WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature microgravity physics

  1. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  2. Containerless experiments in fluid physics in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The physical phenomena associated with the behavior of liquid samples freely suspended in low gravity must be thoroughly understood prior to undertaking detailed scientific studies of the materials under scrutiny. The characteristics of molten specimens under the action of containerless positioning stresses must be identified and separated from the specific phenomena relating to the absence of an overwhelming gravitational field. The strategy designed to optimize the scientific return of reliable experimental data from infrequent microgravity investigations should include the gradual and logical phasing of more sophisticated studies building on the accumulated results from previous flight experiments. Lower temperature fluid physics experiments using model materials can provide a great deal of information that can be useful in analyzing the behavior of high temperature melts. The phasing of the experimental capabilities should, therefore, also include a gradual build-up of more intricate and specialized diagnostic instrumentation and environmental control and monitoring capabilities. Basic physical investigations should also be distinguished from specific materials technology issues. The latter investigations require very specific high temperature (and high vacuum) devices that must be thoroughly mastered on the ground prior to implementing them in space.

  3. NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Strategic Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian J.; Singh, Bhim S.

    2004-01-01

    The Microgravity Fluid Physics Program at NASA has developed a substantial investigator base engaging a broad crosssection of the U.S. scientific community. As a result, it enjoys a rich history of many significant scientific achievements. The research supported by the program has produced many important findings that have been published in prestigious journals such as Science, Nature, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Physics of Fluids, and many others. The focus of the program so far has primarily been on fundamental scientific studies. However, a recent shift in emphasis at NASA to develop advanced technologies to enable future exploration of space has provided motivation to add a strategic research component to the program. This has set into motion a year of intense planning within NASA including three workshops to solicit inputs from the external scientific community. The planning activities and the workshops have resulted in a prioritized list of strategic research issues along with a corresponding detailed roadmap specific to fluid physics. The results of these activities were provided to NASA s Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) to support the development of the Enterprise Strategy document. This paper summarizes these results while showing how the planned research supports NASA s overall vision through OBPR s organizing questions.

  4. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    " is often historically used to describe these microgravity experiments. This is somewhat inaccurate as the field involves the study of many varied biological molecules including viruses, proteins, DNA, RNA and complexes of those structures. For this reason we use the term macromolecular crystal growth. In this chapter we review a series of diagnostic microgravity crystal growth experiments carried out principally using the European Space Agency (ESA) Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF). We also review related research, both experimental and theoretical, on the aspects of microgravity fluid physics that affect microgravity protein crystal growth. Our experiments have revealed some surprises that were not initially expected. We discuss them here in the context of practical lessons learnt and how to maximize the limited microgravity opportunities available.

  5. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This TM is a compilation of abstracts of the papers and the posters presented at the conference. Web-based proceedings, including the charts used by the presenters, will be posted on the web shortly after the conference.

  6. Microgravity fluid physics research in the Space Station Freedom era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Bradley M.

    1992-01-01

    Microgravity fluid physics covers an exciting range of established and potential fields of scientific research. Areas in which the Microgravity Science and Applications Division of NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications is currently supporting research include: multiphase flow and phase change heat transfer, behavior of granular media and colloids; and interface dynamics, morphological stability, and contact line phenomena. As they contribute to our knowledge of fluid behavior, advances in these areas will enhance our understanding of materials processing on Earth and in space, and will contribute to technologies as diverse as chemical extraction, the prediction of soil behavior in earthquakes, and the production of oil reservoirs. NASA' s primary platform for research in microgravity fluid physics will soon be the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility on Space Station Freedom. This facility shares a rack for control and utilities with the Modular Combustion Facility, and has one rack for experiment-unique instruments. It is planned to change out the content of the experiment-unique rack at intervals on the order of one year. In order to obtain a maximum return on the operation of the facility during these intervals, the research community must carefully plan and coordinate an effort that brings the efforts of many investigators to bear on problems of particular importance. NASA is currently working with the community to identify research areas in which microgravity can make a unique and valuable contribution, and to build a balanced program of research around these areas or thrusts. Selections will soon be made from our first solicitation for research in fluid dynamics and transport phenomena. These solicitations will build the research community that will make Space Station Freedom a catalyst for scientific and technological discovery, and offer U.S. scientists in many disciplines a unique opportunity to participate in space science.

  7. The NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: Research Plans for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Fred J.; Singh, Bhim S.; Shaw, Nancy J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.

    2003-01-01

    Building on over four decades of research and technology development related to the behavior of fluids in low gravity environments, the current NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program continues the quest for knowledge to further understand and design better fluids systems for use on earth and in space. NASA's Biological and Physical Research Enterprise seeks to exploit the space environment to conduct research supporting human exploration of space (strategic research), research of intrinsic scientific importance and impact (fundamental research), and commercial research. The strategic research thrust will build the vital knowledge base needed to enable NASA's mission to explore the Universe and search for life. There are currently five major research areas in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: complex fluids, niultiphase flows and phase change, interfacial phenomena, biofluid mechanics, and dynamics and instabilities. Numerous investigations into these areas are being conducted in both ground-based laboratories and facilities and in the flight experiments program. Most of the future NASA- sponsored flight experiments in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena will be carried out on the International Space Station (ISS) in the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR), in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), in EXPRESS racks, and in other facilities provided by international partners. This paper presents an overview of the near- and long-term visions for NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Research Program and brief descriptions of hardware systems planned to enable this research.

  8. Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference: Exposition Topical Areas 1-6. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim (Compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Sixth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provides the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program, current research opportunities, and plans for the near future. The conference focuses not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. A whole session dedicated to biological fluid physics shows increased emphasis that the program has placed on interdisciplinary research. The conference includes invited plenary talks, technical paper presentations, poster presentations, and exhibits. This CP (conference proceeding) is a compilation of the abstracts, presentations, and posters presented at the conference.

  9. Implementation of Temperature-Controlled Method of Protein Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelov, V. I.; Zakharov, B. G.; Bezbakh, I. Zh.; Safronov, V. V.; Chernyshev, B. V.; Dutyshev, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental scientific equipment for implementing temperature-controlled protein crystallization in capillaries under microgravity has been developed, fabricated, and tested. This crystallization method, providing on-line separate control of crystal growth both in the stage of nucleation of crystals and during their further growth, requires small amounts of protein solution. The equipment has been tested on board of Foton-M4 spacecraft (growth of lysozyme protein crystals of high structural quality in microgravity) using a cyclogram developed in ground-based experiments. The results obtained have demonstrated efficiency and importance of the developed equipment and method for growing biomacromolecular crystals of high-structural quality.

  10. The NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: Knowledge for Use on Earth and Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Fred J.; Singh, Bhim S.; Alexander, J. Iwan; Shaw, Nancy J.; Hill, Myron E.; Gati, Frank G.

    2002-01-01

    Building on over four decades of research and technology development related to the behavior of fluids in low gravity environments, the current NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program continues the quest for knowledge to further understand and design better fluids systems for use on earth and in space. The purpose of the Fluid Physics Program is to support the goals of NASA's Biological and Physical Research Enterprise which seeks to exploit the space environment to conduct research and to develop commercial opportunities, while building the vital knowledge base needed to enable efficient and effective systems for protecting and sustaining humans during extended space flights. There are currently five major research areas in the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program: complex fluids, multiphase flows and phase change, interfacial phenomena, biofluid mechanics, and dynamics and instabilities. Numerous investigations into these areas are being conducted in both ground-based laboratories and facilities and in the flight experiments program. Most of the future NASA-sponsored fluid physics and transport phenomena studies will be carried out on the International Space Station in the Fluids Integrated Rack, in the Microgravity Science Glovebox, in EXPRESS racks, and in other facilities provided by international partners. This paper will present an overview of the near- and long-term visions for NASA's Microgravity Fluid Physics Research Program and brief descriptions of hardware systems planned to achieve this research.

  11. Proceedings of the Fourth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference presents information to the scientific community on research results, future directions, and research opportunities in microgravity fluid physics and transport phenomena within NASA's microgravity research program. The conference theme is "The International Space Station." Plenary sessions provide an overview of the Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, the International Space Station and the opportunities ISS presents to fluid physics and transport phenomena researchers, and the process by which researchers may become involved in NASA's program, including information about the NASA Research Announcement in this area. Two plenary lectures present promising areas of research in electrohydrodynamics/electrokinetics in the movement of particles and in micro- and meso-scale effects on macroscopic fluid dynamics. Featured speakers in plenary sessions present results of recent flight experiments not heretofore presented. The conference publication consists of this book of abstracts and the full Proceedings of the 4th Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference on CD-ROM, containing full papers presented at the conference (NASA/CP-1999-208526/SUPPL1).

  12. DECLIC, a Multipurpose Facility for Physical Sciences in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Gérard; Lauver, Richard; Marcout, Romain; Beysens, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    In the frame of an agreement with NASA, the CNES (French Space Center) is developing in new dedicated facility for the study of transparent materials under microgravity conditions. The DECLIC facility (Dispositif pour l'Etude de la Croissance et des Liquides Critiques) will permit to study the behaviour of transparent media in experimental thermal conditions extremely well controled. The optical diagnostics used in the instruments make available in situ direct observation,images recording and transmission to ground of the data in real time Integrated on board the International Space Station, as an EXPRESS Rack payload, the DECLIC facility will permit to implement an wide experimental program, using telescience capabilities that will enable experiment optimisation under Scientist remote control. The DECLIC facility will be operated from the french USOC named CADMOS at Toulouse, in close relationship with the other Control Centers located at NASA, ESA and the User Home Basees (UHB) where the scientists will perform their studies.

  13. Physics of Colloids in Space: Microgravity Experiment Launched, Installed, and Activated on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment is a Microgravity Fluids Physics investigation that is presently located in an Expedite the Process of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack on the International Space Station. PCS was launched to the International Space Station on April 19, 2001, activated on May 31, 2001, and will continue to operate about 90 hr per week through May 2002.

  14. Low-Temperature Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Enss, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This book provides a concise but thorough introduction to important phenomena of low-temperature physics. It is ideally suited as a textbook for advanced undergraduates but will also be valuable for graduate students, scientists and engineers working in this field. Clear explanations of both theoretical and experimental approaches coupled with carefully selected problems will enable students to gain a firm understanding of even the most recent research developments.

  15. Short-term, daily exposure to cold temperature may be an efficient way to prevent muscle atrophy and bone loss in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Claudia; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ya

    2015-04-01

    Microgravity induces less pressure on muscle/bone, which is a major reason for muscle atrophy as well as bone loss. Currently, physical exercise is the only countermeasure used consistently in the U.S. human space program to counteract the microgravity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and bone loss. However, the routinely almost daily time commitment is significant and represents a potential risk to the accomplishment of other mission operational tasks. Therefore, development of more efficient exercise programs (with less time) to prevent astronauts from muscle atrophy and bone loss are needed. Consider the two types of muscle contraction: exercising forces muscle contraction and prevents microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss, which is a voluntary response through the motor nervous system; and cold temperature exposure-induced muscle contraction is an involuntary response through the vegetative nervous system, we formed a new hypothesis. The main purpose of this pilot study was to test our hypothesis that exercise at 4 °C is more efficient than at room temperature to prevent microgravity-induced muscle atrophy/bone loss and, consequently reduces physical exercise time. Twenty mice were divided into two groups with or without daily short-term (10 min × 2, at 12 h interval) cold temperature (4 °C) exposure for 30 days. The whole bodyweight, muscle strength and bone density were measured after terminating the experiments. The results from the one-month pilot study support our hypothesis and suggest that it would be reasonable to use more mice, in a microgravity environment and observe for a longer period to obtain a conclusion. We believe that the results from such a study will help to develop efficient exercise, which will finally benefit astronauts' heath and NASA's missions.

  16. Physics of Regolith Impacts in Microgravity Experiment (PRIME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian (Technical Monitor); Colwell, Joshua; Sture, S.

    2003-01-01

    Collisions between planetary ring particles and in some protoplanetary disk environments occur at low impact velocities (v less than 1 m/s) . In some regions of Saturn s rings, for example, the typical collision velocity inferred from observations by the Voyager spacecraft and dynamical modeling is a fraction of a centimeter per second. Although no direct observations of an individual ring particle exist, the abundance of dust in planetary rings and protoplanetary disks suggests that larger ring and disk particles are coated with a layer of smaller particles and dust - the "regolith". Because the ring particles and proto-planetesimals are small (cm to m-sized), the regolith is only weakly bound to the surface by gravity. Similarly, secondary impacts on asteroids by large blocks of ejecta from high velocity cratering events result in low velocity impacts into the asteroid regolith, which is also weakly bound by the asteroid s gravity. At the current epoch and throughout their history, low velocity collisions have played an important role in sculpting planetary systems. In a one-Earth-gravity environment, it is not possible to experimentally determine the behavior of impact eject from such low velocity collisions. Impacts typically occur at speeds exceeding the mutual escape velocity of the two bodies. Thus, impacts at speeds on the order of 10 m/sec or less involve objects that are tens of meters across, or smaller. This research program is an experimental study of such low velocity collisions in a microgravity environment. The experimental work builds on the Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE), which has flown twice on the space shuttle. The PRIME experimental apparatus is a new apparatus designed specifically for the environment provided on the NASA KC- 135 reduced gravity aircraft.

  17. Pressure-volume-temperature gauging method experiment using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition of parabolic flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Man Su; Park, Hana; Yoo, Don Gyu; Jeong, Sang Kwon [Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young Suk [Launcher Systems Development Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Measuring an exact amount of remaining cryogenic liquid propellant under microgravity condition is one of the important issues of rocket vehicle. A Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) gauging method is attractive due to its minimal additional hardware and simple gauging process. In this paper, PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen is investigated under microgravity condition with parabolic flight. A 9.2 litre metal cryogenic liquid storage tank containing approximately 30% of liquid nitrogen is pressurized by ambient temperature helium gas. During microgravity condition, the inside of the liquid tank becomes near-isothermal condition within 1 K difference indicated by 6 silicon diode sensors vertically distributed in the middle of the liquid tank. Helium injection with higher mass flow rate after 10 seconds of the waiting time results in successful measurements of helium partial pressure in the tank. Average liquid volume measurement error is within 11% of the whole liquid tank volume and standard deviation of errors is 11.9. As a result, the applicability of PVT gauging method to liquid.

  18. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I.; Israelsson, U.; Lee, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics research program, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum fluid based sensor and modeling technology.

  19. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  20. Proceedings of the Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Fifth Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Conference provided the scientific community the opportunity to view the current scope of the Microgravity Fluid Physics and Transport Phenomena Program and research opportunities and plans for the near future. Consistent with the conference theme "Microgravity Research an Agency-Wide Asset" the conference focused not only on fundamental research but also on applications of this knowledge towards enabling future space exploration missions. The conference included 14 invited plenary talks, 61 technical paper presentations, 61 poster presentations, exhibits and a forum on emerging research themes focusing on nanotechnology and biofluid mechanics. This web-based proceeding includes the presentation and poster charts provided by the presenters of technical papers and posters that were scanned at the conference site. Abstracts of all the papers and posters are included and linked to the presentations charts. The invited and plenary speakers were not required to provide their charts and are generally not available for scanning and hence not posted. The conference program is also included.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  2. Induction of hypoxic root metabolism results from physical limitations in O 2 bioavailability in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J.; Liu, G.; Monje, O.; Stutte, G. W.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous spaceflight experiments have noted changes in the roots that are consistent with hypoxia in the rootzone. These observations include general ultrastructure analysis and biochemical measurements to direct measurements of stress specific enzymes. In experiments that have monitored alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the data shows this hypoxically responsive gene is induced and is associated with increased ADH activity in microgravity. These changes in ADH could be induced either by spaceflight hypoxia resulting from inhibition of gravity mediated O 2 transport, or by a non-specific stress response due to inhibition of gravisensing. We tested these hypotheses in a series of two experiments. The objective of the first experiment was to determine if physical changes in gravity-mediated O 2 transport can be directly measured, while the second series of experiments tested whether disruption of gravisensing can induce a non-specific ADH response. To directly measure O 2 bioavailability as a function of gravity, we designed a sensor that mimics metabolic oxygen consumption in the rhizosphere. Because of these criteria, the sensor is sensitive to any changes in root O 2 bioavailability that may occur in microgravity. In a KC-135 experiment, the sensor was implanted in a moist granular clay media and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. The resulting data indicated that root O 2 bioavailability decreased in phase with gravity. In experiments that tested for non-specific induction of ADH, we compared the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants (ADH promoted GUS marker gene) exposed to clinostat, control, and waterlogged conditions. The plants were grown on agar slats in a growth chamber before being exposed to the experimental treatments. The plants were stained for GUS activity localization, and subjected to biochemical tests for ADH, and GUS enzyme activity. These tests showed that the waterlogging treatment induced significant increases in GUS and ADH

  3. Heat Transfer Mechanisms for Flow Boiling in Microgravity using Fluorescing Materials as Temperature Sensors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — I propose an experiment to study two-phase flow boiling in microgravity. Obtaining a fundamental understanding of the nature of flow boiling fluid mechanics and heat...

  4. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  5. Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments and Facilities for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauver, Richard W.; Kohl, Fred J.; Weiland, Karen J.; Zurawski, Robert L.; Hill, Myron E.; Corban, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program supports both ground-based and flight experiment research in the disciplines of Combustion Science and Fluid Physics. Combustion Science research includes the areas of gas jet diffusion flames, laminar flames, burning of droplets and misting fuels, solids and materials flammability, fire and fire suppressants, turbulent combustion, reaction kinetics, materials synthesis, and other combustion systems. The Fluid Physics discipline includes the areas of complex fluids (colloids, gels, foams, magneto-rheological fluids, non-Newtonian fluids, suspensions, granular materials), dynamics and instabilities (bubble and drop dynamics, magneto/electrohydrodynamics, electrochemical transport, geophysical flows), interfacial phenomena (wetting, capillarity, contact line hydrodynamics), and multiphase flows and phase changes (boiling and condensation, heat transfer, flow instabilities). A specialized International Space Station (ISS) facility that provides sophisticated research capabilities for these disciplines is the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The FCF consists of the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Shared Accommodations Rack and is designed to accomplish a large number of science investigations over the life of the ISS. The modular, multiuser facility is designed to optimize the science return within the available resources of on-orbit power, uplink/downlink capacity, crew time, upmass/downmass, volume, etc. A suite of diagnostics capabilities, with emphasis on optical techniques, will be provided to complement the capabilities of the subsystem multiuser or principal investigator-specific experiment modules. The paper will discuss the systems concept, technical capabilities, functionality, and the initial science investigations in each discipline.

  6. Physical Forces Modulate Oxidative Status and Stress Defense Meditated Metabolic Adaptation of Yeast Colonies: Spaceflight and Microgravity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Timothy G.; Allen, Patricia L.; Gunter, Margaret A.; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Birdsall, Holly H.

    2017-12-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has broad genetic homology to human cells. Although typically grown as 1-2mm diameter colonies under certain conditions yeast can form very large (10 + mm in diameter) or `giant' colonies on agar. Giant yeast colonies have been used to study diverse biomedical processes such as cell survival, aging, and the response to cancer pharmacogenomics. Such colonies evolve dynamically into complex stratified structures that respond differentially to environmental cues. Ammonia production, gravity driven ammonia convection, and shear defense responses are key differentiation signals for cell death and reactive oxygen system pathways in these colonies. The response to these signals can be modulated by experimental interventions such as agar composition, gene deletion and application of pharmaceuticals. In this study we used physical factors including colony rotation and microgravity to modify ammonia convection and shear stress as environmental cues and observed differences in the responses of both ammonia dependent and stress response dependent pathways We found that the effects of random positioning are distinct from rotation. Furthermore, both true and simulated microgravity exacerbated both cellular redox responses and apoptosis. These changes were largely shear-response dependent but each model had a unique response signature as measured by shear stress genes and the promoter set which regulates them These physical techniques permitted a graded manipulation of both convection and ammonia signaling and are primed to substantially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of drug action, cell aging, and colony differentiation.

  7. Induction of hypoxic root metabolism results from physical limitations in O2 bio-availability in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J.; Monje, O.; Porterfield, D.

    Numerous spaceflight experiments have noted changes in the roots that are consistent with hypoxia in the rootzone. These observations range from general ultrastructure analysis and biochemical measurements to direct measurements of stress specific enzymes. In experiments that have monitored alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) the data shows this hypoxically responsive gene is induced and ADH activity is elevated in microgravity. These changes in ADH could be induced either by spaceflight hypoxia resulting from inhibition of gravity mediated O 2 transport, or by a non-specific stress response due to inhibition of gravisensing. We tested these hypotheses in two series of experiments. The objective of the first experiment was to determine if physical changes in gravity mediated O 2 transport can be directly measured, while the second series of experiments tested whether disruption of gravisensing can induce a non-specific ADH response. To directly measure O 2 bioavailability as a function of gravity we designed a sensor that mimics metabolic O 2 consumption from the rhizosphere. Because of these design criteria the sensor is sensitive to any changes in root O 2 bioavailability that may occur in microgravity. In a KC-135 experiment the sensor was implanted in a moist granular clay media and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. The resulting data indicated that root O 2 bioavailability decreased in phase with gravity. In experiments that tested for non-specific induction of ADH we compared the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants (ADH promoted GUS marker gene) exposed to clinostat, control, and waterlogged conditions. The plants were grown on agar slats in a growth chamber before being exposed to the experimental treatments. The plants were stained for GUS activity localization, and subjected to biochemical tests for ADH, and GUS enzyme activity. These tests showed that the waterlogging treatment induced significant increases in GUS and ADH enzyme activities

  8. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. VIII. Microgravity Collisions between Porous SiO2 Aggregates and Loosely Bound Agglomerates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whizin, Akbar D.; Colwell, Joshua E.; Blum, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We performed laboratory experiments colliding 0.8–1.0 mm and 1.0–1.6 mm SiO 2 dust aggregates with loosely bound centimeter-sized agglomerates of those aggregates in microgravity. This work builds on previous microgravity laboratory experiments examining the collisional properties of porous loosely bound dust aggregates. In centimeter-sized aggregates, surface forces dominate self-gravity and may play a large role in aggregate growth beyond this size range. We characterize the properties of protoplanetary aggregate analogs to help place constraints on initial formation mechanisms and environments. We determined several important physical characteristics of these aggregates in a large number of low-velocity collisions. We observed low coefficients of restitution and fragmentation thresholds near 1 m s −1 for 1–2 cm agglomerates, which are in good agreement with previous findings in the literature. We find the accretion efficiency for agglomerates of loosely bound aggregates to be higher than that for just aggregates themselves. We find sticking thresholds of 6.6 ± 2 cm s −1 , somewhat higher than those in similar studies, which have observed few aggregates stick at speeds of under 3 cm s −1 . Even with highly dissipative collisions, loosely bound agglomerates have difficulty accreting beyond centimeter-sized bodies at typical collision speeds in the disk. Our results indicate agglomerates of porous aggregates have slightly higher sticking thresholds than previously thought, allowing possible growth to decimeter-sized bodies if velocities are low enough.

  9. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  10. Solidification under microgravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The paper outlines the broad areas where studies are being conducted under microgravity conditions worldwide viz., biotechnology, combustion science, materials science and fluid physics. The paper presents in particular a review on the various areas of research being pursued in materials science. These include studies ...

  11. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  12. Hagedorn temperature and physics of black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov V.I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mini-review devoted to some implications of the Hagedorn temperature for black hole physics. The existence of a limiting temperature is a generic feature of string models. The Hagedorn temperature was introduced first in the context of hadronic physics. Nowadays, the emphasis is shifted to fundamental strings which might be a necessary ingredient to obtain a consistent theory of black holes. The point is that, in field theory, the local temperature close to the horizon could be arbitrarily high, and this observation is difficult to reconcile with the finiteness of the entropy of black holes. After preliminary remarks, we review our recent attempt to evaluate the entropy of large black holes in terms of fundamental strings. We also speculate on implications for dynamics of large-Nc gauge theories arising within holographic models.

  13. Characterization of fluid physics effects on cardiovascular response to microgravity (G-572)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalos, George M.; Bennett, Thomas E.; Sharp, M. Keith; Woodruff, Stewart; Oleary, Sean; Gillars, Kevin; Lemon, Mark; Sojka, Jan

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of cardiovascular adaptation to space flight has seen substantial advancement in the last several years. In-flight echocardiographic measurements of astronaut cardiac function on the Space Shuttle have documented an initial increase, followed by a progressive reduction in both left ventricular volume index and stroke volume with a compensatory increase in heart rate to maintain cardiac output. To date, the reduced cardiac size and stroke volume have been presumed to be the consequence of the reduction in circulating fluid volume within a few days after orbital insertion. However, no specific mechanism for the reduced stroke volume has been identified. The following investigation proposes the use of a hydraulic model of the cardiovascular system to examine the possibility that the observed reduction in stroke volume may, in part, be related to fluid physics effects on heart function. The automated model is being prepared to fly as a Get Away Special (GAS) payload within the next year.

  14. Physical constraints in cell fate specification. A case in point: Microgravity and phenotypes differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Maria Grazia; Verna, Roberto; Cucina, Alessandra; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2018-05-01

    Data obtained by studying mammalian cells in absence of gravity strongly support the notion that cell fate specification cannot be understood according to the current molecular model. A paradigmatic case in point is provided by studying cell populations growing in absence of gravity. When the physical constraint (gravity) is 'experimentally removed', cells spontaneously allocate into two morphologically different phenotypes. Such phenomenon is likely enacted by the intrinsic stochasticity, which, in turn, is successively 'canalized' by a specific gene regulatory network. Both phenotypes are thermodynamically and functionally 'compatibles' with the new, modified environment. However, when the two cell subsets are reseeded into the 1g gravity field the two phenotypes collapse into one. Gravity constraints the system in adopting only one phenotype, not by selecting a pre-existing configuration, but more precisely shaping it de-novo through the modification of the cytoskeleton three-dimensional structure. Overall, those findings highlight how macro-scale features are irreducible to lower-scale explanations. The identification of macroscale control parameters - as those depending on the field (gravity, electromagnetic fields) or emerging from the cooperativity among the field's components (tissue stiffness, cell-to-cell connectivity) - are mandatory for assessing boundary conditions for models at lower scales, thus providing a concrete instantiation of top-down effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physics of cryogenics an ultralow temperature phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Physics of Cryogenics: An Ultralow Temperature Phenomenon discusses the significant number of advances that have been made during the last few years in a variety of cryocoolers, such as Brayton, Joule-Thomson, Stirling, pulse tube, Gifford-McMahon and magnetic refrigerators. The book reviews various approaches taken to improve reliability, a major driving force for new research areas. The advantages and disadvantages of different cycles are compared, and the latest improvements in each of these cryocoolers is discussed. The book starts with the thermodynamic fundamentals, followed by the definition of cryogenic and the associated science behind low temperature phenomena and properties. This book is an ideal resource for scientists, engineers and graduate and senior undergraduate students who need a better understanding of the science of cryogenics and related thermodynamics.

  16. Quantitative Infrared Image Analysis Of Thermally-Thin Cellulose Surface Temperatures During Upstream and Downstream Microgravity Flame Spread from A Central Ignition Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Lee, J. R.; Fujita, O.; Kikuchi, M.; Kashiwagi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface view calibrated infrared images of ignition and flame spread over a thin cellulose fuel were obtained at 30 Hz during microgravity flame spread tests in the 10 second Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). The tests also used a color video of the surface view and color images of the edge view using 35 millimeter 1600 Kodak Ektapress film at 2 Hz. The cellulose fuel samples (50% long fibers from lumi pine and 50% short fibers from birch) were made with an area density of 60 grams per square meters. The samples were mounted in the center of a 12 centimeter wide by 16 centimeter tall flow duct that uses a downstream fan to draw the air through the flow duct. Samples were ignited after the experiment package was released using a straight hot wire across the center of the 7.5 centimeter wide by 14 centimeter long samples. One case, at 1 atmosphere 35%O2 in N2, at a forced flow of 10 centimeters per second, is presented here. In this case, as the test progresses, the single flame begins to separate into simultaneous upstream and downstream flames. Surface temperature profiles are evaluated as a function of time, and temperature gradients for upstream and downstream flame spread are measured. Flame spread rates from IR image data are compared to visible image spread rate data. IR blackbody temperatures are compared to surface thermocouple readings to evaluate the effective emissivity of the pyrolyzing surface. Preheat lengths are evaluated both upstream and downstream of the central ignition point. A surface energy balance estimates the net heat flux from the flame to the fuel surface along the length of the fuel.

  17. Use of international space station for fundamental physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, U.; Lee, M. C.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's research plans aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are discussed. Experiments in low temperature physics and atomic physics are planned to commence in late 2005. Experiments in gravitational physics are planned to begin in 2007. A low temperature microgravity physics facility is under development for the low temperature and gravitation experiments.

  18. Smoldering Combustion Experiments in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, David C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment is part of a study of the smolder characteristics of porous combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a non-flaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of porous materials and takes place in a number of processes ranging from smoldering of porous insulation materials to high temperature synthesis of metals. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smolder, both in microgravity and normal-gravity. As with many forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of oxidizer and transport of heat, and therefore the rate of combustion. Microgravity smolder experiments, in both a quiescent oxidizing environment, and in a forced oxidizing flow have been conducted aboard the NASA Space Shuttle (STS-69 and STS-77 missions) to determine the effect of the ambient oxygen concentration and oxidizer forced flow velocity on smolder combustion in microgravity. The experimental apparatus is contained within the NASA Get Away Special Canister (GAS-CAN) Payload. These two sets of experiments investigate the propagation of smolder along the polyurethane foam sample under both diffusion driven and forced flow driven smoldering. The results of the microgravity experiments are compared with identical ones carried out in normal gravity, and are used to verify present theories of smolder combustion. The results of this study will provide new insights into the smoldering combustion process. Thermocouple histories show that the microgravity smolder reaction temperatures (Ts) and propagation velocities (Us) lie between those of identical normal-gravity upward and downward tests. These observations indicate the effect of buoyancy on the transport of oxidizer to the reaction front.

  19. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  20. The Physics of Protoplanetesimal Dust Agglomerates. VIII. Microgravity Collisions between Porous SiO{sub 2} Aggregates and Loosely Bound Agglomerates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whizin, Akbar D.; Colwell, Joshua E. [Dept. of Physics, Center for Microgravity Research, University of Central Florida, 4111 Libra Drive, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Blum, Jürgen, E-mail: Akbar.Whizin@ucf.edu [Institut für Geophysik und extraterrestrische Physik, University of Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    We performed laboratory experiments colliding 0.8–1.0 mm and 1.0–1.6 mm SiO{sub 2} dust aggregates with loosely bound centimeter-sized agglomerates of those aggregates in microgravity. This work builds on previous microgravity laboratory experiments examining the collisional properties of porous loosely bound dust aggregates. In centimeter-sized aggregates, surface forces dominate self-gravity and may play a large role in aggregate growth beyond this size range. We characterize the properties of protoplanetary aggregate analogs to help place constraints on initial formation mechanisms and environments. We determined several important physical characteristics of these aggregates in a large number of low-velocity collisions. We observed low coefficients of restitution and fragmentation thresholds near 1 m s{sup −1} for 1–2 cm agglomerates, which are in good agreement with previous findings in the literature. We find the accretion efficiency for agglomerates of loosely bound aggregates to be higher than that for just aggregates themselves. We find sticking thresholds of 6.6 ± 2 cm s{sup −1}, somewhat higher than those in similar studies, which have observed few aggregates stick at speeds of under 3 cm s{sup −1}. Even with highly dissipative collisions, loosely bound agglomerates have difficulty accreting beyond centimeter-sized bodies at typical collision speeds in the disk. Our results indicate agglomerates of porous aggregates have slightly higher sticking thresholds than previously thought, allowing possible growth to decimeter-sized bodies if velocities are low enough.

  1. Mathematics, Physics and Computer Sciences Temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the continuous shaly section. Higher gradients are associated with shaly formations primarily because of low thermal conductivity. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences Volume , No 1 January (2001) pp. 137-142. KEY WORDS: Temperature variations, subsurface, temperature logs, sand percentage, depobelts.

  2. Influence of substrate temperature on certain physical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of substrate temperature on certain physical properties and antibacterial activity of nanocrystalline Ag-doped In 2 O 3 thin films ... films were subjected to various characterization studies, to explore certain features like the influence of various deposition temperatures on physical and antibacterial properties.

  3. Transitioning a Fundamental Research Program to Align with the NASA Exploration Initiative-Perspectives from Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    A new Vision for Space Exploration was announced earlier this year by U.S. President George W. Bush. NASA has evaluated on-going programs for strategic alignment with this vision. The evaluation proceeded at a rapid pace and is resulting in changes to the scope and focus of experimental research that will be conducted in support of the new vision. The existing network of researchers in the physical sciences - a highly capable, independent, and loosely knitted community - typically have shared conclusions derived from their work within appropriate discipline-specific peer reviewed journals and publications. The initial result of introducing this Vision for Space Exploration has been to shift research focus from a broad coverage of numerous, widely varying topics into a research program focused on a nearly-singular set of supporting research objectives to enable advances in space exploration. Two of these traditional physical science research disciplines, Combustion Science and Fluid Physics, are implementing a course adjustment from a portfolio dominated by "Fundamental Science Research" to one focused nearly exclusively on supporting the Exploration Vision. Underlying scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure of the Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics disciplines do provide essential research capabilities to support the contemporary thrusts of human life support, radiation countermeasures, human health, low gravity research for propulsion and materials and, ultimately, research conducted on the Moon and Mars. A perspective on how these two research disciplines responded to the course change will be presented. The relevance to the new NASA direction is provided, while demonstrating through two examples how the prior investment in fundamental research is being brought to bear on solving the issues confronting the successful implementation of the exploration goals.

  4. New developments in low temperature physics New developments in low temperature physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanenn, Mikko

    2009-04-01

    Below you will find part of the activity report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the USA, for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse-tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He- 4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior. There

  5. A physically based analytical spatial air temperature and humidity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yang; Theodore A. Endreny; David J. Nowak

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation of urban surface air temperature and humidity influences human thermal comfort, the settling rate of atmospheric pollutants, and plant physiology and growth. Given the lack of observations, we developed a Physically based Analytical Spatial Air Temperature and Humidity (PASATH) model. The PASATH model calculates spatial solar radiation and heat...

  6. Actin dynamics in microgravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, M.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483128X

    2013-01-01

    Organisms on earth develop in the presence of gravity. A good opportunity to study the effects of gravity on organisms is to expose organisms or cells to conditions of altered gravity, such as microgravity in space. Microgravity has been described to affect numerous processes that take place in

  7. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  8. Influence of substrate temperature on certain physical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The deposited films were subjected to various characterization studies, to explore certain features like the influence of various deposition temperatures on physical and antibacterial properties. XRD results showed that all the samples exhibited preferential orientation along the (2 2 2) plane. The variation in the crystalline ...

  9. Influence of substrate temperature on certain physical properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-12

    Nov 12, 2016 ... influence of various deposition temperatures on physical and antibacterial properties. ... terial agents include metal oxide semiconductors as they are ... This method is found to be simple, cost-effective and can be used to prepare dense films on large areas with better quality. 2. Experimental details for the ...

  10. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 13, Internal Energy, Heat, and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the thirteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to internal energy, heat, and temperature. The topics are concerned with collisions, thermometers, friction forces, degrees Centigrade and Fahrenheit, calories, Brownian motion, and state changes. The…

  11. A physically-based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  12. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van L.P.H.; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, van M.T.H.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through

  13. Blood flow and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Lionel; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank; Duperray, Alain; Farutin, Alexander; Minetti, Christophe; Misbah, Chaouqi; Podgorski, Thomas; Tsvirkun, Daria; Vysokikh, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    The absence of gravity during space flight can alter cardio-vascular functions partially due to reduced physical activity. This affects the overall hemodynamics, and in particular the level of shear stresses to which blood vessels are submitted. Long-term exposure to space environment is thus susceptible to induce vascular remodeling through a mechanotransduction cascade that couples vessel shape and function with the mechanical cues exerted by the circulating cells on the vessel walls. Central to such processes, the glycocalyx - i.e. the micron-thick layer of biomacromolecules that lines the lumen of blood vessels and is directly exposed to blood flow - is a major actor in the regulation of biochemical and mechanical interactions. We discuss in this article several experiments performed under microgravity, such as the determination of lift force and collective motion in blood flow, and some preliminary results obtained in artificial microfluidic circuits functionalized with endothelium that offer interesting perspectives for the study of the interactions between blood and endothelium in healthy condition as well as by mimicking the degradation of glycocalyx caused by long space missions. A direct comparison between experiments and simulations is discussed. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Visualization of Thin Liquid Crystal Bubbles in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C. S.; Clark, N. A.; Maclennan, J. E.; Glaser, M. A.; Tin, P.; Stannarius, R.; Hall, N.; Storck, J.; Sheehan, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) experiment exploits the unique characteristics of freely suspended liquid crystals in a microgravity environment to advance the understanding of fluid state physics.

  15. The physics of the low-temperature plasma in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracik, J.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of low-temperature plasma research in Czechoslovakia since 1954 and its main results are pointed out. In the first years, various processes in electric discharges and electromagnetic acceleration of plasma clusters were studied at Czechoslovak universities and in the Institute of Physics. In the study of ionization waves, Czechoslovak physicists achieved world priority. Later on, low-temperature plasma investigation began in the Institute of Plasma Physics, founded in 1959. The issues of plasma interaction with the solid state and plasma applications in plasma chemistry were studied mainly by its Department of Applied Plasma Physics. The main effort of this group, transferred recently to the Institute of Physics, is aimed at thin film production and plasma-surface interactions; similar experimental studies are also carried out at universities in Brno and Bratislava. Last but not least, arc spraying of powder materials using water-cooled plasmatrons is being developed by the Department of Plasma Technology of the Institute of Plasma Physics. (J.U.)

  16. Actin dynamics in mouse fibroblasts in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Maarten J. A.; Bijvelt, Jose J.; Boonstra, Johannes

    2007-09-01

    After stimulating with the growth factor PDGF, cells exhibit abundant membrane ruffling and other morphological changes under normal gravity conditions. These morphological changes are largely determined by the actin microfilament system. Now these actin dynamics were studied under microgravity conditions in mouse fibroblasts during the DELTA mission. The aim of the present study was to describe the actin morphology in detail, to establish the effect of PDGF on actin morphology and to study the role of several actin-interacting proteins involved in introduced actin dynamics in microgravity. Identical experiments were conducted at 1G on earth as a reference. No results in microgravity were obtained due to a combination of malfunctioning hardware and unfulfilled temperature requirements.

  17. High temperature strain of metals and alloys. Physical fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, V. [National Technical Univ., Zaporozhye (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    The author shows how new in-situ X-ray investigations and transmission electron microscope studies lead to novel explanations of high-temperature deformation and creep in pure metals, solid solutions and super alloys. This approach is the first to find unequivocal and quantitative expressions for the macroscopic deformation rate by means of three groups of parameters: substructural characteristics, physical material constants and external conditions. Creep strength of the studied uptodate single crystal super alloys is greatly increased over conventional polycrystalline super alloys. The contents of this book include: macroscopic characteristics of strain at high temperatures; experimental equipment and technique of in situ X-ray investigations; experimental data and structural parameters in deformed metals; sub-boundaries as dislocation sources and obstacles; the physical mechanism of creep and the quantitative structural model; simulation of the parameters evolution; system of differential equations; high-temperature deformation of industrial super alloys; single crystals of super alloys; effect of composition, orientation and temperature on properties; and creep of some refractory metals.

  18. Association and dissociation of Feshbach molecules in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2016-05-01

    NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a multi-user facility scheduled for launch to the ISS in 2017. Our flight experiments with CAL will characterize and mitigate leading-order systematics in dual-atomic-species atom interferometers in microgravity relevant for future fundamental physics missions in space. Here, we study the RF association and dissociation of weakly bound heteronuclear Feshbach molecules for expected parameters relevant for the microgravity environment of CAL. This includes temperatures on the pico-Kelvin range and atomic densities as low as 108/ cm3. We show that under such conditions, thermal and loss effects can be greatly suppressed, resulting in high efficiency in both association and dissociation of extremely weakly bound Feshbach molecules and allowing for high accuracy determination coherent properties of such processes. Our theoretical model for 41 K-87 Rb mixture includes thermal, loss, and density effects in a simple and conceptually clear manner. We derive several conditions in terms of the temperature, density and scattering lengths, determining the regime in which one can achieve efficient association and dissociation. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Turning toys into microgravity machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumners, C.; Reiff, P.

    The Toys in Space program communicates the experience of being in space and ultimately living in space. In space, what would happen to a yo-yo's speed, a top's wobble, or your skill in playing soccer, throwing a boomerang or jumping rope? Discover how these toys and others have performed in microgravity and how these demonstrations can link children to the space program. On April 12, 1985 astronauts carried the first experiment package of miniature mechanical systems called toys into space. Since that time 54 toys have been demonstrated in microgravity. This summer, NASA and the Houston Museum of Natural Science have sponsored the first International Toys in Space project with sixteen toys chosen for their popularity and relevance around the world. This set of toys takes advantage of the larger Space Station by providing toys that take up more room - from two-person games of soccer, lacrosse, marbles, and hockey to a jump rope and several kinds of yoyos. Three earlier Toys in Space missions have shown that toys are ideal machines to demonstrate how gravity affects moving objects on the Earth's surface and how the motions of these objects change in microgravity. In this presentation, participants actually experiment with miniature versions of toys, predict their behavior on orbit, and watch the surprising results. Participants receive toy patterns to share with young people at home, around the world. The Toys in Space program scales for all ages. Young learners can use their observation and comparison skills while older students apply physics concepts to toy behaviors. Concepts demonstrated include all of Newton's Laws of Motion, gyroscopic stability, centripetal force, density, as well as conservation of linear and angular momentum.

  20. Unit Operations in Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David T.; Pettit, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    Presents some of the work currently under way in the development of microgravity chemical processes. Highlights some of the opportunities for materials processing in outer space. Emphasizes some of the contributions that chemical engineers can make in this emerging set of technologies. (TW)

  1. Solidification under microgravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    However, in order to assess the models, experiments able to separate convection from the other mechanisms are still needed. This has led to conducting experiments in microgravity environment on inoculated Al–Cu alloys to minimise convection so that diffusive transport mechanism is dominant and in which density of the.

  2. A hydroponic design for microgravity and gravity installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Judith; Leggett, Nickolaus

    1990-01-01

    A hydroponic system is presented that is designed for use in microgravity or gravity experiments. The system uses a sponge-like growing medium installed in tubular modules. The modules contain the plant roots and manage the flow of the nutrient solution. The physical design and materials considerations are discussed, as are modifications of the basic design for use in microgravity or gravity experiments. The major external environmental requirements are also presented.

  3. Low temperature synthesis of Zn nanowires by physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Philipp; Kast, Michael; Brueckl, Hubert [Austrian Research Centers GmbH ARC, Nano- Systemtechnologies, Donau-City-Strasse 1, A-1220 Wien (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate catalytic growth of zinc nanowires by physical vapor deposition at modest temperatures of 125-175 C on various substrates. In contrast to conventional approaches using tube furnaces our home-built growth system allows to control the vapor sources and the substrate temperature separately. The silicon substrates were sputter coated with a thin gold layer as metal catalyst. The samples were heated to the growth temperature and subsequently exposed to the zinc vapor at high vacuum conditions. The work pressure was adjusted by the partial pressure of oxygen or argon flow gas. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterizations revealed that the nanowires exhibit straight, uniform morphology and have diameters in the range of 50-350 nm and lengths up to 70 {mu}m. The Zn nanowires grow independently of the substrates crystal orientation via a catalytic vapor-solid growth mechanism. Since no nanowire formation was observed without gold coating, we expect that the onedimensional growth is initiated by a surface reactive Au seed. ZnO nanowires can be produced in the same preparation chamber by oxidation at 500 C in 1atm (80% Ar, 20% O{sub 2}) for 1 hour. ZnO is highly attractive for sensor applications.

  4. Microgravity Two-Phase Flow Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, M.; Chao, D.

    1999-01-01

    Two-phase flows under microgravity condition find a large number of important applications in fluid handling and storage, and spacecraft thermal management. Specifically, under microgravity condition heat transfer between heat exchanger surfaces and fluids depend critically on the distribution and interaction between different fluid phases which are often qualitatively different from the gravity-based systems. Heat transfer and flow analysis in two-phase flows under these conditions require a clear understanding of the flow pattern transition and development of appropriate dimensionless scales for its modeling and prediction. The physics of this flow is however very complex and remains poorly understood. This has led to various inadequacies in flow and heat transfer modeling and has made prediction of flow transition difficult in engineering design of efficient thermal and flow systems. In the present study the available published data for flow transition under microgravity condition are considered for mapping. The transition from slug to annular flow and from bubbly to slug flow are mapped using dimensionless variable combination developed in a previous study by the authors. The result indicate that the new maps describe the flow transitions reasonably well over the range of the data available. The transition maps are examined and the results are discussed in relation to the presumed balance of forces and flow dynamics. It is suggested that further evaluation of the proposed flow and transition mapping will require a wider range of microgravity data expected to be made available in future studies.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative imaging in microgravity combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Karen J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the imaging techniques implemented by researchers in the microgravity combustion program shows that for almost any system, imaging of the flame may be accomplished in a variety of ways. Standard and intensified video, high speed, and infrared cameras and fluorescence, laser schlieren, rainbow schlieren, soot volume fraction, and soot temperature imaging have all been used in the laboratory and many in reduced gravity to make the necessary experimental measurements.

  6. Complex influence of factors of a Space on materials and devices of electronics in the microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grichshenko, Valentina; Zhantayev, Zhumabek

    In work the new physical model of the processes occurring in materials and devices of electronics by influence of the Cosmic Rays in the conditions of the microgravity is presented. The model describes features of formation of the area of radiation defects (ARD) in electronics materials in the conditions of the microgravity. The mechanism of interaction of ARD with the memory in microgravity conditions reduce to failures of the onboard is considered. Results of failures of memory in Space will be included.

  7. Complex influence of space environment on materials and electronic devices in the conditions of microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musabayev, T.; Zhantayev, Zh.; Grichshenko, V.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a new physical model describing the processes in materials and electronic devices under the influence of cosmic rays in microgravity. The model identifies specific features of formation of the area of radiation defects (ARD) in the electronic materials in microgravity. The mechanism of interaction between the ARD and memory modules in microgravity causing malfunction and failure of onboard electronics is considered. The results of failure of memory modules under real conditions are presented.

  8. Microgravity particle reduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Vanessa; Joslin, Michelle; Mateo, Lili; Tubbs, Tracey

    1988-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) project, sponsored by NASA, is assembling the knowledge required to design, construct, and operate a system which will grow and process higher plants in space for the consumption by crew members of a space station on a long term space mission. The problem of processing dry granular organic materials in microgravity is discussed. For the purpose of research and testing, wheat was chosen as the granular material to be ground into flour. Possible systems which were devised to transport wheat grains into the food processor, mill the wheat into flour, and transport the flour to the food preparation system are described. The systems were analyzed and compared and two satisfactory systems were chosen. Prototypes of the two preferred systems are to be fabricated next semester. They will be tested under simulated microgravity conditions and revised for maximum effectiveness.

  9. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  10. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    Microgravity is an abnormal environmental condition that plays no role in the functioning of biosphere. Nevertheless, the chronic effect of microgravity in space flight as an unfamiliar factor does not prevent the development of adaptive reactions at the cellular level. In real microgravity in space flight under the more or less optimal conditions for plant growing, namely temperature, humidity, CO2, light intensity and directivity in the hardware angiosperm plants perform an “reproductive imperative”, i.e. they flower, fruit and yield viable seeds. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part on reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of the identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and subcellular level in real and simulated microgravity is considered. Cytological studies of plants developing in real and simulated microgravity made it possible to establish that the processes of mitosis, cytokinesis, and tissue differentiation of vegetative and generative organs are largely normal. At the same time, under microgravity, essential reconstruction in the structural and functional organization of cell organelles and cytoskeleton, as well as changes in cell metabolism and homeostasis have been described. In addition, new interesting data concerning the influence of altered gravity on lipid peroxidation intensity, the level of reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant system activity, just like on the level of gene expression and synthesis of low-molecular and high-molecular heat shock proteins were recently obtained. So, altered gravity caused time-dependent increasing of the HSP70 and HSP90 levels in cells, that may indicate temporary strengthening of their functional loads that is necessary for re-establish a new cellular homeostasis. Relative qPCR results showed that

  11. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry (AMCIL) is a microgravity compatible liquid / liquid vapor, two-phase laundry system with water jet...

  12. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 10 17 to 10 18 cm -3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO 2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  13. Countermeasures to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttges, Marvin W.

    1989-01-01

    Biological systems ranging from the most simple to the most complex generally survive exposure to microgravity. Changes in many characteristics of biological systems are well documented as a consequence of space flight. Attempts to devise countermeasures to microgravity may have direct pragmatic consequences for crew protection and may provide additional insights into the nature of microgravity influences on biological systems. Some of the most well documented changes occur in humans who have experienced space flight. Changes appear to be transient. Space adaption syndrome occurs relatively briefly whereas bone deterioration may require months of postflight time for restoration. It seems critical to recognize that these changes and others may derive from rather passive, active or even reactive changes in the biological systems that are hosts to them. For example, hydrostatic fluid redistributions may be quite passive occurrences that are realized through extensive fluid channels. Changes occur in cell metabolism because of fluid, nutrient and gas redistributions. Equally important are the misconstrued messages likely to be carried by fluid redistributions. These reactive events can trigger, for example, loss of fluids and electrolytes through altered kidney function. Each of these considerations must be evaluated in regard to the biological site affected. Countermeasures to the vast range of biological changes and sites are difficult to envision. The most obvious countermeasure is the restoration of gravity-like influences. Some options are discussed. Recent work has focussed on the use of magnetic fields. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) are shown to alleviate bone deterioration produced in rodents exposed to tail suspension. Methods of PEMF exposure are consistent with human use in space. Related methods may provide muscular and neural benefits.

  14. Microgravity and Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal growth has been seen as an ideal experiment to make use of the reduced acceleration environment provided by an orbiting spacecraft. The experiments are small, simply operated and have a high potential scientific and economic impact. In this review we examine the theoretical reasons why microgravity should be a beneficial environment for crystal growth and survey the history of experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on unmanned spacecraft, and on the Mir space station. Finally we outline the direction for optimizing the future use of orbiting platforms.

