2009-02-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy is a new cancer thermotherapy method based on surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. It is important to measure the temperature during thermotherapy for safety and efficacy. In this study, we apply a photoacoustic (PA) method for real-time, non-invasive temperature measurements. In particular, this method can be effectively combined with a photothermal therapy system that we developed in parallel. The method is based on the fact that the PA pressure amplitude is linearly related to temperature. To explore its potential, a home-made, 20 MHz PA transducer was used, in which an optical fiber was inserted in its center for emitting laser pulses while the PA signal was simultaneously detected. Continuous wave (CW) laser was used to heat the subject, including both phantoms and mice. The temperature of the region of interest was also measured by a fine-needle thermal couple. Results show that the temperature was linearly proportional to the PA signal with good correlation with the CW laser irradiation. The in vivo study also demonstrated potential of this technique.

  3. Optical Fiber Strain Instrumentation for High Temperature Aerospace Structural Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the program is the development and laboratory demonstration of sensors based on silica optical fibers for measurement of high temperature strain for aerospace materials evaluations. A complete fiber strain sensor system based on white-light interferometry was designed and implemented. An experiment set-up was constructed to permit testing of strain measurement up to 850 C. The strain is created by bending an alumina cantilever beam to which is the fiber sensor is attached. The strain calibration is provided by the application of known beam deflections. To ensure the high temperature operation capability of the sensor, gold-coated single-mode fiber is used. Moreover, a new method of sensor surface attachment which permits accurate sensor gage length determination is also developed. Excellent results were obtained at temperatures up to 800-850 C.

  4. Imbedded fiber optic pressure and temperature sensors enable cure monitoring of pultruded composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, David

    1990-05-01

    The application of fiberoptic multifunction sensing system for the measurement of temperature and pressure during the curing of fiberglass/epoxy composite structure is described. The system employs interferometric principles to measure temperature, pressure, and refractive index of liquids as well as other physical parameters. Fiberoptic pressure and temperature sensors have been employed in monitoring composites pultrusion and molding. The system is ideally suited for monitoring a variety of composite curing processes because of the sensor's microminiature size, tolerance of moderately high temperatures, non-metallic construction, and inherent immunity to electromagnetic and radio frequency signals.

  5. In-Situ Real-Time Temperature Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program addresses the need for interfacial and in-depth temperature monitoring of thermal protection systems (TPS). Novel, linear drive, eddy current methods...

  6. T2-based temperature monitoring in trabecular bone marrow for MRgHIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhinsky, Eugene; Han, Misung; Krug, Roland; Rieke, Viola

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical protocols for HIFU treatment of painful bone metastases rely on measurement of temperature change of adjacent muscle to estimate the temperature of the bone. In this study, we investigated if T2-based temperature mapping could be used to determine the temperature within ex vivo trabecular bone during HIFU ablation. We have shown that T2-based ablation monitoring in the red marrow in trabecular bone is feasible. The linear relationship between T2 change and temperature could be used to quantify the temperature during heating of up to 60°C.

  7. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  8. An overview of temperature monitoring devices for early detection of diabetic foot disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Roback, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic foot complications are associated with substantial costs and loss of quality of life. This article gives an overview of available and emerging devices for the monitoring of foot temperature as a means of early detection of foot disorders in diabetes. The aim is to describe the technologies and to summarize experiences from experimental use. Studies show that regular monitoring of foot temperature may limit the incidence of disabling conditions such as foot ulcers and lower-limb amput...

  9. SCUBA divers as oceanographic samplers: The potential of dive computers to augment aquatic temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Serena; Hull, Tom; Sivyer, David B.; Pearce, David; Pinnegar, John K.; Sayer, Martin D. J.; Mogg, Andrew O. M.; Azzopardi, Elaine; Gontarek, Steve; Hyder, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring temperature of aquatic waters is of great importance, with modelled, satellite and in-situ data providing invaluable insights into long-term environmental change. However, there is often a lack of depth-resolved temperature measurements. Recreational dive computers routinely record temperature and depth, so could provide an alternate and highly novel source of oceanographic information to fill this data gap. In this study, a citizen science approach was used to obtain over 7,000 scuba diver temperature profiles. The accuracy, offset and lag of temperature records was assessed by comparing dive computers with scientific conductivity-temperature-depth instruments and existing surface temperature data. Our results show that, with processing, dive computers can provide a useful and novel tool with which to augment existing monitoring systems all over the globe, but especially in under-sampled or highly changeable coastal environments. PMID:27445104

  10. Implementation of a Multi-channel Ultrasonic Thickness Monitoring Technique for a High Temperature Pipe Thinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Dong Jin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Se Beom [Dankook Univ., Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Currently pipe thinning has occurred in the carbon steel piping in nuclear power plants. In order to monitor a FAC(Flow Accelerated Corrosion) in a pipe, there is a need to monitor the pipe wall thickness at a high temperature. An ultrasonic thickness measurement method is a well-known and most commonly used nondestructive testing technique for wall thickness monitoring of a piping or plate. However, conventional ultrasonic thickness gauging techniques cannot be applied to high temperatures of above 200 .deg. C, because conventional piezo-ceramic becomes depolarized at temperatures above the Curie temperature as well as the difference of thermal expansion of the substrate, couplant, and piezoelectric materials may cause a failure. In addition, this manual ultrasonic method reveals several disadvantages: inspections have to be performed during shutdowns with the possible consequences of prolonging down time and increasing production losses, insulation has to be removed and replaced for each manual measurement, and scaffolding has to be installed to inaccessible areas, resulting in considerable cost for intervention. In order to solve those fundamental problems occurring during the propagation of ultrasound at high temperature, a shear horizontal waveguide technique for wall thickness monitoring at high temperatures is developed. Multi-channel ultrasonic wall thickness monitoring system for pipe thinning at high temperature is developed. The pitch-catch method was used with two shear horizontal waveguides. A clamping device for dry coupling contact between the end of waveguide and pipe surface is developed. A computer program for multi-channel on-line monitoring of the pipe thickness at high temperature was developed. Measurement errors were minimized by a moving gate control with temperature variation, normalization of signal amplitude, automatic determination of ultrasonic flight time, and temperature compensation capabilities.

  11. A Wireless Portable High Temperature Data Monitor for Tunnel Ovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mayo Bayón

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tunnel ovens are widely used in the food industry to produce biscuits and pastries. In order to obtain a high quality product, it is very important to control the heat transferred to each piece of dough during baking. This paper proposes an innovative, non-distorting, low cost wireless temperature measurement system, called “eBiscuit”, which, due to its size, format and location in the metal rack conveyor belt in the oven, is able to measure the temperature a real biscuit experience while baking. The temperature conditions inside the oven are over 200 °C for several minutes, which could damage the “eBiscuit” electronics. This paper compares several thermal insulating materials that can be used in order to avoid exceeding the maximum operational conditions (80 °C in the interior of the “eBiscuit. The data registered is then transmitted to a base station where information can be processed to obtain an oven model. The experimental results with real tunnel ovens confirm its good performance, which allows detecting production anomalies early on.

  12. A GSM-Based Remote Temperature and Humidity Monitoring System for Granary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Xiao Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A remote temperature and humidity monitoring system is designed based on the GSM technology and MSP430. With the digital sensor DSB1820 and SHT11, the temperature and humidity of the granary are detected, and these parameters can be adjusted with the controlling system to adapt various working conditions. Through the GSM system, the detected data could be sent to various monitoring devices, such as cellphones and laptops. These data can be used for data display, inquiry, controlling and storage at the remote terminals. The experimental results show that the system is convenient and concise, which meets the remote monitoring demand for the modern granary.

  13. Online Chip Temperature Monitoring Using υce-Load Current and IR Thermography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghimire, Pramod; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Trintis, Ionut

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents on-state collector-emitter voltage (υce, on)-load current (Ic) method to monitor chip temperature on power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules in converter operation. The measurement method is also evaluated using infrared (IR) thermography. Temperature dependencies...

  14. Decision support system for temperature monitoring in beehives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dušan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available European honeybee colonies are the most important pollinator insects and source of honey and other useful products. Honeybee colonies today face new diseases and pests as well as pollution which threaten their survival and endanger whole food production which relies on honey bee pollination. Internet of Things (IoT technology enables integration of wireless sensors inside beehives to enable remote monitoring of various beehive parameters from remote location using Internet. Detection of certain critical events in beehive is hard to be explicitly program due to complex dependence between multiple input parameters. Machine learning algorithms give computers the ability to learn to detect these events without being explicitly programmed. Detection of these event from streams of data collected from IoT sensors is possible using Complex Event Processing (CEP which applies machine induced knowledge do detect and warn beekeepers about certain events in beehive.

  15. Circadian rhythms in bed rest: Monitoring core body temperature via heat-flux approach is superior to skin surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendt, Stefan; Maggioni, Martina Anna; Nordine, Michael; Steinach, Mathias; Opatz, Oliver; Belavý, Daniel; Felsenberg, Dieter; Koch, Jochim; Shang, Peng; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Stahn, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Continuous recordings of core body temperature (CBT) are a well-established approach in describing circadian rhythms. Given the discomfort of invasive CBT measurement techniques, the use of skin temperature recordings has been proposed as a surrogate. More recently, we proposed a heat-flux approach (the so-called Double Sensor) for monitoring CBT. Studies investigating the reliability of the heat-flux approach over a 24-hour period, as well as comparisons with skin temperature recordings, are however lacking. The first aim of the study was therefore to compare rectal, skin, and heat-flux temperature recordings for monitoring circadian rhythm. In addition, to assess the optimal placement of sensor probes, we also investigated the effect of different anatomical measurement sites, i.e. sensor probes positioned at the forehead vs. the sternum. Data were collected as part of the Berlin BedRest study (BBR2-2) under controlled, standardized, and thermoneutral conditions. 24-hours temperature data of seven healthy males were collected after 50 days of -6° head-down tilt bed-rest. Mean Pearson correlation coefficients indicated a high association between rectal and forehead temperature recordings (r > 0.80 for skin and Double Sensor). In contrast, only a poor to moderate relationship was observed for sensors positioned at the sternum (r = -0.02 and r = 0.52 for skin and Double Sensor, respectively). Cross-correlation analyses further confirmed the feasibility of the forehead as a preferred monitoring site. The phase difference between forehead Double Sensor and rectal recordings was not statistically different from zero (p = 0.313), and was significantly smaller than the phase difference between forehead skin and rectal temperatures (p = 0.016). These findings were substantiated by cosinor analyses, revealing significant differences for mesor, amplitude, and acrophase between rectal and forehead skin temperature recordings, but not between forehead Double Sensor and rectal

  16. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  17. Methods for accurate cold-chain temperature monitoring using digital data-logger thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacky, M. J.; Miller, W. M.; Strouse, G. F.

    2013-09-01

    Complete and accurate records of vaccine temperature history are vital to preserving drug potency and patient safety. However, previously published vaccine storage and handling guidelines have failed to indicate a need for continuous temperature monitoring in vaccine storage refrigerators. We evaluated the performance of seven digital data logger models as candidates for continuous temperature monitoring of refrigerated vaccines, based on the following criteria: out-of-box performance and compliance with manufacturer accuracy specifications over the range of use; measurement stability over extended, continuous use; proper setup in a vaccine storage refrigerator so that measurements reflect liquid vaccine temperatures; and practical methods for end-user validation and establishing metrological traceability. Data loggers were tested using ice melting point checks and by comparison to calibrated thermocouples to characterize performance over 0 °C to 10 °C. We also monitored logger performance in a study designed to replicate the range of vaccine storage and environmental conditions encountered at provider offices. Based on the results of this study, the Centers for Disease Control released new guidelines on proper methods for storage, handling, and temperature monitoring of vaccines for participants in its federally-funded Vaccines for Children Program. Improved temperature monitoring practices will ultimately decrease waste from damaged vaccines, improve consumer confidence, and increase effective inoculation rates.

  18. T2-based temperature monitoring in bone marrow for MR-guided focused ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Ozhinsky, Eugene; Han, Misung; Bucknor, Matthew; Krug, Roland; Rieke, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Background Current clinical protocols for MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of osseous lesions, including painful bone metastases and osteoid osteomas, rely on measurement of the temperature change in adjacent muscle to estimate the temperature of the bone. The goal of this study was to determine if T2-based thermometry could be used to monitor the temperature change in bone marrow during focused ultrasound ablation of bone lesions. Methods We investigated the dependence of T2 o...

  19. The design of multi temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junyu; Xu, Peng; Peng, Zitao; Qiang, Haonan; Shen, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there is only one monitor of the temperature and humidity in an incubator, which may cause inaccurate or unreliable data, and even endanger the life safety of the baby. In order to solve this problem,we designed a multi-point temperature and humidity monitoring system for incubators. The system uses the STC12C5A60S2 microcontrollers as the sender core chip which is connected to four AM2321 temperature and humidity sensors. We select STM32F103ZET6 core development board as the receiving end,cooperating with Zigbee wireless transmitting and receiving module to realize data acquisition and transmission. This design can realize remote real-time observation data on the computer by communicating with PC via Ethernet. Prototype tests show that the system can effectively collect and display the information of temperature and humidity of multiple incubators at the same time and there are four monitors in each incubator.

  20. Temperature effect on hybrid damage monitoring of PSC girder bridges by using acceleration and impedance signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Dong-Soo; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Na, Won-Bae

    2009-03-01

    Acceleration and impedance signatures extracted from a structure are appealing features for a prompt diagnosis on structural condition since those are relatively simple to measure and utilize. However, the feasibility of using them for damage monitoring is limited when their changes go undisclosed due to uncertain temperature conditions, particularly for large structures. In this study, temperature effect on hybrid damage monitoring of prestress concrete (PSC) girder bridges is presented. In order to achieve the objective, the following approaches are implemented. Firstly, a hybrid monitoring algorithm using acceleration and impedance signatures is proposed. The hybrid monitoring algorithm mainly consists of three sequential phases: 1) the global occurrence of damage is alarmed by monitoring changes in acceleration features, 2) the type of damage is identified as either prestress-loss or flexural stiffness-loss by identifying patterns of impedance features, 3) the location and the extent of damage are estimated from damage index method using natural frequency and mode shape changes. Secondly, changes in acceleration and impedance signatures were investigated under various temperature conditions on a laboratory-scaled PSC girder model. Then the relationship between temperatures and those signatures is analyzed to estimate and a set of empirical correlations that will be utilized for the damage alarming and classification of PSC girder bridges. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by using a lab-scaled PSC girder bridge for which acceleration and impedance signatures were measured for several damage scenarios under uncertain temperature conditions.

  1. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farve Daneshvar Fard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on a 40×50 cm2 sheet. Pressure and temperature data and the corresponding maps were displayed on a computer in real-time. Risk assessment could be performed by monitoring and recording absolute pressure and temperature values, as well as deviations over time. Furthermore, a posture detection procedure was proposed for sitting posture identification. Information about the patient’s movement history may help caregivers make informed decisions about the patient’s repositioning and ulcer prevention strategies. Results Steady temporal behaviour of the designed system and repeatability of the measurements were evaluated using several particular tests. The results illustrated that the system could be utilized for continuous monitoring of interface pressure and temperature for pressure ulcer prevention. Furthermore, the proposed method for detecting sitting posture was verified using a statistical analysis. Conclusion A continuous time pressure and temperature monitoring system was presented in this study. This system may be suited for pressure ulcer prevention given its feasibility for simultaneous monitoring of pressure and temperature and alarming options. Furthermore, a method for detecting different sitting postures was proposed and verified. Pressure ulcers in wheelchair-bound patients may be prevented using this sitting posture detection method.

  2. In Situ Monitoring of Temperature inside Lithium-Ion Batteries by Flexible Micro Temperature Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Tang, Ming-Shao; Chen, Pei-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion secondary batteries are commonly used in electric vehicles, smart phones, personal digital assistants (PDA), notebooks and electric cars. These lithium-ion secondary batteries must charge and discharge rapidly, causing the interior temperature to rise quickly, raising a safety issue. Over-charging results in an unstable voltage and current, causing potential safety problems, such as thermal runaways and explosions. Thus, a micro flexible temperature sensor for the in in-situ monit...

  3. An overview of temperature monitoring devices for early detection of diabetic foot disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, Kerstin

    2010-09-01

    Diabetic foot complications are associated with substantial costs and loss of quality of life. This article gives an overview of available and emerging devices for the monitoring of foot temperature as a means of early detection of foot disorders in diabetes. The aim is to describe the technologies and to summarize experiences from experimental use. Studies show that regular monitoring of foot temperature may limit the incidence of disabling conditions such as foot ulcers and lower-limb amputations. Infrared thermometry and liquid crystal thermography were identified as the leading technologies in use today. Both technologies are feasible for temperature monitoring of the feet and could be used as a complement to current practices for foot examinations in diabetes.

  4. High Temperatures Health Monitoring of the Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipe Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Takano, Nobuyuki; Ostlund, Patrick; Blosiu, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic probes were designed, fabricated and tested for high temperature health monitoring system. The goal of this work was to develop the health monitoring system that can determine the height level of the condensed water through the pipe wall at high temperature up to 250 deg while accounting for the effects of surface perturbation. Among different ultrasonic probe designs, 2.25 MHz probes with air backed configuration provide satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity, receiving reflections from the target through the pipe wall. A series of tests were performed using the air-backed probes under irregular conditions, such as surface perturbation and surface disturbance at elevated temperature, to qualify the developed ultrasonic system. The results demonstrate that the fabricated air-backed probes combined with advanced signal processing techniques offer the capability of health monitoring of steam pipe under various operating conditions.

  5. Remote Multi-layer Soil Temperature Monitoring System Based on GPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Kuo CHEN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available There is the temperature difference between the upper and lower layer of the shallow soil in the forest. It is a potential energy that can be harvested by thermoelectric generator for the electronic device in the forest. The temperature distribution at different depths of the soil is the first step for thermoelectric generation. A remote multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system based on GPRS is proposed in this paper. The MSP430F149 MCU is used as the main controller of multi-layer soil temperature monitoring system. A temperature acquisition module is designed with DS18B20 and 4 core shielded twisted-pair cable. The GPRS module sends the measured data to remote server through wireless communication network. From the experiments in the campus of Beijing Forestry University, the maximum error of measured temperature in this system is 0.2°C by comparing with professional equipment in the same condition. The results of the experiments show that the system can accurately realize real-time monitoring of multi-layer soil temperature, and the data transmission is stable and reliable.

  6. INTELLIGENT MONITORING SYSTEM WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTED FIBEROPTIC SENSOR FOR POWER PLANT COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2004-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, improvement was made on the performance of in-fiber grating fabricated in single crystal sapphire fibers, test was performed on the grating performance of single crystal sapphire fiber with new fabrication methods, and the fabricated grating was applied to high temperature sensor. Under Task 2, models obtained from 3-D modeling of the Demonstration Boiler were used to study relationships between temperature and NOx, as the multi-dimensionality of such systems are most comparable with real-life boiler systems. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic

  7. The high-dose and high-temperature monitors of reactor irradiation based on insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Stepanov

    2015-10-01

    It has been experimentally shown that the use of Al2O3 single crystals and BN ceramics provides means of monitoring the temperature of irradiation from 370 to 1900 K. The temperature is derived from measurements of the optical absorption or X-ray diffraction line shifts after post-radiation annealing of the monitors. We discuss the applicability of (a the optical absorption and F-center luminescence spectroscopies of irradiated Al2O3 single crystals for gamma dose evaluation and (b the isotopic analysis of irradiated BN ceramics for neutron dose evaluation.

  8. Application of a one-wire digital temperature sensor in the monitoring system of a granary's temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2009-07-01

    A temperature monitoring system with characteristics of bus topology structure is made up of computer, interface adapter, bus driver, bus converter, transmission line and especially 1-wire digital temperature sensor DS18B20. Category 5 twisted-pair is used to form a tree-like or star-like network, in which more than 500 digital temperature sensors can be connected. Bus drivers and converters in network are composed of low-cost 74HC series logic ICs which has a very low static power consumption and high performance, so they can be powered through the sensor bus and make installation, maintenance, and expansion of system very convenient. Because of hardware fault-tolerant technology used by bus driver and converter circuits, the fault sensor branch or branch bus can automatically detach from the main bus and will not affect normal working of other sensors in network, so to solve the problem of a certain sensor or branch's damage causing the paralysis of entire bus. The length of sensor bus can extend to more than 1000 meters. It is very suitable for the multi-point temperature monitoring sites where the detected points are relative concentrated such as food storage, vegetables greenhouses and so on.

  9. APPLICATION OF REMOTE SENSING FOR TEMPERATURE MONITORING: THE TECHNIQUE FOR LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawong Laosuwan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to present the technique for land surface temperature analysis with the data from Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI /Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIR in Meuang Maha Sarakham District, Maha Sarakham Province, Northeastern, Thailand. The research was conducted as following three steps: 1 Collecting the satellite data in thermal infrared band from Landsat-8 TIR satellite to adjust the value of Top of Atmosphere (ToA Reflectance and then analyzing the land surface temperature 2 Collecting multi-band data from Landsat-8 OLI satellite to adjust the value of Top of Atmosphere (ToA Reflectance and then analyzing values of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Fractional Vegetation Cover (FVC and Land surface Emissivity (LSE 3 Bringing the results of 1 and 2 to analyze the land surface temperature with split window algorithm. The research results indicated that the analysis of the data from Landsat-8 OLI/TIR satellites in 18 March 2015 indicated a mean temperature of 33.57 °C.

  10. Online Monitoring of Temperature Using Wireless Module in a Rotating Drum-Applicable to Leather Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Narayani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure safe and efficient operation of unit processes, foremost requirement is accurate measurement of process variables, with which quality can be monitored and controlled. Understanding the necessity of online monitoring of process temperature in tanning/dyeing process, the article is focused on wireless measurement of physical parameters involved in wet processing of hides/ skins and monitoring through digital computer for further analysis. It’s a challenging task to measure and communicate the process information from a closed rotating drum. Wireless communication is proposed because of its enhanced security, superfast operating speed, and increased mobility. The physical parameters which are predominant in tanning process are temperature, pH, conductivity etc. of the process fluid. It is necessary to carryout dyeing at 65 0C for producing raw to wet blue process. As a first attempt, wireless module for temperature measurement has been developed. The module includes signal transmitter and receiver section. In the transmitter section, the temperature which is measured by an integrated sensor is converted into frequency signal and imposed on a radio frequency signal (career signal and get transmitted in air. On the other side, receiver section receives the radio frequency signal and converts that into electrical signals to interface with the digital computer for online monitoring. The module is able to receive and control temperature of tanning drum within a distance of 100 meters. Real time experiments on the fabricated model show interesting results for commercialization.

  11. Using Wireless Sensor Networks to Achieve Intelligent Monitoring for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR can incorporate wireless sensor network (WSN technology to improve safety and economic competitiveness. WSN has great potential in monitoring the equipment and processes within nuclear power plants (NPPs. This technology not only reduces the cost of regular monitoring but also enables intelligent monitoring. In intelligent monitoring, large sets of heterogeneous data collected by the WSN can be used to optimize the operation and maintenance of the HTGR. In this paper, WSN-based intelligent monitoring schemes that are specific for applications of HTGR are proposed. Three major concerns regarding wireless technology in HTGR are addressed: wireless devices interference, cybersecurity of wireless networks, and wireless standards selected for wireless platform. To process nonlinear and non-Gaussian data obtained by WSN for fault diagnosis, novel algorithms combining Kernel Entropy Component Analysis (KECA and support vector machine (SVM are developed.

  12. Reliable temperature probe monitoring - Favorable esophageal motion for consistent probe contact during atrial fibrillation catheter ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Esato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial-esophageal (LA-Eso fistula is now a well-recognized and fatal complication of percutaneous catheter ablation performed using radiofrequency energy for atrial fibrillation (AF. We noted an important esophageal motion during temperature monitoring by a multipolar sensing probe, which could resolve several potential concerns of accurate esophageal temperature measurement and could consequently minimize esophageal injuries including LA-Eso fistulas during catheter ablation for AF.

  13. APPLICATION OF REMOTE SENSING FOR TEMPERATURE MONITORING: THE TECHNIQUE FOR LAND SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Teerawong Laosuwan; Torsak Gomasathit; Tanutdech Rotjanakusol

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to present the technique for land surface temperature analysis with the data from Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) /Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIR) in Meuang Maha Sarakham District, Maha Sarakham Province, Northeastern, Thailand. The research was conducted as following three steps: 1) Collecting the satellite data in thermal infrared band from Landsat-8 TIR satellite to adjust the value of Top of Atmosphere (ToA) Reflectance and then analyzing the land surface temper...

  14. Tunable Diode Laser Sensors to Monitor Temperature and Gas Composition in High-Temperature Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Ronald [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Whitty, Kevin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) when combined with carbon capture and storage can be one of the cleanest methods of extracting energy from coal. Control of coal and biomass gasification processes to accommodate the changing character of input-fuel streams is required for practical implementation of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technologies. Therefore a fast time-response sensor is needed for real-time monitoring of the composition and ideally the heating value of the synthesis gas (here called syngas) as it exits the gasifier. The goal of this project was the design, construction, and demonstration an in situ laserabsorption sensor to monitor multiple species in the syngas output from practical-scale coal gasifiers. This project investigated the hypothesis of using laser absorption sensing in particulateladen syngas. Absorption transitions were selected with design rules to optimize signal strength while minimizing interference from other species. Successful in situ measurements in the dusty, high-pressure syngas flow were enabled by Stanford’s normalized and scanned wavelength modulation strategy. A prototype sensor for CO, CH4, CO2, and H2O was refined with experiments conducted in the laboratory at Stanford University, a pilot-scale at the University of Utah, and an engineering-scale gasifier at DoE’s National Center for Carbon Capture with the demonstration of a prototype sensor with technical readiness level 6 in the 2014 measurement campaign.

  15. Intelligent Monitoring System With High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor For Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boheman

    2005-12-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we investigate a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. The 3D temperature data is furnished by the Penn State Energy Institute using FLUENT. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first develop an analytic description and then extend that model along a single axis. Extrapolation

  16. Monitoring moisture content, temperature, and humidity in whole-tree pine chip piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Klepac; Dana Mitchell; Jason Thompson

    2015-01-01

    Two whole-tree chip piles were monitored for moisture content, temperature, and relative humidity from October 8th, 2010 to March 16th, 2011 at a location in south Alabama. Initial moisture content samples were collected immediately after chips were delivered to the study location on October 8th for Pile 1 and October 22nd for Pile 2. During pile construction, Lascar...

  17. A microprocessor based, multi-channel low-temperature monitoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, B.W.; van Dijk, M.H.H.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-channel low-temperature monitoring system and its design considerations are presented. The system is microprocessor based and specially designed to interface thermoresistive sensors in cryogenic experiments. The system can be easily expanded to accept any type of physical transducer and to

  18. Evaluation of acoustic emission signals during monitoring of thick-wall vessels operating at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasopoulos, A.; Tsimogiannis, A. [Envirocoustics S.A., El. Venizelou 7 and Delfon, Athens (Greece)

    2004-07-01

    Acoustic Emission testing of thick wall vessels, operating at elevated temperatures is discussed and pattern recognition methodologies for AE data evaluation are presented. Two different types of testing procedures are addressed: Cool Down monitoring and semi-continuous periodic monitoring. In both types of tests, temperature variation is the driving force of AE as opposed to traditional AE testing where controlled pressure variation is used as AE stimulus. Representative examples of reactors cool down testing as well as in-process vessel monitoring are given. AE activity as a function of temperature and pressure variation is discussed. In addition to the real-time limited criteria application, unsupervised pattern recognition is applied as a post-processing tool for multidimensional sorting, noise discrimination, characterizing defects and/or damage. On the other hand, Supervised Pattern Recognition is used for data classification in repetitive critical tests, leading to an objective quantitative comparison between repeated tests. Results show that damage sustained by the equipment can be described by the plotting the cumulative energy of AE, from critical signal classes, versus temperature. Overall, the proposed methodology can reduce the complexity of AE tests in many cases leading to higher efficiency. The possibility for real time signals classification, during permanent AE installations and continuous monitoring is discussed. (orig.)

  19. CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic RF ablation : Feasibility in an animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruners, Philipp; Pandeya, Ganga D.; Levit, Elena; Roesch, Eva; Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Schmidt, Bernhardt; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Kuhl, Christiane K.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to establish non-invasive CT-based temperature monitoring during hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation in an ex vivo porcine model followed by transfer of the technique into a feasibility in vivo experiment. Materials and methods: Bipolar RF ablations were performed

  20. Control-monitoring systems of environment temperature and humidity based on oxyspinel thick films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakiv N. M.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to use planar-type multilayer thick-film structures based on manganite CuxNi1–x–yCo2yMn2–yO4 and aluminate MgAl2O4 spinel oxide ceramics as integrated temperature-humidity sensors for environmental control-monitoring systems is analysed.

  1. Best practices for continuous monitoring of temperature and flow in wadeable streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen Stamp; Anna Hamilton; Michelle Craddock; Laila Parker; Allison H. Roy; Daniel J. Isaak; Zach Holden; Margaret Passmore; Britta G. Bierwagen

    2014-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is working with its regional offices, states, tribes, river basin commissions and other entities to establish Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs) for freshwater wadeable streams. To the extent possible, uninterrupted, biological, temperature and hydrologic data will be collected on an ongoing basis at RMN...

  2. Climatological summary of wind and temperature data for the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glantz, C.S.; Schwartz, M.N.; Burk, K.W.; Kasper, R.B.; Ligotke, M.W.; Perrault, P.J.

    1990-09-01

    This document presents climatological summaries of wind and temperature data collected at the twenty-five monitoring stations operated by the Hanford Meteorology Monitoring Network. The climatological analyses presented here involve hourly averaged wind data collected over an 8-year period beginning in 1982 (fewer wind data are available for the several monitoring stations that began full-time operation after 1982) and hourly averaged air temperature data collected over 2-year period beginning in mid-1988. The tables and figures presented in this document illustrate the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological parameters across the Hanford Site and the surrounding areas. This information is useful for emergency response applications, routine meteorological forecasting, planning and scheduling operations, facility design, and environmental impact studies.

  3. Monitoring of temperature profiles and surface morphologies during laser sintering of alumina ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing of alumina by laser is a delicate process and small changes of processing parameters might cause less controlled and understood consequences. The real-time monitoring of temperature profiles, spectrum profiles and surface morphologies were evaluated in off-axial set-up for controlling the laser sintering of alumina ceramics. The real-time spectrometer and pyrometer were used for rapid monitoring of the thermal stability during the laser sintering process. An active illumination imaging system successfully recorded the high temperature melt pool and surrounding area simultaneously. The captured images also showed how the defects form and progress during the laser sintering process. All of these real-time monitoring methods have shown a great potential for on-line quality control during laser sintering of ceramics.

  4. Documentation pckage for the RFID temperature monitoring system (Of Model 9977 packages at NTS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.; Tsai, H.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2009-02-20

    The technical basis for extending the Model 9977 shipping package periodic maintenance beyond the one-year interval to a maximum of five years is based on the performance of the O-ring seals and the environmental conditions. The DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) has tasked Argonne National Laboratory to develop a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature monitoring system for use by the facility personnel at DAF/NTS. The RFID temperature monitoring system, depicted in the figure below, consists of the Mk-1 RFId tags, a reader, and a control computer mounted on a mobile platform that can operate as a stand-alone system, or it can be connected to the local IT network. As part of the Conditions of Approval of the CoC, the user must complete the prescribed training to become qualified and be certified for operation of the RFID temperature monitoring system. The training course will be administered by Argonne National Laboratory on behalf of the Headquarters Certifying Official. This is a complete documentation package for the RFID temperature monitoring system of the Model 9977 packagings at NTS. The documentation package will be used for training and certification. The table of contents are: Acceptance Testing Procedure of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Acceptance Testing Result of MK-1 RFID Tags for DOE/EM Nuclear Materials Management Applications; Performance Test of the Single Bolt Seal Sensor for the Model 9977 Packaging; Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags for Nevada Test Site; Results of Calibration of Built-in Thermistors in RFID Tags; Results of Thermal Calibration of Second Batch of MK-I RFID Tags; Procedure for Installing and Removing MK-1 RFID Tag on Model 9977 Drum; User Guide for RFID Reader and Software for Temperature Monitoring of Model 9977 Drums at NTS; Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) for the ARG-US System; Quality Category for the RFID Temperature Monitoring System; The

  5. Neural Probes with Integrated Temperature Sensors for Monitoring Retina and Brain Implantation and Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqi; Xie, Hui; Chung, Tsing; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Pang, Stella W

    2017-09-01

    Gold (Au) resistive temperature sensors were integrated on flexible polyimide-based neural probes to monitor temperature changes during neural probe implantation and stimulation. Temperature changes were measured as neural probes were implanted to infer the positions of the neural probes, and as the retina or the deep brain region was stimulated electrically. The temperature sensor consisted of a serpentine Au resistor and surrounded by four Au electrodes with 200 and [Formula: see text] diameter (dia.). The Au temperature sensors had temperature coefficient of 0.32%, and they were biocompatible and small in size. In vivo measurements of temperature changes during implantation and stimulation were carried out in the retina and deep brain region in rats. The desired implantation position was reached when temperature measured by the sensor increased to the calibrated level and became stable. There was no temperature increase when low level stimulation current of 8 and [Formula: see text] each for the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, were applied. When higher level stimulation current of 100 and [Formula: see text] each were applied to the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, maximum temperature increases of 1.2 °C in retina and 1 °C in deep brain region were found.

  6. Unobtrusive Monitoring of Neonatal Brain Temperature Using a Zero-Heat-Flux Sensor Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Louis; Bongers, Edwin; Lamichhane, Bishal; Bambang-Oetomo, Sidarto

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of preterm neonates must be maintained within a narrow window to ensure their survival. Continuously measuring their core temperature provides an optimal means of monitoring their thermoregulation and their response to environmental changes. However, existing methods of measuring core temperature can be very obtrusive, such as rectal probes, or inaccurate/lagging, such as skin temperature sensors and spot-checks using tympanic temperature sensors. This study investigates an unobtrusive method of measuring brain temperature continuously using an embedded zero-heat-flux (ZHF) sensor matrix placed under the head of the neonate. The measured temperature profile is used to segment areas of motion and incorrect positioning, where the neonate's head is not above the sensors. We compare our measurements during low motion/stable periods to esophageal temperatures for 12 preterm neonates, measured for an average of 5 h per neonate. The method we propose shows good correlation with the reference temperature for most of the neonates. The unobtrusive embedding of the matrix in the neonate's environment poses no harm or disturbance to the care work-flow, while measuring core temperature. To address the effect of motion on the ZHF measurements in the current embodiment, we recommend a more ergonomic embedding ensuring the sensors are continuously placed under the neonate's head.

  7. Intelligent Monitoring System with High Temperature Distributed Fiberoptic Sensor for Power Plant Combustion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang Y. Lee; Stuart S. Yin; Andre Boehman

    2006-09-26

    The objective of the proposed work is to develop an intelligent distributed fiber optical sensor system for real-time monitoring of high temperature in a boiler furnace in power plants. Of particular interest is the estimation of spatial and temporal distributions of high temperatures within a boiler furnace, which will be essential in assessing and controlling the mechanisms that form and remove pollutants at the source, such as NOx. The basic approach in developing the proposed sensor system is three fold: (1) development of high temperature distributed fiber optical sensor capable of measuring temperatures greater than 2000 C degree with spatial resolution of less than 1 cm; (2) development of distributed parameter system (DPS) models to map the three-dimensional (3D) temperature distribution for the furnace; and (3) development of an intelligent monitoring system for real-time monitoring of the 3D boiler temperature distribution. Under Task 1, we have set up a dedicated high power, ultrafast laser system for fabricating in-fiber gratings in harsh environment optical fibers, successfully fabricated gratings in single crystal sapphire fibers by the high power laser system, and developed highly sensitive long period gratings (lpg) by electric arc. Under Task 2, relevant mathematical modeling studies of NOx formation in practical combustors have been completed. Studies show that in boiler systems with no swirl, the distributed temperature sensor may provide information sufficient to predict trends of NOx at the boiler exit. Under Task 3, we have investigated a mathematical approach to extrapolation of the temperature distribution within a power plant boiler facility, using a combination of a modified neural network architecture and semigroup theory. Given a set of empirical data with no analytic expression, we first developed an analytic description and then extended that model along a single axis.

  8. Monitoring and Modeling Temperature Variations Inside Silage Stack Using Novel Wireless Sensor Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ole; Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    of withstanding the high loads that occurred during ensiling, storage, and feed-out. Mathematical models estimating the relations between the silage temperatures (at depths of 25 and 50 cm) and air and soil temperatures were obtained. Black-box modeling using the prediction error method (PEM) was selected...... the temperature inside silage stacks; (2) to design a suitable sensor protection housing that prevents physical and chemical damage to the sensor; and (3) to mathematically model temperature variations inside a silage stack, using system identification techniques. The designed wireless nodes were used to monitor...... as the identification method. Among different black-box models such as ARX, ARMAX, Output Error (OE), and Box-Jenkins (BJ), with different model orders, a third-order Box-Jenkins model structure gave the best performance in terms of prediction accuracy. The success rate of the models proposed for silage temperature...

  9. Monitoring the body temperature of cows and calves using video recordings from an infrared thermography camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Gundula; Schmidt, Mariana; Ammon, Christian; Rose-Meierhöfer, Sandra; Burfeind, Onno; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Berg, Werner

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the variability of temperatures measured by a video-based infrared camera (IRC) in comparison to rectal and vaginal temperatures. The body surface temperatures of cows and calves were measured contactless at different body regions using videos from the IRC. Altogether, 22 cows and 9 calves were examined. The differences of the measured IRC temperatures among the body regions, i.e. eye (mean: 37.0 °C), back of the ear (35.6 °C), shoulder (34.9 °C) and vulva (37.2 °C), were significant (P infrared thermography videos has the advantage to analyze more than 1 picture per animal in a short period of time, and shows potential as a monitoring system for body temperatures in cattle.

  10. Temperature monitoring with FBG sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngot T.; Lee, Seul Lee; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-02-01

    Temperature variations are often monitored by using sensors operating at the site of treatment during Laser-induced Interstitial Thermotherapy (LITT). Currently, temperature measurements during LITT have been performed with thermocouples (TCs). However, TCs could directly absorb laser light and lead to self-heating (resulting in an over-estimation). Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can instead overcome this limitation of the TCs due to its insensitivity to electromagnetic interference. The aim of the current study was to quantitatively evaluate the FBG temperature sensor with a K-type thermocouple to real-time monitor temperature increase in ex vivo tissue during diffuser-assisted LITT. A 4-W 980-nm laser was employed to deliver optical energy in continuous mode through a 600-µm core-diameter diffusing applicator. A goniometric measurement validated the uniform light distribution in polar and longitudinal directions. The FBG sensor showed a linear relationship (R2 = 0.995) between wavelength shift and temperature change in air and tissue along with a sensitivity of 0.0114 nm/˚C. Regardless of sensor type, the measured temperature increased with irradiation time and applied power but decreased with increasing distance from the diffuser surface. The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT (4.0±0.3-mm at 99˚C after 120-s). The temperature elevation augmented the degree of thermal coagulation in the tissue during LITT s irradiation). The FBG-integrated diffuser was able to monitor the interstitial temperature in tubular tissue (porcine urethra) real-time during laser treatment. However, the thermal coagulation thickness of the porcine urethra was measured to be 1.5 mm that was slightly thicker ( 20%) than that of the bovine liver after 4-W 980-nm laser for 48 s. The FBG temperature sensor can be a feasible tool to real-time monitor the temporal development of the temperature during the diffuser-assisted LITT to

  11. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989-2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R(2) = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The spatial and temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwarts, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model’s results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. PMID:26499933

  13. Core Temperature Monitoring in Obstetric Spinal Anesthesia Using an Ingestible Telemetric Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Leon; van Dyk, Dominique; Hofmeyr, Ross; Lombard, Carl J; Dyer, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Perioperative hypothermia may affect maternal and neonatal outcomes after obstetric spinal anesthesia. Core temperature is often poorly monitored during spinal anesthesia, due to the lack of an accurate noninvasive core temperature monitor. The aim of this study was to describe core temperature changes and temperature recovery during spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean delivery. We expected that obstetric spinal anesthesia would be associated with a clinically relevant thermoregulatory insult (core temperature decrease >1.0°C). A descriptive study was conducted in 28 women. An ingestible telemetric temperature sensor was used to record core temperature over time (measured every 10 seconds). The primary outcome was the maximum core temperature decrease after spinal anesthetic injection. The secondary outcomes were lowest absolute core temperature, time to lowest temperature, time to recovery of core temperature, hypothermic exposure (degree-hours below 37.0°C), and the time-weighted hypothermic exposure (median number of degrees below 37.0°C per hour). Basic descriptive statistics, median spline smooth, and integration of the area below the 37.0°C line of the temperature-over-time curve were utilized to analyze the data. Intestinal temperature decreased by a mean (standard deviation) of 1.30°C (0.31); 99% confidence interval (CI), 1.14 to 1.46 after spinal anesthetic injection. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) time to temperature nadir was 0.96 (0.73-1.32) hours (95% CI, 0.88-1.22). Fourteen of the 28 participants experienced intestinal temperatures below 36.0°C after spinal injection. Temperature was monitored for a minimum of 8 hours after spinal injection. In 8 of 28 participants, intestinal temperature did not recover to baseline during the monitored period. A median (IQR) of 4.59 (3.38-5.92) hours (95% CI, 3.45-5.90) was required for recovery to baseline intestinal temperature in the remaining 20 patients. Participants experienced a median (IQR

  14. Monitoring brain temperature by time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshi, Mohammad Fazel; Diop, Mamadou; St. Lawrence, Keith; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2014-05-01

    Mild hypothermia (HT) is an effective neuroprotective strategy for a variety of acute brain injuries. However, the wide clinical adaptation of HT has been hampered by the lack of a reliable noninvasive method for measuring brain temperature, since core measurements have been shown to not always reflect brain temperature. The goal of this work was to develop a noninvasive optical technique for measuring brain temperature that exploits both the temperature dependency of water absorption and the high concentration of water in brain (80%-90%). Specifically, we demonstrate the potential of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (TR-NIRS) to measure temperature in tissue-mimicking phantoms (in vitro) and deep brain tissue (in vivo) during heating and cooling, respectively. For deep brain tissue temperature monitoring, experiments were conducted on newborn piglets wherein hypothermia was induced by gradual whole body cooling. Brain temperature was concomitantly measured by TR-NIRS and a thermocouple probe implanted in the brain. Our proposed TR-NIRS method was able to measure the temperature of tissue-mimicking phantoms and brain tissues with a correlation of 0.82 and 0.66 to temperature measured with a thermometer, respectively. The mean difference between the TR-NIRS and thermometer measurements was 0.15°C±1.1°C for the in vitro experiments and 0.5°C±1.6°C for the in vivo measurements.