  15. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied wthin linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). mercury within the MHNC scheme via effective ion-ion potentials which are derived from the polarization function within an extended RPA. The optical properties of dense plasmas, the shift

  16. Straight Ahead in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, G.; Wood, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The subjective straight-ahead direction is a very basic perceptual reference for spatial orientation and locomotion. The perceived straight-ahead along the horizontal and vertical meridian is largely determined by both otolith and somatosensory inputs which are altered in microgravity. The Straight Ahead in Microgravity (SAM) experiment will be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how this spatial processing changes as a function of spaceflight. METHODS Data will be collected before the flight, at one-month intervals during long-duration stay (180 days) on board ISS, and after return to Earth. Control studies will also be performed during parabolic flights. Three different protocols will be used in each test session: (1) Fixation: The subject will be asked to look at actual targets (normal vision) and then to imagine these same targets (occluded vision) in the straight-ahead direction. Targets will be located at near distance (arm s length, 0.5m), medium distance (1 m), and far distance (beyond 2 m). This task will be successively performed with subject s body aligned with the spacecraft interior, and with subject s body tilted forward and backward by an operator. (2) Saccades: The subject will be asked to make horizontal and vertical saccades, first relative to the spacecraft interior reference system, and then relative to the subject s head reference system. This task will be successively performed with subject s body aligned with the spacecraft interior, and with subject s body tilted in roll or in pitch by an operator. (3) Linear Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR): The subject will be asked to stare at actual visual targets (normal vision) at various distances (near, medium, far) in the straight-ahead direction. Vision will then be occluded, and the subject will be asked to continue staring at the same imagined targets while he/she is passively translated forward-backward, up-down, or side-to-side. The subject's body motion will

  17. Laser diagnostics for microgravity droplet studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Rapid advances have recently been made in numerical simulation of droplet combustion under microgravity conditions, while experimental capabilities remain relatively primitive. Calculations can now provide detailed information on mass and energy transport, complex gas-phase chemistry, multi-component molecular diffusion, surface evaporation and heterogeneous reaction, which provides a clearer picture of both quasi-steady as well as dynamic behavior of droplet combustion. Experiments concerning these phenomena typically result in pictures of the burning droplets, and the data therefrom describe droplet surface regression along with flame and soot shell position. With much more precise, detailed, experimental diagnostics, significant gains could be made on the dynamics and flame structural changes which occur during droplet combustion. Since microgravity experiments become increasingly more expensive as they progress from drop towers and flights to spaceborne experiments, there is a great need to maximize the information content from these experiments. Sophisticated measurements using laser diagnostics on individual droplets and combustion phenomena are now possible. These include measuring flow patterns and temperature fields within droplets, vaporization rates and vaporization enhancement, radical species profiling in flames and gas-phase flow-tagging velocimetry. Although these measurements are sophisticated, they have undergone maturation to the degree where with some development, they are applicable to studies of microgravity droplet combustion. This program beginning in September of 1992, will include a series of measurements in the NASA Learjet, KC-135 and Drop Tower facilities for investigating the range of applicability of these diagnostics while generating and providing fundamental data to ongoing NASA research programs in this area. This program is being conducted in collaboration with other microgravity investigators and is aimed toward supplementing

  18. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  19. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and

  20. Straight Ahead in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Vanya, R. D.; Clement, G.

    2014-01-01

    This joint ESA-NASA study will address adaptive changes in spatial orientation related to the subjective straight ahead, and the use of a vibrotactile sensory aid to reduce perceptual errors. The study will be conducted before and after long-duration expeditions to the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how spatial processing of target location is altered following exposure to microgravity. This project specifically addresses the sensorimotor research gap "What are the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission?" Six ISS crewmembers will be requested to participate in three preflight sessions (between 120 and 60 days prior to launch) and then three postflight sessions on R+0/1 day, R+4 +/-2 days, and R+8 +/-2 days. The three specific aims include: (a) fixation of actual and imagined target locations at different distances; (b) directed eye and arm movements along different spatial reference frames; and (c) the vestibulo-ocular reflex during translation motion with fixation targets at different distances. These measures will be compared between upright and tilted conditions. Measures will then be compared with and without a vibrotactile sensory aid that indicates how far one has tilted relative to the straight-ahead direction. The flight study was been approved by the medical review boards and will be implemented in the upcoming Informed Crew Briefings to solicit flight subject participation. Preliminary data has been recorded on 6 subjects during parabolic flight to examine the spatial coding of eye movements during roll tilt relative to perceived orientations while free-floating during the microgravity phase of parabolic flight or during head tilt in normal gravity. Binocular videographic recordings obtained in darkness allowed us to quantify the mean deviations in gaze trajectories along both horizontal and vertical coordinates relative to the aircraft and head orientations. During some parabolas, a vibrotactile sensory aid provided

  1. Liposome formation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    Liposomes are artificial vesicles with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The formation of liposomes is a self-assembly process that is driven by the amphipathic nature of phospholipid molecules and can be observed during the removal of detergent from phospholipids dissolved in detergent micelles. As detergent concentration in the mixed micelles decreases, the non-polar tail regions of phospholipids produce a hydrophobic effect that drives the micelles to fuse and form planar bilayers in which phospholipids orient with tail regions to the center of the bilayer and polar head regions to the external surface. Remaining detergent molecules shield exposed edges of the bilayer sheet from the aqueous environment. Further removal of detergent leads to intramembrane folding and membrane vesiculation, forming liposomes. We have observed that the formation of liposomes is altered in microgravity. Liposomes that were formed at 1-g did not exceed 150 nm in diameter, whereas liposomes that were formed during spaceflight exhibited diameters up to 2000 nm. Using detergent-stabilized planar bilayers, we determined that the stage of liposome formation most influenced by gravity is membrane vesiculation. In addition, we found that small, equipment-induced fluid disturbances increased vesiculation and negated the size-enhancing effects of microgravity. However, these small disturbances had no effect on liposome size at 1-g, likely due to the presence of gravity-induced buoyancy-driven fluid flows (e.g., convection currents). Our results indicate that fluid disturbances, induced by gravity, influence the vesiculation of membranes and limit the diameter of forming liposomes.

  2. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  3. How to Make a Microgravity Drop Tower for Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard; Hall, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity is quite often seen as exotic and special as astronauts float around in the International Space Station, eating MM's in mid-air, and performing science experiments, all done seemingly without gravity being present. Surprisingly enough, up on the ISS there is about 90 of the same gravity that holds you to the floor in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. Participate in this session and you will understand that and more. You can use simple devices to demonstrate microgravity conditions in your classroom or museum exhibit hall. This will be the same microgravity condition that astronauts experience on the ISS, just for a much shorter period of time. Contrary to popular opinion of some people, microgravity is NOT caused by zero gravity up there. Microgravity on the ISS is due to free fall within the Earth's gravitational field. That means you can drop an item in free fall in your classroom and museum exhibit hall and that item will experience microgravity. In this session, a short theory segment will explain and reinforce these concepts so that you may explain to others. The session will concentrate on showing the session participants how to make an effective, but inexpensive, drop tower for use in the classroom. Such a drop tower may be used to reinforce classroom instruction in physics and forces motion as well as serve as a platform for student investigations, classroom competitions, and student science or technology fair entries. Session participants will build their own simple microgravity experiment and operate them in a drop tower, compare results, and modify their experiment based on results. This material is also useful for public demonstrations at school open houses, travelling museum exhibits, fixed museum exhibits, and independent student projects or experiments. These free fall concepts also connect terrestrial demonstrations with planetary moon motion, comet trajectory, and more.

  4. Extracting operative temperatures from temperatures of physical models with thermal inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor

    2000-10-01

    Temperatures of operative temperature models, particularly those of thick-walled models of larger ectotherms, lag behind and are more restricted in range than the operative temperatures they estimate.Algorithms are provided to extract estimates of instantaneous operative temperatures from model temperatures.A simple deconvolution method can be used when wind speeds are constant.An iterative estimation method must be used when wind speed varies during the monitoring period.The iterative method is sensitive to measurement error, and so uses a smoothing filter to limit instabilities. The smoothing also limits the short-term fluctuations in the estimated operative temperature.Iterative estimates of operative temperature suggested time lags of up to 90 min between predicted operative temperatures and model temperatures for desert tortoises (mass=3 kg). Differences this large could affect estimates of time available for foraging.

  5. Extracellular hyperosmolality and body temperature during physical exercise in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, S.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Turlejska, E.; Nazar, K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that thermoregulation during exercise can be affected by extracellular fluid hyperosmolality without changing the plasma Na(+) concentration. The effects of preexercise venous infusions of hypertonic mannitol and NaCl solutions on rectal temperature responses were compared in dogs running at moderate intensity for 60 min on a treadmill. Plasma Na(+) concentration was increased by 12 meq after NaCl infusion, and decreased by 9 meq after mannitol infusion. Both infusions increased plasma by 15 mosmol/kg. After both infusions, rectal temperature was essentially constant during 60 min rest. However, compared with the noninfusion exercise increase in osmolality of 1.3 C, rectal temperature increased by 1.9 C after both postinfusion exercise experiments. It was concluded that inducing extracellular hyperosmolality, without elevating plasma, can induce excessive increases in rectal temperature during exericse but not at rest.

  6. Determination of composition and physical properties of partially ionized plasmas in the function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporowski, B.

    1992-01-01

    The investigations of various kinds of partially ionized plasma were conducted for the pressure of 0.1 MPa and in the range of temperature of 298.15 K to 24000 K. The physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma depend mainly of their composition and temperature. The composition of particular kinds of partially ionized plasmas varies also in the function of temperature. Simultaneous going on of physical and chemical processes in plasma is the reason of difficulties in the calculations of plasma's physical properties. The use of the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics for the calculations of physical properties of partially ionized plasma is impossible. There are enough exact methods for measuring of physical properties of partially ionized plasma. For these reasons the theoretical method using the base of statistic physics was used to calculate the composition and physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  7. Summaries of reports of the 30. Conference on low-temperature physics. Pt. 2. Quantum liquids and crystals. Low-temperature solid-state physics. Electron phenomena at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Report thesises of the conference on the low-temperature physics are presented. The fundamental problems of solids low-temperature physics, quantum liquids and crystals. Specific features are considered of structures, magnetic and thermodynamic properties of metals, alloys and other materials, and also optical and electric properties of thin films

  8. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Ma, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Cong; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity can induce a serial of physiological and pathological changes in human body, such as cardiovascular functional disorder, bone loss, muscular atrophy and impaired immune system function, etc. In this research, we focus on the influence of microgravity to vertebrate embryo development. As a powerful model for studying vertebrate development, zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf (hour past fertilization) and 24 hpf were placed into a NASA developed bioreac-tor (RCCS) to simulate microgravity for 64 and 48 hours, respectively. The same number of control embryos from the same parents were placed in a tissue culture dish at the same temper-ature of 28° C. Each experiment was repeated 3 times and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Image analysis of silver stained 2-D gels revealed that 64 from total 292 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations that were significantly (Pmuscle B. Other protein spots showed significant expression alteration will be identified successively and the corresponding genes expression will also be measured by Q-PCR method at different development stages. The data presented in this study illustrate that zebrafish embryo can be significantly induced by microgravity on the expression of proteins involved in bone and muscle formation. Key Words: Danio rerio; Simulated-microgravity; Proteomics

  9. Microgravity influence on the instability of phase separation in protein solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weichun; Zhang, Rui; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Li, Ang

    2015-09-01

    The influence of cooling and heating rates on the spinodal temperature of lysozyme liquid-liquid phase separation was assessed under microgravity and normal gravity. During both heating and cooling, the mean spinodal temperature was independent of gravity conditions and the rate of temperature change. However, during the cooling process, the spinodal temperature was always lower under microgravity than under normal gravity, whereas the opposite effect was observed under heating. We attribute this phenomenon to the hydrodynamic effect. Under normal gravity, mass transfer occurs by universal convection, but under microgravity it can occur only by diffusion. Because of the relatively small diffusivity of lysozyme molecules, the size evolution of the dense liquid domain was slower under microgravity than under normal gravity.

  10. A Test of Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity: Large, Well-Ordered Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lovelace, Jeff; Bellamy, Henry D.; Snell, Edward H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of insulin grown in microgravity on space shuttle mission STS-95 were extremely well-ordered and unusually large (many > 2 mm). The physical characteristics of six microgravity and six earth-grown crystals were examined by X-ray analysis employing superfine f slicing and unfocused synchrotron radiation. This experimental setup allowed hundreds of reflections to be precisely examined for each crystal in a short period of time. The microgravity crystals were on average 34 times larger, had 7 times lower mosaicity, had 54 times higher reflection peak heights and diffracted to significantly higher resolution than their earth grown counterparts. A single mosaic domain model could account for reflections in microgravity crystals whereas reflections from earth crystals required a model with multiple mosaic domains. This statistically significant and unbiased characterization indicates that the microgravity environment was useful for the improvement of crystal growth and resultant diffraction quality in insulin crystals and may be similarly useful for macromolecular crystals in general.

  11. Outdoor temperature, precipitation, and wind speed affect physical activity levels in children: a longitudinal cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Nicholas M.; Myer, Gregory D.; Kalkwarf, Heidi J.; Woo, Jessica G.; Khoury, Philip R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Daniels, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate effects of local weather conditions on physical activity in early childhood. Methods Longitudinal prospective cohort study of 372 children, 3 years old at enrollment, drawn from a major US metropolitan community. Accelerometer-measured (RT3) physical activity was collected every 4 months over 5 years and matched with daily weather measures: day length, heating/cooling degrees (degrees mean temperature Heating and cooling degrees were negatively associated with total physical activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity and positively associated with inactivity (all Pheating degrees there was a five-minute daily reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. For every additional 10 cooling degrees there was a 17-minute reduction in moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Inclement weather (higher/lower temperature, greater wind speed, more rain/snow) is associated with less physical activity in young children. These deleterious effects should be considered when planning physical activity research, interventions, and policies. PMID:25423667

  12. Low-energy physics of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is argued that the low-energy properties of high temperature superconductors are dominated by the interaction between the mobile holes and a particular class of collective modes, corresponding to local large-amplitude low-energy fluctuations in the hole density. The latter are a consequence of the competition between the effects of long-range Coulomb interactions and the tendency of a low concentration of holes in an antiferromagnet to phase separate. The low-energy behavior of the system is governed by the same fixed point as the two-channel Kondo problem, which accounts for the ''universality'' of the properties of the cuprate superconductors. Predictions of the optical properties and the spin dynamics are compared with experiment. The pairing resonance of the two Kondo problem gives a mechanism of high temperature superconductivity with an unconventional symmetry of the order parameter

  13. Physical-chemical quality of onion analyzed under drying temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaeni, M.; Arifin, U. F.; Sasongko, S. B.

    2017-03-01

    Drying is one of conventional processes to enhance shelf life of onion. However, the active compounds such as vitamin and anthocyanin (represented in red color), degraded due to the introduction of heat during the process. The objective of this research was to evaluate thiamine content as well as color in onion drying under different temperature. As an indicator, the thiamine and color was observed every 30 minutes for 2 hours. Results showed that thiamine content and color were sensitvely influenced by the temperature change. For example, at 50°C for 2 hours drying process, the thiamine degradation was 55.37 %, whereas, at 60°C with same drying time, the degradation was 74.01%. The quality degradation also increased by prolonging drying time.

  14. Body temperature rhythm and control of the time of the best physical condition by performing physical labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imafuku, Michio

    2016-01-01

    The initial examination of a male subject's body temperature revealed that it was highest during the evening. Based on this observation, I measured grasping power, calculation speed, performance time on a light sensory task and body temperature, all of which were highest or best during the evening. The time of this subject's best physical condition shifted from the evening to morning hours when the subject executed hard physical labor in the morning, and the shifted phase was maintained after the termination of the labor period.

  15. Overview of NASA's Microgravity Materials Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James Patton; Grugel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The NASA microgravity materials program is dedicated to conducting microgravity experiments and related modeling efforts that will help us understand the processes associated with the formation of materials. This knowledge will help improve ground based industrial production of such materials. The currently funded investigations include research on the distribution of dopants and formation of defects in semiconductors, transitions between columnar and dendritic grain morphology, coarsening of phase boundaries, competition between thermally and kinetically favored phases, and the formation of glassy vs. crystalline material. NASA microgravity materials science investigators are selected for funding either through a proposal in response to a NASA Research Announcement or by participation in a team proposing to a foreign agency research announcement. In the latter case, a US investigator participating in a successful proposal to a foreign agency can then apply to NASA for funding of an unsolicited proposal. The program relies on cooperation with other aerospace partners from around the world. The ISS facilities used for these investigations are provided primarily by partnering with foreign agencies and in most cases the US investigators are working as a part of a larger team studying a specific area of materials science. The following facilities are to be utilized for the initial investigations. The ESA provided Low Gradient Facility and the Solidification and Quench Inserts to the Materials Research Rack/Materials Science Laboratory are to be used primarily for creating bulk samples that are directionally solidified or quenched from a high temperature melt. The CNES provided DECLIC facility is used to observe morphological development in transparent materials. The ESA provided Electro-Magnetic Levitator (EML) is designed to levitate, melt and then cool samples in order to study nucleation behavior. The facility provides conditions in which nucleation of the solid is

  16. The study of some physical properties of high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Atif Mahmoud

    2008-07-01

    The phenomenon of superconductivity, the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the Cuprates and the properties of these materials is described in the introductory chapter. It also includes a discussion of the pseudogap, which has remained a mystery as has the high transition temperature. Possible applications of high temperature superconductivity are reviewed before the theories by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer (BCS) and Ginzburg and Landau are briefly sketched. The last section gives excerpts of the by now vast literature on this subject, focussing on the role impurities play in this context. The second chapter develops the mathematical tools and the theoretical background for the description of many-body systems. Various Green's functions are introduced which are then used to describe scattering of quasiparticles off defects of arbitrary strength. They are also required to calculate the a.c. conductivity, for which an expression is derived using linear response theory. The convergence problems one encounters when actually calculating the conductivity are briefly discussed. Detailed calculations for the normal state are presented in the third chapter and in the appendix. The third Chapter begins with a detailed presentation of the tight binding model for the energy dispersion because this model appears to give a more accurate description of the electronic properties of high temperature superconductors than the nearly free electron model. The shape of the two-dimensional Fermi surface is calculated and displayed as function of band filling and the next-nearest neighbor hopping integral B, assuming a rigid band. B plays an important role in the formation of so-called hot spots. The quasiparticle density of states and its Hilbert transform F({omega}) are solved by means of complete elliptic integrals formalism. These results are used to obtain impurity bound states. A simple model for the superconductivity in the cuprate materials is developed on

  17. The study of some physical properties of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Atif Mahmoud

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of superconductivity, the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in the Cuprates and the properties of these materials is described in the introductory chapter. It also includes a discussion of the pseudogap, which has remained a mystery as has the high transition temperature. Possible applications of high temperature superconductivity are reviewed before the theories by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer (BCS) and Ginzburg and Landau are briefly sketched. The last section gives excerpts of the by now vast literature on this subject, focussing on the role impurities play in this context. The second chapter develops the mathematical tools and the theoretical background for the description of many-body systems. Various Green's functions are introduced which are then used to describe scattering of quasiparticles off defects of arbitrary strength. They are also required to calculate the a.c. conductivity, for which an expression is derived using linear response theory. The convergence problems one encounters when actually calculating the conductivity are briefly discussed. Detailed calculations for the normal state are presented in the third chapter and in the appendix. The third Chapter begins with a detailed presentation of the tight binding model for the energy dispersion because this model appears to give a more accurate description of the electronic properties of high temperature superconductors than the nearly free electron model. The shape of the two-dimensional Fermi surface is calculated and displayed as function of band filling and the next-nearest neighbor hopping integral B, assuming a rigid band. B plays an important role in the formation of so-called hot spots. The quasiparticle density of states and its Hilbert transform F(ω) are solved by means of complete elliptic integrals formalism. These results are used to obtain impurity bound states. A simple model for the superconductivity in the cuprate materials is developed on the basis

  18. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  19. Technology base for microgravity horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, R. L.; Magnuson, J. W.; Scruby, R. R.; Scheld, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced microgravity plant biology research and life support system development for the spacecraft environment are critically hampered by the lack of a technology base. This inadequacy stems primarily from the fact that microgravity results in a lack of convective currents and phase separation as compared to the one gravity environment. A program plan is being initiated to develop this technology base. This program will provide an iterative flight development effort that will be closely integrated with both basic science investigations and advanced life support system development efforts incorporating biological processes. The critical considerations include optimum illumination methods, root aeration, root and shoot support, and heat rejection and gas exchange in the plant canopy.

  20. Surfactant-based critical phenomena in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaler, Eric W.; Paulaitis, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to characterize by experiment and theoretically both the kinetics of phase separation and the metastable structures produced during phase separation in a microgravity environment. The particular systems we are currently studying are mixtures of water, nonionic surfactants, and compressible supercritical fluids at temperatures and pressures where the coexisting liquid phases have equal densities (isopycnic phases). In this report, we describe experiments to locate equilibrium isopycnic phases and to determine the 'local' phase behavior and critical phenomena at nearby conditions of temperature, pressure, and composition. In addition, we report the results of preliminary small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments to characterize microstructures that exist in these mixtures at different fluid densities.

  1. Organ preservation at low temperature: a physical and biological problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussedat, J.; Boutron, P.; Coquilhat, P.; Descotes, J. L.; Faure, G.; Ferrari, M.; Kay, L.; Mazuer, J.; Monod, P.; Odin, J.; Ray, A.

    1993-02-01

    Before reporting the preliminary results obtained by our group, we first review the main problems to be solved in the preservation of organs at very low temperature, before being transplanted. This cryopreservation is being presently explored in order to increase the preservation tiine of transplants and to contribute to a better control of the donor recipient compatibility. We recall that, for the isolated cells to be preserved at nitrogen liquid temperatures, as now successfully performed at industrial scale, it is necessary to immerse the cells in a solution containing more or less t,oxical additives (so-called cryopro tect ants). Furthermore cooling and warming rates must be specific of each type of cells. We then show that cryo preservation could be extrapolated to whole organs by means of vitrification, the only way to avoid any ice crystallization. This vitrification will be the result of two directions of research, the one on the elaboration of cryoprotective solutions, the least toxic possible, the other on the obtention of high enough and homogeneous cooling and warming rates. After having briefly summarized the state of research on the heart and kidneys of small mammals, we present the first results that we have obtained on perfusion at 4 ^{circ}C and the auto-transplantation of rabbit kidneys, on the toxicity of a new cryoprotectant, 2,3-butanediol, on the heart rate, and on the cooling of experimental models of organs. Avant de présenter les résultats préliminaires obtenus par notre groupe, nous passons d'abord en revue les principaux problèmes à résoudre pour conserver à très basse température des organes en vue de leur transplantation. Cette cryopréservation est une voie de recherche actuellement explorée pour augmenter la durée de conservation des greffons et permettre ainsi de mieux contrôler la compatibilité donneur-receveur. Nous rappelons que la conservation des cellules isolées à la température de l'azote liquide, actuellement

  2. The economics of microgravity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Jeanne M; Olson, John M

    2015-01-01

    In this introduction to the economics of microgravity research, DiFrancesco and Olson explore the existing landscape and begin to define the requirements for a robust, well-funded microgravity research environment. This work chronicles the history, the opportunities, and how the decisions made today will shape the future. The past 60 years have seen tremendous growth in the capabilities and resources available to conduct microgravity science. However, we are now at an inflection point for the future of humanity in space. A confluence of factors including the rise of commercialization, a shifting funding landscape, and a growing international presence in space exploration, and terrestrial research platforms are shaping the conditions for full-scale microgravity research programs. In this first discussion, the authors focus on the concepts of markets, tangible and intangible value, research pathways and their implications for investments in research projects, and the collateral platforms needed. The opportunities and implications for adopting new approaches to funding and market-making illuminate how decisions made today will affect the speed of advances the community will be able to achieve in the future.

  3. [The effect of sintering temperature on the physical and mechanical properties of dental zirconia toughened ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Ji-hua; Sun, Lian-jun

    2003-07-01

    To investigate the effects of sintering temperature on the physical and mechanical properties of dental zirconia toughened ceramic (ZTC). 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia compacts were prepared by dry press method and then sintered at 1,490 degrees C, 1,530 degrees C, 1,570 degrees C and 1,610 degrees C respectively. The physical properties and bending strength were then measured. The result of the study indicated along with the rise of sintering temperature density and shrinkage of ZTC increased, but the pore structure decreased. It also showed the peak of bending strength was in 1,570 degrees C. In terms of sintering temperature and bending strength among the selected temperature, the best sintering temperature of 3 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia should be about 1,570 degrees C.

  4. A physics-based temperature model for ultrasonic vibration-assisted pelleting of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxu; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meng; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    Temperature in ultrasonic vibration-assisted (UV-A) pelleting of cellulosic biomass has a significant impact on pellet quality. However, there are no reports on temperature models for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. The development of a physics-based temperature model can help to explain experimentally determined relations between UV-A pelleting process variables and temperature, and provide guidelines to optimize these process variables in order to produce pellets of good quality. This paper presents such a model for UV-A pelleting of cellulosic biomass. Development of the model is described first. Then temperature distribution is investigated using the model, and temperature difference between the top and the bottom surfaces of a pellet is explained. Based on this model, relations between process variables (ultrasonic power and pelleting duration) and temperature are predicted. Experiments were conducted for model verification, and the results agreed well with model predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Microgravity Science and Applications: Program Tasks and Bibliography for Fiscal Year 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) sponsors a program that expands the use of space as a laboratory for the study of important physical, chemical, and biochemical processes. The primary objective of the program is to broaden the value and capabilities of human presence in space by exploiting the unique characteristics of the space environment for research. However, since flight opportunities are rare and flight research development is expensive, a vigorous ground-based research program, from which only the best experiments evolve, is critical to the continuing strength of the program. The microgravity environment affords unique characteristics that allow the investigation of phenomena and processes that are difficult or impossible to study an Earth. The ability to control gravitational effects such as buoyancy driven convection, sedimentation, and hydrostatic pressures make it possible to isolate phenomena and make measurements that have significantly greater accuracy than can be achieved in normal gravity. Space flight gives scientists the opportunity to study the fundamental states of physical matter-solids, liquids and gasses-and the forces that affect those states. Because the orbital environment allows the treatment of gravity as a variable, research in microgravity leads to a greater fundamental understanding of the influence of gravity on the world around us. With appropriate emphasis, the results of space experiments lead to both knowledge and technological advances that have direct applications on Earth. Microgravity research also provides the practical knowledge essential to the development of future space systems. The Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications (OLMSA) is responsible for planning and executing research stimulated by the Agency's broad scientific goals. OLMSA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division (MSAD) is responsible for guiding and focusing a comprehensive program, and currently manages

  6. Burning in Outer Space: Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkowsky, Bernard; Aldushin, Anatoly

    2000-01-01

    A better understanding of combustion can lead to significant technological advances, such as less polluting, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Unfortunately, gravity can interfere with the study of combustion. Gravity drags down gases that are cooler- and, therefore, denser-than heated gases. This movement mixes the fuel and the oxidizer substance that promotes burning. Because of this mixing, an observer cannot necessarily distinguish what is happening as a result of the natural combustion process and what is caused, by the pull of gravity. To remove this uncertainty, scientists can conduct experiments that simulate the negation of gravity through freefall. This condition is known as a microgravity environment. A micro-gravity experiment may take place in a chamber that is dropped down a hole or from a high-speed drop tower. The experiment also be conducted in an airplane or a rocket during freefall in a parabolic flight path. This method provides less than a minute of microgravity at most. An experiment that requires the prolonged absence of gravity may necessitate the use of an orbiting spacecraft as a venue. However, access to an orbital laboratory is difficult to acquire. High-end computing centers such as the NCCS can provide a practical alternative to operating in microgravity. Scientists can model phenomena such as combustion without gravitys observational interference. The study of microgravity combustion produces important benefits beyond increased observational accuracy. Certain valuable materials that are produced through combustion can be formed with a more uniform crystal structure-and, therefore, improved structural quality-when the pull of gravity is removed. Furthermore, understanding how fires propagate in the absence of gravity can improve fire safety aboard spacecraft.

  7. Electrochemical deposited nickel nanowires: influence of deposition bath temperature on the morphology and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofiah, A. G. N.; Kananathan, J.; Samykano, M.; Ulakanathan, S.; Lah, N. A. C.; Harun, W. S. W.; Sudhakar, K.; Kadirgama, K.; Ngui, W. K.; Siregar, J. P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the electrolytic bath temperature on the morphology and physical properties of nickel (Ni) nanowires electrochemically deposited into the anodic alumina oxide porous membrane (AAO). The synthesis was performed using nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4.6H2O) and boric acid (H3BO3) as an electrolytic bath for the electrochemical deposition of Ni nanowires. During the experiment, the electrolyte bath temperature varied from 40°C, 80°C, and 120°C. After the electrochemical deposition process, AAO templates cleaned with distilled water preceding to dissolution in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution to obtain free-standing Ni nanowires. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis were employed to characterize the morphology and physical properties of the synthesized Ni nanowires. Finding reveals the electrodeposition bath temperature significantly influences the morphology and physical properties of the synthesized Ni nanowires. Rougher surface texture, larger crystal size, and longer Ni nanowires obtained as the deposition bath temperature increased. From the physical properties properties analysis, it can be concluded that deposition bath temperature influence the physical properties of Ni nanowires.

  8. Theoretical studies of association and dissociation of Feshbach molecules in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose; Williams, Jason

    2017-04-01

    NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a multi-user facility scheduled for launch to the ISS in 2017. Our flight experiments with CAL will characterize and mitigate leading-order systematics in dual-atomic-species atom interferometers in microgravity relevant for future fundamental physics missions in space. As part of the initial state preparation for interferometry studies, here, we study the RF association and dissociation of weakly bound heteronuclear Feshbach molecules for expected parameters relevant for the microgravity environment of CAL. This includes temperatures on the pico-Kelvin range and atomic densities as low as 108/cm3. We show that under such conditions, thermal and loss effects can be greatly suppressed, resulting in high efficiency in both association and dissociation of extremely weakly bound Feshbach molecules and allowing for high accuracy determination coherent properties of such processes. In addition we study the possibility to implement delta-kick cooling techniques for weakly bound heteronuclear molecules and explore numerically other methods for molecular association and dissociation including the effects of three-body interactions. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  9. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids. PMID:23959901

  10. Meniscus effect in microgravity materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    While the microgravity environment of orbit eliminates a number of effects that impede the formation of materials on Earth, the change can also cause new, unwanted effects. A mysterious phenomenon, known as detached solidification, apparently stems from a small hydrostatic force that turns out to be pervasive. The contact of the solid with the ampoule transfers stress to the growing crystal and causing unwanted dislocations and twins. William Wilcox and Liya Regel of Clarkson University theorize that the melt is in contact with the ampoule wall, while the solid is not, and the melt and solid are cornected by a meniscus. Their work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Researcxh, and builds on earlier work by Dr. David Larson of the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

  11. Fundamental Interactions for Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space are a key element for several applications of interest to NASA. Our proposal for participating in the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station is dedicated to mitigating the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision AI-based measurements of fundamental physics in microgravity. One important focus of our proposal is to enhance initial state preparation for dual-species AIs. Our proposed filtering scheme uses Feshbach molecular states to create highly correlated mixtures of heteronuclear atomic gases in both their position and momentum distributions. We will detail our filtering scheme along with the main factors that determine its efficiency. We also show that the atomic and molecular heating and loss rates can be mitigated at the unique temperature and density regimes accessible on CAL. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of 120 papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 18-20, 1999. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from at least eight international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for the Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  13. Physical properties evaluation of roselle extract-egg white mixture under various drying temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyastuti, M. S.; Kumoro, A. C.; Djaeni, M.

    2017-03-01

    Roselle contains anthocyanin that is potential for food colorant. Occasionally, roselle extract is provided in dry powder prepared under high temperature. In this case, the anthocyanin color degrades due to the intervention of heat. The foammat drying with egg white is a potential method to speed up the drying process as well as minimize color degradation. This research aims to study the physical properties of roselle extract under foam mat drying. As indicators, the powder size and color intensity were observed. The result showed that at high temperatures, roselle powder under foam mat drying has the fine size with porous structure. However, at the higher the drying temperature the color retention decreased.

  14. Metrological Array of Cyber-Physical Systems. Part 12. Study of Quantum Unit of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svyatoslav YATSYSHYN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The reference measure of temperature may be embedded in appropriate unit of Cyber-Physical System. Whereas this measure made on the basis of fundamental constants of matter would be installed in such System, the latter will get an extra precision. It is shown that metrologically correct Kelvin redefinition which would be changed by CODATA to 2018 is insufficient to create a Temperature Standard on the basis of fundamental constants of matter. New approach to the mentioned Standard and firstly to the Quantum Unit of Temperature is developed.

  15. Candle Flames in Microgravity Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video of a candle flame burning in space was taken by the Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM) experiment on the Russian Mir space station. It is actually a composite of still photos from a 35mm camera since the video images were too dim. The images show a hemispherically shaped flame, primarily blue in color, with some yellow early int the flame lifetime. The actual flame is quite dim and difficult to see with the naked eye. Nearly 80 candles were burned in this experiment aboard Mir. NASA scientists have also studied how flames spread in space and how to detect fire in microgravity. Researchers hope that what they learn about fire and combustion from the flame ball experiments will help out here on Earth. Their research could help create things such as better engines for cars and airplanes. Since they use very weak flames, flame balls require little fuel. By studying how this works, engineers may be able to design engines that use far less fuel. In addition, microgravity flame research is an important step in creating new safety precautions for astronauts living in space. By understanding how fire works in space, the astronauts can be better prepared to fight it.

  16. Creating Simulated Microgravity Patient Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Victor; Doerr, Harold K.; Bacal, Kira

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) has been tasked by the Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to integrate medical simulation into 1) medical training for ground and flight crews and into 2) evaluations of medical procedures and equipment for the International Space Station (ISS). To do this, the MOST requires patient models that represent the physiological changes observed during spaceflight. Despite the presence of physiological data collected during spaceflight, there is no defined set of parameters that illustrate or mimic a 'space normal' patient. Methods: The MOST culled space-relevant medical literature and data from clinical studies performed in microgravity environments. The areas of focus for data collection were in the fields of cardiovascular, respiratory and renal physiology. Results: The MOST developed evidence-based patient models that mimic the physiology believed to be induced by human exposure to a microgravity environment. These models have been integrated into space-relevant scenarios using a human patient simulator and ISS medical resources. Discussion: Despite the lack of a set of physiological parameters representing 'space normal,' the MOST developed space-relevant patient models that mimic microgravity-induced changes in terrestrial physiology. These models are used in clinical scenarios that will medically train flight surgeons, biomedical flight controllers (biomedical engineers; BME) and, eventually, astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO).

  17. Characterizing the Physical and Thermal Properties of Planetary Regolith at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, James G.; Swanger, Adam; Townsend, Ivan I., III; Sibille, Laurent; Galloway, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The success or failure of in-situ resource utilization for planetary surface exploration-whether for science, colonization, or commercialization-relies heavily on the design and implementation of systems that can effectively process planetary regolith and exploit its potential benefits. In most cases, this challenge necessarily includes the characterization of regolith properties at low temperatures (cryogenic). None of the nearby solar system destinations of interest, such as the moon, Mars and asteroids, possess a sufficient atmosphere to sustain the consistently "high" surface temperatures found on Earth. Therefore, they can experience permanent cryogenic temperatures or dramatic cyclical changes in surface temperature. Characterization of physical properties (e.g., specific heat, thermal and electrical conductivity) over the entire temperature profile is important when planning a mission to a planetary surface; however, the impact on mechanical properties due to the introduction of icy deposits must also be explored in order to devise effective and robust excavation technologies. The Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Laboratory and the Cryogenics Test Laboratory at NASA Kennedy Space Center are developing technologies and experimental methods to address these challenges and to aid in the characterization of the physical and mechanical properties of regolith at cryogenic temperatures. This paper will review the current state of knowledge concerning planetary regolith at low temperature, including that of icy regolith, and describe efforts to manipulate icy regolith through novel penetration and excavation techniques.

  18. Effects of Experimenting with Physical and Virtual Manipulatives on Students' Conceptual Understanding in Heat and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Olympiou, Georgios; Papaevripidou, Marios

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the comparative value of experimenting with physical manipulatives (PM) in a sequential combination with virtual manipulatives (VM), with the use of PM preceding the use of VM, and of experimenting with PM alone, with respect to changes in students' conceptual understanding in the domain of heat and temperature. A…

  19. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  20. Physical properties, molecular structures and protein quality of texturized whey protein isolate: effect of extrusion temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrusion is a powerful food processing operation, which utilizes high temperature and high shear force to produce a product with unique physical and chemical characteristics. Texturization of whey protein isolate (WPI) through extrusion for the production of protein fortified snack foods has provid...

  1. Telemetric Evaluation of Body Temperature and Physical Activity as Predictors of Mortality in a Murine Model of Staphylococcal Enterotoxic Shock

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vlach, Kim

    2000-01-01

    .... This study determined whether body temperature and physical activity, monitored telemetrically, could predict impending death and provide an earlier, more humane experimental endpoint. Methods...

  2. Terrestrial applications of bone and muscle research in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1994-08-01

    Major applications to people on Earth are possible from NASA-sponsored research on bone and muscle which is conducted either in microgravity or on Earth using models mimicking microgravity. In microgravity bone and muscle mass are lost. Humans experience a similar loss under certain conditions on Earth. Bone and muscle loss exist on Earth as humans age from adulthood to senescence, during limb immobilization for healing of orthopedic injuries, during wheelchair confinement because of certain diseases, and during chronic bed rest prescribed for curing of diseases. NASA-sponsored research is dedicated to learning both what cause bone and muscle loss as well as finding out how to prevent this loss. The health ramifications of these discoveries will have major impact. Objective 1.6 of Healthy People 2000, a report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, states that the performance of physical activities that improve muscular strength, muscular endurance, and flexibility is particularly important to maintaining functional independence and social integration in older adults /1/. This objective further states that these types of physical activities are important because they may protect against disability, an event which costs the U.S. economy hugh sums of money. Thus NASA research related to bone and muscle loss has potential major impact on the quality of life in the U.S. Relative to its potential health benefits, NASA and Congressional support of bone and muscle research is funded is a very low level.

  3. International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) Onboard Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) was the first in a series of Shuttle flights dedicated to fundamental materials and life sciences research with the international partners. The participating space agencies included: NASA, the 14-nation European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the French National Center of Space Studies (CNES), the German Space Agency and the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DAR/DLR), and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Dedicated to the study of life and materials sciences in microgravity, the IML missions explored how life forms adapt to weightlessness and investigated how materials behave when processed in space. Both life and materials sciences benefited from the extended periods of microgravity available inside the Spacelab science module in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In this photograph, Astronauts Stephen S. Oswald and Norman E. Thagard handle ampoules used in the Mercuric Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment. Mercury Iodide crystals have practical uses as sensitive x-ray and gamma-ray detectors. In addition to their exceptional electronic properties, these crystals can operate at room temperature rather than at the extremely low temperatures usually required by other materials. Because a bulky cooling system is urnecessary, these crystals could be useful in portable detector devices for nuclear power plant monitoring, natural resource prospecting, biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, and astronomical observation. Managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, IML-1 was launched on January 22, 1992 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery (STS-42 mission).

  4. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  5. Human Performance in a Realistic Instrument-Control Task during Short-Term Microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Steinberg

    Full Text Available Previous studies have documented the detrimental effects of microgravity on human sensorimotor skills. While that work dealt with simple, laboratory-type skills, we now evaluate the effects of microgravity on a complex, realistic instrument-control skill. Twelve participants controlled a simulated power plant during the short-term microgravity intervals of parabolic flight as well as during level flight. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from the power plant. We quantified control efficiency as the participants' net earnings (revenue minus expenses, motor performance as hand kinematics and dynamics, and stress as cortisol level, self-assessed mood and self-assessed workload. We found that compared to normal gravity, control efficiency substantially decreased in microgravity, hand velocity slowed down, and cortisol level and perceived physical strain increased, but other stress and motor scores didn't change. Furthermore, control efficiency was not correlated with motor and stress scores. From this we conclude that realistic instrument control was degraded in short-term microgravity. This degradation can't be explained by the motor and/or stress indicators under study, and microgravity affected motor performance differently in our complex, realistic skill than in the simple, laboratory-type skills of earlier studies.

  6. Human Performance in a Realistic Instrument-Control Task during Short-Term Microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Fabian; Kalicinski, Michael; Dalecki, Marc; Bock, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have documented the detrimental effects of microgravity on human sensorimotor skills. While that work dealt with simple, laboratory-type skills, we now evaluate the effects of microgravity on a complex, realistic instrument-control skill. Twelve participants controlled a simulated power plant during the short-term microgravity intervals of parabolic flight as well as during level flight. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from the power plant. We quantified control efficiency as the participants' net earnings (revenue minus expenses), motor performance as hand kinematics and dynamics, and stress as cortisol level, self-assessed mood and self-assessed workload. We found that compared to normal gravity, control efficiency substantially decreased in microgravity, hand velocity slowed down, and cortisol level and perceived physical strain increased, but other stress and motor scores didn't change. Furthermore, control efficiency was not correlated with motor and stress scores. From this we conclude that realistic instrument control was degraded in short-term microgravity. This degradation can't be explained by the motor and/or stress indicators under study, and microgravity affected motor performance differently in our complex, realistic skill than in the simple, laboratory-type skills of earlier studies.

  7. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaw, W.L.; Mamat, C.R.; Triwahyono, S.; Jalil, A.A.; Bidin, N.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen.

  8. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaw, W.L. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Mamat, C.R., E-mail: che@kimia.fs.utm.my [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Triwahyono, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Jalil, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Energy Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Centre of Hydrogen Energy, Institute of Future Energy, Univerisiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Bidin, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen.

  9. A Geology Sampling System for Microgravity Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Anthony; Naids, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of microgravity bodies is being investigated as a precursor to a Mars surface mission. Asteroids, comets, dwarf planets, and the moons of Mars all fall into this microgravity category and some are been discussed as potential mission targets. Obtaining geological samples for return to Earth will be a major objective for any mission to a microgravity body. Currently the knowledge base for geology sampling in microgravity is in its infancy. Humans interacting with non-engineered surfaces in microgravity environment pose unique challenges. In preparation for such missions a team at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been working to gain experience on how to safely obtain numerous sample types in such an environment. This paper describes the type of samples the science community is interested in, highlights notable prototype work, and discusses an integrated geology sampling solution.

  10. Effect of simulated microgravity on Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Jeffrey J.

    2005-08-01

    A rotating bioreactor was developed to simulate microgravity and its influence was studied on fungal growth. The reactor was designed to simulate microgravity using 'free fall' principle, which creates an apparent weightlessness for a brief period of time. In this experiment, a sealed vertically rotating tube is the reactor in which the cells are grown. For the first time vertically rotating tubes were used to obtain 'free fall' thereby simulating microgravity. Simulated microgravity served significant in the alteration of growth and productivity of Aspergillus niger, a common soil fungi. Two other sets of similar cultures were maintained as still and shake control cultures to compare with the growth and productivity of cells in rotating culture. It was found increased growth and productivity occurred in simulated microgravity. Since this experiment involves growth of cells in a liquid medium, the fluidic effects must also be studied which is a limitation.

  11. On the physics of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2018-04-01

    An extended plasma fluid theory including atomic physics, radiation, electromagnetic and themodynamic forces, external sources of particles, momentum and energy, and kinetic ion orbit loss is employed to derive theoretical expressions that display the role of the various factors involved in the determination of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas. Calculations for current experiments are presented to illustrate the magnitudes of various effects including strong radiative and atomic physics edge cooling effects and strong reduction in ion particle and energy fluxes due to ion orbit loss in the plasma edge. An important new insight is the strong relation between rotation and the edge pressure gradient.

  12. Embryogenic plant cells in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1991-01-01

    In view of circumstantial evidence for the role of gravity (g) in shaping the embryo environment, normal embryo development may not occur reliably and efficiently in the microgravity environment of space. Attention must accordingly be given to those aspects of higher plant reproductive biology in space environments required for the production of viable embryos in a 'seed to seed to seed' experiment. It is suggested that cultured cells can be grown to be morphogenetically competent, and can be evaluated as to their ability to simulate embryogenic events usually associated with fertilized eggs in the embryo sac of the ovule in the ovary.

  13. Photodesorption and physical properties of CO ice as a function of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Chen, Y.-J.; Aparicio, S.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Rosu-Finsen, A.; Lasne, J.; McCoustra, M. R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Ice photodesorption has been the topic of recent studies that aim to interpret the abundances of gas-phase molecules, in particular CO, toward cold interstellar regions. But little is known about the effect of the ice's physical properties on the photodesorption rate. The linear decrease observed in the photodesorption rate, as a function of increasing CO ice deposition temperature, was provisionally attributed to a more compact CO ice structure. Aims: The goal of this work is to monitor the physical properties of solid CO as a function of ice deposition temperature. Then, we evaluate the possible link between the structure of ice and the ice's photodesorption rate. Methods: Infrared spectroscopy is an efficient tool to monitor the structural evolution of pure ices during warm-up or irradiation. The infrared absorption bands of molecular ice components observed toward various space environments allow for the detection of H2O, CO, CO2, CH3OH, NH3, etc. Typically, a pure ice that is composed of one of these species displays significant changes in their mid-infrared band profiles as a result of warm-up. But, at most, only very subtle changes appear in the narrow CO ice infrared absorption band as the result of warm-up. We, therefore, also used vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopy of CO ice to monitor the effect of temperature in the physical properties of the ice. Finally, temperature-programmed desorption and photo-desorption experiments for different CO ice deposition temperatures were performed. Results: Mid-infrared and vacuum-ultraviolet spectroscopy showed that warm-up of CO ice that is deposited at 8 K did not lead to structural changes. Only CO ice samples deposited at temperatures above 20 K displayed different spectroscopic properties compared to lower deposition temperatures. The observed gradual and linear drop in the photodesorption rate of CO ice, as a function of increasing ice deposition temperature in the 7 to 20 K range, is, therefore, not due to

  14. Metrological Array of Cyber-Physical Systems. Part 15. Approach to the Creation of Temperature Standard on Basis of Fundamental Physical Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohdan STADNYK

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available After proving the existence of Temperature Quantum the next step would be the study of possibility of Temperature Standard creation. We consider the general principles of design and operation of such advanced Temperature Standard constructed on the basis of Quantum Temperature Unit. The latter is determined solely via the fundamental physical constants. Approach to the mentioned Standard is developed in this paper.

  15. Finite temperature formalism for non-Abelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1995-09-01

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedom. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in the temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  16. Finite temperature formalism for nonabelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    OpenAIRE

    Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1995-01-01

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedoms. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  17. Finite temperature formalism for non-Abelian gauge theories in the physical phase space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachbagauer, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique ENSLAPP, Chemin de Bellevue, BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France)

    1995-09-15

    We establish a new framework of finite temperature field theory for Yang-Mills theories in the physical phase space eliminating all unphysical degrees of freedom. Relating our method to the imaginary time formalism of James and Landshoff in the temporal axial gauge, we calculate the two-loop pressure and provide a systematic and unique method to construct the additional vertices encountered in their approach.

  18. Continuous Ultra-Thin MOS2 Films Grown by Low-Temperature Physical Vapor Deposition (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    ultra-high vacuum physical vapor deposition process yields materials with key optical and electronic properties identical to exfoliated layers. The...process yields materials with key optical and electronic properties identical to exfoliated layers. The films are composed of nano-scale domains with...target. Throughout the pro- cess, the temperature was measured with an IR pyrometer calibrated with a thermocouple for each substrate material. The

  19. Paradigm Changes in High Temperature Plasma Physics Research and Implications for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyeon K.

    2008-01-01

    Significant high temperature plasma research in both the magnetic and inertial confinement regimes led to the official launching of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project which is aimed at challenging controlled fusion power for human kind. In particular, such an endeavor originated from the fruitful research outcomes from the world wide magnetic confinement devices (primarily based on the Tokamak approach) mainly in advanced countries (US, EU, and Japan). In recent years, all new steady state capable Tokamak devices are operated and/or constructed in Asian countries and incidentally, the majority of the ITER consortium consists of Asian countries. This provides an opportunity to revisit the unresolved essential physics issues and/or extend the understanding of the transient physics to the required steady state operation so that ITER can benefit from these efforts. The core physics of a magnetically confined hot plasma has two essential components; plasma stability and cross-field energy transport physics. Complete understanding of these two areas is critical for the successful operation of ITER and perhaps, Demo reactor construction. In order to have stable high beta plasmas with a sufficiently long confinement time, the physics of an abrupt disruption and sudden deterioration of the energy transport must be understood and conquered. Physics issues associated with transient harmful MHD behavior and turbulence based energy transport are extremely complicated and theoretical understanding needs a clear validation and verification with a new research approach such as a multi-dimensional visualization.

  20. Temperature and storing time influence on selected physical properties of milk and acidophilus milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Božiková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with thermophysical parameters as: temperature, thermal conductivity, diffusivity and rheologic parameters as: dynamic, kinematic viscosity and fluidity of milk and acidophilus milk. For thermophysical parameters measurements was used Hot Wire method and for rheologic parameters measurements was used single – spindle viscometer. In the first series of measurements we measured relations between thermophysical and rheologic parameters in temperature range (5–25 °C for milk and acidophilus milk. Relations of all physical parameters of milk to the temperature showed influence of relative fat content. Effect of storage on milk and acidophilus milk is shown in the text. All measured relations for milk and acidophilus milk during temperature stabilisation had linear increasing progress with high coefficients of determination in the range (0.991–0.998. It was shown that increasing relative fat content has decreasing influence on milk thermal conductivity. Relations of rheologic parameters as dynamic and kinematic viscosity to the temperature had decreasing exponential progress, while relation of fluidity to the temperature had increasing exponential shape with high coefficients of determination in the range (0.985–0.994.. Mathematical description of the dependencies is summarised by regression equations and all coefficients are in presented tables.

  1. The Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Droplets -Temperature and Physical Phase Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, L.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of oleic acid droplets with ozone are studied at different temperatures to imitating the atmospheric condition. The reactions are monitored concomitantly by using attenuated total reflectance Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) for the organic species and UV-VIS spectrometry for the ozone concentration, in order to investigate reaction rate discrepancies reported in literature as well as the oxidation mechanism, temperature and physical phase effects. The less and semi- volatile products are identified and resolved by a liquid chromatography and a gas chromatography mass spectrometer, respectively. The identified products are predominantly composed by nananoic acid and azelaic acid and might be due to propagation reactions possibly initiated by a secondary reaction such as the stabilized Criegee intermediates reacting with oleic acid. For temperature effect, the oxidation rate decreases with temperature when the oleic acid droplets are in the same physical phases. As oleic acid turns into the solid phase, the oxidation mechanism is observed to be different from the liquid phase. Furthermore, the concentration of ozone was monitored to examine the kinetics of the oxidation reaction. The integrated ozone profile recorded by UV-VIS spectrometry shows that the consumed ozone represents only approximately 12% of total oleic acid for the solid cases at 4°C in contrast to 30% for the liquid cases at 25°C, and hence confirmed the existence of secondary reactions.

  2. Problems associated with gene transfer and opportunities for microgravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessen, Daniel J.

    1997-01-01

    The method of crop improvement by gene transfer is becoming increasingly routine with transgenic foods and ornamental crops now being marketed to consumers. However, biological processes of plants, and the physical barriers of current protocols continue to limit the application of gene transfer in many commercial crops. The goal of this paper is to outline the current limitations of gene transfer and to hypothesize possible opportunities for use of microgravity to overcome such limitations. The limitations detailed in this paper include host-range specificity of Agrobacterium mediated transformation, probability of gene insertion, position effects of the inserted genes, gene copy number, stability of foreign gene expression in host plants, and regeneration of recalcitrant plant species. Microgravity offers an opportunity for gene transfer where cell growth kinetics, DNA synthesis, and genetic recombination rates can be altered. Such biological conditions may enhance the ability for recombination of reporter genes and other genes of interest to agriculture. Proposed studies would be useful for understanding instability of foreign gene expression and may lead to stable transformed plants. Other aspects of gene transfer in microgravity are discussed.

  3. Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics: G-Jitter Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, G. M.

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report on our NASA grant, Problems in Microgravity Fluid Mechanics NAG3-2513: 12/14/2000 - 11/30/2003, extended through 11/30/2004. This grant was made to Stanford University and then transferred to the University of California at Santa Barbara when the PI relocated there in January 2001. Our main activity has been to conduct both experimental and theoretical studies of instabilities in fluids that are relevant to the microgravity environment, i.e. those that do not involve the action of buoyancy due to a steady gravitational field. Full details of the work accomplished under this grant are given below. Our work has focused on: (i) Theoretical and computational studies of the effect of g-jitter on instabilities of convective states where the convection is driven by forces other than buoyancy (ii) Experimental studies of instabilities during displacements of miscible fluid pairs in tubes, with a focus on the degree to which these mimic those found in immiscible fluids. (iii) Theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of time dependent electrohydrodynamic forces on chaotic advection in drops immersed in a second dielectric liquid. Our objectives are to acquire insight and understanding into microgravity fluid mechanics problems that bear on either fundamental issues or applications in fluid physics. We are interested in the response of fluids to either a fluctuating acceleration environment or to forces other than gravity that cause fluid mixing and convection. We have been active in several general areas.

  4. Effect of microgravity simulation using 3D clinostat on cavendish banana (Musa acuminata AAA Group) ripening process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivany, Fenny Martha; Esyanti, Rizkita R.; Prapaisie, Adeline; Puspa Kirana, Listya; Latief, Chunaeni; Ginaldi, Ari

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the research was to determine the effect of microgravity simulation by 3D clinostat on Cavendish banana (Musa acuminata AAA group) ripening process. In this study, physical, physiological changes as well as genes expression were analysed. The result showed that in microgravity simulation condition ripening process in banana was delayed and the MaACOl, MaACSl and MaACS5 gene expression were affected.

  5. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  6. Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al 2 O 3 , ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and α-Al 2 O 3 crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

  7. Rheological characterization of novel physically crosslinked terpolymeric hydrogels at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam; Zohra, Rubab; Khan, Muhammad Saleem

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this research work is to reveal the detailed and extensive rheological characterization of terpolymeric hydrogel formulations using a variety of monomers having different concentrations of acrylic acid and applying a range of temperatures. The hydrogels with the different concentrations of acrylic acid were prepared in the absence of air using three different monomers, by free radical polymerization, gradually increasing the temperature up to polymerization point, using ethyl alcohol as solvent. Different shear measurements were performed to study rheological properties, temperature dependence, and yield strength of acrylic acid pharmaceutical hydrogels. Various models were applied to analyze the rheological behavior of the gels. The acrylic acid pharmaceutical gels having physical cross links in the gel networks, exhibit remarkable temperature dependence especially with relatively higher concentration of acrylic acid at greater shear rate. Flow curves plotted at various temperatures indicate that these gels exhibit a reasonable pseudoplastic behavior. All these hydrogels require appropriate yield strength to break their network structures. The gel samples exhibit the best fit to the Modified Bingham model, which can explain the overall flow behavior of these topical gels. The rheological analysis indicates that these gels may be used as topical gels for targeted and controlled drug delivery at a specific site.

  8. Effects of Solutally Dominant Convection on Physical Vapor Transport for a Mixture of Hg{sub 2}Br{sub 2} and Br{sub 2} under Microgravity Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geug-Tae [Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kown, Moo Hyun [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    The convective flow structures in the vapor phase on earth are shown to be single unicellular, indicating the solutally dominant convection is important. These findings reflect that the total molar fluxes show asymmetrical patterns in a viewpoint of interfacial distributions. With decreasing the gravitational level form 1 g{sub 0} down to 1.0x10{sup -4} g{sub 0}, the total molar fluxes decay first order exponentially. It is also found that the total molar fluxes decay first order exponentially with increasing the partial pressure of component B, PB (Torr) form 5 Torr up to 400 Torr.. Under microgravity environments less than 1 g{sub 0}, a diffusive-convection mode is dominant and, results in much uniformity in front of the crystal regions in comparisons with a normal gravity acceleration of 1 g{sub 0}.

  9. Anaphylaxis Imaging: Non-Invasive Measurement of Surface Body Temperature and Physical Activity in Small Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Manzano-Szalai

    Full Text Available In highly sensitized patients, the encounter with a specific allergen from food, insect stings or medications may rapidly induce systemic anaphylaxis with potentially lethal symptoms. Countless animal models of anaphylaxis, most often in BALB/c mice, were established to understand the pathophysiology and to prove the safety of different treatments. The most common symptoms during anaphylactic shock are drop of body temperature and reduced physical activity. To refine, improve and objectify the currently applied manual monitoring methods, we developed an imaging method for the automated, non-invasive measurement of the whole-body surface temperature and, at the same time, of the horizontal and vertical movement activity of small animals. We tested the anaphylaxis imaging in three in vivo allergy mouse models for i milk allergy, ii peanut allergy and iii egg allergy. These proof-of-principle experiments suggest that the imaging technology represents a reliable non-invasive method for the objective monitoring of small animals during anaphylaxis over time. We propose that the method will be useful for monitoring diseases associated with both, changes in body temperature and in physical behaviour.

  10. High-temperature borate liquids: physical properties of glass-forming compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riebling, E.F.

    1977-05-06

    Several experimental routes can be used to develop a better understanding of the polymeric constitution (polyanionic and/or polyhedral distribution) of borate, germanate, and silicate glasses. Spectral, chemical, physical-chemical, and mechanical property information can be determined directly for the glass compositions of interest. Generally, only physical-chemical information is readily accessible for the corresponding high temperature liquids. It will be shown that information on each state of matter has its own particular merits. Most of the evidence thus far published suggests an excellent agreement between polyhedral distributions in an oxide glass and its corresponding high temperature liquid state. There is no well known oxide glass forming system for which such a state of affairs does not exist. In spite of this, occasional efforts are put forth which ignore some of what is known for oxide liquids, glasses, and crystals. Such attempts therefore invariably imply, if only indirectly, that significant changes occur in the polyhedral distributions close to the glass transition temperature region. Specific examples to be discussed will include efforts that avoid well known coordination change equilibria such as BO/sub 3/ reversible BO/sub 4/ and GeO/sub 4/ reversible GeO/sub 6/.

  11. Examining the Physical Drivers of Photosynthetic Temperature Sensitivity Within a Sub-alpine Mixed Conifer Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Minor, R.; Heard, M.

    2013-12-01

    Current projections of climate change in the southwestern U.S. suggest increasing temperatures and reduced summer precipitation. High temperature and water deficits have major influence on ecosystem functioning by restricting plant growth and productivity. However, there are limited data on what influences plant sensitivity to temperature, and these dynamics are not often captured in ecosystem models. Understanding the sensitivities, linkages, and feedbacks among biotic processes and abiotic forces is especially important within Critical Zone Sciences, which seeks to integrate among disciplines. Here, we analyzed several potential drivers of photosynthetic temperature sensitivity, including differences in soil parent material, aspect, and seasonality within a suite of species. Each of these variables captures a different physical driver: (i) soil parent material influences water holding capacity of the soil; (ii) aspect influences how incoming energy drives evaporative loss of soil water, creating warmer and drier environments on south/east faces; and (iii) seasonality captures temporal patterns of soil moisture recharge. Our research was conducted within two V shaped zero-order catchment basins of the Santa Catalina Critical Zone Observatory in southern Arizona, one with schist bedrock and the other with granite. We used leaf-level gas exchange measurements on 24 trees across a range of temperatures to quantify this plant temperature sensitivity during the dry pre-monsoon and wet monsoon seasons. Preliminary results show that maximum photosynthetic rate was 51% higher during the monsoon than pre-monsoon season. Optimal photosynthetic temperature decreased 25% while the span of functional temperatures (Ω50) was 21% higher following the onset of monsoon rains. During the rainy season, soil parent material became an important factor. The greater water holding capacity of schist soils yielded greater maximum photosynthesis and reduced tree sensitivity to higher

  12. Action of microgravity on root development

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Arabidopsis were grown on horizontal or vertical clinostat for 4 8 or 12 days. Seedlings on horizontal clinostat were in simulated microgravity and seedlings on...

  13. Microgravity Effects on Yersinia Pestis Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, A.; Abogunde, O.; Jejelowo, O.; Rosenzweig, J.-A.

    2010-04-01

    Microgravity effects on Yersinia pestis proliferation, cold growth, and type three secretion system function were evaluated in macrophage cell infections, HeLa cell infections, and cold growth plate assays.

  14. The time course of altered brain activity during 7-day simulated microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eLiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity causes multiple changes in physical and mental levels in humans, which can induce performance deficiency among astronauts. Studying the variations in brain activity that occur during microgravity would help astronauts to deal with these changes. In the current study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI was used to observe the variations in brain activity during a 7-day head down tilt (HDT bed rest, which is a common and reliable model for simulated microgravity. The amplitudes of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF of twenty subjects were recorded pre-head down tilt (pre-HDT, during a bed rest period (HDT0, and then each day in the HDT period (HDT1–HDT7. One-way analysis of variance of the ALFF values over these 8 days was used to test the variation across time period (P<0.05, corrected. Compared to HDT0, subjects presented lower ALFF values in the posterior cingulate cortex and higher ALFF values in the anterior cingulate cortex during the HDT period, which may partially account for the lack of cognitive flexibility and alterations in autonomic nervous system seen among astronauts in microgravity. Additionally, the observed improvement in function in CPL during the HDT period may play a compensatory role to the functional decline in the paracentral lobule to sustain normal levels of fine motor control for astronauts in a microgravity environment. Above all, those floating brain activities during 7 days of simulated microgravity may indicate that the brain self-adapts to help astronauts adjust to the multiple negative stressors encountered in a microgravity environment.

  15. Self-propagating high-temperature reactions for the fabrication of Lunar and Martian physical assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrias, Gianluca; Licheri, Roberta; Orrù, Roberto; Cao, Giacomo

    2012-01-01

    The development of a new process potentially useful for future manned Lunar and/or Martian space missions in the framework of the so-called ISRU (In-Situ Resource Utilization) and ISFR (In-Situ Fabrication and Repair) concepts is described and discussed in this work. This process involves the fabrication of physical assets by self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) for construction applications in Lunar and Martian environments starting from different Lunar or Martian regolith simulants and aluminum, as reducing agent. In addition, although Moon and Mars already contain ilmenite (FeTiO3) and iron oxides, respectively, the latter ones are also added to the initial mixtures to promote suitable SHS reactions. A complete scheme for the fabrication of physical assets to be used as protection against solar rays, solar wind and meteoroids, where all required stages are indicated, is finally proposed in the framework of a recently filed patent.

  16. Reactor physics research activities related to the very high temperature reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor physics research activities in Japan that are related to the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) for multipurpose use are briefly summarized. Emphasis is placed on critical experiments. Neutronic core design accuracy required for the experimental VHTR is made clear, and nuclear data compilation and neutronic calculation code development are described. For experimental work, after a review of the results of all reactor physics experiments performed on the Semi-Homogeneous Experiment at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, its reconstruction program to the VHTR critical assembly is presented. The aim of this program is to perform a detailed mockup experiment of the experimental VHTR loaded with low-enriched uranium-coated particle fuels. Finally, improvement of the neutronic calculation accuracy attained through comparison between calculation and experiment is illustrated, and some future problems are pointed out

  17. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Ortega, Juan F.; Fernandez-Elias, Valentin E.; Kapsokefalou, Maria; Malisova, Olga; Athanasatou, Adelais; Husemann, Marlien; Domnik, Kirsten; Braun, Hans

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA) and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years) from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating). Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality). PMID:27128938

  18. Development of Web Based Learning Material in Physics Subject for Kalor and Temperature Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatwa Aji Kurniawan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been done, the research which aims to develop a web-based teaching materials on the subjects of physics subject with subject mater of temperature and heat. This study using a modified model of the 4D development by eliminating the deployment phase. The validation of product development conducted by validator media experts and experts matter of physics, whereas small-scale trials conducted by physics teacher and 10 students. Validator review results stating that the quality of the product development were included in the category very well with the average percentage rating of 83.93%. The percentage value assigned by media expert by 75% in the good category and the percentage of the value provided by a matter expert 92.85% were in the very good category. Experiments by physics teacher to obtain result of equal to 94.44% were in the very good category and the average percentage of the test results by the students of 90.5% were in the very good category. The characteristics of the products developed include material composition using the curriculum in 2013, there was a recording facility and the results of evaluation of students' activities, there were feedback evaluation results were immediately known by the students and there were some links related to the material either youtube or other learning website.

  19. Spacelab J: Microgravity and life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacelab J is a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Using a Spacelab pressurized long module, 43 experiments will be performed in the areas of microgravity and life sciences. These experiments benefit from the microgravity environment available on an orbiting Shuttle. Removed from the effects of gravity, scientists will seek to observe processes and phenomena impossible to study on Earth, to develop new and more uniform mixtures, to study the effects of microgravity and the space environment on living organisms, and to explore the suitability of microgravity for certain types of research. Mission planning and an overview of the experiments to be performed are presented. Orbital research appears to hold many advantages for microgravity science investigations, which on this mission include electronic materials, metals and alloys, glasses and ceramics, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, and biotechnology. Gravity-induced effects are eliminated in microgravity. This allows the investigations on Spacelab J to help scientists develop a better understanding of how these gravity-induced phenomena affect both processing and products on Earth and to observe subtle phenomena that are masked in gravity. The data and samples from these investigations will not only allow scientists to better understand the materials but also will lead to improvements in the methods used in future experiments. Life sciences research will collect data on human adaptation to the microgravity environment, investigate ways of assisting astronauts to readapt to normal gravity, explore the effects of microgravity and radiation on living organisms, and gather data on the fertilization and development of organisms in the absence of gravity. This research will improve crew comfort and safety on future missions while helping scientists to further understand the human body.

  20. [DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN CARDIOVASCULAR DECONDITIONING ON THE STAGE OF RETURNING TO EARTH AFTER STAY IN MICROGRAVITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovskaya, A R; Koloteva, M I

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the results of retrospective analysis of earlier published papers and reports, and also own observations of cardiovascular deconditioning in cosmonauts and astronauts returning from microgravity. Benefits of in-flight physical exercises to g-tolerance during descent and post-recovery orthostatic stability are discussed.

  1. Acoustic Experiment to Measure the Bulk Viscosity of Near-Critical Xenon in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, K. A.; Shinder, I.; Moldover, M. R.; Zimmerli, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    We plan a rigorous test of the theory of dynamic scaling by accurately measuring the bulk viscosity of xenon in microgravity 50 times closer to the critical temperature T(sub c) than previous experiments. The bulk viscosity zeta (or "second viscosity" or "dilational viscosity") will be determined by measuring the attenuation length of sound alpha lambda and also measuring the frequency-dependence of the speed of sound. For these measurements, we developed a unique Helmholtz resonator and specialized electro-acoustic transducers. We describe the resonator, the transducers, their performance on Earth, and their expected performance in microgravity.

  2. Intra-population level variation in thresholds for physical dormancy-breaking temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Ganesha S; Ooi, Mark K J

    2015-07-01

    Intra-population variation in seed dormancy is an advantage for population persistence in unpredictable environments. The important role played by physically dormant species in these habitats makes understanding the level of variation in their dormancy a key ecological question. Heat produced in the soil is the major dormancy-breaking stimulus and, in fire prone ecosystems, soil temperatures generated by fire may vary spatially and over time. While many studies have investigated variation in initial dormancy, a measure that is of little value in fire-prone ecosystems, where initial dormancy levels are uniformly high, intra-population variation in dormancy-breaking temperature thresholds has never been quantified. This study predicted that species would display variation in dormancy-breaking temperature thresholds within populations, and investigated whether this variation occurred between individual plants from the same maternal environment. The intra-population variation in dormancy-breaking thresholds of five common physically dormant shrub species (family Fabaceae) from fire-prone vegetation in south-eastern Australia was assessed using heat treatments and germination trials. Replicate batches of seeds from each of four maternal plants of Dillwynia floribunda, Viminaria juncea, Bossiaea heterophylla, Aotus ericoides and Acacia linifolia were treated at 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 °C. Dormancy-breaking response to heat treatments varied significantly among individual plants for all species, with some individuals able to germinate after heating at low temperatures and others restricting germination to temperatures that only occur as a result of high-severity fires. Germination rate (T50) varied among individuals of three species. Variation detected among individuals that were in close proximity to each other indicates that strong differences in dormancy-breaking temperature thresholds occur throughout the broader population. Differences found at the individual plant

  3. REPORT FROM THE ORGANIZERS: The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, Peter

    2009-03-01

    The 25th International Conference on Low Temperature Physics (LT25) was hosted by the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium of the Leiden Institute of Physics and held in the RAI Convention Center in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 6-13 August 2008. It was the second time that the Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory had the privilege of organizing an LT conference. In 1958, at LT6, 50 years of liquid helium temperatures were commemorated; in 2008 we celebrated the 100th anniversary of the remarkable achievements of Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators in Leiden. In 1958 there were 323 participants and 145 papers appeared in the proceedings; in 2008 these numbers had increased to 1390 participants and 900 papers, of which eventually 849 were accepted. This large participation required adequate conference and housing facilities. These could not be found in Leiden, but were conveniently available in Amsterdam. The triennial International Low Temperature Conferences are organized under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) through Commission C5 on Low Temperature Physics. It is the most important global meeting that brings together the international scientific community in the broad field of Low Temperature Physics. Because the meeting is held only every third year the 11 plenary and 22 half plenary talks (of 45 or 30 min.) generally provide an overview of important new discoveries over the last few years, whereas the 161 short oral presentations (20 min.) are mainly focused on very recent developments. Since the field is broad, embracing a large section of condensed matter physics, the program is divided into five parallel program lines: A. Quantum Gases, Fluids and Solids B. Superconductivity C. Quantum Phase Transitions and Magnetism D. Electronic Quantum Transport in Condensed Matter E. Cryogenic Techniques and Applications This distinction was used both to group the 1625 accepted abstracts, and the short-oral and poster presentations; the

  4. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Rheological Properties of Quasi-2D Fluids in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf; Eremin, Alexey; Harth, Kirsten; Clark, Noel A.; Maclennan, Joseph; Glaser, Matthew; Park, Cheol; Hall, Nancy; Tin, Padetha

    2016-01-01

    Freely suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters are used to study thermally driven convection and diffusion in the film plane. The experiments were performed during a six minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). The project served as a preliminary test for a planned ISS Experiment with liquid crystal films (OASIS), and in addition it provided new experimental data on smectic films exposed to in-plane thermal gradients.We find an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to a Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 Kmm, thermally driven convection sets in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase.An additional experiment was performed under microgravity conditions to test the stability of liquid crystal bridges in different smectic phases.

  6. Physical, Mineralogical, and Micromorphological Properities of Expansive Soil Treated at Different Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different characterizations were carried out on unheated expansive soil and samples heated at different temperature. The samples are taken from the western outskirts of Nanning of Guangxi Province, China. In the present paper, the mineral and chemical composition and several essential physical parameters of unheated expansive soil are indicated by XRD and EDX analysis. Moreover, the structural transition and change of mechanical properties of samples heated in the range of room temperature to 140°C are proved by TG-DTA and SEM observation. The mean particle diameter, density, hydraulic behaviors, and bond strength also have been investigated. The results indicate that, along with the loss of free water, physical absorbed water, and chemically bound water, the microstructure experiences some obvious change. In addition, the particle size and density both will increase rapidly before 100°C and undertake a slow growth or decline when higher than 100°C. The hydraulic behaviors and strength performance of unheated samples and the one heated at 100°C are given out as well. All these researches play fundamental role in the pollution prevention, modification, and engineering application of expansive soil.

  7. Experimental Validation of Various Temperature Modells for Semi-Physical Tyre Model Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Andreas; Scherndl, Christoph; Hirschberg, Wolfgang; Lex, Cornelia

    2017-10-01

    With increasing level of complexity and automation in the area of automotive engineering, the simulation of safety relevant Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) leads to increasing accuracy demands in the description of tyre contact forces. In recent years, with improvement in tyre simulation, the needs for coping with tyre temperatures and the resulting changes in tyre characteristics are rising significantly. Therefore, experimental validation of three different temperature model approaches is carried out, discussed and compared in the scope of this article. To investigate or rather evaluate the range of application of the presented approaches in combination with respect of further implementation in semi-physical tyre models, the main focus lies on the a physical parameterisation. Aside from good modelling accuracy, focus is held on computational time and complexity of the parameterisation process. To evaluate this process and discuss the results, measurements from a Hoosier racing tyre 6.0 / 18.0 10 LCO C2000 from an industrial flat test bench are used. Finally the simulation results are compared with the measurement data.

  8. Research on reactor physics using the Very High Temperature Reactor Critical Assembly (VHTRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), of which the research and development are advanced by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, is planned to apply for the permission of installation in fiscal year 1988, and to start the construction in the latter half of fisical year 1989. As the duty of reactor physics research, the accuracy of the nuclear data is to be confirmed, the validity of the nuclear design techniques is to be inspected, and the nuclear safety of the HTTR core design is to be verified. Therefore, by using the VHTRC, the experimental data of the reactor physics quantities are acquired, such as critical mass, the reactivity worth of simulated control rods and burnable poison rods, the temperature factor of reactivity, power distribution and so on, and the experiment and analysis are advanced. The cores built up in the VHTRC so far were three kinds having different lattice forms and degrees of uranium enrichment. The calculated critical mass was smaller by 1-5 % than the measured values. As to the power distribution and the reactivity worth of burnable poison rods, the prospect of satisfying the required accuracy for the design of the HTTR core was obtained. The experiment using a new core having axially different enrichment degree is planned. (K.I.)

  9. Low temperature physical properties of Co-35Ni-20Cr-10Mo alloy MP35N®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Toplosky, V. J.; Goddard, R. E.; Han, K.

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase Co-35Ni-20Cr-10Mo alloy MP35N® is a high strength alloy with excellent corrosion resistance. Its applications span chemical, medical, and food processing industries. Thanks to its high modulus and high strength, it found applications in reinforcement of ultra-high field pulsed magnets. Recently, it has also been considered for reinforcement in superconducting wires used in ultra-high field superconducting magnets. For these applications, accurate measurement of its physical properties at cryogenic temperatures is very important. In this paper, physical properties including electrical resistivity, specific heat, thermal conductivity, and magnetization of as-received and aged samples are measured from 2 to 300 K. The electrical resistivity of the aged sample is slightly higher than the as-received sample, both showing a weak linear temperature dependence in the entire range of 2-300 K. The measured specific heat Cp of 430 J/kg-K at 295 K agrees with a theoretical prediction, but is significantly smaller than the values in the literature. The thermal conductivity between 2 and 300 K is in good agreement with the literature which is only available above 77 K. Magnetic property of MP35N® changes significantly with aging. The as-received sample exhibits Curie paramagnetism with a Curie constant C = 0.175 K. While the aged sample contains small amounts of a ferromagnetic phase even at room temperature. The measured MP35N® properties will be useful for the engineering design of pulsed magnets and superconducting magnets using MP35N® as reinforcement.

  10. Advanced multi-physics simulation capability for very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Tak, Nam Il; Jo Chang Keun; Noh, Jae Man; Cho, Bong Hyun; Cho, Jin Woung; Hong, Ser Gi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop methodologies and computer code for high-fidelity multi-physics analysis of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors(VHTRs). The research project was performed through Korea-US I-NERI program. The main research topic was development of methodologies for high-fidelity 3-D whole core transport calculation, development of DeCART code for VHTR reactor physics analysis, generation of VHTR specific 190-group cross-section library for DeCART code, development of DeCART/CORONA coupled code system for neutronics/thermo-fluid multi-physics analysis, and benchmark analysis against various benchmark problems derived from PMR200 reactor. The methodologies and the code systems will be utilized a key technologies in the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration program. Export of code system is expected in the near future and the code systems developed in this project are expected to contribute to development and export of nuclear hydrogen production system

  11. Influence of Physical Activity and Ambient Temperature on Hydration: The European Hydration Research Study (EHRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effects of physical activity (PA and ambient temperature on water turnover and hydration status. Five-hundred seventy three healthy men and women (aged 20–60 years from Spain, Greece and Germany self-reported PA, registered all food and beverage intake, and collected 24-h urine during seven consecutive days. Fasting blood samples were collected at the onset and end of the study. Food moisture was assessed using nutritional software to account for all water intake which was subtracted from daily urine volume to allow calculation of non-renal water loss (i.e., mostly sweating. Hydration status was assessed by urine and blood osmolality. A negative association was seen between ambient temperature and PA (r = −0.277; p < 0.001. Lower PA with high temperatures did not prevent increased non-renal water losses (i.e., sweating and elevated urine and blood osmolality (r = 0.218 to 0.163 all p < 0.001. When summer and winter data were combined PA was negatively associated with urine osmolality (r = −0.153; p = 0.001. Our data suggest that environmental heat acts to reduce voluntary PA but this is not sufficient to prevent moderate dehydration (increased osmolality. On the other hand, increased PA is associated with improved hydration status (i.e., lower urine and blood osmolality.

  12. Animal Thermoregulation and the Operative Environmental (Equivalent) Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Thermoregulation is defined as the ability of an organism to modify its body temperature. This…

  13. Microgravity and the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G Kim

    2014-05-01

    The structure of the lung, with its delicate network of airspaces and capillaries, means that gravity has a profound influence on its function. Studies of lung function in the absence of gravity provide valuable insight into how, for we Earth-bound individuals, its unavoidable effects shape our lung function. Gravity causes uneven ventilation in the lung through the deformation of lung tissue (the so-called Slinky effect), and uneven perfusion through a combination of the Slinky effect and the zone model of pulmonary perfusion. Both ventilation and perfusion exhibit persisting heterogeneity in microgravity, indicating important other mechanisms. However, gravity serves to maintain a degree of matching of these two processes, so that the ventilation/perfusion ratio, and thus gas exchange, remains efficient. Therefore, while both ventilation and perfusion are more uniform in spaceflight, gas exchange is seemingly no more efficient than on Earth. Despite the changes in lung function when gravity is removed, the lung continues to function well in weightlessness. Unlike many other organ systems, the lung does not appear to undergo structural adaptive changes when gravity is removed, and so there is no apparent degradation in lung function upon return to earth, even after 6 months in space.

  14. Synergistic effects of microgravity and space radiation (Nimblegen)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  15. Evaporation of binary mixtures in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Morris; Matta, Nabil; Kolli, Kiran; Brown, Leon; Chubb, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    The motivation of this research is to obtain a better understanding of phase-change heat transfer within single and binary liquid meniscii, both in 1-g and 0-g environments. During phase 1 and part of phase 2, in a glass test cell with an inclined heated plate, 1-6 experiments on pentane with additions of decane up to 3% were conducted to determine the optimum concentration that will exhibit the maximum heat transfer and stability. During phase 2 emphasis was given to explore fundamental research issues and to ultimately develop a reliable capillary pumped loop (CPL) device for low gravity. In related experimental work, it was found that thermocapillary stresses near the contract line could result in a degraded wettability which ultimately could explain the observed failure of CPL devices in zero-gravity environment. Therefore, the current experimental effort investigates the effect of adding binary constituents in improving the thermocapillary characteristics near the contact line within the loop configuration. Achievements during second phase include: (1) Further enhancement of Central State University's Microgravity Laboratory by adding or improving upon capabilities of photography, video imaging, fluid visualization, and general experimental testing capabilities; (2) Experimental results for the inclined plate cell; (3) Modeling effort with a detailed scaling analysis; (4) Additional testing with a tube loop configuration to extend experimental work by Dickens, et al.; (5) Fabrication of a capillary loop to be tested using binary fluid (pentane/decane). The device that has been recently completed will be set up horizontally so that the effect of gravity on the performance is negligible. Testing will cover a wide range of parameters such as decane/pentane concentration, heat input value, heat input location (below or above meniscus), and loop temperature.

  16. Emulsion Droplet Combustion in Microgravity: Water/Heptane Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avedisian, C. Thomas

    1997-01-01

    This presentation reviews a series of experiments to further examine parametric effects on sooting processes of droplet flames in microgravity. The particular focus is on a fuel droplet emulsified with water, specifically emulsions of n-heptane as the fuel-phase and water as the dispersed phase. Water was selected as the additive because of its anticipated effect on soot formation, and the heptane fuel phase was chosen to theoretically reduce the likelihood of microexplosions because its boiling point is nearly the same as that of water: 100 C for water and 98 C for heptane. The water content was varied while the initial droplet diameter was kept within a small range. The experiments were carried out in microgravity to reduce the effects of buoyancy and to promote spherical symmetry in the burning process. Spherically symmetric droplet burning is a convenient starting point for analysis, but experimental data are difficult to obtain for this situation as evidenced by the fact that no quantitative data have been reported on unsupported emulsion droplet combustion in a convection-free environment. The present study improves upon past work carried out on emulsion droplet combustion in microgravity which employed emulsion droplets suspended from a fiber. The fiber can be instrusive to the emulsion droplet burning process as it can promote coalescence of the dispersed water phase and heterogeneous nucleation on the fiber. Prior work has shown that the presence of water in liquid hydrocarbons can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on the combustion process. Water is known to reduce soot formation and radiation heat transfer to combustor walls Gollahalli (1979) reduce flame temperatures and thereby NOx emissions, and encourage secondary droplet atomization or microexplosion. Water also tends to retard ignition and and promote early extinction. The former effect restricted the range of water volume fractions as discussed below.

  17. Low-Temperature Cu-Cu Bonding Using Silver Nanoparticles Fabricated by Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zijian; Cai, Jian; Wang, Junqiang; Geng, Zhiting; Wang, Qian

    2018-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) fabricated by physical vapor deposition (PVD) were introduced in Cu-Cu bonding as surface modification layer. The bonding structure consisted of a Ti adhesive/barrier layer and a Cu substrate layer was fabricated on the silicon wafer. Ag NPs were deposited on the Cu surface by magnetron sputtering in a high-pressure environment and a loose structure with NPs was obtained. Shear tests were performed after bonding, and the influences of PVD pressure, bonding pressure, bonding temperature and annealing time on shear strength were assessed. Cu-Cu bonding with Ag NPs was accomplished at 200°C for 3 min under the pressure of 30 MPa without a post-annealing process, and the average bonding strength of 13.99 MPa was reached. According to cross-sectional observations, a void-free bonding interface with an Ag film thickness of around 20 nm was achieved. These results demonstrated that a reliable low-temperature short-time Cu-Cu bonding was realized by the sintering process of Ag NPs between the bonding pairs, which indicated that this bonding method could be a potential candidate for future ultra-fine pitch 3D integration.

  18. Mineral Phase and Physical Properties of Red Mud Calcined at Different Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-sheng Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different characterizations were carried out on red mud uncalcined and samples calcined in the range of 100°C–1400°C. In the present paper, the phase composition and structural transition of red mud heated from room temperature are indicated by XRD, TG-DTA, and SEM techniques. The mean particle diameter, density, and bond strength of these samples also have been investigated. The results indicate the decomposition of gibbsite into Al2O3 and H2O between 300°C and 550°C and calcite into CaO and CO2 in the interval of 600–800°C. Tricalcium aluminate and gehlenite are formed in the range of 800–900°C. Combined with the SEM images, the results of physical property testing show that the particle size and the strength each has a continuous rise during the heat treatment from 150°C to 1350°C. But the value of density will undergo a little drop before 450°C and then increases to a higher value at the temperature of 1200°C. These obtained results provide an important base for the further studies of comprehensive utilization of red mud.

  19. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  20. Kennedy Educate to Innovate (KETI) Microgravity Powerpoint Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to define and explain microgravity and show how microgravity can help students learn about the phenomena of the world. The presentation is designed to provide teachers of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics at many levels with a foundation in microgravity science and applications.

  1. Neurology of microgravity and space travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, M. D.; Patten, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity and space travel produce several neurologic changes, including SAS, ataxia, postural disturbances, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue. Inflight SAS, perceptual illusions, and ocular changes are of more importance. After landing, however, ataxia, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue play greater roles in astronaut health and readaptation to a terrestrial environment. Cardiovascular adjustments to microgravity, bone demineralization, and possible decompression sickness and excessive radiation exposure contribute further to medical problems of astronauts in space. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which microgravity adversely affects the nervous system and more effective treatments will provide healthier, happier, and longer stays in space on the space station Freedom and during the mission to Mars.

  2. How cells (might) sense microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1999-01-01

    This article is a summary of a lecture presented at an ESA/NASA Workshop on Cell and Molecular Biology Research in Space that convened in Leuven, Belgium, in June 1998. Recent studies are reviewed which suggest that cells may sense mechanical stresses, including those due to gravity, through changes in the balance of forces that are transmitted across transmembrane adhesion receptors that link the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and to other cells (e.g., integrins, cadherins, selectins). The mechanism by which these mechanical signals are transduced and converted into a biochemical response appears to be based, in part, on the finding that living cells use a tension-dependent form of architecture, known as tensegrity, to organize and stabilize their cytoskeleton. Because of tensegrity, the cellular response to stress differs depending on the level of pre-stress (pre-existing tension) in the cytoskeleton and it involves all three cytoskeletal filament systems as well as nuclear scaffolds. Recent studies confirm that alterations in the cellular force balance can influence intracellular biochemistry within focal adhesion complexes that form at the site of integrin binding as well as gene expression in the nucleus. These results suggest that gravity sensation may not result from direct activation of any single gravioreceptor molecule. Instead, gravitational forces may be experienced by individual cells in the living organism as a result of stress-dependent changes in cell, tissue, or organ structure that, in turn, alter extracellular matrix mechanics, cell shape, cytoskeletal organization, or internal pre-stress in the cell-tissue matrix.--Ingber, D. How cells (might) sense microgravity.

  3. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  4. The Influence of Microgravity on Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the studies and the use of plants in various space exploration scenarios. The current state of research on plant growth in microgravity is reviewed, with several questions that require research for answers to assist in our fundamental understanding of the influence of microgravity and the space environment on plant growth. These questions are posed to future Principal Investigators and Payload Developers, attending the meeting, in part, to inform them of NASA's interest in proposals for research on the International Space Station.

  5. Technology Thresholds for Microgravity: Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    The technological and economic thresholds for microgravity space research are estimated in materials science and biotechnology. In the 1990s, the improvement of materials processing has been identified as a national scientific priority, particularly for stimulating entrepreneurship. The substantial US investment at stake in these critical technologies includes six broad categories: aerospace, transportation, health care, information, energy, and the environment. Microgravity space research addresses key technologies in each area. The viability of selected space-related industries is critically evaluated and a market share philosophy is developed, namely that incremental improvements in a large markets efficiency is a tangible reward from space-based research.

  6. Microgravity Experiment Programs for Students at the Bremen Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM established as a research center and currently headed by Prof. Dr. Claus Lämmerzahl is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM more than 70 scientists, engineers and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important university institutes for space sciences and technologies in Europe as well as worldwide well known in the space community. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM’s ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10 (-6) g (microgravity). The provided quality is one of the purest for experiments under weightlessness worldwide achieved. The scientists may choose between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and a catapult experiment with 9.3 s of weightlessness. Either in the drop or in the worldwide unique catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM are always the same, generally up to 3 times per day. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 6750 launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like Fundamental Physics, Combustion, Fluid Dynamics, Planetary Formation / Astrophysics, Biology and Materials Sciences have been successfully accomplished so far. In our paper we will report and inform about microgravity experiment programs for students like "Drop Your Thesis!“ by ESA and

  7. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS : Part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanen, Mikko

    2009-03-01

    Below you find part of the Activity Report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the United States for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He-4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior

  8. Model of ASTM Flammability Test in Microgravity: Iron Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Theodore A; Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is extensive qualitative results from burning metallic materials in a NASA/ASTM flammability test system in normal gravity. However, this data was shown to be inconclusive for applications involving oxygen-enriched atmospheres under microgravity conditions by conducting tests using the 2.2-second Lewis Research Center (LeRC) Drop Tower. Data from neither type of test has been reduced to fundamental kinetic and dynamic systems parameters. This paper reports the initial model analysis for burning iron rods under microgravity conditions using data obtained at the LERC tower and modeling the burning system after ignition. Under the conditions of the test the burning mass regresses up the rod to be detached upon deceleration at the end of the drop. The model describes the burning system as a semi-batch, well-mixed reactor with product accumulation only. This model is consistent with the 2.0-second duration of the test. Transient temperature and pressure measurements are made on the chamber volume. The rod solid-liquid interface melting rate is obtained from film records. The model consists of a set of 17 non-linear, first-order differential equations which are solved using MATLAB. This analysis confirms that a first-order rate, in oxygen concentration, is consistent for the iron-oxygen kinetic reaction. An apparent activation energy of 246.8 kJ/mol is consistent for this model.

  9. An Experimental and Computational Study on Soot Formation in a Coflow Jet Flame Under Microgravity and Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Cao, Su; Giassi, Davide; Stocker, Dennis P.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Bennett, Beth Anne V.; Smooke, Mitchell D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2014-01-01

    Upon the completion of the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) in March 2012, a comprehensive and unique set of microgravity coflow diffusion flame data was obtained. This data covers a range of conditions from weak flames near extinction to strong, highly sooting flames, and enabled the study of gravitational effects on phenomena such as liftoff, blowout and soot formation. The microgravity experiment was carried out in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS), while the normal gravity experiment was performed at Yale utilizing a copy of the flight hardware. Computational simulations of microgravity and normal gravity flames were also carried out to facilitate understanding of the experimental observations. This paper focuses on the different sooting behaviors of CH4 coflow jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. The unique set of data serves as an excellent test case for developing more accurate computational models.Experimentally, the flame shape and size, lift-off height, and soot temperature were determined from line-of-sight flame emission images taken with a color digital camera. Soot volume fraction was determined by performing an absolute light calibration using the incandescence from a flame-heated thermocouple. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the chemically reacting flow, and the soot evolution was modeled by the sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on an axisymmetric computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting system of fully coupled, highly nonlinear equations was solved by a damped, modified Newtons method. The microgravity sooting flames were found to have lower soot temperatures and higher volume fraction than their normal gravity counterparts. The soot distribution tends to shift from the centerline of the flame to the wings from normal gravity to

  10. Physical Models of Layered Polar Firn Brightness Temperatures from 0.5 to 2 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shurun; Aksoy, Mustafa; Brogioni, Marco; Macelloni, Giovanni; Durand, Michael; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Wang, Tian-Lin; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; hide

    2015-01-01

    We investigate physical effects influencing 0.5-2 GHz brightness temperatures of layered polar firn to support the Ultra Wide Band Software Defined Radiometer (UWBRAD) experiment to be conducted in Greenland and in Antarctica. We find that because ice particle grain sizes are very small compared to the 0.5-2 GHz wavelengths, volume scattering effects are small. Variations in firn density over cm- to m-length scales, however, cause significant effects. Both incoherent and coherent models are used to examine these effects. Incoherent models include a 'cloud model' that neglects any reflections internal to the ice sheet, and the DMRT-ML and MEMLS radiative transfer codes that are publicly available. The coherent model is based on the layered medium implementation of the fluctuation dissipation theorem for thermal microwave radiation from a medium having a nonuniform temperature. Density profiles are modeled using a stochastic approach, and model predictions are averaged over a large number of realizations to take into account an averaging over the radiometer footprint. Density profiles are described by combining a smooth average density profile with a spatially correlated random process to model density fluctuations. It is shown that coherent model results after ensemble averaging depend on the correlation lengths of the vertical density fluctuations. If the correlation length is moderate or long compared with the wavelength (approximately 0.6x longer or greater for Gaussian correlation function without regard for layer thinning due to compaction), coherent and incoherent model results are similar (within approximately 1 K). However, when the correlation length is short compared to the wavelength, coherent model results are significantly different from the incoherent model by several tens of kelvins. For a 10-cm correlation length, the differences are significant between 0.5 and 1.1 GHz, and less for 1.1-2 GHz. Model results are shown to be able to match the v

  11. PI Microgravity Services Role for International Space Station Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During the ISS era, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) project will provide to principal investigators (PIs) microgravity environment information and characterization of the accelerations to which their experiments were exposed during on orbit operations. PIMS supports PIs by providing them with microgravity environment information for experiment vehicles, carriers, and locations within the vehicle. This is done to assist the PI with their effort to evaluate the effect of acceleration on their experiments. Furthermore, PIMS responsibilities are to support the investigators in the area of acceleration data analysis and interpretation, and provide the Microgravity science community with a microgravity environment characterization of selected experiment carriers and vehicles. Also, PIMS provides expertise in the areas of microgravity experiment requirements, vibration isolation, and the implementation of requirements for different spacecraft to the microgravity community and other NASA programs.

  12. Imaging of premixed flames in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, L. W.; Cheng, R. K.

    1994-12-01

    A laser schlieren system which uses video recording and digital images analysis has been developed and applied successfully to microgravity combustion experiments performed in a drop-tower. The optical system and the experiment are installed within a small package which is subjected to free-fall. The images are recorded on video tape and are digitized and analyzed by a computer-controlled image processor. The experimental results include laminar and turbulent premixed conical flames in microgravity, normal positive gravity (upward), and reverse gravity (downward). The procedures to extract frequency information from the digitized images are described. Many gross features of the effects of gravity on premixed conical flames are found. Flames that ignite easily in normal gravity fail to ignite in microgravity. Buoyancy driven instabilities associated with an interface formed between the hot products and the cold surrounding air is the mechanism through which gravity influences premixed laminar and turbulent flames. In normal gravity, this causes the flame to flicker. In reverse gravity, - g, and microgravity, μg, the interface is stable and flame flickering ceases. The flickering frequencies of + g flames vary with changing upstream boundary conditions. The absence of flame flickering in μg suggest that μg flames would be less sensitive to these changes.

  13. Validity of microgravity simulation models on earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regnard, J; Heer, M; Drummer, C

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have used water immersion and head-down bed rest as experimental models to simulate responses to microgravity. However, some data collected during space missions are at variance or in contrast with observations collected from experimental models. These discrepancies could reflect inc...

  14. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...

  15. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND pH OF MODIFICATION PROCESS ON THE PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED CASSAVA STARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Wicaksono

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of cassava starch for excipient in the manufacturing of the tablet has some problems, especially on physical-mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the differentness of temperature and pH in the process of modification on the physical-mechanical properties of modified cassava starch. Modifications were performed by suspending cassava starch into a solution of 3 % (w/v PVP K30. The effect of the difference of temperature was observed at temperatures of 25; 45 and 65 0C, while the effect of the difference of pH was observed at pH of 4.0; 7.0 and 12.0. The results showed that the temperature and pH did not affect the physical-mechanical properties of the modified cassava starch. Modification of cassava starch at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 45 0C was produced modified cassava starch with the most excellent solubility, while the best swelling power were formed by the modification process at pH and temperature of 7.0 and 25 0C. Overall, the most excellent compression properties of modified cassava starch resulted from the modification process at pH 12.

  16. Experimental studies in solid state and low temperature physics. Final report for 1966-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, A.M.; Weyhmann, W.V.; Zimmermann, W. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations have been carried out in a broad area of low temperature and solid state physics which includes superconductivity, theory of quantum crystals (through 1973), magnetism in metals, and liquid helium. The work in superconductivity has involved investigations of the Josephson effect, studies of the pair-field susceptibility of superconductors and investigations of the thermodynamics of the superconducting phase transition. The competition between the metal-nonmetal transition and superconductivity has also been studied in random metal-rare gas systems. In the area of magnetism, magnetically ordered materials and dilute magnetic alloys have been investigated. Enhanced hyperfine nuclear magnetic ordering was discovered in PrCu 6 at about 2.5 mK. The research on liquid 4 He and 3 He/ 4 He mixtures has been directed at the quantum aspects of superfluid flow and rotation, the critical behavior near the lambda transition and the properties of the tricritical point. The theoretical program (through 1973) encompassed a broad spectrum of research on the properties of quantum liquids and solids with particular emphasis on crystalline 3 He

  17. Improved Quality of MODIS Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval and Data Coverage Using Physical Deterministic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhat K. Koner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface temperature (SST retrievals from satellite imager measurements are often performed using only two or three channels, and employ a regression methodology. As there are 16 thermal infrared (IR channels available for MODIS, we demonstrate a new SST retrieval methodology using more channels and a physically deterministic method, the modified total least squares (MTLS, to improve the quality of SST. Since cloud detection is always a part of any parameter estimation from IR satellite measurements, we hereby extend our recently-published novel cloud detection technique, which is based on both functional spectral differences and radiative transfer modeling for GOES-13. We demonstrate that the cloud detection coefficients derived for GOES-13 are working well for MODIS, while further improvements are made possible by the extra channels replacing some of the previous tests. The results are compared with available operational MODIS SST through the Group for High Resolution SST website–the data themselves are originally processed by the NASA Goddard Ocean Biology Processing Group. It is observed the data coverage can be more than doubled compared to the currently-available operational product, and at the same time the quality can be improved significantly. Two other SST retrieval methods, offline-calculated coefficients using the same form of the operational regression equation, and radiative transfer based optimal estimation, are included for comparison purposes.

  18. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of physically based constitutive models characterizing armor steel over wide temperature and strain rate ranges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zejian; Huang, Fenglei

    2012-01-01

    Both descriptive and predictive capabilities of five physically based constitutive models (PB, NNL, ZA, VA, and RK) are investigated and compared systematically, in characterizing plastic behavior of the 603 steel at temperatures ranging from 288 to 873 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 4500 s −1 . Determination of the constitutive parameters is introduced in detail for each model. Validities of the established models are checked by strain rate jump tests performed under different loading conditions. The results show that the RK and NNL models have better performance in the description of material behavior, especially the work-hardening effect, while the PB and VA models predict better. The inconsistency that is observed between the capabilities of description and prediction of the models indicates the existence of the minimum number of required fitting data, reflecting the degree of a model's requirement for basic data in parameter calibration. It is also found that the description capability of a model is dependent to a large extent on both its form and the number of its constitutive parameters, while the precision of prediction relies largely on the performance of description. In the selection of constitutive models, the experimental data and the constitutive models should be considered synthetically to obtain a better efficiency in material behavior characterization

  20. Comparison of physically based constitutive models characterizing armor steel over wide temperature and strain rate ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zejian; Huang, Fenglei

    2012-01-01

    Both descriptive and predictive capabilities of five physically based constitutive models (PB, NNL, ZA, VA, and RK) are investigated and compared systematically, in characterizing plastic behavior of the 603 steel at temperatures ranging from 288 to 873 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 4500 s-1. Determination of the constitutive parameters is introduced in detail for each model. Validities of the established models are checked by strain rate jump tests performed under different loading conditions. The results show that the RK and NNL models have better performance in the description of material behavior, especially the work-hardening effect, while the PB and VA models predict better. The inconsistency that is observed between the capabilities of description and prediction of the models indicates the existence of the minimum number of required fitting data, reflecting the degree of a model's requirement for basic data in parameter calibration. It is also found that the description capability of a model is dependent to a large extent on both its form and the number of its constitutive parameters, while the precision of prediction relies largely on the performance of description. In the selection of constitutive models, the experimental data and the constitutive models should be considered synthetically to obtain a better efficiency in material behavior characterization.

  1. Combustion in microgravity: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Roger; Legros, Guillaume; Torero, José L.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity (drop towers, parabolic flights, sounding rockets and space stations) are particularly relevant to combustion problems given that they show high-density gradients and in many cases weak forced convection. For some configurations where buoyancy forces result in complex flow fields, microgravity leads to ideal conditions that correspond closely to canonical problems, e.g., combustion of a spherical droplet in a far-field still atmosphere, Emmons' problem for flame spreading over a solid flat plate, deflagration waves, etc. A comprehensive chronological review on the many combustion studies in microgravity was written first by Law and Faeth (1994) and then by F.A. Williams (1995). Later on, new recommendations for research directions have been delivered. In France, research has been managed and supported by CNES and CNRS since the creation of the microgravity research group in 1992. At this time, microgravity research and future activities contemplated the following: Droplets: the "D2 law" has been well verified and high-pressure behavior of droplet combustion has been assessed. The studies must be extended in two main directions: vaporization in mixtures near the critical line and collective effects in dense sprays. Flame spread: experiments observed blue flames governed by diffusion that are in accordance with Emmons' theory. Convection-dominated flames showed significant departures from the theory. Some theoretical assumptions appeared controversial and it was noted that radiation effects must be considered, especially when regarding the role of soot production in quenching. Heterogeneous flames: two studies are in progress, one in Poitiers and the other in Marseilles, about flame/suspension interactions. Premixed and triple flames: the knowledge still needs to be complemented. Triple flames must continue to be studied and understanding of "flame balls" still needs to be addressed.

  2. Evaluation by an Aeronautic Dentist on the Adverse Effects of a Six-Week Period of Microgravity on the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balwant Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. HDT bed rest condition is a simulated microgravity condition in which subject lies on bed inclined −6 degree feet up. To determine the influence of a simulated microgravity (HDT bed rest on oral cavity, 10 healthy male volunteers were studied before, during, just after, and after 6 weeks of the simulated microgravity condition of −6° head-down-tilt (HDT bed rest. Materials and Methods. Facial nerve function, facial sensation, chemosensory system, salivary biomarkers were measured. Results. Lactate dehydrogenase, MIP 1 alpha, malonaldehyde, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and thiocyanate were found to increase significantly, while flow rate, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, protein, amylase activity, vitamin E and C, and mouth opening were decreased in simulation environments in contradiction to normal. The threshold for monosodium glutamate (MSG and capsaicin increased during microgravity as compared to normal conditions. Moderate pain of teeth, facial oedema, mild pain, loss of sensation of pain and temperature, decreased tongue, and mandibular movement in simulation microgravity environments were observed. Conclusions. These results suggest that reversible effect of microgravity is oedema of face, change in taste, abnormal expression of face, teeth pain, and xerostomia. Further study will be required on large scale on long-term effects of microgravity on oral cavity to prevent the adverse effects.