  15. Monitoring of a steel incrementally launched bridge construction with strain and temperature FBGs sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Antonio; Torres, Benjamín; Barrera, David; Calderón, Pedro; Sales, Salvador

    2010-04-01

    We present in this paper the results of monitoring the construction process of a steel incrementally launched bridge located at the Kadagua Valley in Bilbao (Spain) with FBG sensors. The installation of FBG strain and temperature sensors was done in order to obtain deformation and temperature variations during the launching operation. The deflection recovery process was also monitored. The setup carried out in the sensors installation process consists of five optical channels (one for each cross section monitored) and a multiplexed structure of nine strain sensor in each optical channel. Temperature sensors were also installed in order to measure temperature variation of the steel structure but also for thermal compensation for the FBG strain sensors. The installation of the optical sensors is explained in detail including cleaning, bonding and connection of the almost fifty sensors installed in this structure. We also are going to explain the behaviour of the steel structure by presenting several figures showing the strain values for each sensor taken in real time during the launching of the bridge.

  16. Comparison of temperature processing methods for monitoring focused ultrasound ablation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Viola; Instrella, Ron; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Grissom, William; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the performance of different reconstruction methods for monitoring temperature changes during transcranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). Four different temperature reconstruction methods were compared in volunteers (without heating) and patients undergoing transcranial MRgFUS: single baseline subtraction, multibaseline subtraction, hybrid single baseline/referenceless reconstruction, and hybrid multibaseline/referenceless reconstruction. Absolute temperature error and temporal temperature uncertainty of the different reconstruction methods were analyzed and compared. Absolute temperature errors and temporal temperature uncertainty were highest with single baseline subtraction and lowest with hybrid multibaseline/referenceless reconstruction in all areas of the brain. Pulsation of the brain and susceptibility changes from tongue motion or swallowing caused substantial temperature errors when single or multibaseline subtraction was used, which were much reduced when the referenceless component was added to the reconstruction. Hybrid multibaseline/referenceless thermometry accurately measures temperature changes in the brain with fewer artifacts and errors due to motion than pure baseline subtraction methods. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Locatable-body temperature monitoring based on semi-active UHF RFID tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangwei; Mao, Luhong; Chen, Liying; Xie, Sheng

    2014-03-26

    This paper presents the use of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology for the real-time remote monitoring of body temperature, while an associated program can determine the location of the body carrying the respective sensor. The RFID chip's internal integrated temperature sensor is used for both the human-body temperature detection and as a measurement device, while using radio-frequency communication to broadcast the temperature information. The adopted RFID location technology makes use of reference tags together with a nearest neighbor localization algorithm and a multiple-antenna time-division multiplexing location system. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed for collecting temperature and location data for the data fusion by using RFID protocols. With a puppy as test object, temperature detection and localization experiments were carried out. The measured results show that the applied method, when using a mercury thermometer for comparison in terms of measuring the temperature of the dog, has a good consistency, with an average temperature error of 0.283 °C. When using the associated program over the area of 12.25 m2, the average location error is of 0.461 m, which verifies the feasibility of the sensor-carrier location by using the proposed program.

  18. Temperature dependence of electromechanical impedance based bond-line integrity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh; Bond, Leonard J.

    2017-04-01

    Electromechanical impedance (EMI) is an important technique for bond-line integrity monitoring of adhesively bonded joints in automotive and aerospace structures. In the current work, numerical analysis of temperature sensitivity of the EMI technique is performed. The objective is to detect stiffness reduction of the adhesive in the presence of temperature and external mechanical load. Increase in the operating temperature can degrade the bonded piezoelectric material causing misinterpretation of the EMI data. EMI Signal features are numerically investigated to decouple the effect of load and temperature on the piezoelectric material in the mechanically loaded bonded joint. The computational results indicate higher dependence of EM resonance spectrum towards piezoelectric material matrix as compared to the tensile load applied on the bonded sample as the stiffness of adhesive is numerically varied.

  19. Dynamic temperature monitoring and control with fully distributed fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuetong; Chen, Na; Chen, Zhenyi; Pang, Fufei; Zeng, Xianglong; Wang, Tingyun

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used as a fully distributed sensor to monitor tissue dynamic temperature changes during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). This work is mainly realized by the correlative single particle (CSP) algorithm, which is a rapid algorithm for spectrum reconstruction. Experimental LITT treatment was set up by using 532nm laser applicator on a piece of fresh liver tissue. In the experiments, the dynamic temperature profile was successfully demodulated with a refreshing speed of 11 seconds. With the aid of dynamic feedback, the thermotherapy boundary temperature was well controlled around 35°C during the treatment by adjusting the laser output power in real-time. Therefore, with this method, it is promising to precisely control the tissue temperature in vivo and improve the safety of the LITT remarkably.

  20. Monitoring an Induced Permafrost Warming Experiment Using ERT, Temperature, and NMR in Fairbanks, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Ekblaw, I.; Lindsey, N.; Wagner, A. M.; Saari, S.; Daley, T. M.; Freifeld, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    As global temperatures continue to rise, permafrost landscapes will experience more rapid changes than other global climate zones. Permafrost thaw is a result of increased temperatures in arctic settings resulting in surface deformation and subsurface hydrology changes. From an engineering perspective, surface deformation poses a threat to the stability of existing infrastructure such as roads, utility piping, and building structures. Preemptively detecting or monitoring subsurface thaw dynamics presents a difficult challenge due to the long time scales as deformation occurs. Increased subsurface moisture content results from permafrost thaw of which electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), soil temperature, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are directly sensitive. In this experiment we evaluate spatial and temporal changes in subsurface permafrost conditions (moisture content and temperature) at a experimental heating plot in Fairbanks, AK. This study focuses on monitoring thaw signatures using multiple collocated electrical resistivity (ERT), borehole temperature, and borehole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. Timelapse ERT (sensitive to changes in moisture content) was inverted using collocated temperature and NMR to constrain ERT inversions. Subsurface thermal state was monitored with timelapse thermistors, sensitive to soil ice content. NMR was collected in multiple boreholes and is sensitive to changes in moisture content and pore scale distribution. As permafrost thaws more hydrogen, in the form of water, is available resulting in a changing NMR response. NMR requires the availability of liquid water in order to induce spin of the hydrogen molecule, hence, if frozen water molecules will be undetectable. In this study, the permafrost is poised close to 0oC and is mainly silt with small pore dimensions; this combination makes NMR particularly useful due to the possibility of sub-zero thaw conditions within the soil column. Overall this

  1. Techniques for temperature monitoring during laser-induced thermotherapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-11-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) is a hyperthermic procedure recently employed to treat cancer in several organs. The amount of coagulated tissue depends on the temperature distribution around the applicator, which plays a crucial role for an optimal outcome: the removal of the whole neoplastic tissue, whilst preventing damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. Although feedback concerning tissue temperature could be useful to drive the physician in the adjustment of laser settings and treatment duration, LITT is usually performed without real-time monitoring of tissue temperature. During recent decades, many thermometric techniques have been developed to be used during thermal therapies. This paper provides an overview of techniques and sensors employed for temperature measurement during tissue hyperthermia, focusing on LITT, and an investigation of their performances in this application. The paper focuses on the most promising and widespread temperature monitoring techniques, splitting them into two groups: the former includes invasive techniques based on the use of thermocouples and fibre-optic sensors; the second analyses non-invasive methods, i.e. magnetic resonance imaging-, computerised tomography- and ultrasound-based thermometry. Background information on measuring principle, medical applications, advantages and weaknesses of each method are provided and discussed.

  2. Statistical models for fever forecasting based on advanced body temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jorge; Miro-Martinez, Pau; Vargas, Borja; Varela-Entrecanales, Manuel; Cuesta-Frau, David

    2017-02-01

    Body temperature monitoring provides health carers with key clinical information about the physiological status of patients. Temperature readings are taken periodically to detect febrile episodes and consequently implement the appropriate medical countermeasures. However, fever is often difficult to assess at early stages, or remains undetected until the next reading, probably a few hours later. The objective of this article is to develop a statistical model to forecast fever before a temperature threshold is exceeded to improve the therapeutic approach to the subjects involved. To this end, temperature series of 9 patients admitted to a general internal medicine ward were obtained with a continuous monitoring Holter device, collecting measurements of peripheral and core temperature once per minute. These series were used to develop different statistical models that could quantify the probability of having a fever spike in the following 60 minutes. A validation series was collected to assess the accuracy of the models. Finally, the results were compared with the analysis of some series by experienced clinicians. Two different models were developed: a logistic regression model and a linear discrimination analysis model. Both of them exhibited a fever peak forecasting accuracy greater than 84%. When compared with experts' assessment, both models identified 35 (97.2%) of 36 fever spikes. The models proposed are highly accurate in forecasting the appearance of fever spikes within a short period in patients with suspected or confirmed febrile-related illnesses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Data Transmission Algorithm Based on Dynamic Grid Division for Coal Goaf Temperature Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available WSN (wireless sensor network is a perfect tool of temperature monitoring in coal goaf. Based on the three-zone theory of goaf, the GtmWSN model is proposed, and its dynamic features are analyzed. Accordingly, a data transmission scheme, named DTDGD, is worked out. Firstly, sink nodes conduct dynamic grid division on the GtmWSN according to virtual semicircle. Secondly, each node will confirm to which grid it belongs based on grid number. Finally, data will be delivered to sink nodes with greedy forward and hole avoidance. Simulation results and field data showed that the GtmWSN and DTDGD satisfied the lifetime need of goaf temperature monitoring.

  4. Updating temperature monitoring on reciprocating compressor connecting rods to improve reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Townsend

    2016-03-01

    The compressors are used to move CO2 and boost the gas to the required field pressure, usually around 2,200 psig. Reciprocating compressors are flexible and able to handle wide capacity and condition swings, offer an efficient method of compressing almost any gas composition in a wide range of pressures and have numerous applications and wide power ratings. This makes them a vital component in various industrial facilities. Condition monitoring of critical rotating machinery is widely accepted by operators of centrifugal compressors. However, condition monitoring of reciprocating machinery such as compressors and internal combustion engines has not received the same degree of acceptance. This paper examines the reliability impact as a result of upgrading the temperature monitoring devices on the connecting rods of electric driven reciprocating compressors. A cost analysis is also presented to demonstrate that the upgrade in hardware and software will eventually yield a saving in the operating cost.

  5. Elevated Temperature Sensors for On-Line Critical Equipment Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Sebastian

    2006-03-31

    The objective of the program was to improve high temperature piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) sensor technology to make it useful for instrumentation and health monitoring of current and future electrical power generation equipment. Improvements were aimed primarily at extending the useful temperature range of the sensor from approximately 700 C to above 1000 C, and investigating ultrasonic coupling to objects at these temperatures and tailoring high temperature coupling for use with the sensor. During the project, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) AlN deposition process was successfully transferred from film production on tungsten carbide substrates to titanium alloy and silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. Film adhesion under thermal cycling was found to be poor, and additional substrate materials and surface preparations were evaluated. A new, porous SiC substrate improved the performance but not to the point of making the films useful for sensors. Near the end of the program, a new family of high temperature piezoelectric materials came to the attention of the program. Samples of langasite, the most promising member of this family, were obtained and experimental data showed promise for use up to the 1000 C target temperature. In parallel, research successfully determined that metal foil under moderate pressure provided a practical method of coupling ultrasound at high temperature. A conceptual sensor was designed based upon these methods and was tested in the laboratory.

  6. Two-wavelength Raman imaging for non-intrusive monitoring of transient temperature in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Reiko; Sato, Yohei

    2014-09-01

    The present study proposes a non-intrusive visualization technique based on two-wavelength Raman imaging for in-situ monitoring of the unsteady temperature field in microfluidic systems. The measurement principle relies on the contrasting temperature dependencies of hydrogen-bonded and non-hydrogen-bonded OH stretching modes of the water Raman band, whose intensities were simultaneously captured by two cameras equipped with corresponding bandpass filters. The temperature distributions were then determined from the intensity ratio of the simultaneously-obtained Raman images, which enables compensation for temporal fluctuation and spatial inhomogeneity of the excitation laser intensity. A calibration experiment exhibited a linear relationship between the temperature and the intensity ratio in the range 293-343 K and least-regression analysis gave an uncertainty of 1.43 K at 95% confidence level. By applying the calibration data, time series temperature distributions were quantitatively visualized in a Y-shaped milli-channel at a spatial resolution of 6.0  ×  6.0 µm2 with an acquisition time of 16.5 s. The measurement result clearly exhibited the temporal evolution of the temperature field and was compared with the values obtained by thermocouples. This paper therefore demonstrates the viability of employing the two-wavelength Raman imaging technique for temperature measurements in microfluidic devices.

  7. Fiber optic sensing subsystem for temperature monitoring in space in-flight applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, S.; Araujo, F.; Pinto, F.; González Torres, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Moreno, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber Optic Sensor (FOS) technology presents long recognized advantages which enable to mitigate deficient performance of conventional technology in hazard-environments common in spacecraft monitoring applications, such as: multiplexing capability, immunity to EMI/RFI, remote monitoring, small size and weight, electrical insulation, intrinsically safe operation, high sensibility and long term reliability. A key advantage is also the potential reduction of Assembly Integration and Testing (AIT) time achieved by the multiplexing capability and associated reduced harness. In the frame of the ESA's ARTES5.2 and FLPP-Phase 3 programs, Airbus DS-Crisa and FiberSensing are developing a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) - based temperature monitoring system for application in space telecommunication platforms and launchers. The development encompasses both the interrogation unit and the FBG temperature sensors and associated fiber harness. In parallel Airbus DS - Crisa is developing a modular RTU (RTU2015) to provide maximum flexibility and mission-customization capability for RTUs maintaining the ESA's standards at I/O interface level [1]. In this context, the FBG interrogation unit is designed as a module to be compatible, in both physical dimensions and electrical interfaces aspects, with the Electrical Internal Interface Bus of the RTU2015, thus providing the capability for a hybrid electrical and optical monitoring system.

  8. Real time monitoring of water level and temperature in storage fuel pools through optical fibre sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, S; Périsse, J; Boukenter, A; Ouerdane, Y; Marin, E; Macé, J-R; Cannas, M; Girard, S

    2017-08-18

    We present an innovative architecture of a Rayleigh-based optical fibre sensor for the monitoring of water level and temperature inside storage nuclear fuel pools. This sensor, able to withstand the harsh constraints encountered under accidental conditions such as those pointed-out during the Fukushima-Daiichi event (temperature up to 100 °C and radiation dose level up to ~20 kGy), exploits the Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry technique to remotely monitor a radiation resistant silica-based optical fibre i.e. its sensing probe. We validate the efficiency and the robustness of water level measurements, which are extrapolated from the temperature profile along the fibre length, in a dedicated test bench allowing the simulation of the environmental operating and accidental conditions. The conceived prototype ensures an easy, practical and no invasive integration into existing nuclear facilities. The obtained results represent a significant breakthrough and comfort the ability of the developed system to overcome both operating and accidental constraints providing the distributed profiles of the water level (0-to-5 m) and temperature (20-to-100 °C) with a resolution that in accidental condition is better than 3 cm and of ~0.5 °C respectively. These new sensors will be able, as safeguards, to contribute and reinforce the safety in existing and future nuclear power plants.

  9. Online Decorrelation of Humidity and Temperature in Chemical Sensors for Continuous Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, Ramon; Fonollosa, Jordi; Rulkov, Nikolai F; Rodriguez-Lujan, Irene

    2016-01-01

    A method for online decorrelation of chemical sensor readings from the effects of environmental humidity and temperature variations is proposed. The goal is to improve the accuracy of electronic nose measurements for continuous monitoring by processing data from simultaneous readings of environmental humidity and temperature. The electronic nose setup built for this study included eight different metal-oxide sensors, temperature and humidity sensors with a wireless communication link to PC. This wireless electronic nose was used to monitor air for two years in the residence of one of the authors and collected data continuously during 510 full days with a sampling rate of 2 samples per second. To estimate the effects of variations in air humidity and temperature on the chemical sensors readings, we used a standard energy band model for an n-type metal-oxide sensor. The main assumption of the model is that variations in sensor conductivity can be expressed as a nonlinear function of changes in the semiconductor...

  10. High Temperature Monitoring the Height of Condensed Water in Steam Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick; Blosiu, Julian

    2011-01-01

    An in-service health monitoring system is needed for steam pipes to track through their wall the condensation of water. The system is required to measure the height of the condensed water inside the pipe while operating at temperatures that are as high as 250 deg. C. The system needs to be able to make real time measurements while accounting for the effects of cavitation and wavy water surface. For this purpose, ultrasonic wave in pulse-echo configuration was used and reflected signals were acquired and auto-correlated to remove noise from the data and determine the water height. Transmitting and receiving the waves is done by piezoelectric transducers having Curie temperature that is significantly higher than 250 deg. C. Measurements were made at temperatures as high as 250 deg. C and have shown the feasibility of the test method. This manuscript reports the results of this feasibility study.

  11. Development of a low-cost temperature data monitoring. An upgrade for hot box apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rubeis, T.; Nardi, I.; Muttillo, M.

    2017-11-01

    The monitoring phase has gained a fundamental role in the energy efficiency evaluation of a system. Number and typology of the probes depend on the physical quantity to be monitored, and on the size and complexity of the system. Moreover, a measurement equipment should be designed to allow the employment of probes different for number and measured physical quantities. For this reason, a scalable equipment represents a good way for easily carrying out a system monitoring. Proprietary software and high costs characterize instruments of current use, thus limiting the possibilities to realize customized monitoring. In this paper, a temperature measuring instrument, conceived, designed, and realized for real time applications, is presented. The proposed system is based on digital thermometers and on open-source code. A remarkable feature of the instrument is the possibility of acquiring data from a high and variable number of probes (order of hundred), assuring flexibility of the software, since it can be programmed, and low-cost of the hardware components. The contemporary use of multiple temperature probes suggested to apply this instrument for a hot box apparatus, although the software can be set for recording different physical quantities. A hot box compliant with standard EN ISO 8990 should be equipped with several temperature probes to investigate heat exchanges of a specimen wall and thermal field of the chambers. In this work, preliminary tests have been carried out focusing only on the evaluation of the prototypal system’s performance. The tests were realized by comparing different sensors, such as thermocouples and resistance thermometers, traditionally employed in hot box experiments. A preliminary test was realized imposing a dynamic condition with a thermoelectric Peltier cell. Data obtained by digital thermometers DS18B20, compared with the ones of Pt100 probes, show a good correlation. Based on these encouraging results, a further test was carried out

  12. Large-volume and room-temperature gamma spectrometer for environmental radiation monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Coulon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of a room-temperature gamma spectrometer is an issue in environmental radiation monitoring. To monitor radionuclides released around a nuclear power plant, suitable instruments giving fast and reliable information are required. High-pressure xenon (HPXe chambers have range of resolution and efficiency equivalent to those of other medium resolution detectors such as those using NaI(Tl, CdZnTe, and LaBr3:Ce. An HPXe chamber could be a cost-effective alternative, assuming temperature stability and reliability. The CEA LIST actively studied and developed HPXe-based technology applied for environmental monitoring. Xenon purification and conditioning was performed. The design of a 4-L HPXe detector was performed to minimize the detector capacitance and the required power supply. Simulations were done with the MCNPX2.7 particle transport code to estimate the intrinsic efficiency of the HPXe detector. A behavioral study dealing with ballistic deficits and electronic noise will be utilized to provide perspective for further analysis.

  13. In and ex-vivo Myocardial Tissue Temperature Monitoring by Combined Infrared and Ultrasonic Thermometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engrand, C.; Laux, D.; Ferrandis, J.-Y.; Sinquet, J.-C.; Demaria, R.; Le Clézio, E.

    The success of cardiac surgery essentially depends on tissue preservation during intervention. Consequently a hypothermic cardio-plegia is applied in order to avoid ischemia. However, myocardial temperature is not monitored during operation. The aim of this study is then to find a relevant and simple method for myocardial global temperature estimation in real time using both ultrasounds and infra-red thermography. In order to quantify the sensitivity of ultrasonic velocity to temperature, a 2.25 MHz ultrasonic probe was used for ex-vivo tests. Pig myocards (n=25) were placed in a thermostatically-controlled water bath and measurements of the ultrasound velocity were realized from 10 to 30 ˚C. The results of this study indicate that the specificity and sensitivity of the ultrasonic echo delay induced by the modification of temperature can be exploited for in-depth thermometry. In parallel, for TIR experiments, a bolometer was used to detect the myocardium surface thermal evolution during in-vivo pig heart experiments. Hypothermic cardioplegic solutions were injected and infra-red surface imaging was performed during one hour. In the near futur, the correlation of the ultrasound and the infrared measurements should allow the real time estimation of the global temperature of the heart. The final objective being to realize in vivo measurements on human hearts, this information may have a very high importance in terms of per-operation inspection as well as decision making process during medical interventions.

  14. Improving marine disease surveillance through sea temperature monitoring, outlooks and projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Jeffrey; van Hooidonk, Ruben; Harvell, C Drew; Eakin, C Mark; Liu, Gang; Willis, Bette L; Williams, Gareth J; Groner, Maya L; Dobson, Andrew; Heron, Scott F; Glenn, Robert; Reardon, Kathleen; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-05

    To forecast marine disease outbreaks as oceans warm requires new environmental surveillance tools. We describe an iterative process for developing these tools that combines research, development and deployment for suitable systems. The first step is to identify candidate host-pathogen systems. The 24 candidate systems we identified include sponges, corals, oysters, crustaceans, sea stars, fishes and sea grasses (among others). To illustrate the other steps, we present a case study of epizootic shell disease (ESD) in the American lobster. Increasing prevalence of ESD is a contributing factor to lobster fishery collapse in southern New England (SNE), raising concerns that disease prevalence will increase in the northern Gulf of Maine under climate change. The lowest maximum bottom temperature associated with ESD prevalence in SNE is 12 °C. Our seasonal outlook for 2015 and long-term projections show bottom temperatures greater than or equal to 12 °C may occur in this and coming years in the coastal bays of Maine. The tools presented will allow managers to target efforts to monitor the effects of ESD on fishery sustainability and will be iteratively refined. The approach and case example highlight that temperature-based surveillance tools can inform research, monitoring and management of emerging and continuing marine disease threats. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Monitoring small molecule diffusion into hydrogels at various temperatures by fluorescence technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evingür, Gülşen Akin; Karsli, Kadir; Pekcan, Onder

    2006-12-01

    Steady state fluorescence technique was used to study small molecule diffusion into polyacrylamide (PAAm) gels at various temperatures. Pyranine (P(y)), dissolved in water was introduced as a probe and fluorescence emission (I(p)) from P(y) was monitored during diffusion. Scattered light intensities, I(sc) from PAAm gel was also monitored to observe structural variations during diffusion process. Increase in I(p) intensity was attributed to P(y) diffusion into PAAm gel. On the other hand decrease in I(sc) intensity was interpreted as the variation of the spatial heterogeneities in the system. Li-Tanaka and Fickian models were used to quantify the swelling and diffusion experiments and diffusion coefficients were produced in both cases. Related activation energies were also calculated from the corresponding physical processes.

  16. Monitoring metal contamination of silicon by multiwavelength room temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Ko Jang Jian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thin thermal oxide film (∼36 nm was grown on p--Si (100 wafers in a vertical furnace at 950 °C for 90 min in 1 atm dry O2 as a vehicle for monitoring metal contamination. They are annealed in separate vertical furnaces at 1100°C for 120 min in N2 and tested for metal contamination using multiwavelength room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS. Significant RTPL intensity and spectral variations, corresponding to the degree of metal contamination, were observed. Nondestructive wafer mapping and virtual depth profiling capabilities of RTPL is a very attractive metal contamination monitoring technique.

  17. Analysis of post-tensioned girders structural behaviour using continuous temperature and strain monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, Ł.; Sieńko, R.; Howiacki, T.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents the possibility of using structural health monitoring system data for the analysis of structure’s operation during its life cycle. Within the specific case study it was proved, that continuous, automatic and long term monitoring of selected physical quantities such as strains and temperatures, can significantly improve the assessment of technical condition by identifying hazardous phenomena. In this work the analysis of structural behaviour of post-tensioned girders within the roofing of sport halls in Cracow, Poland, was performed based on measurement results and verified by numerical model carried out in SOFiSTiK software. Thanks to the possibility of performing calculations in real time and informing the manager of the object about abnormalities it is possible to manage the structure in effective way by, inter alia, planning the renovations or supporting decisions about snow removal.

  18. A high-temperature shape memory alloy sensor for combustion monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Greg S.; Snyder, Joseph T.; Prince, Troy S.; Willett, Michael C.

    2005-05-01

    Innovations in the use of thin film SMA materials have enabled the development of a harsh environment pressure sensor useful for combustion monitoring and control. Development of such active combustion control has been driven by rising fuel costs and environmental pressures. Active combustion control, whether in diesel, spark ignited or turbine engines requires feedback to the engine control system in order to adjust the quantity, timing, and placement of fuel charges. To be fully effective, sensors must be integrated into each engine in a manner that will allow continuous combustion monitoring (turbine engines) or monitoring of each discrete combustion event (diesel and SI engines). To date, the sensors available for detection of combustion events and processes have suffered from one or more of three problems: 1) Low sensitivity: The sensors are unable to provide and adequate signal-to-noise ratio in the high temperature and electrically noisy environment of the engine compartment. Attempts to overcome this difficulty have focused on heat removal and/or temperature compensation or more challenging high temperature electronics. 2) Low reliability: Sensors and/or sensor packages have been unable to withstand the engine environment for extended periods of time. Issues have included gross degradation and more subtle issues such as migration of dopants in semiconductor sensor materials. 3) High cost: The materials that have been used, the package concepts employed, and the required support electronics have all contributed to the high cost of the few sensor systems available. Prices have remained high due to the limited demand associated with the poor reliability and the high price itself. Ternary titanium nickel alloys, with platinum group metal substitution for the nickel, are deposited as thin films on MEMS-based diaphragms and patterned to form strain gages of a standard metal film configuration. The strain induced phase transformation of the SMA is used as a

  19. Intra-hole fluid convection: High-resolution temperature time monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, Vladimir; Safanda, Jan; Kresl, Milan

    2008-01-01

    SummaryIntra-hole convection was monitored in detail by a string of five high resolution temperature probes arranged in an 8-m long unit lowered step-by-step into a slim experimental borehole. The experiment was performed in the test hole Sporilov (Prague). A 50-m long depth interval (between 80 and 130 m) was covered in five successive steps. The hole itself is 150 m deep and 112 mm in diameter. The experiment occurred in the internal plastic tube 5 cm in diameter which is sealed from the influx of ground water in the surrounding strata. In the studied interval the temperature gradient varies in the range of 0.020-0.0215 K/m. The borehole was drilled in 1993 and has been in equilibrium since then. Temperature as a function of time was sampled in 15 s intervals and the individual measuring steps took from 1.5 to 2.5 days, each temperature time series thus contained 9000 up to 16,000 data points. The obtained results revealed: (1) temperature-time series present a complex apparently random oscillation pattern with the amplitude of up to 0.045 K; (2) the statistical analysis confirmed a quasi-periodic skeleton of a two-frequency oscillation structure. Shorter periods of 10 up to 30 min are superposed on longer variations with period of several hours. (3) The quasi-periodicity may be hidden under a considerable amount of noise. (4) Within the studied interval the quasi-periodic convection may alternate with a relatively "quiet" regime when temperature oscillations decreased to only 0.004-0.01 K range. (5) Regardless of certain deterministic rules present in the dynamics, the bulk of temperature variations are chaotic.

  20. Monitoring of Regional Land Surface Temperature in city by Wireless Sensing Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Jin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important environmental factor. The precise monitoring data of LST can provide crucial support for further ecological researches such as the environment change and urban heat island. The Wireless Sensing Network (WSN) is a kind of modern information technology which integrates sensor technology, automatic control technology with data network transmission, storage, processing and analysis technology. As a new kind of data collection method, WSN is innovatively applied to monitor regional LST in different land cover types of city in this study. The LST data with high temporal resolution is obtained from temperature sensors of WSN. The land cover types of city are extracted from WorldView-II image with high resolution. The Southeast University Wuxi Branch campus and its surroundings which covers 2 km2 is chosen as the study area in Wuxi city, Jiangsu province, China. WSN is established to continuously monitor LST in real-time for one week. Then, the heterogeneous pattern of LST is investigated at a fine spatial and temporal scale based on different land cover types. The result shows LST of streets is higher than LST of campus in the daytime, but lower than LST of campus at night. The spatial heterogeneity of LST in the campus is not significant. This is because the number of vehicle was larger in the daytime than that at night, while the population of campus in day and night almost having little change. Notably, the influence of plant activities (e.g. photosynthesis and respiration) on LST can be detected by WSN. This study is a new attempt to monitor regional environment of city by WSN technology. Moreover, compared to traditional methods, WSN technology can improve the detection of LST with finer temporal and spatial resolution.

  1. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, A; Santra, S; Ghosh, R; Ali, S Z; Gardner, J W; Guha, P K; Udrea, F

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of ±5%; response and recovery times equal to 189 ± 49 s and 89 ± 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.

  2. Distributed Wireless Monitoring System for Ullage and Temperature in Wine Barrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Skouroumounis, George K.; Monro, Tanya M.; Taylor, Dennis K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a multipurpose and low cost sensor for the simultaneous monitoring of temperature and ullage of wine in barrels in two of the most important stages of winemaking, that being fermentation and maturation. The distributed sensor subsystem is imbedded within the bung of the barrel and runs on battery for a period of at least 12 months and costs around $27 AUD for all parts. In addition, software was designed which allows for the remote transmission and easy visual interpretation of the data for the winemaker. Early warning signals can be sent when the temperature or ullage deviates from a winemakers expectations so remedial action can be taken, such as when topping is required or the movement of the barrels to a cooler cellar location. Such knowledge of a wine’s properties or storage conditions allows for a more precise control of the final wine quality. PMID:26266410

  3. Distributed Wireless Monitoring System for Ullage and Temperature in Wine Barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Skouroumounis, George K; Monro, Tanya M; Taylor, Dennis

    2015-08-10

    This paper presents a multipurpose and low cost sensor for the simultaneous monitoring of temperature and ullage of wine in barrels in two of the most important stages of winemaking, that being fermentation and maturation. The distributed sensor subsystem is imbedded within the bung of the barrel and runs on battery for a period of at least 12 months and costs around $27 AUD for all parts. In addition, software was designed which allows for the remote transmission and easy visual interpretation of the data for the winemaker. Early warning signals can be sent when the temperature or ullage deviates from a winemakers expectations so remedial action can be taken, such as when topping is required or the movement of the barrels to a cooler cellar location. Such knowledge of a wine's properties or storage conditions allows for a more precise control of the final wine quality.

  4. Fiber Bragg Grating Measuring System for Simultaneous Monitoring of Temperature and Humidity in Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available During mechanical ventilation, the humidification of the dry air delivered by the mechanical ventilator is recommended. Among several solutions, heated wire humidifiers (HWHs have gained large acceptance to be used in this field. The aim of this work is to fabricate a measuring system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG for the simultaneous monitoring of gas relative humidity (RH and temperature, intended to be used for providing feedback to the HWHs’ control. This solution can be implemented using an array of two FBGs having a different center wavelength. Regarding RH monitoring, three sensors have been fabricated by coating an FBG with two different moisture-sensitive and biocompatible materials: the first two sensors were fabricated by coating the grating with a 3 mm × 3 mm layer of agar and agarose; to investigate the influence of the coating thickness to the sensor response, a third sensor was developed with a 5 mm × 5 mm layer of agar. The sensors have been assessed in a wide range of RH (up to 95% during both an ascending and a subsequent descending phase. Only the response of the 3 mm × 3 mm-coated sensors were fast enough to follow the RH changes, showing a mean sensitivity of about 0.14 nm/% (agar-coated and 0.12 nm/% (agarose-coated. The hysteresis error was about <10% in the two sensors. The contribution of temperature changes on these RH sensors was negligible. The temperature measurement was performed by a commercial FBG insensitive to RH changes. The small size of these FBG-based sensors, the use of biocompatible polymers, and the possibility to measure both temperature and RH by using the same fiber optic embedding an array of two FBGs make intriguing the use of this solution for application in the control of HWHs.

  5. Internal and External Temperature Monitoring of a Li-Ion Battery with Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Novais

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The integration of fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors in lithium-ion cells for in-situ and in-operando temperature monitoring is presented herein. The measuring of internal and external temperature variations was performed through four FBG sensors during galvanostatic cycling at C-rates ranging from 1C to 8C. The FBG sensors were placed both outside and inside the cell, located in the center of the electrochemically active area and at the tab-electrode connection. The internal sensors recorded temperature variations of 4.0 ± 0.1 °C at 5C and 4.7 ± 0.1 °C at 8C at the center of the active area, and 3.9 ± 0.1 °C at 5C and 4.0 ± 0.1 °C at 8C at the tab-electrode connection, respectively. This study is intended to contribute to detection of a temperature gradient in real time inside a cell, which can determine possible damage in the battery performance when it operates under normal and abnormal operating conditions, as well as to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integration of in-operando microsensors inside Li-ion cells.

  6. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Liang, Zhen; Zhou, Shuangxi

    2017-01-01

    This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF) communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL)-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple. PMID:28640188

  7. Characterizing the Air Temperature Drop in Mediterranean Courtyards from Monitoring Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ángel Rodríguez Jara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As microclimate modifiers, courtyards may be a good passive strategy for enhancing thermal comfort and reducing the energy demands of buildings. Thus, it is necessary to be able to quantify their tempering effect in dominant summer climates. This is frequently done using calculation methods based on CFD, but these have the drawback of their high computational cost and complexity, so their use is limited to advanced users with a high level of knowledge. Thus, an alternative is required based on a simplified method that can explain and predict the air temperature drop in courtyards. This would be extremely useful for professionals looking for the optimal design of this kind of space through energy assessment programs integrating these methods. This study proposes a simplified method of characterization that aims to identify the functional dependencies of the decrease in air temperatures in courtyards, and so to predict the air temperature inside them from that outside, if available. From the results of several experimental campaigns, three variables have been identified that characterize the decrease in the air temperature in courtyards, all of which depend on the confinement factor of the courtyard. Finally, the proposed predictive method was validated by means of an additional monitoring campaign. The results show a good fit of the calculated values to the measured ones, R2 being equal to 0.98.

  8. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Deng, Fangming; He, Yigang; Li, Bing; Liang, Zhen; Zhou, Shuangxi

    2017-06-22

    This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID) sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF) communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL)-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple.

  9. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound. [Ultrasonic thermometry proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    A study of the state-of-the-art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems has been carried out. The instrumentation types studied include Thermocouples, Radiation Pyrometers, and Acoustical Thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. The study determined that ultrasonic thermometry has the potential of providing viable instrumentation. Consequently, a feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry was undertaken. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible. To experimentally verify the technique it is needed (a) to test the available sensor materials at high temperatures under erosive and corrosive conditions and (b) upon the selection of the appropriate sensor material to validate the proposed signal processing technique. The base for the applicability of this technique will be the frequency of operation, which will determine the length of the sensor and the noise background at the frequency of interest. It is, however, believed that the proposed technique will provide reliable estimates under the noise background.

  10. Novel Concrete Temperature Monitoring Method Based on an Embedded Passive RFID Sensor Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper firstly introduces the importance of temperature control in concrete measurement, then a passive radio frequency identification (RFID sensor tag embedded for concrete temperature monitoring is presented. In order to reduce the influences of concrete electromagnetic parameters during the drying process, a T-type antenna is proposed to measure the concrete temperature at the required depth. The proposed RFID sensor tag is based on the EPC generation-2 ultra-high frequency (UHF communication protocol and operates in passive mode. The temperature sensor can convert the sensor signals to corresponding digital signals without an external reference clock due to the adoption of phase-locked loop (PLL-based architecture. Laboratory experimentation and on-site testing demonstrate that our sensor tag embedded in concrete can provide reliable communication performance in passive mode. The maximum communicating distance between reader and tag is 7 m at the operating frequency of 915 MHz and the tested results show high consistency with the results tested by a thermocouple.

  11. Generating daily high spatial land surface temperatures by combining ASTER and MODIS land surface temperature products for environmental process monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingquan; Li, Hua; Huang, Wenjiang; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Changyao

    2015-08-01

    There is a shortage of daily high spatial land surface temperature (LST) data for use in high spatial and temporal resolution environmental process monitoring. To address this shortage, this work used the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM), Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (ESTARFM), and the Spatial and Temporal Data Fusion Approach (STDFA) to estimate high spatial and temporal resolution LST by combining Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) LST and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST products. The actual ASTER LST products were used to evaluate the precision of the combined LST images using the correlation analysis method. This method was tested and validated in study areas located in Gansu Province, China. The results show that all the models can generate daily synthetic LST image with a high correlation coefficient (r) of 0.92 between the synthetic image and the actual ASTER LST observations. The ESTARFM has the best performance, followed by the STDFA and the STARFM. Those models had better performance in desert areas than in cropland. The STDFA had better noise immunity than the other two models.

  12. 40 CFR 60.1325 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... June 6, 2001 Other Monitoring Requirements § 60.1325 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at... a device to continuously measure the temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of...

  13. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  14. Mars Thermospheric Temperature Sensitivity to Solar EUV Forcing from the MAVEN EUV Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Ed; Eparvier, Francis; Andersson, Laila; Pilinski, Marcin; Chamberlin, Phillip; Fowler, Christopher; MAVEN Extreme Ultraviolet Monitor Team, MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves Team

    2017-10-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is the primary heat source for the Mars thermosphere, and the primary source of long-term temperature variability. The Mars obliquity, dust cycle, tides and waves also drive thermospheric temperature variability; and it is important to quantify the role of each in order to understand processes in the upper atmosphere today and, ultimately, the evolution of Mars climate over time. Although EUV radiation is the dominant heating mechanism, accurately measuring the thermospheric temperature sensitivity to EUV forcing has remained elusive, in part, because Mars thermospheric temperature varies dramatically with latitude and local time (LT), ranging from 150K on the nightside to 300K on the dayside. It follows that studies of thermospheric variability must control for location.Instruments onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) orbiter have begun to characterize thermospheric temperature sensitivity to EUV forcing. Bougher et al. [2017] used measurements from the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) and the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) to characterize solar activity trends in the thermosphere with some success. However, aside from restricting measurements to solar zenith angles (SZAs) below 75 degrees, they were unable to control for latitude and LT because repeat-track observations from either instrument were limited or unavailable.The MAVEN EUV Monitor (EUVM) has recently demonstrated the capability to measure thermospheric density from 100 to 200 km with solar occultations of its 17-22 nm channel. These new density measurements are ideal for tracking the long-term thermospheric temperature variability because they are inherently constrained to either 06:00 or 18:00 LT, and the orbit has precessed to include a range of ecliptic latitudes, a number of which have been revisited multiple times over 2.5 years. In this study we present, for the first-time, measurements of thermospheric

  15. Magnetic actuator based on giant magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D with strain and temperature monitoring using FBG optical sensor

    OpenAIRE

    García Miquel, Ángel Héctor; Barrera Vilar, David; Amat, Rafael; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Sales Maicas, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    We have designed a temperature and strain monitoring system for a magnetic actuator based on the giant magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D (Tb0.3 Dy0.7Fe1.92) with Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Magneto-elastic properties of Terfenol-D depend on magnetization, stress pre-history, and temperature. In order to simultaneously monitor these effects, we have implemented a system based on a cylindrical Terfenol-D rod monitored with four FBGs that allows making the appropriate co...