  3. Numerical simulation of gender differences in a long-term microgravity exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni

    The objective of this work is to analyse and simulate gender differences when individuals are exposed to long-term microgravity. Risk probability of a health impairment which may put in jeopardy a long-term mission is also evaluated. Computer simulations are becoming a promising research line of work, as physiological models become more and more sophisticated and reliable. Technological advances in state-of-the-art hardware technology and software allow nowadays for better and more accurate simulations of complex phenomena, such as the response of the human cardiovascular system to long-term exposure to microgravity. Experimental data for long-term missions are difficult to achieve and reproduce, therefore the predictions of computer simulations are of a major importance in this field. Our approach is based on a previous model developed and implemented in our laboratory (NELME: Numerical Evaluation of Long-term Microgravity Effects). The software simulates the behaviour of the cardiovascular system and different human organs, has a modular architecture, and allows to introduce perturbations such as physical exercise or countermeasures. The implementation is based on a complex electricallike model of this control system, using inexpensive software development frameworks, and has been tested and validated with the available experimental data. Gender differences have been implemented for this specific work, as an adjustment of a number of parameters that are included in the model. Women versus men physiological differences have been therefore taken into account, based upon estimations from the physiology bibliography. A number of simulations have been carried out for long-term exposure to microgravity. Gravity varying from Earth-based to zero, and time exposure are the two main variables involved in the construction of results, including responses to patterns of physical aerobical exercise, and also thermal stress simulating an extra-vehicular activity. Results show

  4. A Characterization Of Alcohol Fuel Vapor For Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Applied To Microgravity Flame Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Perry, David S.; Miller, Fletcher; Piltch, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A diode laser diagnostic is being developed for use in an ongoing investigation of flame spread in microgravity at NASA Glenn Research Center. Flame spread rates through non-homogenous gas mixtures are significantly different in a microgravity environment because of buoyancy and possibly hydrostatic pressure effects. These effects contribute to the fuel vapor concentration ahead of the flame being altered so that flame spread is more rapid in microgravity. This paper describes spectral transmission measurements made through mixtures of alcohol, water vapor, and nitrogen in a gas cell that was designed and built to allow measurements at temperatures up to 500 C. The alcohols considered are methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol. The basic technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas species measurements in microgravity was developed by Silver et al. For this technique to be applicable, one must carefully choose the spectral features over which the diode laser is modulated to provide good sensitivity and minimize interference from other molecular lines such as those in water. Because the methanol spectrum was not known with sufficient resolution in the wavelength region of interest, our first task was to perform high-resolution transmission measurements with an FTIR spectrometer for methanol vapor in nitrogen, followed recently by ethanol and n-propanol. A computer program was written to generate synthesized data to mimic that expected from the experiment using the laser diode, and results from that simulation are also presented.

  5. Development of Apparatus for Microgravity Experiments on Evaporation and Combustion of Palm Methyl Ester Droplet in High-Pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masato; Nomura, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Nozomu

    New apparatus for microgravity experiments was developed in order to obtain fundamental data of single droplet evaporation and combustion of palm methyl ester (PME) for understanding PME spray combustion in internal combustion engines. n-hexadecane droplet combustion and evaporation experiments were also performed to obtain single-component fuel data. Combustion experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For droplet evaporation experiments, ambient temperature and pressure were varied from 473 to 873 K and 0.10 to 4.0 MPa, respectively. Microgravity conditions were employed for evaporation experiments to prevent natural convection. Droplet diameter history of a burning PME droplet is similar to that of n-hexadecane. Droplet diameter history of an evaporating PME droplet is different from that of n-hexadecane at low ambient temperatures. In the latest stage of PME droplet evaporation, temporal evaporation constant decreases remarkably. At ambient temperatures sufficiently above the boiling temperature of PME components, droplet diameter history of PME and n-hexadecane are similar to each other. Corrected evaporation lifetime τ of PME at 873 K as a function of ambient pressure was obtained at normal and microgravity. At normal gravity, τ monotonically decreases with ambient pressure. On the other hand, at microgravity, τ increases with ambient pressure, and then decreases.

  6. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  7. Summaries of reports of the 30. Conference on low-temperature physics. Pt. 1. Fundamental questions of superconductivity including HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Thesis of reporsts of the 30th Conference on low-temperature physics are presented. Fundamental problems of superconductivity are discussed including HTSC in bulk crystals, in thin films of Josephson junctions, ceramics and heterostructures. Specific features of superconductor structure and magnetic properties and also different mechanisms of superconductivity are analyzed

  8. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  9. Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the detailed background information that has been compiled to support the preparation of a much shorter white paper on the design features and fuel cycles of Very High-Temperature Reactors (VHTRs), including the proposed Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), to identify the important proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) aspects of the proposed concepts. The shorter white paper derived from the information in this report was prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Science and Technology for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) VHTR Systems Steering Committee (SSC) as input to the GIF Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Working Group (PR&PPWG) (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/horizontal/proliferation.htm). The short white paper was edited by the GIF VHTR SCC to address their concerns and thus may differ from the information presented in this supporting report. The GIF PR&PPWG will use the derived white paper based on this report along with other white papers on the six alternative Generation IV design concepts (http://www.gen-4.org/Technology/systems/index.htm) to employ an evaluation methodology that can be applied and will evolve from the earliest stages of design. This methodology will guide system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders in evaluating the response of each system, to determine each system's resistance to proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats, and thereby guide future international cooperation on ensuring safeguards in the deployment of the Generation IV systems. The format and content of this report is that specified in a template prepared by the GIF PR&PPWG. Other than the level of detail, the key exception to the specified template format is the addition of Appendix C to document the history and status of coated-particle fuel reprocessing technologies, which fuel reprocessing technologies have yet to be

  10. Mineralization and growth of cultured embryonic skeletal tissue in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1999-01-01

    Microgravity provides a unique environment in which to study normal and pathological phenomenon. Very few studies have been done to examine the effects of microgravity on developing skeletal tissue such as growth plate formation and maintenance, elongation of bone primordia, or the mineralization of growth plate cartilage. Embryonic mouse premetatarsal triads were cultured on three space shuttle flights to study cartilage growth, differentiation, and mineralization, in a microgravity environment. The premetatarsal triads that were cultured in microgravity all formed cartilage rods and grew in length. However, the premetatarsal cartilage rods cultured in microgravity grew less in length than the ground control cartilage rods. Terminal chondrocyte differentiation also occurred during culture in microgravity, as well as in the ground controls, and the matrix around the hypertrophied chondrocytes was capable of mineralizing in both groups. The same percentage of premetatarsals mineralized in the microgravity cultures as mineralized in the ground control cultures. In addition, the sizes of the mineralized areas between the two groups were very similar. However, the amount of 45Ca incorporated into the mineralized areas was significantly lower in the microgravity cultures, suggesting that the composition or density of the mineralized regions was compromised in microgravity. There was no significant difference in the amount of 45Ca liberated from prelabeled explants in microgravity or in the ground controls.

  11. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, Ernest D. [Modeling and Computing Services, LLC; Odette, George Robert [UCSB; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Yamamoto, Takuya [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high-energy neutrons from the core, which causes changes in material toughness properties that increase with radiation exposure and are affected by many variables. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials is currently evaluated using Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG1.99/2), which presents methods for estimating the shift in Charpy transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (TTS) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). The purpose of the work reported here is to improve on the TTS correlation model in RG1.99/2 using the broader database now available and current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The USE database and models have not been updated since the publication of NUREG/CR-6551 and, therefore, are not discussed in this report. The revised embrittlement shift model is calibrated and validated on a substantially larger, better-balanced database compared to prior models, including over five times the amount of data used to develop RG1.99/2. It also contains about 27% more data than the most recent update to the surveillance shift database, in 2000. The key areas expanded in the current database relative to the database available in 2000 are low-flux, low-copper, and long-time, high-fluence exposures, all areas that were previously relatively sparse. All old and new surveillance data were reviewed for completeness, duplicates, and discrepancies in cooperation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.02 on Radiation Effects in Structural Materials. In the present modeling effort, a 10% random sample of data was reserved from the fitting process, and most aspects of the model were validated with that sample as well as other data not used in calibration. The model is a hybrid, incorporating both physically motivated features and empirical calibration to the U.S. power reactor surveillance

  12. Electrostatic Levitation: A Tool to Support Materials Research in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jan; SanSoucie, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important topic for materials research in microgravity. Levitated specimens are free from contact with a container, which permits studies of deeply undercooled melts, and high-temperature, highly reactive materials. Containerless processing provides data for studies of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable state formation, microstructure formation, undercooling, and nucleation. The European Space Agency (ESA) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) jointly developed an electromagnetic levitator facility (MSL-EML) for containerless materials processing in space. The electrostatic levitator (ESL) facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center provides support for the development of containerless processing studies for the ISS. Apparatus and techniques have been developed to use the ESL to provide data for phase diagram determination, creep resistance, emissivity, specific heat, density/thermal expansion, viscosity, surface tension and triggered nucleation of melts. The capabilities and results from selected ESL-based characterization studies performed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center will be presented.

  13. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMAD DWI SETYAWAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Setyawan AD, Sugiyarto, Solichatun, Susilowati A. 2013. Review: Physical, physical chemistries, chemical and sensorial characteristics of the several fruits and vegetables chips by low-temperature vacuum frying machine. Nusantara Bioscience 5: 84-100. Frying process is one of the oldest cooking methods and most widely practiced in the world. Frying process is considered as a dry cooking method because the process does not involve water. In frying process, oil conduction occurs at high temperature pressing water out of food in the form of bubbles. Fried foods last longer due to reduced water levels lead less decomposition by microbes, even fried foods can be enhanced nutritional value and quality of appearance. Food frying technology can extend the shelf life of fruits and vegetables and frying oil enhances the flavors of the products, however, improper frying oil can have harmful effects on human health. Vacuum frying is a promising technology that may be an option for the production of novel snacks such as fruit and vegetable crisps that present the desired quality and respond to new health trends. This technique fry food at a low temperature and pressure so that the nutritional quality of the food is maintained and the quality of the used oil does not quickly declined and became saturated oils that are harmful to human health. This technique produces chips that have physical, physico-chemical, chemical, and sensory generally better than conventional deep-fat frying methods.

  14. Effect of vulcanization temperature on curing characteristic, physical and mechanical properties of natural rubber/palygorskite composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. C.; Yusoff, N. A. Md; Othman, N.; Mohamad Aini, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to determine the optimum vulcanization temperature on curing characteristic, mechanical and physical properties of natural rubber/palygorskite composites. Three variations of vulcanization temperature (140, 150 and 160°C) were conducted on the samples. Cation-exchanged method used to treat the palygorskite. Rheological measurements and mechanical testing (tear, tensile and fatique life) were conducted on the composites sample. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to reveal the dispersion of palygorskite in NR matrix. It was found that the scorch and cure time of NR/Palygorskite decrease with increasing of vulcanization temperature. The tensile strength and fatigue life was optimum at 140°C and slightly decreased with the increasing of vulcanization temperature. The SEM micrograph revealed the strength and weakness in the system. It can be concluded that the optimum properties of NR/Palygorskite composites were at 140°C of vulcanization temperature and most of the mechanical and physical properties were slightly decreased with the increasing of vulcanization temperature.

  15. Estimation of Ion temperatures in the Ionosphere using Swarm Langmuir Probe data and a Physics-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomidze, L.; Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Kouznetsov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Ion temperature is one of the key parameters that provides insight into the thermal balance of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere system. Together with the temperatures of neutral and electron gases it controls various physical and chemical processes in the upper atmosphere. These include the ion-neutral collision frequencies, chemical reaction rates and plasma scale height, all of which affect the variation and distribution of the electron density. Yet, the modeling of ionospheric ion temperature has received relatively little attention compared to other parameters. The Electric Field Instruments on the European Space Agency's (ESA's) polar orbiting Swarm satellites consist of a pair of Thermal Ion Imagers (TII) and a pair of Langmuir probes (LP) measuring ionospheric plasma parameters at around 500 km. The TII was designed to image ion velocity distribution functions and provide ionospheric electric fields and ion temperatures along the satellites' orbits. Currently, the TII instruments are operating only during limited time intervals, while the measurements of ionospheric electron temperatures and densities are carried out continuously. In this work we estimate the ion temperatures along the orbits of Swarm satellites at low and middle latitudes using a heat balance equation for the ions gas under steady-state conditions. The physics-based ion temperature model assumes ions are heated by the hotter electron gas through elastic Coulomb collisions and cooled by resonance charge transfer collisions with the parent atoms and by elastic collisions with unlike atoms and molecules. The corrected Swarm LP data represent key input parameters for the model. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, we perform two types of analysis. The first is based on the synthetic (model-generated) inputs by a physics-based ionosphere model which solves the complete ion heat balance equation. In another, the estimates of ion temperatures are obtained using actual data for those

  16. Fish Inner Ear Otolith Growth Under Real Microgravity (Spaceflight) and Clinorotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Ralf; Brungs, Sonja; Grimm, Dennis; Knie, Miriam; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    Using late larval stages of cichlid fish ( Oreochromis mossambicus) we have shown earlier that the biomineralization of otoliths is adjusted towards gravity by means of a neurally guided feedback loop. Centrifuge experiments, e.g., revealed that increased gravity slows down otolith growth. Microgravity thus should yield an opposite effect, i.e., larger than normal otoliths. Consequently, late larval cichlids (stage 14, vestibular system operational) were subjected to real microgravity during the 12 days FOTON-M3 spaceflight mission (OMEGAHAB-hardware). Controls were kept at 1 g on ground within an identical hardware. Animals of another batch were subsequently clinorotated within a submersed fast-rotating clinostat with one axis of rotation (2d-clinostat), a device regarded to simulate microgravity. Temperature and light conditions were provided in analogy to the spaceflight experiment. Controls were maintained at 1 g within the same aquarium. After all experiments, animals had reached late stage 21 (fish can swim freely). Maintenance under real microgravity during spaceflight resulted in significantly larger than normal otoliths (both lapilli and sagittae, involved in sensing gravity and the hearing process, respectively). This result is fully in line with an earlier spaceflight study in the course of which otoliths from late-staged swordtails Xiphophorus helleri were analyzed. Clinorotation resulted in larger than 1 g sagittae. However, no effect on lapilli was obtained. Possibly, an effect was present but too light to be measurable. Overall, spaceflight obviously induces an adaptation of otolith growth, whereas clinorotation does not fully mimic conditions of microgravity regarding late larval cichlids.

  17. Glucocorticoid: A potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiancheng; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Wenbin; Xue, Yanru; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Jingbao; Shang, Peng

    2017-11-01

    Exposure of animals and humans to conditions of microgravity, including actual spaceflight and simulated microgravity, results in numerous negative alterations to bone structure and mechanical properties. Although there are abundant researches on bone loss in microgravity, the explicit mechanism is not completely understood. At present, it is widely accepted that the absence of mechanical stimulus plays a predominant role in bone homeostasis disorders in conditions of weightlessness. However, aside from mechanical unloading, nonmechanical factors such as various hormones, cytokines, dietary nutrition, etc. are important as well in microgravity induced bone loss. The stress-induced increase in endogenous glucocorticoid (GC) levels is inevitable in microgravity environments. Moreover, it is well known that GCs have a detrimental effect to bone health at excess concentrations. Therefore, GC plays a potential role in microgravity-induced bone loss. This review summarizeds several studies and their prospective solutions to this hypothesis.

  18. Effect of sintering temperature on physical properties & hardness of CoCrMo alloys fabricated by metal injection moulding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridhwan Abdullah, Ahmad; Aidah Nabihah Dandang, Nur; Zalikha Khalil, Nur; Harun, Wan Sharuzi Wan

    2017-10-01

    Metal Injection Moulding (MIM) process is one of the Powder Metallurgy manufacturing techniques utilised to produce Cobalt Chromium Molybdenum (CoCrMo) compacts. The objective of this study is to determine physical properties and hardness of CoCrMo alloy compact sintered at three different sintering temperature at the similar soaking time. At the beginning, sample were fabricated by using Injection Moulding machine. Cobalt Chrome Molybdenum (CoCrMo) metal powder was selected for this study. A morphological study was conducted using optical microscope (OM) and micro-Vickers hardness testing. From the result obtained, it shows upward trend either on the hardness or physical properties of the samples. CoCrMo sintered compact become harder and volume of pores on surface become less due to the increase on sintering temperature. However, effect of increasing sintering temperature shows significant shrinkage of the sample, beginning losses in dimensional accuracy. It is discovered that a little change in sintering temperature gives significant impact on the microstructure, physical, mechanical of the alloy.

  19. Modeling of two-phase flow in membranes and porous media in microgravity as applied to plant irrigation in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scovazzo, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Hoehn, A.; Todd, P.

    2001-01-01

    In traditional applications in soil physics it is convention to scale porous media properties, such as hydraulic conductivity, soil water diffusivity, and capillary head, with the gravitational acceleration. In addition, the Richards equation for water flux in partially saturated porous media also contains a gravity term. With the plans to develop plant habitats in space, such as in the International Space Station, it becomes necessary to evaluate these properties and this equation under conditions of microgravitational acceleration. This article develops models for microgravity steady state two-phase flow, as found in irrigation systems, that addresses critical design issues. Conventional dimensionless groups in two-phase mathematical models are scaled with gravity, which must be assigned a value of zero for microgravity modeling. The use of these conventional solutions in microgravity, therefore, is not possible. This article therefore introduces new dimensionless groups for two-phase models. The microgravity models introduced here determined that in addition to porous media properties, important design factors for microgravity systems include applied water potential and the ratio of inner to outer radii for cylindrical and spherical porous media systems.

  20. Effects of microgravity on osteoblast growth activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Lewis, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight is an environmental condition where astronauts can lose up to 19% of weight-bearing bone during long duration missions. We used the MC3T3-E1 osteoblast to investigate bone cell growth in microgravity (10(-6) to 10(-9)g). Osteoblasts were launched on the STS-56 shuttle flight in a quiescent state with 0.5% fetal calf serum (FCS) medium and growth activation was initiated by adding fresh medium with 10% FCS during microgravity exposure. Four days after serum activation, the cells were fixed before return to normal Earth gravity. Ground controls were treated in parallel with the flight samples in identical equipment. On landing, cell number, cell cytoskeleton, glucose utilization, and prostaglandin synthesis in flight (n = 4) and ground controls (n = 4) were examined. The flown osteoblasts grew slowly in microgravity with total cell number significantly reduced (55 +/- 6 vs 141 +/- 8 cells per microscopic field). The cytoskeleton of the flight osteoblasts had a reduced number of stress fibers and a unique abnormal morphology. Nuclei in the ground controls were large and round with punctate Hoechst staining of the DNA nucleosomes. The flight nuclei were 30% smaller than the controls (P prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis when compared to controls (57.3 +/- 17 vs 138.3 +/- 41 pmol/ml). Cell viability was normal since, on a per-cell basis, glucose use and prostaglandin synthesis were comparable for flight and ground samples. Taken together, these data suggest that growth activation in microgravity results in reduced growth, causing reduced glucose utilization and reduced prostaglandin synthesis, with significantly altered actin cytoskeleton in osteoblasts.

  1. Measurements and Modeling of Soot Formation and Radiation in Microgravity Jet Diffusion Flames. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, Li; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    This is a computational and experimental study for soot formation and radiative heat transfer in jet diffusion flames under normal gravity (1-g) and microgravity (0-g) conditions. Instantaneous soot volume fraction maps are measured using a full-field imaging absorption technique developed by the authors. A compact, self-contained drop rig is used for microgravity experiments in the 2.2-second drop tower facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. On modeling, we have coupled flame structure and soot formation models with detailed radiation transfer calculations. Favre-averaged boundary layer equations with a k-e-g turbulence model are used to predict the flow field, and a conserved scalar approach with an assumed Beta-pdf are used to predict gaseous species mole fraction. Scalar transport equations are used to describe soot volume fraction and number density distributions, with formation and oxidation terms modeled by one-step rate equations and thermophoretic effects included. An energy equation is included to couple flame structure and radiation analyses through iterations, neglecting turbulence-radiation interactions. The YIX solution for a finite cylindrical enclosure is used for radiative heat transfer calculations. The spectral absorption coefficient for soot aggregates is calculated from the Rayleigh solution using complex refractive index data from a Drude- Lorentz model. The exponential-wide-band model is used to calculate the spectral absorption coefficient for H20 and C02. It is shown that when compared to results from true spectral integration, the Rosseland mean absorption coefficient can provide reasonably accurate predictions for the type of flames studied. The soot formation model proposed by Moss, Syed, and Stewart seems to produce better fits to experimental data and more physically sound than the simpler model by Khan et al. Predicted soot volume fraction and temperature results agree well with published data for a normal gravity co-flow laminar

  2. Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

  3. Effects of chemical composite, puffing temperature and intermediate moisture content on physical properties of potato and apple slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabtaing, S.; Paengkanya, S.; Tanthong, P.

    2017-09-01

    Puffing technique is the process that can improve texture and volumetric of crisp fruit and vegetable. However, the effect of chemical composite in foods on puffing characteristics is still lack of study. Therefore, potato and apple slices were comparative study on their physical properties. Potato and apple were sliced into 2.5 mm thickness and 2.5 cm in diameter. Potato slices were treated by hot water for 2 min while apple slices were not treatment. After that, they were dried in 3 steps. First step, they were dried by hot air at temperature of 90°C until their moisture content reached to 30, 40, and 50 % dry basis. Then they were puffed by hot air at temperature of 130, 150, and 170°C for 2 min. Finally, they were dried again by hot air at temperature of 90°C until their final moisture content reached to 4% dry basis. The experimental results showed that chemical composite of food affected on physical properties of puffed product. Puffed potato had higher volume ratio than those puffed apple because potato slices contains starch. The higher starch content provided more hard texture of potato than those apples. Puffing temperature and moisture content strongly affected on the color, volume ratio, and textural properties of puffed potato slices. In addition, the high drying rate of puffed product observed at high puffing temperature and higher moisture content.

  4. A physics-based algorithm for retrieving land-surface emissivity and temperature from EOS/MODIS data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Z.; Li, Z.L.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have developed a physics-based land-surface temperature (LST) algorithm for simultaneously retrieving surface band-averaged emissivities and temperatures from day/night pairs of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data in seven thermal infrared bands. The set of 14 nonlinear equations in the algorithm is solved with the statistical regression method and the least-squares fit method. This new LST algorithm was tested with simulated MODIS data for 80 sets of band-averaged emissivities calculated from published spectral data of terrestrial materials in wide ranges of atmospheric and surface temperature conditions. Comprehensive sensitivity and error analysis has been made to evaluate the performance of the new LST algorithm and its dependence on variations in surface emissivity and temperature, upon atmospheric conditions, as well as the noise-equivalent temperature difference (NEΔT) and calibration accuracy specifications of the MODIS instrument. In cases with a systematic calibration error of 0.5%, the standard deviations of errors in retrieved surface daytime and nighttime temperatures fall between 0.4--0.5 K over a wide range of surface temperatures for mid-latitude summer conditions. The standard deviations of errors in retrieved emissivities in bands 31 and 32 (in the 10--12.5 microm IR spectral window region) are 0.009, and the maximum error in retrieved LST values falls between 2--3 K

  5. Methodology and results of investigations of physical parameters of high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepnin, Yu.S.; Chertkov, Yu.B.

    1995-01-01

    A physical investigations of reactors of stand complexes Baikal-1 and IGR have been carrying out more 30 years. Measuring methods of the physical investigations were divided into 2 groups: 1) methods for measuring of reactivity effects; 2) methods for measuring relative and absolute values of neutron flux and power release. The physical investigations on the reactors IVG-1 and IGR were carryied out under following conditions: during physical starts-up of regular variants of reactor cores; during energy starts-up of the reactors; before beginning of new loop chanel tests of the reactors; during research hot starts-up of the reactors the physical parameters were controled. The most full and authentic information about studied reactor have been providing by physical investigations. In 1984 physical investigations were carryied out on the IGR reactor and then the hot start-up of the mostest power and mostest large on fuel loading loop chanel was carryied out. This chanel contained 6 fuel assemblies with the summary fuel loading 3,06 kilogrammes of uranium and it was calculated for power equal to 20 MW. In 1988 the physical investigations for selection of project process chanels destined for new water cooled reactor core were carryied out. In 1993 the neutron-physical calculation on possibility of tests for the rector Nerva fuel element was carryied out. 9 refs., 4 figs

  6. Effect of microgravity on an animal-bacteria symbiosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spaceflight imposes numerous adaptive challenges for terrestrial life. The reduction in gravity or microgravity represents a novel environment that can disrupt...

  7. Single Electron Transistor Platform for Microgravity Proteomics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Proteomic studies in microgravity are crucial to understanding the health effects of spaceflight on astronauts. Unfortunately, existing tools for measuring protein,...

  8. Transpiration and Leaf Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, David M.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report introduces two models of the thermal energy budget of a leaf. Typical values for…

  9. Chemical and physical processes for integrated temperature control in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, Rosanne M.; Dodge, Arash; Van Dedem, Gijs W. K.; De Rooij, Nico F.; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are a promising new tool for studying and optimizing (bio)chemical reactions and analyses. Many (bio)chemical reactions require accurate temperature control, such as for example thermocycling for PCR. Here, a new integrated temperature control system for microfluidic devices is

  10. The Influence of Heat Treatment Time and Temperature on the Physical Properties of Assab-Corax Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz K-Jahja; Parikin; Nurdin-Effendi

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction experiment was carried out on commercial Assab-Corax steel sample. The polished samples are then heated to various temperature for different holding time; 200 o C for 4 hours, 300 o C for 4 hours, 400 o C for 6-, 8-, 12- and 16 hours, 500 o C for 4 hours and 600 o C for 4 hours. The refinement of the diffraction intensity was carried out using the Im3m model, and the results show that the Carbon atoms are distributed among the base position in the body centered cubic unit cell at the eight-fold octahedral interstitial sites. Using the refined structural parameters, thermo-physical properties such as Debye temperature and coefficient of thermal expansion are calculated. From the results of the analysis it could be concluded that Debye temperature in Assab-Corrax steels tend to decrease with increasing heat-treatment time but tend to increase with heat treatment temperature. The coefficients of linear expansion also tend to decrease with increasing heat-treatment time and tend to increase with heat treatment temperature. Although the patterns are different, for example when the Debye temperature reaches its peak value for heat treatment time of 8 hours, the coefficient of linear expansion would reach its low point at this time. Therefore, the general finding is that both treatment temperature and - time are influential to the physical properties of Assab-Corrax steels and x-ray diffraction methods could be utilized in elucidating these important findings. (author)

  11. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  12. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  13. Lutein-enriched emulsion-based delivery systems: Influence of pH and temperature on physical and chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidov-Pardo, Gabriel; Gumus, Cansu Ekin; McClements, David Julian

    2016-04-01

    Lutein may be utilized in foods as a natural pigment or nutraceutical ingredient to improve eye health. Nevertheless, its use is limited by its poor water-solubility and chemical instability. We evaluated the effect of storage temperature and pH on the physical and chemical stability of lutein-enriched emulsions prepared using caseinate. The emulsions (initial droplet diameter=232 nm) remained physically stable at all incubation temperatures (5-70 °C); however the chemical degradation of lutein increased with increasing temperature (activation energy=38 kJ/mol). Solution pH had a major impact on the physical stability of the emulsions, causing droplet aggregation at pH 4 and 5. Conversely, the chemical stability of lutein was largely independent of the pH, with only a slight decrease in degradation at pH 8. This work provides important information for the rational design of emulsion-based delivery systems for a lipophilic natural dye and nutraceutical. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of fiber-matrix adhesion on the creep behavior of CF/PPS composites: temperature and physical aging characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta Dias, M. H.; Jansen, K. M. B.; Luinge, J. W.; Bersee, H. E. N.; Benedictus, R.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of fiber-matrix adhesion on the linear viscoelastic creep behavior of `as received' and `surface modified' carbon fibers (AR-CF and SM-CF, respectively) reinforced polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite materials was investigated. Short-term tensile creep tests were performed on ±45° specimens under six different isothermal conditions, 40, 50, 60, 65, 70 and 75 °C. Physical aging effects were evaluated on both systems using the short-term test method established by Struik. The results showed that the shapes of the curves were affected neither by physical aging nor by the test temperature, allowing then superposition to be made. A unified model was proposed with a single physical aging and temperature-dependent shift factor, a_{T,te}. It was suggested that the surface treatment carried out in SM-CF/PPS had two major effects on the creep response of CF/PPS composites at a reference temperature of 40 °C: a lowering of the initial compliance of about 25 % and a slowing down of the creep response of about 1.1 decade.

  15. Solid-state physics at microkelvin temperatures: Is anything left to learn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobell, F. (Bayreuth Univ. (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of research that has been conducted by varying the temperature of matter to better understand its properties. Experimenters reached the kelvin and millikelvin range only by overcoming substantial experimental difficulties. This paper addresses the problems encountered as researchers attempt to probe microkelvin temperatures. Also discussed is whether or not the knowledge gained by this research will outweigh the required investment of manpower and financial resources. The author believes that experiments at ultralow temperatures will address important general questions and are worth the necessary expense. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Kyu Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS. The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36±1°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  17. Design and Performance of an Automated Bioreactor for Cell Culture Experiments in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Kyu; Park, Seul-Hyun; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Gi-Hyuk

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a bioreactor for a cell-culture experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The bioreactor is an experimental device for culturing mouse muscle cells in a microgravity environment. The purpose of the experiment was to assess the impact of microgravity on the muscles to address the possibility of longterm human residence in space. After investigation of previously developed bioreactors, and analysis of the requirements for microgravity cell culture experiments, a bioreactor design is herein proposed that is able to automatically culture 32 samples simultaneously. This reactor design is capable of automatic control of temperature, humidity, and culture-medium injection rate; and satisfies the interface requirements of the ISS. Since bioreactors are vulnerable to cell contamination, the medium-circulation modules were designed to be a completely replaceable, in order to reuse the bioreactor after each experiment. The bioreactor control system is designed to circulate culture media to 32 culture chambers at a maximum speed of 1 ml/min, to maintain the temperature of the reactor at 36°C, and to keep the relative humidity of the reactor above 70%. Because bubbles in the culture media negatively affect cell culture, a de-bubbler unit was provided to eliminate such bubbles. A working model of the reactor was built according to the new design, to verify its performance, and was used to perform a cell culture experiment that confirmed the feasibility of this device.

  18. Coarsening Dynamics and Marangoni Effects in Thin Liquid Crystal Bubbles in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Noel; Glaser, Matthew; Maclennan, Joseph; Park, Cheol; Tin, Padetha; Hall, Nancy R.; Sheehan, Christopher; Storck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was successfully launched on SpaceX-6 on April 15, 2015 and was operated in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on board the International Space Station (ISS). The OASIS project comprises a series of experiments that probe the interfacial and hydrodynamic behavior of spherical-bubble freely suspended liquid crystal (FSLC) membranes in space. These are the thinnest known stable condensed phase structures, making them ideal for studies of two-dimensional (2D) coarsening dynamics and thermocapillary phenomena in microgravity. The OASIS experimental investigation was carried out using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in four separate sample chambers housed inside the MSG. In this report, we present the behavior of collective dynamics on 2D bubble surface, including the equilibrium spatial organization and interaction of islands in electric fields and temperature gradients, and the diffusion and coalescence-driven coarsening dynamics of island emulsions in microgravity. We have observed spontaneous bubble thickening behavior caused by gradients between the bubble-blowing needle and ambient air temperatures. A uniform, thicker band forms during coarsening as a result of non-uniform heating by the LED illumination panels. These are proposed to be a result of Marangoni convection on the bubble surface.

  19. Proposal of a Simple Plant Growth System under Microgravity Conditions in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Hiroaki; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsukamoto, Koya; Yamashita, Youichirou

    2012-07-01

    Plant culture in space has multiple functions for human life support such as providing food and purifying air and water. It is also suggested that crew can relieve their stress by watching growing plants and by enjoying fresh vegetable food during staying for several months in the International Space Station. Under such circumstances, it is an utmost importance to develop plant culture equipment that can be handled more easily by crew. This study aims to develop an easy-to-use plant growth system with modification of commercial household plant culture equipment. The item is equipped with a peltier device for cooling air and collecting water vapor in the growth room. The study was conducted to examine the performance of the equipment under microgravity conditions that were created by the parabolic airplane flights. As a result, the temperature of the peltier device was affected under the microgravity conditions due to the absence of heat convection. When an air flow was made with an air circulation fan, the temperature of the peltier device was stable to gravity changes. The water recycling method for an automatic nutrient solution supply system in the closed plant culture equipment under microgravity is proposed. In addition, a high output white LEDs showing a good performance for growing leafy vegetables will be introduced.

  20. High temperature dielectric properties of (BxNyOz thin films deposited using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Badi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric integrity has been one of the major obstacle in bringing out capacitor devices with suitable performance characteristics at high temperatures. In this paper, BxNyOz dielectric films for high temperature capacitors solutions are investigated. The films were grown on silicon substrate by using ion source assisted physical vapor deposition technique. The as-grown films were characterized by SEM, XRD, and XPS. The capacitor structures were fabricated using BxNyOz as a dielectric and titanium as metal electrodes. The elaborated devices were subjected to electrical and thermal characterization. They exhibited low electrical loss and very good stability when subjected to high temperature for a prolonged period of time.

  1. Physics responsible for heating efficiency and self-controlled temperature rise of magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaterabadi, Zhila; Nabiyouni, Gholamreza; Soleymani, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles as heat-generating nanosources in hyperthermia treatment are still faced with many drawbacks for achieving sufficient clinical potential. In this context, increase in heating ability of magnetic nanoparticles in a biologically safe alternating magnetic field and also approach to a precise control on temperature rise are two challenging subjects so that a significant part of researchers' efforts has been devoted to them. Since a deep understanding of Physics concepts of heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is essential to develop hyperthermia as a cancer treatment with non-adverse side effects, this review focuses on different mechanisms responsible for heat dissipation in a radio frequency magnetic field. Moreover, particular attention is given to ferrite-based nanoparticles because of their suitability in radio frequency magnetic fields. Also, the key role of Curie temperature in suppressing undesired temperature rise is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  3. Fluid Flow and Solidification Under Combined Action of Magnetic Fields and Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B. Q.; Shu, Y.; Li, K.; deGroh, H. C.

    2002-01-01

    Mathematical models, both 2-D and 3-D, are developed to represent g-jitter induced fluid flows and their effects on solidification under combined action of magnetic fields and microgravity. The numerical model development is based on the finite element solution of governing equations describing the transient g-jitter driven fluid flows, heat transfer and solutal transport during crystal growth with and without an applied magnetic field in space vehicles. To validate the model predictions, a ground-based g-jitter simulator is developed using the oscillating wall temperatures where timely oscillating fluid flows are measured using a laser PIV system. The measurements are compared well with numerical results obtained from the numerical models. Results show that a combined action derived from magnetic damping and microgravity can be an effective means to control the melt flow and solutal transport in space single crystal growth systems.

  4. A review of the strategies for obtaining high-quality crystals utilizing nanotechnologies and microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechkova, Eugenia; Bragazzi, Nicola; Bozdaganyan, Marine; Belmonte, Luca; Nicolini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Crystallization is a highly demanding and time-consuming task that causes a real bottle-neck in basic research. Great effort has been made to understand the factors and parameters that influence this process and to finely tune them to facilitate crystal growth. Different crystallization techniques have been proposed over the past decades, such as the classical vapor hanging drop method, its variant the sitting drop method, dialysis, cryo-temperature, gel, batch, and the innovative microgravity (space) techniques like free interface diffusion (FID) and counter-ion diffusion (CID). Here, we present a review of the strategies utilizing Langmuir-Blodgett (LB)-based nanotechnologies, and microgravity techniques for obtaining optimal high-quality crystals, as proven by molecular dynamics (MD) and bioinformatics approaches, namely using a clustering algorithm and protein alignment.

  5. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on chemical and physical properties of sewage sludge biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanmohammadi, Zahra; Afyuni, Majid; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of pyrolysis temperatures (300, 400, 500, 600 and 700°C) on properties of biochar produced from an urban sewage sludge. Biochar yield significantly decreased from 72.5% at 300°C to 52.9% at 700°C, whereas an increase in temperature increased the gas yield. Biochar pH and electrical conductivity increased by 3.8 and 1.4 dS m⁻¹, proportionally to the increment of temperature. Biochar produced at low temperatures had higher total nitrogen and total organic carbon content but a lower C/N ratio, calcium carbonate equivalent, and total P, K and Na contents. Total and diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (DTPA)-extractable concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni, Cr and Pb increased with increment of temperature. Lower DTPA-extractable concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni and Pb were found in biochars compared to the sewage sludge. Pyrolysis decreased bulk density, whereas particle density and porosity increment was observed upon pyrolysis with increment of temperature. Sewage sludge saturated water content (θs ) was 130.4 g 100g⁻¹ and significantly greater than biochar, but biochar θs significantly increased with temperature (95.7 versus 105.4 g 100g⁻¹ at 300 and 700°C, respectively). Pyrolysis decreased the biochar's water repellency, assessed by molarity of ethanol droplet (MED), compared to the sewage sludge. The lowest MED of 0.2 and water repellency rating of 3 were found for the biochar produced at 700°C. Based on our results and considering the energy consumption, pyrolysis temperature in the range of 300-400°C may be suggested for sewage sludge pyrolysis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Influence of Temperature and Storing Time on Selected Red Wine Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hlaváč

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented article is focused on red wine rheological and thermal properties. Effects of temperature and short term storage on density, rheological parameters and thermal parameters were investigated. First measurement was done at the beginning of storage and then the same sample was measured again after one week of storing. Density was measured by densimeter Mettler Toledo DM 40 at different temperatures. For dynamic viscosity measurement was used rotational viscometer Anton Paar DV-3P. The kinematic viscosity and fluidity were determined according to the definitions. Thermal parameters were measured by instrument Isomet 2104. Temperature dependencies of wine dynamic and kinematic viscosity had decreasing exponential shape and temperature dependencies of fluidity had an increasing exponential shape. Temperature dependencies of red wine thermal conductivity and diffusivity had increasing linear character. Decreasing polynomial functions were obtained for temperature dependencies of red wine density. The values of dynamic and kinematic viscosity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, and density of red wine were a little bit higher after short term storing, which can be expressed by changed amount of water caused by evaporation. Due to the same reasons were values of fluidity little bit lower after storage.

  7. Physical mechanism or evolutionary trade-off? Factors dictating the relationship between metabolic rate and ambient temperature in carabid beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudowska, Agnieszka; Schramm, Bartosz W; Czarnoleski, Marcin; Kozłowski, Jan; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2017-08-01

    The tight association between ambient temperature (T) and metabolic rate (MR) is a common occurrence in ectotherms, but the determinants of this association are not fully understood. This study examined whether the relationship between MR and T is the same among individuals, as predicted by the Universal Temperature Dependence hypothesis, or whether this relationship differs between them. We used flow-through respirometry to measure standard MR and to determine gas exchange patterns for 111 individuals of three Carabidae species which differ in size (Abax ovalis, Carabus linnei and C. coriaceus), exposed to four different temperatures (ten individuals of each species measured at 6, 11, 16 and 21°C). We found a significant interaction between ln body mass and the inverse of temperature, indicating that in a given species, the effect of temperature on MR was weaker in larger individuals than in smaller individuals. Overall, this finding shows that the thermal dependence of MR is not body mass invariant. We observed three types of gas exchange patterns among beetles: discontinuous, cyclic and continuous. Additionally, the appearance of these patterns was associated with MR and T. Evolution in diverse terrestrial environments could affect diverse ventilation patterns, which accommodate changes in metabolism in response to temperature variation. In conclusion, explaining the variance in metabolism only through fundamental physical laws of thermodynamics, as predicted by the Universal Temperature Dependence hypothesis, appears to oversimplify the complexity of nature, ignoring evolutionary trade-offs that should be taken into account in the temperature - metabolism relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of air temperature on physically-based maximum precipitation estimation through change in moisture holding capacity of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, K.; Ohara, N.; Kavvas, M. L.; Chen, Z. Q.; Anderson, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    Impact of air temperature on the Maximum Precipitation (MP) estimation through change in moisture holding capacity of air was investigated. A series of previous studies have estimated the MP of 72-h basin-average precipitation over the American River watershed (ARW) in Northern California by means of the Maximum Precipitation (MP) estimation approach, which utilizes a physically-based regional atmospheric model. For the MP estimation, they have selected 61 severe storm events for the ARW, and have maximized them by means of the atmospheric boundary condition shifting (ABCS) and relative humidity maximization (RHM) methods. This study conducted two types of numerical experiments in addition to the MP estimation by the previous studies. First, the air temperature on the entire lateral boundaries of the outer model domain was increased uniformly by 0.0-8.0 °C with 0.5 °C increments for the two severest maximized historical storm events in addition to application of the ABCS + RHM method to investigate the sensitivity of the basin-average precipitation over the ARW to air temperature rise. In this investigation, a monotonous increase was found in the maximum 72-h basin-average precipitation over the ARW with air temperature rise for both of the storm events. The second numerical experiment used specific amounts of air temperature rise that is assumed to happen under future climate change conditions. Air temperature was increased by those specified amounts uniformly on the entire lateral boundaries in addition to application of the ABCS + RHM method to investigate the impact of air temperature on the MP estimate over the ARW under changing climate. The results in the second numerical experiment show that temperature increases in the future climate may amplify the MP estimate over the ARW. The MP estimate may increase by 14.6% in the middle of the 21st century and by 27.3% in the end of the 21st century compared to the historical period.

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  10. Physical exercise-induced changes in the core body temperature of mice depend more on ambient temperature than on exercise protocol or intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Costa, Kátia Anunciação; Soares, Anne Danieli Nascimento; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying physical exercise-induced hyperthermia may be species specific. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise intensity and ambient temperature on the core body temperature ( T core) of running mice, which provide an important experimental model for advancing the understanding of thermal physiology. We evaluated the influence of different protocols (constant- or incremental-speed exercises), treadmill speeds and ambient temperatures ( T a) on the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. To measure T core, a telemetric sensor was implanted in the abdominal cavity of male adult Swiss mice under anesthesia. After recovering from the surgery, the animals were familiarized to running on a treadmill and then subjected to the different running protocols and speeds at two T a: 24 °C or 34 °C. All of the experimental trials resulted in marked increases in T core. As expected, the higher-temperature environment increased the magnitude of running-induced hyperthermia. For example, during incremental exercise at 34 °C, the maximal T core achieved was increased by 1.2 °C relative to the value reached at 24 °C. However, at the same T a, neither treadmill speed nor exercise protocol altered the magnitude of exercise-induced hyperthermia. We conclude that T core of running mice is influenced greatly by T a, but not by the exercise protocols or intensities examined in the present report. These findings suggest that the magnitude of hyperthermia in running mice may be regulated centrally, independently of exercise intensity.

  11. Physical modelling of globe and natural wet bulb temperatures to predict WBGT heat stress index in outdoor environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Adélio R; Quintela, Divo A

    2009-05-01

    The present paper describes a physical model that estimates the globe and the natural wet bulb temperatures from the main parameters generally recorded at meteorological weather stations, in order to predict the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) heat stress index for outdoor environments. The model is supported by a thermal analysis of the globe and the natural wet bulb temperature sensors. The results of simultaneous measurements of the WBGT and climatological parameters (solar radiation, wind velocity, humidity, etc.) are presented and used to validate the model. The final comparison between calculated and measured values shows a good agreement with the experimental data, with a maximum absolute deviation of 2.8% for the globe temperature and 2.6% for the natural wet bulb temperature and the WBGT index. The model is applied to the design reference year for Coimbra, Portugal, in order to illustrate its preventative capabilities from a practical point of view. The results clearly show that during the summer there is a critical daily period (1200-1600 hours, local standard time) during which people working outdoors should not be allowed to perform their normal activities.

  12. An innovative approach to the development of a portable unit for analytical flame characterization in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinskiy, Mark A.; Kamal, Mohammed M.; Misra, Prabhaker

    1995-01-01

    The availability of manned laboratory facilities in space offers wonderful opportunities and challenges in microgravity combustion science and technology. In turn, the fundamentals of microgravity combustion science can be studied via spectroscopic characterization of free radicals generated in flames. The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique is a noninvasive method of considerable utility in combustion physics and chemistry suitable for monitoring not only specific species and their kinetics, but it is also important for imaging of flames. This makes LIF one of the most important tools for microgravity combustion science. Flame characterization under microgravity conditions using LIF is expected to be more informative than other methods aimed at searching for effects like pumping phenomenon that can be modeled via ground level experiments. A primary goal of our work consisted in working out an innovative approach to devising an LIF-based analytical unit suitable for in-space flame characterization. It was decided to follow two approaches in tandem: (1) use the existing laboratory (non-portable) equipment and determine the optimal set of parameters for flames that can be used as analytical criteria for flame characterization under microgravity conditions; and (2) use state-of-the-art developments in laser technology and concentrate some effort in devising a layout for the portable analytical equipment. This paper presents an up-to-date summary of the results of our experiments aimed at the creation of the portable device for combustion studies in a microgravity environment, which is based on a portable UV tunable solid-state laser for excitation of free radicals normally present in flames in detectable amounts. A systematic approach has allowed us to make a convenient choice of species under investigation, as well as the proper tunable laser system, and also enabled us to carry out LIF experiments on free radicals using a solid-state laser tunable in the UV.

  13. Subjective Straight Ahead Orientation in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, G.; Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    This joint ESA NASA study will address adaptive changes in spatial orientation related to the subjective straight ahead and the use of a vibrotactile sensory aid to reduce perceptual errors. The study will be conducted before and after long-duration expeditions to the International Space Station (ISS) to examine how spatial processing of target location is altered following exposure to microgravity. This study addresses the sensorimotor research gap to "determine the changes in sensorimotor function over the course of a mission and during recovery after landing."

  14. Deposition of CdTe films under microgravity: Foton M3 mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, K.W.; Croell, A. [Freiburger Materialforschungszentrum FMF, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Zappettini, A.; Calestani, D. [CNR Parma, Instituto Materiali Speciali per Elettronica e Magnetismo IMEM, Fontani Parma (Italy); Dieguez, E. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Fisica de Materiales; Carotenuto, L.; Bassano, E. [Telespazio Napoli, Via Gianturco 31, 80146 Napoli (Italy); Fiederle, M.

    2009-10-15

    Experiments of deposition of CdTe films have been carried out under microgravity in the Russian Foton M3 mission. The influence of gravity has been studied with these experiments and compared to the results of simulations. The measured deposition rate could be confirmed by the theoretical results for lower temperatures. For higher temperatures the measured thickness of the deposited films was larger compared to the theoretical data. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Review of Environmental and Geological Microgravity Applications and Feasibility of Its Employment at Archaeological Sites in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev V. Eppelbaum

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity investigations are widely applied at present for solving various environmental and geological problems. Unfortunately, microgravity survey is comparatively rarely used for searching for hidden ancient targets. It is caused mainly by small geometric size of the desired archaeological objects and various types of noise complicating the observed useful signal. At the same time, development of modern generation of field gravimetric equipment allows to register promptly and digitally microGal (10-8 m/s2 anomalies that offer a new challenge in this direction. An advanced methodology of gravity anomalies analysis and modern 3D modeling, intended for ancient targets delineation, is briefly presented. It is supposed to apply in archaeological microgravity the developed original methods for the surrounding terrain relief computing. Calculating second and third derivatives of gravity potential are useful for revealing some closed peculiarities of the different Physical-Archaeological Models (PAMs. It is underlined that physical measurement of vertical gravity derivatives in archaeological studying has a significant importance and cannot be replaced by any transformation methods. Archaeological targets in Israel have been ranged by their density/geometrical characteristics in several groups. The performed model computations indicate that microgravity investigations might be successfully applied at least in 20–25% of archaeological sites in Israel.

  16. Physical robustness of canopy temperature models for crop heat stress simulation across environments and production conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webber, Heidi; White, Jeffrey W; Kimball, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Despite widespread application in studying climate change impacts, most crop models ignore complex interactions among air temperature, crop and soil water status, CO2 concentration and atmospheric conditions that influence crop canopy temperature. The current study extended previous studies...... between modeling approaches. More accurate simulation of heat stress will likely require use of energy balance approaches that consider atmospheric stability conditions....... by evaluating Tc simulations from nine crop models at six locations across environmental and production conditions. Each crop model implemented one of an empirical (EMP), an energy balance assuming neutral stability (EBN) or an energy balance correcting for atmospheric stability conditions (EBSC) approach...

  17. Lectures presented at the 8th school of low temperature physics and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The texts of 31 lectures are presented of which 6 have been inputted in INIS. They treat a cryostat for a superconducting magnet of an NMR spectrometer, the deformation of the axial variation of the magnetic field induction of a superconducting magnet for NMR, the superconductivity of granular high temperature superconductors, the cooling technique using superfluid helium, the application of NMR in measuring ultralow temperatures, and the manufacture of superconducting magnets for NMR from single-wire NbTi superconductors. (M.D.)

  18. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  19. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % ( p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences ( p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  20. Physical stability of drugs after storage above and below the glass transition temperature: Relationship to glass-forming ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhalaweh, Amjad; Alzghoul, Ahmad; Mahlin, Denny; Bergström, Christel A S

    2015-11-10

    Amorphous materials are inherently unstable and tend to crystallize upon storage. In this study, we investigated the extent to which the physical stability and inherent crystallization tendency of drugs are related to their glass-forming ability (GFA), the glass transition temperature (Tg) and thermodynamic factors. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to produce the amorphous state of 52 drugs [18 compounds crystallized upon heating (Class II) and 34 remained in the amorphous state (Class III)] and to perform in situ storage for the amorphous material for 12h at temperatures 20°C above or below the Tg. A computational model based on the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was developed to predict the structure-property relationships. All drugs maintained their Class when stored at 20°C below the Tg. Fourteen of the Class II compounds crystallized when stored above the Tg whereas all except one of the Class III compounds remained amorphous. These results were only related to the glass-forming ability and no relationship to e.g. thermodynamic factors was found. The experimental data were used for computational modeling and a classification model was developed that correctly predicted the physical stability above the Tg. The use of a large dataset revealed that molecular features related to aromaticity and π-π interactions reduce the inherent physical stability of amorphous drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tailoring physical properties of transglutaminase-modified gelatin films by varying drying temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatin films prepared with or without transglutaminase (TGase) and dried at 15, 25 and 35 °C were analyzed for polymeric network structure, chemical composition and physical properties. Differences in protein network structure were observed by optical microscopy analysis in freeze-dried film-formin...

  2. Physical and chemical changes in whey protein concentrate stored at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemistry of whey protein concentrate (WPC) under adverse storage conditions was monitored to provide information on shelf life in hot, humid areas. WPC34 (34.9 g protein/100 g) and WPC80 (76.8 g protein/100 g) were stored for up to 18 mo under ambient conditions and at elevated temperature and...

  3. Impact of Annealing Temperature on the Physical Properties of the Lanthanum Deficiency Manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skini Ridha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The lanthanum deficiency manganites La0.8-x□xCa0.2MnO3 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2, where □ is a lanthanum vacancy, were prepared using the classic ceramic methods with different thermal treatments (1373 K and 973 K. The structural, magnetic, and magnetocaloric properties of these compounds were studied as a function of annealing temperature. It was noted that the annealing temperature did not affect the crystal structure of our samples (orthorhombic structure with Pnma space group. Nevertheless, a change in the variation of the unit cell volume V, the average bond length dMn–O, and the average bond angles θMn–O–Mn were observed. Magnetization versus temperature study has shown that all samples exhibited a magnetic transition from ferromagnetic (FM to paramagnetic (PM phase with increasing temperature. However, it can be clearly seen that the annealing at 973 K induced an increase of the magnetization. In addition, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE as well as the relative cooling power (RCP were estimated. As an important result, the values of MCE and RCP in our Lanthanum-deficiency manganites are reported to be near to those found in gadolinium, considered as magnetocaloric reference material.

  4. The combined effects of storage temperature and packaging on the sensory, chemical, and physical properties of a Cabernet Sauvignon wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfer, Helene; Buffon, Peter A; Ebeler, Susan E; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2013-04-03

    A Californian Cabernet Sauvignon was stored for 6 months at three different constant temperatures to study the combined effects of storage temperature and packaging configuration. Glass bottles with natural cork, synthetic cork, and screw cap closure, as well as two Bag-in-Box treatments, were used in the experiment. A trained sensory panel was able to detect significant changes in aroma, flavor, taste, mouthfeel, and color attributes among the samples, differences that were found also with various chemical and physical measurements (volatile profile, polyphenol pattern, enological parameters, color space). Additionally, two commonly used polyphenol assays were compared to each other in terms of their ability to detect the changes in the polyphenol profile. Generally, sample changes were more pronounced due to the different storage temperatures, with 30 sensory attributes differing significantly among the three different storage temperatures, while only 17 sensory attributes showed a significant packaging effect. With increasing storage temperature the packaging effect became more pronounced, resulting in the largest changes in the Bag-in-Box samples stored at the highest temperature of 40 °C. At the highest storage temperature, all wines showed oxidized characters, independent of the wine packaging configurations, but to a varying degree. Generally, wines that received highest oxygen amounts and storage temperatures were much lighter, less red, and more brown-yellow at the end of the 6-month storage period, compared to their counterparts stored at 10 °C. These changes in color and polyphenols, respectively, were also detected with the two spectrophotometric assays. With increasing storage temperature both assays measured reduced concentrations in total phenols and total anthocyanins, while total tannins, degree of ionized anthocyanins, and color density increased. Various volatile compounds differed significantly among the samples, with largest relative

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  6. Media Compositions for Three Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth Under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  7. Media Compositions for Three-Dimensional Mammalian Tissue Growth under Microgravity Culture Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue.The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  8. Planarians sense simulated microgravity and hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, Teresa; Saló, Emili; van Loon, Jack J W A; Auletta, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms, which belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They have been a classical subject of study due to their amazing regenerative ability, which relies on the existence of adult totipotent stem cells. Nowadays they are an emerging model system in the field of developmental, regenerative, and stem cell biology. In this study we analyze the effect of a simulated microgravity and a hypergravity environment during the process of planarian regeneration and embryogenesis. We demonstrate that simulated microgravity by means of the random positioning machine (RPM) set at a speed of 60 °/s but not at 10 °/s produces the dead of planarians. Under hypergravity of 3 g and 4 g in a large diameter centrifuge (LDC) planarians can regenerate missing tissues, although a decrease in the proliferation rate is observed. Under 8 g hypergravity small planarian fragments are not able to regenerate. Moreover, we found an effect of gravity alterations in the rate of planarian scission, which is its asexual mode of reproduction. No apparent effects of altered gravity were found during the embryonic development.

  9. Planarians Sense Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Adell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Planarians are flatworms, which belong to the phylum Platyhelminthes. They have been a classical subject of study due to their amazing regenerative ability, which relies on the existence of adult totipotent stem cells. Nowadays they are an emerging model system in the field of developmental, regenerative, and stem cell biology. In this study we analyze the effect of a simulated microgravity and a hypergravity environment during the process of planarian regeneration and embryogenesis. We demonstrate that simulated microgravity by means of the random positioning machine (RPM set at a speed of 60 °/s but not at 10 °/s produces the dead of planarians. Under hypergravity of 3 g and 4 g in a large diameter centrifuge (LDC planarians can regenerate missing tissues, although a decrease in the proliferation rate is observed. Under 8 g hypergravity small planarian fragments are not able to regenerate. Moreover, we found an effect of gravity alterations in the rate of planarian scission, which is its asexual mode of reproduction. No apparent effects of altered gravity were found during the embryonic development.

  10. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  11. Microgravity Flammability Experiments for Spacecraft Fire Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legros, Guillaume; Minster, Olivier; Tóth, Balazs

    2012-01-01

    As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re-sup...... validation experiment are crucial to the ultimate goal of the project, which is the development of predictive tools that should be capable of selecting an adaptive response to fire spread in any manned spacecraft.......As fire behaviour in manned spacecraft still remains poorly understood, an international topical team has been created to design a validation experiment that has an unprecedented large scale for a microgravity flammability experiment. While the validation experiment is being designed for a re...... spread, and thus also the modeling thereof, in realistic conditions is described. Some of the parameters governing the flame spread are also identified and their scaling against the dimensions of the test specimen is briefly questioned. Then several of the current and scheduled efforts are presented...

  12. Baroreflex Function in Rats after Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasser, Eileen M.

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans to decreased gravitational forces during spaceflight results in a number of adverse cardiovascular consequences, often referred to as cardiovascular deconditioning. Prominent among these negative cardiovascular effects are orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity. Rat hindlimb unweighting is an animal model which simulates weightlessness, and results in similar cardiovascular consequences. Cardiovascular reflexes, including arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, are required for normal adjustment to both orthostatic challenges and exercise. Therefore, the orthostatic intolerance and decreased exercise capacity associated with exposure to microgravity may be due to cardiovascular reflex dysfunction. The proposed studies will test the general hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting in rats results in impaired autonomic reflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. Specifically, we hypothesize that the ability to reflexly increase sympathetic nerve activity in response to decreases in arterial pressure or blood volume will be blunted due to hindlimb unweighting. There are 3 specific aims: (1) To evaluate arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats subjected to 14 days of hindlimb unweighting; (2) To examine the interaction between arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious hindlimb unweighted rats; (3) to evaluate changes in afferent and/or central nervous system mechanisms in baroreflex regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. These experiments will provide information related to potential mechanisms for orthostatic and exercise intolerance due to microgravity.

  13. Collective search by ants in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M. Countryman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of collective search is a tradeoff between searching thoroughly and covering as much area as possible. This tradeoff depends on the density of searchers. Solutions to the problem of collective search are currently of much interest in robotics and in the study of distributed algorithms, for example to design ways that without central control robots can use local information to perform search and rescue operations. Ant colonies operate without central control. Because they can perceive only local, mostly chemical and tactile cues, they must search collectively to find resources and to monitor the colony's environment. Examining how ants in diverse environments solve the problem of collective search can elucidate how evolution has led to diverse forms of collective behavior. An experiment on the International Space Station in January 2014 examined how ants (Tetramorium caespitum perform collective search in microgravity. In the ISS experiment, the ants explored a small arena in which a barrier was lowered to increase the area and thus lower ant density. In microgravity, relative to ground controls, ants explored the area less thoroughly and took more convoluted paths. It appears that the difficulty of holding on to the surface interfered with the ants’ ability to search collectively. Ants frequently lost contact with the surface, but showed a remarkable ability to regain contact with the surface.

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  16. Refractive index and temperature sensing in anisotropic silver nanostructures with stable photo-physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subrata; Kumbhakar, Pathik

    2018-01-01

    In this report, we have demonstrated the refractive index and temperature-sensing abilities of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-protected silver nanostructures of triangular, connected and plate-like shapes. Interestingly, these nanostructures even after 2 and ½ years of syntheses showed plasmonic-sensing ability of temperature in the temperature range of 283-333 K. Also, refractive index (R.I.) sensing has been demonstrated in the aged samples and obtained the highest R.I. sensitivity of 306 nm/RIU in one of the sample. The synthesized samples have been kept in dark (inside desiccators) intentionally for the extended period of 2 and ½ years after synthesis and monitored intermittently their UV-Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission characteristics to check the functionally of the aged silver nanostructures. It has been found the samples remain well dispersed in different solvents and can forbid agglomeration even in 0.25 M NaCl solution. We have also demonstrated here fabrication of a flexible and transparent thin film of the synthesized samples in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and investigated its low power continuous-wave (CW) nonlinear optical properties using spatial self-phase modulation (SSPM) technique. The nonlinear refractive index ( n 2) value of the film has been determined to be 5.6 × 10- 6 cm2/W at the He-Ne laser wavelength of 632.8 nm. In this report we have demonstrated temperature and R.I. sensing and also it has been demonstrated that the synthesized samples remain functional even after 2 and ½ years of synthesis. Also, samples may find potential applications in nonlinear optical phase modulation devices.

  17. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  18. Feasibility of monitoring muscle health in microgravity environments using Myoton technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan; Peipsi, Aleko; Stokes, Maria; Knicker, Axel; Abeln, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for people living under extreme environmental conditions to stay healthy. Particularly in space, exercise can partially counteract the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength caused by microgravity. Monitoring the adaptation of the musculoskeletal system to assess muscle quality and devise individual training programmes is highly desirable but is restricted by practical, technical and time constraints on board the International Space Station. This study aimed to test the feasibility of using myometric measurements to monitor the mechanical properties of skeletal muscles and tendons in weightlessness during parabolic flights. The mechanical properties (frequency, decrement, stiffness relaxation time and creep) of the m. gastrocnemius, m. erector spinae and Achilles tendon were assessed using the hand-held MyotonPRO device in 11 healthy participants (aged 47 ± 9 years) in normal gravity as well as in microgravity during two parabolic flight campaigns. Results showed significant (p health in extreme conditions that prohibit many other methods. Real-time assessment of the quality of a muscle being exposed to the negative effect of microgravity and also the positive effects of muscular training could be achieved using Myoton technology.

  19. Effect of IR Laser on Myoblasts: Prospects of Application for Counteracting Microgravity-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Rizzo, Angela Maria; Caselli, Anna; Ranaldi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    Microgravity-induced muscle atrophy is a problem of utmost importance for the impact it may have on the health and performance of astronauts. Therefore, appropriate countermeasures are needed to prevent disuse atrophy and favour muscle recovery. Muscle atrophy is characterized by loss of muscle mass and strength, and a shift in substrate utilization from fat to glucose, that leads to a reduced metabolic efficiency and enhanced fatigability. Laser therapy is already used in physical medicine and rehabilitation to accelerate muscle recovery and in sports medicine to prevent damages produced by metabolic disturbances and inflammatory reactions after heavy exercise. The aim of the research we present was to get insights on possible benefits deriving from the application of an advanced infrared laser system to counteract deficits of muscle energy metabolism and stimulate the recovery of the hypotrophic tissue. The source used was a Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser, which combines continuous and pulsed emissions at 808 nm and 905 nm, respectively. We studied the effect of MLS treatment on morphology and energy metabolism of C2C12 cells, a widely accepted myoblast model, previously exposed to microgravity conditions modelled by a Random Positioning Machine. The MLS laser treatment was able to restore basal levels of serine/threonine protein phosphatase activity and to counteract cytoskeletal alterations and increase in glycolytic enzymes activity that occurred following the exposure to modelled microgravity. In conclusion, the results provide interesting insights for the application of infrared laser in the treatment of muscle atrophy.

  20. Free fall plasma-arc reactor for synthesis of carbon nanotubes in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2 and 5.18 s drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 A at 30 V to the arc for the duration of a 5 s drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity and 2.2 and 5 s long microgravity runs. Much longer duration microgravity time is required for SWNT's growth such as the zero-G aircraft, but more likely will need to be performed on the international space station or an orbiting spacecraft

  1. Benefits of applying low-temperature plasma treatment to wound care and hemostasis from the viewpoints of physics and pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, low-temperature plasma (LTP) technology has reached the life sciences and introduced the benefits of using such technology at atmospheric pressure for medical applications. The active elements from LTP, such as reactive molecular species, charged particles and photons, appear to react with biomolecules on wounds and at bleeding points. This action by LTP might be analogous with semiconductor fabrication techniques such as etching and surface modification. From this perspective, we discuss the general aspects and principles of LTP devices used at atmospheric pressure in wound care and hemostasis as an interdisciplinary fusion of applied physics and pathology.

  2. High temperature measurements and condensed matter analysis of the thermo-physical properties of ThO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, T R; Wangle, T; Wenman, M R; Tyrpekl, V; Vlahovic, L; Robba, D; Van Uffelen, P; Konings, R J M; Grimes, R W

    2018-03-22

    Values are presented for thermal conductivity, specific heat, spectral and total hemispherical emissivity of ThO 2 (a potential nuclear fuel material) in a temperature range representative of a nuclear accident - 2000 K to 3050 K. For the first time direct measurements of thermal conductivity have been carried out on ThO 2 at such high temperatures, clearly showing the property does not decrease above 2000 K. This could be understood in terms of an electronic contribution (arising from defect induced donor/acceptor states) compensating the degradation of lattice thermal conductivity. The increase in total hemispherical emissivity and visible/near-infrared spectral emissivity is consistent with the formation of donor/acceptor states in the band gap of ThO 2 . The electronic population of these defect states increases with temperature and hence more incoming photons (in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range) can be absorbed. A solid state physics model is used to interpret the experimental results. Specific heat and thermal expansion coefficient increase at high temperatures due to the formation of defects, in particular oxygen Frenkel pairs. Prior to melting a gradual increase to a maximum value is predicted in both properties. These maxima mark the onset of saturation of oxygen interstitial sites.

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  4. Bradsim-prediction of solute concentration. Temperature and physical property profiles along pulsed plate columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logsdail, D.H.; Evans, S.F.; Jenkins, J.A.; Smith, I.J.

    1988-01-01

    Dynamic model of the operation of the BRADSIM pulsed plate column is developed. Examples of simulation of the pures process extraction system are given. Profiles of dissolved substances concentrations and profiles of physical properties of liquid along the column are provided. Calculated values are compared with the experimental data, obtained in case of the column 50 mm in diameter, Harwell extractional facility and Sellafield pulsed column 300 mm in diameter for extraction systems uranyl nitrate-nitric acid-20% and 30% TBP in kerosene. 2 refs.; 6 figs

  5. The influence of deposition temperature on vanadium dioxide thin films microstructure and physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velaphi Msomi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium dioxide thin films were successfully prepared on soda lime glass substrates using the optimised conditions for r.f-inverted cylindrical magnetron sputtering. The optimised deposition parameters were fixed and then a systematic study of the effect of deposition temperature, ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C, on the microstructure of thermochromic thin films was carried out. The deposited films were found to be well crystallised, showing strong texture corresponding to the (011 plane, indicating the presence of vanadium dioxide.

  6. Design, crystal growth, and physical properties of low-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccillo, Michael K.

    Thermoelectric materials serve as the foundation for two important modern technologies, namely 1) solid-state cooling, which enables small-area refrigeration without vibrations or moving parts, and 2) thermoelectric power generation, which has important implications for waste heat recovery and improved sources of alternative energy. Although the overall field of thermoelectrics research has been active for decades, and several consumer and industrial products have already been commercialized, the design and synthesis of new thermoelectrics that outperform long-standing state of the art materials has proven extremely challenging. This is particularly true for low-temperature refrigeration applications, which is the focus of this work; however, scientific advances in this area generally support power generation as well. In order to achieve more efficient materials for virtually all thermoelectric applications, improved materials design principles must be developed and synthetic procedures must be better understood. We aim to contribute to these goals by studying two classes of materials, namely 1) the tetradymites Bi2TeSe 2 and Bi2Te2Se, which are close relatives of state of the art thermoelectric cooling materials, and 2) Kondo insulating (-like) FeSb2 and FeSi, which possess anomalously enhanced low-temperature thermoelectric properties that arise from exotic electronic and magnetic properties. The organization of this dissertation is as follows: Chapter 1 is a brief perspective on solid-state chemistry. Chapter 2 presents experimental methods for synthesizing and characterizing thermoelectric materials. In Chapter 3, two original research projects are discussed: first, work on the tetradymite Bi2TeSe2 doped with Sb to achieve an n- to p-type transition, and second, the tetradymite Bi2Te2Se with chemical defects through two different methods. Chapter 4 gives the magnetic and transport properties of FeSb 2--RuSb2 alloys, a family of compounds exemplifying what we

  7. Kinetics of heterogeneous reaction of ozone with linoleic acid and its dependence on temperature, physical state, RH, and ozone concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guang; Holladay, Sara; Langlois, Danielle; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-03-07

    Heterogeneous reaction between ozone and linoleic acid (LA) thin film was investigated by a flow reactor coupled to attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (FR-ATR-IR) over wide ranges of temperature, relative humidity (RH), and ozone concentration under atmospheric pressure condition. Pseudo-first-order rate constants kapp and overall reactive uptake coefficients γ were acquired on the basis of changes in absorbance from peaks located near 1743, 1710, 1172, and 1110 cm(-1), which can be assigned to C═O in ester, C═O in acid, and C-C and C-O stretching modes, respectively. Results showed that the kapp and γ increased nearly by a factor of 6 with increasing temperatures from 258 to 314 K. It was noted the temperature effect on the reaction kinetics was much more pronounced at lower temperatures. Such behavior can be explained by a change in the physical state of LA at lower temperatures. In addition, kapp and γ were enhanced by 2-fold as the RH increased from 0 to 80%. Moreover, the effect of ozone concentration on the reaction kinetics was reported for the first time. kapp was found to display a Langmuir-Hinshelwood dependence on ozone concentration with KO3 = (1.146 ± 0.017) × 10(-15) molecules cm(-3) and k[S] = 0.0522 ± 0.0004 s(-1), where KO3 is a parameter that describes the partitioning of ozone to the thin film surface, and k[S] is the maximum pseudo-first-order coefficient at high ozone concentration. Furthermore, yields and hygroscopic properties of reaction products were also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The intensity ratio of two C═O stretching bands, A1743/A1710, which was utilized as an indicator of the product yields, increased sharply with increasing temperatures in the lower temperature region (258-284 K), and then remained nearly constant in the higher temperature region (284-314 K). The product yields showed no significant variation with RH, for the intensity ratio of A1743/A1710 barely changed in the wide RH range 0

  8. Biochemical, physical, and temperature data from BT casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1924-02-26 to 1959-12-23 (NODC Accession 0000325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Biochemical, physical, and temperature data were collected from the EXPLORER and CLUPEA from February 26, 1924, to December 23, 1959. Data were collected using BT...

  9. Chemical, physical, and temperature data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 30 October 1936 to 17 May 1938 (NODC Accession 0000328)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, and temperature data were collected from the ATLANTIS 1931-9/63 from October 30, 1936 to May 17, 1938. These data were collected using bottle...

  10. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2016-12-06

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  11. Influence of temperature dependent physical properties on heat transfer in the laminar boundary layer of a parallel affluxed flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehle, F.; Brandt, F.

    1982-08-23

    The influence of temperature dependent properties on the heat transfer is not jet satisfying claryfied. Measurements of heat transfer contain more or less great faults, and it is practically not possible to investigate the influence of the temperature dependence for particular physical properties separately. Therefore, the only possibility is to examine this problem numerically. Hereby it is important to use methods which don't require too much computing time in order to study a great number of parameters. In the following article such a numerical method for the calculation of a laminar boundary layer will be introduced. By this method it is also possible to consider the dissipation. Already, the form of the differential equations, which are to be solved, shows, that the influence of a variable property fluid has to be considered separately, because it is not possible to combine all physical properties with the Pr-number. The results of the parameter studies will be discussed and will be compared with the well-known correction terms.

  12. The performance test of a modified miniature rotary compressor in upright and inverted modes subjected to microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Rui; Wu, Yu-ting; Du, Chun-xu; Chen, Xia; Zhang, De-lou; Ma, Chong-fang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A miniature rotary compressor by ASPEN company was modified. • The modified compressor can be employed in microgravity. • Performance of upright compressor is superior to inverted mode in most cases. • Performance curves of system with inverted compressor are obtained. • Experimental results of compressor inverted and upright are compared. - Abstract: Vapor compression heat pump is a new concept of thermal control system and refrigerator for future space use. Compressor is a key component in the vapor compression heat pump. Development of compressor capable of operating in both microgravity (10 E-6 g) and lunar (1/6 g) environments is urgently needed for space thermal control systems based on heat pump technique. In this paper, a miniature rotary compressor by ASPEN company was modified to realize acceptable compressor lubrication and oil circulation in microgravity environments. An experimental system was built up to check the performance of the modified compressor subjected to microgravity. A performances comparison of inverted compressor with upright one was made. The influences of operating parameters such as refrigerant charge, cooling water temperature as well as compressor speed on the performances of vapor compression heat pump were investigated. The results show that the modified miniature rotary compressor in inverted mode can operate stably in a long period, which indicates that the modified compressor can be employed in microgravity environments. Compressor discharge temperature increased or decreased while COP changed more obviously with cooling water temperature and speed in microgravity. In most cases, performance of the upright compressor is superior to that of the inverted one. But when the compressor speed is from 1500 rpm to 2500 rpm or the coolant temperature is between 20 and 25 degrees, the performance of inverted compressor is better. The highest discharge temperature of the inverted compressor can be as high

  13. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.  Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish how ready we are to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the week was thus pac...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Futyan

    A lot has transpired on the “Physics” front since the last CMS Bulletin. The summer was filled with preparations of new Monte Carlo samples based on CMSSW_3, the finalization of all the 10 TeV physics analyses [in total 50 analyses were approved] and the preparations for the Physics Week in Bologna. A couple weeks later, the “October Exercise” commenced and ran through an intense two-week period. The Physics Days in October were packed with a number of topics that are relevant to data taking, in a number of “mini-workshops”: the luminosity measurement, the determination of the beam spot and the measurement of the missing transverse energy (MET) were the three main topics.   Physics Week in Bologna The second physics week in 2009 took place in Bologna, Italy, on the week of Sep 7-11. The aim of the week was to review and establish (we hoped) the readiness of CMS to do physics with the early collisions at the LHC. The agenda of the...

  16. Microgravity sciences application visiting scientist program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center pursues scientific research in the area of low-gravity effects on materials and processes. To facilitate these Government performed research responsibilities, a number of supplementary research tasks were accomplished by a group of specialized visiting scientists. They participated in work on contemporary research problems with specific objectives related to current or future space flight experiments and defined and established independent programs of research which were based on scientific peer review and the relevance of the defined research to NASA microgravity for implementing a portion of the national program. The programs included research in the following areas: protein crystal growth, X-ray crystallography and computer analysis of protein crystal structure, optimization and analysis of protein crystal growth techniques, and design and testing of flight hardware.

  17. The Fastrack Suborbital Platform for Microgravity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.; Ball, J. E.; Shultz, D.; Odyssey, A.; Wells, H. W.; Soler, R. R.; Albino, S.; Meshberger, R. J.; Murdoch, T.

    2009-01-01

    The FASTRACK suborbital experiment platform has been developed to provide a capability for utilizing 2.5-5 minute microgravity flight opportunities anticipated from the commercial suborbital fleet (currently in development) for science investigations, technology development and hardware testing. It also provides "express rack" functionality to deliver payloads to ISS. FASTRACK fits within a 24" x 24" x 36" (61 cm x 61 cm x 91.4 cm) envelope and is capable of supporting either two single Middeck Locker Equivalents (MLE) or one double MLE configuration. Its overall mass is 300 lbs (136 kg), of which 160 lbs (72 kg) is reserved for experiments. FASTRACK operates using 28 VDC power or batteries. A support drawer located at the bottom of the structure contains all ancillary electrical equipment (including batteries, a conditioned power system and a data collection system) as well as a front panel that contains all switches (including remote cut-off), breakers and warning LEDs.

  18. Powder agglomeration in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG3-755 entitled 'Powder Agglomeration in a Microgravity Environment.' The research program included both two types of numerical models and two types of experiments. The numerical modeling included the use of Monte Carlo type simulations of agglomerate growth including hydrodynamic screening and molecular dynamics type simulations of the rearrangement of particles within an agglomerate under a gravitational field. Experiments included direct observation of the agglomeration of submicron alumina and indirect observation, using small angle light scattering, of the agglomeration of colloidal silica and aluminum monohydroxide. In the former class of experiments, the powders were constrained to move on a two-dimensional surface oriented to minimize the effect of gravity. In the latter, some experiments involved mixture of suspensions containing particles of opposite charge which resulted in agglomeration on a very short time scale relative to settling under gravity.

  19. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios following microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, C E; Xun, L

    1996-10-01

    The cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio in the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of juvenile rats after 5.4 days of microgravity was studied. Three groups of rats (n = 8 each) were used. The experimental group (space rats) was flown aboard the space shuttle Discovery (NASA, STS-48), while two ground-based groups, one hindlimb suspended (suspended rats), one non-suspended (control), served as controls. Single fibre analysis revealed a significant decrease in cross-sectional area (microns2) in the gastrocnemius for both the space and the suspended rats; in the tibialis anterior only the suspended rats showed a significant decrease. Myonuclei counts (myonuclei per mm) in both the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius were significantly increased in the space rats but not in the suspended rats. The mean myonuclear volume (individual nuclei: microns3) in tibialis anterior fibres from the space rats, and in gastrocnemius fibres from both the space and the suspended rats, was significantly lower than that in the respective control group. Estimation of the total myonuclear volume (microns3 per.mm), however, revealed no significant differences between the three groups in either the tibialis anterior or gastrocnemius. The described changes in the cross-sectional area and myonuclei numbers resulted in significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio (microns3 x 10(3)) in both muscles and for both space and suspended rats (tibialis anterior; 15.6 +/- 0.6 (space), 17.2 +/- 1.0 (suspended), 20.8 +/- 0.9 (control): gastrocnemius; 13.4 +/- 0.4 (space) and 14.9 +/- 1.1 (suspended) versus 18.1 +/- 1.1 (control)). These results indicate that even short periods of unweighting due to microgravity or limb suspension result in changes in skeletal muscle fibres which lead to significant decreases in the cytoplasmic volume-to-myonucleus ratio.

  20. Locomotion in simulated microgravity: gravity replacement loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Jean L.; Baron, Heidi A.; Balkin, Sandy; Cavanagh, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When an astronaut walks or runs on a treadmill in microgravity, a subject load device (SLD) is used to return him or her back to the treadmill belt. The gravity replacement load (GRL) in the SLD is transferred, via a harness, to the pelvis and/or the shoulders. This research compared comfort and ground reaction forces during treadmill running in a microgravity locomotion simulator at GRLs of 60%, 80%, and 100% of body weight (BW). Two harness designs (shoulder springs only (SSO) and waist and shoulder springs (WSS)) were used. HYPOTHESES: 1) The 100% BW gravity replacement load conditions would be comfortably tolerated and would result in larger ground reaction forces and loading rates than the lower load conditions, and 2) the WSS harness would be more comfortable than the SSO harness. METHODS: Using the Penn State Zero Gravity Locomotion Simulator (ZLS), 8 subjects ran at 2.0 m x s(-1) (4.5 mph) for 3 min at each GRL setting in each harness. Subjective ratings of harness comfort, ground reaction forces, and GRL data were collected during the final minute of exercise. RESULTS: The 100% BW loading conditions were comfortably tolerated (2.3 on a scale of 0-10), although discomfort increased as the GRL increased. There were no overall differences in perceived comfort between the two harnesses. The loading rates (27.1, 33.8, 39.1 BW x s(-1)) and the magnitudes of the first (1.0, 1.4, 1.6 BW) and second (1.3, 1.7, 1.9 BW) peaks of the ground reaction force increased with increasing levels (60, 80, 100% BW respectively) of GRL. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects were able to tolerate a GRL of 100% BW well. The magnitude of the ground reaction force peaks and the loading rate is directly related to the magnitude of the GRL.

  1. Microgravity Turbulent Gas-Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A gas-jet diffusion flame is similar to the flame on a Bunsen burner, where a gaseous fuel (e.g., propane) flows from a nozzle into an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., air). The difference is that a Bunsen burner allows for (partial) premixing of the fuel and the air, whereas a diffusion flame is not premixed and gets its oxygen (principally) by diffusion from the atmosphere around the flame. Simple gas-jet diffusion flames are often used for combustion studies because they embody the mechanisms operating in accidental fires and in practical combustion systems. However, most practical combustion is turbulent (i.e., with random flow vortices), which enhances the fuel/air mixing. These turbulent flames are not well understood because their random and transient nature complicates analysis. Normal gravity studies of turbulence in gas-jet diffusion flames can be impeded by buoyancy-induced instabilities. These gravitycaused instabilities, which are evident in the flickering of a candle flame in normal gravity, interfere with the study of turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames. By conducting experiments in microgravity, where buoyant instabilities are avoided, we at the NASA Lewis Research Center hope to improve our understanding of turbulent combustion. Ultimately, this could lead to improvements in combustor design, yielding higher efficiency and lower pollutant emissions. Gas-jet diffusion flames are often researched as model flames, because they embody mechanisms operating in both accidental fires and practical combustion systems (see the first figure). In normal gravity laboratory research, buoyant air flows, which are often negligible in practical situations, dominate the heat and mass transfer processes. Microgravity research studies, however, are not constrained by buoyant air flows, and new, unique information on the behavior of gas-jet diffusion flames has been obtained.

  2. Growth and division of Escherichia coli under microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, G; Tixador, R; Eche, B; Lapchine, L; Moatti, N; Toorop, P; Woldringh, C

    1994-02-01

    The growth rate in glucose minimal medium and time of entry into the stationary phase in pepton cultures were determined during the STS 42 mission of the space shuttle Discovery. Cells were cultured in plastic bags and growth was stopped at six different time points by lowering the temperature to 5 degrees C, and at a single time point, by formaldehyde fixation. Based on cell number determination, the doubling time calculated for the flight samples of glucose cells was shorter (46 min) than for the ground samples (59 min). However, a larger cell size expected for more rapidly growing cells was not observed by volume measurements with the electronic particle counter, nor by electron microscopic measurement of cell dimensions. Only for cells fixed in flight was a larger cell length and percentage of constricted cells found. An optical density increase in the peptone cultures showed an earlier entry into the stationary phase in flight samples, but this could not be confirmed by viability counts. The single sample with cells fixed in flight showed properties indicative of growth stimulation. However, taking all observations together, we conclude that microgravity has no effect on the growth rate of exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells.

  3. Microgravity Production of Nanoparticles of Novel Materials Using Plasma Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The research goal is to study the formation in reduced gravity of high quality nanoparticulate of novel materials using plasma synthesis. Particular emphasis will be placed on the production of powders of non-oxide materials like diamond, SiC, SiN, c-BN, etc. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of gravity on plasma synthesis of these materials, and to determine how the microgravity synthesis can improve the quality and yield of the nanoparticles. It is expected that the reduced gravity will aid in the understanding of the controlling mechanisms of plasma synthesis, and will increase the yield, and quality of the synthesized powder. These materials have properties of interest in several industrial applications, such as high temperature load bearings or high speed metal machining. Furthermore, because of the nano-meter size of the particulate produced in this process, they have specific application in the fabrication of MEMS based combustion systems, and in the development and growth of nano-systems and nano-structures of these materials. These are rapidly advancing research areas, and there is a great need for high quality nanoparticles of different materials. One of the primary systems of interest in the project will be gas-phase synthesis of nanopowder of non-oxide materials.

  4. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Bénard convection under microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, H N; Tadie Fogaing, M; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2013-04-01

    Thermal convection in a dielectric fluid layer between two parallel plates subjected to an alternating electric field and a temperature gradient is investigated under microgravity conditions. A thermoelectric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due to an effective gravity. This electric gravity can destabilize a stationary conductive state of the fluid to develop convection. The similarity of the DEP thermal convection with the Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection is examined by considering its behavior in detail by a linear stability theory and a two-dimensional direct numerical simulation. The results are analyzed from an energetic viewpoint and in the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation. The stabilizing effects of a thermoelectric feedback make the critical parameters different from those in the RB instability. The nonuniformity of the electric gravity arising from the finite variation of permittivity also affects the critical parameters. The characteristic constants of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection is weaker than in the RB convection as a consequence of the feedback that impedes the convection.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    The all-plenary format of the CMS week in Cyprus gave the opportunity to the conveners of the physics groups to present the plans of each physics analysis group for tackling early physics analyses. The presentations were complete, so all are encouraged to browse through them on the Web. There is a wealth of information on what is going on, by whom and on what basis and priority. The CMS week was followed by two CMS “physics events”, the ICHEP08 days and the physics days in July. These were two weeks dedicated to either the approval of all the results that would be presented at ICHEP08, or to the review of all the other Monte-Carlo based analyses that were carried out in the context of our preparations for analysis with the early LHC data (the so-called “2008 analyses”). All this was planned in the context of the beginning of a ramp down of these Monte Carlo efforts, in anticipation of data.  The ICHEP days are described below (agenda and talks at: http://indic...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Joe Incandela

    There have been two plenary physics meetings since the December CMS week. The year started with two workshops, one on the measurements of the Standard Model necessary for “discovery physics” as well as one on the Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT). Meanwhile the tail of the “2007 analyses” is going through the last steps of approval. It is expected that by the end of January all analyses will have converted to using the data from CSA07 – which include the effects of miscalibration and misalignment. January Physics Days The first Physics Days of 2008 took place on January 22-24. The first two days were devoted to comprehensive re¬ports from the Detector Performance Groups (DPG) and Physics Objects Groups (POG) on their planning and readiness for early data-taking followed by approvals of several recent studies. Highlights of POG presentations are included below while the activities of the DPGs are covered elsewhere in this bulletin. January 24th was devo...

  7. Musing over Microbes in Microgravity: Microbial Physiology Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweickart, Randolph; McGinnis, Michael; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New York City, the most populated city in the United States, is home to over 8 million humans. This means over 26,000 people per square mile! Imagine, though, what the view would be if you peeked into the world of microscopic organisms. Scientists estimate that a gram of soil may contain up to 1 billion of these microbes, which is as much as the entire human population of China! Scientists also know that the world of microbes is incredibly diverse-possibly 10,000 different species in one gram of soil - more than all the different types of mammals in the world. Microbes fill every niche in the world - from 20 miles below the Earth's surface to 20 miles above, and at temperatures from less than -20 C to hotter than water's boiling point. These organisms are ubiquitous because they can adapt quickly to changing environments, an effective strategy for survival. Although we may not realize it, microbes impact every aspect of our lives. Bacteria and fungi help us break down the food in our bodies, and they help clean the air and water around us. They can also cause the dark, filmy buildup on the shower curtain as well as, more seriously, illness and disease. Since humans and microbes share space on Earth, we can benefit tremendously from a better understanding of the workings and physiology of the microbes. This insight can help prevent any harmful effects on humans, on Earth and in space, as well as reap the benefits they provide. Space flight is a unique environment to study how microbes adapt to changing environmental conditions. To advance ground-based research in the field of microbiology, this STS-107 experiment will investigate how microgravity affects bacteria and fungi. Of particular interest are the growth rates and how they respond to certain antimicrobial substances that will be tested; the same tests will be conducted on Earth at the same times. Comparing the results obtained in flight to those on Earth, we will be able to examine how microgravity induces

  8. Electrical Microgravity Research in Colloidal Development Platform, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a platform upon which to perform high voltage Electrical microGravity Research In colloidal Development (E-GRID). This platform will...

  9. Genechip analysis of bone marrow osteoprogenitors exposed to microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In March 2006 murine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSC) were flown in the Soyuz 12S to the International Space Station to investigate the effects of microgravity on...

  10. Measured Success: The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLombard, Richard; Sedlak, Deborah A.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity, even minute forces can affect experiments: therefore, investigators need to know the precise strength of the gravitational levels and vibrations affecting their experiments to interpret results correctly and to develop an understanding of the effects caused by these forces. The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project (MMAP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center was established to provide a single source for measuring the microgravity environment on various orbiting spacecraft, providing support for scientists, and microgravity environment data. As part of this project, the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) have supported 15 shuttle missions. In addition, one SAMS unit has been operated on Russia's Mir Space Station since September 1994.

  11. Hemodynamic effects of microgravity and their ground-based simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobachik, V. I.; Abrosimov, S. V.; Zhidkov, V. V.; Endeka, D. K.

    Hemodynamic effects of simulated microgravity were investigated, in various experiments, using radioactive isotopes, in which 40 healthy men, aged 35 to 42 years, took part. Blood shifts were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. Simulation studies included bedrest, head-down tilt (-5° and -15°), and vertical water immersion, it was found that none of the methods could entirely simulate hemodynamic effects of microgravity. Subjective sensations varied in a wide range. They cannot be used to identify reliably the effects of real and simulated microgravity. Renal fluid excretion in real and simulated microgravity was different in terms of volume and time. The experiments yielded data about the general pattern of circulation with blood displaced to the upper body.

  12. Zero-Energy Ultrafast Water Nanofiltration System in Microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this program is to develop a water nanofiltration system that functions in microgravity for use during a long-duration human space exploration. The...

  13. The Influence of Microgravity on Invasive Growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E.; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk; Devreese, Bart; Siewers, Verena; van Eijsden, Rudy G. E.; Nielsen, Jens; Delvaux, Freddy R.; Willaert, Ronnie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of microgravity on colony growth and the morphological transition from single cells to short invasive filaments in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two-dimensional spreading of the yeast colonies grown on semi-solid agar medium was reduced under microgravity in the Σ1278b laboratory strain but not in the CMBSESA1 industrial strain. This was supported by the Σ1278b proteome map under microgravity conditions, which revealed upregulation of proteins linked to anaerobic conditions. The Σ1278b strain showed a reduced invasive growth in the center of the yeast colony. Bud scar distribution was slightly affected, with a switch toward more random budding. Together, microgravity conditions disturb spatially programmed budding patterns and generate strain-dependent growth differences in yeast colonies on semi-solid medium.

  14. Macromolecule Crystal Quality Improvement in Microgravity: The Role of Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; Pusey, Marc L.; Sportiello, Michael G.; Todd, Paul; Bellamy, Henry; Borgstahl, Gloria E.; Pokros, Matt; Cassanto, John M.

    2000-01-01

    While macromolecule impurities may affect crystal size and morphology the over-riding question is; "How do macromolecule impurities effect crystal X-ray quality and diffraction resolution?" In the case of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystals can be grown in the presence of a number of impurities without affecting diffraction resolution. One impurity however, the lysozyme dimer, does negatively impact the X-ray crystal properties. Crystal quality improvement as a result of better partitioning of this impurity during crystallization in microgravity has been reported'. In our recent experimental work dimer partitioning was found to be not significantly different between the two environments. Mosaicity analysis of pure crystals showed a reduced mosaicity and increased signal to noise for the microgravity grown crystals. Dimer incorporation however, did greatly reduce the resolution limit in both ground and microgravity grown crystals. These results indicate that impurity effects in microgravity are complex and may rely on the conditions or techniques employed.

  15. RNA-seq analysis of mycobacteria stress response to microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The aim of this work is to determine whether mycobacteria have enhanced virulence during space travel and what mechanisms they use to adapt to microgravity. M....

  16. The potential impact of microgravity science and technology on education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of educational support materials by NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division is discussed in the light of two programs. Descriptions of the inception and application possibilities are given for the Microgravity-Science Teacher's Guide and the program of Undergraduate Research Opportunities in Microgravity Science and Technology. The guide is intended to introduce students to the principles and research efforts related to microgravity, and the undergraduate program is intended to reinforce interest in the space program. The use of computers and electronic communications is shown to be an important catalyst for the educational efforts. It is suggested that student and teacher access to these programs be enhanced so that they can have a broader impact on the educational development of space-related knowledge.

  17. Exercise training - Blood pressure responses in subjects adapted to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional endurance exercise training that involves daily workouts of 1-2 hr duration during exposure to microgravity has not proven completely effective in ameliorating postexposure orthostatic hypotension. Single bouts of intense exercise have been shown to increase plasma volume and baroreflex sensitivity in ambulatory subjects through 24 hr postexercise and to reverse decrements in maximal oxygen uptake and syncopal episodes following exposure to simulated microgravity. These physiological adaptations to acute intense exercise were opposite to those observed following exposure to microgravity. These results suggest that the 'exercise training' stimulus used to prevent orthostatic hypotension induced by microgravity may be specific and should be redefined to include single bouts of maximal exercise which may provide an acute effective countermeasure against postflight hypotension.

  18. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated laundry System (AMCILS) is proposed that uses a two phase water / water vapor system to allow good agitation of...

  19. Evidence for Increased Cardiac Compliance During Exposure to Simulated Microgravity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koenig, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We measured specific hemodynamic responses during 4 days (96 hours) of head-down tilt (HDT) in invasively- instrumented rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that exposure to simulated microgravity causes increased cardiac compliance...

  20. Determining Weight of Stockpiled Ore Using Microgravity Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sjostrom, Keith

    1997-01-01

    ...; and Large, PA. Microgravity measurements were performed over selected ore piles to provide high-resolution surveys of the gravitational field with which to determine the average bulk density of the ore material...

  1. The physical interpretation of the parameters measured during the tensile testing of materials at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, B.

    1984-01-01

    Hot tensile (or compression) testing, where the stress developed in a material is measured under an imposed strain rate, is often used as an alternative to conventional creep testing. The advantages of the hot tensile test are that its duration can be more closely controlled by the experimenter and also that the technique is more convenient, since high precision testing machines are available. The main disadvantage is that the interpretation of results is more complex. The present paper relates the parameters which are measured in hot tensile tests, to physical processes which occur in materials deforming by a variety of mechanisms. For cases where no significant structural changes occur, as in viscous or superplastic flow, analytical expressions are derived which relate the stresses measured in these tests to material constants. When deformation is controlled by recovery processes, account has to be taken of the structural changes which occur concurrently. A wide variety of behaviour may then be exhibited which depends on the initial dislocation density, the presence of second-phase particles and the relative values of the recovery rate parameters and the velocity imposed by the testing machine. Numerical examples are provided for simple recovery models. (author)

  2. Exercise hyperthermia as a factor limiting physical performance - Temperature effect on muscle metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, S.; Brzezinska, Z.; Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trunk cooling on the muscle contents of ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate (CrP), and creatine, as well as of glycogen, some glycolytic intermediates, pyruvate, and lactate were assessed in 11 fasted dogs exercised at 20 C on treadmill to exhaustion. Without cooling, dogs were able to run 57 min, and their rectal (Tre) and muscle (Tm) temperatures increased to 41.8 and 43.0 C, respectively. Cooling with ice packs prolonged the ability to run by 45 percent, and resulted in lower Tre (by 1.1 C) and Tm (by 1.2 C). Depletion of muscle content of total high-energy phosphates (ATP + CrP) and glycogen, and increases in contents of AMP, pyruvate, and lactate were lower in cooled dogs than in non-cooled dogs. The muscle content of lactiate correlated positively with TM. These results indicate that hypothermia accelerates glycolysis, and shifts the equilibrium between high- and low-energy phosphates in favor of the latter. The adverse effect of hypothermia on muscle metabolism may be relevant to the limitation of endurance.

  3. High temperature thermo-physical properties of SPS-ed W–Cu functional gradient materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatanu, Magdalena; Enculescu, Monica; Galatanu, Andrei

    2018-02-01

    The divertor of a fusion reactor like DEMO requires materials able to withstand high heat fluxes and neutron irradiation for several years. For the water cooling concept of this essential part of the reactor, the most likely plasma facing material will be W, while the heatsink material considered is CuCrZr or an improved version of such a Cu-based alloy. To realize W–Cu alloy joints able to withstand thousands of thermal cycles can be difficult due to the difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of these materials. In this work we investigate the possibility to realize such joints by using W–Cu functional gradient materials (FGMs) produced from nanometric and micrometric metallic powders mixtures and consolidated by spark plasma sintering at about 900 °C. Morphological and thermal properties investigations, performed for typical compositions, shows that the best results are obtained using powders with micrometric dimensions. A resulting 1 mm thick, 3 layers W–Cu FGM produced by this simple method shows a remarkable almost constant thermal conductivity value of 200 W m‑1 K‑1, from room temperature up to 1000 °C.

  4. Uncertainty and target accuracy studies for the very high temperature reactor(VHTR) physics parameters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taiwo, T. A.; Palmiotti, G.; Aliberti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Kim, T.K.

    2005-09-16

    The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on a number of performance parameters (core and fuel cycle) of the prismatic block-type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) has been evaluated and results are presented in this report. An uncertainty analysis has been performed, based on sensitivity theory, which underlines what cross-sections, what energy range and what isotopes are responsible for the most significant uncertainties. In order to give guidelines on priorities for new evaluations or validation experiments, required accuracies on specific nuclear data have been derived, accounting for target accuracies on major design parameters. Results of an extensive analysis indicate only a limited number of relevant parameters do not meet the target accuracies assumed in this work; this does not imply that the existing nuclear cross-section data cannot be used for the feasibility and pre-conceptual assessments of the VHTR. However, the results obtained depend on the uncertainty data used, and it is suggested to focus some future evaluation work on the production of consistent, as far as possible complete and user oriented covariance data.

  5. Determination of the physical properties of room temperature ionic liquids using a Love wave device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouali, F Fouzia; Doy, Nicola; McHale, Glen; Hardacre, Christopher; Ge, Rile; Allen, Ray W K; MacInnes, Jordan M; Newton, Michael I

    2011-09-01

    In this work, we have shown that a 100 MHz Love wave device can be used to determine whether room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are Newtonian fluids and have developed a technique that allows the determination of the density-viscosity product, ρη, of a Newtonian RTIL. In addition, a test for a Newtonian response was established by relating the phase change to insertion loss change. Five concentrations of a water-miscible RTIL and seven pure RTILs were measured. The changes in phase and insertion loss were found to vary linearly with the square root of the density-viscosity product for values up to (ρη)(1/2) ~ 10 kg m(-2) s(-1/2). The square root of the density-viscosity product was deduced from the changes in either phase or insertion loss using glycerol as a calibration liquid. In both cases, the deduced values of ρη agree well with those measured using viscosity and density meters. Miniaturization of the device, beyond that achievable with the lower-frequency quartz crystal microbalance approach, to measure smaller volumes is possible. The ability to fabricate Love wave and other surface acoustic wave sensors using planar metallization technologies gives potential for future integration into lab-on-a-chip analytical systems for characterizing ionic liquids.

  6. Temperature-Dependent Physical and Memory Characteristics of Atomic-Layer-Deposited RuOx Metal Nanocrystal Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maikap

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical and memory characteristics of the atomic-layer-deposited RuOx metal nanocrystal capacitors in an n-Si/SiO2/HfO2/RuOx/Al2O3/Pt structure with different postdeposition annealing temperatures from 850–1000°C have been investigated. The RuOx metal nanocrystals with an average diameter of 7 nm and a highdensity of 0.7 × 1012/cm2 are observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy after a postdeposition annealing temperature at 1000°C. The density of RuOx nanocrystal is decreased (slightly by increasing the annealing temperatures, due to agglomeration of multiple nanocrystals. The RuO3 nanocrystals and Hf-silicate layer at the SiO2/HfO2 interface are confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For post-deposition annealing temperature of 1000°C, the memory capacitors with a small equivalent oxide thickness of ~9 nm possess a large hysteresis memory window of >5 V at a small sweeping gate voltage of ±5 V. A promising memory window under a small sweeping gate voltage of ~3 V is also observed due to charge trapping in the RuOx metal nanocrystals. The program/erase mechanism is modified Fowler-Nordheim (F-N tunneling of the electrons and holes from Si substrate. The electrons and holes are trapped in the RuOx nanocrystals. Excellent program/erase endurance of 106 cycles and a large memory window of 4.3 V with a small charge loss of ~23% at 85°C are observed after 10 years of data retention time, due to the deep-level traps in the RuOx nanocrystals. The memory structure is very promising for future nanoscale nonvolatile memory applications.

  7. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  8. Consort and Joust sounding rockets for microgravity research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, F. C.; Maybee, G. W.

    1992-08-01

    Descriptions are given of the hardware and techniques used for five launches of the Consort and Joust sounding rockets with payloads for short periods of microgravity payload research. The Consort rockets can provide about seven minutes of microgravity conditions for about 300 kg of payload, and the Joust rocket can yield over 14 minutes for 240 kg. These rockets provide effective means for experiments involving foam formation, bioprocessing, polymer processing, and accelerometers.

  9. Microgravity metal processing: from undercooled liquids to bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott N

    2015-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a novel class of metal alloys that are poised for widespread commercialization. Over 30 years of NASA and ESA (as well as other space agency) funding for both ground-based and microgravity experiments has resulted in fundamental science data that have enabled commercial production. This review focuses on the history of microgravity BMG research, which includes experiments on the space shuttle, the ISS, ground-based experiments, commercial fabrication and currently funded efforts. PMID:28725709

  10. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Theng Yee Chong; Kent Loong Ho; Boon Hoong Ong

    2012-01-01

    The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very...

  11. Effect of microgravity on forearm subcutaneous vascular resistance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, A; Norsk, P; Videbæk, R

    1995-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the subcutaneous vascular constrictor response to an orthostatic stress in humans is augmented after exposure to microgravity, the following experiment was performed. Four male astronauts underwent a standardized stepwise lower body negative pressure (LBNP) profile 5 mo...... after 1-2 days after exposure to 10 days of microgravity and could act as a defense mechanism to alleviate decreased orthostatic tolerance...

  12. Extreme Adiabatic Expansion in Micro-gravity: Modeling for the Cold Atomic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, C. A.; Lam, T. C.; Stickney, J. C.; Burke, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    The upcoming Cold Atom Laboratory mission for the International Space Station will allow the investigation of ultracold gases in a microgravity environment. Cold atomic samples will be produced using evaporative cooling in a magnetic chip trap. We investigate here the possibility to release atoms from the trap via adiabatic expansion. We discuss both general considerations and a detailed model of the planned apparatus. We find that it should be possible to reduce the mean trap confinement frequency to about 0.2 Hz, which will correspond to a three-dimensional sample temperature of about 150 pK and a mean atom velocity of 0.1 mm/s.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Chris Hill

    2012-01-01

    The months that have passed since the last CMS Bulletin have been a very busy and exciting time for CMS physics. We have gone from observing the very first 8TeV collisions produced by the LHC to collecting a dataset of the collisions that already exceeds that recorded in all of 2011. All in just a few months! Meanwhile, the analysis of the 2011 dataset and publication of the subsequent results has continued. These results come from all the PAGs in CMS, including searches for the Higgs boson and other new phenomena, that have set the most stringent limits on an ever increasing number of models of physics beyond the Standard Model including dark matter, Supersymmetry, and TeV-scale gravity scenarios, top-quark physics where CMS has overtaken the Tevatron in the precision of some measurements, and bottom-quark physics where CMS made its first discovery of a new particle, the Ξ*0b baryon (candidate event pictured below). Image 2:  A Ξ*0b candidate event At the same time POGs and PAGs...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther Dissertori

    The time period between the last CMS week and this June was one of intense activity with numerous get-together targeted at addressing specific issues on the road to data-taking. The two series of workshops, namely the “En route to discoveries” series and the “Vertical Integration” meetings continued.   The first meeting of the “En route to discoveries” sequence (end 2007) had covered the measurements of the Standard Model signals as necessary prerequisite to any claim of signals beyond the Standard Model. The second meeting took place during the Feb CMS week and concentrated on the commissioning of the Physics Objects, whereas the third occurred during the April Physics Week – and this time the theme was the strategy for key new physics signatures. Both of these workshops are summarized below. The vertical integration meetings also continued, with two DPG-physics get-togethers on jets and missing ET and on electrons and photons. ...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2011-01-01

    Since the last CMS Week, all physics groups have been extremely active on analyses based on the full 2010 dataset, with most aiming for a preliminary measurement in time for the winter conferences. Nearly 50 analyses were approved in a “marathon” of approval meetings during the first two weeks of March, and the total number of approved analyses reached 90. The diversity of topics is very broad, including precision QCD, Top, and electroweak measurements, the first observation of single Top production at the LHC, the first limits on Higgs production at the LHC including the di-tau final state, and comprehensive searches for new physics in a wide range of topologies (so far all with null results unfortunately). Most of the results are based on the full 2010 pp data sample, which corresponds to 36 pb-1 at √s = 7 TeV. This report can only give a few of the highlights of a very rich physics program, which is listed below by physics group...