  16. PROTOTIPE SISTEM JARINGAN SENSOR UNTUK MONITORING TEMPERATUR-KELEMBABAN PERMUKAAN DAN BAWAH LAHAN GAMBUT BERBASIS DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendra Rosada Nasution

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK. Lahan gambut adalah jenis tanah yang terbentuk dari sisa-sisa tumbuhan yang terpendam dalam jangka  waktu yang sangat lama. Lahan gambut memiliki  karakteristik mudah terbakar  pada kondisi panas tertentu yang membentuk bara api di bawah permukaan dan menjalar ke atas permukaan hingga menyebabkan terbakarnya semak belukar atau hutan yang berada di atasnya, sehingga perlu dilakukan monitoring temperatur dan kelembaban permukaan dan bawah lahan gambut. Prototipe yang dibuat terdiri dari dua perangkat transmitter yang dilengkapi dengan sensor sebagai pengukur parameter dan satu perangkat receiver sebagai penerima data kedua transmitter. Pengukuran temperatur tanah di bawah permukaan digunakan sensor LM35 berbentuk probe, kemudian pengukuran temperatur dan kelembaban udara di permukaan digunakan sensor SHT11. pengiriman data dilakukan secara nirkabel menggunakan nRF24L01 dengan jarak maksimal 450 meter dengan jarak yang baik 200 meter. Perangkat receiver dilengkapi sistem interface PC berbasis database pada server  localhost/phpmyadmin. Hasil karakterisasi sensor LM35 dalam bentuk probe menunjukan linieritasnya adalah 0,9994 dan 0,9996; deviasi error 0,380C dan 0,400C; sensitivitas 0,960C dan 0,810C. Hasil lima kali pengukuran pada dua titik pengujian setiap transmitter menunjukkan temperatur tanah memiliki nilai 30,200C - 38,100C dan 24,800C - 38,600C, temperatur udara 25,000C - 38,860C dan 24,850C - 40,150C, kelembaban udara 51,65% - 96,51% dan 43,03% - 96,17%.   Kata kunci : Prototipe, Database, Lahan Gambut, LM35, nRF24L01, SHT11

  17. Impact of esophageal temperature monitoring guided atrial fibrillation ablation on preventing asymptomatic excessive transmural injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Kunihiko; Okajima, Katsunori; Shimane, Akira; Kanda, Gaku; Yokoi, Kiminobu; Teranishi, Jin; Aoki, Kousuke; Chimura, Misato; Toba, Takayoshi; Oishi, Shogo; Sawada, Takahiro; Tsukishiro, Yasue; Onishi, Tetsuari; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Yamada, Shinichiro; Yasaka, Yoshinori; Kawai, Hiroya; Yoshida, Akihiro; Fukuzawa, Koji; Itoh, Mitsuaki; Imamura, Kimitake; Fujiwara, Ryudo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nakanishi, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Soichiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi; Tada, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Hiro; Naruse, Yoshihisa; Igarashi, Miyako; Aonuma, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Even with the use of a reduced energy setting (20–25 W), excessive transmural injury (ETI) following catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is reported to develop in 10% of patients. However, the incidence of ETI depends on the pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) method and its esophageal temperature monitor setting. Data comparing the incidence of ETI following AF ablation with and without esophageal temperature monitoring (ETM) are still lacking. Methods This study was comprised of 160 patients with AF (54% paroxysmal, mean: 24.0±2.9 kg/m2). Eighty patients underwent ablation accompanied by ETM. The primary endpoint was defined as the occurrence of ETI assessed by endoscopy within 5 d after the AF ablation. The secondary endpoint was defined as AF recurrence after a single procedure. If the esophageal temperature probe registered >39 °C, the radiofrequency (RF) application was stopped immediately. RF applications could be performed in a point-by-point manner for a maximum of 20 s and 20 W. ETI was defined as any injury that resulted from AF ablation, including esophageal injury or periesophageal nerve injury (peri-ENI). Results The incidence of esophageal injury was significantly lower in patients whose AF ablation included ETM compared with patients without ETM (0 [0%] vs. 6 [7.5%], p=0.028), but not the incidence of peri-ENI (2 [2.5%] vs. 3 [3.8%], p=1.0). AF recurrence 12 months after the procedure was similar between the groups (20 [25%] in the ETM group vs. 19 [24%] in the non-ETM group, p=1.00). Conclusions Catheter ablation using ETM may reduce the incidence of esophageal injury without increasing the incidence of AF recurrence but not the incidence of peri-ENI. PMID:26949429

  18. Flat Branch monitoring project: stream water temperature and sediment responses to forest cutting in the riparian zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton D. Clinton; James M. Vose; Dick L. Fowler

    2010-01-01

    Stream water protection during timber-harvesting activities is of primary interest to forest managers. In this study, we examine the potential impacts of riparian zone tree cutting on water temperature and total suspended solids. We monitored stream water temperature and total suspended solids before and after timber harvesting along a second-order tributary of the...

  19. Permanent geoelectrical and temperature monitoring in the permafrost region Magnetköpfl, Salzburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottowitz, D.; Jochum, B.; Supper, R.; Keuschnig, M.; Hartmeyer, I.

    2012-04-01

    Changes of climate parameters due to global warming generate increased permafrost warming and deglaciation in alpine regions. In the area of interest scientists observe increasing rock instability due to the disappearance of the permafrost inside the Magnetköpfl, a peak below the Kitzsteinhorn (3203 m a.m.s.l), as well as the decrease of glacier hight followed by a lack of counterpressure at the flanks of the slope. As a result, slabs of rock fall onto the year-round ski slope during the warmer season. Geoelectric measurements are an adequate method to measure permafrost, since the underground electric resistivity is highly dependent on temperature. The GEOMON4D, an autonomous geoelectric monitoring system, developed by the Geological Survey of Austria, equipped with 80 electrodes and powered by a fuel cell, was installed for testing reasons in the year 2007 on Sonnblick and 2010 on Mölltaler Glacier. In 2011 the system was moved to the Magnetköpfl. The results of the active site show, that the resistivities are much higher than at the Mölltaler Glacier, which was about 200 m lower and contained no permafrost. Although the GEOMON4D is adapted for very high subsurface electrical resistivities with a constant current source we still approach the 10 V at the input channel with an injected current in the range of µA. Resistivity ranges at the Magnetköpfl from 104-108 Ohmm. By the end of December we covered the interesting period of the freezing process by measuring increased resistivity in the first 3 m below surface. Since the soil temperature is highly dependent on various parameters (e.g. location, slope angle, lithology) it is necessary to have on site soil temperatures for a more reliable interpretation of the resistivity data. The geoelectric measurements are accompanied by various soil temperature sensors in several depths on and around the Magnetköpfl. The recording of the soil temperature is conducted in the framework of the MOREXPERT project by the

  20. HotSense: a high temperature piezoelectric platform for sensing and monitoring in extreme environments (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tim; Wines, Thomas; Martin, David; Vickers, William; Laws, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Effective monitoring of asset integrity subject to corrosion and erosion while minimizing the exposure of personnel to difficult and hazardous working environments has always been a major problem in many industries. One solution of this problem is permanently installed ultrasonic monitoring equipment which can continuously provide information on the rate of corrosion or cracking, even in the most severe environments and at extreme temperatures to prevent the need for shutdown. Here, a permanently installed 5 MHz ultrasonic monitoring system based on our HotSense® technology is designed and investigated. The system applicability for wall thickness, crack monitoring and weld inspection in high temperature environments is demonstrated through experimental studies on a range of Schedule 40 pipes at temperatures up to 350 °C continuously. The applicability for this technology to be distributed to Aerospace and Nuclear sectors are also explored and preliminary results discussed.

  1. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C, sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings, and frequency response (hundreds of kHz, are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  2. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-07-22

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C(-1) for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  3. Development and Application of the Power Plant Real-Time Temperature and Stress Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Duda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of temperature and stress estimation in pressure components of conventional or nuclear power plants. The proposed algorithm can be applied without the information concerning the thermal boundary condition on the component inner surfaces and it is fast enough to be applied in an online mode. The solution is possible thanks to “measured” temperature histories determined in easily accessible points located on the component outer surface. The presented model has been recently verified analytically, numerically, and experimentally. The proposed algorithm was used to calculate the transient temperature and stress distribution in the outlet header of a steam reheater and the results indicate that the component lower part is loaded the most, but allowable stresses are not exceeded. If the presented heating process was shortened, the calculated stresses would exceed the allowable values. Monitoring the boiler thermal and strength operating conditions makes it possible to identify dangerous loads of the power boiler pressure elements during transient-state operations. The presented method for controlling thermal and pressure-related stresses is suitable for nuclear power plants because it does not require drilling holes for sensors in the pressure element walls.

  4. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures. PMID:27455273

  5. Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program: Subsurface Temperature Recorders (STRs) at selected coral reef locations across the Pacific Ocean from 2001 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water temperature data are collected using subsurface temperature recorders (STRs) that aid in the monitoring of seawater temperature variability at permanent coral...

  6. Wireless Intelligent Monitoring and Control System of Greenhouse Temperature Based on Fuzzy-PID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei ZHAN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Control effect is not ideal for traditional control method and wired control system, since greenhouse temperature has such characteristics as nonlinear and longtime lag. Therefore, Fuzzy- PID control method was introduced and radio frequency chip CC1110 was applied to design greenhouse wireless intelligent monitoring and control system. The design of the system, the component of nodes and the developed intelligent management software system were explained in this paper. Then describe the design of the control algorithm Fuzzy-PID. By simulating the new method in Matlab software, the results showed that Fuzzy-PID method small overshoot and better dynamic performance compared with general PID control. It has shorter settling time and no steady-state error compared with fuzzy control. It can meet requirements in greenhouse production.

  7. Monitoring And Recording Data For Solar Radiation Temperature And Charging Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Bhone Myint

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A data logger based on 8051 microcontroller has been implemented in this project to measure the solar radiation temperature and charging current. Development of a low-cost data logger can easily be made and easily be used to convert the analog signal of physical parameters of various test or other purposes of engineering. By using a suitable program code it can be used to read the value digitally with a PC. Our aim is to provide with a module and a software package when installed in a computer one can remotely acquire and monitor several numbers of the same or different types of signals sequentially at a time. Signals obtained from various sensors have been effectively conditioned. Now interfacing these signals using ADC with the Bluetooth module port of a computer satisfies the very goal of data acquisition. Proposed system provides better performance and has low cost versatile portable.

  8. Monitoring and modeling water temperature and trophic status of a shallow Mediterranean lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Bueche, Thomas; Pulina, Silvia; Marrosu, Roberto; Padedda, Bachisio Mario; Mariani, Maria Antonietta; Vetter, Mark; Cohen, Denis; Pirastru, Mario; Niedda, Marcello; Lugliè, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are sensitive to changes in climate and human activities. Over the last few decades, Mediterranean lakes have experienced various problems due to the current climate change (drought, flood, warming, salt accumulation, water quality changes, etc.), often amplified by water use, intensification of land use activities, and pollution. The overall impact of these changes on water resources is still an open question. In this study we monitor the trophic status and the dynamics of water temperature of Lake Baratz, the only natural lake in Sardinia, Italy, characterized by high salinity and shallow depth. We extend the research carried out in the past 8 years by integrating new physical, chemical and biological data using a multidisciplinary approach that combines hydrological and biological dynamics. In particular, the lake water balance and the thermal and hydrochemical regime are studied with a lake dynamic model (the General Lake Model or GLM) which combine the energy budget method for estimating lake evaporation, and a physically-based rainfall-runoff simulator for estimating lake inflow, calibrated with measurements at the cross section of the main inlet stream. The trophic state of the lake was evaluated applying the OCDE Probability Distribution Diagrams method, which requires nutrient concentrations in the lake (total phosphorus), phytoplankton chlorophyll a and Secchi disk transparency data. We collected field data from a raft station and a land station, measuring net solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity, precipitation, wind velocity, atmospheric pressure, and temperature from thermistors submerged in the uppermost three centimeters of water and beneath the lake surface at depths of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 m. Samples for nutrients and chlorophyll a analyses were collected at the same above mentioned depths close to the raft station using a Niskin bottle. Temperature, salinity, pH, and dissolved oxygen were measured using a multi

  9. Estrous detection by monitoring ventral tail base surface temperature using a wearable wireless sensor in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ryotaro; Yoshioka, Koji; Miyamoto, Toru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Okada, Hironao; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the ventral tail base surface temperature (ST) was monitored using a wearable wireless sensor for estrus detection in cattle. Relationships among ST, behavioral estrus expression, ovulation, and changes in hormone profiles during the estrous cycle were examined. Holstein Friesian or Japanese Black female cattle were used in summer (August-September), autumn (October-November) and winter (January-February; three animals per season). On Day 11 of the estrous cycle (Day 0=the day of ovulation), the sensor was attached to the surface of the ventral tail base and ST was measured every 2min until Day 11 of the next estrous cycle. Hourly maximum ST values were used for analysis. To exclude circadian rhythm and seasonal effects, ST changes were expressed as residual temperatures (RT=actual ST - mean ST for the same hour on the previous 3days). Obvious circadian rhythms of the ST were observed and daily changes in the ST significantly differed among seasons. There was no significant seasonal difference, however, in the RT. The mean RT increased significantly ∼24 compared with ∼48h before ovulation. The mean maximum RT was 1.27±0.30°C, which was observed 5.6±2.4h after the onset of estrus, 2.4±1.3h before LH peak, and 26.9±1.2h before ovulation. The ST of the ventral tail base could be monitored throughout the estrous cycle and could detect a substantial change around the time of expression of behavioral estrus. Calculation and analysis of the RT could be useful for automatic estrous detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative temperature monitoring with zero heat flux technology (3M SpotOn sensor) in comparison with sublingual and nasopharyngeal temperature: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Timo; Horn, Ernst-Peter; Bein, Berthold; Böhm, Ruwen; Beese, Janne; Höcker, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hypothermia is common in patients undergoing general anaesthesia and is associated with important adverse events. The 'gold standard' for monitoring body core temperature - the pulmonary artery catheter - is invasive and unsuitable for most patients. For routine clinical practice, other sites and methods of temperature monitoring are commonly used. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new temperature sensor (3M SpotOn) using the 'zero heat flux' method attached to the forehead, and compare it to sublingual and nasopharyngeal sensors in terms of correlation, accuracy and precision. An observational study. University Medical Center Schleswig Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany from October 2013 to January 2014. One hundred and twenty patients scheduled for elective gynaecological or trauma surgery undergoing general anaesthesia were enrolled into this study. Data of 83 patients were finally analysed. Patients with unexpected blood loss, haemodynamic instability determined by the need for continuous norepinephrine infusion and/or need for postoperative ventilation were excluded from this study. Temperature monitoring was established after induction of anaesthesia with sublingual and nasopharyngeal probes, and the SpotOn sensor. Body temperature was measured 15, 45 and 75 min after induction of anaesthesia from sublingual and nasopharyngeal probes and the 3M SpotOn sensor at precisely the same moment. Analysis of 83 data sets revealed that 3M SpotOn temperatures were almost identical with nasopharyngeal temperatures (mean difference 0.07 °C; P = 0.1424) and slightly lower than sublingual temperatures by 0.35 °C (P sensor provides a good measurement of body temperature in comparison to the nasopharyngeal probe and an acceptable measurement in comparison with sublingual thermometry. It is adequate for clinical use. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02031159.

  11. Advanced Signal Processing for High Temperatures Health Monitoring of Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Takano, Nobuyuki; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    An advanced signal processing methodology is being developed to monitor the height of condensed water thru the wall of a steel pipe while operating at temperatures as high as 250deg. Using existing techniques, previous study indicated that, when the water height is low or there is disturbance in the environment, the predicted water height may not be accurate. In recent years, the use of the autocorrelation and envelope techniques in the signal processing has been demonstrated to be a very useful tool for practical applications. In this paper, various signal processing techniques including the auto correlation, Hilbert transform, and the Shannon Energy Envelope methods were studied and implemented to determine the water height in the steam pipe. The results have shown that the developed method provides a good capability for monitoring the height in the regular conditions. An alternative solution for shallow water or no water conditions based on a developed hybrid method based on Hilbert transform (HT) with a high pass filter and using the optimized windowing technique is suggested. Further development of the reported methods would provide a powerful tool for the identification of the disturbances of water height inside the pipe.

  12. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  13. Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

  14. Polymer Electrolyte-Based Ambient Temperature Oxygen Microsensors for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2011-01-01

    An ambient temperature oxygen microsensor, based on a Nafion polymer electrolyte, has been developed and was microfabricated using thin-film technologies. A challenge in the operation of Nafion-based sensor systems is that the conductivity of Nafion film depends on the humidity in the film. Nafion film loses conductivity when the moisture content in the film is too low, which can affect sensor operation. The advancement here is the identification of a method to retain the operation of the Nafion films in lower humidity environments. Certain salts can hold water molecules in the Nafion film structure at room temperature. By mixing salts with the Nafion solution, water molecules can be homogeneously distributed in the Nafion film increasing the film s hydration to prevent Nafion film from being dried out in low-humidity environment. The presence of organics provides extra sites in the Nafion film to promote proton (H+) mobility and thus improving Nafion film conductivity and sensor performance. The fabrication of ambient temperature oxygen microsensors includes depositing basic electrodes using noble metals, and metal oxides layer on one of the electrode as a reference electrode. The use of noble metals for electrodes is due to their strong catalytic properties for oxygen reduction. A conducting polymer Nafion, doped with water-retaining components and extra sites facilitating proton movement, was used as the electrolyte material, making the design adequate for low humidity environment applications. The Nafion solution was coated on the electrodes and air-dried. The sensor operates at room temperature in potentiometric mode, which measures voltage differences between working and reference electrodes in different gases. Repeat able responses to 21-percent oxygen in nitrogen were achieved using nitrogen as a baseline gas. Detection of oxygen from 7 to 21 percent has also been demonstrated. The room-temperature oxygen micro sensor developed has extremely low power

  15. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 1; Bragg Grating Strain and Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors are being developed for health monitoring of future aircraft. Aircraft health monitoring involves the use of strain, temperature, vibration and chemical sensors to infer integrity of the aircraft structure. Part 1 of this two part series describes sensors that will measure load and temperature signatures of these structures. In some cases a single fiber may be used for measuring these parameters. Part 2 will describe techniques for using optical fibers to monitor composite cure in real time during manufacture and to monitor in-service integrity of composite structures using a single fiber optic sensor capable of measuring multiple chemical and physical parameters. The facilities for fabricating optical fiber and associated sensors and the methods of demodulating Bragg gratings for strain measurement will be described.

  16. Monitoring of bolt clamping force at high temperatures using metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating strain sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Kuo; Tu, Yun; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-10-01

    Insufficient or excessive preload has been regarded as the main issue that may endanger the safety of bolted joints operated at high temperatures. A new technique for monitoring the bolt clamping force is thus proposed using metal-packaged regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) strain sensors spot-welded onto the bolt. The measurement of the clamping force in a bolted steel-steel joint subjected to thermal loading is conducted. The experimental results show that the bolt clamping force can be monitored by the metal-packaged RFBG strain sensor at high temperatures up to 500 °C. This technique provides a new possibility for structural health monitoring of bolted joints operated at high temperatures.

  17. Preferential flows and soil moistures on a Benggang slope: Determined by the water and temperature co-monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yu; He, Yangbo; Duan, Xiaoqian; Zou, Ziqiang; Lin, Lirong; Chen, Jiazhou

    2017-10-01

    Soil preferential flow (PF) has important effects on rainfall infiltration, moisture distribution, and hydrological and ecological process; but it is very difficult to monitor and characterize on a slope. In this paper, soil water and soil temperature at 20, 40, 60, 80 cm depths in six positions were simultaneously monitored at high frequency to confirm the occurrence of PF at a typical Benggang slope underlain granite residual deposits, and to determine the interaction of soil moisture distribution and Benggang erosion. In the presence of PF, the soil temperature was first (half to one hour) governed by the rainwater temperature, then (more than one hour) governed by the upper soil temperature; in the absence of PF (only matrix flow, MF), the soil temperature was initially governed by the upper soil temperature, then by the rainwater temperature. The results confirmed the water replacement phenomenon in MF, thus it can be distinguished from PF by additional temperature monitoring. It indicates that high frequency moisture and temperature monitoring can determine the occurrence of PF and reveal the soil water movement. The distribution of soil water content and PF on the different positions of the slope showed that a higher frequency of PF resulted in a higher variation of average of water content. The frequency of PF at the lower position can be three times as that of the upper position, therefore, the variation coefficient of soil water content increased from 4.67% to 12.68% at the upper position to 8.18%-33.12% at the lower position, where the Benggang erosion (soil collapse) was more possible. The results suggest strong relationships between PF, soil water variation, and collapse activation near the Benggang wall.

  18. Investigations on Temperature Fields during Laser Beam Melting by Means of Process Monitoring and Multiscale Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schilp

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Process monitoring and modelling can contribute to fostering the industrial relevance of additive manufacturing. Process related temperature gradients and thermal inhomogeneities cause residual stresses, and distortions and influence the microstructure. Variations in wall thickness can cause heat accumulations. These occur predominantly in filigree part areas and can be detected by utilizing off-axis thermographic monitoring during the manufacturing process. In addition, numerical simulation models on the scale of whole parts can enable an analysis of temperature fields upstream to the build process. In a microscale domain, modelling of several exposed single hatches allows temperature investigations at a high spatial and temporal resolution. Within this paper, FEM-based micro- and macroscale modelling approaches as well as an experimental setup for thermographic monitoring are introduced. By discussing and comparing experimental data with simulation results in terms of temperature distributions both the potential of numerical approaches and the complexity of determining suitable computation time efficient process models are demonstrated. This paper contributes to the vision of adjusting the transient temperature field during manufacturing in order to improve the resulting part's quality by simulation based process design upstream to the build process and the inline process monitoring.

  19. Monitoring rock glacier dynamics and ground temperatures in the semiarid Andes (Chile, 30°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenning, Alexander; Azócar, Guillermo F.; Bodin, Xavier

    2013-04-01

    Rock glaciers and mountain permafrost are widespread in the high semiarid Andes of Chile, where they concentrate greater amounts of ice than glaciers. Rock glaciers are of particular interest because in some cases the permafrost they contain might be in a degrading in response to climatic warming. This could result in increased dynamics and even to destabilization, which has been observed on some rock glaciers in the studied area. Displacement rates and active-layer temperatures of two rock glaciers as well as ground surface temperatures of the periglacial environment in the upper Elqui valley have been monitored since summer 2009/10 with funding from the Chilean Dirección General de Aguas. Differential GPS measurements of 115 points on the surface of two rock glaciers since April 2010 showed horizontal displacements of up to 1.3 m/a on the Llano de las Liebres rock glacier and up to 1.2 m/a on the Tapado rock glacier. General velocity patterns are consistent with the morphological evidence of activity (e.g., front slopes, looseness of debris) and for the Tapado complex, a clearly distinct activity from the debris-covered glacier was observed. Temperature measurements in four boreholes indicate active-layer depths of about 2.5 m at the highest locations on the Tapado rock glacier (~4400 m a.s.l.) and about 8 m near the front of the Llano rock glacier (3786 m a.s.l.). Spatial patterns of mean ground surface temperature (MGST) were analyzed with regards to influences of elevation, potential incoming solar radiation, location on ice-debris landforms (rock and debris-covered glaciers), and snow cover duration using linear mixed-effects models. While accounting for the other variables, sites with long-lasting snow patches had ~0.4°C lower MGST, and ice-debris landforms had ~0.4-0.6°C lower MGST than general debris surfaces, highlighting important local modifications to the general topographic variation of ground thermal conditions.

  20. 40 CFR 62.15270 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....15270 How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control... temperature of the flue gas stream at the inlet of each particulate matter control device. ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of...

  1. High temperature flexible ultrasonic transducers for structural health monitoring and NDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, J.L. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kobayashi, M.; Jen, C.K.; Tatibouet, J. [National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, PQ (Canada). Industrial Materials Inst.; Mrad, N. [Department of National Defence, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Air Vehicles Research Station

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are often used for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of pipes in nuclear and fossil fuel power plants, petrochemical plants and other structures as a method to improve safety and extend the service life of the structure. In such applications, ultrasonic transducers (UTs) must be able to operate at high temperature, and must come in contact with structures that have surfaces with different curvatures. As such, flexible UTs (FUTs) are most suitable because they ensure self-alignment to the object's surface. The purpose of this study was to develop FUTs that have high flexibility similar to commercially available polyvinylidene fluoride PVDF FUTs, but which can operate at up to at least 150 degrees C and have a high ultrasonic performance comparable to commercial broadband UTs. The fabrication of the FUT consisted of a sol-gel based sensor fabrication process. The substrate was a 75 {mu}m thick titanium (Ti) membrane, a piezoelectric composite with a thickness larger than 85 {mu}m and a top electrode. The ultrasonic performance of the FUT in terms of signal strength was found to be at least as good as commercially available broadband ultrasonic transducers at room temperature. Onsite gluing and brazing installation techniques which bond the FUTs onto steel pipes for SHM and NDT purposes up to 100 and 150 degrees C were developed, respectively. The best thickness measurement accuracy of FUT at 150 degrees C was estimated to be 26 {mu}m. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  2. Fault zone hydrogeologic properties and processes revealed by borehole temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, P. M.; Brodsky, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution borehole temperature monitoring can provide valuable insight into the hydrogeologic structure of fault zones and transient processes that affect fault zone stability. Here we report on results from a subseafloor temperature observatory within the Japan Trench plate boundary fault. In our efforts to interpret this unusual dataset, we have developed several new methods for probing hydrogeologic properties and processes. We illustrate how spatial variations in the thermal recovery of the borehole after drilling and other spectral characteristics provide a measure of the subsurface permeability architecture. More permeable zones allow for greater infiltration of cool drilling fluids, are more greatly thermally disturbed, and take longer to recover. The results from the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) observatory are consistent with geophysical logs, core data, and other hydrologic observations and suggest a permeable damage zone consisting of steeply dipping faults and fractures overlays a low-permeability clay-rich plate boundary fault. Using high-resolution time series data, we have also developed methods to map out when and where fluid advection occurs in the subsurface over time. In the JFAST data, these techniques reveal dozens of transient earthquake-driven fluid pulses that are spatially correlated and consistently located around inferred permeable areas of the fault damage zone. These observations are suspected to reflect transient fluid flow driven by pore pressure changes in response to dynamic and/or static stresses associated with nearby earthquakes. This newly recognized hydrologic phenomenon has implications for understanding subduction zone heat and chemical transport as well as the redistribution of pore fluid pressure which influences fault stability and can trigger other earthquakes.

  3. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2015-02-10

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  4. Flexible metallic ultrasonic transducers for structural health monitoring of pipes at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jeanne-Louise; Kobayashi, Makiko; Jen, Cheng-Kuei

    2010-09-01

    Piezoelectric films have been deposited by a sol-gel spray technique onto 75-μm-thick titanium and stainless steel (SS) membranes and have been fabricated into flexible ultrasonic transducers (FUTs). FUTs using titanium membranes were glued and those using SS membranes brazed onto steel pipes, procedures that serve as on-site installation techniques for the purpose of offering continuous thickness monitoring capabilities at up to 490 °C. At 150 °C, the thickness measurement accuracy of a pipe with an outer diameter of 26.6 mm and a wall thickness of 2.5 mm was estimated to be 26 μm and the center frequency of the FUT was 10.8 MHz. It is demonstrated that the frequency bandwidth of the FUTs and SNR of signals using glue or brazing materials as high-temperature couplant for FUTs are sufficient to inspect the steel pipes even with a 2.5 mm wall thickness.

  5. Active Layer moisture and temperature monitoring at Half Moon Island, Maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Roberto; Francelino, Márcio; Schaefer, Carlos; Schmitz, Daniela; Dittmar, Camila; Silva, Tássio; Loureiro, Diego

    2017-04-01

    Half Moon Island is a minor Antarctic island, lying in the Half Moon Bay, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands of the Antarctic Peninsula region. Having the Mc Farlane Strait at its western shore the island was formed by the junction of three smaller islands during the Holocene, altitude at its northern portion can reach 101 m a.s.l. Its surface area is 171 hectares (420 acres). The Argentine Cámara Base is located on the island, the naval base is operational occasionally during the summer, when it's water suply comes from a near by lake. Permafrost spreads over wider areas on higher Holocene beaches being sporadic on the lowest Present-day platforms (López-Martínez et al., 2012), processes related to the presence of permafrost were observed. The mean annual air temperature is near -2°C, and average summer temperatures are higher than 0°C. These conditions allow snow cover melting and freeze-thaw cycles during summer although the annual number of air freeze-thaw cycles reported for the near by Byers Peninsula is low, 14 in summer (Blümel and Eitel, 1989; Qingsong, 1989). The objective of this study was to evaluate soil temperature and moisture content based on in situ measurements from a Cryosol developed on a Holocene beach at Half Moon Island, Maritime Antarctica. The monitoring systems consist of soil temperature probes (Campbell L107E thermocouple, accuracy of ± 0.2°C) and soil moisture probes (CS656 water content reflectometer, accuracy of ± 2.5%), placed in the active layer (Turbic Eutric Cryosol 44 m a.s.l., 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm, 50 cm and 100 cm, S 62°35´23.8", W 059°55´18.3"). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger, recording data at every 1 hour interval. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). This system recorded data of soil temperature and moisture from March 2015 to December 2016. Despite the absence of

  6. Development of hardware system using temperature and vibration maintenance models integration concepts for conventional machines monitoring: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeri, Michael Kanisuru; Mpofu, Khumbulani; Kareem, Buliaminu

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the integration of temperature and vibration models for maintenance monitoring of conventional machinery parts in which their optimal and best functionalities are affected by abnormal changes in temperature and vibration values thereby resulting in machine failures, machines breakdown, poor quality of products, inability to meeting customers' demand, poor inventory control and just to mention a few. The work entails the use of temperature and vibration sensors as monitoring probes programmed in microcontroller using C language. The developed hardware consists of vibration sensor of ADXL345, temperature sensor of AD594/595 of type K thermocouple, microcontroller, graphic liquid crystal display, real time clock, etc. The hardware is divided into two: one is based at the workstation (majorly meant to monitor machines behaviour) and the other at the base station (meant to receive transmission of machines information sent from the workstation), working cooperatively for effective functionalities. The resulting hardware built was calibrated, tested using model verification and validated through principles pivoted on least square and regression analysis approach using data read from the gear boxes of extruding and cutting machines used for polyethylene bag production. The results got therein confirmed related correlation existing between time, vibration and temperature, which are reflections of effective formulation of the developed concept.

  7. Real-time temperature estimation and monitoring of HIFU ablation through a combined modeling and passive acoustic mapping approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, C. R.; Cleveland, R. O.; Coussios, C. C.

    2013-09-01

    Passive acoustic mapping (PAM) has been recently demonstrated as a method of monitoring focused ultrasound therapy by reconstructing the emissions created by inertially cavitating bubbles (Jensen et al 2012 Radiology 262 252-61). The published method sums energy emitted by cavitation from the focal region within the tissue and uses a threshold to determine when sufficient energy has been delivered for ablation. The present work builds on this approach to provide a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring software that displays both real-time temperature maps and a prediction of the ablated tissue region. This is achieved by determining heat deposition from two sources: (i) acoustic absorption of the primary HIFU beam which is calculated via a nonlinear model, and (ii) absorption of energy from bubble acoustic emissions which is estimated from measurements. The two sources of heat are used as inputs to the bioheat equation that gives an estimate of the temperature of the tissue as well as estimates of tissue ablation. The method has been applied to ex vivo ox liver samples and the estimated temperature is compared to the measured temperature and shows good agreement, capturing the effect of cavitation-enhanced heating on temperature evolution. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by using PAM and predictions of heating it is possible to produce an evolving estimate of cell death during exposure in order to guide treatment for monitoring ablative HIFU therapy. Portions presented at the 13th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Heidelberg, Germany (2012).

  8. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Change on Sea Surface Temperature in Monitoring Coral Reef Health in the Florida Keys Using Sea Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jason; Burbank, Renane; Billiot, Amanda; Schultz, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses use of 4 kilometer satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) data to monitor and assess coral reef areas of the Florida Keys. There are growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on coral reef systems throughout the world. Satellite remote sensing technology is being used for monitoring coral reef areas with the goal of understanding the climatic and oceanic changes that can lead to coral bleaching events. Elevated SST is a well-documented cause of coral bleaching events. Some coral monitoring studies have used 50 km data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to study the relationships of sea surface temperature anomalies to bleaching events. In partnership with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the University of South Florida's Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, this project utilized higher resolution SST data from the Terra's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AVHRR. SST data for 2000-2010 was employed to compute sea surface temperature anomalies within the study area. The 4 km SST anomaly products enabled visualization of SST levels for known coral bleaching events from 2000-2010.

  9. The Improved NRL Tropical Cyclone Monitoring System with a Unified Microwave Brightness Temperature Calibration Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The near real-time NRL global tropical cyclone (TC monitoring system based on multiple satellite passive microwave (PMW sensors is improved with a new inter-sensor calibration scheme to correct the biases caused by differences in these sensor’s high frequency channels. Since the PMW sensor 89 GHz channel is used in multiple current and near future operational and research satellites, a unified scheme to calibrate all satellite PMW sensor’s ice scattering channels to a common 89 GHz is created so that their brightness temperatures (TBs will be consistent and permit more accurate manual and automated analyses. In order to develop a physically consistent calibration scheme, cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line system over the west Pacific coast and hurricane Bonnie in the Atlantic Ocean are applied to simulate the views from different PMW sensors. To clarify the complicated TB biases due to the competing nature of scattering and emission effects, a four-cloud based calibration scheme is developed (rain, non-rain, light rain, and cloudy. This new physically consistent inter-sensor calibration scheme is then evaluated with the synthetic TBs of hurricane Bonnie and a squall line as well as observed TCs. Results demonstrate the large TB biases up to 13 K for heavy rain situations before calibration between TMI and AMSR-E are reduced to less than 3 K after calibration. The comparison stats show that the overall bias and RMSE are reduced by 74% and 66% for hurricane Bonnie, and 98% and 85% for squall lines, respectively. For the observed hurricane Igor, the bias and RMSE decrease 41% and 25% respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of TB calibrations between PMW sensors in order to systematically monitor the global TC life cycles in terms of intensity, inner core structure and convective organization. A physics-based calibration scheme on TC’s TB corrections developed in this study is able to significantly reduce the

  10. Metal temperature monitoring in corrosive gases at high temperature and high thermal flows; Monitoreo de temperaturas de metal en gases corrosivos a alta temperatura y altos flujos termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta Espino, Mario; Martinez Flores, Marco Antonio; Martinez Villafane, Alberto; Porcayo Calderon, Jesus; Gomez Guzman, Roberto; Reyes Cervantes, Fernando [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1990-12-31

    The direct measurement of metal temperatures during operation in superheater, reheater, and water wall tubes in zones exposed to high thermal flows is of great interest for the operation and analysis of the correct functioning of a steam generator. The operation temperature measurement of these zones differs very much of the monitored temperature in headers in the dead chamber, since the temperature measured in this zone is the steam temperature that does not reflect the one detected in the gas zone. For this reason, the thermocouples implant in gas zones will detect the real metal temperature and the incidence that some operation variables might have on it (Martinez et al., (1990). [Espanol] La medicion directa de temperaturas de metal durante operacion en tubos de sobrecalentador, recalentador y pared de agua en zonas expuestas a altos flujos termicos es de gran interes para la operacion y analisis del buen funcionamiento de un generador de vapor. La medicion de la temperatura de operacion de estas zonas, difiere mucho de la temperatura monitoreada en cabezales en zona de camara muerta, ya que la temperatura registrada en esta zona es la de vapor que no es un reflejo de la detectada en zona de gases. Por esta razon, la implantacion de termopares en zona de gases detectara la temperatura de metal real y la incidencia que algunas variables de operacion tengan sobre esta (Martinez et al., 1990).

  11. Temperature and Humidity Calibration of a Low-Cost Wireless Dust Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojaiji, Hannaneh; Kalantarian, Haik; Bui, Alex A T; King, Christine E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2017-03-01

    This paper introduces the design, calibration, and validation of a low-cost portable sensor for the real-time measurement of dust particles within the environment. The proposed design consists of low hardware cost and calibration based on temperature and humidity sensing to achieve accurate processing of airborne dust density. Using commercial particulate matter sensors, a highly accurate air quality monitoring sensor was designed and calibrated using real world variations in humidity and temperature for indoor and outdoor applications. Furthermore, to provide a low-cost secure solution for real-time data transfer and monitoring, an onboard Bluetooth module with AES data encryption protocol was implemented. The wireless sensor was tested against a Dylos DC1100 Pro Air Quality Monitor, as well as an Alphasense OPC-N2 optical air quality monitoring sensor for accuracy. The sensor was also tested for reliability by comparing the sensor to an exact copy of itself under indoor and outdoor conditions. It was found that accurate measurements under real-world humid and temperature varying and dynamically changing conditions were achievable using the proposed sensor when compared to the commercially available sensors. In addition to accurate and reliable sensing, this sensor was designed to be wearable and perform real-time data collection and transmission, making it easy to collect and analyze data for air quality monitoring and real-time feedback in remote health monitoring applications. Thus, the proposed device achieves high quality measurements at lower-cost solutions than commercially available wireless sensors for air quality.

  12. Monitoring thermal processes in low-permeability fractured media using fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixel, Bernard; Klepikova, Maria; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Loew, Simon; Amann, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Fibre-optics distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) systems constitute arguably one of the main significant advances in the development of modern monitoring techniques in field hydrogeology, both for shallow (e.g. quantification of surface water-groundwater interactions) and deeper applications (borehole temperature monitoring). Deployment of FO-DTS monitoring systems in boreholes has notably allowed further promoting the use of temperature as a tracer to improve the characterization of heterogeneous media, with a strong focus on permeable environments such as shallow unconsolidated aquifers and/or highly-fractured rocks, generally found close to ground surface. However, applying this technology to low-permeability media, as in the case of intact rock mass intersected by isolated, discrete fractures still remains a challenge, perhaps explaining the limited number of field results reported in the scientific literature to date. Yet, understanding the transport, storage and exchange of heat in deep, low-permeability crystalline rocks is critical to many scientific and engineering research topics and applications, including for example deep geothermal energy (DGE). In the present contribution, we describe the use and application of FO-DTS monitoring to a broad range of processes, varying from the propagation and persistence of thermal anomalies (both natural and induced) to the monitoring of the curing of epoxy resin and cement grouts along the annular space of boreholes designed for monitoring discrete, packed-off zones. All data provided herein has been collected as part of a multi-disciplinary research program on hydraulic stimulation and deep geothermal energy carried out at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), an underground rock laboratory located in the Aar massif, in the Swiss Alps. Through these examples, we illustrate the importance of understanding the spatial and temporal variations of local thermal regimes when planning to monitoring boreholes temperatures

  13. Temperature monitoring during thermal treatments using magnetic resonance imaging incorporating novel multi spatial and temporal resolution strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljallad, Mohammed H.

    Thermal therapy is widely used for the treatment of tumors such as uterine fibroid tumors. When heating the fibroid volume, continuous and fast temperature monitoring is required to limit the damage to healthy tissue. The phase component of the Magnetic Resonance (MR) image changes with heating; this phase change can be converted to temperature using a scaling parameter. One plane alone can be imaged in the current treatments while monitoring the temperature during heating because of time limitations. This plane is usually prescribed at the focus of the transducer (focal plane) to cover the maximum heat deposition. However, the heat distribution is not limited to the focal plane only, which requires temperature monitoring in more than one plane. MUltiple Resolution along Phase-encode and Slice-select-dimensions (MURPS) was a method previously introduced [7] to produce a variable slice thickness in the z-direction and variable phase encodings in the y-direction. MURPS is implemented to address the need for very fast imaging of multiple planes. Because only a small portion of the field of view (FOV) has real clinical value in the thermotherapy of a large volume, the FOV can be reduced to image that portion and speed up the scanning. The MURPS method, combined with half reduced field of view (rFOV), can image three planes in the same time needed to image a single full field of view plane without MURPS. The proposed technique of MURPS with rFOV should have a significant advantage for monitoring thermal therapies and should provide more robust temperature control for current thermal therapy treatment procedures.

  14. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease and Diabetes Blood Glucose Monitoring Insulin Injection Resources Mental Health and Diabetes Healthy Holiday Eating Lifestyle Resources Improve Medication Taking Spanish Language Resources AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors ...

  15. Using wheel temperature detector technology to monitor railcar brake system effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Wheel temperature detector technology has been used extensively in the railroad industry for the past several decades. The : technology has traditionally been used to identify wheels with elevated temperatures. There is currently a movement in the : ...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1815 - How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? You... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I monitor the temperature of flue gases at the inlet of my particulate matter control device? 60.1815 Section 60.1815 Protection of...

  17. A simple protocol using underwater epoxy to install annual temperature monitoring sites in rivers and streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Isaak; Dona L. Horan; Sherry P. Wollrab

    2013-01-01

    Thermal regimes in rivers and streams are fundamental determinants of biological processes and are often monitored for regulatory compliance. Here, we describe a simple technique for establishing annual monitoring sites that uses underwater epoxy to attach miniature sensors to large rocks and cement bridge supports, which then serve as protective anchors. More than 500...

  18. Cryogenic temperature monitoring in superconducting power transmission line at CERN with hybrid multi-point and distributed fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Palmieri, L.; Consales, M.; Giordano, M.; Bajas, H.; Galtarossa, A.; Bajko, M.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    Distributed and multi-point fiber-optic based measurements of cryogenic temperature down to 30 K are presented. Measurements have been performed along the cryostat of a superconducting power transmission line, which is currently being tested at CERN over a length of about 20 m. Multi-point measurements were based on two kinds of FBG with different coatings (epoxy and PMMA). In addition, distributed measurements exploited optical frequency-domain reflectometry to analyze the Rayleigh scattering along two concatenated fibers with different coatings (acrylate and polyimmide). Results confirm the viability of these approaches to monitor cryogenic temperatures along a superconducting transmission line.

  19. Seepage Reconnaissance in an Embankment Dam using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS): Monitoring and Modelling of Seasonal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, T.; Ringeri, A.; Butler, K. E.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is important to ensure that any anomalous seepage giving rise to internal erosion within embankment dams be identified and remediated at an early stage. In some cases, increased seepage may locally alter seasonal temperature distributions within dams and their foundations. It may then be detectable by in-situ temperature monitoring, provided that measurements can be made with sufficiently high spatial resolution such as those available from fibre optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) systems. In this study, spatiotemporal variations in temperature are being monitored and modeled at the interface between the compacted till core of an embankment dam and an adjoining concrete diversion sluiceway structure at the Mactaquac Generating Station, located on the Saint John River near Fredericton, NB, Canada. The measurements are acquired using a fibre optic DTS system installed in a 50 m long borehole drilled into the concrete structure and offset 0.5 m from the till-concrete interface. The DTS system has been functioning since late December 2013. Following two active heating experiments during the summers of 2014 and 2015, the system is now devoted to passive monitoring. Comparisons of daily average temperature profiles show that the amplitude of annual temperature variation measured in the borehole varies from more than 35 °C at surface to less than 1 °C near the dam foundation. The noise level of the DTS measurements, as defined by scatter of the daily mean, is on the order of 0.05 - 0.1 °C. The temperature profiles generally vary smoothly with depth, but short wavelength seasonal anomalies are evident at two depths, particularly during the winter. Interpretation of the profiles is complicated by the heterogeneity of the environment including the nearby concrete-earth dam, concrete-reservoir, and concrete-air interfaces, a water table at 15 m depth, and possible fractures within the concrete. Three-dimensional transient finite element modeling is therefore

  20. Hardware/Software Data Acquisition System for Real Time Cell Temperature Monitoring in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a hardware/software data acquisition system developed for monitoring the temperature in real time of the cells in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (AC-PEFC). These fuel cells are of great interest because they can carry out, in a single operation, the processes of oxidation and refrigeration. This allows reduction of weight, volume, cost and complexity of the control system in the AC-PEFC. In this type of PEFC (and in general in any PEFC), the reliable monitoring of temperature along the entire surface of the stack is fundamental, since a suitable temperature and a regular distribution thereof, are key for a better performance of the stack and a longer lifetime under the best operating conditions. The developed data acquisition (DAQ) system can perform non-intrusive temperature measurements of each individual cell of an AC-PEFC stack of any power (from watts to kilowatts). The stack power is related to the temperature gradient; i.e., a higher power corresponds to a higher stack surface, and consequently higher temperature difference between the coldest and the hottest point. The developed DAQ system has been implemented with the low-cost open-source platform Arduino, and it is completed with a modular virtual instrument that has been developed using NI LabVIEW. Temperature vs time evolution of all the cells of an AC-PEFC both together and individually can be registered and supervised. The paper explains comprehensively the developed DAQ system together with experimental results that demonstrate the suitability of the system. PMID:28698497

  1. Hardware/Software Data Acquisition System for Real Time Cell Temperature Monitoring in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Segura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a hardware/software data acquisition system developed for monitoring the temperature in real time of the cells in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (AC-PEFC. These fuel cells are of great interest because they can carry out, in a single operation, the processes of oxidation and refrigeration. This allows reduction of weight, volume, cost and complexity of the control system in the AC-PEFC. In this type of PEFC (and in general in any PEFC, the reliable monitoring of temperature along the entire surface of the stack is fundamental, since a suitable temperature and a regular distribution thereof, are key for a better performance of the stack and a longer lifetime under the best operating conditions. The developed data acquisition (DAQ system can perform non-intrusive temperature measurements of each individual cell of an AC-PEFC stack of any power (from watts to kilowatts. The stack power is related to the temperature gradient; i.e., a higher power corresponds to a higher stack surface, and consequently higher temperature difference between the coldest and the hottest point. The developed DAQ system has been implemented with the low-cost open-source platform Arduino, and it is completed with a modular virtual instrument that has been developed using NI LabVIEW. Temperature vs time evolution of all the cells of an AC-PEFC both together and individually can be registered and supervised. The paper explains comprehensively the developed DAQ system together with experimental results that demonstrate the suitability of the system.

  2. Hardware/Software Data Acquisition System for Real Time Cell Temperature Monitoring in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Francisca; Bartolucci, Veronica; Andújar, José Manuel

    2017-07-09

    This work presents a hardware/software data acquisition system developed for monitoring the temperature in real time of the cells in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (AC-PEFC). These fuel cells are of great interest because they can carry out, in a single operation, the processes of oxidation and refrigeration. This allows reduction of weight, volume, cost and complexity of the control system in the AC-PEFC. In this type of PEFC (and in general in any PEFC), the reliable monitoring of temperature along the entire surface of the stack is fundamental, since a suitable temperature and a regular distribution thereof, are key for a better performance of the stack and a longer lifetime under the best operating conditions. The developed data acquisition (DAQ) system can perform non-intrusive temperature measurements of each individual cell of an AC-PEFC stack of any power (from watts to kilowatts). The stack power is related to the temperature gradient; i.e., a higher power corresponds to a higher stack surface, and consequently higher temperature difference between the coldest and the hottest point. The developed DAQ system has been implemented with the low-cost open-source platform Arduino, and it is completed with a modular virtual instrument that has been developed using NI LabVIEW. Temperature vs time evolution of all the cells of an AC-PEFC both together and individually can be registered and supervised. The paper explains comprehensively the developed DAQ system together with experimental results that demonstrate the suitability of the system.

  3. Simultaneous telemetric monitoring of tail-skin and core body temperature in a rat model of thermoregulatory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmi, Scott; Pawlyk, Aaron C; Alfinito, Peter D; Roman, Janet; Zhou, Tianhui; Deecher, Darlene C

    2009-04-15

    Temperature dysfunction, clinically described as hot flashes/flushes and night sweats, commonly occur in women transitioning through menopause. Research in this field has yet to fully elucidate the biological underpinnings explaining this dysfunction. The need to develop animal models that can be used to study hormone-dependent temperature regulation is essential to advancing this scientific area. Development of telemetric transmitters for monitoring tail-skin (TST) and core body (CBT) temperatures for animal research has increased the accuracy of data by reducing extraneous factors associated with previous methods. However, until recently, TST and CBT could not be simultaneously measured telemetrically within the same animal. In this report, new dual temperature monitoring transmitters were validated by simultaneously evaluating them with the single measurement transmitters using the ovariectomized (OVX) rat thermoregulatory dysfunction model. A major advantage of measuring TST and CBT in the same animal is the ability to relate temporal changes on these two temperature parameters. Comparative experimentation was performed by single administration of clonidine (alpha(2) adrenergic agonist), MDL-100907 (5-HT(2a) antagonist), or a 7-day treatment of 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol (EE). Clonidine caused decreases in TST and CBT, MDL-100907 caused increases in TST while decreasing CBT, and EE caused decreases in TST with minor CBT decreases only at the higher dose. Data from either probe type showed similar results on temperature parameters regardless of transmitter used. These findings support the use of the new dual temperature transmitters and should enhance the quality and interpretation of data being generated in thermoregulation studies.

  4. Optimizing Mouse Surgery with Online Rectal Temperature Monitoring and Preoperative Heat Supply. Effects on Post-Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A Marschner

    Full Text Available Body temperature affects outcomes of tissue injury. We hypothesized that online body core temperature recording and selective interventions help to standardize peri-interventional temperature control and the reliability of outcomes in experimental renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI. We recorded core temperature in up to seven mice in parallel using a Thermes USB recorder and ret-3-iso rectal probes with three different protocols. Setup A: Heating pad during ischemia time; Setup B: Heating pad from incision to wound closure; Setup C: A ventilated heating chamber before surgery and during ischemia time with surgeries performed on a heating pad. Temperature profile recording displayed significant declines upon installing anesthesia. The profile of the baseline experimental setup A revealed that <1% of the temperature readings were within the target range of 36.5 to 38.5°C. Setup B and C increased the target range readings to 34.6 ± 28.0% and 99.3 ± 1.5%, respectively. Setup C significantly increased S3 tubular necrosis, neutrophil influx, and mRNA expression of kidney injury markers. In addition, using setup C different ischemia times generated a linear correlation with acute tubular necrosis parameters at a low variability, which further correlated with the degree of kidney atrophy 5 weeks after surgery. Changing temperature control setup A to C was equivalent to 10 minutes more ischemia time. We conclude that body temperature drops quickly in mice upon initiating anesthesia. Immediate heat supply, e.g. in a ventilated heating chamber, and online core temperature monitoring can help to standardize and optimize experimental outcomes.

  5. In-situ thermoelectric temperature monitoring and "Closed-loop integrated control" system for concentrator photovoltaic-thermoelectric hybrid receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolley, Matthew H.; Sweet, Tracy K. N.; Min, Gao

    2017-09-01

    This work demonstrates a new technique that capitalizes on the inherent flexibility of the thermoelectric module to provide a multifunctional platform, and exhibits a unique advantage only available within CPV-TE hybrid architectures. This system is the first to use the thermoelectric itself for hot-side temperature feedback to a PID control system, needing no additional thermocouple or thermistor to be attached to the cell - eliminating shading, and complex mechanical designs for mounting. Temperature measurement accuracy and thermoelectric active cooling functionality is preserved. Dynamic "per-cell" condition monitoring and protection is feasible using this technique, with direct cell-specific temperature measurement accurate to 1°C demonstrated over the entire experimental range. The extrapolation accuracy potential of the technique was also evaluated.

  6. Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors for true temperature monitoring in Nb$_3$Sn superconducting magnets for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Bajko, M; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Perez, J C; Cusano, A

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) planned at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb3Sn technology. The instrumentation required for the racetrack coils needs the development of reliable sensing systems able to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behavior during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation. With this purpose, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet fabricated at CERN. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents for the first time a feasibility study devoted to the implementation of an embedded FBG sensor for the measurement of the "true" temperature in the impregnated Nb3Sn coil during the fabrication process. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentatio...

  7. An experimental study on the effect of temperature on piezoelectric sensors for impedance-based structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Fabricio G; Budoya, Danilo E; de Almeida, Vinicius A D; Ulson, Jose Alfredo C

    2014-01-10

    The electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique is considered to be one of the most promising methods for developing structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. This technique is simple to implement and uses small and inexpensive piezoelectric sensors. However, practical problems have hindered its application to real-world structures, and temperature effects have been cited in the literature as critical problems. In this paper, we present an experimental study of the effect of temperature on the electrical impedance of the piezoelectric sensors used in the EMI technique. We used 5H PZT (lead zirconate titanate) ceramic sensors, which are commonly used in the EMI technique. The experimental results showed that the temperature effects were strongly frequency-dependent, which may motivate future research in the SHM field.

  8. Real-time temperature monitoring with fiber Bragg grating sensor during diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngot Thi; Lee, Seul Lee; Park, Suhyun; Lee, Yong Wook; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-04-01

    High-sensitivity temperature sensors have been used to validate real-time thermal responses in tissue during photothermal treatment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the feasible application of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for diffuser-assisted laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) particularly to treat tubular tissue disease. A 600-μm core-diameter diffuser was employed to deliver 980-nm laser light for coagulation treatment. Both a thermocouple and a FBG were comparatively tested to evaluate temperature measurements in ex vivo liver tissue. The degree of tissue denaturation was estimated as a function of irradiation times and quantitatively compared with light distribution as well as temperature development. At the closer distance to a heat source, the thermocouple measured up to 41% higher maximum temperature than the FBG sensor did after 120-s irradiation (i.e., 98.7°C±6.1°C for FBG versus 131.0°C±5.1°C for thermocouple; p<0.001). Ex vivo porcine urethra tests confirmed the real-time temperature measurements of the FBG sensor as well as consistently circumferential tissue denaturation after 72-s irradiation (coagulation thickness=2.2±0.3 mm). The implementation of FBG can be a feasible sensing technique to instantaneously monitor the temperature developments during diffuser-assisted LITT for treatment of tubular tissue structure.

  9. Monitoring of soil and air-rock temperatures in the Western Massif of the Picos de Europa (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo; García, Cristina

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we study the ground thermal regime and air-rock interface in the Western Massif of the Picos de Europa (Cantabrian Range, Spain). This calcareous massif is highly affected by karstification processes. Quaternary glaciers, fluvio-torrential processes and present-day periglacial processes also contribute to explain the landforms present in this massif. Up to 9 dataloggers were installed during 6 years in different sites in terms of altitude, orientation, slope and geomorpolohical setting recording temperatures every two hours. The number of freeze-thaw cycles in the soil(between 0 and 16) was controlled by the depth of the snow cover. The temperatures in the interface rock-air showed between 30-60 cycles, reaching 119 and 130 during the year 2007-2008. Extreme minimum temperatures in the soil oscillate between 0.3 and -6.3, while in the rocky walls the loggers recorded temperatures between -7.3 and -14.3°C. Monitoring of soil temperatures around the ice patch - the only one in the massif today - resulted in slightly negative mean annual temperatures. These conditions may reveal the existence of sporadic permafrost on debris that cover the ice patch. Both the buried ice and the permafrost are in disequilibrium with the current environmental conditions of the massif.

  10. Monitoring of soil temperatures in an Atlantic high mountain environment: The Forcadona buried ice patch (Picos de Europa, NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Fernández, Jesus; Vieira, Gonçalo; Oliva, Marc; Gallinar, David; García-Hernández, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Ground temperatures in the area of a buried ice mass located at Western Massif of the Picos de Europa (Cantabrian Mountains, Northwestern Spain) are studied. Ground temperatures were measured at depths of 10 to 50 cm at intervals 2-hour intervals from 2006 to 2011. Ground temperatures showed two distinct seasonal periods: 1) continuous thaw with diurnal oscillation, from late summer to early autumn, and 2) near-0°C, isothermal regime from mid-autumn to late summer. Snow cover thickness controls freeze-thaw cycles in the latter. Transition periods are of very short duration. The small annual number of freeze-thaw cycles in the soil (0 to 16) was controlled by the depth of the snow cover. Extreme minimum temperatures in the soil oscillated between 0.3 and -6.3°C. Monitoring of soil temperatures on the ice patch resulted in slightly negative mean annual temperatures about 0°C. These conditions may reveal that the buried ice is close to melting point and in disequilibrium with the current environmental conditions of the massif.

  11. Monitoring sea level and sea surface temperature trends from ERS satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Beckley, B.

    2002-01-01

    surface temperature as these satellites are equipped with an altimeter to measure sea level height as well as an along track scanning radiometer (ATSR) to measure the sea surface temperature. Consistent increase in both sea level and sea surface temperatures are found in most parts of the Atlantic Ocean...... over this period. In the Indian Ocean and particularly the Pacific Ocean the trends in both sea level and temperature are still dominated by the large changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation. In terms of contribution to the total global sea level change, the contribution of the central...... Pacific Ocean is as large as the contribution of the whole North Atlantic. The regional changes detected by ERS sea level and sea surface temperature observations are highly correlated with independent finding from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) sea level observations and the Reynolds advanced very high resolution...

  12. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Shuo-Jen; Hu, Yuh-Chung; Shih, Wen-Pin; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA) were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10−3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C. PMID:22573963

  13. [Atomic force microscopy monitoring of temperature dependence of cytochrome BM3 oligomeric state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukharina, N S; Ivanov, Iu D; Pleshakova, T O; Frantsuzov, P A; Ivanova, N D; Krokhin, N V; Petushkova, N A; Archakov, A I

    2015-01-01

    The change in temperature is one of the factors affecting the activity of enzymes. In this work thermal denaturation and aggregation of cytochrome P450 BM3 were studied by atomic force microscopy. To determine specific temperature transitions the fluorescence analysis was used. In the low melting temperature range, 10-33 degrees C, a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of aromatic residues was observed with an increase in the fluorescence intensity of flavin groups. Protein melting in this range indicated three narrow S-shaped cooperative transitions at temperatures 16, 22 and 29 degrees C. Atomic force microscopy analysis in this temperature range showed that the shape of BM3 molecules remained globular in the form of compact objects (heights h < 7 nm, lateral dimensions d < 50 nm), but protein oligomeric state changed. The first two transitions were accompanied by a decrease in the degree of oligomerization and the third one was accompanied by its increase.

  14. Real Time Monitoring of Temperature of a Micro Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chuang

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon micro-hole arrays (Si-MHA were fabricated as a gas diffusion layer (GDL in a micro fuel cell using the micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS fabrication technique. The resistance temperature detector (RTD sensor was integrated with the GDL on a bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the fuel cell. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature was generally linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity were within 0.5 °C and 1.68×10-3/°C, respectively. The best experimental performance was 9.37 mW/cm2 at an H2/O2 dry gas flow rate of 30/30 SCCM. Fuel cell temperature during operation was 27 °C, as measured using thermocouples in contact with the backside of the electrode. Fuel cell operating temperature measured in situ was 30.5 °C.

  15. Reducing the loss of vaccines from accidental freezing in the cold chain: the experience of continuous temperature monitoring in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, John; Lydon, Patrick; Ouhichi, Ramzi; Zaffran, Michel

    2015-02-11

    Accidental freezing of vaccines is a growing threat and a real risk for national immunization programs when the potency of many vaccines can be compromised if these are exposed to sub-zero temperatures in the cold chain. In Tunisia, this issue is compounded by using sub-standard domestic cold chain equipment instead of equipping the program with medical refrigerators designed specifically for storing vaccines and temperature sensitive pharmaceuticals. Against this backdrop, this paper presents the findings of a demonstration project conducted in Tunisia in 2012 that tested the impact of introducing several freeze prevention solutions to mitigate the risk of accidental freezing of vaccines. The main finding is that, despite the continued use of underperforming domestic refrigerators, continuous temperature monitoring using new technologies combined with other technological interventions significantly reduced the prevalence of accidental exposure to freezing temperatures. These improvements were noticed for cold chain storage at regional, district and health center levels, and during the transport legs that were part of the demonstration conducted in the regions of Kasserine in the South-Eastern part of Tunisia. Subsequent to introducing these freeze prevention solutions, the incidence of freeze alarms was reduced and the percent of time the temperatures dropped below the 2 °C recommended threshold. The incidence of freeze alarms at health center level was reduced by 40%. Lastly, the solutions implemented reduced risk of freezing during transport from 13.8% to 1.7%. Although the solution implemented is not optimal in the longer term because domestic refrigerators are used extensively in district stores and health centers, the risk of accidental freezing is significantly reduced by introducing the practice of continuous temperature monitoring as a standard. The management of the cold chain equipment was strengthened as a result which helps protect the potency of

  16. Temperature monitoring using fibre optic sensors in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pauw, B., E-mail: bdepauw@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Lamberti, A.; Ertveldt, J.; Rezayat, A.; Vanlanduit, S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Acoustics and Vibration Research Group (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Van Tichelen, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Berghmans, F. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors in lead-bismuth cooled installations. • In this first of a kind experiment, we focus on temperature measurements of fuel rods • We acquire the surface temperature with a resolution of 30 mK. • We asses the condition of the installation during different steps of the operation. - Abstract: In-core temperature measurements are crucial to assess the condition of nuclear reactor components. The sensors that measure temperature must respond adequately in order, for example, to actuate safety systems that will mitigate the consequences of an undesired temperature excursion and to prevent component failure. This issue is exacerbated in new reactor designs that use liquid metals, such as for example a molten lead-bismuth eutectic, as coolant. Unlike water cooled reactors that need to operate at high pressure to raise the boiling point of water, liquid metal cooled reactors can operate at high temperatures whilst keeping the pressure at lower levels. In this paper we demonstrate the use of optical fibre sensors to measure the temperature distribution in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation and we derive functional input e.g. the temperature control system or other systems that rely on accurate temperature actuation. This first-of-a-kind experiment demonstrates the potential of optical fibre based instrumentation in these environments. We focus on measuring the surface temperature of the individual fuel rods in the fuel assembly, but the technique can also be applied to other components or sections of the installation. We show that these surface temperatures can be experimentally measured with limited intervention on the fuel pin owing to the small geometry and fundamental properties of the optical fibres. The unique properties of the fibre sensors allowed acquiring the surface temperatures with a resolution of 30 mK. With these sensors, we assess the condition of the test section containing the fuel

  17. Network performance of a wireless sensor network for temperature monitoring in vineyards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liscano, Ramiro; Jacoub, John Khalil; Dersingh, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are an emerging technology which can be used for outdoor environmental monitoring. This paper presents challenges that arose from the development and deployment of a WSN for environmental monitoring as well as network performance analysis of this network. Different...... components in our sensor network architecture are presented like the physical nodes, the sensor node code, and two messaging protocols; one for collecting sensor and network values and the other for sensor node commands. An information model for sensor nodes to support plug-and-play capabilities in sensor...

  18. Bahamas Sea Water Temperature Data 1988-2003, PIMS Environmental Monitoring Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record references seawater temperature data collected at various sites and depths in the vicinity of PIMS research station on Lee Stocking Island,...

  19. Electronic temperature monitoring during the decompression surgery of the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Patricia M C; Rodrigues, Suelia S R; Altoe, Mirella Lorrainy; Santos, Larissa S; Rocha, Adson F

    2010-01-01

    Despite of its apparent protection by being located deep in a bony canal, the facial nerve is a cranial pair of nerves more vulnerable to traumatic injuries. The surgical accidents are the most frequent causes of intratemporal complications of the facial nerve. Among the postoperative sequelae, the thermal injuries are common due to overheating of the otologic burr resulting in facial paralysis. For the prevention of thermal injuries in the facial nerve was designed a data acquisition board to obtain the temperature measured by thermocouples using a PC and parallel communication. The signals from the temperature sensors passed through conditioning for amplification and analog to digital data conversion. Afterwards, they were stored on a computer for the statistical analysis and the visualization of the curves of variation of the measured temperatures. These curves provide the verification of the facial nerve temperature ascending and descending time during surgery steps to access the nerve. These data provide a substantial safe working margin to the surgeon.

  20. Assessing Static Performance of the Dashengguan Yangtze Bridge by Monitoring the Correlation between Temperature Field and Its Static Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Xin Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking advantage of the structural health monitoring system installed on the steel truss arch girder of Dashengguan Yangtze Bridge, the temperature field data and static strain data are collected and analyzed for the static performance assessment of the bridge. Through analysis, it is found that the static strain changes are mainly caused by temperature field (temperature and temperature difference and train. After the train-induced static strains are removed, the correlation between the remaining static strains and the temperature field shows apparent linear characteristics, which can be mathematically modeled for the description of static performance. Therefore, multivariate linear regression function combined with principal component analysis is introduced to mathematically model the correlation. Furthermore, the residual static strains of mathematical model are adopted as assessment indicator and three kinds of degradation regulations of static performance are obtained after simulation of the residual static strains. Finally, it is concluded that the static performance of Dashengguan Yangtze Bridge was in a good condition during that period.

  1. Development of an improved wearable device for core body temperature monitoring based on the dual heat flux principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingjie; Zhou, Congcong; He, Cheng; Li, Yuan; Ye, Xuesong

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized wearable core body temperature (CBT) monitoring system based on the dual heat flux (DHF) principle was developed. By interspersing calcium carbonate powder in PolyDimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a reformative heat transfer medium was produced to reduce the thermal equilibrium time. Besides, a least mean square (LMS) algorithm based active noise cancellation (ANC) method was adopted to diminish the impact of ambient temperature fluctuations. Theoretical analyses, finite element simulation, experiments on a hot plate and human volunteers were performed. The results showed that the proposed system had the advantages of small size, reduced initial time (~23.5 min), and good immunity to fluctuations of the air temperature. For the range of 37-41 °C on the hot plate, the error compared with a Fluke high accuracy thermometer was 0.08  ±  0.20 °C. In the human experiments, the measured temperature in the rest trial (34 subjects) had a difference of 0.13  ±  0.22 °C compared with sublingual temperature, while a significant increase of 1.36  ±  0.44 °C from rest to jogging was found in the exercise trial (30 subjects). This system has the potential for reliable continuous CBT measurement in rest and can reflect CBT variations during exercise.

  2. Radiofrequency ablation of small liver malignancies under magnetic resonance guidance: progress in targeting and preliminary observations with temperature monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terraz, Sylvain; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Viallon, Magalie; Salomir, Rares; Becker, Christoph D. [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, Gilles [University Hospitals of Geneva, Department of Visceral Surgery and Transplantation, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablation for small liver tumours with poor conspicuity on both contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT), using fast navigation and temperature monitoring. Sixteen malignant liver nodules (long-axis diameter, 0.6-2.4 cm) were treated with multipolar RF ablation on a 1.5-T wide-bore MR system in ten patients. Targeting was performed interactively, using a fast steady-state free precession sequence. Real-time MR-based temperature mapping was performed, using gradient echo-echo planar imaging (GRE-EPI) and hardware filtering. MR-specific treatment data were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 19 {+-} 7 months. Correct placement of RF electrodes was obtained in all procedures (image update, <500 ms; mean targeting time, 21 {+-} 11 min). MR thermometry was available for 14 of 16 nodules (88%) with an accuracy of 1.6 C in a non-heated region. No correlation was found between the size of the lethal thermal dose and the ablation zone at follow-up imaging. The primary and secondary effectiveness rates were 100% and 91%, respectively. RF ablation of small liver tumours can be planned, targeted, monitored and controlled with MR imaging within acceptable procedure times. Temperature mapping is technically feasible, but the clinical benefit remains to be proven. (orig.)

  3. Raspberry Pi in-situ network monitoring system of groundwater flow and temperature integrated with OpenGeoSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Hee; Lee, Cholwoo

    2016-04-01

    Raspberry Pi series is a low cost, smaller than credit-card sized computers that various operating systems such as linux and recently even Windows 10 are ported to run on. Thanks to massive production and rapid technology development, the price of various sensors that can be attached to Raspberry Pi has been dropping at an increasing speed. Therefore, the device can be an economic choice as a small portable computer to monitor temporal hydrogeological data in fields. In this study, we present a Raspberry Pi system that measures a flow rate, and temperature of groundwater at sites, stores them into mysql database, and produces interactive figures and tables such as google charts online or bokeh offline for further monitoring and analysis. Since all the data are to be monitored on internet, any computers or mobile devices can be good monitoring tools at convenience. The measured data are further integrated with OpenGeoSys, one of the hydrogeological models that is also ported to the Raspberry Pi series. This leads onsite hydrogeological modeling fed by temporal sensor data to meet various needs.

  4. Development and Improvement of an Intelligent Cable Monitoring System for Underground Distribution Networks Using Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintae Cho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With power systems switching to smart grids, real-time and on-line monitoring technologies for underground distribution power cables have become a priority. Most distribution components have been developed with self-diagnostic sensors to realize self-healing, one of the smart grid functions in a distribution network. Nonetheless, implementing a real-time and on-line monitoring system for underground distribution cables has been difficult because of high cost and low sensitivity. Nowadays, optical fiber composite power cables (OFCPCs are being considered for communication and power delivery to cope with the increasing communication load in a distribution network. Therefore, the application of distributed temperature sensing (DTS technology on OFCPCs used as underground distribution lines is studied for the real-time and on-line monitoring of the underground distribution power cables. Faults can be reduced and operating ampacity of the underground distribution system can be increased. This paper presents the development and improvement of an intelligent cable monitoring system for the underground distribution power system, using DTS technology and OFCPCs as the underground distribution lines in the field.

  5. High frame rate ultrasound monitoring of high intensity focused ultrasound-induced temperature changes: a novel asynchronous approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Sheng-Min; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-11-01

    When applying diagnostic ultrasound to guide focused ultrasound (FUS) thermal therapy, high frame rate ultrasonic temperature monitoring is valuable in better treatment control and dose monitoring. However, one of the potential problems encountered when performing ultrasonic temperature monitoring of a FUS procedure is interference between the FUS and imaging systems. Potential means of overcoming this problem include the switch between the FUS system and the imaging system (limited by a reduced frame rate of thermal imaging) or the development of complex synchronization protocols between the FUS therapeutic system and the ultrasonic imaging apparatus (limited by implementation efforts both for software and hardware designs, and low potential for widespread diffusion). In this paper, we apply an asynchronous idea to retrieving high frame rate and FUS-interference-free thermal imaging during FUS thermal therapy. Tone-burst delivery mode of the FUS energy is employed in our method, and the imaging and FUS systems are purposely operated in an asynchronous manner. Such asynchronous operation causes FUS interference to saturate sequential image frames at different A-lines; thus clean A-lines from several image frames can be extracted by a total energy-thresholding technique and then combined to reconstruct interference-free B-mode images at a high frame rate for temperature estimation. The performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by phantom experiments. Relationships of the FUS duty-cycle with the maximum reconstructed frame rate of thermal imaging and the corresponding maximum temperature increase are also studied. Its performance was also evaluated and compared with the existing manually synchronous and synchronous approaches. By proper selection of the FUS duty-cycle, using our method, the frame rate of thermal imaging can be increased up to tenfold compared with that provided by the manually synchronous approach. Our method is capable of pushing the frame

  6. The Benefits of Using Dense Temperature Sensor Networks to Monitor Urban Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, T. E.; Snyder, P. K.; Kucharik, C. J.; Schatz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands (UHIs) occur when urban and suburban areas experience temperatures that are elevated relative to their rural surroundings because of differences in the fraction of gray and green infrastructure. Studies have shown that communities most at risk for impacts from climate-related disasters (i.e., lower median incomes, higher poverty, lower education, and minorities) tend to live in the hottest areas of cities. Development of adequate climate adaptation tools for cities relies on knowledge of how temperature varies across space and time. Traditionally, a city's urban heat island has been quantified using near-surface air temperature measurements from a few sites. This methodology assumes (1) that the UHI can be characterized by the difference in air temperature from a small number of points, and (2) that these few points represent the urban and rural signatures of the region. This methodology ignores the rich information that could be gained from measurements across the urban to rural transect. This transect could traverse elevations, water bodies, vegetation fraction, and other land surface properties. Two temperature sensor networks were designed and implemented in the Minneapolis-Saint Paul, MN and Madison, WI metropolitan areas beginning in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Both networks use the same model sensor and record temperature every 15 minutes from ~150 sensors. Data from each network has produced new knowledge of how temperature varies diurnally and seasonally across the cities and how the UHI magnitude is influenced by weather phenomena (e.g., wind, snow cover, heat waves) and land surface characteristics such as proximity to inland lakes. However, the two metropolitan areas differ in size, population, structure, and orientation to water bodies. In addition, the sensor networks were established in very different manners. We describe these differences and present lessons learned from the design and ongoing efforts of these two dense networks

  7. Printed strain sensor with temperature compensation and its evaluation with an example of applications in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zymelka, Daniel; Yamashita, Takahiro; Takamatsu, Seiichi; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a flexible printed strain sensor and its evaluation with an example of its applications to structural health monitoring. The sensor was fabricated on a thin poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) substrate using the screen printing method. In order to ensure compensation for temperature variations, a full-Wheatstone-bridge circuit was integrated into the sensor’s structure. For this reason, the sensor’s shape was specially designed in such a way that only one symmetrical structure was enough to build the full-Wheatstone-bridge. The developed device was evaluated by various laboratory tests as well as by measurements carried out on a highway bridge. The collected results demonstrate its potential suitability for application to dynamic load tests within the framework of structural health monitoring.

  8. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  9. Monitoring attack and flight activity of Xylosandrus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): the influence of temperature on activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M; Oliver, Jason B; Schultz, Peter B

    2013-08-01

    Wood-boring ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), including Xylosandrus spp., are key pests in ornamental nurseries. Knowledge of their activity in spring is important for nursery growers to effectively time their protective sprays. We measured the reliability of ethanol-baited bottle traps for monitoring emergence of overwintered Xylosandrus spp. in ornamental nurseries. Detection of initial flight activity by traps was compared with initial attacks on ethanol-injected trap trees. To develop tools for forecasting Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) activity, the relationships between temperature and their attack and flight activity were examined, and the bloom sequence of ornamental plants was examined as phenological indicators of X. germanus emergence in Ohio. Captures of X. germanus coincided with attacks on trap trees on seven of eight occasions over 2 yr in four nurseries. Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motshulsky) were detected in only one nursery and captures coincided with attacks each year. There was a strong relationship between maximum daily temperatures 20 and 21degrees C and X. germanus attack and flight activity. No attack or flight activity were detected in a monitoring period unless there were 1 or 2 d of at least 20 degrees C. Emergence of X. germanus always began after and within 6 d of full bloom on Cornelian cherry dogwood, and usually after and within 4 d of first bloom on Norway maple and full bloom on border forsythia. The traps or phenological indicators can be used by growers to monitor emergence of X. germanus to time their initial protective sprays. The relationship between X. germanus activity and temperature can be used by growers to make decisions on timing subsequent treatments.

  10. In-situ Monitoring of Internal Local Temperature and Voltage of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of temperature and voltage of a fuel cell are key factors that influence performance. Conventional sensors are normally large, and are also useful only for making external measurements of fuel cells. Centimeter-scale sensors for making invasive measurements are frequently unable to accurately measure the interior changes of a fuel cell. This work focuses mainly on fabricating flexible multi-functional microsensors (for temperature and voltage to measure variations in the local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC that are based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. The power density at 0.5 V without a sensor is 450 mW/cm2, and that with a sensor is 426 mW/cm2. Since the reaction area of a fuel cell with a sensor is approximately 12% smaller than that without a sensor, but the performance of the former is only 5% worse.

  11. In Situ Monitoring of Microwave Processing of Materials at High Temperatures through Dielectric Properties Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Garcia-Baños

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-assisted processes have recognized advantages over more conventional heating techniques. However, the effects on the materials’ microstructure are still a matter of study, due to the complexity of the interaction between microwaves and matter, especially at high temperatures. Recently developed advanced microwave instrumentation allows the study of high temperature microwave heating processes in a way that was not possible before. In this paper, different materials and thermal processes induced by microwaves have been studied through the in situ characterization of their dielectric properties with temperature. This knowledge is crucial in several aspects: to analyze the effects of the microwave field on the reaction pathways; to design and optimize microwave-assisted processes, and to predict the behavior of materials leading to repeatable and reliable heating processes, etc.

  12. In-situ Monitoring of Internal Local Temperature and Voltage of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Hsieh, Wei-Jung

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of temperature and voltage of a fuel cell are key factors that influence performance. Conventional sensors are normally large, and are also useful only for making external measurements of fuel cells. Centimeter-scale sensors for making invasive measurements are frequently unable to accurately measure the interior changes of a fuel cell. This work focuses mainly on fabricating flexible multi-functional microsensors (for temperature and voltage) to measure variations in the local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) that are based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The power density at 0.5 V without a sensor is 450 mW/cm2, and that with a sensor is 426 mW/cm2. Since the reaction area of a fuel cell with a sensor is approximately 12% smaller than that without a sensor, but the performance of the former is only 5% worse. PMID:22163556

  13. Satellite air temperature estimation for monitoring the canopy layer heat island of Milan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pichierri, Manuele; Bonafoni, Stefania; Biondi, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, satellite maps of the urban heat island of Milan are produced using satellite-based infrared sensor data. For this aim, we developed suitable algorithms employing satellite brightness temperatures for the direct air temperature estimation 2 m above the surface (canopy layer), showing...... 2007 and 2010 were processed. Analysis of the canopy layer heat island (CLHI) maps during summer months reveals an average heat island effect of 3–4K during nighttime (with some peaks around 5K) and a weak CLHI intensity during daytime. In addition, the satellite maps reveal a well defined island shape...

  14. Structural health monitoring of power plant components based on a local temperature measurement concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Juergen; Bergholz, S.; Hilpert, R.; Jouan, B.; Goetz, A. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The fatigue assessment of power plant components based on fatigue monitoring approaches is an essential part of the integrity concept and modern lifetime management. It is comparable to structural health monitoring approaches in other engineering fields. The methods of fatigue evaluation of nuclear power plant components based on realistic thermal load data measured on the plant are addressed. In this context the Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) and Detailed Fatigue Calculation (DFC) of nuclear power plant components are parts of the three staged approach to lifetime assessment and lifetime management of the AREVA Fatigue Concept (AFC). The three stages Simplified Fatigue Estimation (SFE), Fast Fatigue Evaluation (FFE) and Detailed Fatigue Calculation (DFC) are characterized by increasing calculation effort and decreasing degree of conservatism. Their application is case dependent. The quality of the fatigue lifetime assessment essentially depends on one hand on the fatigue model assumptions and on the other hand on the load data as the basic input. In the case of nuclear power plant components thermal transient loading is most fatigue relevant. Usual global fatigue monitoring approaches rely on measured data from plant instrumentation. As an extension, the application of a local fatigue monitoring strategy (to be described in detail within the scope of this paper) paves the way of delivering continuously (nowadays at a frequency of 1 Hz) realistic load data at the fatigue relevant locations. Methods of qualified processing of these data are discussed in detail. Particularly, the processing of arbitrary operational load sequences and the derivation of representative model transients is discussed. This approach related to realistic load-time histories is principally applicable for all fatigue relevant components and ensures a realistic fatigue evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Recovery Act: High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, Matthew [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States); Fabian, Paul [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One of the key renewable resources currently being advanced is geothermal energy. To tap into the large potential offered by generating power from the heat of the earth, and for geothermal energy to be more widely used, it will be necessary to drill deeper wells to reach the hot, dry rock located up to 10 km beneath the earth’s surface. In this instance, water will be introduced into the well to create a geothermal reservoir. A geothermal well produced in this manner is referred to as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS). EGS reservoirs are typically at depths of 3 to 10 km, and the temperatures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the application of existing downhole technologies. These high temperatures are especially problematic for electronic systems such as downhole data-logging tools, which are used to map and characterize the fractures and high-permeability regions in underground formations. Information provided by these tools is assessed so that underground formations capable of providing geothermal energy can be identified, and the subsequent drilling operations can be accurately directed to those locations. The mapping of geothermal resources involves the design and fabrication of sensor packages, including the electronic control modules, to quantify downhole conditions (300°C temperature, high pressure, seismic activity, etc.). Because of the extreme depths at which these measurements are performed, it is most desirable to perform the sensor signal processing downhole and then transmit the information to the surface. This approach necessitates the use of high-temperature electronics that can operate in the downhole environment. Downhole signal processing in EGS wells will require the development and demonstration of circuit boards that can withstand the elevated temperatures found at these

  16. Performance evaluation of a conformal thermal monitoring sheet sensor array for measurement of surface temperature distributions during superficial hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P; Juang, T; Gaeta, C; Stauffer, P R

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a novel conformal thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) sensor array with differential thermal sensitivity for measuring temperature distributions over large surface areas. Performance of the sensor array is evaluated in terms of thermal accuracy, mechanical stability and conformity to contoured surfaces, probe self-heating under irradiation from microwave and ultrasound hyperthermia sources, and electromagnetic field perturbation. A prototype with 4 x 4 array of fiber-optic sensors embedded between two flexible and thermally conducting polyimide films was developed as an alternative to the standard 1-2 mm diameter plastic catheter-based probes used in clinical hyperthermia. Computed tomography images and bending tests were performed to evaluate the conformability and mechanical stability respectively. Irradiation and thermal barrier tests were conducted and thermal response of the prototype was compared with round cross-sectional clinical probes. Bending and conformity tests demonstrated higher flexibility, dimensional stability and close conformity to human torso. Minimal perturbation of microwave fields and low probe self-heating was observed when irradiated with 915 MHz microwave and 3.4 MHz ultrasound sources. The transient and steady state thermal responses of the TMS array were superior compared to the clinical probes. A conformal TMS sensor array with improved thermal sensitivity and dimensional stability was investigated for real-time skin temperature monitoring. This fixed-geometry, body-conforming array of thermal sensors allows fast and accurate characterization of two-dimensional temperature distributions over large surface areas. The prototype TMS demonstrates significant advantages over clinical probes for characterizing skin temperature distributions during hyperthermia treatments of superficial tissue disease.

  17. Monitoring hot mix asphalt temperature to improve homogeneity and pavement quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Huerne, Henderikus L.; Miller, Seirgei Rosario; Doree, Andries G.; Santagata, E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how controlled compaction practices lead to better quality asphalt. Therefore, it is important that during compaction operations the mixture is at a suitable temperature in order to achieve the specified degree of compaction. The University of Twente’s Asphalt Paving Research

  18. Monitoring the Temperature of Tree Seedlings With the Thermochron iButton Data Logger

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. Gasvoda; Richard W. Tinus; Karen E. Burr; Andy Trent

    2002-01-01

    Tracking the temperature of tree seedlings from the nursery to the planting site can be the key to evaluating possible physiological causes of morality after seedlings are planted. Seedlings enter and leave nursery storage with easily documented levels of cold hardiness, root growth potential, and general stress tolerance (Burr 1990: Ritchie and Tanaka 1990). The...

  19. Monitoring precipitation intensity and type - combined use of radar and temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjertsen, U.; Dahl, J.I.; Oedegaard, V.; Kristensen, A. [Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Two new products developed for road authorities and other customers of the Norwegian Meteorological Institutes Market Division are presented and verified in this paper: A precipitation type forecast and a radar precipitation type product. The HIRLAM model is used to forecast the precipitation types rain, sleet and snow. The operational HIRLAM-forecasts are biased towards predicting too many cases with snow. The paper shows that additional calculations of snow melting based on temperature and humidity in the lowest model layer reduce this error. For the radar product, the precipitation type is estimated from synoptic observations of 2m-temperature and dew point temperature. The observations are interpolated in space using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) after deriving local vertical temperature gradients. A precipitation type dataset is derived and combined with the actual radar precipitation intensity image. The radar product is verified against observed precipitation types at the synoptic stations for the winter season 2002/2003 (October to March). The percentage correct is 85%. The Probability of Detection is 0.9 for rain and 0.91 for snow. A comparison of estimated and forecasted precipitation types is carried out for January 2002 against an independent set of precipitation stations in Southern Norway. The results confirm the good quality of the radar product and show that the adjustment of HIRLAM precipitation type to real topography improves the forecast. (orig.)

  20. Utilizing Humidity and Temperature Data to Advance Monitoring and Prediction of Meteorological Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Behrangi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The fraction of land area over the Continental United States experiencing extreme hot and dry conditions has been increasing over the past several decades, consistent with expectation from anthropogenic climate change. A clear concurrent change in precipitation, however, has not been confirmed. Vapor pressure deficit (VPD, combining temperature and humidity, is utilized here as an indicator of the background atmospheric conditions associated with meteorological drought. Furthermore, atmospheric conditions associated with warm season drought events are assessed by partitioning associated VPD anomalies into the temperature and humidity components. This approach suggests that the concurrence of anomalously high temperature and low humidity was an important driver of the rapid development and evolution of the exceptionally severe 2011 Texas and the 2012 Great Plains droughts. By classification of a decade of extreme drought events and tracking them back in time, it was found that near surface atmospheric temperature and humidity add essential information to the commonly used precipitation-based drought indicators and can advance efforts to determine the timing of drought onset and its severity.

  1. Stream Water and Groundwater Interaction Revealed by Temperature Monitoring in Agricultural Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngyun Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Variations in stream water, streambed, adjacent stream sediment, and groundwater temperatures in the Haean basin, Korea were examined using time series analyses including auto-correlation, spectral density, and cross-correlation functions. The temperatures of the ambient air, stream water, streambed (depth = 10 cm, and adjacent stream sediment (depth = 10 cm showed distinctive diurnal variations with long-term seasonal cooling trends, while groundwater temperature showed only a seasonal decreasing trend with little diurnal variations. Auto-correlations and spectral densities of the stream water, streambed, and sediment temperatures also revealed strong daily cyclical behaviors, with longer periodic cycles varying from weekly to monthly. Amplitudes and lag times of the streambed thermal signals were also affected by the hydraulic conductivities of the sediments. Lower hydraulic conductivity indicates a more attenuated and slower thermal response for the streambed. The calculated vertical water flow velocities of the streambed revealed that the investigated stream locations were under losing or gaining conditions, depending on the location and time.