  17. PHYSICAL DESIGN OF CHANGE OF POWER INFLUENCE IS ON WORKPLACES TAKING INTO ACCOUNT HIGH TEMPERATURE RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELIKOV A. S.

    2017-04-01

    novelty. As a result of theoretical and experimental investigations on the basis of physical modeling regularities change thermoradiation intensity depending on the measuring point and the angle of the emitter placement. Installed dependence have been used to calculate the irradiance at any point of the workspace from excess radiation source. Practical meaningfulness. Studies have shown that calculation of the intensity of the thermal radiation at the workplace and time-consuming, so in practice it is more convenient to use universal nomogram, which was built on the basis of the results of the modeling light. The software that allows you to perform mapping the placement of thermal fields of technological equipment and unorganized excessive heat sources.

  18. SOLUBILITIES AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SATURATED SOLUTIONS IN THE COPPER SULFATE + SULFURIC ACID + SEAWATER SYSTEM AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Justel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Chile, the most important economic activity is mining, concentrated in the north of the country. This is a desert region with limited water resources; therefore, the mining sector requires research and identification of alternative sources of water. One alternative is seawater, which can be a substitute of the limited fresh water resources in the region. This work determines the influence of seawater on the solid-liquid equilibrium for acid solutions of copper sulfate at different temperatures (293.15 to 318.15 K, and its effect on physical properties (density, viscosity, and solubility. Knowledge of these properties and solubility data are useful in the leaching process and in the design of copper sulfate pentahydrate crystallization plants from the leaching process using seawater by means of the addition of sulfuric acid.

  19. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanism in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Flight Definition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1999-01-01

    A need exists for understanding precisely how particles move and interact in a fluid in the absence of gravity. Such understanding is required, for example, for modeling and predicting crystal growth in space where crystals grow from solution around nucleation sites as well as for any study of particles or bubbles in liquids or in experiments where particles are used as tracers for mapping microconvection. We have produced an exact solution to the general equation of motion of particles at extremely low Reynolds number in microgravity that covers a wide range of interesting conditions. We have also developed diagnostic tools and experimental techniques to test the validity of the general equation . This program, which started in May, 1998, will produce the flight definition for an experiment in a microgravity environment of space to validate the theoretical model. We will design an experiment with the help of the theoretical model that is optimized for testing the model, measuring g, g-jitter, and other microgravity phenomena. This paper describes the goals, rational, and approach for the flight definition program. The first objective of this research is to understand the physics of particle interactions with fluids and other particles in low Reynolds number flows in microgravity. Secondary objectives are to (1) observe and quantify g-jitter effects and microconvection on particles in fluids, (2) validate an exact solution to the general equation of motion of a particle in a fluid, and (3) to characterize the ability of isolation tables to isolate experiments containing particle in liquids. The objectives will be achieved by recording a large number of holograms of particle fields in microgravity under controlled conditions, extracting the precise three-dimensional position of all of the particles as a function of time and examining the effects of all parameters on the motion of the particles. The feasibility for achieving these results has already been established

  20. Observational study: microgravity testing of a phase-change reference on the International Space Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, T Shane; Bingham, Gail E; Latvakoski, Harri; Podolski, Igor; Sychev, Vladimir S; Burdakin, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Orbital sensors to monitor global climate change during the next decade require low-drift rates for onboard thermometry, which is currently unattainable without on-orbit recalibration. Phase-change materials (PCMs), such as those that make up the ITS-90 standard, are seen as the most reliable references on the ground and could be good candidates for orbital recalibration. Space Dynamics Lab (SDL) has been developing miniaturized phase-change references capable of deployment on an orbital blackbody for nearly a decade. Improvement of orbital temperature measurements for long duration earth observing and remote sensing. To determine whether and how microgravity will affect the phase transitions, SDL conducted experiments with ITS-90 standard material (gallium, Ga) on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared the phase-change temperature with earth-based measurements. The miniature on-orbit thermal reference (MOTR) experiment launched to the ISS in November 2013 on Soyuz TMA-11M with the Expedition 38 crew and returned to Kazakhstan in March 2014 on the Soyuz TMA-10 spacecraft. MOTR tested melts and freezes of Ga using repeated 6-h cycles. Melt cycles obtained on the ground before and after launch were compared with those obtained on the ISS. To within a few mK uncertainty, no significant difference between the melt temperature of Ga at 1 g and in microgravity was observed.

  1. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  2. Growth of a Si0.50Ge0.50 crystal by the traveling liquidus-zone (TLZ) method in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, K.; Arai, Y.; Inatomi, Y.; Tsukada, T.; Adachi, S.; Miyata, H.; Tanaka, R.; Yoshikawa, J.; Kihara, T.; Tomioka, H.; Shibayama, H.; Kubota, Y.; Warashina, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Ishizuka, Y.; Harada, Y.; Wada, S.; Harada, C.; Ito, T.; Takayanagi, M.; Yoda, S.

    2014-02-01

    An alloy semiconductor Si1-xGex (x~0.5) crystal was grown by the TLZ method in microgravity. Ge concentration was 48.5±1.5 at% for the whole region of 10 mm diameter and 17.2 mm long crystal. Compositional uniformity was established but the average concentration was a little deviated from the expected 50 at%. For further improving compositional uniformity and for obtaining Si0.5Ge0.5 crystals in microgravity, growth conditions were refined based on the measured axial compositional profile. In determining new growth conditions, difference in temperature gradient in a melt, difference in freezing interface curvature, and difference in melt back length of a seed between microgravity and terrestrial growth were taken into consideration.

  3. Relationship of Cure Temperature to Mechanical, Physical, and Dielectric Performance of PDMS Glass Composite for Electric Motor Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Becker, Kathleen; Williams, Tiffany S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Heimann, Paula J.; Ring, Andrew; Woodworth, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Achieving NASAs aggressive fuel burn and emission reduction for N-plus-3 aircraft will require hybrid electric propulsion system in which electric motors driven by either power generated from turbine or energy storage system will power the fan for propulsion. Motors designed for hybrid electric aircraft are expected to operate at medium to high voltages over long durations in a high altitude service environment. Such conditions have driven research toward the development of wire insulation with improved mechanical strength, thermal stability and increased breakdown voltage. The silicone class of materials has been considered for electric wire insulation due to its inherent thermal stability, dielectric strength and mechanical integrity. This paper evaluates the dependence of these properties on the cure conditions of a polydimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) elastomer; where both cure temperature and base-to-catalyst ratio were varied. The PDMS elastomer was evaluated as a bulk material and an impregnation matrix within a lightweight glass veil support. The E-glass support was selected for mechanical stiffness and dielectric strength. This work has shown a correlation between cure conditions and material physical properties. Tensile strength increased with cure temperature whereas breakdown voltage tended to be independent of process variations. The results will be used to direct material formulation based on specific insulation requirements.

  4. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE PHYSICAL CHANGES AND DRYING KINETICS IN PLUM (Prunus domestica L. POŽEGAČA VARIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Nikolić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, drying kinetics of autochthonous variety Požegača plum was examined in a laboratory dryer at three temperatures. The whole plum fruits, together with the kernels were subjected to the drying process. The effect of drying has been examined at temperatures of 55, 60 and 75 °C, with a constant air velocity of 1.1 m s-1. The corresponding experimental results were tested using six nonlinear regression models. Coefficient of determination (R2, standard regression error (SSE, model correlation coeficient (Vy, as well as the maximum absolute error (ΔY showed that the logaritmic model was in good agreement with the experimental data obtained. During drying of plums, the effective diffusivity was found to be between 5.6×10-9 for 55 °C and 8.9×10-9 m2s-1 at 75 °C, respectively. The physical characteristics of fresh (length 39.64 mm and width 29.15 mm and dried (length 37.52 mm and width 22.85 mm plum fruit were determined. Finally, by chemical analysis, the contents of micro-and macro-elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, B and N, F, K, Ca, Mg and S in the skin and flesh of the dried product, prunes, has been established.

  5. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    the PAG conveners

    2011-01-01

    The delivered LHC integrated luminosity of more than 1 inverse femtobarn by summer and more than 5 by the end of 2011 has been a gold mine for the physics groups. With 2011 data, we have submitted or published 14 papers, 7 others are in collaboration-wide review, and 75 Physics Analysis Summaries have been approved already. They add to the 73 papers already published based on the 2010 and 2009 datasets. Highlights from each physics analysis group are described below. Heavy ions Many important results have been obtained from the first lead-ion collision run in 2010. The published measurements include the first ever indications of Υ excited state suppression (PRL synopsis), long-range correlation in PbPb, and track multiplicity over a wide η range. Preliminary results include the first ever measurement of isolated photons (showing no modification), J/ψ suppression including the separation of the non-prompt component, further study of jet fragmentation, nuclear modification factor...

  6. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The Physics Groups are actively engaged on analyses of the first data from the LHC at 7 TeV, targeting many results for the ICHEP conference taking place in Paris this summer. The first large batch of physics approvals is scheduled for this CMS Week, to be followed by four more weeks of approvals and analysis updates leading to the start of the conference in July. Several high priority analysis areas were organized into task forces to ensure sufficient coverage from the relevant detector, object, and analysis groups in the preparation of these analyses. Already some results on charged particle correlations and multiplicities in 7 TeV minimum bias collisions have been approved. Only one small detail remains before ICHEP: further integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC! Beyond the Standard Model measurements that can be done with these data, the focus changes to the search for new physics at the TeV scale and for the Higgs boson in the period after ICHEP. Particle Flow The PFT group is focusing on the ...

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      The period since the last CMS Bulletin has been historic for CMS Physics. The pinnacle of our physics programme was an observation of a new particle – a strong candidate for a Higgs boson – which has captured worldwide interest and made a profound impact on the very field of particle physics. At the time of the discovery announcement on 4 July, 2012, prominent signals were observed in the high-resolution H→γγ and H→ZZ(4l) modes. Corroborating excess was observed in the H→W+W– mode as well. The fermionic channel analyses (H→bb, H→ττ), however, yielded less than the Standard Model (SM) expectation. Collectively, the five channels established the signal with a significance of five standard deviations. With the exception of the diphoton channel, these analyses have all been updated in the last months and several new channels have been added. With improved analyses and more than twice the i...

  8. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    L. Demortier

    Physics-wise, the CMS week in December was dominated by discussions of the analyses that will be carried out in the “next six months”, i.e. while waiting for the first LHC collisions.  As presented in December, analysis approvals based on Monte Carlo simulation were re-opened, with the caveat that for this work to be helpful to the goals of CMS, it should be carried out using the new software (CMSSW_2_X) and associated samples.  By the end of the week, the goal for the physics groups was set to be the porting of our physics commissioning methods and plans, as well as the early analyses (based an integrated luminosity in the range 10-100pb-1) into this new software. Since December, the large data samples from CMSSW_2_1 were completed. A big effort by the production group gave a significant number of events over the end-of-year break – but also gave out the first samples with the fast simulation. Meanwhile, as mentioned in December, the arrival of 2_2 meant that ...

  9. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  10. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2012-01-01

      2012 has started off as a very busy year for the CMS Physics Groups. Planning for the upcoming higher luminosity/higher energy (8 TeV) operation of the LHC and relatively early Rencontres de Moriond are the high-priority activities for the group at the moment. To be ready for the coming 8-TeV data, CMS has made a concerted effort to perform and publish analyses on the 5 fb−1 dataset recorded in 2011. This has resulted in the submission of 16 papers already, including nine on the search for the Higgs boson. In addition, a number of preliminary results on the 2011 dataset have been released to the public. The Exotica and SUSY groups approved several searches for new physics in January, such as searches for W′ and exotic highly ionising particles. These were highlighted at a CERN seminar given on 24th  January. Many more analyses, from all the PAGs, including the newly formed SMP (Standard Model Physics) and FSQ (Forward and Small-x QCD), were approved in February. The ...

  11. Sensorimotor adaptations to microgravity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. R.; McCall, G. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Gotto, J.; Goulet, C.; Fleischmann, K.; Roy, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor function is altered by microgravity, but little detail is available as to what these changes are and how changes in the individual components of the sensorimotor system affect the control of movement. Further, there is little information on whether the changes in motor performance reflect immediate or chronic adaptations to changing gravitational environments. To determine the effects of microgravity on the neural control properties of selected motor pools, four male astronauts from the NASA STS-78 mission performed motor tasks requiring the maintenance of either ankle dorsiflexor or plantarflexor torque. Torques of 10 or 50% of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were requested of the subjects during 10 degrees peak-to-peak sinusoidal movements at 0.5 Hz. When 10% MVC of the plantarflexors was requested, the actual torques generated in-flight were similar to pre-flight values. Post-flight torques were higher than pre- and in-flight torques. The actual torques when 50% MVC was requested were higher in- and post-flight than pre-flight. Soleus (Sol) electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes during plantarflexion were higher in-flight than pre- or post-flight for both the 10 and 50% MVC tasks. No differences in medial gastrocnemius (MG) EMG amplitudes were observed for either the 10 or 50% MVC tasks. The EMG amplitudes of the tibialis anterior (TA), an antagonist to plantarflexion, were higher in- and post-flight than pre-flight for the 50% MVC task. During the dorsiflexion tasks, the torques generated in both the 10 and 50% MVC tasks did not differ pre-, in- and post-flight. TA EMG amplitudes were significantly higher in- than pre-flight for both the 10 or 50% MVC tasks, and remained elevated post-flight for the 50% MVC test. Both the Sol and MG EMG amplitudes were significantly higher in-flight than either pre- or post-flight for both the 10 and 50% MVC tests. These data suggest that the most consistent response to space flight was an elevation in the level of

  12. The relationship of normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and BAC/BrAC ratio in 98 physically fit human test subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, J Mack; Burris, James M; Hughes, James R; Cunningham, Margaret P

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between normal body temperature, end-expired breath temperature, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC)/breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) ratio was studied in 98 subjects (84 men, 14 women). Subjects consumed alcohol sufficient to produce a BrAC of at least 0.06 g/210 L 45-75 min after drinking. Breath samples were analyzed using an Intoxilyzer 8000 specially equipped to measure breath temperature. Venous blood samples and body temperatures were then taken. The mean body temperature of the men (36.6 degrees C) was lower than the women (37.0 degrees C); however, their mean breath temperatures were virtually identical (men: 34.5 degrees C; women: 34.6 degrees C). The BAC exceeded the BrAC for every subject. BAC/BrAC ratios were calculated from the BAC and BrAC analytical results. There was no difference in the BAC/BrAC ratios for men (1:2379) and women (1:2385). The correlation between BAC and BrAC was high (r = 0.938, p body temperature and end-expired breath temperature, body temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio, and breath temperature and BAC/BrAC ratio were much lower. Neither normal body temperature nor end-expired breath temperature was strongly associated with BAC/BrAC ratio.

  13. The Distinctive Sensitivity to Microgravity of Immune Cell Subpopulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Luo, Haiying; Liu, Jing; Wang, Peng; Dong, Dandan; Shang, Peng; Zhao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Immune dysfunction in astronauts is well documented after spaceflights. Microgravity is one of the key factors directly suppressing the function of immune system. However, it is unclear which subpopulations of immune cells including innate and adaptive immune cells are more sensitive to microgravity We herein investigated the direct effects of modeled microgravity (MMg) on different immune cells in vitro. Mouse splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells were exposed to MMg for 16 hrs. The survival and the phenotypes of different subsets of immune cells including CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells, CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg), B cells, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), natural killer cells (NK) were determined by flow cytometry. After splenocytes were cultured under MMg for 16h, the cell frequency and total numbers of monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+T cells were significantly decreased more than 70 %. MMg significantly decreased the cell numbers of CD8+ T cells, B cells and neutrophils in splenocytes. The cell numbers of CD4+T cells and NK cells were unchanged significantly when splenocytes were cultured under MMg compared with controls. However, MMg significantly increased the ratio of mature neutrophils to immature neutrophils in bone marrow and the cell number of DCs in splenocytes. Based on the cell survival ability, monocytes, macrophages and CD4+Foxp3+Treg cells are most sensitive to microgravity; CD4+T cells and NK cells are resistant to microgravity; CD8+T cells and neutrophils are impacted by short term microgravity exposure. Microgravity promoted the maturation of neutrophils and development of DCs in vitro. The present studies offered new insights on the direct effects of MMg on the survival and homeostasis of immune cell subsets.

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Document Server

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    The period since the last CMS bulletin has seen the end of proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy 8 TeV, a successful proton-lead collision run at 5 TeV/nucleon, as well as a “reference” proton run at 2.76 TeV. With these final LHC Run 1 datasets in hand, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have been busy analysing these data in preparation for the winter conferences. Moreover, despite the fact that the pp run only concluded in mid-December (and there was consequently less time to complete data analyses), CMS again made a strong showing at the Rencontres de Moriond in La Thuile (EW and QCD) where nearly 40 new results were presented. The highlight of these preliminary results was the eagerly anticipated updated studies of the properties of the Higgs boson discovered in July of last year. Meanwhile, preparations for Run 2 and physics performance studies for Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrade scenarios are ongoing. The Higgs analysis group produced updated analyses on the full Run 1 dataset (~25 f...

  15. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Hill

    2013-01-01

    In the period since the last CMS Bulletin, the LHC – and CMS – have entered LS1. During this time, CMS Physics Analysis Groups have performed more than 40 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete 8 TeV dataset delivered by the LHC in 2012 (and in some cases on the full Run 1 dataset). These results were shown at, and well received by, several high-profile conferences in the spring of 2013, including the inaugural meeting of the Large Hadron Collider    Physics Conference (LHCP) in Barcelona, and the 26th International Symposium on Lepton Photon Interactions at High Energies (LP) in San Francisco. In parallel, there have been significant developments in preparations for Run 2 of the LHC and on “future physics” studies for both Phase 1 and Phase 2 upgrades of the CMS detector. The Higgs analysis group produced five new results for LHCP including a new H-to-bb search in VBF production (HIG-13-011), ttH with H to γ&ga...

  16. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Christopher Hill

    2013-01-01

    Since the last CMS Bulletin, the CMS Physics Analysis Groups have completed more than 70 new analyses, many of which are based on the complete Run 1 dataset. In parallel the Snowmass whitepaper on projected discovery potential of CMS for HL-LHC has been completed, while the ECFA HL-LHC future physics studies has been summarised in a report and nine published benchmark analyses. Run 1 summary studies on b-tag and jet identification, quark-gluon discrimination and boosted topologies have been documented in BTV-13-001 and JME-13-002/005/006, respectively. The new tracking alignment and performance papers are being prepared for submission as well. The Higgs analysis group produced several new results including the search for ttH with H decaying to ZZ, WW, ττ+bb (HIG-13-019/020) where an excess of ~2.5σ is observed in the like-sign di-muon channel, and new searches for high-mass Higgs bosons (HIG-13-022). Search for invisible Higgs decays have also been performed both using the associ...

  18. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-12-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  19. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments) was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigator (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes thE MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  20. Mechanobiologic Research in a Microgravity Environment Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, A.; Dubini, G.; Tominetti, F.; Raimondi, M.

    mechanical forces. For example, cartilage constructs have been cultured in spinner flasks under mixed or unmixed conditions, in simulated and in real microgravity. In these mixing studies, however, it is difficult to definitively quantify the effects of mixing-induced mechanical forces from those of convection-enhanced transport of nutrients to and of catabolites away from the cells. At the state of the art, the presence of a more controlled mechanical environment may be the condition required in order to study the biochemical and mechanical response of these biological systems. Such a controlled environment could lead to an advanced fluid dynamic design of the culture chamber that could both enhance the local mass transfer phenomena and match the needs of specific macroscopic mechanical effects in tissue development. The bioreactor is an excellent example of how the skills and resources of two distinctly different fields can complement each other. Microgravity can be used to enhance the formation of tissue like aggregates in specially designed bioreactors. Theoretical and experimental projects are under way to improve cell culture techniques using microgravity conditions experienced during space flights. Bioreactors usable under space flight conditions impose constructional principles which are different from those intended solely for ground applications. The Columbus Laboratory as part of the International Space Station (ISS) will be an evolving facility in low Earth orbit. Its mission is to support scientific, technological, and commercial activities in space. A goal of this research is to design a unique bioreactor for use sequentially from ground research to space research. One of the particularities of the simulated microgravity obtained through time averaging of the weight vector is that by varying the rotational velocity the same results can be obtained with a different value of g. One of the first applications of this technique in space biology was in fact the

  1. A hydroponic system for microgravity plant experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, B. D.; Bausch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The construction of a permanently manned space station will provide the opportunity to grow plants for weeks or months in orbit for experiments or food production. With this opportunity comes the need for a method to provide plants with a continuous supply of water and nutrients in microgravity. The Capillary Effect Root Environment System (CERES) uses capillary forces to maintain control of circulating plant nutrient solution in the weightless environment of an orbiting spacecraft. The nutrient solution is maintained at a pressure slightly less than the ambient air pressure while it flows on one side of a porous membrane. The root, on the other side of the membrane, is surrounded by a thin film of nutrient solution where it contacts the moist surface of the membrane. The root is provided with water, nutrients and air simultaneously. Air bubbles in the nutrient solution are removed using a hydrophobic/hydrophilic membrane system. A model scaled to the size necessary for flight hardware to test CERES in the space shuttle was constructed.

  2. Physiology of a microgravity environment invited review: microgravity and skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. R.; Widrick, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Spaceflight (SF) has been shown to cause skeletal muscle atrophy; a loss in force and power; and, in the first few weeks, a preferential atrophy of extensors over flexors. The atrophy primarily results from a reduced protein synthesis that is likely triggered by the removal of the antigravity load. Contractile proteins are lost out of proportion to other cellular proteins, and the actin thin filament is lost disproportionately to the myosin thick filament. The decline in contractile protein explains the decrease in force per cross-sectional area, whereas the thin-filament loss may explain the observed postflight increase in the maximal velocity of shortening in the type I and IIa fiber types. Importantly, the microgravity-induced decline in peak power is partially offset by the increased fiber velocity. Muscle velocity is further increased by the microgravity-induced expression of fast-type myosin isozymes in slow fibers (hybrid I/II fibers) and by the increased expression of fast type II fiber types. SF increases the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to damage, with the actual damage elicited during postflight reloading. Evidence in rats indicates that SF increases fatigability and reduces the capacity for fat oxidation in skeletal muscles. Future studies will be required to establish the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the SF-induced muscle atrophy and functional loss and to develop effective exercise countermeasures.

  3. Finite Element Analysis of Osteocytes Mechanosensitivity Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Du, Cheng-Fei; Wu, Xin-Tong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2018-04-01

    It was found that the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes could be altered under simulated microgravity. However, how the mechanical stimuli as the biomechanical origins cause the bioresponse in osteocytes under microgravity is unclear yet. Computational studies may help us to explore the mechanical deformation changes of osteocytes under microgravity. Here in this paper, we intend to use the computational simulation to investigate the mechanical behavior of osteocytes under simulated microgravity. In order to obtain the shape information of osteocytes, the biological experiment was conducted under simulated microgravity prior to the numerical simulation The cells were rotated by a clinostat for 6 hours or 5 days and fixed, the cytoskeleton and the nucleus were immunofluorescence stained and scanned, and the cell shape and the fluorescent intensity were measured from fluorescent images to get the dimension information of osteocytes The 3D finite element (FE) cell models were then established based on the scanned image stacks. Several components such as the actin cortex, the cytoplasm, the nucleus, the cytoskeleton of F-actin and microtubules were considered in the model. The cell models in both 6 hours and 5 days groups were then imposed by three magnitudes (0.5, 10 and 15 Pa) of simulating fluid shear stress, with cell total displacement and the internal discrete components deformation calculated. The results showed that under the simulated microgravity: (1) the nuclear area and height statistically significantly increased, which made the ratio of membrane-cortex height to nucleus height statistically significantly decreased; (2) the fluid shear stress-induced maximum displacements and average displacements in the whole cell decreased, with the deformation decreasing amplitude was largest when exposed to 1.5Pa of fluid shear stress; (3) the fluid shear stress-induced deformation of cell membrane-cortex and cytoskeleton decreased, while the fluid shear stress

  4. Synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity (miRNA WT and ced-1 mutant)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  5. Synergistic effects of space radiation and microgravity (miRNA WT and dys-mutant)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space radiations and microgravity both could cause DNA damage in cells but the effects of microgravity on DNA damage response to space radiations are still...

  6. Microgravity effect on C. elegans N2/VC (CERISE 4 days)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microgravity effect on C. elegans gene expression was analysed by whole genome microarray. The worms were cultivated under microgravity for 4 days in the Japanese...

  7. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  8. A CASPER STEM Oriented Educational Intervention based on Microgravity using a 1.5 sec Drop Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Jorge; Wang, Li; Moore, Rachel; York, Judy; Buchs, Todd; Clyatt, Marie; Laufer, Rene; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2017-10-01

    The CASPER educational research group strives to contribute to the effort of increasing students' interest in and preparation for STEM careers by cultivating partnerships between educators, industry, and state educational institutions while applying the latest innovations and available tools to curriculum development. To this end, CASPER has brought together a group of educational researchers and curriculum designers to produce the CASPER Microgravity Investigators educational intervention, which is coordinated to the 21st Century Learning framework. Material for this educational intervention is based on a newly constructed 1.5 s drop tower at Baylor University and operated by the Center. In this presentation we present the details of the intervention as well as the physics and STEM material which are incorporated into microgravity experiments. Funding from the NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Oryza sativa Calli Under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Chen, Haiying; Cai, Weiming

    2015-11-01

    The transcriptome of Oryza sativacalli was analyzed on board the Chinese spaceship "Shenzhou 8" to study the effects of microgravity on plant signal transduction and secondary metabolism (as one of the experiments with SIMBOX on Shenzhou 8). Calli of Oryza sativa were pre-cultured for 4 days on ground and then loaded into the stationary platform or the rotating platform of a biological incubator, called SIMBOX, to grow in space under microgravity conditions or 1g-conditions, respectively. The calli were fixed by RNAlater after grew 324 h under microgravity. After 17 days, Shenzhou 8 returned to Earth carrying SIMBOX. Oryza sativa calli were recovered, and the RNA was extracted for transcriptome analysis. After comparing 1 gspaceflight controls-inflight controls with 1 g-ground controls, 157 probe sets with different expression levels (fold change ≥2, p<0.05) were identified. When comparing spaceflight controls to 1 g-ground controls and to 1 g-inflight controls, 678 probe sets with different expression levels (fold change ≥2, p<0.05) were identified. The fact that the same 678 probe sets were identified in these two comparisons suggests that transcription was affected under microgravity conditions. MapMan analysis was used to classify 627 microgravity responsive (MR) transcripts. The MR transcripts were mainly involved in cell wall structure, the TCA cycle, primary metabolism, transcription, protein modification and degradation, hormone metabolism, calcium regulation, receptor like kinase activity and transport.

  10. Evaporation temperature-tuned physical vapor deposition growth engineering of one-dimensional non-Fermi liquid tetrathiofulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkar, I.; Laux, M.; Demokritova, J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the growth of high quality tetrathiofulvalene tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) organic charge-transfer thin films which show a clear non-Fermi liquid behavior. Temperature dependent angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations show that the growth...... of TTF-TCNQ films is accompanied by the unfavorable presence of neutral TTF and TCNQ molecules. The quality of the films can be controlled by tuning the evaporation temperature of the precursor in physical vapor deposition method....

  11. Heave, settlement and fracture of chalk during physical modelling experiments with temperature cycling above and below 0 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, Julian B.; Ozouf, Jean-Claude; Peterson, Rorik

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the early stages of heave, settlement and fracture of intact frost-susceptible rock by temperature cycling above and below 0 °C, two physical modelling experiments were performed on 10 rectangular blocks 450 mm high of fine-grained, soft limestone. One experiment simulated 21 cycles of bidirectional freezing (upward and downward) of an active layer above permafrost, and the other simulated 26 cycles of unidirectional freezing (downward) of a seasonally frozen bedrock in a non-permafrost region. Heave and settlement of the top of the blocks were monitored in relation to rock temperature and unfrozen water content, which ranged from almost dry to almost saturated. In the bidirectional freezing experiment, heave of the wettest block initially occurred abruptly at the onset of freezing periods and gradually during thawing periods (summer heave). After the crossing of a threshold marked by the appearance of a macrocrack in the upper layer of permafrost, summer heave increased by an order of magnitude as segregated ice accumulated incrementally in macrocracks, interrupted episodically by abrupt settlement that coincided with unusually high air temperatures. In the unidirectional freezing experiment, the wet blocks heaved during freezing periods and settled during thawing periods, whereas the driest blocks showed the opposite behaviour. The two wettest blocks settled progressively during the first 15 freeze-thaw cycles, before starting to heave progressively as macrocracks developed. Four processes, operating singly or in combination in the blocks account for their heave and settlement: (1) thermal expansion and contraction caused heave and settlement when little or no water-ice phase change was involved; (2) volumetric expansion of water freezing in situ caused short bursts of heave of the outer millimetres of wet rock; (3) ice segregation deeper in the blocks caused sustained heave during thawing and freezing periods; and (4) freeze-thaw cycling caused

  12. Effect of Wind Velocity on Flame Spread in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kuldeep; Olson, Sandra L.; Nakamura, Yuji; Fujita, Osamu; Nishizawa, Katsuhiro; Ito, Kenichi; Kashiwagi, Takashi; Simons, Stephen N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent model is developed describing ignition and subsequent transition to flame spread over a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external radiation in a microgravity environment. A low Mach number approximation to the Navier Stokes equations with global reaction rate equations describing combustion in the gas phase and the condensed phase is numerically solved. The effects of a slow external wind (1-20 cm/s) on flame transition are studied in an atmosphere of 35% oxygen concentration. The ignition is initiated at the center part of the sample by generating a line-shape flame along the width of the sample. The calculated results are compared with data obtained in the 10s drop tower. Numerical results exhibit flame quenching at a wind speed of 1.0 cm/s, two localized flames propagating upstream along the sample edges at 1.5 cm/s, a single line-shape flame front at 5.0 cm/s, three flames structure observed at 10.0 cm/s (consisting of a single line-shape flame propagating upstream and two localized flames propagating downstream along sample edges) and followed by two line-shape flames (one propagating upstream and another propagating downstream) at 20.0 cm/s. These observations qualitatively compare with experimental data. Three-dimensional visualization of the observed flame complex, fuel concentration contours, oxygen and reaction rate isosurfaces, convective and diffusive mass flux are used to obtain a detailed understanding of the controlling mechanism, Physical arguments based on lateral diffusive flux of oxygen, fuel depletion, oxygen shadow of the flame and heat release rate are constructed to explain the various observed flame shapes.

  13. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    V.Ciulli

    2011-01-01

    The main programme of the Physics Week held between 16th and 20th May was a series of topology-oriented workshops on di-leptons, di-photons, inclusive W, and all-hadronic final states. The goal of these workshops was to reach a common understanding for the set of objects (ID, cleaning...), the handling of pile-up, calibration, efficiency and purity determination, as well as to revisit critical common issues such as the trigger. Di-lepton workshop Most analysis groups use a di-lepton trigger or a combination of single and di-lepton triggers in 2011. Some groups need to collect leptons with as low PT as possible with strong isolation and identification requirements as for Higgs into WW at low mass, others with intermediate PT values as in Drell-Yan studies, or high PT as in the Exotica group. Electron and muon reconstruction, identification and isolation, was extensively described in the workshop. For electrons, VBTF selection cuts for low PT and HEEP cuts for high PT were discussed, as well as more complex d...

  14. Modeling of Slosh Dynamics in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks in Microgravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The slosh dynamics in cryogenic fuel tanks under microgravity is a pressing problem that severely affects the reliability of launching spacecraft. After reaching low Earth orbit, the propellant in a multistage rocket experiences large and cyclic changes in temperature as a result of solar heating. Tank wall heating can induce thermal stratification and propellant boiloff, particularly during slosh-inducing vehicle maneuvers. Precise understanding of the dynamic and thermodynamic effects of propellant slosh caused by these maneuvers is critical to mission performance and success. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used extensively within the space vehicle industry in an attempt to characterize the behavior of liquids in microgravity, yet experimental data to quantify these predictions is very limited and reduces confidence in the analytical predictions. A novel approach designed to produce high-fidelity data for correlation to CFD model predictions is being developed with the assistance of Florida Institute of Technology (FIT) and Sierra Lobo, Inc. With few exceptions, previous work in slosh dynamics was theoretical or treated the mass of fuel as a variable of inertia only; such models did not consider the viscosity, surface tension, or other important fluid effects. The challenges in this research are in the development of instrumentation able to measure the required parameters, the computational ability to quantify the fluid behaviors, and the means to assess both the measurements and predictions. The design of this experiment bridges the understanding of slosh dynamics in microgravity by a comprehensive approach that combines CFD tools, dynamic simulation tools, semianalytical models of the predominant fluid effects, and an experimental framework that includes measurement and characterization of liquid slosh in one-degree-of-freedom (DOF) and two-DOF experiments, and ultimately experiments in a NASA low-gravity aircraft.

  15. Transcritical phenomena of autoignited fuel droplet at high pressures under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Daisuke; Kajikawa, Tomoki; Kadoka, Toshikazu

    2005-09-01

    An experimental study has been performed under microgravity to obtain the detailed information needed for the deep understanding of the combustion phenomena of single fuel droplets which autoignite in supercritical gaseous environment. The microgravity environments both in a capsule of a drop shaft and during the parabolic flight of an aircraft were utilized for the experiments. An octadecanol droplet suspended at the tip of a fine quartz fiber in the cold section of the high-pressure combustion chamber was transferred quickly to be subjected to a hot gaseous medium in an electric furnace, this followed by autoignition and combustion of the fuel droplet in supercritical gaseous environment. High-pressure gaseous mixture of oxygen and nitrogen was used as the ambient gas. Temporal variation of temperature of the fuel droplet in supercritical gaseous environment was examined using an embedded fine thermocouple. Sequential backlighted images of the autoignited fuel droplet or the lump of fuel were acquired in supercritical gaseous environment with reduced oxygen concentration. The observed pressure dependence of the ignition delay and that of the burning time of the droplet with the embedded thermocouple were consistent with the previous results. Simultaneous imaging with thermometry showed that the appearance of the fuel changed remarkably at measured fuel temperatures around the critical temperature of the pure fuel. The interface temperature of the fuel rose well beyond the critical temperature of the pure fuel in supercritical gaseous environment. The fuel was gasified long before the end of combustion in supercritical gaseous environment. The proportion of the gasification time to the burning time decreased monotonically with increasing the ambient pressure.

  16. Physical defect formation in few layer graphene-like carbon on metals: influence of temperature, acidity, and chemical functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Christoph M; Grass, Robert N; Rossier, Michael; Athanassiou, Evagelos K; Stark, Wendelin J

    2012-03-06

    A systematical examination of the chemical stability of cobalt metal nanomagnets with a graphene-like carbon coating is used to study the otherwise rather elusive formation of nanometer-sized physical defects in few layer graphene as a result of acid treatments. We therefore first exposed the core-shell nanomaterial to well-controlled solutions of altering acidity and temperature. The release of cobalt into these solutions over time offered a simple tool to monitor the progress of particle degradation. The results suggested that the oxidative damage of the graphene-like coatings was the rate-limiting step during particle degradation since only fully intact or entirely emptied carbon shells were found after the experiments. If ionic noble metal species were additionally present in the acidic solutions, the noble metal was found to reduce on the surface of specific, defective particles. The altered electrochemical gradients across the carbon shells were however not found to lead to a faster release of cobalt from the particles. The suggested mechanistic insight was further confirmed by the covalent chemical functionalization of the particle surface with chemically inert aryl species, which leads to an additional thickening of the shells. This leads to reduced cobalt release rates as well as slower noble metal reduction rates depending on the augmentation of the shell thickness.

  17. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Composites Made with Aluminous Cement and Basalt Fibers Developed for High Temperature Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Reiterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the experimental study of the composition of refractory fiber-reinforced aluminous cement based composites and its response to gradual thermal loading. Basalt fibers were applied in doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0% in volume. Simultaneously, binder system based on the aluminous cement was modified by fine ground ceramic powder originated from the accurate ceramic blocks production. Ceramic powder was dosed as partial replacement of used cement of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25%. Influence of composition changes was evaluated by the results of physical and mechanical testing; compressive strength, flexural strength, bulk density, and fracture energy were determined on the different levels of temperature loading. Increased dose of basalt fibers allows reaching expected higher values of fracture energy, but with respect to results of compressive and flexural strength determination as an optimal rate of basalt fibers dose was considered 0.25% in volume. Fine ground ceramic powder application led to extensive increase of residual mechanical parameters just up to replacement of 10%. Higher replacement of aluminous cement reduced final values of bulk density but kept mechanical properties on the level of mixtures without aluminous cement replacement.

  18. Effect of Activation Temperature and Heating Duration on Physical Characteristics of Activated Carbon Prepared from Agriculture Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tham Yee Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the physical characteristics of activated carbon prepared from durian shell in varied heating durations from 10 min to 30 min and activation temperatures of 400C and 500C. Durian shells have been characterized in term of ultimate and proximate analysis, chemical composition and thermal behaviour with a view to be used as activated carbon precursor. Durian shell activated carbon was prepared by impregnating 10g of sample in 10% (v/v concentration of phosphoric acid for 24 h, followed by carbonization at 400C and 500C with different heating durations under nitrogen atmosphere. The results showed that various treatment conditions affect the percentage of yield, BET surface area, micropore volume, and average pore diameter. The highest surface area (SBET 1024 m2/g was obtained at 500C and 20 min of heating duration with 63% of yield and 0.21 cm3/g micropore volume.

  19. Microgravity effect on endophytic bacteria communities of Triticum aestivum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Youcai; Fu, Yuming; Chen, Huiwen; Liu, Hong; Sun, Yi

    2018-02-01

    Under normal gravity conditions, endophytic bacteria, one of the key bacterial community that inhabit in plant tissues, are well-known in promoting the plant growth and health, which are essential for long-term and long-distance manned microgravity space exploration. Here, we report how the Triticum aestivum endophytic bacterial communities behave differently under the simulated microgravity conditions. We demonstrate that, under simulated microgravity conditions, the microbial diversity in wheat seedling leaf increases while that in root decreases, compared to that cultivated under normal gravity conditions. We found that the dominant bacteria genus such as Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus and Bacillus significantly changes with gravity. The findings of this study provide important insight for space research, especially in terms of the Triticum aestivum cultivation in space.

  20. Microgravity Experiment for Attitude Control of a Tethered Space Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohmi, Masahiro

    A tethered space robot, which is connected to a mother spacecraft through a peace of tether, is a new space system proposed in the previous work. The tethered subsystem is envisioned to be a multi-body system for a robot, whose attitude can be controlled under tether tension by its own link motion. This paper discusses about microgravity experiment for a tethered space robot. Design and mechanism of the experimental device, required for the proposed attitude control, were explained. Also, link motion control algorithm was designed for the experimental device. Characteristics of the proposed attitude control were confirmed by microgravity experiment using a drop shaft, which can provide high quality microgravity condition during 4.5s.

  1. The Impact of Microgravity and Hypergravity on Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette A. M. Maier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cells (ECs, which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature.

  2. Viscosity of Xenon Examined in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    Why does water flow faster than honey? The short answer, that honey has a greater viscosity, merely rephrases the question. The fundamental answer is that viscosity originates in the interactions between a fluid s molecules. These interactions are so complicated that, except for low-density gases, the viscosity of a fluid cannot be accurately predicted. Progress in understanding viscosity has been made by studying moderately dense gases and, more recently, fluids near the critical point. Modern theories predict a universal behavior for all pure fluids near the liquid-vapor critical point, and they relate the increase in viscosity to spontaneous fluctuations in density near this point. The Critical Viscosity of Xenon (CVX) experiment tested these theories with unprecedented precision when it flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-85) in August 1997. Near the critical point, xenon is a billion times more compressible than water, yet it has about the same density. Because the fluid is so "soft," it collapses under its own weight when exposed to the force of Earth s gravity - much like a very soft spring. Because the CVX experiment is conducted in microgravity, it achieves a very uniform fluid density even very close to the critical point. At the heart of the CVX experiment is a novel viscometer built around a small nickel screen. An oscillating electric field forces the screen to oscillate between pairs of electrodes. Viscosity, which dampens the oscillations, can be calculated by measuring the screen motion and the force applied to the screen. So that the fluid s delicate state near the critical point will not be disrupted, the screen oscillations are set to be both slow and small.

  3. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Microgravity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    1998-01-01

    The second series of MGM experiment was conducted during the STS-89 mission in January 1998. The experiment was previously flow on Atlantis's STS-79 mission in September 1996. Six displacement-controlled, drained triaxial compression experiments were performed at very low effective confining stresses. The confining stresses were in the ranges 0.05, 0.52 and 1.30 kPa. Three experiments were subjected to monotonic loading and unloading cycles while the other three experiments were subjected to cyclic loading. The results show very high peak strength friction angles in the range of 47.6 to 70.0 degrees, which are mainly due to overconsolidation and grain interlocking effects. It was observed that the residual strength levels in the monotonic loading experiments were in the same range as that observed at higher confining stress levels. The dilatancy angles were unusually high in the range of 30 to 31 degrees. All specimens display substantial initial stiffnesses and elastic moduli during unloading and reloading events, which are nearly an order of magnitude higher than conventional theories predict. A periodic instability phenomenon which appears to result from buckling of multiple internal arches and columnar systems, augmented by stick-slips was observed in the experiments. Computed Tomography (CT) measurements revealed valuable data about the internal fabric and the specimens deformation patterns. Uniform diffuse bifurcation with multiple radial shear bands was observed in the specimens tested in a microgravity environment. In the axial direction, two major conical surfaces were developed. Spatial nonsymmetrical deformations were observed in specimens tested in terrestrial laboratory.

  4. The effect of CO2 activation temperature on the physical and electrochemical properties of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taer, E.; Susanti, Y.; Awitdrus, Sugianto, Taslim, R.; Setiadi, R. N.; Bahri, S.; Agustino, Dewi, P.; Kurniasih, B.

    2018-02-01

    The effect of CO2 activation on the synthesis of activated carbon monolith from banana stem waste has been studied. Physical characteristics such as density, degree of crystallinity, surface morphology and elemental content has been analyzed, supporting the finding of an excellent electrochemical properties for the supercapacitor. The synthesis of activated carbon electrode began with pre-carbonization process at temperature of 250°C for 2.5 h. Then the process was continued by chemical activation using KOH as activating agent with a concentration of 0.4 M. The pellets were formed with 8 ton hydrolic pressure. All the samples were carbonized at a temperature of 600°C, followed by physical activation using CO2 gas at a various temperatures ranging from 800°C, 850°C, 900°C and 950°C for 2 h. The carbon content was increased with increasing temperature and the optimum temperature was 900°C. The specific capacitance depends on the activation temperature with the highest specific capacitance of 104.2 F/g at the activation temperature of 900°C.

  5. A numerical study of biofilm growth in a microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristotelous, A. C.; Papanicolaou, N. C.

    2017-10-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to investigate the effect of microgravity on biofilm growth. We examine the case of biofilm suspended in a quiescent aqueous nutrient solution contained in a rectangular tank. The bacterial colony is assumed to follow logistic growth whereas nutrient absorption is assumed to follow Monod kinetics. The problem is modeled by a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations in two spatial dimensions solved using the Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method. Nutrient and biofilm concentrations are computed in microgravity and normal gravity conditions. A preliminary quantitative relationship between the biofilm concentration and the gravity field intensity is derived.

  6. Robots for manipulation in a micro-gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, R. D.; Lawrence, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of control strategies and mechanisms for robots operating in the micro-gravity environment of Space Station. These robots must be capable of conducting experiments and manufacturing processes without disturbing the micro-gravity environment through base reactions/motions. Approaches discussed for controlling the robot base reactions/motions include strategies making use of manipulators with redundant degrees of freedon, actuators at the robot base, and a redundant (balancing) arm. Two degree-of-freedom, traction-drive joints are discussed as well as the conceptual design for a traction-driven manipulator.

  7. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theng Yee Chong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very much dependent on the applied magnetic field. The difference of magnetic pole (north and south had shown to be a factor to the perturbation as well.

  8. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Theng Yee; Ho, Kent Loong; Ong, Boon Hoong

    2012-03-01

    The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very much dependent on the applied magnetic field. The difference of magnetic pole (north and south) had shown to be a factor to the perturbation as well.

  9. Electronic states of germanium grown under micro-gravity condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, A. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)]. E-mail: sugahara@tsurugi.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ogawa, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohyama, T. [Liberal Arts, Fukui University of Technology, 3-6-1 Gakuen, Fukui, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan); Nakata, J. [Kyoto Semiconductor Corp. 418-9 Yodo Saime-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 613-0915 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    Magneto-optical absorption measurements of Sb-doped germaniums grown under micro-gravity condition were carried out to investigate the influence of the gravity on crystal growth, using far-infrared laser and microwave. For comparison, we prepared two germanium crystals grown in the same conditions except the gravity conditions. In spite of the quite short growth period, the germanium grown under micro-gravity has a quite good quality. The lineshape analysis of Zeeman absorption peaks due to donor electrons indicates the existence of residual thermal acceptors.

  10. Shape Evolution of Detached Bridgman Crystals Grown in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2015-01-01

    A theory describing the shape evolution of detached Bridgman crystals in microgravity has been developed. A starting crystal of initial radius r0 will evolve to one of the following states: Stable detached gap; Attachment to the crucible wall; Meniscus collapse. Only crystals where alpha plus omega is great than 180 degrees will achieve stable detached growth in microgravity. Results of the crystal shape evolution theory are consistent with predictions of the dynamic stability of crystallization (Tatarchenko, Shaped Crystal Growth, Kluwer, 1993). Tests of transient crystal evolution are planned for ICESAGE, a series of Ge and GeSi crystal growth experiments planned to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS).

  11. Intermittent Exposure to Social Defeat and Open-field Test in Rats : Acute and Long-term Effects on ECG, Body Temperature and Physical Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sgoifo, Andrea; Pozzato, Chiara; Meerlo, Peter; Costoli, Tania; Manghi, Massimo; Stilli, Donatella; Olivetti, Giorgio; Musso, Ezio

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to an intermittent homotypic stressor on: (i) habituation of acute autonomic responsivity (i.e. cardiac sympathovagal balance and susceptibility to arrhythmias), and (ii) circadian rhythmicity of heart rate, body temperature, and physical activity.

  12. Effects of drying temperature and time of a canine diet extruded with a 4 or 8 mm die on physical and nutritional quality indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Q.D.; Hendriks, W.H.; Poel, van der A.F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Two factorial experiments (4 temperatures × 2 durations) were carried out to test the effect of drying variables on nutritional and physical quality indicators of extruded canine diets produced using a 4 and 8 mm die (kibble size). The diet was extruded using a single screw extruder at 130 °C and

  13. Rrhizogenesis in vitro is a convenient model for studying the root graviperceptive apparatus formation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Sarnatska, Veresa; Ovcharenko, Yulia

    A root graviperceptive apparatus is known to form in microgravity but does not function in the absence of a gravitational vector, that has been shown in many spaceflight experiments with seedlings of different plant species. In statocytes, which are differentiated in microgravity, a nucleus is localized in the proximal part of a cell as at 1 g. Unlike control, amyloplastsstatoliths do not sedimented in the distal part of a cell in microgravity, they group in the cell center more often, sometimes they localized in the different part of a cell. In all these experiments, the objects of investigations were embryonal roots formed in seeds at 1 g. There is only single report that columella cells in roots, which developed de novo from callus in space flight, did not differentiate in statocytes. Therefore, we call to attention to rhizogenesis in vitro as a convenient model for studying the influence of microgravity on differentiation of a root graviperceptive apparatus. Two methods for obtaining of Arabidopsis thaliana roots in vitro are proposed: the first-from the primary callus of leaf origin and the second - from leaf fragments. Callus initiation and growth are successful on MS medium supplemented with vitamin B5, glycine, inositol, 2,4-D, kinetin, glucose and agar. For induction of rhizogenesis calli were transferred to medium without hormones or medium which contained one to ten of MS mineral salts and microelements, without vitamins and hormones. Rhyzogenesis was obtained without added growth substances, but considerably higher number of calli with roots and number of roots per callus are on MS medium diluted tenfold. Rhizogenesis in A. thaliana leaf segments should present no problem, but the most intensive root formation is obtained when culturing them for three day on diluted MS medium supplemented with salycilic acid and then on diluted MS medium only. The low temperature treatment for three days increases the number of roots formed. A role of both plasticity

  14. Microgravity effects on water supply and substrate properties in porous matrix root support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, G. E.; Jones, S. B.; Or, D.; Podolski, I. G.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Sytchov, V. N.; Ivanova, T.; Kostov, P.; Sapunova, S.; Dandolov, I.; hide

    2000-01-01

    The control of water content and water movement in granular substrate-based plant root systems in microgravity is a complex problem. Improper water and oxygen delivery to plant roots has delayed studies of the effects of microgravity on plant development and the use of plants in physical and mental life support systems. Our international effort (USA, Russia and Bulgaria) has upgraded the plant growth facilities on the Mir Orbital Station (OS) and used them to study the full life cycle of plants. The Bulgarian-Russian-developed Svet Space Greenhouse (SG) system was upgraded on the Mir OS in 1996. The US developed Gas Exchange Measurement System (GEMS) greatly extends the range of environmental parameters monitored. The Svet-GEMS complex was used to grow a fully developed wheat crop during 1996. The growth rate and development of these plants compared well with earth grown plants indicating that the root zone water and oxygen stresses that have limited plant development in previous long-duration experiments have been overcome. However, management of the root environment during this experiment involved several significant changes in control settings as the relationship between the water delivery system, water status sensors, and the substrate changed during the growth cycles. c 2001 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of intermittent -Gx gravitation in preventing deconditioning due to simulated microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Fan; Sun, Biao; Cao, Xin-Sheng; Liu, Chun; Yu, Zhi-Bin; Zhang, Le-Ning; Cheng, Jiu-Hua; Wu, Yan-Hong; Wu, Xing-Yu

    2003-07-01

    This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of daily short-duration -Gx gravity exposure in preventing adverse changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles and bone due to simulated microgravity. Tail suspension for 28 days was used to simulate microgravity-induced deconditioning effects. Daily standing (STD) at 1 G for 1, 2, or 4 h/day or centrifugation (CEN) at 1.5 or 2.6 G for 1 h/day was used to provide -Gx gravitation as a countermeasure. The results indicate that the minimum gravity exposure requirements vary greatly in different systems. Cardiac muscle is most responsive to such treatment: 1 h/day of -Gx gravitation by STD was sufficient to prevent adverse changes in myocardial contractility; bone is most resistant: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation only partially alleviated the adverse changes in physical and mechanical properties of the femur. The responsiveness of skeletal muscle is moderate: 4 h/day of -Gx gravitation prevented mass reduction and histomorphometric changes in the soleus muscle during a 28-day simulation period. Increasing gravitational intensity to 2.6 G showed less benefit or no additional benefit in preventing adverse changes in muscle and bone. The present work suggests that system specificity in responsiveness to intermittent gravity exposure should be considered one of the prerequisites in proposing intermittent artificial gravity as a potential countermeasure.