  2. A low-cost microcontroller-based system to monitor crop temperature and water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prototype microcontroller-based system was developed to automate the measurement and recording of soil-moisture status and canopy-, air-, and soil-temperature levels in cropped fields. Measurements of these conditions within the cropping system are often used to assess plant stress, and can assis...

  3. Monitoring operating temperature and supply voltage in achieving high system dependability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.A.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    System dependability being a set of number of attributes, of which the important reliability, heavily depends on operating temperature and supply voltage. Any change beyond the designed specifications may change the system performance and could result in system reliability and hence dependability

  4. Monitoring of Refractory Wall recession using high temperature impact echo instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Dayton

    2004-04-30

    Regression of refractory linings of furnaces occurs due to a variety of mechanisms. The specific mechanism selected for investigation during this program is the regression of refractories which are in direct contact with a liquid corrodant. Examples include the melting of glass, the production of pig iron and steel, and the melting of aluminum. The rates of regression to a wall thickness which requires reline or extensive reconstruction vary widely, from less than a year to over ten years depending on the specific service environment. This program investigated the feasibility of measuring refractory wall thickness with an impact-echo method while at operating temperature (wall temperatures exceeding 500 C). The impact-echo method uses the impact of a small sphere with the surface of the test object to send a stress wave into the object. In a plate-like structure, the stress wave reflects back to the front surface, reverberating in the structure and causing a periodic surface displacement whose frequency is inversely proportional to the thickness of the test object. Impact-echo testing was chosen because it requires access to only one side of the test object and could be performed during the operation of a refractory structure. Commercially-available impact-echo instrumentation is available for room temperature use for a variety of tests on concrete. The enabling technology for this work was to use a high-temperature piezoelectric material, aluminum nitride, as the receiving sensor for the stress waves, allowing its use on refractories during furnace operation.

  5. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 < T < 5000 K) and atmospheric pressure. The reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  6. Temperature performance of portable radiation survey instruments used for environmental monitoring and clean-up activities in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Kayo; Hasumi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takenori; Uchita, Yoshiaki

    2017-08-01

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, extensive radiation monitoring and environmental clean-up activities have been conducted throughout the Fukushima region. Outside air temperatures there reach 40 °C in summer and -20 °C in winter, which are beyond the quoted operational range of many radiation survey instruments. Herein, temperature performance of four types of portable Japanese radiation survey instruments widely used in Fukushima was experimentally investigated using a temperature-controlled chamber. They included two ionization chamber type instruments, Fuji NHA1 and Aloka ICS-323C, and two NaI(Tl) scintillation type ones, Fuji NHC7 and Aloka TCS-172B. Experimental results showed significantly diverse characteristics on the temperature dependences from one type of instrument to another. For example, NHA1 overestimated the ambient dose-equivalent rate by as much as 17% at -30 °C and 10% at 40 °C, whereas the TCS-172B readings underestimated the rate by 30% at -30 °C and 7% at 40 °C.

  7. Real-time temperature monitoring during radiofrequency treatments on ex-vivo animal model by fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giovanna; Tosi, Daniele; Schena, Emiliano; Massaroni, Carlo; Ippolito, Juliet; Verze, Paolo; Carlomagno, Nicola; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Iadicicco, Agostino; Campopiano, Stefania

    2017-05-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors applied to bio-medical procedures such as surgery and rehabilitation are a valid alternative to traditional sensing techniques due to their unique characteristics. Herein we propose the use of FBG sensor arrays for accurate real-time temperature measurements during multi-step RadioFrequency Ablation (RFA) based thermal tumor treatment. Real-time temperature monitoring in the RF-applied region represents a valid feedback for the success of the thermo-ablation procedure. In order to create a thermal multi-point map around the tumor area to be treated, a proper sensing configuration was developed. In particular, the RF probe of a commercial medical instrumentation, has been equipped with properly packaged FBGs sensors. Moreover, in order to discriminate the treatment areas to be ablated as precisely as possible, a second array 3.5 cm long, made by several FBGs was used. The results of the temperature measurements during the RFA experiments conducted on ex-vivo animal liver and kidney tissues are presented herein. The proposed FBGs based solution has proven to be capable of distinguish different and consecutive discharges and for each of them, to measure the temperature profile with a resolution of 0.1 °C and a minimum spatial resolution of 5mm. Based upon our experiments, it is possible to confirm that the temperature decreases with distance from a RF peak ablation, in accordance with RF theory. The proposed solution promises to be very useful for the surgeon because a real-time temperature feedback allows for the adaptation of RFA parameters during surgery and better delineates the area under treatment.

  8. Shape Memory Alloys for Monitoring Minor Over-Heating/Cooling Based on the Temperature Memory Effect via Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. X.; Huang, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The recent development in the temperature memory effect (TME) via differential scanning calorimetry in shape memory alloys is briefly discussed. This phenomenon was also called the thermal arrest memory effect in the literature. However, these names do not explicitly reveal the potential application of this phenomenon in temperature monitoring. On the other hand, the standard testing process of the TME has great limitation. Hence, it cannot be directly applied for temperature monitoring in most of the real engineering applications in which temperature fluctuation occurs mostly in a random manner within a certain range. However, as shown here, after proper modification, we are able to monitor the maximum or minimum temperature in either over-heating or over-cooling with reasonable accuracy.

  9. Shape Memory Alloys for Monitoring Minor Over-Heating/Cooling Based on the Temperature Memory Effect via Differential Scanning Calorimetry: A Review of Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. X.; Huang, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    The recent development in the temperature memory effect (TME) via differential scanning calorimetry in shape memory alloys is briefly discussed. This phenomenon was also called the thermal arrest memory effect in the literature. However, these names do not explicitly reveal the potential application of this phenomenon in temperature monitoring. On the other hand, the standard testing process of the TME has great limitation. Hence, it cannot be directly applied for temperature monitoring in most of the real engineering applications in which temperature fluctuation occurs mostly in a random manner within a certain range. However, as shown here, after proper modification, we are able to monitor the maximum or minimum temperature in either over-heating or over-cooling with reasonable accuracy.

  10. T2-based temperature monitoring in abdominal fat during HIFU treatment of patients with uterine fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhinsky, Eugene; Kohi, Maureen; Ghanouni, Pejman; Rieke, Viola

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we have implemented T2-based monitoring of near-field heating in patients undergoing HIFU ablation of uterine fibroids using Insightec ExAblate system. In certain areas, near-field heating can reach 18°C and the tissue may experience sustained heating of more than 10°C for the period of 2 hours or more. This indicates a cumulative thermal dose that may cause necrosis. Our results show the feasibility and importance of measuring near-field heating in subcutaneous fat.

  11. Real-time electrical impedimetric monitoring of blood coagulation process under temperature and hematocrit variations conducted in a microfluidic chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Fong Lei

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation is an extremely complicated and dynamic physiological process. Monitoring of blood coagulation is essential to predict the risk of hemorrhage and thrombosis during cardiac surgical procedures. In this study, a high throughput microfluidic chip has been developed for the investigation of the blood coagulation process under temperature and hematocrit variations. Electrical impedance of the whole blood was continuously recorded by on-chip electrodes in contact with the blood sample during coagulation. Analysis of the impedance change of the blood was conducted to investigate the characteristics of blood coagulation process and the starting time of blood coagulation was defined. The study of blood coagulation time under temperature and hematocrit variations was shown a good agreement with results in the previous clinical reports. The electrical impedance measurement for the definition of blood coagulation process provides a fast and easy measurement technique. The microfluidic chip was shown to be a sensitive and promising device for monitoring blood coagulation process even in a variety of conditions. It is found valuable for the development of point-of-care coagulation testing devices that utilizes whole blood sample in microliter quantity.

  12. Active-sensing based damage monitoring of airplane wings under low-temperature and continuous loading condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jun Young; Jung, Hwee Kwon; Park, Gyu Hae [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jae Seok; Park, Chan Yik [7th R and D Institute, Agency for Denfense Development, Yuseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    As aircrafts are being operated at high altitude, wing structures experience various fatigue loadings under cryogenic environments. As a result, fatigue damage such as a crack could be develop that could eventually lead to a catastrophic failure. For this reason, fatigue damage monitoring is an important process to ensure efficient maintenance and safety of structures. To implement damage detection in real-world flight environments, a special cooling chamber was built. Inside the chamber, the temperature was maintained at the cryogenic temperature, and harmonic fatigue loading was given to a wing structure. In this study, piezoelectric active-sensing based guided waves were used to detect the fatigue damage. In particular, a beam forming technique was applied to efficiently measure the scattering wave caused by the fatigue damage. The system was used for detection, growth monitoring, and localization of a fatigue crack. In addition, a sensor diagnostic process was also applied to ensure the proper operation of piezoelectric sensors. Several experiments were implemented and the results of the experiments demonstrated that this process could efficiently detect damage in such an extreme environment.

  13. A Realization of Temperature Monitoring System Based on Real-Time Kernel μC/OS and 1-wire Bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanmei Qi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional temperature monitoring system generally adopt some analog sensors for collecting data and a microcontroller for processing data for the purpose of temperature monitoring. However, this back-fore ground system has the disadvantages that the system has poor real-time property and single function, the amount of sensors is not easy to expand, and the software system has a difficulty in upgrading. Aiming at these disadvantages, the system designed in this paper adopts brand-new hardware and software structures: a digitaltemperature sensor array is connected to 1-wire bus and communicated with a control core through 1-wire bus protocol, thus a great convenience is provided for the expansion of the sensor; a real-time operating system is introduced into the software, an application program capable of realizing various functions runs on the real-time kernel μC/OS-II platform. The application of the real-time kernel also provides a good lower layer interface for the late-stage software upgrading.

  14. Novel Integration Approach for In situ Monitoring of Temperature in Micro-direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Huang, Ren-De; Chuang, Chih-Wei

    2007-10-01

    In this work, a porous silicon layer is fabricated as the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a micro-direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology. Platinum is deposited on surface of the porous silicon layer to improve the electrical conductivity of the μDMFC. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) was utilized to deposit Pt metal and wet etching was adopted to form the conductive layer and micro-thermal sensors. The Pt acted both as a current collector and a micro-thermal sensor. We fabricated a resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensor for integration with the gas diffusion layer on the bipolar plate to measure the temperature inside the μDMFC. GDLs with pores of various sizes (10, 30, and 50 μm) were considered to test the performance of the μDMFC. A silicon wafer (500 μm) was etched using KOH wet etching to yield fuel channels with a depth of 450 μm and a width of 200 μm. Then, a porous silicon layer was formed by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to act as the GDL of the μDMFC. The experimental results obtained at various fuel flow rates, pore sizes and other operating conditions demonstrate that the maximum power density of the μDMFC is 1.784 mW/cm2, which was reached at 203 mV with 50-μm-diameter holes. The microsensor temperature was determined to be in the range from 20 to 46 °C and the resistance of the microsensor was in the range from 7.524 to 7.677 kΩ. Experimental results demonstrate that temperature is almost linearly related to resistance and that accuracy and sensitivity are 0.3 °C and 7.82× 10-4/°C, respectively.

  15. Monitoring of vulcanization process using measurement of electrical properties during linear increasing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliga, E.; Bošák, O.; Koštial, P.; Dvořák, Z.; Kubliha, M.; Minárik, S.; Labaš, V.

    2015-04-01

    The article presents the possibilities of diagnostics of irreversible chemical reaction - vulcanization in case of laboratory prepared rubber mixture based on styrene - butadiene (SBR) using measurements of selected physical parameters. Our work is focused on the measurement of current rheologic parameters (torque at defined shear deformation) and selected electrical parameters (DC conductivity) during linear increasing temperature. The individual steps of vulcanization are well identified by means of measurements of rheologic parameters, while significantly affecting the value of the electrical conductivity. The value of the electrical conductivity increases with the increasing of rate of the crossbridging reactions during vulcanization. The rate of the heating affects both types of measurements. When the rate of the heating is increasing the temperature of the beginning of networking step of reactions and also the rate of vulcanization grow. The sensitivity of the both types of measurements allows a good mathematical description of the temperature dependence of the torque and the electric conductivity during the vulcanization of rubber mixtures based on SBR.

  16. Use of thermography to monitor sole haemorrhages and temperature distribution over the claws of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, K; Wilhelm, J; Fürll, M

    2015-02-07

    Subclinical laminitis, an early pathological event in the development of many claw diseases, is an important factor in the welfare and economics of high-producing dairy cows. However, the aetiology and pathogenesis of this complex claw disease are not well understood. The present study investigated to what extent thermographic examination of claws is able to give information about corium inflammation, and whether the technique may be used as a diagnostic tool for early detection of subclinical laminitis. Moreover, the temperature distribution over the individual main claws was investigated to obtain further knowledge about pressure distribution on the claws. For this purpose the claws of 123 cows were evaluated in the first week after calving as well as after the second month of lactation for presence of sole haemorrhages (a sign of subclinical laminitis). Furthermore, the ground contact area was analysed by thermography. Sole haemorrhages were significantly increased by the second month of lactation. Thermography showed clear differences between the claws of the front limbs and hindlimbs, as well as between lateral and medial claws. Although the distribution of sole haemorrhages was consistent with the pattern of the temperature distribution over the main claws, no clear correlation was found between the claw temperature after calving and the visible laminitis-like changes (sole haemorrhages) eight weeks later. British Veterinary Association.

  17. Quantitative magnetic resonance temperature mapping for real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation of the liver: an ex vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seror, Olivier [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris/CHU Paris XIII, Service de Radiologie Hopital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Universite Paris 13, UPRES EA 3409, UFR SMBH, Bobigny (France); Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T.W [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Trillaud, Herve [ERT CNRS/Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire d' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle, Bordeaux (France); Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux, Service de Radiologie, Bordeaux (France)

    2006-10-15

    We evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry for monitoring radiofrequency (RF) ablation in the liver. Continuous MR temperature mapping was used to monitor bipolar RF ablations performed in ex vivo livers with and without flow using two parallel electrodes. Macroscopic inspection of ablation zones was compared with thermal dose maps (TDm) and T1-weighted inversion recovery turbo spin echo (IR-TSE) images for their size and shape and the influence of flow. Pearson's correlation (r), Bland and Altman tests and kappa ({chi}K) tests were performed. The mean differences in ablation zone size between macroscopic and TDm and IR-TSE measurements were +4 mm and -2 mm, respectively. TDm was well correlated with macroscopy (r=0.77 versus r=0.44 for IR-TSE). TDm was found to be more precise for shape recognition ({chi}K=0.73 versus {chi}K=0.55 for IR-TSE) and for detection of an intact ring of liver due to the cooling effect of flow which was impossible with IR-TSE. Simultaneous monitoring of RF ablation by MR thermometry is feasible and reliable for predicting the shape of ablation zones and the impact of the heat-sink effect of flow. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in vivo. (orig.)

  18. Video and thermal imaging system for monitoring interiors of high temperature reaction vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, Alexei V [Chicago, IL; Zelepouga, Serguei A [Hoffman Estates, IL; Rue, David M [Chicago, IL

    2012-01-10

    A system and method for real-time monitoring of the interior of a combustor or gasifier wherein light emitted by the interior surface of a refractory wall of the combustor or gasifier is collected using an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end. Color information in the light is captured with primary color (RGB) filters or complimentary color (GMCY) filters placed over individual pixels of color sensors disposed within a digital color camera in a BAYER mosaic layout, producing RGB signal outputs or GMCY signal outputs. The signal outputs are processed using intensity ratios of the primary color filters or the complimentary color filters, producing video images and/or thermal images of the interior of the combustor or gasifier.

  19. Apparatus for and Method of Monitoring Condensed Water in Steam Pipes at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh (Inventor); Lee, Hyeong Jae (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the properties of a fluid, such as water, in a steam pipe without mechanically penetrating the wall of the pipe. The system uses a piezoelectric transducer to launch an ultrasonic probe signal into the pipe. Reflected ultrasonic signals are captured in a transducer, which can be the same transducer that launched the probe signal. The reflected signals are subjected to data processing, which can include filtering, amplification, analog-to-digital conversion and autocorrelation analysis. A result is extracted which is indicative of a property of the fluid, such as a height of the condensed fluid, a cavitation of the condensed fluid, and a surface perturbation of the condensed fluid. The result can be recorded, displayed, and/or transmitted to another location. One embodiment of the system has been constructed and tested based on a general purpose programmable computer using instructions recorded in machine-readable non-volatile memory.

  20. In-Service Monitoring of Steam Pipe Systems at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Lih, Shyh-Shiuh (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Scott, James Samson (Inventor); Blosiu, Julian O. (Inventor); Widholm, Scott E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the properties of a fluid, such as water, in a steam pipe without mechanically penetrating the wall of the pipe. The system uses a piezoelectric transducer to launch an ultrasonic probe signal into the pipe. Reflected ultrasonic signals are captured in a transducer, which can be the same transducer that launched the probe signal. The reflected signals are subjected to data processing, which can include filtering, amplification, analog-to-digital conversion and autocorrelation analysis. A result is extracted which is indicative of a property of the fluid, such as a height of the condensed fluid, a cavitation of the condensed fluid, and a surface perturbation of the condensed fluid. The result can be recorded, displayed, and/or transmitted to another location. One embodiment of the system has been constructed and tested based on a general purpose programmable computer using instructions recorded in machine-readable non-volatile memory.

  1. Infrared skin temperature measurements for monitoring health in pigs: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dennis Dam; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2015-01-01

    Infrared temperature measurement equipment (IRTME) is gaining popularity as a diagnostic tool for evaluating human and animal health. It has the prospect of reducing subject stress and disease spread by being implemented as an automatic surveillance system and by a quick assessment of skin....... The studies performed on pigs using IRTME have presented somewhat discrepant results, which could be caused by inadequate equipment, varying knowledge about reliable equipment operation, and site-specific factors not included in the assessment. Future focus areas in the field of IRTME are suggested...

  2. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Liger-Belair

    Full Text Available In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2 and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2 and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC, all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2 was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2 visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2 found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2 escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  3. Monitoring gaseous CO2 and ethanol above champagne glasses: flute versus coupe, and the role of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    In champagne tasting, gaseous CO(2) and volatile organic compounds progressively invade the headspace above glasses, thus progressively modifying the chemical space perceived by the consumer. Simultaneous quantification of gaseous CO(2) and ethanol was monitored through micro-gas chromatography (μGC), all along the first 15 minutes following pouring, depending on whether a volume of 100 mL of champagne was served into a flute or into a coupe. The concentration of gaseous CO(2) was found to be significantly higher above the flute than above the coupe. Moreover, a recently developed gaseous CO(2) visualization technique based on infrared imaging was performed, thus confirming this tendency. The influence of champagne temperature was also tested. As could have been expected, lowering the temperature of champagne was found to decrease ethanol vapor concentrations in the headspace of a glass. Nevertheless, and quite surprisingly, this temperature decrease had no impact on the level of gaseous CO(2) found above the glass. Those results were discussed on the basis of a multiparameter model which describes fluxes of gaseous CO(2) escaping the liquid phase into the form of bubbles.

  4. Active Thermometry Based DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Network for Offshore Pipeline Scour Monitoring Using K-Means Clustering Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Li, Weijie; Zhou, Lei; Song, Gang-Bing; Ba, Qin; Ou, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an offshore pipeline scour monitoring sensor network system based on active thermometry. The system consists of thermal cables, data acquisition unit, and data processing unit. As the thermal cables emit heats, the distributed DS18B20 digital temperature sensors record temperature information over time. The scour-induced exposure and free spanning can be identified by analyzing the temperature curves. Pipeline exposure and free-spanning experiments were carried out in labor...

  5. Monitoring Groundwater Temperatures in a Shallow Urban Aquifer Before, During and After Installation of a Ground Source Heat System in Cardiff, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Ashley M.; Farr, Gareth J.; Boon, David P.; James, David R.; Williams, Bernard; Tucker, David; Harcombe, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of shallow urban aquifers, warmed by the Urban Heat Island Effect, is a relatively new concept in the U.K. An extensive groundwater temperature baseline monitoring network has been established for a shallow superficial aquifer in the city of Cardiff, U.K., to characterise groundwater temperatures and monitor the impacts of the first open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) installed in the city. In Spring 2014, temperature profiling was carried out at 1m depth intervals at 168 groundwater monitoring boreholes across Cardiff, establishing baseline groundwater temperatures within the shallow (Data was contoured to form the first U.K. 2D city heat map. During the warmest time of year, Autumn 2014, a subset of boreholes were re-profiled to ascertain seasonal temperature variation, defining the Zone of Seasonal Fluctuation. Re-profiling was again carried out at these boreholes in Autumn 2015 to confirm these temperatures as normal for that time of year. By comparing Spring and Autumn profiles, the average depth to the base of the Zone of Seasonal Fluctuation was found to be 9.5mbgl. Two >100m boreholes showed the urban warming effect may extend to 80mbgl, before temperatures follow the predicted geothermal gradient. We term this the Zone of Anthropogenic Influence. After initial baseline temperatures were established, a site was selected for the installation of a shallow GSHP. Before installation work began, a monitoring network was set up to establish a temperature baseline for future GSHPs and identify any impacts on the thermal resource caused by removing ~2°C from the abstracted groundwater prior to reinjection into the aquifer. This comprised of 97 temperature loggers in 60 boreholes, including the abstraction and recharge boreholes and boreholes up and down gradient of the site. Some of these boreholes have multiple loggers at different depths, including the near-surface, but the majority of loggers were placed within the boreholes' slotted sections

  6. Design and Development of a Relative Humidity and Room Temperature Measurement System with On Line Data Logging Feature for Monitoring the Fermentation Room of Tea Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal SARMA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and development of a Relative Humidity (RH and Room Temperature (RT monitoring system with on line data logging feature for monitoring fermentation room of a tea factory is presented in this paper. A capacitive RH sensor with on chip signal conditioner is taken as RH sensor and a temperature to digital converter (TDC is used for ambient temperature monitoring. An 8051 core microcontroller is the heart of the whole system which reads the digital equivalent of RH data with the help of a 12-bit Analog to Digital (A/D converter and synchronize TDC to get the ambient temperature. The online data logging is achieved with the help of RS-232C communication. Field performance is also studied by installing it in the fermentation room of a tea factory.

  7. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. Methods: The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30–110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. Results: When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was −3.4 ± 2.1 mm and −0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small

  8. Monitoring Excitations of the N =1 Landau Level by Optical Emission at mK Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Antonio; Wurstbauer, Ursula; Fields, Dov; Pinczuk, Aron; Watson, John; Mondal, Sumit; Manfra, Michael J.; West, Ken W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    2013-03-01

    Optical emission experiments have proven to be powerful contactless probe of collective states of electrons in the second (N =1) Landau Level (LL). We report the emission spectrum from optical recombination in the N =0 and N =1 LL's the second LL. The 2DEG is confined in ultra-high-mobility GaAs quantum well structures. Optical emission red-shifted from the main luminescence of the N =0 and N =1 LL are interpreted as shakeup processes of quasiparticles in the N =1 LL. Results of two samples with different carrier densities measured in the temperature range of 42mK mK will be compared. The experimental observations will be discussed taking into account the striking quantum phases dominating the second LL. Supported by NSF and AvH

  9. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30-110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was -3.4 ± 2.1 mm and -0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small uncertainties in the PAM

  10. Distributed fibre optic temperature measurement system for the safety monitoring of the next generation of large nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Fernandez, Alberto; Brichard, Benoit [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Center (Belgium); Hartog, Arthur H.; Hughes, Paul [SENSA, a Schlumberger Company (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    The use of optical fibre distributed sensors for temperature sensing is a powerful way of monitoring, quasi simultaneously, thousands of points avoiding the requirement of optimum positioning of discrete temperature sensors. Their range of applications is rapidly expanding in the industry, and nowadays this fibre optic sensing technology is mature for industrial applications such as fire detection inside buildings and tunnels, process vessel monitoring, leak detection in cryogenic storage vessels (liquid natural gas (LNG), ammonia, ethylene) or oil wells and the measurement of energy cable thermal distribution for the power supply industry. These applications rely on the well known immunity of fibre optic sensors to electromagnetic interference and the ability of fibre sensors to be operated in hazardous environments. The nuclear industry shows a growing interest for the possibilities offered for temperature sensing applications. Fibre optic sensing technology could be considered as an alternative to classical measurements techniques in a wide range of applications. The potential of distributed temperature measurements for the monitoring of large nuclear infrastructures such as reactor containment buildings, nuclear waste repositories and reactor primary circuitry have already been shown. However, a major problem in the application of optical fibres in nuclear environments is the presence of ionizing radiation fields that induce an increase of the optical fibre attenuation. This radiation-induced degradation of the measurement signal could be critical since most commercially available distributed temperature sensors derive the temperature profile from the measurement of the Raman backscattered light intensity along the fibre, using optical time domain reflectometry techniques. The Raman signal comprises two elements: the Stokes and anti-Stokes lines. The longer wavelength Stokes line is only weakly temperature sensitive but the intensity of the backscattered light

  11. Dynamic Angular Control Of Thermal Therapy With Stationary Multi-Sectored Tubular Ultrasound Applicators Under MR Temperature Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Ross, Anthony B.; Butts Pauly, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Sommer, Graham

    2006-05-01

    Multi-sectored ultrasound heating applicators with dynamic angular and longitudinal control of heating profiles are being investigated for the thermal treatment of tumors in sites such as prostate, uterus, and brain. Multi-sectored tubular ultrasound transducers with independent sector power control were incorporated into interstitial and transurethral applicators and provided dynamic angular control of a heating pattern without requiring device manipulation during treatment. Acoustic beam measurements of each applicator type demonstrated a 35-40° acoustic dead zone between each independent sector, with negligible mechanical or electrical coupling. Despite the acoustic dead zone between sectors, simulations and experiments under MR temperature (MRT) monitoring showed that the variance from the maximum lesion radius (scalloping) with all elements activated on a transducer was minimal and did not affect conformal heating of a target area. A biothermal model with a multi-point controller was used to adjust the applied power and treatment time of individual transducer segments as the tissue temperature changed in simulations of thermal lesions with both interstitial and transurethral applicators. Transurethral ultrasound applicators for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) treatment with either three or four sectors conformed a thermal dose to a simulated target area in the angular and radial dimensions. The simulated treatment was controlled to a maximum temperature of 85°C, and had a maximum duration of 5 min when power was turned off as the 52°C temperature contour reach a predetermined control point for each sector in the tissue. Experiments conducted with multi-sectored applicators under MRT monitoring showed thermal ablation and hyperthermia treatments had little or no border `scalloping', conformed to a pretreatment target area, and correlated very well with the simulated thermal lesions. The radial penetration of the heat treatments in tissue with interstitial

  12. Frost Monitoring and Forecasting Using MODIS Land Surface Temperature Data and a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Forecasts for Eastern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuchanga, Eric; Flores, Africa; Malaso, Susan; Mungai, John; Sakwa, Vincent; Shaka, Ayub; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Frost is a major challenge across Eastern Africa, severely impacting agricultural farms. Frost damages have wide ranging economic implications on tea and coffee farms, which represent a major economic sector. Early monitoring and forecasting will enable farmers to take preventive actions to minimize the losses. Although clearly important, timely information on when to protect crops from freezing is relatively limited. MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, derived from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, and 72-hr weather forecasts from the Kenya Meteorological Service's operational Weather Research Forecast model are enabling the Regional Center for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to provide timely information to farmers in the region. This presentation will highlight an ongoing collaboration among the Kenya Meteorological Service, RCMRD, and the Tea Research Foundation of Kenya to identify frost events and provide farmers with potential frost forecasts in Eastern Africa.

  13. Application of radio frequency based digital thermometer for real-time monitoring of dairy cattle rectal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Tridib; Bera, Santanu; Deb, Suman; Pal, Prasenjit; Debbarma, Nibash; Haldar, Avijit

    2017-09-01

    Dairy cattle health monitoring program becomes vital for detecting the febrile conditions to prevent the outbreak of the animal diseases as well as ensuring the fitness of the animals that are directly affecting the health of the consumers. The aim of this study was to validate real-time rectal temperature (RT) data of radio frequency based digital (RFD) thermometer with RT data of mercury bulb (MB) thermometer in dairy cattle. Two experiments were conducted. In experiment I, six female Jersey crossbred cattle with a mean (±standard error of the mean) body weight of 534.83±13.90 kg at the age of 12±0.52 years were used to record RT for 2 h on empty stomach and 2 h after feeding at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min using a RFD thermometer as well as a MB thermometer. In experiment II, six female Jersey crossbred cattle were further used to record RT for 2 h before exercise and 2 h after exercise at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc comparisons by Bonferroni test was done. Real-time RT data recorded by RFD thermometer as well as MB thermometer did not differ (p>0.05) before and after feeding/exercise. An increase (p<0.05) in RT after feeding/exercise in experimental crossbred cattle was recorded by both RFD thermometer and MB thermometer. The results obtained in the present study suggest that the body temperature recordings from RFD thermometer would be acceptable and thus RFD thermometer could work well for monitoring real-time RT in cattle.

  14. Application of radio frequency based digital thermometer for real-time monitoring of dairy cattle rectal temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tridib Debnath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Dairy cattle health monitoring program becomes vital for detecting the febrile conditions to prevent the outbreak of the animal diseases as well as ensuring the fitness of the animals that are directly affecting the health of the consumers. The aim of this study was to validate real-time rectal temperature (RT data of radio frequency based digital (RFD thermometer with RT data of mercury bulb (MB thermometer in dairy cattle. Materials and Methods: Two experiments were conducted. In experiment I, six female Jersey crossbred cattle with a mean (±standard error of the mean body weight of 534.83±13.90 kg at the age of 12±0.52 years were used to record RT for 2 h on empty stomach and 2 h after feeding at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min using a RFD thermometer as well as a MB thermometer. In experiment II, six female Jersey crossbred cattle were further used to record RT for 2 h before exercise and 2 h after exercise at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc comparisons by Bonferroni test was done. Results: Real-time RT data recorded by RFD thermometer as well as MB thermometer did not differ (p>0.05 before and after feeding/exercise. An increase (p<0.05 in RT after feeding/exercise in experimental crossbred cattle was recorded by both RFD thermometer and MB thermometer. Conclusion: The results obtained in the present study suggest that the body temperature recordings from RFD thermometer would be acceptable and thus RFD thermometer could work well for monitoring real-time RT in cattle.

  15. low-Cost, High-Performance Alternatives for Target Temperature Monitoring Using the Near-Infrared Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgo, Mathew [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-02-01

    A process is being developed for commercial production of the medical isotope Mo-99 through a photo-nuclear reaction on a Mo-100 target using a highpower electron accelerator. This process requires temperature monitoring of the window through which a high-current electron beam is transmitted to the target. For this purpose, we evaluated two near infrared technologies: the OMEGA Engineering iR2 pyrometer and the Ocean Optics Maya2000 spectrometer with infrared-enhanced charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor. Measuring in the near infrared spectrum, in contrast to the long-wavelength infrared spectrum, offers a few immediate advantages: (1) ordinary glass or quartz optical elements can be used; (2) alignment can be performed without heating the target; and (3) emissivity corrections to temperature are typically less than 10%. If spatial resolution is not required, the infrared pyrometer is attractive because of its accuracy, low cost, and simplicity. If spatial resolution is required, we make recommendations for near-infrared imaging based on our data augmented by calculations

  16. Sparse Reconstruction for Temperature Distribution Using DTS Fiber Optic Sensors with Applications in Electrical Generator Stator Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Bazzo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image reconstruction method to monitor the temperature distribution of electric generator stators. The main objective is to identify insulation failures that may arise as hotspots in the structure. The method is based on temperature readings of fiber optic distributed sensors (DTS and a sparse reconstruction algorithm. Thermal images of the structure are formed by appropriately combining atoms of a dictionary of hotspots, which was constructed by finite element simulation with a multi-physical model. Due to difficulties for reproducing insulation faults in real stator structure, experimental tests were performed using a prototype similar to the real structure. The results demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to reconstruct images of hotspots with dimensions down to 15 cm, representing a resolution gain of up to six times when compared to the DTS spatial resolution. In addition, satisfactory results were also obtained to detect hotspots with only 5 cm. The application of the proposed algorithm for thermal imaging of generator stators can contribute to the identification of insulation faults in early stages, thereby avoiding catastrophic damage to the structure.

  17. Sparse Reconstruction for Temperature Distribution Using DTS Fiber Optic Sensors with Applications in Electrical Generator Stator Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Paulo; Pipa, Daniel Rodrigues; da Silva, Erlon Vagner; Martelli, Cicero; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos

    2016-09-07

    This paper presents an image reconstruction method to monitor the temperature distribution of electric generator stators. The main objective is to identify insulation failures that may arise as hotspots in the structure. The method is based on temperature readings of fiber optic distributed sensors (DTS) and a sparse reconstruction algorithm. Thermal images of the structure are formed by appropriately combining atoms of a dictionary of hotspots, which was constructed by finite element simulation with a multi-physical model. Due to difficulties for reproducing insulation faults in real stator structure, experimental tests were performed using a prototype similar to the real structure. The results demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to reconstruct images of hotspots with dimensions down to 15 cm, representing a resolution gain of up to six times when compared to the DTS spatial resolution. In addition, satisfactory results were also obtained to detect hotspots with only 5 cm. The application of the proposed algorithm for thermal imaging of generator stators can contribute to the identification of insulation faults in early stages, thereby avoiding catastrophic damage to the structure.

  18. Sparse Reconstruction for Temperature Distribution Using DTS Fiber Optic Sensors with Applications in Electrical Generator Stator Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, João Paulo; Pipa, Daniel Rodrigues; da Silva, Erlon Vagner; Martelli, Cicero; Cardozo da Silva, Jean Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an image reconstruction method to monitor the temperature distribution of electric generator stators. The main objective is to identify insulation failures that may arise as hotspots in the structure. The method is based on temperature readings of fiber optic distributed sensors (DTS) and a sparse reconstruction algorithm. Thermal images of the structure are formed by appropriately combining atoms of a dictionary of hotspots, which was constructed by finite element simulation with a multi-physical model. Due to difficulties for reproducing insulation faults in real stator structure, experimental tests were performed using a prototype similar to the real structure. The results demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to reconstruct images of hotspots with dimensions down to 15 cm, representing a resolution gain of up to six times when compared to the DTS spatial resolution. In addition, satisfactory results were also obtained to detect hotspots with only 5 cm. The application of the proposed algorithm for thermal imaging of generator stators can contribute to the identification of insulation faults in early stages, thereby avoiding catastrophic damage to the structure. PMID:27618040

  19. Monitoring of temperature increase and tissue vaporization during laser interstitial thermotherapy of ex vivo swine liver by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Giurazza, F; Del Vescovo, R; Mortato, L; Martino, M; Panzera, F; Di Matteo, F M; Beomonte Zobel, B; Silvestri, S

    2013-01-01

    Laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique used to thermally destroy tumour cells. Being based on hyperthermia, LITT outcome depends on the temperature distribution inside the tissue. Recently, CT scan thermometry, based on the dependence of the CT number (HU) on tissue temperature (T) has been introduced during LITT; it is an attractive approach to monitor T because it overcomes the concerns related to the invasiveness. We performed LITT on nine ex vivo swine livers at three different laser powers, (P=1.5 W, P=3 W, P=5 W) with a constant treatment time t=200 s; HU is averaged on two ellipsoidal regions of interest (ROI) of 0.2 cm2, placed at two distances from the applicator (d=3.6 mm and d=8.7 mm); a reference ROI was placed away from the applicator (d=30 mm). The aim of this study is twofold: 1) to evaluate the effect of the T increase in terms of HU variation in ex vivo swine livers undergoing LITT; and 2) to estimate the P value for tissue vaporization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focused on the HU variation in swine livers undergoing LITT at different P. The reported findings could be useful to assess the effect of LITT on the liver in terms of both T changes and tissue vaporization, with the aim to obtain an effective therapy.

  20. High temperature transformations of waste printed circuit boards from computer monitor and CPU: Characterisation of residues and kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Raghu Raman; Rajarao, Ravindra; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the high temperature transformation, specifically the kinetic behaviour of the waste printed circuit board (WPCB) derived from computer monitor (single-sided/SSWPCB) and computer processing boards - CPU (multi-layered/MLWPCB) using Thermo-Gravimetric Analyser (TGA) and Vertical Thermo-Gravimetric Analyser (VTGA) techniques under nitrogen atmosphere. Furthermore, the resulting WPCB residues were subjected to characterisation using X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), Carbon Analyser, X-ray Photoelectron Spectrometer (XPS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). In order to analyse the material degradation of WPCB, TGA from 40°C to 700°C at the rates of 10°C, 20°C and 30°C and VTGA at 700°C, 900°C and 1100°C were performed respectively. The data obtained was analysed on the basis of first order reaction kinetics. Through experiments it is observed that there exists a substantial difference between SSWPCB and MLWPCB in their decomposition levels, kinetic behaviour and structural properties. The calculated activation energy (EA) of SSWPCB is found to be lower than that of MLWPCB. Elemental analysis of SSWPCB determines to have high carbon content in contrast to MLWPCB and differences in materials properties have significant influence on kinetics, which is ceramic rich, proving to have differences in the physicochemical properties. These high temperature transformation studies and associated analytical investigations provide fundamental understanding of different WPCB and its major variations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Satellite-derived temperature data for monitoring water status in a floodplain forest of the Upper Sabine River, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Mary Grace T.; Allen, Scott T.; Edwards, Brandon L.; King, Sammy L.; Keim, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Decreased water availability due to hydrologic modifications, groundwater withdrawal, and climate change threaten bottomland hardwood (BLH) forest communities. We used satellite-derived (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) data to investigate spatial heterogeneity of canopy temperature (an indicator of plant-water status) in a floodplain forest of the upper Sabine River for 2008–2014. High LST pixels were generally further from the river and at higher topographic locations, indicating lower water-availability. Increasing rainfall-derived soil moisture corresponded with decreased heterogeneity of LST between pixels but there was weaker association between Sabine River stage and heterogeneity. Stronger dependence of LST convergence on rainfall rather than river flow suggests that some regions are less hydrologically connected to the river, and vegetation may rely on local precipitation and other contributions to the riparian aquifer to replenish soil moisture. Observed LST variations associated with hydrology encourage further investigation of the utility of this approach for monitoring forest stress, especially with considerations of climate change and continued river management.

  2. Forsmark site investigation. Monitoring of brook water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges January-December 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult (Sweden)); Juston, John (Juston Konsult (Sweden))

    2011-06-15

    This document reports the monitoring of water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges at four brook discharge gauging stations, and the monitoring of water electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden in the Forsmark area. The report presents data from 1 January through 31 December 2010 and is a continuation of reporting from Johansson and Juston (2007, 2009, 2011), which covered the periods from 1 April 2004 through 31 March 2007, 1 April 2007 through 31 December 2008, and 1 January through 31 December 2009, respectively. Long-throated flumes equipped with automatically recording devices were used for the discharge measurements. Every c. 14 days the water depths at the upstream edge of the flumes were measured manually by a ruler as a check. Electrical conductivity and temperature were automatically recorded and these parameters were also measured manually every c. 14 days with the site investigation field devices. SKB's Hydro Monitoring System (HMS) was used to collect and store all data. From HMS quality assured data were transferred to SKB's primary database Sicada. Measurements of levels, electrical conductivities and temperatures were made every 10 minutes (every 30 minutes for electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden). For the calculation of discharge, quality assured water level data from the flumes were used. The calculation procedure included consolidation of the time series to hourly averages, screening of data for removal of short-term spikes, noise and other data that were judged erroneous. After the calculations were performed, the results were delivered to Sicada. The amplitudes of water level variations during this reporting period were 0.41-0.55 m and the mean electrical conductivities varied between 23 and 39 mS/m at the four discharge stations. However, due to mal-function of measuring devices for electrical conductivity, data were missing for relatively long time periods. Due

  3. Forsmark site investigation. Monitoring of brook water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges January-December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Per-Olof (Artesia Grundvattenkonsult (Sweden)); Juston, John (Juston Konsult (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    This document reports the monitoring of water levels, electrical conductivities, temperatures and discharges at four brook discharge gauging stations, and the monitoring of water electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden in the Forsmark area. The report presents data from 1 January through 31 December 2009 and is a continuation of reporting from Johansson and Juston (2007, 2009), which covered the periods from 1 April 2004 through 31 March 2007 and 1 April 2007 through 31 December 2008, respectively. Long-throated flumes equipped with automatically recording devices were used for the discharge measurements. Every c. 14 days the water depths at the upstream edge of the flumes were measured manually by a ruler as a check. Electrical conductivity and temperature were automatically recorded and these parameters were also measured manually every c. 14 days with the site investigation field devices. SKB's Hydro Monitoring System (HMS) was used to collect and store all data. From HMS quality assured data were transferred to SKB's primary database Sicada. Measurements of levels, electrical conductivities and temperatures were made every 10 minutes (every 30 minutes for electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden). For the calculation of discharge, quality assured water level data from the flumes were used. The calculation procedure included consolidation of the time series to hourly averages, screening of data for removal of short-term spikes, noise and other data that were judged erroneous. After the calculations were performed, the results were delivered to Sicada. The amplitudes of water level variations during this reporting period were 0.26-0.33 m at the four stations. The mean electrical conductivities varied between 26 and 41 mS/m at the four discharge stations. The electrical conductivity at the outlet of Lake Bolundsfjaerden varied between 53 and 188 mS/m during the period with the higher values at the end of the

  4. Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects : Habitat Evaluation, Adult and Juvenile Habitat Utilization and Water Temperature Monitoring : 2001 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumgarner, Joseph D.

    2002-01-01

    projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring.

  5. Long-term observations minus background monitoring of ground-based brightness temperatures from a microwave radiometer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Francesco; Cimini, Domenico; Löhnert, Ulrich; Caumont, Olivier; Haefele, Alexander; Pospichal, Bernhard; Martinet, Pauline; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Klein-Baltink, Henk; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Hocking, James

    2017-10-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs) offer the capability to provide continuous, high-temporal-resolution observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) with low maintenance. This makes MWR an ideal instrument to supplement radiosonde and satellite observations when initializing numerical weather prediction (NWP) models through data assimilation. State-of-the-art data assimilation systems (e.g. variational schemes) require an accurate representation of the differences between model (background) and observations, which are then weighted by their respective errors to provide the best analysis of the true atmospheric state. In this perspective, one source of information is contained in the statistics of the differences between observations and their background counterparts (O-B). Monitoring of O-B statistics is crucial to detect and remove systematic errors coming from the measurements, the observation operator, and/or the NWP model. This work illustrates a 1-year O-B analysis for MWR observations in clear-sky conditions for an European-wide network of six MWRs. Observations include MWR brightness temperatures (TB) measured by the two most common types of MWR instruments. Background profiles are extracted from the French convective-scale model AROME-France before being converted into TB. The observation operator used to map atmospheric profiles into TB is the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV-gb. It is shown that O-B monitoring can effectively detect instrument malfunctions. O-B statistics (bias, standard deviation, and root mean square) for water vapour channels (22.24-30.0 GHz) are quite consistent for all the instrumental sites, decreasing from the 22.24 GHz line centre ( ˜ 2-2.5 K) towards the high-frequency wing ( ˜ 0.8-1.3 K). Statistics for zenith and lower-elevation observations show a similar trend, though values increase with increasing air mass. O-B statistics for temperature channels show different

  6. NOAA/APT Satellite Data for Online and Real Time Monitoring of Tungurahua Volcanic Eruption and Temperature Profile in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, G.; Nader, R.; Koudelka, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Ecuadorian Space Agency (EXA) has built HERMES, an online and real time ground station (GS) available to participating schools/universities for free access to NOAA and other remote sensing satellites. The GS is being used by students and scientists in Austria, USA, Japan and Ecuador to access NOAA satellites and spacecrafts online using only a computer and an internet connection with immediate access to satellite imaging and science data for their educational and research projects. The accuracy of analysed data can be used in research areas like forecasting, monitoring and damage assessment caused by eruptions. The HERMES internet-to-orbit gateway transforms a laptop into a full space-qualified GS on-the-move. The purpose of this paper is to present results of Andean mountain area in Ecuador being affected by high temperatures over 30 degree Celsius located over 3000 m high. From May 15 - 20, 2010, we received images from NOAA-18 and NOAA-19 using HERMS GS and applied Surface Temperature (ST), a remote sensing tool to process these images in real-time. Moreover, measured results have been validated by the records from the local meteorological stations network. Additionally, the visual observations revealed that due to high temperature, those glaciers were in fact receding and exposing terrain, never seen before. This paper also highlights the possible causes of this rapid thermal change. The second event dealt by this paper happened on May 28th; we captured a large ash cloud emanating from Tungurahua volcano eruption in the Andean region along with a large ash cloud from the Pacaya volcano in Guatemala using far infrared images from NOAA-18 satellite with overlaid geo-reference coordinates. Both events were analysed with remote sensing tools and image enhancement schemes like 'thermal', 'hvct' and 'fire', available in weather decoding software using free APT data. The aftermath correlation results of volcanic eruption with high temperature profile in the same

  7. Hillslope-scale hydrological and snow cover dynamics derived from a wireless soil moisture and temperature monitoring network and time-lapse digital photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, Ute; Vogt, Constantin; Kögler, Simon; Martini, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    In mountainous catchments, snowmelt may be an important component of the water balance. We apply data from a wireless soil moisture and temperature monitoring network in combination with time-lapse digital photographs from a hillslope in the Schäfertal catchment, Lower Harz Mountains, to investigate interactions between hillslope-scale snow cover, soil moisture and soil temperature. The time series of digital photographs is evaluated using an automatic algorithm that estimates snow height at the position of several snow stakes placed along the hillslope using the green value of the RGB color cube. Inferred snow heights are applied to interpret near-subsurface soil moisture and soil temperature dynamics from the same time period including snow accumulation and melt. The combination of time-lapse digital photography, soil moisture and soil temperature monitoring clearly shows the strong influence of the snow cover on subsurface soil moisture and soil temperature dynamics. The shallow snow cover has a strong insulating effect on near-subsurface soil temperatures keeping the soil unfrozen even at air temperatures reaching down to less than -10 °C. The time-lapse photographs, soil moisture and soil temperature observations also show the different snowmelt behavior of the north- and south-exposed slopes. These observations are important information for future modelling of hillslope and catchment-scale hydrological dynamics.

  8. Bifunctional AgCl/Ag composites for SERS monitoring and low temperature visible light photocatalysis degradation of pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lihong; Zhu, Junyi; Xia, Guangqing

    2014-12-01

    With the assistance of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), AgCl/Ag composites were fabricated in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent via a photoactivated route. The size of AgCl particles was in the range of 500 nm to 1 μm and the Ag particle's diameter was about 10-20 nm. Different from those core-shell structures reported before, the Ag nanoparticles were dispersed uniformly both on the surface and in the body of AgCl particles. The generation of such kind of composites was resulted from the reducing ability of DMF and light irradiation during the formation of AgCl particles. The as-obtained AgCl/Ag composites presented great activity for both surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection and visible light photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes. Additionally, the AgCl/Ag composites could maintain high photocatalytic activity even though the ambient temperature was as low as 15 °C and recycle photocatalysis experiments indicated that the photocatalyst exhibited higher stability. Such kind of AgCl/Ag composites holds great potential for environmental monitoring devices and pollutant treatments.

  9. Internal hive temperature as a means of monitoring honey bee colony health in a migratory beekeeping operation before and during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Internal temperatures of honey bee hives kept at different sites in North Dakota were monitored before and during winter to evaluate the effects of treatment, in the form of exposure to commercial pollination, and location on colony health. In October, hives exposed to commercial pollination durin...

  10. T1 and T2 temperature dependence of female human breast adipose tissue at 1.5 T : groundwork for monitoring thermal therapies in the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Paul; Deckers, RHR; Knuttel, Floor M.; Bartels, LW

    2015-01-01

    The T-1 and T-2 temperature dependence of female breast adipose tissue was investigated at 1.5 T in order to evaluate the applicability of relaxation-based MR thermometry in fat for the monitoring of thermal therapies in the breast. Relaxation times T-1, T-2 and T-2TSE (the apparent T-2 measured

  11. Sensors and Biosensors for C-Reactive Protein, Temperature and pH, and Their Applications for Monitoring Wound Healing: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Pietro; Dini, Valentina; Kirchhain, Arno; Janowska, Agata; Oranges, Teresa; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Lomonaco, Tommaso; Di Francesco, Fabio; Romanelli, Marco

    2017-12-19

    Wound assessment is usually performed in hospitals or specialized labs. However, since patients spend most of their time at home, a remote real time wound monitoring would help providing a better care and improving the healing rate. This review describes the advances in sensors and biosensors for monitoring the concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature and pH in wounds. These three parameters can be used as qualitative biomarkers to assess the wound status and the effectiveness of therapy. CRP biosensors can be classified in: (a) field effect transistors, (b) optical immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance, total internal reflection, fluorescence and chemiluminescence, (c) electrochemical sensors based on potentiometry, amperometry, and electrochemical impedance, and (d) piezoresistive sensors, such as quartz crystal microbalances and microcantilevers. The last section reports the most recent developments for wearable non-invasive temperature and pH sensors suitable for wound monitoring.

  12. A pilot study testing the feasibility of skin temperature monitoring to reduce recurrent foot ulcers in patients with diabetes--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafjeld, Anita; Iversen, Marjolein M; Holme, Ingar; Ribu, Lis; Hvaal, Kjetil; Kilhovd, Bente K

    2015-10-09

    Although monitoring foot skin temperatures has been associated with diabetic foot ulcer recurrence, no studies have been carried out to test the feasibility among European Caucasians. Moreover, the educational and/or motivational models that promote cognitive or psychosocial processes in these studies are lacking. Thus, we conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility of monitoring foot skin temperatures in combination with theory-based counselling to standard foot care to reduce diabetic foot ulcer recurrence. In a single-blinded nurse-led 1-year controlled trial, conducted at a hospital setting in Norway, 41 patients with diabetic neuropathy and previous foot ulcer were randomized to the intervention (n = 21) or control groups (n = 20). All participants were instructed in foot care and recording observations daily. Additionally, the intervention group was taught how to monitor and record skin temperature at baseline, and received counselling every third month supporting them to use the new treatment. Subjects observing temperature differences > 2.0 °C between corresponding sites on the left and right foot on two consecutive days were asked to contact the study nurse and reduce physical activity. Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the effect of the intervention on the proportion of subjects with a foot ulcer. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare the two groups in regard to the time to development of a foot ulcer. In the intervention group, 67 % (n = 14/21) monitored and recorded skin temperatures ≥ 80 % of the time while 70 % (n = 14/20) of the controls recorded foot inspections. Foot ulcer incidence was 39 % (7/21) vs. 50 % (10/20) in the intervention and control groups, respectively (ns). This feasibility study showed that the addition of counselling to promote self-monitoring of skin temperature to standard care to prevent recurrence of foot ulcer is feasible in patients with diabetes in Norway. Home skin

  13. Long-term observations minus background monitoring of ground-based brightness temperatures from a microwave radiometer network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Angelis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWRs offer the capability to provide continuous, high-temporal-resolution observations of the atmospheric thermodynamic state in the planetary boundary layer (PBL with low maintenance. This makes MWR an ideal instrument to supplement radiosonde and satellite observations when initializing numerical weather prediction (NWP models through data assimilation. State-of-the-art data assimilation systems (e.g. variational schemes require an accurate representation of the differences between model (background and observations, which are then weighted by their respective errors to provide the best analysis of the true atmospheric state. In this perspective, one source of information is contained in the statistics of the differences between observations and their background counterparts (O–B. Monitoring of O–B statistics is crucial to detect and remove systematic errors coming from the measurements, the observation operator, and/or the NWP model. This work illustrates a 1-year O–B analysis for MWR observations in clear-sky conditions for an European-wide network of six MWRs. Observations include MWR brightness temperatures (TB measured by the two most common types of MWR instruments. Background profiles are extracted from the French convective-scale model AROME-France before being converted into TB. The observation operator used to map atmospheric profiles into TB is the fast radiative transfer model RTTOV-gb. It is shown that O–B monitoring can effectively detect instrument malfunctions. O–B statistics (bias, standard deviation, and root mean square for water vapour channels (22.24–30.0 GHz are quite consistent for all the instrumental sites, decreasing from the 22.24 GHz line centre ( ∼  2–2.5 K towards the high-frequency wing ( ∼  0.8–1.3 K. Statistics for zenith and lower-elevation observations show a similar trend, though values increase with increasing air mass. O

  14. A DGGE Marker-Mediated Fast Monitoring of Bacterial Diversity and Comprehensive Identification of High-Temperature Daqu Starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanqimuge; Liang, Huizhen; Zhang, Changxia; Shao, Chunfu; Peng, Xiaopei; Liang, Liquan; Su, Jing; Li, Changwen

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria play an essential role in Daqu starter (Daqu) fermentation. The identification of Daqu bacteria was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the highly variable V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Here, we define a novel DGGE marker for the quick identification of Daqu bacteria. A dynamic alteration of the bacterial populations at different stages of fermentation was determined through a 2-y continuous monitoring. The physicochemical parameters of Daqu at different fermentation stages were investigated by weighing, NaOH titration, and HCl hydrolysis together with Fehling reagent methods. Furthermore, infrared spectral analysis using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy was performed to determine physicochemical changes of Daqu. Therefore, our studies provide key insight for a comprehensive quality control of Daqu at different fermentation stages using the PCR-DGGE analysis combined with the physicochemical measurement. Chinese liquor is one of the 6 well-known distilled spirits in the world. High-temperature Daqu acts as an important source of nutrients and of microorganisms in the solid-state fermentation of Chinese Moutai-flavor liquor, which has a critical impact on the final flavor of the liquor. The study identifies a novel DGGE marker and provides an efficient way to identify bacterial diversity in Daqu from different fermentation stages. Importantly, the study defines dynamic changes of the physicochemical parameters and the infrared spectra analysis of Daqu during the fermentation process. These studies will help to (1) establish a standard operation procedure for Daqu production; (2) stabilize manufacturing process for Daqu fermentation and even for liquor brewing. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. The circadian rhythm of core body temperature (Part I: The use of modern telemetry systems to monitor core body temperature variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Słomko Joanna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The best known daily rhythms in humans include: the sleep-wake rhythm, the circadian core body temperature variability, daily fluctuations in arterial blood pressure and heartbeat frequency, and daily changes in hormone secretion: e.g. melatonin, cortisol, growth hormone, prolactin. The core body temperature in humans has a characteristic sinusoidal course, with the maximum value occurring between 3:00-5:00 pm and the minimum between 3:00-5:00 am. Analysis of literature indicates that the obtained results concerning core body temperature are to a large extent influenced by the type of method applied in the measurement. Depending on test protocols, we may apply various methodologies to measuring core body temperature. One of the newest methods of measuring internal and external body temperature consists in the utilisation of remote temperature sensors transmitting the obtained value via a radio signal. The advantages of this method includes the ability to perform: continuous core temperature measurement, observe dynamic changes in core body temperature occurring in circadian rhythm and the repeatability and credibility of the obtained results, which is presented in numerous scientific reports.

  16. Implementation of subsea system to monitor in-situ temperature and formation pressure in methane hydrates sediments for the production test in 2017, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    The methane hydrates phase changes, from solid to fluid, is governed by pressure drop and heat transportation through a geological formation. For the world's first offshore production test of methane hydrates conducted in 2013, the MH21 research team installed distributed temperature sensing (DTS) cables and array type resistance temperature devices (RTD) behind the casings of the monitoring wells. The temperature monitoring was continued over the period of 18 months. As a result, the thermal response of the methane hydrate-bearing sediment during depressurization was observed, and the obtained data was used to evaluate the methane dissociation behavior and to estimate the dissociation front radius from a producer well. The second offshore production test is planned in the same area in 2017 with the extended period up to one month. Two sets of a pair of monitoring and producer well were drilled in 2016. A pair of monitoring and producer wells is only 20m apart. An improved monitoring system is prepared for the second test with additional pressure measurement capability with new features of subsea system. The planed formation pressure measurement is expected to contribute not only for the evaluation of methane hydrate phase changes and estimation of its areal distribution but also the analyzing the interference in the vicinity of the producer wells from the geo-mechanical point of view. The DTS resolution was improved with longer averaging time than the previously utilized system. To accomplish the continuous acquisition up running over longer than 18 months to cover pre-flow and post-flow periods, the subsea acquisition system was equipped with an exchangeable subsea batteries by ROV. As for the surface communication method, the acoustic transponder was added in the subsea system. In this technical presentation, the improvements on the monitoring system are discussed and the scientific objectives for new measurements such as formation pressure are presented.

  17. First investigations to refine video-based IR thermography as a non-invasive tool to monitor the body temperature of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G; Schmidt, M; Ammon, C

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a video-based infrared camera (IRC) was investigated as a tool to monitor the body temperature of calves. Body surface temperatures were measured contactless using videos from an IRC fixed at a certain location in the calf feeder. The body surface temperatures were analysed retrospectively at three larger areas: the head area (in front of the forehead), the body area (behind forehead) and the area of the entire animal. The rectal temperature served as a reference temperature and was measured with a digital thermometer at the corresponding time point. A total of nine calves (Holstein-Friesians, 8 to 35 weeks old) were examined. The average maximum temperatures of the area of the entire animal (mean±SD: 37.66±0.90°C) and the head area (37.64±0.86°C) were always higher than that of the body area (36.75±1.06°C). The temperatures of the head area and of the entire animal were very similar. However, the maximum temperatures as measured using IRC increased with an increase in calf rectal temperature. The maximum temperatures of each video picture for the entire visible body area of the calves appeared to be sufficient to measure the superficial body temperature. The advantage of the video-based IRC over conventional IR single-picture cameras is that more than one picture per animal can be analysed in a short period of time. This technique provides more data for analysis. Thus, this system shows potential as an indicator for continuous temperature measurements in calves.

  18. Development of Meandering Winding Magnetometer (MWM (Register Trademark)) Eddy Current Sensors for the Health Monitoring, Modeling and Damage Detection of High Temperature Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard; Washabaugh, Andy; Sheiretov, Yanko; Martin, Christopher; Goldfine, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The increased use of high-temperature composite materials in modern and next generation aircraft and spacecraft have led to the need for improved nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring techniques. Such technologies are desirable to improve quality control, damage detection, stress evaluation and temperature measurement capabilities. Novel eddy current sensors and sensor arrays, such as Meandering Winding Magnetometers (MWMs) have provided alternate or complimentary techniques to ultrasound and thermography for both nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM). This includes imaging of composite material quality, damage detection and .the monitoring of fiber temperatures and multidirectional stresses. Historically, implementation of MWM technology for the inspection of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Composite (RCC) leading edge panels was developed by JENTEK Sensors and was subsequently transitioned by NASA as an operational pre and post flight in-situ inspection at the Kennedy Space Center. A manual scanner, which conformed'automatically to the curvature of the RCC panels was developed and used as a secondary technique if a defect was found during an infrared thermography screening, During a recent proof of concept study on composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPV's), three different MWM sensors were tested at three orientations to demonstrate the ability of the technology to measure stresses at various fiber orientations and depths. These results showed excellent correlation with actual surface strain gage measurements. Recent advancements of this technology have been made applying MWM sensor technology for scanning COPVs for mechanical damage. This presentation will outline the recent advance in the MWM.technology and the development of MWM techniques for NDE and SHM of carbon wraped composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) including the measurement of internal stresses via a surface mounted sensor

  19. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hai [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Dong, Junhang [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lin, Jerry [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Romero, Van [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases. This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  20. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS. These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it.

  1. A Novel Method for In-Situ Monitoring of Local Voltage, Temperature and Humidity Distributions in Fuel Cells Using Flexible Multi-Functional Micro Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Chih-Ping

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation, micro voltage, temperature and humidity sensors were fabricated and integrated for the first time on a stainless steel foil using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). These flexible multi-functional micro sensors have the advantages of high temperature resistance, flexibility, smallness, high sensitivity and precision of location. They were embedded in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and used to simultaneously measure variations in the inner voltage, temperature and humidity. The accuracy and reproducibility of the calibrated results obtained using the proposed micro sensors is excellent. The experimental results indicate that, at high current density and 100%RH or 75%RH, the relative humidity midstream and downstream saturates due to severe flooding. The performance of the PEM fuel cell can be stabilized using home-made flexible multi-functional micro sensors by the in-situ monitoring of local voltage, temperature and humidity distributions within it. PMID:22319361

  2. In situ monitoring of the acetylene decomposition and gas temperature at reaction conditions for the deposition of carbon nanotubes using linear Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold-López, Karla; Braeuer, Andreas; Popovska, Nadejda; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-08-16

    To understand the reaction mechanisms taking place by growing carbon nanotubes via the catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, a strategy to monitor in situ the gas phase at reaction conditions was developed applying linear Raman spectroscopy. The simultaneous determination of the gas temperature and composition was possible by a new strategy of the evaluation of the Raman spectra. In agreement to the well-known exothermic decomposition of acetylene, a gas temperature increase was quantified when acetylene was added to the incident flow. Information about exhaust gas recirculation and location of the maximal acetylene conversion was derived from the composition measurements.

  3. Development of self-powered wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ corrosion monitoring of coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Naing Naing; Crowe, Edward; Liu, Xingbo

    2015-03-01

    Reliable wireless high temperature electrochemical sensor technology is needed to provide in situ corrosion information for optimal predictive maintenance to ensure a high level of operational effectiveness under the harsh conditions present in coal-fired power generation systems. This research highlights the effectiveness of our novel high temperature electrochemical sensor for in situ coal ash hot corrosion monitoring in combination with the application of wireless communication and an energy harvesting thermoelectric generator (TEG). This self-powered sensor demonstrates the successful wireless transmission of both corrosion potential and corrosion current signals to a simulated control room environment. Copyright © 2014 ISA. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for monitoring the restabilization of Recycled Low-density Polyethylene (LDPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruvolo-Filho, Adhemar; Pelozzi, Tadeu Luiz Alonso, E-mail: adhemar@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    In this work a new method was developed for monitoring the oxidative stability of restabilized and non-restabilized low-density polyethylene (LDPE) during multiple extrusion cycles. The method is based on correlations between Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT). Non-linear calibration curves correlating the concentration of primary or secondary antioxidants and the OOT values were obtained. (author)

  5. Correlation between Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR for monitoring the restabilization of Recycled Low-density Polyethylene (LDPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhemar Ruvolo-Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a new method was developed for monitoring the oxidative stability of restabilized and non-restabilized low-density polyethylene (LDPE during multiple extrusion cycles. The method is based on correlations between Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Onset Oxidation Temperature (OOT. Non-linear calibration curves correlating the concentration of primary or secondary antioxidants and the OOT values were obtained.

  6. Remote Monitoring of Soil Water Content, Temperature, and Heat Flow Using Low-Cost Cellular (3G) IoT Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    New microprocessor boards, open-source sensors, and cloud infrastructure developed for the Internet of Things (IoT) can be used to create low-cost monitoring systems for environmental research. This project describes two applications in soil science and hydrology: 1) remote monitoring of the soil temperature regime near oil and gas operations to detect the thermal signature associated with the natural source zone degradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone, and 2) remote monitoring of soil water content near the surface as part of a global citizen science network. In both cases, prototype data collection systems were built around the cellular (2G/3G) "Electron" microcontroller (www.particle.io). This device allows connectivity to the cloud using a low-cost global SIM and data plan. The systems have cellular connectivity in over 100 countries and data can be logged to the cloud for storage. Users can view data real time over any internet connection or via their smart phone. For both projects, data logging, storage, and visualization was done using IoT services like Thingspeak (thingspeak.com). The soil thermal monitoring system was tested on experimental plots in Colorado USA to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of different temperature sensors and 3D printed housings. The soil water experiment included comparison opens-source capacitance-based sensors to commercial versions. Results demonstrate the power of leveraging IoT technology for field research.

  7. Monitoring oral temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) during capture and handling in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arthur W.; Bonde, Robert K.; Siegal-Willott, Jessica; Stamper, M. Andrew; Colee, James; Powell, James A.; Reid, James P.; Deutsch, Charles J.; Harr, Kendal E.

    2012-01-01

    West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) are captured, handled, and transported to facilitate conservation, research, and rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring manatee oral temperature (OT), heart rate (HR), and respiration rate (RR) during out-of-water handling can assist efforts to maintain animal well-being and improve medical response to evidence of declining health. To determine effects of capture on manatee vital signs, we monitored OT, HR, and RR continuously for a 50-min period in 38 healthy, awake, juvenile and adult Florida manatees (T. m. latirostris) and 48 similar Antillean manatees (T. m. manatus). We examined creatine kinase (CK), potassium (K+), serum amyloid A (SAA), and lactate values for each animal to assess possible systemic inflammation and muscular trauma. OT range was 29.5 to 36.2° C, HR range was 32 to 88 beats/min, and RR range was 0 to 17 breaths/5 min. Antillean manatees had higher initial OT, HR, and RR than Florida manatees (p < 0.001). As monitoring time progressed, mean differences between the subspecies were no longer significant. High RR over monitoring time was associated with high lactate concentration. Antillean manatees had higher overall lactate values ([mean ± SD] 20.6 ± 7.8 mmol/L) than Florida manatees (13.7 ± 6.7 mmol/L; p < 0.001). We recommend monitoring manatee OT, HR, and RR during capture and handling in the field or in a captive care setting.

  8. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  9. Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V I; Koepke, M E; Raitses, Y

    2010-10-01

    By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

  10. Multilevel groundwater monitoring of hydraulic head and temperature in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2007-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason C.; Twining, Brian V.

    2011-01-01

    During 2007 and 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected quarterly depth-discrete measurements of fluid pressure and temperature in six boreholes located in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer of Idaho. Each borehole was instrumented with a multilevel monitoring system consisting of a series of valved measurement ports, packer bladders, casing segments, and couplers. Hydraulic heads (head) and water temperatures in boreholes were monitored at 86 hydraulically-isolated depth intervals located 448.0 to 1,377.6 feet below land surface. The calculation of head is most sensitive to fluid pressure and the altitude of the pressure transducer at each port coupling; it is least sensitive to barometric pressure and water temperature. An analysis of errors associated with the head calculation determined the accuracy of an individual head measurement at +/- 2.3 feet. Many of the sources of measurement error are diminished when considering the differences between two closely-spaced readings of head; therefore, a +/- 0.1 foot measurement accuracy was assumed for vertical head differences (and gradients) calculated between adjacent monitoring zones. Vertical head and temperature profiles were unique to each borehole, and were characteristic of the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The vertical hydraulic gradients in each borehole remained relatively constant over time with minimum Pearson correlation coefficients between head profiles ranging from 0.72 at borehole USGS 103 to 1.00 at boreholes USGS 133 and MIDDLE 2051. Major inflections in the head profiles almost always coincided with low permeability sediment layers. The presence of a sediment layer, however, was insufficient for identifying the location of a major head change in a borehole. The vertical hydraulic gradients were defined for the major inflections in the head profiles and were as much as 2.2 feet per foot. Head gradients

  11. Application of infrared thermography for online monitoring of wall temperatures in inductively coupled plasma torches with conventional and low-flow gas consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Maue, Thomas; Hieftje, Gary M.; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources typically used for trace elemental determination and speciation were investigated with infrared (IR) thermography to obtain spatially resolved torch temperature distributions. Infrared thermographic imaging is an excellent tool for the monitoring of temperatures in a fast and non-destructive way. This paper presents the first application of IR thermography to inductively coupled plasma torches and the possibility to investigate temperatures and thermal patterns while the ICP is operating and despite background emission from the plasma itself. A fast and easy method is presented for the determination of temperature distributions and stress features within ICP torches. Two different ICP operating torches were studied: a commercially available Fassel-type ICP unit with 14 L min - 1 total Ar consumption and a SHIP torch with the unusually low Ar flow of 0.6 L min - 1 . Spatially resolved infrared images of both torches were obtained and laterally resolved temperature profiles were extracted. After temperature-resolved calibration of the emissivity (between 0.5 and 0.35 at 873-1323 K) and transmission (20% between 3.75 and 4.02 μm) of the fused quartz used in the torch construction, an image correction was applied. Inhomogeneous temperature distributions with locally defined stress areas in the conventional Fassel-type torch were revealed. As a general trend, it was found that the SHIP torch exhibited higher temperatures ( Tmax = 1580 K) than the conventional torch ( Tmax = 730 K). In the former case, torch sites with efficient and inefficient cooling were discovered and the external flow of cooling air (24-48 m s - 1 ) was identified as the limiting factor.

  12. Real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation of liver tumors using thermal-dose calculation by MR temperature imaging: initial results in nine patients, including follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit-Coiffe, Matthieu; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T.W. [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Laumonier, Herve; Trillaud, Herve [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Seror, Olivier [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service de Radiologie, Hopital Jean Verdier, Bondy (France); Sesay, Musa-Bahazid [Service d' Anesthesie Reanimation III, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Grenier, Nicolas [Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle: de la physiologie a la therapie CNRS UMR 5231, Bordeaux Cedex (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Therapeutique de l' Adulte, Hopital Pellegrin, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France)

    2010-01-15

    To assess the practical feasibility and effectiveness of real-time magnetic resonance (MR) temperature monitoring for the radiofrequency (RF) ablation of liver tumours in a clinical setting, nine patients (aged 49-87 years, five men and four women) with one malignant tumour (14-50 mm, eight hepatocellular carcinomas and one colorectal metastasis), were treated by 12-min RF ablation using a 1.5-T closed magnet for real-time temperature monitoring. The clinical monopolar RF device was filtered at 64 MHz to avoid electromagnetic interference. Real-time computation of thermal-dose (TD) maps, based on Sapareto and Dewey's equation, was studied to determine its ability to provide a clear end-point of the RF procedure. Absence of local recurrence on follow-up MR images obtained 45 days after the RF ablation was used to assess the apoptotic and necrotic prediction obtained by real-time TD maps. Seven out of nine tumours were completely ablated according to the real-time TD maps. Compared with 45-day follow-up MR images, TD maps accurately predicted two primary treatment failures, but were not relevant in the later progression of one case of secondary local tumour. The real-time TD concept is a feasible and promising monitoring method for the RF ablation of liver tumours. (orig.)

  13. High temperature stress monitoring and detection using chlorophyll a fluorescence and infrared thermography in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2013-01-01

    (PSII) and stomatal conductance (gs). A combination of chlorophyll a fluorescence, gas exchange measurements and infrared thermography was applied using Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) cultivar ‘Coral Charm’ as a model species. Increasing temperature had a highly significant effect...

  14. Permafrost in vegetated scree slopes below the timberline - characterization of thermal properties and permafrost conditions by temperature measurements and geoelectrical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Daniel; Kneisel, Christof

    2010-05-01

    Discontinuous alpine permafrost is expected to exist at altitudes above 2400m a.s.l. at mean annual air temperatures (MAAT) of less than -1°C. Below timberline only a few sites are known, where sporadic permafrost exists in vegetated talus slopes with positive MAAT. Aim of the study is to characterize permafrost-humus interaction, the thermal regime and its influence on temporal and spatial permafrost variability. Results of geophysical and thermal measurements from three talus slopes, located in the Swiss Alps (Engadin, Appenzell) at elevations between 1200 and 1800m a.s.l. with MAAT between 2.8°C and 5.5°C are presented. Parent rock-material of the slopes are granite (Bever Valley, Engadin) and dolomite (Susauna Valley, Engadin; Brüeltobel, Appenzell). Joint application of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and refraction seismic tomography (RST) is used to detect and characterize permafrost. To observe temporal and spatial variability in ice content and characteristics year-around geoelectrical monitoring and quasi-3D ERT are used. A forward modeling approach has been applied to validate the results of geoelectrical monitoring. A number of temperature data loggers were installed in different depth of the humus layer and in different positions of the slope to monitor the ground thermal regime. Isolated permafrost has been detected by the combination of ERT and RST in the lower parts of the investigated talus slopes. Results from geophysical measurements and monitoring indicate a high spatial and temporal variability in ice content and ice characteristics (temperature, density, content of unfrozen water) for all sites. A distinct rise of resistivities between November and December indicates a decrease of unfrozen water content, caused by a pronounced cooling in the lower parts of the slope. Decreasing ice content and extent of the permafrost lenses can be observed in decreasing seismic velocities from 2600m/sec in spring to only 1500m/sec in October. Ice

  15. Monitoring changes in skin temperature associated with exercise in horses on a water treadmill by use of infrared thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Kelly; Fleming, Jennifer; Stratton, Tim D; Brassington, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) was used to assess surface temperature change as an indirect measure of muscle activity and exercise associated changes in blood flow in the working hind limb muscles of horses (n=7) undergoing water treadmill exercise. Three treatments were investigated including the treadmill ran dry (TD), water at the height of the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) and water at the height of the carpus (CP). Maximum skin surface temperature was recorded from the region of the semitendinosus muscle during exercise at each water height. There was a significant difference in surface hind limb temperature between exercise on the water treadmill ran dry and with water at the height of the PIP and CP (P<0.0001) with hotter temperatures recorded during the TD treatment. There was a greater increase in surface temperature of the hind limbs from pre exercise to maximum temperature during the PIP and CP treatments when compared to the TD treatment, however, this was not significant (P=0.58). There was no significant difference in surface hind limb temperature found between exercise in water at the height of the PIP and water at the height of the CP. The findings from this study suggest that IRT is able to non-invasively detect muscle activity and associated changes in blood flow whilst horses are exercised on a water treadmill. IRT could potentially be used as an alternative method to assess muscle activity and temperature change in an aquatic environment where existing methods present methodological challenges. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperature monitoring and lesion volume estimation during double-applicator laser-induced thermotherapy in ex vivo swine pancreas: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Giurazza, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Caponero, Michele A; Mortato, Luca; Panzera, Francesco; Cazzato, Roberto L; Grasso, Francesco R; Di Matteo, Francesco M; Silvestri, Sergio; Zobel, Bruno B

    2014-03-01

    Tissue temperature distribution plays a crucial role in the outcome of laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), a technique employed for neoplasias removal. Since recent studies proposed LITT for pancreatic tumors treatment, assessment of temperature and of its effects around the laser applicator could be useful to define optimal laser settings. The aims of this work are temperature monitoring and measurement of ablated tissue volume in an ex vivo porcine pancreas undergoing double-applicator LITT. A three-dimensional numerical model is implemented to predict temperature rise and volumes of ablated tissue in treated pancreas. Experiments are performed to validate the model, with two modalities: (1) 12-fiber Bragg grating sensors are adopted to monitor the heating and cooling during LITT at several distances from the applicators tip, and (2) 1.5-T MR imaging is used to estimate the ablated volume. Experimental data agree with theoretical ones: at 2 mm from both applicators tips, the maximum temperature increase is approximately 60 °C downward from the tips, while it increases of about 40 °C and 30 °C, respectively, at the level and upward from the tips. This behavior occurs also at other distances, proving that the tissue downward from the tip is mostly heated. Furthermore, the estimated volume with MRI agrees with theoretical one (i.d., 0.91 ± 0.09 vs. 0.95 cm(3)). The encouraging results indicate that the model could be a suitable tool to choose the optimal laser settings, in order to control the volume of ablated tissue.

  17. In vivo evaluation of multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 approach for temperature monitoring during breast MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the precision of in vivo temperature measurements in adipose and glandular breast tissue using a multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 pulse sequence. A high-bandwidth, multi-echo hybrid PRF/T1 sequence was developed for monitoring temperature changes simultaneously in fat- and water-based tissues. The multiple echoes were combined with the optimal weightings for magnitude and phase images, allowing for precise measurement of both T1 and the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift. The sequence was tested during in vivo imaging of 10 healthy volunteers in a breast-specific MR-guided focused ultrasound system and also during focused ultrasound heating of excised breast adipose tissue. The in vivo results indicated that the sequence can measure PRF temperatures with 1.25 × 1.25 × 3.5 mm resolution, 1.9 s temporal resolution, and 1.0°C temperature precision, and can measure T1 values with 3.75 × 3.75 × 3.5 mm resolution, 3.8 s temporal resolution, and 2.5%-4.8% precision. The excised tissue heating experiments demonstrate the sequence's ability to monitor temperature changes simultaneously in water- and fat-based tissues. The addition of a high-bandwidth, multi-echo readout to the hybrid PRF/T1 sequence improves the precision of each measurement, providing a sequence that will be beneficial to several MR-guided thermal therapies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang; Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H2O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm(-1) (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm(-1) (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  19. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang; Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H2O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm-1 (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm-1 (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  20. Wearable, Flexible, and Multifunctional Healthcare Device with an ISFET Chemical Sensor for Simultaneous Sweat pH and Skin Temperature Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Shogo; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2017-03-24

    Real-time daily healthcare monitoring may increase the chances of predicting and diagnosing diseases in their early stages which, currently, occurs most frequently during medical check-ups. Next-generation noninvasive healthcare devices, such as flexible multifunctional sensor sheets designed to be worn on skin, are considered to be highly suitable candidates for continuous real-time health monitoring. For healthcare applications, acquiring data on the chemical state of the body, alongside physical characteristics such as body temperature and activity, are extremely important for predicting and identifying potential health conditions. To record these data, in this study, we developed a wearable, flexible sweat chemical sensor sheet for pH measurement, consisting of an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) integrated with a flexible temperature sensor: we intend to use this device as the foundation of a fully integrated, wearable healthcare patch in the future. After characterizing the performance, mechanical flexibility, and stability of the sensor, real-time measurements of sweat pH and skin temperature are successfully conducted through skin contact. This flexible integrated device has the potential to be developed into a chemical sensor for sweat for applications in healthcare and sports.

  1. Establishing Bedding Requirements during Transport and Monitoring Skin Temperature during Cold and Mild Seasons after Transport for Finishing Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McGlone

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The broad aim of this study was to determine whether bedding level in the transport trailer influenced pig performance and welfare. Specifically, the objective was to define the bedding requirements of pigs during transportation in commercial settings during cold and mild weather. Animals (n = 112,078 pigs on 572 trailers used were raised in commercial finishing sites and transported in trailers to commercial processing plants. Dead on arrival (DOA, non-ambulatory (NA, and total dead and down (D&D data were collected and skin surface temperatures of the pigs were measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected during winter (Experiment 1 and fall/spring (Experiment 2. Total D&D percent showed no interaction between bedding level and outside air temperature in any experiments. Average skin surface temperature during unloading increased with outside air temperature linearly in both experiments (P < 0.01. In conclusion, over-use of bedding may be economically inefficient. Pig skin surface temperature could be a useful measure of pig welfare during or after transport.

  2. Monitoring changes in body surface temperature associated with treadmill exercise in dogs by use of infrared methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Maria; Arfuso, Francesca; Alberghina, Daniela; Giudice, Elisabetta; Gianesella, Matteo; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of moderate treadmill exercise session on body surface and core temperature in dog measured by means of two infrared instruments. Ten Jack Russell Terrier/Miniature Pinscher mixed-breed dogs were subjected to 15min of walking, 10min of trotting and 10min of gallop. At every step, body surface temperature (Tsurface) was measured on seven regions (neck, shoulder, ribs, flank, back, internal thigh and eye) using two different methods, a digital infrared camera (ThermaCam P25) and a non-contact infrared thermometer (Infrared Thermometer THM010-VT001). Rectal temperature (Trectal) and blood samples were collected before (T0) and after exercise (T3). Blood samples were tested for red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). A significant effect of exercise in all body surface regions was found, as measured by both infrared methods. The temperature obtained in the eye and the thigh area were higher with respect to the other studied regions throughout the experimental period (Pinfrared thermometer was found in neck, shoulder, ribs, flank, back regions respect to the values obtained by digital infrared camera (Pinfrared instruments used in this study have proven to be useful in detecting surface temperature variations of specific body regions, however factors including type and color of animal hair coat must be taken into account in the interpretation of data obtained by thermography methodology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monitoring the temperature-dependent elastic and anelastic properties in isotropic polycrystalline ice using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Vaughan

    2016-11-01

    calibration of active and passive seismic data gathered in the field. The elastic properties and anelastic quality factor Q in laboratory-manufactured polycrystalline isotropic ice cores decrease (reversibly with increasing temperature, but compressional-wave speed and attenuation prove most sensitive to temperature, indicative of pre-melting of the ice. This method of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy can be deployed in the field, for those situations where shipping samples is difficult (e.g. remote locations, or where the properties of ice change rapidly after extraction (e.g. in the case of sea ice.

  4. Integration of a prototype wireless communication system with micro-electromechanical temperature and humidity sensor for concrete pavement health monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, structural health monitoring and management (SHMM has become a popular approach and is considered essential for achieving well-performing, long-lasting, sustainable transportation infrastructure systems. Key requirements in ideal SHMM of road infrastructure include long-term, continuous, and real-time monitoring of pavement response and performance under various pavement geometry-materials-loading configurations and environmental conditions. With advancements in wireless technologies, integration of wireless communications into sensing device is considered an alternate and superior solution to existing time- and labor-intensive wired sensing systems in meeting the requirements of an ideal SHMM. This study explored the development and integration of a wireless communications sub-system into a commercial off-the-shelf micro-electromechanical sensor-based concrete pavement monitoring system. A success-rate test was performed after the wireless transmission system was buried in the concrete slab, and the test results indicated that the system was able to provide reliable communications at a distance of more than 46 m (150 feet. This will be a useful feature for highway engineers performing routine pavement scans from the pavement shoulder without the need for traffic control or road closure.

  5. Tracking reactive intermediates by FTIR monitoring of reactions in low-temperature sublimed solids: nitric oxide disproportionation mediated by ruthenium(II) carbonyl porphyrin Ru(TPP)(CO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizyan, Arsen S; Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Martirosyan, Garik G; Ford, Peter C

    2013-05-06

    Interaction of NO ((15)NO) with amorphous layers of Ru(II) carbonyl porphyrin (Ru(TPP)(CO), TPP(2-) = meso-tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion) was monitored by FTIR spectroscopy from 80 K to room temperature. An intermediate spectrally characterized at very low temperatures (110 K) with ν(CO) at 2001 cm(-1) and ν(NO) at 1810 cm(-1) (1777 cm(-1) for (15)NO isotopomer) was readily assigned to the mixed carbonyl-nitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(CO)(NO), which is the logical precursor to CO labilization. Remarkably, Ru(TPP)-mediated disproportionation of NO is seen even at 110 K, an indication of how facile this reaction is. By varying the quantity of supplied NO, it was also demonstrated that the key intermediate responsible for NO disproportionation is the dinitrosyl complex Ru(TPP)(NO)2, supporting the conclusion previously made from solution experiments.

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-05-07 (NODC Accession 7800391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 07 May 1978. Data were collected as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring,...

  7. Use of Landsat Land Surface Temperature and Vegetation Indices for Monitoring Drought in the Salt Lake Basin Area, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Osman; Ekercin, Semih; Dadaser-Celik, Filiz

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate multitemporal land surface temperature (LST) changes by using satellite remote sensing data. The study included a real-time field work performed during the overpass of Landsat-5 satellite on 21/08/2011 over Salt Lake, Turkey. Normalized vegetation index (NDVI), vegetation condition index (VCI), and temperature vegetation index (TVX) were used for evaluating drought impact over the region between 1984 and 2011. In the image processing step, geometric and radiometric correction procedures were conducted to make satellite remote sensing data comparable with in situ measurements carried out using thermal infrared thermometer supported by hand-held GPS. The results showed that real-time ground and satellite remote sensing data were in good agreement with correlation coefficient (R 2) values of 0.90. The remotely sensed and treated satellite images and resulting thematic indices maps showed that dramatic land surface temperature changes occurred (about 2°C) in the Salt Lake Basin area during the 28-year period (1984–2011). Analysis of air temperature data also showed increases at a rate of 1.5–2°C during the same period. Intensification of irrigated agriculture particularly in the southern basin was also detected. The use of water supplies, especially groundwater, should be controlled considering particularly summer drought impacts on the basin. PMID:24587709

  8. Issues in Continuous 24-h Core Body Temperature Monitoring in Humans Using an Ingestible Capsule Telemetric Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnard, Cathriona R; Fares, Elie-Jacques; Calonne, Julie; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Durrer, Dominique; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of pill-sized ingestible capsule telemetric sensors for assessing core body temperature (Tc) as a potential indicator of variability in metabolic efficiency and thrifty metabolic traits. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of measuring Tc using the CorTemp® system. Tc was measured over an average of 20 h in 27 human subjects, with measurements of energy expenditure made in the overnight fasted state at rest, during standardized low-intensity physical activity and after a 600 kcal mixed meal. Validation of accuracy of the capsule sensors was made ex vivo against mercury and electronic thermometers across the physiological range (35-40°C) in morning and afternoon of 2 or 3 consecutive days. Comparisons between capsule sensors and thermometers were made using Bland-Altman analysis. Systematic bias, error, and temperature drift over time were assessed. The circadian Tc profile classically reported in free-living humans was confirmed. Significant increases in Tc (+0.2°C) were found in response to low-power cycling at 40-50 W (~3-4 METs), but no changes in Tc were detectable during low-level isometric leg press exercise (temperature, new technology requires a reduction in the inherent error of measurement and elimination of temperature drift and warrants more interlaboratory investigation on the above factors.