  16. Properties of flames propagating in rich propane-air mixtures at microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. F.; Pu, Y. K.; Jia, F.; Jarosinski, J.

    Under normal gravity conditions it was found that the rich flammability limits for propane-air mixture are 9 2 C 3 H 8 equivalence ratio phi 2 42 for upward and 6 3 C 3 H 8 phi 1 60 for downward propagating flames An extremely large concentration gap exists between these two limits which is attributed to the influence of buoyancy and preferential diffusion in the mixture The present study enables a better understanding of flame behaviors in rich propane-air mixtures through microgravity experiments in which flame propagation can be examined in the absence of buoyancy The experiments were carried out in a cubic closed vessel of 80 mm inner length made of quartz glass A high-speed camera recorded flame propagation in the combustion vessel while the pressure history was measured by a transducer to indicate corresponding changes in heat release rate and the temperature development was measured by a thermocouple During the microgravity experiments the vessel was located inside a drop tower assembly The experimental data were compared with similar experiments conducted under normal gravity The flame characteristics were investigated for mixture concentrations between 6 5 C 3 H 8 and 9 2 C 3 H 8 Reliable data related to laminar burning velocity and flame thickness were obtained Some new details of the flame propagation near rich flammability limits were deduced Comparative experiments revealed the influence of gravity on combustion processes of rich propane-air

  17. Growth and Characteristics of Bulk Single Crystals Grown from Solution on Earth and in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, A. K.; Lal, R. B.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of crystals has been of interest to physicists and engineers for a long time because of their unique properties. Single crystals are utilized in such diverse applications as pharmaceuticals, computers, infrared detectors, frequency measurements, piezoelectric devices, a variety of high technology devices and sensors. Solution crystal growth is one of the important techniques to grow a variety of crystals when the material decomposes at the melting point and a suitable solvent is available to make a saturated solution at a desired temperature. In this chapter an attempt is made to give some fundamentals of growing crystals from solution including improved designs of various crystallizers. Since the same solution crystal growth technique could not be used in microgravity, authors had proposed a new cooled sting technique to grow crystals in space. Authors? experiences of conducting two space shuttle experiments relating to solution crystal growth are also detailed in this work. The complexity of these solution growth experiments to grow crystals in space are discussed. These happen to be some of the early experiments performed in space, and various lessons learned are described. A brief discussion of protein crystal growth that also shares basic principles of solution growth technique is given along with some flight hardware information for its growth in microgravity.

  18. Department of Physics, Nara Women's University, Nara 630, Japan: Learning from stochastic rules under finite temperature - optimal temperature and asymptotic learning curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezu, Tatsuya

    1997-11-01

    In learning under external disturbance, it is expected that some tolerance in the system will optimize the learning process. In this paper, we give one example of this in learning from stochastic rules by the Gibbs algorithm. Using the replica method, we show that for the case of output noise, there exists an optimal temperature at which the generalization error is a minimum. This temperature exists even in the limit of large training sets and is determined by the stable replica symmetric solution. On the other hand, for other types of noise no such temperature exists and the asymptotic behaviour is determined by the one-step replica symmetric breaking solution. Further, the asymptotic expressions for learning curves are derived. They are precisely the same as those for the minimum-error algorithm.

  19. Investigation of the Influence of Microgravity on Transport Mechanisms in a Virtual Spaceflight Chamber: A Ground Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolinger, James D.; Rangel, Roger; Witherow, William; Rogers, Jan; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1999-01-01

    In January 1992, the IML-1 FES experiment produced a set of classic experimental data and a 40 hour holographic "movie" of an ensemble of spheres in a fluid in microgravity. Because the data are in the form of holograms, we can study the three-dimensional distribution of particles with unprecedented detail by a variety of methods and for a wide variety of interests. The possession of the holographic movie is tantamount to having a complex experiment in space while working in an easily accessible laboratory on earth. The movie contains a vast amount of useful data, including residual g, g-jitter, convection and transport data, and particle fluid interaction data. The information content in the movie is so great that we have scarcely begun to tap into the data that is actually available in the more than 1000 holograms, each containing as much as 1000 megabytes of information. This ground-based project is exploiting this data and the concept of holographic storage of spaceflight data to provide an understanding of the effects of microgravity in materials processing. This paper provides the foundation, objectives, and status of the ground based project. The primary objective of this project is to advance the understanding of microgravity effects on crystal growth, convection in materials processing in the space environment, and complex transport phenomena at low Reynolds numbers. This objective is being achieved both experimentally and theoretically. Experiments are making use of existing holographic data recorded during the IML- I spaceflight. A parallel theoretical effort is providing the models for understanding the particle fields and their physics in the microgravity environment.

  20. Micro-gravity Isolation using only Electro-magnetic Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, D.; Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the design, construction and test of a free floating micro-gravity isolation platform to reduce the acceleration dose on zero gravity experiments on e.g. the International Space Station (ISS) is discussed. During the project a system is specified and constructed whereupon it is test...

  1. Microgravity: A Teacher's Guide with Activities. Secondary Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L., Ed.; Wargo, Michael J., Ed.

    A microgravity environment is one that will impart to an object a net acceleration that is small compared with that produced by Earth at its surface. In practice, such acceleration will range from about one percent of Earth's gravitational acceleration to better than one part in a million. this teacher's guide presents an introduction to…

  2. Calcium dependent current recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Simon L.; Roesch, Christian; Ille, Fabian; Egli, Marcel

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical unloading by microgravity (or weightlessness) conditions triggers profound adaptation processes at the cellular and organ levels. Among other mechanisms, mechanosensitive ion channels are thought to play a key role in allowing cells to transduce mechanical forces. Previous experiments performed under microgravity have shown that gravity affects the gating properties of ion channels. Here, a method is described to record a calcium-dependent current in native Xenopus laevis oocytes under microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight. A 3-voltage-step protocol was applied to provoke a calcium-dependent current. This current increased with extracellular calcium concentration and could be reduced by applying extracellular gadolinium. The custom-made ;OoClamp; hardware was validated by comparing the results of the 3-voltage-step protocol to results obtained with a well-established two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC). In the context of the 2nd Swiss Parabolic Flight Campaign, we tested the OoClamp and the method. The setup and experiment protocol worked well in parabolic flight. A tendency that the calcium-dependent current was smaller under microgravity than under 1 g condition could be observed. However, a conclusive statement was not possible due to the small size of the data base that could be gathered.

  3. Orbital and Intracranial Effects of Microgravity: 3T MRI Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, L. A.; Sargsyan, A.; Hasan, K. M.; Polk, J. D.; Hamilton, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    Goals and Objectives of this presentation are: 1. To briefly describe a newly discovered clinical entity related to space flight. 2. To describe normal anatomy and pathologic changes of the optic nerve, posterior globe, optic nerve sheath and pituitary gland related to exposure to microgravity. 3. To correlate imaging findings with known signs of intracranial hypertension.

  4. Centrifuges for Microgravity Simulation. The Reduced Gravity Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, Jack J. W. A. van

    2016-01-01

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the end of the nineteenth century. Since then, the fast rotating clinostat, the 3D clinostat or the random positioning machine, the rotating wall vessels, tail suspension and bed rest head down tilt and lately the levitating magnets have been introduced. Several of these simulation systems provide some similarities of the responses and phenotypes as seen in real microgravity experiments. However, one should always realize that we cannot reduce gravity on Earth, other than the relative short duration free fall studies in e.g., drop towers or parabolic aircraft. In this paper we want to explore the possibility to apply centrifuges to simulate microgravity or maybe better to simulate hypo-gravity. This Reduced Gravity Paradigm, RGP is based on the premise that adaptations seen going from a hypergravity level to a lower gravity are similar as changes seen going from unit gravity to microgravity.

  5. The Development of Vestibular Connections in Rat Embryos in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Laura L.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    1997-01-01

    Existing experimental embryological data suggests that the vestibular system initially develops in a very rigid and genetically controlled manner. Nevertheless, gravity appears to be a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system that monitors position with respect to gravity (saccule and utricle). In fact several studies have shown that prenatal exposure to microgravity causes temporary deficits in gravity-dependent righting behaviors, and prolonged exposure to hypergravity from conception to weaning causes permanent deficits in gravity-dependent righting behaviors. Data on hypergravity and microgravity exposure suggest some changes in the otolith formation during development, in particular the size although these changes may actually vary with the species involved. In adults exposed to microgravity there is a change in the synaptic density in the otic sensory epithelia suggesting that some adaptation may occur there. However, effects have also been reported in the brainstem. Several studies have shown synaptic changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus and in the nodulus of the cerebellum after neonatal exposure to hypergravity. We report here that synaptogenesis in the medial vestibular nucleus is retarded in developing rat embryos that were exposed to microgravity from gestation days 9 to 19.

  6. MARANGONI CONVECTION AROUND A VENTILATED AIR BUBBLE UNDER MICROGRAVITY CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEFSLOOT, HCJ; JANSSEN, LPBM; HOOGSTRATEN, HW

    Under microgravity conditions in both parabolic and sounding rocket flights, the mass-transfer-induced Marangoni convection around an air bubble was studied. To prevent the bubble from becoming saturated, the bubble was ventilated. It turned out that the flow rate of the air through the bubble

  7. Centrifuges for microgravity simulation. The reduced gravity paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, J.J.W.A.

    Due to the cumbersome nature of performing real microgravity—spaceflight research scientists have been searching for alternatives to perform simulated microgravity or partial gravity experiments on Earth. For more than a century one uses the slow rotating clinostat as developed by von Sachs at the

  8. Stress, and pathogen response gene expression in modeled microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Immune suppression in microgravity has been well documented. With the advent of human exploration and long-term space travel, the immune system of the astronaut must be optimally maintained. It is important to investigate the expression patterns of cytokine genes, because they are directly related to immune response. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also called stress proteins, are a group of proteins that are present in the cells of every life form. These proteins are induced when a cell responds to stressors such as heat, cold and oxygen deprivation. Microgravity is another stressor that may regulate HSPs. Heat shock proteins trigger immune response through activities that occur both inside the cell (intracellular) and outside the cell (extracellular). Knowledge about these two gene groups could lead to establishment of a blueprint of the immune response and adaptation-related genes in the microgravity environment. Methods: Human peripheral blood cells were cultured in 1g (T flask) and modeled microgravity (MMG, rotating-wall vessel) for 24 and 72 hours. Cell samples were collected and subjected to gene array analysis using the Affymetrix HG_U95 array. Data was collected and subjected to a two-way analysis of variance. The genes related to immune and stress responses were analyzed. Results and Conclusions: HSP70 was up-regulated by more than two fold in microgravity culture, while HSP90 was significantly down-regulated. HSP70 is not typically expressed in all kinds of cells, but it is expressed at high levels in stress conditions. HSP70 participates in translation, protein translocation, proteolysis and protein folding, suppressing aggregation and reactivating denatured proteins. Increased serum HSP70 levels correlate with a better outcome for heat-stroke or severe trauma patients. At the same time, elevated serum levels of HSP70 have been detected in patients with peripheral or renal vascular disease. HSP90 has been identified in the cytosol, nucleus and

  9. Microgravity induced changes in the control of motor units

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, C.; Roy, S.

    The goal of this project is to understand the effects of microgravity on the control of muscles. It is motivated by the notion that in order to adequately address microgravity-induced deterioration in the force generating capacity of muscles, one needs to understand the changes in the control aspects in addition to histochemical and morphological changes. The investigations into muscle control need to include the regulation of the firing activity of motor units that make up a muscle and the coordination of different muscles responsible for the control of a joint. In order to understand the effects of microgravity on these two aspects of muscle control, we will test astronauts before and after spaceflight. The investigations of the control of motor units will involve intramuscular EMG techniques developed in our laboratory. We will use a quadrifilar electrode to detect simultaneously three differential channels of EMG activity. These data will be decomposed accurately using a sophisticated set of algorithms constructed with artificial intelligence knowledge- based techniques. Particular attention will be paid to the firing rate and recruitment behavior of motor units and we will study the degree of cross-correlation of the firing rates. This approach will enable us to study the firing behavior of several (approx. 10) concurrently active motor units. This analysis will enable us to detect modifications in the control of motor units. We will perform these investigations in a hand muscle, which continues being used in prehensile tasks in space, and a leg muscle whose antigravity role is not needed in space. The comparison of the effects of weightlessness on these muscles will determine if continued use of muscles in space deters the possible deleterious effects of microgravity on the control of motor units, in addition to slowing down atrophy. We are particularly interested in comparing the results of this study to similar data already obtained from elderly subjects

  10. Cellular and molecular aspects of plant adaptation to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla

    2016-07-01

    Elucidation of the range and mechanisms of the biological effects of microgravity is one of the urgent fundamental tasks of space and gravitational biology. The absence of forbidding on plant growth and development in orbital flight allows studying different aspects of plant adaptation to this factor that is directly connected with development of the technologies of bioregenerative life-support systems. Microgravity belongs to the environmental factors which cause adaptive reactions at the cellular and molecular levels in the range of physiological responses in the framework of genetically determined program of ontogenesis. It is known that cells of a multicellular organism not only take part in reactions of the organism but also carry out processes that maintain their integrity. In light of these principles, the problem of identification of biochemical, physiological and structural patterns that can have adaptive significance at the cellular and molecular levels in real and simulated microgravity is considered. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in the cell organelle functional load. The maintenance of the plasmalemma fluidity at the certain level, an activation of both the antioxidant system and expression of HSP genes, especially HSP70, under increasing reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation intensity and alteration in protein homeostasis, are a strategic paradigm of rapid (primary) cell adaptation to microgravity. In this sense, biological membranes, especially plasmalemma, and their properties and functions may be considered as the most sensitive indicators of the influence of gravity or altered gravity on a cell. The plasmalemma lipid bilayer is a border between the cell internal content and environment, so it is a mediator

  11. Microgravity Science Experiment of Marangoni Convection occurred in Larger Liquid Bridge on KIBO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Yoda, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tetsuo

    Marangoni convection is a fluid motion induced by local variations of surface tension along a free surface which is caused by temperature and/or concentration differences. Marangoni convection plays important roll in such applications as crystal growth from melt, welding, con-tainerless material processing, and so on. One of the promising techniques to grow a high quality crystal is a floating-zone method which exists cylindrical melting part at heated region. This liquid part like a column is sustained between solid rods and it has free surface on the side. For investigation of Marangoni convection, a liquid bridge configuration with heated top and cooled bottom is often employed to simplify phenomena. Much work has been performed on Marangoni convection in the past, both experimentally and theoretically. Most of the ex-perimental investigations were conducted in normal gravity but some results from microgravity experiments are now available. However, problems to be solved are still remained in scientific view point. The effect of liquid bridge size on critical Marangoni number to determine the onset of oscillatory flow is one of important subjects. To investigate size effect, the experiment with changing wide range of diameter is needed. Under terrestrial conditions, large size of liquid bridge enhances to induce buoyancy convection. Much larger liquid bridge is deformed its shape or finally liquid bridge could not keep between disks because of its self-weight. So, microgravity experiment is required to make clear the size effect and to obtain precise data. We carried out Marangoni experiment under microgravity condition in Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO". A 50 mm diameter liquid bridge was formed and temperature difference between supporting rods was imposed to induce thermocapillary flow. Convective motion was observed in detail using several cameras, infrared camera and temperature sensors. Silicone oil of 5cSt was employed as a working fluid, which Prandtl

  12. Two-dimensional finite difference model to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise in cold climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Babita; Adlakha, Neeru

    2015-02-01

    Thermoregulation is a complex mechanism regulating heat production within the body (chemical thermoregulation) and heat exchange between the body and the environment (physical thermoregulation) in such a way that the heat exchange is balanced and deep body temperatures are relatively stable. The external heat transfer mechanisms are radiation, conduction, convection and evaporation. The physical activity causes thermal stress and poses challenges for this thermoregulation. In this paper, a model has been developed to study temperature distribution in SST regions of human limbs immediately after physical exercise under cold climate. It is assumed that the subject is doing exercise initially and comes to rest at time t = 0. The human limb is assumed to be of cylindrical shape. The peripheral region of limb is divided into three natural components namely epidermis, dermis and subdermal tissues (SST). Appropriate boundary conditions have been framed based on the physical conditions of the problem. Finite difference has been employed for time, radial and angular variables. The numerical results have been used to obtain temperature profiles in the SST region immediately after continuous exercise for a two-dimensional unsteady state case. The results have been used to analyze the thermal stress in relation to light, moderate and vigorous intensity exercise.

  13. Monitoring the Microgravity Environment Quality On-board the International Space Station Using Soft Computing Techniques. Part 2; Preliminary System Performance Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Kenol; Lin, Paul P.; Weiss, Daniel S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary performance results of the artificial intelligence monitoring system in full operational mode using near real time acceleration data downlinked from the International Space Station. Preliminary microgravity environment characterization analysis result for the International Space Station (Increment-2), using the monitoring system is presented. Also, comparison between the system predicted performance based on ground test data for the US laboratory "Destiny" module and actual on-orbit performance, using measured acceleration data from the U.S. laboratory module of the International Space Station is presented. Finally, preliminary on-orbit disturbance magnitude levels are presented for the Experiment of Physics of Colloids in Space, which are compared with on ground test data. The ground test data for the Experiment of Physics of Colloids in Space were acquired from the Microgravity Emission Laboratory, located at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. The artificial intelligence was developed by the NASA Glenn Principal Investigator Microgravity Services Project to help the principal investigator teams identify the primary vibratory disturbance sources that are active, at any moment of time, on-board the International Space Station, which might impact the microgravity environment their experiments are exposed to. From the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services' web site, the principal investigator teams can monitor via a dynamic graphical display, implemented in Java, in near real time, which event(s) is/are on, such as crew activities, pumps, fans, centrifuges, compressor, crew exercise, structural modes, etc., and decide whether or not to run their experiments, whenever that is an option, based on the acceleration magnitude and frequency sensitivity associated with that experiment. This monitoring system detects primarily the vibratory disturbance sources. The system has built-in capability to detect both known

  14. Study of the factors affecting the karst volume assessment in the Dead Sea sinkhole problem using microgravity field analysis and 3-D modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Eppelbaum

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of sinkholes have appeared in the Dead Sea (DS coastal area in Israel and Jordan during two last decades. The sinkhole development is recently associated with the buried evaporation karst at the depth of 25–50 m from earth's surface caused by the drop of the DS level at the rate of 0.8–1.0 m/yr. Drop in the Dead Sea level has changed hydrogeological conditions in the subsurface and caused surface to collapse. The pre-existing cavern was detected using microgravity mapping in the Nahal Hever South site where seven sinkholes of 1–2 m diameter had been opened. About 5000 gravity stations were observed in the area of 200×200 m2 by the use of Scintrex CG-3M AutoGrav gravimeter. Besides the conventional set of corrections applied in microgravity investigations, a correction for a strong gravity horizontal gradient (DS Transform Zone negative gravity anomaly influence was inserted. As a result, residual gravity anomaly of –(0.08÷0.14 mGal was revealed. The gravity field analysis was supported by resistivity measurements. We applied the Emigma 7.8 gravity software to create the 3-D physical-geological models of the sinkholes development area. The modeling was confirmed by application of the GSFC program developed especially for 3-D combined gravity-magnetic modeling in complicated environments. Computed numerous gravity models verified an effective applicability of the microgravity technology for detection of karst cavities and estimation of their physical-geological parameters. A volume of the karst was approximately estimated as 35 000 m3. The visual analysis of large sinkhole clusters have been forming at the microgravity anomaly site, confirmed the results of microgravity mapping and 3-D modeling.

  15. Changes of decartograms under gravitational acceleration and microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinova, E V; Sakhnova, T A; Kozhemyakina, E S; Vaida, P; Capderou, A; Atkov, O Y; Trunov, V G; Aidu, E A I; Titomir, L I

    2002-01-01

    The Decarto technique was used to study the orthogonal ECGs recorded in 23 subjects during parabolic flights (44 records). A parameter of the instantaneous decartograms, namely the activation area (AA), which is the total area of the depolarization front projection on the image sphere, was analyzed. We compared the values of AA during the periods of horizontal flight, upward parts of all parabolas, and the initial 10 s of microgravity of all parabolas. According to the characteristics of the vectorcardiograms and AA, all subjects were subdivided into 3 groups: with increased electric activity of the right ventricle (I), the left ventricle (II) and both ventricles (III). Changes of AA with change of gravitational levels in these groups showed some differences. In groups I and II, the AA of the initial part of the QRS complex increased during microgravity and decreased during hypergravity. In group III it decreased during microgravity and changed variously during hypergravity. The AA of the middle part of the QRS complex decreased during microgravity and increased during hypergravity, and these changes were more pronounced in group III. The changes of AA in groups I and II may be explained by the Brody effect. In group III, AA seems to be influenced by some additional factors, possibly by changes in the intramyocardial or intraventricular blood volume. The AA of the last part of the QRS complex increased during microgravity and decreased during hypergravity in all groups. This may be explained by an effect of mutual neutralization of depolarization fronts related to the changes of the QRS duration.(Fig. 3, Ref. 4)

  16. Neural readaptation to earth s gravity following exposure to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Highstein, S.; Mensinger, A.

    Vertebrates possess hair cell otolith organs of the inner ear, the utricule and saccule, that transduce inertial force due to head translation and head tilt relative to gravitational vertical, and transform the vector sum of the imposing accelerations into a neural code carried by the afferent nerve fibers. This code is combined in the central vestibular pathways with motion signals obtained from the semicircular canals and other sensory modalities to compute a cent ral representation of the body in space called the gravitoinertial vector. Thus the central nervous system resolves the ambiguity of gravity and self-motion and thereby maintains balance and equilibrium under varying conditions. Exposure to microgravity imposes an extreme condition to which the organism must adapt. Space travelers often experience disorientation during the first few days in microgravity, called Space Adaptation Syndrome. From the earliest manned missions it was evident that adjustments to the microgravity environment in-flight and upon return to Earth's 1g occur. We studied the neural readaptation to Earth's 1g using electrophysiological techniques to measure the response characteristics of utricular nerve afferents in fish upon return from an exposure to microgravity. Following a 9 (STS-95) and 15 (STS-90) day exposure to microgravity aboard two NASA shuttle orbital flights, single afferent recording experiments were conducted in four toadfish, Opsanus tau, to characterize the afferent response properties to gravito inertial accelerations and compare them to- afferent responses of control animals similarly tested. Six recording sessions were made sequentially 10-117 hrs postflight. Afferent responses to translational accelerations and head tilts were detected in the earliest sessions. The most striking result is the occurrence of hypersensitive afferents, having extremely high response sensitivity to minor displacements such as vestibular disorientation in astronauts following return

  17. Dimple coalescence and liquid droplets distributions during phase separation in a pure fluid under microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel A; Hegseth, John J; Garrabos, Yves; Lecoutre-Chabot, Carole; Beysens, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Phase separation has important implications for the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of materials. Weightless conditions prevent buoyancy and sedimentation from affecting the dynamics of phase separation and the morphology of the domains. In our experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was initially heated about 1K above its critical temperature under microgravity conditions and then repeatedly quenched using temperature steps, the last one being of 3.6 mK, until it crossed its critical temperature and phase-separated into gas and liquid domains. Both full view (macroscopic) and microscopic view images of the sample cell unit were analyzed to determine the changes in the distribution of liquid droplet diameters during phase separation. Previously, dimple coalescences were only observed in density-matched binary liquid mixture near its critical point of miscibility. Here we present experimental evidences in support of dimple coalescence between phase-separated liquid droplets in pure, supercritical, fluids under microgravity conditions. Although both liquid mixtures and pure fluids belong to the same universality class, both the mass transport mechanisms and their thermophysical properties are significantly different. In supercritical pure fluids the transport of heat and mass are strongly coupled by the enthalpy of condensation, whereas in liquid mixtures mass transport processes are purely diffusive. The viscosity is also much smaller in pure fluids than in liquid mixtures. For these reasons, there are large differences in the fluctuation relaxation time and hydrodynamics flows that prompted this experimental investigation. We found that the number of droplets increases rapidly during the intermediate stage of phase separation. We also found that above a cutoff diameter of about 100 microns the size distribution of droplets follows a power law with an exponent close to -2, as predicted from phenomenological considerations.

  18. Gas-liquid two-phase flow behaviors and performance characteristics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells in a short-term microgravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hang; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Jian Fu; Ye, Fang; Ma, Chong Fang

    2017-06-01

    In this work, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with transparent windows are designed to study the gas-liquid two-phase flow behaviors inside flow channels and the performance of a PEMFC with vertical channels and a PEMFC with horizontal channels in a normal gravity environment and a 3.6 s short-term microgravity environment. Experiments are conducted under high external circuit load and low external circuit load at low temperature where is 35 °C. The results of the present experimental work demonstrate that the performance and the gas-liquid two-phase flow behaviors of the PEMFC with vertical channels exhibits obvious changes when the PEMFCs enter the 3.6 s short-term microgravity environment from the normal gravity environment. Meanwhile, the performance of the PEMFC with vertical channels increases after the PEMFC enters the 3.6 s short-term microgravity environment under high external circuit load, while under low external circuit load, the PEMFC with horizontal channels exhibits better performance in both the normal gravity environment and the 3.6 s short-term microgravity environment.

  19. Bubble Dynamics, Two-Phase Flow, and Boiling Heat Transfer in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains two independent sections. Part one is titled "Terrestrial and Microgravity Pool Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical heat flux phenomenon in an acoustic standing wave." Terrestrial and microgravity pool boiling heat transfer experiments were performed in the presence of a standing acoustic wave from a platinum wire resistance heater using degassed FC-72 Fluorinert liquid. The sound wave was created by driving a half wavelength resonator at a frequency of 10.15 kHz. Microgravity conditions were created using the 2.1 second drop tower on the campus of Washington State University. Burnout of the heater wire, often encountered with heat flux controlled systems, was avoided by using a constant temperature controller to regulate the heater wire temperature. The amplitude of the acoustic standing wave was increased from 28 kPa to over 70 kPa and these pressure measurements were made using a hydrophone fabricated with a small piezoelectric ceramic. Cavitation incurred during experiments at higher acoustic amplitudes contributed to the vapor bubble dynamics and heat transfer. The heater wire was positioned at three different locations within the acoustic field: the acoustic node, antinode, and halfway between these locations. Complete boiling curves are presented to show how the applied acoustic field enhanced boiling heat transfer and increased critical heat flux in microgravity and terrestrial environments. Video images provide information on the interaction between the vapor bubbles and the acoustic field. Part two is titled, "Design and qualification of a microscale heater array for use in boiling heat transfer." This part is summarized herein. Boiling heat transfer is an efficient means of heat transfer because a large amount of heat can be removed from a surface using a relatively small temperature difference between the surface and the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms that govern boiling heat transfer are not well understood. Measurements of

  20. Influences of Temperature on the Conversion of Ammonium Tungstate Pentahydrate to Tungsten Oxide Particles with Controllable Sizes, Crystallinities, and Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Bayu Dani Nandiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate influences of temperature on the conversion of ammonium tungstate pentahydrate (ATP powder to tungsten trioxide (WO3 particles with controllable sizes, crystallinities, and physicochemical properties. In this study, we used a simple thermal decomposition method. In the experimental procedure, we explored the effect of temperature on the physicochemical properties of ATP by testing various heating temperatures (from 100 to 900 °C. The heated ATP samples were then characterized by a physical observation (i.e. color and various analysis methods (i.e. a thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that increases in temperature had an impact to the decreases in particle size, the change in material crystallinity, and the change in physical properties (e.g. change of color from white, orange, to yellowish green. The relationships between the reaction temperatures and the physicochemical properties of the ATP were also investigated in detail along with the theoretical consideration and the proposal of the WO3 particle formation mechanism. In simplification, the phenomena can be described into three zones of temperatures. (1 Below 250 °C (release of water molecules and some ammonium ions.; (2 At 250-400 °C (release of water molecules and ammonium ions, restructurization of tungsten and oxygen elements, and formation of amorphous tungsten trioxide. (3 At higher than 400 °C (crystallization of tungsten trioxide. Since ATP possessed reactivity on temperature, its physicochemical properties changing could be observed easily, and the experimental procedure could be done easily. The present study will benefit not only for “chemistry and material science” but also potentially to be used as a model material for explaining the thermal behavior of material to undergraduate students (suitable

  1. Particle aggregation in microgravity: Informal experiments on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stanley G.; Pettit, Donald R.; Messenger, Scott R.

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments in space to investigate the aggregation of millimeter- and submillimeter-sized particles in microgravity, an important early step in planet formation. Particulate materials included salt (NaCl), sugar (sucrose), coffee, mica, ice, Bjurböle chondrules, ordinary and carbonaceous chondrite meteorite fragments, and acrylic and glass beads, all triply confined in clear plastic containers. Angular submillimeter particles rapidly and spontaneously formed clusters strong enough to survive turbulence in a protoplanetary nebula. Smaller particles generally aggregated more strongly and quickly than larger ones. We observed only a weak dependence of aggregation time on particle number density. We observed no strong dependence on composition. Round, smooth particles aggregated weakly or not at all. In a mixture of particle types, some phases aggregated more readily than others, creating selection effects that controlled the composition of the growing clumps. The physical process of aggregation appears to be electrostatic in nature.

  2. Measurement of contact angles in a simulated microgravity environment generated by a large gradient magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Ming; Chen, Rui-Qing; Wu, Zi-Qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Jian-Yu; Lu, Hui-Meng; Shang, Peng; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-09-01

    The contact angle is an important parameter that is essential for studying interfacial phenomena. The contact angle can be measured using commercially available instruments. However, these well-developed instruments may not function or may be unsuitable for use in some special environments. A simulated microgravity generated by a large gradient magnetic field is such an environment in which the current measurement instruments cannot be installed. To measure the contact angle in this environment, new tools must be designed and manufactured to be compatible with the size and physical environment. In this study, we report the development and construction of a new setup that was specifically designed for use in a strong magnetic field to measure the contact angle between a levitated droplet and a solid surface. The application of the setup in a large gradient magnetic field was tested, and the contact angles were readily measured.

  3. Psychophysiology in microgravity and the role of exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. M.; Hackney, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Transportation-Shuttle (STS) Program has greatly expanded our capabilities in space by allowing for missions to be flown more frequently, less expensively, and to encompass a greater range of goals than ever before. However, the scope of the United State's role and involvement in space is currently at the edge of a new and exciting era. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has plans for placing an orbiting space station (Space Station Freedom) into operation before the year 2000. Space Station Freedom promises to redefine the extent of our involvement in space even further than the STS program. Space Station crewmembers will be expected to spend extended periods of time (approximately 30 to 180 days) in space exposed to an extremely diverse and adverse environment (e.g., the major adversity being the chronic microgravity condition). Consequently, the detrimental effects of exposure to the microgravity environment is of primary importance to the biomedical community responsible for the health and well-being of the crewmembers. Space flight and microgravity exposure present a unique set of stressors for the crewmember; weightlessness, danger, isolation/confinement, irregular work-rest cycles, separation from family/friends, and mission/ground crew interrelationships. A great deal is beginning to be known about the physiological changes associated with microgravity exposure, however, limited objective psychological findings exist. Examination of this latter area will become of critical concern as NASA prepares to place crewmembers on the longer space missions that will be required on Space Station Freedom. Psychological factors, such as interpersonal relations will become increasingly important issues, especially as crews become more heterogeneous in the way of experience, professional background, and assigned duties. In an attempt to minimize the detrimental physiological effects of prolonged space flight and microgravity exposure, the

  4. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  5. Effect of RF power and substrate temperature on physical properties of Zr0.8Sn0.2TiO4 films by RF magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu Cheng-Shing; Huang Cheng-Liang

    2001-01-01

    Physical properties of rf-sputtered crystalline (Zr 0.8 Sn 0.2 )TiO 4 (ZST) thin films deposited on n-type Si(100) substrates at different rf powers and substrate temperatures have been investigated. The structural and morphological characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were found to be sensitive to deposition conditions, such as rf power from 300 W to 400 W and substrate temperature (400degC, 450degC). Highly oriented ZST (111) and (002) perpendicular to the substrate surface were identified at a rf power of 400 W and a substrate temperature of 450degC. The selected-area diffraction pattern showed that the deposited films exhibited a polycrystalline microstructure. The grain size as well as the deposition rate of the film increased with the increase in both the rf power and the substrate temperature. The leakage current decreased with increasing rf power and substrate temperature. As rf power = 400 W and substrate temperature = 450degC, a leakage current of 7.2x10 -11 A was obtained at 1 V. (author)

  6. Effect of sintering temperature on physical, structural and optical properties of wollastonite based glass-ceramic derived from waste soda lime silica glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Amer Almasri

    Full Text Available The impact of different sintering temperatures on physical, optical and structural properties of wollastonite (CaSiO3 based glass-ceramics were investigated for its potential application as a building material. Wollastonite based glass-ceramics was provided by a conventional melt-quenching method and followed by a controlled sintering process. In this work, soda lime silica glass waste was utilized as a source of silicon. The chemical composition and physical properties of glass were characterized by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF and Archimedes principle. The Archimedes measurement results show that the density increased with the increasing of sintering temperature. The generation of CaSiO3, morphology, size and crystal phase with increasing the heat-treatment temperature were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Fourier transforms infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The average calculated crystal size gained from XRD was found to be in the range 60 nm. The FESEM results show a uniform distribution of particles and the morphology of the wollastonite crystal is in relict shapes. The appearance of CaO, SiO2, and Ca-O-Si bands disclosed from FTIR which showed the formation of CaSiO3 crystal phase. In addition to the calculation of the energy band gap which found to be increased with increasing sintering temperature. Keywords: Soda lime silica glass, Wollastonite, Sintering, Structural properties, Optical properties

  7. Effect of sintering temperature on physical, structural and optical properties of wollastonite based glass-ceramic derived from waste soda lime silica glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Karima Amer; Sidek, Hj. Ab Aziz; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    The impact of different sintering temperatures on physical, optical and structural properties of wollastonite (CaSiO3) based glass-ceramics were investigated for its potential application as a building material. Wollastonite based glass-ceramics was provided by a conventional melt-quenching method and followed by a controlled sintering process. In this work, soda lime silica glass waste was utilized as a source of silicon. The chemical composition and physical properties of glass were characterized by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Archimedes principle. The Archimedes measurement results show that the density increased with the increasing of sintering temperature. The generation of CaSiO3, morphology, size and crystal phase with increasing the heat-treatment temperature were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transforms infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The average calculated crystal size gained from XRD was found to be in the range 60 nm. The FESEM results show a uniform distribution of particles and the morphology of the wollastonite crystal is in relict shapes. The appearance of CaO, SiO2, and Ca-O-Si bands disclosed from FTIR which showed the formation of CaSiO3 crystal phase. In addition to the calculation of the energy band gap which found to be increased with increasing sintering temperature.

  8. Investigations of physical processes affecting leaf temperature profiles and primary production in the red mangrove ecosystem. Modification 8 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.C.

    Profiles of carbon dioxide, air temperature, and vapor density were measured in a red mangrove canopy in south Florida. Results indicated that the microclimate model will predict profiles of air temperature within 2/sup 0/C, humidity within 1 g m/sup -3/, and CO/sub 2/ levels within 1 ppM through the vegetation canopy. Simulations of mangrove response to thermal additions indicate that in the subtropical climate photosynthesis is increased in winter and decreased in summer by thermal additions, but in tropical climates photosynthesis is decreased throughout the year. Studies on seedlings of South Florida mangroves, Rhizophora mangle, Avicennia germinans, and Laguncularia racemosa, indicated that short-term effects of higher root temperatures cause less water stress than cooler root temperature. (HLW)

  9. Temperature imaging with speed of ultrasonic transmission tomography for medical treatment control: A physical model-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhe-Qi; Yuan, Jie; Stephen, Z. Pinter; Oliver, D. Kripfgans; Wang, Xue-Ding; Paul, L. Carson; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    Hyperthermia is a promising method to enhance chemo and radiation therapy of breast cancer. In the process of hyperthermia, temperature monitoring is of great importance to assure the effectiveness of treatment. The transmission speed of ultrasound in biomedical tissue changes with temperature. However, when mapping the speed of sound directly to temperature in each pixel as desired for using all speeds of ultrasound data, temperature bipolar edge enhancement artifacts occur near the boundary of two tissues with different speeds of ultrasound. After the analysis of the reasons for causing these artifacts, an optimized method is introduced to rebuild the temperature field image by using the continuity constraint as the judgment criterion. The significant smoothness of the rebuilding image in the transitional area shows that our proposed method can build a more precise temperature image for controlling the medical thermal treatment. Project supported in part by DoD/BCRP Idea Award, BC095397P1, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61201425), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK20131280), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Provincial Higher Education Institutions, China, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of United States (Grant Nos. R01AR060350, R01CA91713, and R01AR055179).

  10. Characterization of physical and viscoelastic properties of polymer films for coating applications under different temperature of drying and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, G; Jansen, K M B; Wildeboer, W J; van Hee, P; Meesters, G M H

    2010-01-15

    The increasing tendency to enhance consumer products with added functionality is leading to ever more complex products. Nowadays more and more particulate products are coated to give the product specific functionalities. An appropriate approach is needed to be able to satisfy customer's requirements. In this work, three reference well-known coating agents, namely two grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and one polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were selected and investigated. Aqueous solutions of such polymers were obtained and viscosity and shear stress were measured function of shear rate, temperature and polymer concentration. The viscosities of the solutions appear to be mainly shear rate independent, they clearly show Newtonian behaviour. Drying and storage conditions influence on morphology and structure of the cast films were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) experiments were carried out on HPMC and PVA cast films to assess the viscoelastic properties over wide temperature-frequency range. The time-temperature superposition principle was used to determine the shift factor, aT, and to compose a master curve. Magnitudes and profiles of storage modulus, E', loss modulus, E'', and tan delta master curves are discussed with relation to drying and storage conditions. No impact of drying temperature on the polymer properties was observed whereas the effect of storage temperature resulted to be relevant in terms of shifts in glass transition temperature and, only partially, changes in the magnitudes of E' and E''.

  11. Experimental study of physical and rheological properties of grape juice using different temperatures and concentrations. Part II: Merlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castilhos, Maurício Bonatto Machado; Betiol, Lilian Fachin Leonardo; de Carvalho, Gisandro Reis; Telis-Romero, Javier

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the temperature and concentration on rheological behavior of Merlot juice concentrates was assessed using a rheometer over a wide range of temperature (1-66°C) and concentrations (13.6-45.0Brix) at shear rates of 0.84-212.1 1/s. The Ostwald-De Waele was the best rheological model fitted the data (R 2 =0.99967 and relative error=7.99%). The consistency levels were significantly reduced with the increase of temperature and increased with the increase of the concentrations, ranging from 0.1766 (13.6Brix at 66°C) to 19.1140Pa·s n (45.0Brix at 1°C). The flow behavior index presented no up or downward pattern when the temperatures were compared. The flow activation energy ranged from 13.95 (45.0Brix) to 24.88KJ/mol (21.0Brix) with a R 2 =0.9822 and 0.9812, respectively. Density and specific heat were influenced by both temperature and concentration; however, thermal conductivity was only influenced by concentration and temperature in two cases (13.6 and 29.0Brix). The data showed the potential use of Merlot juice concentrates as wine chaptalization agent in winemaking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigating the Effect of Impurities on Macromolecule Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Judge, Russell A.; Crawford, Lisa; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.; Sportiello, Michael; Todd, Paul; Bellamy, Henry; Lovelace, Jeff; Cassanto, John M.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) crystals were grown in microgravity and on the ground in the presence of various amounts of a naturally occurring lysozyme dimer impurity. No significant favorable differences in impurity incorporation between microgravity and ground crystal samples were observed. At low impurity concentration the microgravity crystals preferentially incorporated the dimer. The presence of the dimer in the crystallization solutions in microgravity reduced crystal size, increased mosaicity and reduced the signal to noise ratio of the X-ray data. Microgravity samples proved more sensitive to impurity. Accurate indexing of the reflections proved critical to the X-ray analysis. The largest crystals with the best X-ray diffraction properties were grown from pure solution in microgravity.

  13. Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) Flight Configuration Verification and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, William

    2000-01-01

    The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) is a precision spaceflight instrument designed to measure and characterize the microgravity environment existing in the US Lab Module of the International Space Station. Both vibratory and quasi-steady triaxial acceleration data are acquired and provided to an Ethernet data link. The MAMS Double Mid-Deck Locker (DMDL) EXPRESS Rack payload meets all the ISS IDD and ICD interface requirements as discussed in the paper which also presents flight configuration illustrations. The overall MAMS sensor and data acquisition performance and verification data are presented in addition to a discussion of the Command and Data Handling features implemented via the ISS, downlink and the GRC Telescience Center displays.

  14. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  15. Pollination and embryo development in Brassica rapa L. in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Popova, A.; Xiao, Y.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    Plant reproduction under spaceflight conditions has been problematic in the past. In order to determine what aspect of reproductive development is affected by microgravity, we studied pollination and embryo development in Brassica rapa L. during 16 d in microgravity on the space shuttle (STS-87). Brassica is self-incompatible and requires mechanical transfer of pollen. Short-duration access to microgravity during parabolic flights on the KC-135A aircraft was used initially to confirm that equal numbers of pollen grains could be collected and transferred in the absence of gravity. Brassica was grown in the Plant Growth Facility flight hardware as follows. Three chambers each contained six plants that were 13 d old at launch. As these plants flowered, thin colored tape was used to indicate the date of hand pollination, resulting in silique populations aged 8-15 d postpollination at the end of the 16-d mission. The remaining three chambers contained dry seeds that germinated on orbit to produce 14-d-old plants just beginning to flower at the time of landing. Pollen produced by these plants had comparable viability (93%) with that produced in the 2-d-delayed ground control. Matched-age siliques yielded embryos of equivalent developmental stage in the spaceflight and ground control treatments. Carbohydrate and protein storage reserves in the embryos, assessed by cytochemical localization, were also comparable. In the spaceflight material, growth and development by embryos rescued from siliques 15 d after pollination lagged behind the ground controls by 12 d; however, in the subsequent generation, no differences between the two treatments were found. The results demonstrate that while no stage of reproductive development in Brassica is absolutely dependent upon gravity, lower embryo quality may result following development in microgravity.

  16. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  17. Improvement in the quality of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase crystals in a microgravity environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Aritake, Kosuke; Furubayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Mari; Hirota, Erika; Sano, Satoshi; Sato, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuo; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase grown in microgravity show improved quality. Human hematopoietic prostaglandin synthase, one of the better therapeutic target enzymes for allergy and inflammation, was crystallized with 22 inhibitors and in three inhibitor-free conditions in microgravity. Most of the space-grown crystals showed better X-ray diffraction patterns than the terrestrially grown ones, indicating the advantage of a microgravity environment on protein crystallization, especially in the case of this protein

  18. Finite Element Modeling of the Posterior Eye in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Mulugeta, Lealem; Gleason, Rudolph; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity experienced during spaceflight affects astronauts in various ways, including weakened muscles and loss of bone density. Recently, visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome has become a major concern for space missions lasting longer than 30 days. Astronauts suffering from VIIP syndrome have changes in ocular anatomical and visual impairment that persist after returning to earth. It is hypothesized that a cephalad fluid shift in microgravity may increase the intracranial pressure (ICP), which leads to an altered biomechanical environment of the posterior globe and optic nerve sheath (ONS).Currently, there is a lack of knowledge of how elevated ICP may lead to vision impairment and connective tissue changes in VIIP. Our goal was to develop a finite element model to simulate the acute effects of elevated ICP on the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath. We used a finite element (FE) analysis approach to understand the response of the lamina cribrosa and optic nerve to the elevations in ICP thought to occur in microgravity and to identify which tissue components have the greatest impact on strain experienced by optic nerve head tissues.

  19. Autonomous robot for detecting subsurface voids and tunnels using microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stacy S.; Crawford, Nicholas C.; Croft, Leigh Ann; Howard, Michael; Miller, Stephen; Rippy, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    Tunnels have been used to evade security of defensive positions both during times of war and peace for hundreds of years. Tunnels are presently being built under the Mexican Border by drug smugglers and possibly terrorists. Several have been discovered at the border crossing at Nogales near Tucson, Arizona, along with others at other border towns. During this war on terror, tunnels under the Mexican Border pose a significant threat for the security of the United States. It is also possible that terrorists will attempt to tunnel under strategic buildings and possibly discharge explosives. The Center for Cave and Karst Study (CCKS) at Western Kentucky University has a long and successful history of determining the location of caves and subsurface voids using microgravity technology. Currently, the CCKS is developing a remotely controlled robot which will be used to locate voids underground. The robot will be a remotely controlled vehicle that will use microgravity and GPS to accurately detect and measure voids below the surface. It is hoped that this robot will also be used in military applications to locate other types of voids underground such as tunnels and bunkers. It is anticipated that the robot will be able to function up to a mile from the operator. This paper will describe the construction of the robot and the use of microgravity technology to locate subsurface voids with the robot.

  20. 2-D Clinostat for Simulated Microgravity Experiments with Arabidopsis Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xugang; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Schüler, Oliver; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Kircher, Stefan; Lasok, Hanna; Haser, Thomas; Rapp, Katja; Schmidt, Jürgen; Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Aubry-Hivet, Dorothée; Tietz, Olaf; Dovzhenko, Alexander; Palme, Klaus; Ditengou, Franck Anicet

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based simulators of microgravity such as fast rotating 2-D clinostats are valuable tools to study gravity related processes. We describe here a versatile g-value-adjustable 2-D clinostat that is suitable for plant analysis. To avoid seedling adaptation to 1 g after clinorotation, we designed chambers that allow rapid fixation. A detailed protocol for fixation, RNA isolation and the analysis of selected genes is described. Using this clinostat we show that mRNA levels of LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), MIZU-KUSSEI 1 (MIZ1) and microRNA MIR163 are down-regulated in 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana roots after 3 min and 6 min of clinorotation using a maximal reduced g-force of 0.02 g, hence demonstrating that this 2-D clinostat enables the characterization of early transcriptomic events during root response to microgravity. We further show that this 2-D clinostat is able to compensate the action of gravitational force as both gravitropic-dependent statolith sedimentation and subsequent auxin redistribution (monitoring D R5 r e v :: G F P reporter) are abolished when plants are clinorotated. Our results demonstrate that 2-D clinostats equipped with interchangeable growth chambers and tunable rotation velocity are suitable for studying how plants perceive and respond to simulated microgravity.

  1. Mechano-biological Coupling of Cellular Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mian; Wang, Yuren; Zheng, Huiqiong; Shang, Peng; Duan, Enkui; Lü, Dongyuan

    2015-11-01

    Cellular response to microgravity is a basic issue in space biological sciences as well as space physiology and medicine. It is crucial to elucidate the mechano-biological coupling mechanisms of various biological organisms, since, from the principle of adaptability, all species evolved on the earth must possess the structure and function that adapts their living environment. As a basic element of an organism, a cell usually undergoes mechanical and chemical remodeling to sense, transmit, transduce, and respond to the alteration of gravitational signals. In the past decades, new computational platforms and experimental methods/techniques/devices are developed to mimic the biological effects of microgravity environment from the viewpoint of biomechanical approaches. Mechanobiology of plant gravisensing in the responses of statolith movements along the gravity vector and the relevant signal transduction and molecular regulatory mechanisms are investigated at gene, transcription, and protein levels. Mechanotransduction of bone or immune cell responses and stem cell development and tissue histogenesis are elucidated under microgravity. In this review, several important issues are briefly discussed. Future issues on gravisensing and mechanotransducing mechanisms are also proposed for ground-based studies as well as space missions.

  2. Microgravity effects on the legume/Rhizobium symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation is of critical importance to world agriculture and likely will be a critical part of life support systems developed for prolonged missions in space. Bacteroid formation, an essential step in an effective Dutch White Clover/Rhizobium leguminosarum bv trifolii symbiosis, is induced by succinic acid which is produced by the plant and which is bound and incorporated by the bacterium. Aspirin mimics succinate in its role as a bacteroid inducer and measures of aspirin binding mimiced measurements of succinate binding. In normal gravity (1×g), rhizobium bacteria immediately bound relatively high levels of aspirin (or succinate) in a readily reversible manner. Within a few seconds a portion of this initially bound aspirin became irreversibly bound. In the microgravity environment aboard the NASA 930 aircraft, rhizobia did not display the initial reversible binding of succinate, but did display a similar kinetic pattern of irreversible binding, and ultimately bound 32% more succinate (Acta Astronautica 36:129-133, 1995.) In normal gravity succinate treated cells stop dividing and swell to their maximum size (twice the normal cell volume) within a time equivalent to the time required for two normal cell doublings. Swelling in microgravity was tested in FPA and BPM sample holders aboard the space shuttle (USML-1, and STS-54, 57, and 60.) The behavior of cells in the two sample holders was similar, and swelling behavior of cells in microgravity was identical to behavior in normal gravity.

  3. Sleep and vestibular adaptation: implications for function in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J. A.; Stickgold, R.; Pace-Schott, E. F.; Leslie, K. R.

    1998-01-01

    Optimal human performance depends upon integrated sensorimotor and cognitive functions, both of which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to loss of sleep. Under the microgravity conditions of space flight, adaptation of both sensorimotor (especially vestibular) and cognitive functions (especially orientation) must occur quickly--and be maintained--despite any concurrent disruptions of sleep that may be caused by microgravity itself, or by the uncomfortable sleeping conditions of the spacecraft. It is the three-way interaction between sleep quality, general work efficiency, and sensorimotor integration that is the subject of this paper and the focus of new work in our laboratory. To record sleep under field conditions including microgravity, we utilize a novel system called the Nightcap that we have developed and extensively tested on normal and sleep-disordered subjects. To perturb the vestibular system in ground-based studies, we utilize a variety of experimental conditions including optokinetic stimulation and both minifying and reversing goggle paradigms that have been extensively studied in relation to plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Using these techniques we will test the hypothesis that vestibular adaptation both provokes and is enhanced by REM sleep under both ground-based and space conditions. In this paper we describe preliminary results of some of our studies.