  9. Development of a combined piezoresistive pressure and temperature sensor using a chemical protective coating for Kraft pulp digester process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza R.; Bennington, Chad P. J.; Chiao, Mu

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an integrated piezoresistive pressure and temperature sensor for multiphase chemical reactors, primarily Kraft pulp digesters (pH 13.5, temperatures up to 175 °C, reaching a local maximum of 180 °C and pressures up to 2 MPa). The absolute piezoresistive pressure sensor consisted of a large square silicon diaphragm (1000 × 1000 µm2) and high resistance piezoresistors (10 000 Ω). A 4500 Ω buried piezoresistive wire was patterned on the silicon chip to form a piezoresistive temperature sensor which was used for pressure sensor compensation and temperature measurement. A 4 µm thick Parylene HT® coating, a chemically resistant epoxy and a silicone conformal coating were deposited to passivate the pressure sensor against the caustic environment in Kraft digesters. The sensors were characterized up to 2 MPa and 180 °C in an environment chamber. A maximum thermal error of ±0.72% full-scale output (FSO), an average sensitivity of 0.116 mV (V kPa)-1 and a power consumption of 0.3 mW were measured in the pressure sensor. The sensors' resistances were measured before and after test in a Kraft pulping cycle and showed no change in their values. SEM pictures and topographical surfaces were also analyzed before and after pulp liquor exposure and showed no observable changes.

  10. Culture-dependent and independent techniques to monitor yeast species during cold soak carried out at different temperatures in winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturano, Y Paola; Mestre, M Victoria; Combina, Mariana; Toro, María Eugenia; Vazquez, Fabio; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-11-21

    Transformation of grape must into wine is a process that may vary according to the consumers' requirements. Application of cold soak prior to alcoholic fermentation is a common practice in cellars in order to enhance flavor complexity and extraction of phenolic compounds. However, the effect of this step on wine yeast microbiota is not well-known. The current study simultaneously analyzed the effect of different cold soak temperatures on the microbiological population throughout the process and the use of culture-dependent and independent techniques to study this yeast ecology. The temperatures assayed were those normally applied in wineries: 2.5, 8 and 12°C. PCR-DGGE allowed detection of the most representative species such as Hanseniaspora uvarum, Starmerella bacillaris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As could be expected, highest diversity indices were obtained at the beginning of each process, and survival of H. uvarum or S. bacillaris depended on the temperature. Our results are in agreement with those obtained with culture independent methods, but qPCR showed higher precision and a different behavior was observed for each yeast species and at each temperature assayed. Comparison of both culture-independent techniques can provide a general overview of the whole process, although DGGE does not reveal the diversity expected due to the reported problems with the sensitivity of this technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An optimised multi-baseline approach for on-line MR-temperature monitoring on commodity graphics hardware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Ries, Mario

    2008-01-01

    . They have required significant time to compute however, and have not been sufficiently fast for several real-time temperature mapping applications. This paper proposes to use modern graphics cards (GPUs) to assess on-line motion corrected thermal maps. The computation times obtained on the GPU are compared...

  12. Monitoring thermally induced structural deformation and framework decomposition of ZIF-8 through in situ temperature dependent measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Mei, Yingjie; Xiao, Zhenyu; Kang, Zixi; Wang, Rongming; Sun, Daofeng

    2017-10-18

    ZIF-8 is an easily synthesized porous material which is widely applied in gas storage/separation, catalysis, and nanoarchitecture fabrication. Thermally induced atomic displacements and the resultant framework deformation/collapse significantly influence the application of ZIF-8, and therefore, in situ temperature dependent FTIR spectroscopy was utilized to study the framework changes during heating in the oxidative environment. The results suggest that ZIF-8 undergoes three transition stages, which are the lattice expansion stage below 200 °C, the "reversible" structural deformation stage from 200 to 350 °C, and the decomposition/collapse stage over 350 °C. Our research indicates that the Zn-N bond breaks at a temperature of 350 °C in the oxidant environment, leading to a drastic deformation of the ZIF-8 structure.

  13. Monitoring of Short Term Wind and Temperature Variations in Venus Upper Atmosphere Derived from Ground-based Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, M.; Sornig, M.; Sonnabend, G.; Stangier, T.

    2012-09-01

    The atmosphere of Venus is unique in our solar system. The dynamical structure as well as the temperature distribution are under ongoing investigations and a stable sub solar to anti solar flow has been detected [1]. Recently, advanced groundbased and space-based observing methods have shown that the atmosphere is much more active than formerly believed. The temperature gradient shows significant deviation from a simple sub solar to anti solar distribution. Also the wind velocities show more variability than predicted before. Wave mechanisms may cause variability in wind velocities as well as in temperatures. Hoshino et al 2012 [2] implemented wave mechanisms in a global circulation model and predicted variations in the wind velocity with a maximum of ±4m/s in the equatorial regions at an altitude of 110km due to Kelvin waves with periods of four days. Nagakawa et al (2012) [3] predicted gravity waves with amplitudes up to 15m/s in this altitude. In March 2012 the Tuneable Heterodyne Infrared Spectrometer (THIS) of the University of Cologne was installed at the McMath Pierce Telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona to observe the Non-LTE emission line of CO2 at 10 microns in the atmosphere of Venus. This feature occurs only in a low pressure environment, about 0.001mbar corresponding to an altitude region of about 110km. From the Doppler shift of the line it is possible to calculate the movement of the molecules in the atmosphere. The line width contains information about the temperature of the molecules. THIS features the possibility for ground-based measurements of wind velocities with high precision down to 10m/s [4]. The observing geometry was especially chosen to search for variability in the equatorial region where the Kelvin waves are expected. We are going to present unique data covering measurements of the same positions over twelve days in order to retrieve detailed information over temporal variability.

  14. Design, Development and Implementation of the IR Signalling Techniques for Monitoring Ambient and Body Temperature in WBANs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attiya Baqai

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare systems such as hospitals, homecare, telemedicine, and physical rehabilitation are expected to be revolutionized by WBAN (Wireless Body Area Networks. This research work aims to investigate, design, optimize, and demonstrate the applications of IR (Infra-Red communication systems in WBAN. It is aimed to establish a prototype WBAN system capable of measuring Ambient and Body Temperature using LM35 as temperature sensor and transmitting and receiving the data using optical signals. The corresponding technical challenges that have to be faced are also discussed in this paper. Investigations are carried out to efficiently design the hardware using low-cost and low power optical transceivers. The experimental results reveal the successful transmission and reception of Ambient and Body Temperatures over short ranges i.e. up to 3-4 meters. A simple IR transceiver with an LED (Light Emitting Diodes, TV remote control IC and Arduino microcontroller is designed to perform the transmission with sufficient accuracy and ease. Experiments are also performed to avoid interference from other sources like AC and TV remote control signals by implementing IR tags

  15. Shallow subsurface temperature and moisture monitoring at rock walls during freeze thaw cycles in the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Matthias; Sass, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The process of frost weathering as well as the contribution of further weathering processes (e.g. hydration, thermal fatigue) is poorly understood. For this purpose, different measuring systems were set up in two study areas (Dachstein massif - permafrost area (2700m asl, 47° 28' 32″ N, 13° 36' 23″ E) and Gesäuse mountains - non permafrost area (900m asl, 47° 35' 19″ N, 14° 39' 32″ E) located in Styria, Austria within the framework of the research project ROCKING ALPS (FWF-P2444). A key to understand frost weathering is to observe the rock temperature with several high resolution temperature sensors from the rock surface down to -20cm depth. The temperatures are measured hourly at north and south exposed rock walls since 2012 in the headwalls of the Dachstein glacier at the Koppenkarstein (built up of limestone) in about 2600m asl. Since 2013 the same measurement setup is installed in the lower Johnsbachtal (Gesäuse mountains, prevailing rock type is dolomite) in about 800m asl. To know the temperature is crucial to understand internal heat flow and transport and latent heat effects during freezing and thawing caused by night frost (lasting some hours), cold fronts (lasting some days) or winter frost of several weeks or months. At these study points we also have installed small-scale 2D-geoelectric survey lines, supplemented by moisture sensors. Moisture is determined by means of resistivity measurements which are difficult to calibrate, but provide good time series. Additional novel moisture sensors were developed which use the heat capacity of the surrounding rock as a proxy of water content. These sensors give point readings from a defined depth and are independent from soluble salt contents. First results from the Dachstein show that short term latent heat effects during the phase change have crucial influence on the moisture content. The moisture distribution and movements during temperature changes inside the rock are discussed upon the two main

  16. Global Monitoring RSEM System for Crop Production by Incorporating Satellite-based Photosynthesis Rates and Anomaly Data of Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, D.; Sakuma, H.

    2014-12-01

    The first author has been developing RSEM crop-monitoring system using satellite-based assessment of photosynthesis, incorporating meteorological conditions. Crop production comprises of several stages and plural mechanisms based on leaf photosynthesis, surface energy balance, and the maturing of grains after fixation of CO2, along with water exchange through soil vegetation-atmosphere transfer. Grain production in prime countries appears to be randomly perturbed regionally and globally. Weather for crop plants reflects turbulent phenomena of convective and advection flows in atmosphere and surface boundary layer. It has been difficult for scientists to simulate and forecast weather correctly for sufficiently long terms to crop harvesting. However, severely poor harvests related to continental events must originate from a consistent mechanism of abnormal energetic flow in the atmosphere through both land and oceans. It should be remembered that oceans have more than 100 times of energy storage compared to atmosphere and ocean currents represent gigantic energy flows, strongly affecting climate. Anomalies of Sea Surface Temperature (SST), globally known as El Niño, Indian Ocean dipole, and Atlantic Niño etc., affect the seasonal climate on a continental scale. The authors aim to combine monitoring and seasonal forecasting, considering such mechanisms through land-ocean biosphere transfer. The present system produces assessments for all continents, specifically monitoring agricultural fields of main crops. Historical regions of poor and good harvests are compared with distributions of SST anomalies, which are provided by NASA GSFC. Those comparisons fairly suggest that the Worst harvest in 1993 and the Best in 1994 relate to the offshore distribution of low temperature anomalies and high gaps in ocean surface temperatures. However, high-temperature anomalies supported good harvests because of sufficient solar radiation for photosynthesis, and poor harvests because

  17. In-situ monitoring of etching of bovine serum albumin using low-temperature atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousal, J.; Shelemin, A.; Kylián, O.; Slavínská, D.; Biederman, H.

    2017-01-01

    Bio-decontamination of surfaces by means of atmospheric pressure plasma is nowadays extensively studied as it represents promising alternative to commonly used sterilization/decontamination techniques. The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas were already reported to be highly effective in removal of a wide range of biological residual from surfaces. Nevertheless the kinetics of removal of biological contamination from surfaces is still not well understood as the majority of performed studies were based on ex-situ evaluation of etching rates, which did not allow investigating details of plasma action on biomolecules. This study therefore presents a real-time, in-situ ellipsometric characterization of removal of bovine serum albumin (BSA) from surfaces by low-temperature atmospheric plasma jet operated in argon. Non-linear and at shorter distances between treated samples and nozzle of the plasma jet also non-monotonic dependence of the removal rate on the treatment duration was observed. According to additional measurements focused on the determination of chemical changes of treated BSA as well as temperature measurements, the observed behavior is most likely connected with two opposing effects: the formation of a thin layer on the top of BSA deposit enriched in inorganic compounds, whose presence causes a gradual decrease of removal efficiency, and slight heating of BSA that facilitates its degradation and volatilization induced by chemically active radicals produced by the plasma.

  18. Temperature monitoring along the Rhine River based on airborne thermal infrared remote sensing: qualitative results compared to satellite data and validation with in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Katharina; Baschek, Björn

    2014-10-01

    Water temperature is an important parameter of water quality and influences other physical and chemical parameters. It also directly influences the survival and growth of animal and plant species in river ecosystems. In situ measurements do not allow for a total spatial coverage of water bodies and rivers that is necessary for monitoring and research at the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG), Germany. Hence, the ability of different remote sensing products to identify and investigate water inflows and water temperatures in Federal waterways is evaluated within the research project 'Remote sensing of water surface temperature'. The research area for a case study is the Upper and Middle Rhine River from the barrage in Iffezheim to Koblenz. Satellite products (e. g. Landsat and ASTER imagery) can only be used for rivers at least twice as wide as the spatial resolution of the satellite images. They can help to identify different water bodies only at tributaries with larger inflow volume (Main and Mosel) or larger temperature differences between the inflow (e. g. from power plants working with high capacity) and the river water. To identify and investigate also smaller water inflows and temperature differences, thermal data with better ground and thermal resolution is required. An aerial survey of the research area was conducted in late October 2013. Data of the surface was acquired with two camera systems, a digital camera with R, G, B, and Near-IR channels, and a thermal imaging camera measuring the brightness temperature in the 8-12 m wavelength region (TIR). The resolution of the TIR camera allowed for a ground resolution of 4 m, covering the whole width of the main stream and larger branches. The RGB and NIR data allowed to eliminate land surface temperatures from the analysis and to identify clouds and shadows present during the data acquisition. By degrading the spatial resolution and adding sensor noise, artificial Landsat ETM+ and TIRS datasets were created

  19. Evaluation of a New Brain Tissue Probe for Intracranial Pressure, Temperature, and Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seule, Martin; Sikorski, Christopher; Sakowitz, Oliver; von Campe, Gord; Santos, Edgar; Orakcioglu, Berk; Unterberg, Andreas; Keller, Emanuela

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate an intraparenchymal probe for intracranial pressure (ICP) and temperature (TEMP) monitoring as well as determination of cerebral hemodynamics using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and indocyanine green (ICG) dye dilution method (NIRS-ICP probe). The NIRS-ICP probe was applied after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage if multimodal monitoring was established due to poor neurological condition. ICP and TEMP values were obtained from ventricular catheters and systemic temperature sensors. Repeated NIRS-ICG measurements (2 injections within 30 min) were performed daily for determination of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time of ICG (mttICG). Secondary neurologic dysfunction was defined as brain tissue oxygen tension 35 obtained from cerebral probing. A total of 128 NIRS-ICG measurements were performed in ten patients. The correlation coefficients between ICP and TEMP values obtained with the NIRS-ICP probe and values from routine monitoring were r = 0.72 and r = 0.96, respectively. The mean values were 30.3 ± 13.6 ml/100 g/min for CBF, 3.3 ± 1.2 ml/100 g for CBV, and 6.8 ± 1.6 s for mttICG. The coefficients of variation from repeated NIRS-ICG measurements were 10.9 % for CBF, 11.7 % for CBV, and 3.8 % for mttICG. The sensitivity for detection of secondary neurologic dysfunction was 85 % and the specificity 83 % using a CBF-threshold of 25 ml/100 g/min. Multimodal monitoring using the NIRS-ICP probe is feasible with high reproducibility of measurement values and the ability to detect secondary neurologic dysfunction. No safety concerns exist for the routine clinical use of the NIRS-ICP probe.

  20. Bridge deck surface temperature monitoring by infrared thermography and inner structure identification using PPT and PCT analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project was to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, we focused our research and development efforts on uncooled infrared camera techniques due to their promising potential level of dissemination linked to their relative low cost on the market. On the other hand, works were also carried out to identify well adapted implementation protocols and key limits of Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) processing methods to analyse thermal image sequence and retrieve information about the inner structure. So the first part of this research works addresses infrared thermography measurement when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey). In such context, it requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time, thanks to additional measurements. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed [1] with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The whole measurement system was implemented on the "Musmeci" bridge located in Potenza (Italy). No traffic interruption was required during the mounting of our measurement system. The infrared camera was fixed on top of a mast at 6 m elevation from the surface of the bridge deck. A small weather station was added on the same mast at 1 m under the camera. A GPS antenna was also fixed at the

  1. Incompatible Trace Elements in Olivine: Using Sc, Y and V as Temperature and Redox Monitors in Basaltic Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, G.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2012-12-01

    Olivine is the dominant constituent phase of the Earth's upper mantle and the first silicate mineral to crystallize from primitive basaltic melts on cooling following decompression. The physical and chemical properties of olivine have, therefore, been of great interest to geochemists and geophysicists. Yet, olivine is so poor in incompatible trace elements (phosphorus being the exception) that it features in much geochemical modeling merely as an inert dilutant. Consequently, our understanding of incompatible trace-element partitioning between olivine and silicate melt has lagged behind that of phases such as pyroxenes or garnet, which control bulk crystal/melt partitioning behavior during mantle melting. Advances in trace-element microanalysis, particularly LA-ICP-MS, have now placed the determination of incompatible elements in natural olivines within reach, and recent studies have shown that mantle and magmatic olivines can preserve complex intracrystalline distributions of these elements. The combined major and trace element compositions of phenocrystal olivines could, therefore, provide unique and detailed insights into magmatic evolution. The course of evolution of basaltic magmas depends substantially on their redox state, hence oxygen fugacity, but there is increasing evidence that this intensive thermodynamic variable may be less well understood in basalts than commonly supposed. The redox state of terrestrial basalts has to a large extent been inferred from the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios of their quenched glasses. However, this quantity appears to be significantly affected during late and post-eruptive processes in magmatic systems (e.g. by degassing, charge-transfer reactions of redox-variable species, and alteration), so that the degree to which the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios preserved in basaltic glasses reflect the oxidation state of the magma at high temperature is unclear. The equilibrium partitioning relations preserved in olivine phenocrysts in basalts are, in

  2. Some remarks on the influence of temperature-variations, non-linearities, repeatability and ageing on modal-analysis for structural health monitoring of real bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural Health Monitoring (SHM intends to identify damage by changes of characteristics as for instance the modal parameters. The eigenfrequencies, mode-shapes and damping-values are either directly used as damage indicators or the changes of derived parameters are analysed, such as e.g. flexibilities or updated finite element models. One common way is a continuous monitoring under environmental excitation forces, such as wind or traffic, i.e. the so-called output-only modal analysis. Alternatively, a forced measured external excitation in distinct time-intervals may be used for input-output modal analysis. Both methods are limited by the precision or the repeatability under real-life conditions at site. The paper will summarize several field tests of artificially step-by-step damaged bridges prior to their final demolishment and it will show the changes of eigenfrequencies due to induced artificial damage. Additionally, some results of a monitoring campaign of a healthy bridge in Luxembourg are presented. Reinforced concrete shows non-linear behaviour in the sense that modal parameters depend on the excitation force amplitude, i.e. higher forces lead often to lower eigenfrequencies than smaller forces. Furthermore, the temperature of real bridges is neither constant in space nor in time, while for instance the stiffness of asphalt is strongly dependant on it. Finally, ageing as such can also change a bridge’s stiffness and its modal parameters, e.g. because creep and shrinkage of concrete or ageing of elastomeric bearing pads influence their modulus of elasticity. These effects cannot be considered as damage, though they influence the measurement of modal parameters and hinder damage detection.

  3. Monitoring temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon decomposition under maize-wheat cropping systems in semi-arid India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, S; Manjaiah, K M; Mayadevi, M R; Singh, A K

    2016-08-01

    Long-term storage of soil organic carbon (SOC) is essential for sustainability of agricultural ecosystems and maintaining overall environment quality as soils contain a significant part of global carbon stocks. In this study, we attempted to explain the carbon mineralization and temperature sensitivity of SOC in maize-wheat systems, a common cropping system in the semi-arid regions of India. Soil samples(0-0.15 m) from long-term experimental plots laid in split plot design with two tillage systems (conventional tillage and bed planting) and six nutrient management treatments (T 1 = control, T 2 = 120 kg urea-N/ha, T 3 = T2 (25 % N substituted by farmyard manure (FYM)), T 4 = T 2 (25 % N substituted by sewage sludge), T 5 = T 2 + crop residue, T 6 = 100 % recommended doses of N through organic source - 50 % FYM + 25 % biofertilizer + 25 % crop residue) were incubated at different temperatures (25, 30, 35, and 40 °C) to determine the thermal sensitivity parameters associated with carbon mineralization. Earlier reports suggest a selective preservation of C3-derived carbon fractions over C4 in the SOC pool, and this is the first instance where δ (13)C signatures (C4-derived carbon) were used as a qualitative measure to assess thermal sensitivity of SOC pools in the maize-wheat crop rotation systems of semi-arid India. Among the nutrient management treatments, mineral fertilizers were found to add more C4-derived carbon to the SOC pool in both the tillage systems but shows less promise in SOC stability as indicated by their lower activation energies (Ea) (14.25 kJ mol(-1)). Conventional tillage was found to mineralize 18.80 % (T 1-control at 25 °C) to 29.93 % carbon (T 3-mineral fertilizer + FYM at 40 °C) during the 150 days of incubation which was significantly higher than bed planting system (14.90 % in T 1-control at 25 °C and 21.99 % in T 6-100% organic sources at 40 °C). Organic manures, especially FYM (19

  4. Long-term monitoring of fresco paintings in the cathedral of Valencia (Spain) through humidity and temperature sensors in various locations for preventive conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzo, Manuel; Fernández-Navajas, Angel; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999).

  5. Long-Term Monitoring of Fresco Paintings in the Cathedral of Valencia (Spain Through Humidity and Temperature Sensors in Various Locations for Preventive Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Fernández-Navajas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999.

  6. Long-Term Monitoring of Fresco Paintings in the Cathedral of Valencia (Spain) Through Humidity and Temperature Sensors in Various Locations for Preventive Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzo, Manuel; Fernández-Navajas, Angel; García-Diego, Fernando-Juan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the performance of a microclimate monitoring system that was implemented for the preventive conservation of the Renaissance frescoes in the apse vault of the Cathedral of Valencia, that were restored in 2006. This system comprises 29 relative humidity (RH) and temperature sensors: 10 of them inserted into the plaster layer supporting the fresco paintings, 10 sensors in the walls close to the frescoes and nine sensors measuring the indoor microclimate at different points of the vault. Principal component analysis was applied to RH data recorded in 2007. The analysis was repeated with data collected in 2008 and 2010. The resulting loading plots revealed that the similarities and dissimilarities among sensors were approximately maintained along the three years. A physical interpretation was provided for the first and second principal components. Interestingly, sensors recording the highest RH values correspond to zones where humidity problems are causing formation of efflorescence. Recorded data of RH and temperature are discussed according to Italian Standard UNI 10829 (1999). PMID:22164100

  7. Two year soil moisture and temperature monitoring from two vegetation communities on olivine-basalt soils from Coppermine Peninsula, Maritime Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Carlos; Thomazini, André; Michel, Roberto; Francelino, Márcio; Pereira, Antônio; Schünemann, Adriano; Mendonça, Eduardo Sá

    2017-04-01

    Current climate change is greatly affecting terrestrial ecosystems of Maritime Antarctica, especially due the variations in soil temperature and moisture content. The vegetation species distribution in Maritime Antarctica is highly heterogeneous on the landscape, being governed mainly by water regime and soil characteristics. Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate soil temperature and moisture based on long-term in situ measurements from two well-developed vegetation communities in Coppermine Peninsula, Robert Island, Maritime Antarctica. The moss site (S1) is located in a marine terrace, highly influenced by ice/snow/permafrost melting (20 m a.s.l) not affected by permafrost. This site represents the most extensive moss carpet in Coppermine Peninsula, mainly constituted by Sanionia uncinata (Hedw.) Loeske, forming a dense carpet of 3-7 cm thickness. The moss/lichen site (S2) is located in an elevated area on basaltic ridge (29 m a.s.l.). The site has great influence of permafrost bellow the A horizon of the soil, at 50 cm depth. Vegetation species constitution is highly variable, with a significant occurrence of Polytrichastrum alpinum G.L. Smith. Musiccolas lichens populations of Psoroma cinnamomeum Malme, Ochrolechia frigida (Sw.). The monitoring systems consist of soil temperature probes (Campbell L107E thermocouple, accuracy of ± 0.2°C) and soil moisture probes (CS656 water content reflectometer, accuracy of ± 2.5%), placed in the active layer at 0-10 cm depths. Three probes were inserted at each site in triplicates, spaced at 2 m from each other. All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger, recording data at every 1 hour interval. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). This system recorded data of soil temperature and moisture from February 2014 to February 2016. A predominance of freezing conditions

  8. In-line monitoring of effluents from high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particle preparation processes by mass spectrometry. [UO/sub 2/; UC/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.A.; Constanzo, D.A.; Stinton, D.P.; Carpenter, J.A. Jr.; Rainey, W.T.; Canada, D.C.; Carter, J.A.

    1977-06-01

    The carbonization, conversion, and coating processes in the manufacture of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particles have been studied with the use of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Noncondensable effluents from these fluidized-bed processes have been monitored continuously from the beginning to the end of the process. The processes monitored are these: uranium-loaded ion exchange resin carbonization, the carbothermic reduction of UO/sub 2/ to UC/sub 2/, buffer and low-temperature isotropic pyrocarbon coatings of fuel kernels, SiC coating of the kernels, and high-temperature particle annealing. Changes in concentrations of significant molecules with time and temperature have been useful in the interpretation of reaction mechanisms and optimization of process procedures.

  9. Evidences of volcanic unrest on high-temperature fumaroles by satellite thermal monitoring: The case of Santa Ana volcano, El Salvador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiolo, M.; Coppola, D.; Barahona, F.; Benítez, J. E.; Cigolini, C.; Escobar, D.; Funes, R.; Gutierrez, E.; Henriquez, B.; Hernandez, A.; Montalvo, F.; Olmos, R.; Ripepe, M.; Finizola, A.

    2017-06-01

    On October 1st, 2005, Santa Ana volcano (El Salvador) underwent a VEI 3 phreatomagmatic eruption after approximately one century of rest. Casualties and damages to some of the local infrastructures and surrounding plantations were followed by the evacuation of the nearby communities. The analysis of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) infrared data reveals that the main explosion was preceded by a one-year-long thermal unrest, associated to the development of a fumaroles field, located at the western rim of the summit crater lake. By combining space-based thermal flux and ground-based measurements (seismicity, sulfur emissions and lake temperatures), we suggest that the activity observed at Santa Ana between 2004 and 2005 was driven by the gradual intrusion of an undegassed magma body at a very shallow depth. Magma injection induced thermal anomalies associated with sustained degassing from the fumaroles field and promoted the interaction between the magmatic-hydrothermal system and the overlying water table. This process culminated into the VEI 3 phreatomagmatic eruption of October 2005 that strongly modified the shallow structure of the crater area. The subsequent three-years-long activity resulted from self-sealing of the fracture system and by the opening of a new fracture network directly connecting the deeper hydrothermal system with the crater lake. Our results show that satellite-based thermal data allow us to detect the expansion of the high-temperature fumarolic field. This may precede an explosive eruption and/or a lava dome extrusion. In particular, we show that thermal records can be analyzed with other geochemical (i.e. SO2 emissions) and geophysical (seismicity) data to track a shallow magmatic intrusion interacting with the surrounding hydrothermal system. This provides a remarkable support for volcano monitoring and eruption forecasting, particularly in remote areas where permanent ground data acquisition is hazardous, expensive

  10. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  11. Application of process analytical technology for monitoring freeze-drying of an amorphous protein formulation: use of complementary tools for real-time product temperature measurements and endpoint detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneid, Stefan C; Johnson, Robert E; Lewis, Lavinia M; Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT) and quality by design have gained importance in all areas of pharmaceutical development and manufacturing. One important method for monitoring of critical product attributes and process optimization in laboratory scale freeze-drying is manometric temperature measurement (MTM). A drawback of this innovative technology is that problems are encountered when processing high-concentrated amorphous materials, particularly protein formulations. In this study, a model solution of bovine serum albumin and sucrose was lyophilized at both conservative and aggressive primary drying conditions. Different temperature sensors were employed to monitor product temperatures. The residual moisture content at primary drying endpoints as indicated by temperature sensors and batch PAT methods was quantified from extracted sample vials. The data from temperature probes were then used to recalculate critical product parameters, and the results were compared with MTM data. The drying endpoints indicated by the temperature sensors were not suitable for endpoint indication, in contrast to the batch methods endpoints. The accuracy of MTM Pice data was found to be influenced by water reabsorption. Recalculation of Rp and Pice values based on data from temperature sensors and weighed vials was possible. Overall, extensive information about critical product parameters could be obtained using data from complementary PAT tools. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R; Harms, Craig A; Owens, David W

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA) to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58) of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male) had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007), nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL) size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented.

  13. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Braun McNeill

    Full Text Available Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD, including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting effects on hatchling sex ratios. However, given the inherent difficulty in studying sex ratios at this life stage, a more accurate assessment of changes in population sex ratios might be derived by evaluating the juvenile portion of foraging aggregations. We investigated the long-term trend in sex ratio of a juvenile loggerhead (Caretta caretta sea turtle population inhabiting Pamlico and Core Sounds, North Carolina, USA. We used plasma testosterone reference ranges measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA to assign sex for 959 turtles and confirmed sex assignment of a subset (N = 58 of the sampled turtles through laparoscopic examination of their gonads. Our results demonstrate that for this particular population of loggerheads, sex ratios (3Females:1Male had not significantly changed over a 10 year period (1998-2007, nor showed any significant difference among 5-cm straight carapace length (SCL size classes. Ultimately, these findings provide a basis for comparison with future sex ratios, and highlight the importance of establishing similar long-term studies monitoring secondary, rather than primary, sex ratios, so that needed mitigation measures to climate change impacts can be implemented.

  14. The application of two-step linear temperature program to thermal analysis for monitoring the lipid induction of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 in large scale cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bongmun; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2015-02-01

    Recently, microalgae was considered as a renewable energy for fuel production because its production is nonseasonal and may take place on nonarable land. Despite all of these advantages, microalgal oil production is significantly affected by environmental factors. Furthermore, the large variability remains an important problem in measurement of algae productivity and compositional analysis, especially, the total lipid content. Thus, there is considerable interest in accurate determination of total lipid content during the biotechnological process. For these reason, various high-throughput technologies were suggested for accurate measurement of total lipids contained in the microorganisms, especially oleaginous microalgae. In addition, more advanced technologies were employed to quantify the total lipids of the microalgae without a pretreatment. However, these methods are difficult to measure total lipid content in wet form microalgae obtained from large-scale production. In present study, the thermal analysis performed with two-step linear temeperature program was applied to measure heat evolved in temperature range from 310 to 351 °C of Nostoc sp. KNUA003 obtained from large-scale cultivation. And then, we examined the relationship between the heat evolved in 310-351 °C (HE) and total lipid content of the wet Nostoc cell cultivated in raceway. As a result, the linear relationship was determined between HE value and total lipid content of Nostoc sp. KNUA003. Particularly, there was a linear relationship of 98% between the HE value and the total lipid content of the tested microorganism. Based on this relationship, the total lipid content converted from the heat evolved of wet Nostoc sp. KNUA003 could be used for monitoring its lipid induction in large-scale cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago in 2013 (NCEI Accession 0161327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  16. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Pacific Remote Island Areas since 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  17. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across American Samoa in 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  18. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  19. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago since 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  20. Design and construction of a new temperature-controlled chamber for light and confocal microscopy under monitored conditions: biological application for plant samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, O; Lütz, C; Holzinger, A

    2007-02-01

    A new light microscope-temperature-controlled chamber (LM-TCC) has been constructed. The special feature of the light microscope-temperature-controlled chamber is the Peltier-element temperature control of a specimen holder for biological samples, with a volume capacity of 1 mL. This system has marked advantages when compared to other approaches for temperature-controlled microscopy. It works in a temperature range of -10 degrees C to +95 degrees C with an accuracy of +/-0.1 degrees C in the stationary phase. The light microscope-temperature-controlled chamber allows rapid temperature shift rates. A maximum heating rate of 12.9 degrees C min(-1) and a maximum cooling rate of 6.0 degrees C min(-1) are achieved with minimized overshoots (Ficaria verna exposed to 4500 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) in a standard microscopic preparation show a temperature increase (deltaT) of 18.0 degrees C, whereas in the light microscope-temperature-controlled chamber this is reduced to 4 degrees C. The kinetics of microscope-light induced deltaT are described and infrared thermography demonstrates the dissipation of the temperature. Chloroplasts of the cold adapted plant Ranunculus glacialis show the tendency to form stroma-filled protrusions in relation to the exposure temperature. The relative number of chloroplasts with protrusions is reduced at 5 degrees C when compared to 25 degrees C. This effect is reversible. The new light microscope-temperature-controlled chamber will be useful in a wide range of biological applications where a rapid change of temperature during microscopic observations is necessary or has to be avoided allowing a simulation of ecologically relevant temperature scenarios.

  1. Forest buffers soil temperature and postpones soil thaw as indicated by a three-year large-scale soil temperature monitoring in the forest-steppe ecotone in Inner Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guozheng; Liu, Hongyan; Anenkhonov, Oleg A.; Korolyuk, Andrey Yu.; Sandanov, Denis V.; Guo, Dali

    2013-05-01

    Increases in soil temperature affect both soil biotic process and the soil hydrological cycle in the mid and high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Using a three-year automatic record of soil temperature in paired forest and steppe plots along a temperature gradient from northern China to southern Siberia in Russia, collected from 2008-2011, we investigated how vegetation cover has impacted soil temperature at a regional scale, with focus on soil freezing/thawing timing. We found that there was a buffering effect of forests on soil temperature, as indicated by cooler soil temperatures in the warm season and warmer soil temperatures in the cold season. Forest soil thawed about 15 days later than steppe soil at the same site. At a regional scale, the onset date of soil freezing showed significant positive correlation with cold season soil temperature in both forest and steppe. The onset date of soil thawing was significantly negatively correlated with cold season mean daily soil temperature (DST) in the steppe, but showed no significant correlation in the forest. In terms of space-for-time-substitution, it could be implied that forest might face an increased likelihood of drought by impeding snowmelt infiltration, under the present warming trend in soil temperature.

  2. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...... in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn...

  3. Feasibility Study of Using High-Temperature Raman Spectroscopy for On-Line Monitoring and Product Control of the Glass Vitrification Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Piepel, G.F.; Li, H.; Elliott, M.L.; Su, Y.

    1999-01-04

    A pulse-gating Raman spectroscopy setup was developed in this project. The setup was capable of performing in-situ high-temperature Raman measurements for glasses at temperatures as high as 1412 C. In the literature, high-temperature Raman measurements have only been performed on thin films of glass to minimize black-body radiation effects. The pulse-gating Raman setup allows making high-temperature measurements for bulk melts while effectively minimizing black-body radiation effects. A good correlation was found between certain Raman characteristic parameters and glass melt temperature for sodium silicate glasses measured in this project. Comparisons were made between the high-temperature Raman data from this study and literature data. The results suggest that an optimization of the pulse-gating Raman setup is necessary to further improve data quality (i.e., to obtain data with a higher signal-to-noise ratio). An W confocal Raman microspectrometer with continuous wave laser excitation using a 325 nm excitation line was evaluated selectively using a transparent silicate glass ad a deep-colored high-level waste glass in a bulk quantity. The data were successfully collected at temperatures as high as approximately 1500 C. The results demonstrated that the UV excitation line can be used for high-temperature Raman measurements of molten glasses without black-body radiation interference from the melt for both transparent and deep-color glasses. Further studies are needed to select the best laser system that can be used to develop high-temperature Raman glass databases.

  4. Junction temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters and their application to condition monitoring and active thermal control of power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Liserre, Marco; Dupont, L.

    2013-01-01

    implementation of active thermal control to reduce losses and increase lifetime can be performed given an accurate knowledge of temperature. Temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP) are one way to carry out immediate temperature readings on fully packaged devices. However......, successful implementation of these techniques during the actual operation of a device has not yet been achieved. This paper provides an overview of literature where the usage of TSEPs has been hypothesised or realised in realistic power electronic converter setups. Barriers and limitations preventing wider...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-04-20 (NODC Accession 7601066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 20 April 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-08-17 (NODC Accession 7700691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 17 August 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-06-14 (NODC Accession 7700521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 14 June 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-10-19 (NODC Accession 7700137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 19 October 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-03-25 (NODC Accession 7600884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the BLUENOSE from 25 March 1976. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  10. The ability to use the results of satellite monitoring of temperature conditions in the main spawning ground of the Northeast Arctic cod to assess the abundance of its generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanyushin, George; Bulatova, Tatyana

    2017-04-01

    The paper presents the results of the assessment of the possible influence of such temperature conditions, as the sea surface temperature (SST) and its anomalies in the Northeast Arctic cod's (Gadus morhua) main spawning grounds in the Norwegian Sea (area adjacent to the Lofoten Islands), on the formation of its generations' productivity at age 3+. Data about the temperature during the main cod spawning (March-April) were obtained from the analysis of daily output of infrared satellite imagery from weather satellites of the NOAA series. The results of a comparative analysis between the number of cod generations at age 3+ in 2001-2015 (ICES data) and the actual temperature conditions that were observed in the previous period in its main spawning grounds in 1998-2012 are present. It was revealed that in these years rich and average (close in numbers to rich) generations of cod at age 3+ appeared when anomalies of SST in the area adjacent to the Lofoten Islands ranged from -0.1 ÷ 0°C to +1,3 ÷ +1,4°C during cod's spawning period. Average (close in number to poor) and poor generation of cod at age 3+ appeared at lower and higher values of SST's anomalies. Thus, satellite monitoring of anomalies in SST in the Northeast Arctic cod's main spawning grounds provides additional prognostic information resource when evaluating the number of future estimate of future cod's generation at age 3+. Keywords: the Northeast Arctic cod, main spawning ground, satellite monitoring, sea surface temperature (SST), forecasting, the abundance of new cod generations at age 3+.

  11. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lijun, E-mail: lijunxu@buaa.edu.cn; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang [School of Instrument Science and Opto-Electronic Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory of Precision Opto-Mechatronics Technology, Beijing 100191 (China); Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2016-01-15

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm{sup −1} (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm{sup −1} (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  12. The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program : Variation (Status and Trend) of Stream Water Temperature within th Entiat River Subbasin : January 2008 - October 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Pierre

    2008-01-29

    The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP - BPA project No.2003-017-00) has been created as a cost effective means of developing protocols and new technologies, novel indicators, sample designs, analytical, data management and communication tools and skills, and restoration experiments that support the development of a region-wide Research, Monitoring and Evaluation (RME) program to assess the status of anadromous salmonid populations, their tributary habitat and restoration and management actions. The most straightforward approach to developing a regional-scale monitoring and evaluation program would be to increase standardization among status and trend monitoring programs. However, the diversity of species and their habitat, as well as the overwhelming uncertainty surrounding indicators, metrics, and data interpretation methods, requires the testing of multiple approaches. Thus, the approach ISEMP has adopted is to develop a broad template that may differ in the details among subbasins, but one that will ultimately lead to the formation of a unified RME process for the management of anadromous salmonid populations and habitat across the Columbia River Basin. ISEMP has been initiated in three pilot subbasins, the Wenatchee/Entiat, John Day, and Salmon. To balance replicating experimental approaches with the goal of developing monitoring and evaluation tools that apply as broadly as possible across the Pacific Northwest, these subbasins were chosen as representative of a wide range of potential challenges and conditions, e.g., differing fish species composition and life histories, ecoregions, institutional settings, and existing data. ISEMP has constructed a framework that builds on current status and trend monitoring infrastructures in these pilot subbasins, but challenges current programs by testing alternative monitoring approaches. In addition, the ISEMP is: (1) Collecting information over a hierarchy of spatial scales, allowing for a

  13. The automated infrared thermal imaging system for the continuous long-term monitoring of the surface temperature of the Vesuvius crater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Sansivero

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Infrared remote sensing monitoring is a significant tool aimed to integrated surveillance system of active volcanic areas. In this paper we describe the realization and the technological evolution of the permanent image thermal infrared (TIR surveillance system of the Vesuvius volcano. The TIR monitoring station was installed on the Vesuvius crater rim on July 2004 in order to acquire scenes of the SW inner slope of Vesuvius crater that is characterized by a significant thermal emission. At that time, it represented the first achievement all over the world of a permanent surveillance thermal imaging system on a volcano. It has been working in its prototypal configuration till May 2007. The experience gained over years about the engineering, management and maintenance of TIR remote acquisition systems in extreme environmental conditions, allows us to design and realize a new release of the TIR monitoring station with improved functionalities and more flexibility for the IR image acquisition, management and storage, which became operational in June 2011. In order to characterize the thermal background of the Vesuvius crater at present state of volcanic quiescence, the time series of TIR images gathered between July 2004 and May 2012 were analyzed using a statistical approach. Results show no significant changes in the thermal radiation during the observation periods, so they can be assumed as representative of a background level to which refer for the interpretation of possible future anomalies related to a renewal of the volcanic dynamics of the Vesuvius volcano.

  14. A Flexible Three-in-One Microsensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Internal Temperature, Voltage and Current of Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yuan Lee

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lithium batteries are widely used in notebook computers, mobile phones, 3C electronic products, and electric vehicles. However, under a high charge/discharge rate, the internal temperature of lithium battery may rise sharply, thus causing safety problems. On the other hand, when the lithium battery is overcharged, the voltage and current may be affected, resulting in battery instability. This study applies the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS technology on a flexible substrate, and develops a flexible three-in-one microsensor that can withstand the internal harsh environment of a lithium battery and instantly measure the internal temperature, voltage and current of the battery. Then, the internal information can be fed back to the outside in advance for the purpose of safety management without damaging the lithium battery structure. The proposed flexible three-in-one microsensor should prove helpful for the improvement of lithium battery design or material development in the future.

  15. Female-Bias in a Long-Term Study of a Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination: Monitoring Sex Ratios for Climate Change Research

    OpenAIRE

    Braun McNeill, Joanne; Avens, Larisa; Goodman Hall, April; Goshe, Lisa R.; Harms, Craig A.; Owens, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations have occurred and continue to manifest in the Earth's biota as a result of climate change. Animals exhibiting temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), including sea turtles, are perhaps most vulnerable to a warming of the Earth as highly skewed sex ratios can result, potentially leading to population extinction resulting from decreased male recruitment. Recent studies have begun to quantify climate change impacts to sea turtle populations, especially in terms of predicting e...

  16. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C.; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2–3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future. PMID:27486664

  17. Detection and Characterization of Low Temperature Peat Fires during the 2015 Fire Catastrophe in Indonesia Using a New High-Sensitivity Fire Monitoring Satellite Sensor (FireBird).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Elizabeth C; Englhart, Sandra; Lorenz, Eckehard; Halle, Winfried; Wiedemann, Werner; Siegert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Vast and disastrous fires occurred on Borneo during the 2015 dry season, pushing Indonesia into the top five carbon emitting countries. The region was affected by a very strong El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate phenomenon, on par with the last severe event in 1997/98. Fire dynamics in Central Kalimantan were investigated using an innovative sensor offering higher sensitivity to a wider range of fire intensities at a finer spatial resolution (160 m) than heretofore available. The sensor is onboard the TET-1 satellite, part of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) FireBird mission. TET-1 images (acquired every 2-3 days) from the middle infrared were used to detect fires continuously burning for almost three weeks in the protected peatlands of Sebangau National Park as well as surrounding areas with active logging and oil palm concessions. TET-1 detection capabilities were compared with MODIS active fire detection and Landsat burned area algorithms. Fire dynamics, including fire front propagation speed and area burned, were investigated. We show that TET-1 has improved detection capabilities over MODIS in monitoring low-intensity peatland fire fronts through thick smoke and haze. Analysis of fire dynamics revealed that the largest burned areas resulted from fire front lines started from multiple locations, and the highest propagation speeds were in excess of 500 m/day (all over peat > 2m deep). Fires were found to occur most often in concessions that contained drainage infrastructure but were not cleared prior to the fire season. Benefits of implementing this sensor system to improve current fire management techniques are discussed. Near real-time fire detection together with enhanced fire behavior monitoring capabilities would not only improve firefighting efforts, but also benefit analysis of fire impact on tropical peatlands, greenhouse gas emission estimations as well as mitigation measures to reduce severe fire events in the future.

  18. Long-Term Vibration Monitoring of the Effects of Temperature and Humidity on PC Girders with and without Fly Ash considering ASR Deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Minh Ha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural responses have been used as inputs in the evaluation procedures of civil structures for years. Apart from the degradation of a structure itself, changes in the environmental conditions affect its characteristics. For adequate maintenance, it is necessary to quantify the environment-induced changes and discriminate them from the effects due to damage. This study investigates the variation in the vibration responses of prestressed concrete (PC girders, which were deteriorated because of the alkali–silica reaction (ASR, concerning ambient temperature and humidity. Three PC girders were exposed to outdoor weather conditions outside the laboratory, one of which had a selected amount of fly ash in its mixture to mitigate the ASR. The girders were periodically vibration tested for one and a half years. It was found that when the temperature and humidity increased, the frequencies and damping ratios decreased in proportion. No apparent variation in the mode shapes could be identified. A finite element model was proposed for numerical verification, the results of which were in good agreement with the measured changes in the natural frequencies. Moreover, the different dynamic performances of the three specimens indicated that the fly ash significantly affected the vibrations of the PC girders under ASR deterioration.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROCONTROLLED TEMPERATURE MONITORING SYSTEM AND EVALUATION OF THE SENSOR ELEMENT IMPLANT IN BOVINES DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UM SISTEMA MICROCONTROLADO DE MONITORAÇÃO DA TEMPERATURA E AVALIAÇÃO DO IMPLANTE DO ELEMENTO SENSOR DIGITAL EM BOVINOS

    OpenAIRE

    Ernane José Xavier Costa; Evaldo Antonio Lencioni Titto; Fernando José Schalch; Ana Carolina de Sousa Silva; Aldo Ivan Céspedes Arce

    2007-01-01

    this paper presents a complete system for tempe-rature monitoring. the system was developed to speed up bovine behavior studies under temperature exposure. the equipment uses digital technology with custom setup ca-pability by means of computer program and the sensor can be implanted in to animal. results obtained show that the developed system is able to monitor bovine temperatures with a sample rate of five minutes during 30 days with accuracy of 0.0625 oc.

    KEY-WO...

  20. Marine sediments monitoring studies for trace elements with the application of fast temperature programs and solid sampling high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orani, Anna Maria; Han, Eunmi; Mandjukov, Petko; Vassileva, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    , such as straightforward calibration, a high sample throughput, sufficient precision, suitable limits of detection, appropriate for monitoring studies concentration range and reduced risk of analyte loss and contamination. This approach allows comparatively simple and reliable evaluation of uncertainty of the results and the basic validation parameters and in a natural way provides traceability of the obtained results. A comparison between the proposed fast programs with solid standard calibration and the conventional ones with liquid standard calibration demonstrates advantages of the new methodology. It provides faster, accurate and unbiased results typically with significantly lower uncertainties. The potential of the HR CS AAS technique is demonstrated by direct analysis of marine sediments form the Caribbean region and various sediment CRMs within the frame of monitoring program for this region.

  1. Structural characterization of porous solids by simultaneously monitoring the low-temperature phase equilibria and diffusion of intrapore fluids using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondrashova, Daria; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Valiullin, Rustem, E-mail: valiullin@uni-leipzig.de [Institute of Experimental Physics I, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provides a variety of tools for the structural characterization of porous solids. In this paper, we discuss a relatively novel approach called NMR cryodiffusometry, which is based on a simultaneous assessment of both the phase state of intraporous liquids at low temperatures, using NMR cryoporometry, and their transport properties, using NMR diffusometry. Choosing two model porous materials with ordered and disordered pore structures as the host systems, we discuss the methodological and fundamental aspects of the method. Thus, with the use of an intentionally micro-structured mesoporous silicon, we demonstrate how its structural features give rise to specific patterns in the effective molecular diffusivities measured upon progressive melting of a frozen liquid in the mesopores. We then present the results of a detailed study of the transport properties of the same liquid during both melting and freezing processes in Vycor porous glass, a material with a random pore structure.

  2. [Research on using a mono-window algorithm for land surface temperature retrieval from Chinese satellite for environment and natural disaster monitoring (HJ-1B) data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shao-Hua; Qin, Qi-Ming; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Qiao; Yao, Yun-Jun; You, Lin; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Cui, Rong-Bo; Yao, Yian-Juan

    2011-06-01

    Land surface temperature(LST) is a key parameter in earth environment, the thermal infrared band that can detect LST plays an important role in spectroscopy. Aiming to the latest optical and thermal bands of HJ-1B satellite, the LST retrieval over Ningxia plain was implemented using a mono-window algorithm without atmospheric water vapor content input, based on the COST model for atmospheric correction. Considering the difficulty of obtaining simultaneous ground measured data, the MODIS LST product was adopted as a standard to test the approach. The comparison and validation indicate that this method has good reliability with accuracy of less than 1 K. In addition, the sensitivity analysis is performed for land surface emissivity, and the result shows that this variable was not sensitive to LST, because the LST error is less than 0. 5 K when it varies at me dium level. This study proves that the satellite data has higher availability for detecting LST.

  3. Chapter 6: Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  4. Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and temperature data to generate time-activity classifications for estimating personal exposure in air monitoring studies: an automated method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethery, Elizabeth; Mallach, Gary; Rainham, Daniel; Goldberg, Mark S; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2014-05-08

    Personal exposure studies of air pollution generally use self-reported diaries to capture individuals' time-activity data. Enhancements in the accuracy, size, memory and battery life of personal Global Positioning Systems (GPS) units have allowed for higher resolution tracking of study participants' locations. Improved time-activity classifications combined with personal continuous air pollution sampling can improve assessments of location-related air pollution exposures for health studies. Data was collected using a GPS and personal temperature from 54 children with asthma living in Montreal, Canada, who participated in a 10-day personal air pollution exposure study. A method was developed that incorporated personal temperature data and then matched a participant's position against available spatial data (i.e., road networks) to generate time-activity categories. The diary-based and GPS-generated time-activity categories were compared and combined with continuous personal PM2.5 data to assess the impact of exposure misclassification when using diary-based methods. There was good agreement between the automated method and the diary method; however, the automated method (means: outdoors = 5.1%, indoors other =9.8%) estimated less time spent in some locations compared to the diary method (outdoors = 6.7%, indoors other = 14.4%). Agreement statistics (AC1 = 0.778) suggest 'good' agreement between methods over all location categories. However, location categories (Outdoors and Transit) where less time is spent show greater disagreement: e.g., mean time "Indoors Other" using the time-activity diary was 14.4% compared to 9.8% using the automated method. While mean daily time "In Transit" was relatively consistent between the methods, the mean daily exposure to PM2.5 while "In Transit" was 15.9 μg/m3 using the automated method compared to 6.8 μg/m3 using the daily diary. Mean times spent in different locations as categorized by a GPS-based method were

  5. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, James E.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  6. Measurement of polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients for semivolatile organic compounds as a function of temperature: Application to passive air sampler monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Paula; Harner, Tom; Eng, Anita

    2017-05-01

    Polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients (KPUF-air) for 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 10 alkyl-substituted PAHs, 4 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and dibenzothiophene were measured as a function of temperature over the range 5 °C-35 °C, using a generator column approach. Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔHPUF-air, kJ/mol) were determined from the slopes of log KPUF-air versus 1000/T (K), and have an average value of 81.2 ± 7.03 kJ/mol. The log KPUF-air values at 22 °C ranged from 4.99 to 7.25. A relationship for log KPUF-air versus log KOA was shown to agree with a previous relationship based on only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and derived from long-term indoor uptake study experiments. The results also confirm that the existing KOA-based model for predicting log KPUF-air values is accurate. This new information is important in the derivation of uptake profiles and effective air sampling volumes for PUF disk samplers so that results can be reported in units of concentration in air. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emerging Threats for Human Health in Poland: Pathogenic Isolates from Drug Resistant Acanthamoeba Keratitis Monitored in terms of Their In Vitro Dynamics and Temperature Adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Chomicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphizoic amoebae generate a serious human health threat due to their pathogenic potential as facultative parasites, causative agents of vision-threatening Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK. Recently, AK incidences have been reported with increasing frequency worldwide, particularly in contact lens wearers. In our study, severe cases of AK in Poland and respective pathogenic isolates were assessed at clinical, morphological, and molecular levels. Misdiagnoses and the unsuccessful treatment in other ophthalmic units delayed suitable therapy, and resistance to applied chemicals resulted in severe courses and treatment difficulties. Molecular assessment indicated that all sequenced pathogenic corneal isolates deriving from Polish patients with AK examined by us showed 98–100% homology with Acanthamoeba genotype T4, the most prevalent genotype in this human ocular infection worldwide. In vitro assays revealed that the pathogenic strains are able to grow at elevated temperature and have a wide adaptive capability. This study is our subsequent in vitro investigation on pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains of AK originating from Polish patients. Further investigations designed to foster a better understanding of the factors leading to an increase of AK observed in the past years in Poland may help to prevent or at least better cope with future cases.

  8. Development of models and online diagnostic monitors of the high-temperature corrosion of refractories in oxy/fuel glass furnaces : final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Gupta, Amul (Monofrax Inc., Falconer, NY); Walsh, Peter M.; Rice, Steven F.; Velez, Mariano (University of Missouri, Rolla, MO); Allendorf, Mark D.; Pecoraro, George A. (PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA); Nilson, Robert H.; Wolfe, H. Edward (ANH Refractories, Pittsburgh, PA); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Bugeat, Benjamin () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Spear, Karl E. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Marin, Ovidiu () American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL); Ghani, M. Usman (American Air Liquide, Countryside, IL)

    2005-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a five-year effort to understand the mechanisms and develop models that predict the corrosion of refractories in oxygen-fuel glass-melting furnaces. Thermodynamic data for the Si-O-(Na or K) and Al-O-(Na or K) systems are reported, allowing equilibrium calculations to be performed to evaluate corrosion of silica- and alumina-based refractories under typical furnace operating conditions. A detailed analysis of processes contributing to corrosion is also presented. Using this analysis, a model of the corrosion process was developed and used to predict corrosion rates in an actual industrial glass furnace. The rate-limiting process is most likely the transport of NaOH(gas) through the mass-transport boundary layer from the furnace atmosphere to the crown surface. Corrosion rates predicted on this basis are in better agreement with observation than those produced by any other mechanism, although the absolute values are highly sensitive to the crown temperature and the NaOH(gas) concentration at equilibrium and at the edge of the boundary layer. Finally, the project explored the development of excimer laser induced fragmentation (ELIF) fluorescence spectroscopy for the detection of gas-phase alkali hydroxides (e.g., NaOH) that are predicted to be the key species causing accelerated corrosion in these furnaces. The development of ELIF and the construction of field-portable instrumentation for glass furnace applications are reported and the method is shown to be effective in industrial settings.

  9. High temperature measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  10. The use of 16S rRNA gene metagenetic monitoring of refrigerated food products for understanding the kinetics of microbial subpopulations at different storage temperatures: the example of white pudding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchie, Emilie; Gand, Mathieu; Kergourlay, Gilles; Taminiau, Bernard; Delhalle, Laurent; Korsak, Nicolas; Daube, Georges

    2017-04-17

    In order to control food losses and wastage, monitoring the microbial diversity of food products, during processing and storage is important, as studies have highlighted the metabolic activities of some microorganisms which can lead to spoilage. Knowledge of this diversity can be greatly improved by using a metagenetic approach based on high throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which enables a much higher resolution than culture-based methods. Moreover, the Jameson effect, a phenomenon described by Jameson in 1962, is often used to classify bacterial strains within an ecosystem. According to this, we have studied the bacterial microbiota of Belgian white pudding during storage at different temperatures using culture-dependent and independent methods. The product was inoculated with a mix of dominant strains previously isolated from this foodstuff at the end of its shelf life (Carnobacterium maltaromaticum, Lactobacillus fuchuensis, Lactobacillus graminis, Lactobacillus oligofermentans, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Raoultella terrigena and Serratia sp.). Daily during 16days, the absolute abundance of inoculated strain was monitored by combining total count on plate agar and metagenetic analysis. The results were confirmed by qPCR analysis. The growth of each species was modelled for each temperature conditions, representative of good or bad storage practices. These data allowed the bacterial strains subdivision into three classes based on criteria of growth parameters for the studied temperature: the "dominant", the "subdominant" and the "inhibited" bacterial species, according to their maximal concentration (Nmax, log CFU/g), growth rate (μmax, 1/h) and time to reach the stationary phase (TRSP, days). Thereby, depending on the storage conditions, these data have permitted to follow intrinsically the evolution of each strain on the bacterial ecosystem of Belgian white pudding. Interestingly, it has shown that the reliability of the Jameson effect

  11. Battery system with temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  12. Noninvasive Measurement of Core Temperature. Phase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topical Testing proposes the development of a noninvasive device to monitor core temperature by sampling the maximal temperature of the respiratory...air during expiration. Phase I development used a fast rise-time thermocouple to monitor the temperature of the expired air of an anesthetized animal

  13. Microminiature thermocouple monitors own installation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, A. J.; Sellers, J. P., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Microminiature thermocouple makes precision gas sidewall temperature readings inside large thrust chambers. It is installed by a technique whereby the sensor monitors its own installation to insure against thermal damage to the thermocouple and ensure minimum disturbance to chamber surfaces.

  14. Models for power transformers monitoring in the intelligent electrical network: humidity and temperature of bubble generation; Modelos para el monitoreo de transformadores de potencia en la red electrica inteligente: humedad y temperatura de generacion de burbujas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linan Garcia, Roberto; Ponce Noyola, David; Guzman Lopez, Arali [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Betancourt Ramirez, Enrique; Tamez Torres, Gerardo [PROLEC GE, (Mexico)

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the development of two experimental models in order to ensure reliable operation of power transformers under emergency overload conditions. The first model estimates the moisture distribution in the transformer windings, while the second model estimates the safe operating temperature and time before steam bubbles generation presents. Additionally, an electronic device was designed and built, using the models developed, in order to monitor in real time both parameters. This device allows a more reliable operation of the transmission network, considering the transformers condition. [Spanish] Este documento presenta el desarrollo de dos modelos experimentales para asegurar la operacion confiable de transformadores de potencia bajo condiciones de sobrecarga de emergencia. El primer modelo estima la temperatura de operacion segura y el tiempo antes de que ocurra la generacion de burbujas de vapor. Ademas, se diseno y construyo un dispositivo electronico, usando los modelos desarrollados, con el fin de monitorear en tiempo real ambos parametros. Este dispositivo permite una operacion mas confiable de la red de transmision, considerando la condicion de los transformadores.

  15. Lunar Health Monitor (LHM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisy, Frederick J.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., has developed a low-profile, wearable sensor suite for monitoring astronaut health in both intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The Lunar Health Monitor measures respiration, body temperature, electrocardiogram (EKG) heart rate, and other cardiac functions. Orbital Research's dry recording electrode is central to the innovation and can be incorporated into garments, eliminating the need for conductive pastes, adhesives, or gels. The patented dry recording electrode has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The LHM is easily worn under flight gear or with civilian clothing, making the system completely versatile for applications where continuous physiological monitoring is needed. During Phase II, Orbital Research developed a second-generation LHM that allows sensor customization for specific monitoring applications and anatomical constraints. Evaluations included graded exercise tests, lunar mission task simulations, functional battery tests, and resting measures. The LHM represents the successful integration of sensors into a wearable platform to capture long-duration and ambulatory physiological markers.

  16. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  17. Monitoring of Underground Coal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagoner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramirez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-08-31

    For efficient and responsible UCG operations, a UCG process must be monitored in the following three categories: 1) process parameters such as injection and product gas flow rates, temperature, pressure and syngas content and heating value; 2) geomechanical parameters, e.g., cavity and coal seam pressures, cavity development, subsidence and ground deformation; and 3) environmental parameters, e.g., groundwater chemistry and air quality. This report focuses on UCG monitoring with geophysical techniques that can contribute to monitoring of subsurface temperature, cavity development, burn front, subsidence and deformation.

  18. Measuring body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Louise; Higgins, Dan

    Body temperature is one of the four main vital signs that must be monitored to ensure safe and effective care. Temperature measurement is recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence a part of the initial assessment in acute illness in adults (NICE, 2007) and by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines for post-operative management in adults (SIGN, 2004). Despite applying in all healthcare environments, wide variations exist on the methods and techniques used to measure body temperature. It is essential to use the most appropriate technique to ensure that temperature is measured accurately. Inaccurate results may influence diagnosis and treatment, lead to a failure to identify patient deterioration and compromise patient safety. This article explains the importance of temperature regulation and compares methods of its measurement.

  19. Mobility Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schæbel, Anne-Lise; Dybbro, Karina Løvendahl; Andersen, Lisbeth Støvring

    2015-01-01

    Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby......Undersøgelse af digital monitorering af plejehjemsbeboeres vendinger under søvn på Fremtidens Plejehjem, Nørresundby...

  20. Manage habitat, monitor species [Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael K. Schwartz; Jamie S. Sanderlin; William M. Block

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring is the collection of data over time. We monitor many things: temperatures at local weather stations, daily changes in sea level along the coastline, annual prevalence of specific diseases, sunspot cycles, unemployment rates, inflation, commodity futures-the list is virtually endless. In wildlife biology, we also conduct a lot of monitoring, most commonly...

  1. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Hawaiian Archipelago from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-27 (NCEI Accession 0161171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  2. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Shallow Water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) Profiles for selected locations across the Mariana Archipelago from 2014-03-24 to 2014-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0161168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Near-shore shallow water Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) surveys provided vertical profiles of temperature, salinity, and turbidity providing indications for...

  3. Recombination monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-02-03

    This is a brief report on LEReC recombination monitor design considerations. The recombination produced Au78+ ion rate is reviewed. Based on this two designs are discussed. One is to use the large dispersion lattice. It is shown that even with the large separation of the Au78+ beam from the Au79+ beam, the continued monitoring of the recombination is not possible. Accumulation of Au78+ ions is needed, plus collimation of the Au79+ beam. In another design, it is shown that the recombination monitor can be built based on the proposed scheme with the nominal lattice. From machine operation point of view, this design is preferable. Finally, possible studies and the alternative strategies with the basic goal of the monitor are discussed.

  4. Monitoring Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    This book is useful for Hadoop administrators who need to learn how to monitor and diagnose their clusters. Also, the book will prove useful for new users of the technology, as the language used is simple and easy to grasp.

  5. OSS-1/contamination monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, R.; Triolo, J.; McIntosh, R.

    1983-02-01

    A 20-cm high, 18-cm wide, and 30-cm long (8x7x12 inch) box weighing about 7 kg (15 lbs) and consuming about 7 watts of power was carried on the OSS-1 pallet to monitor the mass build-up or accretion of condensible, volatile materials on surfaces in the shuttle bay during all phases of ascent, on-orbit, and descent. Passively thermally controlled, the box holds two witness samples and four actively temperature controlled quartz crystal microbalances (TQCM) whose temperature can vary from -60 C to +80 C. Graphs show the accretion indicated by the TQCM during the launch and early orbital phase. Conditions during tail to the Sun, nose to the Sun, and bay to the Sun attitudes of the shuttle during STS-3 are reflected in temperatures indicated by the OSS-1 thermistor. These temperatures influence outgassing rates of various materials as well as measurements made by the contamination monitor package. The parameters that bear on TQCM measurements data are shown in graphs and discussed.

  6. Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an oral temperature. Other factors to take into account are: In general, rectal temperatures are considered to ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  7. Monitoring and thermal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Rainer

    2003-12-01

    Anaesthesia alters normal thermoregulatory control of the body, usually leading to perioperative hypothermia. Hypothermia is associated with a large number of serious complications. To assess perianaesthetic hypothermia, core temperature should be monitored vigorously. Pulmonary artery, tympanic membrane, distal oesophageal or nasopharyngeal temperatures reflect core temperature reliably. Core temperatures can be often estimated with reasonable accuracy using oral, axillary and bladder temperatures, except during extreme thermal perturbations. The body site for measurements should be chosen according to the surgical procedure. Unless hypothermia is specifically indicated, efforts should be made to maintain intraoperative core temperatures above 36 degrees C. Forced air is the most effective, commonly available, non-invasive warming method. Resistive heating electrical blankets and circulating water garment systems are an equally effective alternative. Intravenous fluid warming is also helpful when large volumes are required. In some patients, induction of mild therapeutic hypothermia may become an issue for the future. Recent studies indicate that patients suffering from neurological disease may profit from rapid core cooling.

  8. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, Aart; Robinson, James C. R.; Leijnse, Hidde; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Horn, Berthold K. P.; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2014-05-01

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on human health. However, the availability of temperature observations in cities is often limited. Here we show that relatively accurate air temperature information for the urban canopy layer can be obtained from an alternative, nowadays omnipresent source: smartphones. In this study, battery temperatures were collected by an Android application for smartphones. It has been shown that a straightforward heat transfer model can be employed to estimate daily mean air temperatures from smartphone battery temperatures for eight major cities around the world. The results demonstrate the enormous potential of this crowdsourcing application for real-time temperature monitoring in densely populated areas. Battery temperature data were collected by users of an Android application for cell phones (opensignal.com). The application automatically sends battery temperature data to a server for storage. In this study, battery temperatures are averaged in space and time to obtain daily averaged battery temperatures for each city separately. A regression model, which can be related to a physical model, is employed to retrieve daily air temperatures from battery temperatures. The model is calibrated with observed air temperatures from a meteorological station of an airport located in or near the city. Time series of air temperatures are obtained for each city for a period of several months, where 50% of the data is for independent verification. The methodology has been applied to Buenos Aires, London, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, Moscow, Rome, and Sao Paulo. The evolution of the retrieved air temperatures often correspond well with the observed ones. The mean absolute error of daily air temperatures is less than 2 degrees Celsius, and the bias is within 1 degree

  9. Temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen measurements collected using CTD, bottle from multiple platforms in the Gulf of Mexico from 1992 through 2008 as part of the Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) (NODC Accession 0069702)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program (SEAMAP) is a State/Federal/university program for collection, management and dissemination of...

  10. Temperature, salinity, radioisotopes, sediments, and other data from Phase II Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Monitoring Program in the Santa Maria Basin, California from 21 Oct 1986 to 08 Mar 1987 (NODC Accession 8900198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are part of the data collected for the California Phase II OCS Monitoring Program of the Santa Maria Basin by Dr. Hyland from Battelle Ocean Science and...

  11. Corrosion Monitors for Embedded Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Casias, Adrian L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorensen, Neil R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We have developed and characterized novel in-situ corrosion sensors to monitor and quantify the corrosive potential and history of localized environments. Embedded corrosion sensors can provide information to aid health assessments of internal electrical components including connectors, microelectronics, wires, and other susceptible parts. When combined with other data (e.g. temperature and humidity), theory, and computational simulation, the reliability of monitored systems can be predicted with higher fidelity.

  12. Design and Development of Patient Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazwanie Azizulkarim, Azra; Jamil, Muhammad Mahadi Abdul; Ambar, Radzi

    2017-08-01

    Patient monitoring system allows continuous monitoring of patient vital signs, support decision making among medical personnel and help enhance patient care. This system can consist of devices that measure, display and record human’s vital signs, including body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure and other health-related criteria. This paper proposes a system to monitor the patient’s conditions by monitoring the body temperature and pulse rate. The system consists of a pulse rate monitoring software and a wearable device that can measure a subject’s temperature and pulse rate only by using a fingertip. The device is able to record the measurement data and interface to PC via Arduino microcontroller. The recorded data can be viewed as a historical file or can be archived for further analysis. This work also describes the preliminary experimental results of the selected sensors to show the usefulness of the sensors for the proposed patient monitoring system.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A MICROCONTROLLED TEMPERATURE MONITORING SYSTEM AND EVALUATION OF THE SENSOR ELEMENT IMPLANT IN BOVINES DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UM SISTEMA MICROCONTROLADO DE MONITORAÇÃO DA TEMPERATURA E AVALIAÇÃO DO IMPLANTE DO ELEMENTO SENSOR DIGITAL EM BOVINOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernane José Xavier Costa

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    this paper presents a complete system for tempe-rature monitoring. the system was developed to speed up bovine behavior studies under temperature exposure. the equipment uses digital technology with custom setup ca-pability by means of computer program and the sensor can be implanted in to animal. results obtained show that the developed system is able to monitor bovine temperatures with a sample rate of five minutes during 30 days with accuracy of 0.0625 oc.

    KEY-WORDS: Heat stress sensors, optical, temperature, transceptor.

    um sistema completo de instrumentação para monitoração de temperatura é apresentado neste artigo. o sistema foi desenvolvido para auxiliar estudo de estresse térmico em bovinos. neste equipamento, o elemento sensor pode ser implantado no animal. o equipamento consiste de tecnologia digital e óptica com capacidade de configuração através de programa de computador. os resultados obtidos mostram que o sistema desenvolvido é capaz de monitorar a temperatura de bovinos a cada cinco minutos durante trinta dias com resolução de 0.0625 oc.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: estresse térmico sensores, óptico, temperatura, transceptor.  

  14. Monitoring Leverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geanakoplos, John; Heje Pedersen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    We argue that leverage is a central element of economic cycles and discuss how leverage can be properly monitored. While traditionally the interest rate has been regarded as the single key feature of a loan, we contend that the size of the loan, i.e., the leverage, is in fact a more important...... measure of systemic risk. Indeed, systemic crises tend to erupt when highly leveraged economic agents are forced to deleverage, sending the economy into recession. We emphasize the importance of measuring both the average leverage on old loans (which captures the economy's vulnerability) and the leverage...... and monitored....

  15. Monitoring in the Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Kipnis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In critical care, the monitoring is essential to the daily care of ICU patients, as the optimization of patient’s hemodynamic, ventilation, temperature, nutrition, and metabolism is the key to improve patients' survival. Indeed, the decisive endpoint is the supply of oxygen to tissues according to their metabolic needs in order to fuel mitochondrial respiration and, therefore, life. In this sense, both oxygenation and perfusion must be monitored in the implementation of any resuscitation strategy. The emerging concept has been the enhancement of macrocirculation through sequential optimization of heart function and then judging the adequacy of perfusion/oxygenation on specific parameters in a strategy which was aptly coined “goal directed therapy.” On the other hand, the maintenance of normal temperature is critical and should be regularly monitored. Regarding respiratory monitoring of ventilated ICU patients, it includes serial assessment of gas exchange, of respiratory system mechanics, and of patients' readiness for liberation from invasive positive pressure ventilation. Also, the monitoring of nutritional and metabolic care should allow controlling nutrients delivery, adequation between energy needs and delivery, and blood glucose. The present paper will describe the physiological basis, interpretation of, and clinical use of the major endpoints of perfusion/oxygenation adequacy and of temperature, respiratory, nutritional, and metabolic monitorings.

  16. Total Energy Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S

    2008-08-11

    The total energy monitor (TE) is a thermal sensor that determines the total energy of each FEL pulse based on the temperature rise induced in a silicon wafer upon absorption of the FEL. The TE provides a destructive measurement of the FEL pulse energy in real-time on a pulse-by-pulse basis. As a thermal detector, the TE is expected to suffer least from ultra-fast non-linear effects and to be easy to calibrate. It will therefore primarily be used to cross-calibrate other detectors such as the Gas Detector or the Direct Imager during LCLS commissioning. This document describes the design of the TE and summarizes the considerations and calculations that have led to it. This document summarizes the physics behind the operation of the Total Energy Monitor at LCLS and derives associated engineering specifications.

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-02-09 to 1980-03-21 (NODC Accession 8000165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 09 Februay 1980 to 21 March 1980. Data were collected by...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-01-30 to 1979-01-31 (NODC Accession 7900085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE from 30 January 1979 to 31 January 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-09-21 to 1973-10-17 (NODC Accession 7301174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA from 21 September 1973 to 17 October 1973. Data were collected by Delata Steamship Co. as...

  20. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-11-14 to 1973-01-02 (NODC Accession 7300035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA and other platforms from 14 November 1972 to 02 January 1973. Data were collected by the...

  1. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the KASHU MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-03 to 1977-03-10 (NCEI Accession 8100129)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from KASHU MARU in the Pacific Ocean from March 3, 1977 to March 10, 1977. Data were...

  2. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HIEI MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-10-09 to 1976-10-16 (NCEI Accession 8100178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HIEI MARU in the Pacific Ocean from October 9, 1976 to October 16, 1976. Data were...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-09-30 to 1978-10-05 (NODC Accession 7800858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms from 30 September 1978 to 05 October 1978. Data were collected by the...

  4. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1983-10-07 to 1984-02-15 (NCEI Accession 8400106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from October 7, 1983 to...

  5. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1985-01-02 to 1985-03-19 (NCEI Accession 8500081)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ELBE EXPRESS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from January 2, 1985 to...

  6. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the KASHU MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-11-06 to 1976-11-22 (NCEI Accession 8100139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from KASHU MARU in the Pacific Ocean from November 16, 1976 to November 22, 1976. Data...

  7. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the AMERICA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-07-19 to 1977-07-27 (NCEI Accession 8100351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from AMERICA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from July 19, 1977 to July 27, 1977. Data were...

  8. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the LEXA MAERSK and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1986-11-15 to 1988-01-04 (NCEI Accession 8800006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from LEXA MAERSK and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from November 15, 1986 to...

  9. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HAKUSAN MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-12-30 to 1977-01-09 (NCEI Accession 8100419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HAKUSAN MARU in the Pacific Ocean from December 30, 1976 to January 9, 1977. Data...

  10. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-14 to 1977-03-23 (NCEI Accession 8100332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from March 14, 1977 to March 23, 1977. Data...

  11. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HAKONE MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-26 to 1977-04-04 (NCEI Accession 8100303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HAKONE MARU in the Pacific Ocean March 26 1977 to April 4, 1977. Data were...

  12. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HAKUSAN MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-04-08 to 1977-04-14 (NCEI Accession 8100423)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HAKUSAN MARU in the Pacific Ocean from April 8, 1977 to April 14, 1977. Data were...

  13. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HARUNA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-03-14 to 1977-03-21 (NODC Accession 8100370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HARUNA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from March 14, 1977 to March 21, 1977. Data were...

  14. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1973-02-12 to 1973-03-23 (NODC Accession 7300813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station,temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 12 February 1973 to 23 March 1973. Data...

  15. Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data from bottle and XBT from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-01-09 to 1974-01-12 (NODC Accession 7400287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, temperature profiles, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 09 January 1974 to 12...

  16. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1976-08-28 to 1976-09-21 (NODC Accession 7700036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 28 August 1976 to 21 September 1976. Data were...

  17. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-04-01 to 1974-05-09 (NODC Accession 7400626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 01 April 1974 to 09 May 1974. Data were...

  18. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1977-01-18 to 1977-05-22 (NODC Accession 7800595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 18 January 1977 to 22 May 1977. Data were...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-11-08 to 1974-11-14 (NODC Accession 7500079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 08 November 1974 to 14 November 1974. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  20. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-04-17 to 1976-02-07 (NODC Accession 7600888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 17 April 1975 to 07 February 1976. Data were...

  1. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-12-03 to 1975-12-06 (NODC Accession 7600754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 03 December 1975 to 06 December 1975. Data were...

  2. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-08-13 to 1974-09-18 (NODC Accession 7400814)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 13 August 1974 to 18 September 1974. Data...

  3. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the SIRIUS and other platforms from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1983-06-07 to 1984-07-29 (NODC Accession 8400165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from SIRIUS and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean from June 7, 1983 to July 29,...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-04-04 to 1976-05-13 (NODC Accession 7601166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 04 April 1976 to 13 May 1976. Data were collected by Grace Prudential...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-08-14 to 1977-01-21 (NODC Accession 7700124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 14 August 1976 to 21 January 1977. Data were collected by Grace...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-03-08 to 1977-04-22 (NODC Accession 7700321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 08 March 1977 to 22 April 1977. Data were collected by the National...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-12-02 to 1976-06-30 (NODC Accession 7601553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 02 December 1975 to 30 June 1976. Data were collected by Grace...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1969-08-30 to 1983-03-31 (NODC Accession 8300047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms from 30 August 1969 to 31 March 1983. Data were collected by the National...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-08-22 to 1981-08-23 (NODC Accession 8100650)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 22 August 1981 to 23 August 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-07-17 to 1979-07-18 (NODC Accession 7900253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE from 17 July 1979 to 18 July 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  11. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the AMERICA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-06-05 to 1977-06-13 (NCEI Accession 8100354)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from AMERICA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from June 5, 1977 to June 13, 1977. Data were...

  12. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the AMERICA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-07-06 to 1977-07-14 (NCEI Accession 8100352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from AMERICA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from July 6, 1977 to July 14, 1977. Data were...

  13. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PRESIDENT MCKINLEY from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-09-04 to 1976-09-12 (NCEI Accession 8100324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PRESIDENT MCKINLEY in the Pacific Ocean from September 4, 1976 to September 12,...

  14. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the HAKUSAN MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-05-19 to 1977-05-26 (NCEI Accession 8100426)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from HAKUSAN MARU in the Pacific Ocean from May 19, 1977 to May 26, 1977. Data were...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-09-11 to 1984-10-11 (NODC Accession 8400249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 11 September 1984 to 11 October 1984. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  16. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the YAMASHIN MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, September 1976 to 1976-09-27 (NCEI Accession 8100210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from YAMASHIN MARU in the Pacific Ocean from September 22, 1976 to September 27, 1976....

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the UNIMAK and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-03-19 to 1981-04-07 (NODC Accession 8100521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the UNIMAK and other platforms from 19 March 1981 to 07 April 1981. Data were collected by the National...

  18. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-11-14 to 1976-11-22 (NCEI Accession 8100339)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from November 14, 1976 to November 22, 1976....

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the FORAGER and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-02-14 to 1983-01-05 (NODC Accession 8300035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the FORAGER and other platforms from 14 February 1981 to 05 January 1983. Data were collected by the National...

  20. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-12-29 to 1977-01-06 (NCEI Accession 8100327)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from December 29, 1976 to January 6, 1977. Data...

  1. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-02-13 to 1977-02-21 (NCEI Accession 8100330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from February 13, 1977 to February 21, 1977....

  2. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-12-15 to 1976-12-23 (NCEI Accession 8100326)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from December 12, 1976 to December 23, 1976....

  3. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-02-27 to 1977-03-08 (NCEI Accession 8100331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from February 27, 1977 to March 8, 1977. Data...

  4. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-05-26 to 1977-06-03 (NCEI Accession 8100341)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from May 26, 1977 to June 3, 1977. Data were...

  5. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-12-01 to 1976-12-07 (NCEI Accession 8100325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from December 1, 1976 to December 7, 1976. Data...

  6. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-06-24 to 1977-07-02 (NCEI Accession 8100343)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from June 24, 1977 to July 2, 1977. Data were...

  7. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the GOLDEN ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-05-17 to 1977-05-21 (NCEI Accession 8100298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from GOLDEN ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from May 17, 1977 to May 21, 1977. Data were...

  8. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the PACIFIC ARROW from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-07-24 to 1977-08-01 (NCEI Accession 8100345)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from PACIFIC ARROW in the Pacific Ocean from July 24, 1977 to August 1, 1977. Data were...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-06-02 to 1978-06-03 (NCEI Accession 7800532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 02 June 1978 to 03 June 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-08-28 to 1979-11-22 (NODC Accession 7900342)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms from 28 August 1979 to 22 November 1979. Data were collected by the...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-11-11 (NODC Accession 8000591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 11 November 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-06-10 to 1981-06-11 (NODC Accession 8100563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 10 June 1981 to 11 June 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-05-22 to 1978-05-23 (NCEI Accession 7800456)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 22 May 1978 to 23 May 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-04-08 to 1981-04-09 (NODC Accession 8100553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 08 April 1981 to 09 April 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-03-09 to 1981-03-10 (NODC Accession 8100487)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 09 March 1981 to 10 March 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-02-24 to 1981-02-25 (NODC Accession 8100489)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 24 February 1981 to 25 February 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-08-03 (NODC Accession 7900261)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 03 August 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-06-05 to 1980-06-26 (NODC Accession 8000459)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms from 05 June 1980 to 26 June 1980. Data were collected by the...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-10-20 to 1980-10-21 (NODC Accession 8100556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 20 October 1980 to 21 October 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  20. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-12-14 to 1980-12-15 (NODC Accession 8000623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 14 December 1980 to 15 December 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-04-20 to 1977-04-21 (NODC Accession 7700322)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 20 April 1977 to 21 April 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  2. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-07-22 to 1981-07-23 (NODC Accession 8100604)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 22 July 1981 to 23 July 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-05-30 to 1981-05-31 (NODC Accession 8100564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 30 May 1981 to 31 May 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-09-06 to 1981-09-07 (NODC Accession 8100654)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 06 September 1981 to 07 September 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-05-19 to 1980-01-02 (NODC Accession 8000020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms from 19 May 1979 to 02 January 1980. Data were collected by the...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-11-13 to 1980-11-14 (NODC Accession 8000611)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 13 November 1980 to 14 November 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-03-11 to 1978-03-12 (NODC Accession 7800267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 11 March 1978 to 12 March 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-07-21 to 1980-09-03 (NODC Accession 8000469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II from 21 July 1980 to 03 September 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-04-17 to 1980-05-06 (NODC Accession 8000328)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms from 17 April 1980 to 06 May 1980. Data were collected by the...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-08-05 to 1982-03-18 (NODC Accession 8200052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER II and other platforms from 05 August 1981 to 18 March 1982. Data were collected by the...

  11. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the MEDELENA from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1976-10-27 to 1976-11-05 (NCEI Accession 8100380)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from MEDELENA in the Pacific Ocean from October 27, 1976 to November 5, 1976. Data were...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-07-14 to 1979-08-20 (NODC Accession 8000421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 14 July 1979 to 20 August 1979. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as part of...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-04-09 to 1975-04-10 (NODC Accession 7500518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 09 April 1975 to 10 April 1975. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of...

  14. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the YAMASHIN MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-26 to 1977-02-01 (NCEI Accession 8100200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from YAMASHIN MARU in the Pacific Ocean from January 26, 1977 to February 1, 1977. Data...

  15. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ASIA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-04-14 to 1977-04-21 (NCEI Accession 8100275)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ASIA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from April 14, 1977 to April 21, 1977. Data were...

  16. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the ASIA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-23 to 1977-02-01 (NCEI Accession 8100281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from ASIA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from January 23, 1977 to February 1, 1977. Data...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DECISIVE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-01-23 to 1979-01-24 (NODC Accession 7900108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DECISIVE from 23 January 1979 to 24 January 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA MAR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-10-26 to 1979-01-24 (NODC Accession 7900096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA MAR and other platforms from 26 October 1978 to 24 January 1979. Data were collected by the Delta...

  19. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the AMERICA MARU from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-01-07 to 1977-01-17 (NCEI Accession 8100348)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from AMERICA MARU in the Pacific Ocean from January 7, 1977 to January 17, 1977. Data...

  20. Temperature profile data collected using XBTs from the MEDELENA from the Pacific Ocean during the Thermal Structure Monitoring Program in the Pacific (TRANSPAC) project, 1977-02-28 to 1977-03-07 (NCEI Accession 8100387)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from MEDELENA in the Pacific Ocean from February 28, 1977 to March 7, 1977. Data were...