  4. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  5. The venture space alliance commercial application of microgravity research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The Venture Space Alliance is a Canadian commercial enterprise formed to develop a successful sustainable business, providing industrial and institutional clients with cost effective timely access to space and microgravity facilities for commercial and scientific benefit. The goal is to offer users a comprehensive and reliable set of products and services from the early stages of research, where access to short duration microgravity such as drop towers, aircraft and sub-orbital rockets is required, to more complex missions requiring free flyers, shuttle or Space Station. The service is designed to relieve the researcher from having to be concerned with the special processes associated with space flight, and to assist in the commercial application of their research through the development of business plans and investment strategy. Much of this research could lead to new and better medicines, high disease tolerant and more prolific agricultural products, new materials and alloys, and improvements in fundamental human health. This paper will describe the commercial successes derived from microgravity research, and the anticipated growth of this segment particularly with the completion of the International Space Station.

  6. Altered baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance during simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Vernikos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Reflex peripheral vasoconstriction induced by activation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in response to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) is a basic mechanism for elevating systemic vascular resistance and defending arterial blood pressure during orthostatically-induced reductions in cardiac filling and output. The sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex response [defined as the slope of the relationship between changes in forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and CVP] and the resultant vasoconstriction are closely and inversely associated with the amount of circulating blood volume. Thus, a high-gain FVR response will be elicited by a hypovolemic state. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in reduced plasma volume. It is therefore reasonable to expect that the FVR response to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading would be accentuated following adaptation to microgravity. Such data could provide better insight about the physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in blood pressure control following spaceflight. We therefore exposed eleven men to 6 degrees head-down bedrest for 7 days and measured specific hemodynamic responses to low levels of the lower body negative pressure to determine if there are alterations in cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulus-FVR reflex response relationship during prolonged exposure to an analog of microgravity.

  7. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: How Gamow calculated the temperature of the background radiation or a few words about the fine art of theoretical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, Artur D.

    1994-08-01

    In a paper published in 1953, i.e., more than a decade before the observational discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation, George Gamow predicted theoretically the temperature of this radiation. He estimated it to be 7 K, which is very close to the subsequently measured value of about 3 K. Gamow found the present temperature of the background radiation on the basis of general formulas of cosmological dynamics. This prediction was in no way related to primordial nucleosynthesis.This circumstance has and is still causing misunderstanding in those cases in which the authors have raised doubts about Gamow's results, although an actual error has never been demonstrated. A detailed analysis makes it possible to understand how Gamow's calculation is possible. The problem lies in the fact that Gamow makes a certain additional implicit assumption which allows him to dispense with information on nucleosynthesis. This assumption is discussed in the context of the state of cosmology in the period from the fifties to the seventies, and of the current status of this branch of science.

  8. Changes in peak oxygen uptake and plasma volume in fit and unfit subjects following exposure to a simulation of microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the magnitude of reduction in plasma volume and work capacity following exposure to simulated microgravity is dependent on the initial level of aerobic fitness, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) was measured in a group of physically fit subjects and compared with VO2peak in a group of relatively unfit subjects before and after 10 days of continuous 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT). Ten fit subjects (40 +/- 2 year) with mean +/- SE VO2peak = 48.9 +/- 1.7 mL kg-1 min-1 were matched for age, height, and lean body weight with 10 unfit subjects (VO2peak = 37.7 +/- 1.6 mL kg-1 min-1). Before and after HDT, plasma, blood, and red cell volumes and body composition were measured and all subjects underwent a graded supine cycle ergometer test to determine VO2peak period needed. Reduced VO2peak in fit subjects (-16.2%) was greater than that of unfit subjects (-6.1%). Similarly, reductions in plasma (-18.3%) and blood volumes (-16.0%) in fit subjects were larger than those of unfit subjects (blood volume = -5.6%; plasma volume = -6.6%). Reduced plasma volume was associated with greater negative body fluid balance during the initial 24 h of HDT in the fit group (912 +/- 154 mL) compared with unfit subjects (453 +/- 200 mL). The percentage change for VO2peak correlated with percentage change in plasma volume (r = +0.79). Following exposure to simulated microgravity, fit subjects demonstrated larger reductions in VO2peak than unfit subjects which was associated with larger reductions in plasma and blood volume. These data suggest that the magnitude of physical deconditioning induced by exposure to microgravity without intervention of countermeasures was influenced by the initial fitness of the subjects.

  9. Changes in physical and gelling properties of freeze-dried egg white as a result of temperature and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katekhong, Wattinee; Charoenrein, Sanguansri

    2016-10-01

    The quality of dried egg white with respect to functional properties can be affected by storage conditions. The effect of temperature and relative humidity (RH) on changes in colour and gelling properties in freeze-dried egg white (FDEW) during storage was investigated. The glass transition temperature (Tg ) of FDEW decreased with increasing % RH. The colour of FDEW stored at 60 °C was darker yellow than those at 40 and 25 °C, particularly at high % RH. RH had no effect on hardness and water-holding capacity (WHC) of gels made from FDEW stored at 25 °C for 1 week. However, hardness and WHC of gels from FDEW stored at higher temperatures; 40 °C, 48% RH and 60 °C, 11% RH dramatically increased. These results related to the differential scanning calorimeter thermograms which showed a broadening peak with lower enthalpy of protein denaturation. Moreover, the protein's SDS-PAGE pattern in the samples stored at high temperatures or RH levels showed protein aggregation. Storage of FDEW at high temperature and RH levels induced protein conformation changes. These have contributed to protein aggregation which affected the gelling properties of FDEW. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Transcutaneous Noninvasive Device for the Responsive Delivery of Melatonin in Microgravity., Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is develop a smart, transcutaneous device for individualized circadian (sleep) therapy by responsive release of melatonin, in microgravity. Additionally,...

  11. T Cell Activation in Microgravity Compared to 1g (Earth s) Gravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study tested the hypothesis that transcription of immediate early genes is inhibited in T cells activated in microgravity (mg). Immunosuppression during...

  12. Transcutaneous Noninvasive Device for the Responsive Delivery of Melatonin in Microgravity. Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our goal is develop a smart, transcutaneous device for individualized circadian (sleep) therapy by responsive release of melatonin, in microgravity. Additionally,...

  13. Determination of basalt physical and thermal properties at varying temperatures, pressures, and moisture contents. First progress report, fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Bishop, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    This report is a summary of the rock mechanics testing done at the Earth Mechanics Institute of the Colorado School of Mines for Rockwell Hanford Operations under Subcontract SA-917. Cores were supplied from drill hole DC-6 on the Hanford Site, characterized geologically, and tested for thermal and physical properties for designing long-term underground storage of radioactive waste materials. This report presents the approved test procedures, results, and data analysis for this test series. Results indicated thermophysical properties similar to those of previously tested basalt cores from the Hanford area, but showed no significant trends; thus, generalizations are risky at this time. However, density was found to be a good guide to thermal and physical properties--higher density basalt cores showed significant improvements in physical and thermal properties

  14. Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors for true temperature monitoring in Nb$_3$Sn superconducting magnets for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Bajko, M; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Perez, J C; Cusano, A

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) planned at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb$_{3}$Sn technology. The instrumentation required for the racetrack coils needs the development of reliable sensing systems able to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behavior during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation. With this purpose, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet fabricated at CERN. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents for the first time a feasibility study devoted to the implementation of an embedded FBG sensor for the measurement of the "true" temperature in the impregnated Nb$_{3}$Sn coil during the fabrication process. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Inst...

  15. Embedded fiber Bragg grating sensors for true temperature monitoring in Nb$_3$Sn superconducting magnets for high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Bajko, M; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Perez, J C; Cusano, A

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) planned at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) requires the development of a new generation of superconducting magnets based on Nb3Sn technology. The instrumentation required for the racetrack coils needs the development of reliable sensing systems able to monitor the magnet thermo-mechanical behavior during its service life, from the coil fabrication to the magnet operation. With this purpose, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors have been embedded in the coils of the Short Model Coil (SMC) magnet fabricated at CERN. The FBG sensitivity to both temperature and strain required the development of a solution able to separate mechanical and temperature effects. This work presents for the first time a feasibility study devoted to the implementation of an embedded FBG sensor for the measurement of the "true" temperature in the impregnated Nb3Sn coil during the fabrication process. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentatio...

  16. Influence of annealing temperature on physical properties and photocatalytic ability of g-C3N4 nanosheets synthesized through urea polymerization in Ar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai Oanh, Le Thi; Hang, Lam Thi; Lai, Ngoc Diep; Phuong, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Dao Viet; Hung, Nguyen Manh; Danh Bich, Do; Minh, Nguyen Van

    2018-03-01

    The influences of annealing temperature on structure, morphology, vibration, optical properties and photocatalytic ability of g-C3N4 nanosheets synthesized from urea in Ar atmosphere were investigated in detail by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis absorption, and photoluminescence (PL). It was found that the preparation temperature had a great effect on structure and physical properties of g-C3N4. As the processing temperature increased from 450 °C to 650 °C, the interlayer stacking distance of g-C3N4 decreased from 3.281 Å to 3.217 Å and the lattice parameter a decreased from 5.010 Å to 4.934 Å. This indicated a denser packing fashion of g-C3N4 at high annealing temperature. Moreover, the FTIR spectra and SEM images revealed a large fraction of small polymer segments containing only a few heptazine units as annealing temperature increased. BET result indicated an increasing specific surface area as preparation temperature increased. UV-vis absorption spectra showed a decrease of the band gap energy with increasing calcination temperature which agrees well with the measured PL spectra. It was demonstrated that samples annealed at 550 °C exhibited the strongest photocatalytic activity. A decomposition of 80% and 100% of rhodamine B was obtained within respectively 1 h and 2 h under Xenon lamp irradiation. Photocatalytic result could be adequately explained based on evidences of specific surface area, average pore volume and pore size, and recombination rate of photoinduced electron-hole pairs.

  17. Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Petersen, Lonnie G; Howden, Erin J; Sarma, Satyam; Cornwell, William K; Zhang, Rong; Whitworth, Louis A; Williams, Michael A; Levine, Benjamin D

    2017-03-15

    Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not

  18. Effects of Microgravity on the Formation of Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A. J.; Ayers, M. R.; Sibille, L.; Cronise, R. J.; Noever, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes research to investigate fundamental aspects of the effects of microgravity on the formation of the microstructure of metal oxide alcogels and aerogels. We are studying the role of gravity on pore structure and gel uniformity in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on gelling systems under microgravity conditions. While this project was just initiated in May 1998, related research performed earlier is described along with the plans and rationale for the current microgravity investigation to provide background and describe newly developing techniques that should be useful for the current gellation studies. The role of gravity in materials processing must be investigated through the study of well-mastered systems. Sol-gel processed materials are near-perfect candidates to determine the effect of gravity on the formation and growth of random clusters from hierarchies of aggregated units. The processes of hydrolysis, condensation, aggregation and gellation in the formation of alcogels are affected by gravity and therefore provide a rich system to study under microgravity conditions. Supercritical drying of the otherwise unstable wet alcogel preserves the alcogel structure produced during sol-gel processing as aerogel. Supercritically dried aerogel provides for the study of material microstructures without interference from the effects of surface tension, evaporation, and solvent flow. Aerogels are microstructured, low density open-pore solids. They have many unusual properties including: transparency, excellent thermal resistance, high surface area, very low refractive index, a dielectric constant approaching that of air, and extremely low sound velocity. Aerogels are synthesized using sol-gel processing followed by supercritical solvent extraction that leaves the original gel structure virtually intact. These studies will elucidate the effects of microgravity on the homogeneity of the microstructure and porosity of aerogel. The

  19. Effects of fire temperature on the physical and chemical characteristics of the ash from two plots of Cork oak (Quercus Suber)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, X.; Pereira, P.; Outeiro, L.; Martin, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Cork oak, (Quercus suber) is widely distributed in the Mediterranean region, an area subject to frequent fires. The ash produced by burning can have impacts on the soil status and water resources that can differ according to the temperature reached during fire and the characteristics of the litter, defined as the dead organic matter accumulated on the soil surface prior to the fire. The aim of this work is to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of ash produced in laboratory experiments to approximate conditions typical of fires in this region. The litter of Quercus suber collected from two different plots on the Iberian Peninsula, Mas Bassets (Catalonia) and Albufeira (Portugal), was combusted at different temperatures for 2h. We measured Mass Loss (ML per cent), ash colour and CaCO3 content, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC) and the major cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ and Na+) released from ash slurries created by mixing ash with deionized water. The results showed that ML per cent is higher at all temperatures in Albufeira samples compared to Mas Bassets samples, except at 550??C, and the rate of loss increases faster with temperature than the Mas Bassets samples. At 150??C the ash colour is yellowish, becoming reddish at 200- 250??C and black at 300??C. Above 400??C the ash is grey/white. This thermal degradation is mostly observed in Albufeira litter. The formation of CaCO3 was identified at a lower temperature in Albufeira litter. At temperatures ash slurries. The analysis of the Ca:Mg ratio also showed that for the same temperature, a higher severity results for Albufeira litter. Potential negative effects on soil properties are observed at medium and higher temperatures. These negative effects include a higher percentage of mass loss, meaning more soil may be exposed to erosion, higher pH values and greater cation release from ash, especially monovalalent cations (K+,Na+) in higher proportions than the divalent ions (Ca2+, Mg2+), that can lead to

  20. Validity of microgravity simulation models on earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regnard, J; Heer, M; Drummer, C

    2001-01-01

    incomplete knowledge of the characteristics inherent to each model. During water immersion, the hydrostatic pressure lowers the peripheral vascular capacity and causes increased thoracic blood volume and high vascular perfusion. In turn, these changes lead to high urinary flow, low vasomotor tone, and a high...... a negative pressure around the body. The differences in renal function between space and experimental models appear to be explained by the physical forces affecting tissues and hemodynamics as well as by the changes secondary to these forces. These differences may help in selecting experimental models...

  1. The effect of a change in sleep-wakefulness timing, bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskra-Golec, I; Fafrowicz, M; Marek, T; Costa, G; Folkard, S; Foret, J; Kundi, M; Smith, L

    2001-12-01

    Experiments consisting of baseline, bright light and physical exercise studies were carried out to compare the effect of a 9-hour delay in sleep-wakefulness timing, and the effects of bright light and physical exercise interventions on 24-hour patterns of performance, mood and body temperature were examined. Each study comprised a 24-hour constant routine at the beginning followed by 3 night shifts and 24-hour constant routine at the end. Performance on tasks differing in cognitive load, mood and body temperature was measured during each constant routine and the interventions were applied during the night shifts. The 24-hour pattern of alertness and performance on the tasks with low cognitive load in post-treatment conditions followed the change in sleep-wakefulness timing while more cognitively loaded tasks tended to show a reverse trend when compared to pre-treatment conditions. There was a phase delay around 4 hours in circadian rhythms of body temperature in post-treatment conditions.

  2. Physical and photocatalytic properties of laser fabricated crystalline TiO.sub.2./sub. at low temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Remsa, Jan; Jelínek, M.; Kocourek, T.; Mikšovský, J.; Studnička, Václav; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Sváta, V.; Vymětalová, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2010), s. 754-757 ISSN 1454-4164 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : pulsed laser deposition * TiO 2 * contact angle * photocatalytic properties * thin films Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.412, year: 2010

  3. Structure and physical properties of YCoO.sub.3./sub. at temperatures up to 1000 K

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knížek, Karel; Jirák, Zdeněk; Hejtmánek, Jiří; Veverka, Miroslav; Maryško, Miroslav; Hauback, B.C.; Fjellvag, H.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 21 (2006), 214443/1-214443/6 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : neutron diffraction * thermal expansion * cobalt perovskites * magnetic properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.107, year: 2006

  4. Shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites: Determination of the pressure-temperature conditions by shock physics mesoscale modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreau, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Wünnemann, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 11 (2017), s. 2375-2390 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : chondrites * pressure-temperature conditions * astrophysics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  5. Natural convection in square enclosures differentially heated at sides using alumina-water nanofluids with temperature-dependent physical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianfrini Marta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar natural convection of Al2O3 + H2O nanofluids inside square cavities differentially heated at sides is studied numerically. A computational code based on the SIMPLE-C algorithm is used for the solution of the system of the mass, momentum and energy transfer governing equations. Assuming that the nanofluid behaves like a single-phase fluid, these equations are the same as those valid for a pure fluid, provided that the thermophysical properties appearing in them are the nanofluid effective properties. The thermal conductivity and dynamic viscosity of the nanofluid are calculated by means of a couple of empirical equations based on a wide variety of experimental data reported in the literature. The other effective properties are evaluated by the conventional mixing theory. Simulations are performed for different values of the nanoparticle volume fraction in the range 0-0.06, the diameter of the suspended nanoparticles in the range 25-100 nm, the temperature of the cooled sidewall in the range 293-313 K, the temperature of the heated sidewall in the range 298-343 K, and the Rayleigh number of the base fluid in the range 103-107. All computations are executed in the hypothesis of temperature-dependent effective properties. The main result obtained is the existence of an optimal particle loading for maximum heat transfer, that is found to increase as the size of the suspended nanoparticles is decreased, and the nanofluid average temperature is increased.

  6. Experimental study of physical and rheological properties of grape juice using different temperatures and concentrations. Part I: Cabernet Sauvignon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castilhos, Maurício Bonatto Machado; Betiol, Lilian Fachin Leonardo; de Carvalho, Gisandro Reis; Telis-Romero, Javier

    2017-10-01

    The effect of the temperature and concentration on rheological behavior of Cabernet Sauvignon juice concentrates was assessed using a rheometer over a wide range of temperature (1-66°C) and concentrations (13.6-45.0Brix) at shear rates of 0.84-212.1 1/s. The Ostwald-De Waele was the best rheological model fitted the data (R 2 =0.99957 and relative error=7.77%). The Cabernet Sauvignon juice concentrates presented a non-Newtonian pseudoplastic behavior (n<1). The consistency levels were significantly reduced with the increase of temperature and increased with the increase of the concentrations. The flow activation energy ranged from 28.87 (45.0Brix) to 38.05KJ/mol (37.0Brix) with a R 2 =0.9798 for both cases. Density and specific heat were influenced by both temperature and concentration; however, thermal conductivity was only influenced by concentration. The Cabernet Sauvignon juice concentrates will be useful as wine chaptalization agent in future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dewetting and Segregation of Zn-Doped InSb in Microgravity Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrogorsky, A. G.; Marin, C.; Duffar, T.; Volz, M.

    2009-01-01

    In directional solidification, dewetting is characterized by the lack of contact between the crystal and the crucible walls, due to the existence of a liquid meniscus at the level of the solid-liquid interface. This creates a gap of a few tens of micrometers between the crystal and the crucible. One of the immediate consequences of this phenomenon is the dramatic improvement of the quality of the crystal. This improvement is partly due to the modification of the solid-liquid interface curvature and partly to the absence of sticking and spurious nucleation at the crystal-crucible interface. Dewetting has been, commonly observed during the growth of semiconductors in crucibles under microgravity conditions where it appears to be very stable: the gap between the crystal and the crucible remains constant along several centimetres of growth. The physical models of the phenomenon are well established and they predict that dewetting should not occur in microgravity, if sufficient static pressure is imposed on the melt, pushing it towards the crucible. We present the results of InSb(Zn) solidification experiments conducted at the International Space Station (ISS) where, in spite of a spring exerting a pressure on the liquid, partial dewetting did occur. This surprising result is discussed in terms of force exerted .by the spring on the liquid and of possibility that the spring did not work properly. Furthermore, it appears that the segregation of the Zn was not affected by the occurrence of the dewetting. The data suggest that there was no significant interference of convection with segregation of Zn in InSb.

  8. Terrestrial Testing of the CapiBRIC, a Microgravity Optimized Brine Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.; Callahan, Michael R.; Weislogel, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing geometry based static phase separation exhibited in the radial vaned capillary drying tray, a system was conceived to recover water from brine. This technology has been named the Capillary BRIC; abbreviated CapiBRIC. The CapiBRIC utilizes a capillary drying tray within a drying chamber. Water is recovered from clean water vapor evaporating from the free surface leaving waste brine solids behind. A novel approach of optimizing the containment geometry to support passive capillary flow and static phase separation provides the opportunity for a low power system that is not as susceptible to fouling as membranes or other technologies employing physical barriers across the free brine surface to achieve phase separation in microgravity. Having been optimized for operation in microgravity, full-scale testing of the CapiBRIC as designed cannot be performed on the ground as the force of gravity would dominate over the capillary forces. However, subscale units relevant to full-scale design were used to characterize fill rates, containment stability, and interaction with a variable volume reservoir in the PSU Dryden Drop Tower (DDT) facility. PSU also using tested units scaled such that capillary forces dominated in a 1-g environment to characterize evaporation from a free-surface in 1-g upward, sideways and downward orientations. In order to augment the subscale testing performed by PSU, a full scale 1-g analogue of the CapiBRIC drying unit was initiated to help validate performance predictions regarding expected water recovery ratio, estimated processing time, and interface definitions for inlets, outlets, and internal processes, including vent gas composition. This paper describes the design, development and test of the terrestrial CapiBRIC prototypes.

  9. Insects as test systems for assessing the potential role of microgravity in biological development and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernós, I.; Carratalá, M.; González-Jurado, J.; Valverde, J. R.; Calleja, M.; Domingo, A.; Vinós, J.; Cervera, M.; Marco, R.

    Gravity and radiation are undoubtedly the two major environmental factors altered in space. Gravity is a weak force, which creates a permanent potential field acting on the mass of biological systems and their cellular components, strongly reduced in space flights. Developmental systems, particularly at very early stages, provide the larger cellular compartments known, where the effects of alterations in the size of the gravity vector on living organisms can be more effectively tested. The insects, one of the more highly evolved classes of animals in which early development occurs in a syncytial embryo, are systems particularly well suited to test these effects and the specific developmental mechanisms affected. Furthermore, they share some basic features such as small size, short life cycles, relatively high radio-resistance, etc. and show a diversity of developmental strategies and tempos advantageous in experiments of this type in space. Drosophila melanogaster, the current biological paradigm to study development, with so much genetic and evolutionary background available, is clearly the reference organism for these studies. The current evidence on the effects of the physical parameters altered in space flights on insect development indicate a surprising correlation between effects seen on the fast developing and relatively small Drosophila embryo and the more slowly developing and large Carausius morosus system. In relation to the issue of the importance of developmental and environmental constraints in biological evolution, still the missing link in current evolutionary thinking, insects and space facilities for long-term experiments could provide useful experimental settings where to critically assess how development and evolution may be interconnected. Finally, it has to be pointed out that since there are experimental data indicating a possible synergism between microgravity and space radiation, possible effects of space radiation should be taken into

  10. Improving Working Conditions for Astronauts: An Electronic Personal Restraint System for Use in Microgravity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Tait

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While in microgravity, astronauts are preoccupied with physical restraint, which takes attention away from the maintenance task or scientific experiment at hand. This may directly lead to safety concerns and increased time for extravehicular activity, as well as potentially inhibit or corrupt data collection. A primary concern is the time it takes to manipulate the current restraint system. The portable foot restraint currently in use by NASA employs a series of pins in order to engage the system or release in an emergency. This requires considerable time for the user to detach, and there is an increased risk of entanglement. If restraint operating time could be reduced by 50%, the astronaut’s assigned experiment time could be increased an average of 100 minutes per mission. Another problem identified by NASA included the inability of the current system to release the user upon failure. Research and design was conducted following the Six-Sigma DMEDI project architecture, and a new form of restraint to replace the existing system was proposed. The research team first studied the customer requirements and relevant standards set by NASA, and with this information they began drafting designs for a solution. This project utilized electromagnetism to restrain a user in microgravity. The proposed system was capable of being manipulated quickly, failing in a manner that released the user, and being electronically controlled. This active electronic control was a new concept in restraint systems, as it enabled an astronaut to effectively “walk” along a surface while remaining restrained to it. With the design prototype and a limited budget, a rudimentary test assembly was built by the team, and most of NASA’s specifications were met. With recommendations from NASA, the research team concluded by developing potential material and design solutions that can be explored in the future by Purdue University or other parties.

  11. Modulation of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Qiao [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Xu, Wei; Li, Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Li, Huasheng; Lu, Jinying [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Liu, Min [Space Molecular Biological Lab, China Academy of Space Technology, Beijing 100086 (China); Bian, Po [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of microgravity on the radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) were definitely demonstrated. • The effects of microgravity on RIBE might be divergent for different biological events. • The microgravity mainly modified the generation or transport of bystander signals at early stage. - Abstract: Both space radiation and microgravity have been demonstrated to have inevitable impact on living organisms during space flights and should be considered as important factors for estimating the potential health risk for astronauts. Therefore, the question whether radiation effects could be modulated by microgravity is an important aspect in such risk evaluation. Space particles at low dose and fluence rate, directly affect only a fraction of cells in the whole organism, which implement radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) in cellular response to space radiation exposure. The fact that all of the RIBE experiments are carried out in a normal gravity condition bring forward the need for evidence regarding the effect of microgravity on RIBE. In the present study, a two-dimensional rotation clinostat was adopted to demonstrate RIBE in microgravity conditions, in which the RIBE was assayed using an experimental system of root-localized irradiation of Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) plants. The results showed that the modeled microgravity inhibited significantly the RIBE-mediated up-regulation of expression of the AtRAD54 and AtRAD51 genes, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of multicopy P35S:GUS, but made no difference to the induction of homologous recombination by RIBE, showing divergent responses of RIBE to the microgravity conditions. The time course of interaction between the modeled microgravity and RIBE was further investigated, and the results showed that the microgravity mainly modulated the processes of the generation or translocation of the bystander signal(s) in roots.

  12. Electro-physical properties of thin films based on metal-containing polyacrylonitrile for application in low temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenistaya, T. V.; Ivanenko, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The metal-containing (Cu, Co, Ag, Cr) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) thin films were fabricated using IR-pyrolysis under low vacuum conditions in different temperature and time modes. The thickness of the fabricated films was between 0.01÷0.68 μm. The metal-containing PAN films had the resistance values in the range from 2.9·102 to 5.1·1011 Ohm. It has been investigated that the film thickness, resistance and gas sensitivity of the samples depends on the composition of the initial solution and on the process parameters of the film material’s fabrication. It has been studied that the samples demonstrate gas-sensing properties to CO, NO2, Cl2 and gasoline vapours at room temperature.

  13. Transcription profiling of activated human T cells induced by microgravity to identify apoptotic genes and other immune response genes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this study was to search for microgravity-sensitive genes specifically for apoptotic genes influenced by the microgravity environment and other genes...

  14. Biologically relevant physical measurements in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land: soil temperature profiles and ultraviolet radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienow, J. A.; Meyer, M. A.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    As part of the ongoing comprehensive study of the cryptoendolithic microbial community in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land, thermal properties of the soil and the ultraviolet radiation regime were measured. Although soil temperature profiles have been measured in the ice-free valleys (e.g., Cameron et al. 1970; Cameron 1972), these are the first such data from higher elevations. This is apparently the first time the ultraviolet radiation regime has been measured in the Antarctic.

  15. Application of computational methods to analyse and investigate physical and chemical processes of high-temperature mineralizing of condensed substances in gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelov, A. Y.; Shiryaevskii, V. L.; Kudrinskiy, A. A.; Anpilov, S. V.; Bobrakov, A. N.

    2017-11-01

    A computational method of analysis of physical and chemical processes of high-temperature mineralizing of low-level radioactive waste in gas stream in the process of plasma treatment of radioactive waste in shaft furnaces was introduced. It was shown that the thermodynamic simulation method allows fairly adequately describing the changes in the composition of the pyrogas withdrawn from the shaft furnace at different waste treatment regimes. This offers a possibility of developing environmentally and economically viable technologies and small-sized low-cost facilities for plasma treatment of radioactive waste to be applied at currently operating nuclear power plants.

  16. Water activity-temperature state diagrams of freeze-dried Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-5): influence of physical state on bacterial survival during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtmann, Lone; Carlsen, Charlotte U; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Water activity-temperature state diagrams for Lactobacillus acidophilus freeze-dried in a sucrose or a lactose matrix were established based on determination of stabilized glass transition temperatures by differential scanning calorimetry during equilibration with respect to water activity at fixed temperatures. The bacteria in the lactose matrix had higher stabilized glass transition temperatures for all a(w) investigated. The survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus determined as colony forming units for up to 10 weeks of storage at 20 degrees C for (i) a(w) = 0.11 with both freeze-dried matrices in the glassy state, (ii) a(w) = 0.23 with the bacteria in the lactose matrix in a glassy state but with the bacteria in sucrose matrix in the nonglassy state, and (iii) a(w) = 0.43 with both freeze-dried matrices in a nonglassy state showed that the nature of the sugar was more important for storage stability than the physical state of the matrix with the nonreducing sucrose providing better stability than the reducing lactose.

  17. A Review on InGaSb Growth under Microgravity and Terrestrial Conditions Towards Future Crystal Growth Project Using Chinese Recovery Satellite SJ-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianding; Liu, Yan; Pan, Xiuhong; Zhao, Hongyang; Kumar, Velu Nirmal; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Momose, Yoshimi; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro; Zhang, Xingwang; Luo, Xinghong; Okano, Yasuhiro; Inatomi, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    The paper reviewed the previous microgravity experiment using Chinese recovery satellite, the in-situ measurement of composition profile in the solution by X-ray penetration method and homogeneous growth of InGaSb by temperature freezing method under terrestrial condition for making clear the effect of gravity on the growth of InGaSb ternary alloy semiconductor crystals. The previous experimental results showed that the shape of solid/liquid interfaces and composition profile in the solution were significantly affected by gravity. Based on the previous microgravity experimental results, experimental conditions were investigated to grow homogeneous In xGa 1-xSb with higher indium composition at Chinese recovery satellite SJ-10 in near future.

  18. DCCO and SCCO: measurements of diffusion coefficients and of thermodiffusion in microgravity; DCCO et SCCO: mesures de coefficients de diffusion et de thermodiffusion en microgravite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legros, J.C.; Van Vaerenbergh, S.; Dubois, F.; Decroly, Y. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Montel, F. [ELF-Aquitaine Production, 64 - Pau (France); Goodman, S. [C-CORE, New Foundland, (Canada); Bekaert, G. [SABCA, Bruxelles (Belgium); Van Ransbeek, E. [IASB-BIRA, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1996-12-31

    Measurements of diffusion coefficients of ternary systems and of thermodiffusion coefficients of multicomponent systems, including crude oils, have been undertaken by MRC and Elf-Aquitaine. The experiments DCCO and SCCO (respectively Diffusion and Soret Coefficients of Crude Oils) will be performed in 1997 and 1998 in GAS containers on the Space Shuttle. The 9 systems of DCCO are analyzed by Mach-Zehnder bicolor interferometry. The samples of the 18 systems of SCCO, among which three at 300 bars and at a mean temperature of 60 deg. C, will be analyzed after recovery on ground by a chromatographic technique. Such measurements performed in microgravity, like the measurements of Soret coefficients of binary solutions performed in the microgravity SCM experiments, are necessary reference measurements. (authors) 12 refs.

  19. Status of Physics and Safety Analyses for the Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, DT

    2005-12-15

    A study has been completed to develop a new baseline core design for the liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR) that is better optimized for liquid coolant and that satisfies the top-level operational and safety targets, including strong passive safety performance, acceptable fuel cycle parameters, and favorable core reactivity response to coolant voiding. Three organizations participated in the study: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Although the intent was to generate a new reference LS-VHTR core design, the emphasis was on performing parametric studies of the many variables that constitute a design. The results of the parametric studies not only provide the basis for choosing the optimum balance of design options, they also provide a valuable understanding of the fundamental behavior of the core, which will be the basis of future design trade-off studies. A new 2400-MW(t) baseline design was established that consists of a cylindrical, nonannular core cooled by liquid {sup 7}Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) salt. The inlet and outlet coolant temperatures were decreased by 50 C, and the coolant channel diameter was increased to help lower the maximum fuel and vessel temperatures. An 18-month fuel cycle length with 156 GWD/t burnup was achieved with a two-batch shuffling scheme, while maintaining a core power density of 10 MW/m{sup 3} using graphite-coated uranium oxicarbide particle fuel enriched to 15% {sup 235}U and assuming a 25 vol-% packing of the coated particles in the fuel compacts. The revised design appears to have excellent steady-state and transient performance. The previous concern regarding the core's response to coolant voiding has been resolved for the case of Flibe coolant by increasing the coolant channel diameter and the fuel loading. Also, the LSVHTR has a strong decay heat removal performance and appears capable of surviving a loss of forced

  20. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  1. A Physically Motivated and Empirically Calibrated Method to Measure the Effective Temperature, Metallicity, and Ti Abundance of M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyette, Mark J.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Mann, Andrew W.; Brewer, John M.; Allard, France; Homeier, Derek

    2017-12-01

    The ability to perform detailed chemical analysis of Sun-like F-, G-, and K-type stars is a powerful tool with many applications, including studying the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and constraining planet formation theories. Unfortunately, complications in modeling cooler stellar atmospheres hinders similar analyses of M dwarf stars. Empirically calibrated methods to measure M dwarf metallicity from moderate-resolution spectra are currently limited to measuring overall metallicity and rely on astrophysical abundance correlations in stellar populations. We present a new, empirical calibration of synthetic M dwarf spectra that can be used to infer effective temperature, Fe abundance, and Ti abundance. We obtained high-resolution (R ˜ 25,000), Y-band (˜1 μm) spectra of 29 M dwarfs with NIRSPEC on Keck II. Using the PHOENIX stellar atmosphere modeling code (version 15.5), we generated a grid of synthetic spectra covering a range of temperatures, metallicities, and alpha-enhancements. From our observed and synthetic spectra, we measured the equivalent widths of multiple Fe I and Ti I lines and a temperature-sensitive index based on the FeH band head. We used abundances measured from widely separated solar-type companions to empirically calibrate transformations to the observed indices and equivalent widths that force agreement with the models. Our calibration achieves precisions in T eff, [Fe/H], and [Ti/Fe] of 60 K, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, and is calibrated for 3200 K H] < +0.3, and -0.05 < [Ti/Fe] < +0.3. This work is a step toward detailed chemical analysis of M dwarfs at a precision similar to what has been achieved for FGK stars.

  2. Perspectives of experimental and theoretical studies of self-organized dust structures in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V N

    2015-01-01

    We review research aimed at understanding the phenomena occurring in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions. Some aspects of the work already performed are considered that have not previously been given sufficient attention but which are potentially crucial for future work. These aspects, in particular, include the observation of compact dust structures that are estimated to be capable of confining all components of a dust plasma in a bounded spatial volume; experimental evidence of the nonlinear screening of dust particles; and experimental evidence of the excitation of collective electric fields. In theoretical terms, novel collective attraction processes between likely charged dust particles are discussed and all schemes of the shadowy attraction between dust particles used earlier, including in attempts to interpret observations, are reviewed and evaluated. Dust structures are considered from the standpoint of the current self-organization theory. It is emphasized that phase transitions between states of self-organized systems differ significantly from those in homogeneous states and that the phase diagrams should be constructed in terms of the parameters of a self-organized structure and cannot be constructed in terms of the temperature and density or similar parameters of homogeneous structures. Using the existing theoretical approaches to modeling self-organized structures in dust plasmas, the parameter distribution of a structure is recalculated for a simpler model that includes the quasineutrality condition and neglects diffusion. These calculations indicate that under microgravity conditions, any self-organized structure can contain a limited number of dust particles and is finite in size. The maximum possible number of particles in a structure determines the characteristic inter-grain distance in dust crystals that can be created under microgravity conditions. Crystallization criteria for the structures are examined and the quasispherical

  3. Fluid mechanics phenomena in microgravity; ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA, Nov. 8-13, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siginer, Dennis A. (Editor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series of symposia presenting research activity in microgravity fluid mechanics. General topics addressed include two-phase flow and transport phenomena, thermo-capillary flow, and interfacial stability. Papers present mathmatical models of fluid dynamics in the microgravity environment. Applications suggested include space manufacturing and storage of liquids in low gravity.

  4. Simulation of microgravity by magnetic levitation and random positioning: Effect on human A431 cell morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, M.J.A.; Gielen, J.C.; Bleichrodt, R.J.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Christianen, P.C.M.; Boonstra, J.

    2011-01-01

    Simulation of weightlessness is a desired replenishment for research in microgravity since access to space flights is limited. In real microgravity conditions, the human epidermoid cell line A431 exhibits specific changes in the actin cytoskeleton resulting ultimately in the rounding-up of cells.

  5. Facilities for simulation of microgravity in the ESA ground-based facility programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brungs, S.; Egli, M.; Wuest, S.L.; Christianen, P.C.M.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Ahn, T.J.N.; Hemmersbach, R.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the role of gravity in fundamental biological processes and, consequently, the impact of exposure to microgravity conditions provide insight into the basics of the development of life as well as enabling long-term space exploration missions. However, experimentation in real microgravity

  6. Physical, chemical, and temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts and other instruments from GASCOYNE and other platforms in the Pacific Ocean and Mediterranean Sea from 07 November 1959 to 01 July 1972 (NODC Accession 0000095)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, and temperature profile data were collected using bottle casts, plankton net, fluorometer, and meteorological sensors. Data were collected from...

  7. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm

  8. Physical properties of {anisole + n-alkanes} at temperatures between (293.15 and 303.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jimaz, Adel S.; Al-Kandary, Jasem A.; Abdul-latif, Abdul-Haq M.; Al-Zanki, Adnan M.

    2005-01-01

    Density ρ, viscosity η, and refractive index n D , values of {anisole + hexane, or heptane, or octane, or nonane, or decane, or dodecane} binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fraction at temperatures (293.15, 298.15, and 303.15) K, have been investigated at atmospheric pressure. The excess molar volume V E , has been calculated from the experimental measurements. These results were fitted to Redlich and Kister polynomial equation to estimate the binary interaction parameters. The viscosity data were correlated with equations of Grunberg and Nissan, and McAllister. The refractive indices data were used to calculate the specific refractivity R 12 , and also correlated with Lorentz-Lorenz equation. While the excess molar volumes of {anisole + hexane} are negative, and {anisole + heptane} are sigmoidal S-shaped, the remaining binary mixtures are positive. The effects of n-alkanes chain length as well as the temperature on the excess molar volume have been studied. The calculated values have been qualitatively used to explain the intermolecular interaction between the mixing components

  9. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow Characteristics Under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshock, E. G.; Lin, C. S.; Edwards, L. G.; Knapp, J.; Harrison, M. E.; Xhang, X.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the technical approach and initial results of a test program for studying two-phase annular flow under the simulated microgravity conditions of KC-135 aircraft flights. A helical coil flow channel orientation was utilized in order to circumvent the restrictions normally associated with drop tower or aircraft flight tests with respect to two-phase flow, namely spatial restrictions preventing channel lengths of sufficient size to accurately measure pressure drops. Additionally, the helical coil geometry is of interest in itself, considering that operating in a microgravity environment vastly simplifies the two-phase flows occurring in coiled flow channels under 1-g conditions for virtually any orientation. Pressure drop measurements were made across four stainless steel coil test sections, having a range of inside tube diameters (0.95 to 1.9 cm), coil diameters (25 - 50 cm), and length-to-diameter ratios (380 - 720). High-speed video photographic flow observations were made in the transparent straight sections immediately preceding and following the coil test sections. A transparent coil of tygon tubing of 1.9 cm inside diameter was also used to obtain flow visualization information within the coil itself. Initial test data has been obtained from one set of KC-135 flight tests, along with benchmark ground tests. Preliminary results appear to indicate that accurate pressure drop data is obtainable using a helical coil geometry that may be related to straight channel flow behavior. Also, video photographic results appear to indicate that the observed slug-annular flow regime transitions agree quite reasonably with the Dukler microgravity map.

  10. Effect of microgravity on sap flow in plant stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Hirai, Hiroaki; Nobol Ikeda, MR..

    2012-07-01

    A fundamental study was conducted to assess the possibility of plant growth suppression caused by poor movement of air in closed plant growth facilities in space farming. Sap water flow in plant stems, which plays an important role to transport fluid and nutrients from roots to leaves, will be suppressed through suppression of transpiration because of little natural convection of air under microgravity conditions. In this study, the sap flow in tomato stems was examined using a heat flow method at 0.01 and 1.0 g for 20 seconds each during parabolic airplane flights in order to clarify the effect of microgravity on the sap flow in stems. Heat generated with a tiny heater installed in the stem was transferred upstream and downstream by conduction and upstream by the sap flow through xylems of the vascular tissue. The internal heat convection corresponding to the sap flow was analyzed with thermal images captured on stems near heated points. In results, the sap flow in stems at 0.01 g was suppressed under a retarded air condition at a wind speed of 0.1 m s-1 compared with that at 1 g. No suppression of the sap flow was observed under a stirred air condition at a wind speed of 0.5 m s-1. Suppressed sap water flow in stems would be caused by suppression of transpiration in leaves and would cause restriction of water and nutrient uptake in roots. The forced air movement is, therefore, essential to culture healthy plants at a high growth rate under microgravity conditions in space.

  11. Drop Tower Experiments concerning Fluid Management under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulke, Diana; Dreyer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Transport and positioning of liquid under microgravity is done utilizing capillary forces. Therefore, capillary transport processes have to be understood for a wide variety of space applications, ranging from propellant management in tanks of space transportation systems to eating and drinking devices for astronauts. There are two types of liquid transportation in microgravity using capillary forces. First, the driven liquid flow in open channels where the capillary forces at free surfaces ensure a gas and vapor free flow. Here it is important to know the limiting flow rate through such an open channel before the free surface collapses and gas is sucked into the channel. A number of different experiments at the drop tower Bremen, on sounding rockets and at the ISS have been conducted to analyse this phenomenon within different geometries. As result a geometry dependent theory for calculating the maximum flow rate has been found. On the other hand liquid positioning and transportation requires the capillary pressure of curved surfaces to achieve a liquid flow to a desired area. Especially for space applications the weight of structure has to be taken into account for development. For example liquid positioning in tanks can be achieved via a complicated set of structure filling the whole tank resulting in heavy devices not reasonable in space applications. Astrium developed in cooperation with ZARM a propellant management device much smaller than the tank volume and ensuring a gas and vapour free supply of propellant to the propulsion system. In the drop tower Bremen a model of this device was tested concerning different microgravity scenarios. To further decrease weight and ensure functionality within different scenarios structure elements are designed as perforated geometries. Capillary transport between perforated plates has been analyzed concerning the influence of geometrical pattern of perforations. The conducted experiments at the drop tower Bremen show the

  12. Stress and Recovery during Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Michel

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a 60-day head-down tilt long-term bed rest (HDT) on stress and recovery in sixteen healthy female volunteers during the WISE-2005 study (Women International Space Simulation for Exploration). Participants were randomly assigned to either an exercise group (Exe) that followed a training program combining resistive and aerobic exercises, or to a no-exercise control group (Ctl). Psychological states were assessed using the Rest-Q, a validated questionnaire based on stress-recovery responses. A longitudinal analysis revealed significant changes in the general and specific stress scales for all participants throughout the experiment with a critical stage from supine to standing posture leading to a significant decrease in physical recovery. During HDT, Exe reported higher scores in stress subscales, as well as lower recovery scores compared to the Ctl. During the post HDT ambulatory recovery period, the exercisers still reported higher scores than the non-exercisers on the Lack of energy stress related scale, along with lower scores in general well-being and personal accomplishment. The present findings show that simulated weightlessness such as HDT may induce psychological stress and lead to subsequent alterations in perceived recovery. Exercise did not reduce HDT impaired effects on stress and recovery states. In the perspective of spaceflights of long-duration such as the future missions to Mars, there is a need for additional experiments to further investigate spaceflight-induced changes of stress and recovery parameters and the effects of exercise on these parameters. Further studies might determine and analyze the psychological factors involved, but also how to intervene concerning these factors with efficient psychological preparation which, although not yet fully investigated, may reduce stress, promote recovery and support adaptive responses to such extreme environments.

  13. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  14. Physical and thermal waste utilisation in industrial high-temperature processes; Stoffliche und thermische Verwertung von Abfaellen in industriellen Hochtemperaturprozessen. Fachseminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leithner, R. [ed.

    1998-09-01

    This year`s DVV Colloquium, the eleventh of its kind, was dedicated to ``Physical and thermal waste utilisation in industrial high-temperature processes``, a topic of growing importance in our time. The three old principles of Disperse, Bury, and Forget having been found inexpedient, there is now a growing interest in the three new principles of Avoid, Reduce, and Utilise. The colloquium saw a scientific discussion on physical and thermal waste utilisation in high-temperature processes. Proposals were made for the solution of specific problems, and the economic implications and impact of these solutions on products and the environment were elucidated. [Deutsch] Das diesjaehrige 11. DVV-Kolloquium mit dem Thema: `Stoffliche und thermische Verwertung von Abfaellen in industriellen Hochtemperaturprozessen`, behandelt einen Themenkomplex, der immer mehr an Bedeutung gewinnt. Nachdem sich die drei alten Prinzipien Verteilen, Vergraben, Vergessen als unzweckmaessig herausgestellt haben, gewinnen die drei neuen Prinzipien Vermeiden, Vermindern, Verwerten immer groessere Bedeutung. Stoffliche und thermische Verwertung in industriellen Hochtemperaturprozessen werden in diesem Kolloquium wissenschaftlich diskutiert und Loesungsvorschlaege und deren wirtschaftliche Implikationen und deren Auswirkungen auf die Produkte und die Umwelt beleuchtet. (orig.)

  15. Response of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 to low-shear modeled microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Wallace, Sarah; Stahl, Sarah; Voorhies, Alexander; Lorenzi, Hernan; Douglas, Grace L.

    2017-10-01

    The introduction of probiotic microbes into the spaceflight food system has the potential for use as a safe, non-invasive, daily countermeasure to crew microbiome and immune dysregulation. However, the microgravity effects on the stress tolerances and gene expression of probiotic bacteria must be investigated to confirm that benefits of selected strains will still be conveyed under microgravity conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 in a microgravity analog environment. L. acidophilus was cultured anaerobically under modeled microgravity conditions and assessed for differences in growth, survival through stress challenge, and gene expression compared to control cultures. No significant differences were observed between the modeled microgravity and control grown L. acidophilus, suggesting that this strain will behave similarly in spaceflight.

  16. Influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; McClelen, C. E.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps. The influence of microgravity varied with different stages of cellular differentiation. Overall, microgravity tended to 1) increase relative volumes of hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, 2) decrease the relative volumes of plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and the vacuome, and 3) exert no influence on the relative volume of nuclei in cells comprising the root cap. The reduced allocation of dictyosomal volume in peripheral cells of flight-grown seedlings correlated positively with their secretion of significantly less mucilage than peripheral cells of Earth-grown seedlings. These results indicate that 1) microgravity alters the patterns of cellular differentiation and structures of all cell types comprising the root cap, and 2) the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays is organelle specific.

  17. Lung Cancer Stem Cell Lose Their Stemness Default State after Exposure to Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Pisanu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity influences cell differentiation by modifying the morphogenetic field in which stem cells are embedded. Preliminary data showed indeed that stem cells are committed to selective differentiation when exposed to real or simulated microgravity. Our study provides evidence that a similar event occurs when cancer stem cells (CSCs are cultured in microgravity. In the same time, a significant increase in apoptosis was recorded: those data point out that microgravity rescues CSCs from their relative quiescent state, inducing CSCs to lose their stemness features, as documented by the decrease in ALDH and the downregulation of both Nanog and Oct-4 genes. Those traits were stably acquired and preserved by CSCs when cells were placed again on a 1 g field. Studies conducted in microgravity on CSCs may improve our understanding of the fundamental role exerted by biophysical forces in cancer cell growth and function.

  18. Characterizing parameters of Jatropha curcas cell cultures for microgravity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Wagner A.; Pinares, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a tropical perennial species identified as a potential biofuel crop. The oil is of excellent quality and it has been successfully tested as biodiesel and in jet fuel mixes. However, studies on breeding and genetic improvement of jatropha are limited. Space offers a unique environment for experiments aiming at the assessment of mutations and differential gene expression of crops and in vitro cultures of plants are convenient for studies of genetic variation as affected by microgravity. However, before microgravity studies can be successfully performed, pre-flight experiments are necessary to characterize plant material and validate flight hardware environmental conditions. Such preliminary studies set the ground for subsequent spaceflight experiments. The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro growth of cultures from three explant sources (cotyledon, leaf, and stem sections) of three jatropha accessions (Brazil, India, and Tanzania) outside and inside the petriGAP, a modified group activation pack (GAP) flight hardware to fit petri dishes. In vitro jatropha cell cultures were established in petri dishes containing a modified MS medium and maintained in a plant growth chamber at 25 ± 2 °C in the dark. Parameters evaluated were surface area of the explant tissue (A), fresh weight (FW), and dry weight (DW) for a period of 12 weeks. Growth was observed for cultures from all accessions at week 12, including subsequent plantlet regeneration. For all accessions differences in A, FW and DW were observed for inside vs. outside the PetriGAPs. Growth parameters were affected by accession (genotype), explant type, and environment. The type of explant influenced the type of cell growth and subsequent plantlet regeneration capacity. However, overall cell growth showed no abnormalities. The present study demonstrated that jatropha in vitro cell cultures are suitable for growth inside PetriGAPs for a period of 12 weeks. The parameters

  19. [Human body composition during extended stay in microgravity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, V B; Nichiporuk, I A; Vasilieva, G Yu; Smirnov, Yu I

    2015-01-01

    According to the Sprut-2 protocol, bio-impedancemetry of ISS cosmonauts was performed once a month and also before and after mission. Multiple non-invasive body measurements were carried out in 15 cosmonauts in real time. Relocation of extracellular liquid along the body axis led to its reduction in legs and, on the contrary, an increase in the abdomen. Volumes of total body liquid as well as intra- and extracellular liquids decreased in comparison with pre-flight levels. Lean body mass also became less in microgravity, whereas fat mass showed an increase.

  20. Phase transitions in vibrated granular systems in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsomer, E.; Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.

    2011-11-01

    We numerically investigated various dynamical behaviors of a vibrated granular gas in microgravity. Using the parameters of an earlier Mini-Texus 5 experiment, three-dimensional simulations, based on molecular dynamics, efficiently reproduce experimental results. Using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, four dynamical regimes have been distinguished: gaseous state, partial clustering, complete clustering, and bouncing aggregates. Different grain radii and densities have been considered in order to describe a complete (r,η)-phase diagram. The latter exhibits rich features such as phase transitions and triple points. Our work emphasizes the complexity of diluted granular systems and opens fundamental perspectives.