WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature measurement application

  1. Cryogenic temperature measurement for large applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ylöstalo, J; Kyynäräinen, J; Niinikoski, T O; Voutilainen, R

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a resistance thermometry system for the acquisition, control and monitoring of temperature in large-scale cryogenic applications. The resistance of the sensor is converted to a voltage using a self-balancing AC bridge circuit featuring square-wave excitation currents down to 1 nA. The system is easily scalable and includes intelligent features to treat special situations such as magnet quenches differently from normal operation.

  2. Application of digital holography in temperature distribution measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangjun; Li, Yan; Wang, Dayong; Zhao, Jie

    2010-11-01

    A reflection heat source including a radiator as well as an aluminum plate is designed, and the temperature field of the aluminum plate is used as the tested object. The reflection lensless Fourier transform (LFT) digital holography is performed to measure the temperature field distribution. For the comparison, the temperature measurement system within the radiator is used to measure the temperature distributions. The results obtained by these two methods are in good agreement, which demonstrates that the digital holography method is valid for the measurement of the temperature distribution.

  3. Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003400.htm Temperature measurement To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The measurement of body temperature can help detect illness. It can also monitor ...

  4. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, J.M.

    1969-03-01

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Pu δ and Pu ε . E δ 360 deg. C = 1.6 10 11 dy/cm 2 ; E ε 490 deg. C = 1.1 10 11 dy/cm 2 , σ ε = 0.25 ± 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Pu ε . (author) [fr

  5. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  6. Equipment for temperature measurements

    OpenAIRE

    HORELICA, Josef

    2008-01-01

    This work deals with theoretical description, practical connection of temperature measuring instruments and how they function while measuring the temperature. This document explaines basic concepts of temperature, temperature scales and temperature measuring. Further there are introduced standard types of sensors used in these measuring intruments. This document includes a picture presentation in PowerPoint, where an aggregate table of sensors and an application of these sensors in measuring ...

  7. A new and inexpensive temperature-measuring system. Application to photovoltaic solar facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohorquez, Miguel Angel Martinez; Enrique Gomez, Juan Manuel; Andujar Marquez, Jose Manuel [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, de Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, Universidad de Huelva, Carretera Huelva - Palos de la, Frontera S/N, 21819 Huelva (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    This article presents the design, construction and testing of a new and inexpensive digital sensor-based temperature-measuring system, whose principal characteristics are: precision, ease of connection, immunity to noise, remote operation and easy scaling, and all this at a very low cost. This new digital sensor-based measuring system overcomes the traditional problems of digital measuring sensors, offering characteristics similar to Pt100-based measuring systems, and therefore can be used in any installation where reliable temperature measurement is necessary. It is especially suitable for installations where cost is a deciding factor in the choice of measuring system. It presents a practical application of the developed instrumentation system for use in photovoltaic solar facilities. This new temperature-measuring system has been registered in the Spanish Patent and Trademark Office with the number P200803364. (author)

  8. Generalized temperature measurement equations for Rhodamine B dye solution and its application to microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jayna J; Gaitan, Michael; Geist, Jon

    2009-10-01

    Temperature mapping based on fluorescent signal intensity ratios is a widely used noncontact approach for investigating temperature distributions in various systems. This noninvasive method is especially useful for applications, such as microfluidics, where accurate temperature measurements are difficult with conventional physical probes. However, the application of a calibration equation to relate fluorescence intensity ratio to temperature is not straightforward when the reference temperature in a given application is different than the one used to derive the calibration equation. In this report, we develop and validate generalized calibration equations that can be applied for any value of reference temperature. Our analysis shows that a simple linear correction for a 40 degrees C reference temperature produces errors in measured temperatures between -3 to 8 degrees C for three previously published sets of cubic calibration equations. On the other hand, corrections based on an exact solution of these equations restrict the errors to those inherent in the calibration equations. The methods described here are demonstrated for cubic calibration equations derived by three different groups, but the general method can be applied to other dyes and calibration equations.

  9. Research on calibration method of downhole optical fiber temperature measurement and its application in SAGD well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Han, Li; Hu, Chengjun; Pan, Yong; Duan, Shengnan; Wang, Ningbo; Li, Shijian; Nuer, Maimaiti

    2017-10-01

    With the development of oil and gas fields, the accuracy and quantity requirements of real-time dynamic monitoring data needed for well dynamic analysis and regulation are increasing. Permanent, distributed downhole optical fiber temperature and pressure monitoring and other online real-time continuous data monitoring has become an important data acquisition and transmission technology in digital oil field and intelligent oil field construction. Considering the requirement of dynamic analysis of steam chamber developing state in SAGD horizontal wells in F oil reservoir in Xinjiang oilfield, it is necessary to carry out real-time and continuous temperature monitoring in horizontal section. Based on the study of the principle of optical fiber temperature measurement, the factors that cause the deviation of optical fiber temperature sensing are analyzed, and the method of fiber temperature calibration is proposed to solve the problem of temperature deviation. Field application in three wells showed that it could attain accurate measurement of downhole temperature by temperature correction. The real-time and continuous downhole distributed fiber temperature sensing technology has higher application value in the reservoir management of SAGD horizontal wells. It also has a reference for similar dynamic monitoring in reservoir production.

  10. Direct Measurements of Infrared Normal Spectral Emissivity of Solid Materials for High-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzl, S.; Kirschner, M.; Lippig, V.; Sander, T.; Mundt, Ch.; Pfitzner, M.

    2013-11-01

    A new facility for the measurement of the normal spectral emissivity of solid materials for high-temperature applications in the thermal steady state was developed at the Bundeswehr University of Munich. The measurements are performed under atmospheric conditions. The facility covers the temperature range between and and wavelengths between and . The principle of operation involves the spectral comparison of a test sample with a reference blackbody and the sample surface temperature determination with a numerical spectral ratio calculation. The optical characteristics of the blackbody and the sample surface temperature determination are discussed in detail. Furthermore, measurement results of the quasi-reference material silicon-carbide under steady-state conditions are presented to validate the measurement method.

  11. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Masanori; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1×10-6 s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m2 for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500 °C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated.

  12. Temperature measurement and control

    CERN Document Server

    Leigh, JR

    1988-01-01

    This book treats the theory and practice of temperature measurement and control and important related topics such as energy management and air pollution. There are no specific prerequisites for the book although a knowledge of elementary control theory could be useful. The first half of the book is an application oriented survey of temperature measurement techniques and devices. The second half is concerned mainly with temperature control in both simple and complex situations.

  13. A study on the applicability of implantable microchip transponders for body temperature measurements in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Uttenthal, Åse; Enøe, Claes

    2010-01-01

    Background The applicability of an electronic monitoring system using microchip transponders for measurement of body temperatures was tested in 6-week-old conventional Danish weaners infected with classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Subcutaneous tissue temperatures obtained by the implantable...... transponders were compared with rectal temperatures, recorded by a conventional digital thermometer. Methods In a preliminary study, transponders were inserted subcutaneously at 6 different positions of the body of 5 pigs. The transponders positioned by the ear base provided the best correlation to rectal......C lower than the rectal temperature. However, a simple linear relationship between the measures of the two methods was found. Conclusions Our study showed that the tested body monitoring system may represent a promising tool to obtain an approximate correlate of body temperatures in groups of pigs...

  14. Thermographic Phosphors for High Temperature Measurements: Principles, Current State of the Art and Recent Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of phosphor thermometry, focusing on developments in the past 15 years. The fundamental principles and theory are presented, and the various spectral and temporal modes, including the lifetime decay, rise time and intensity ratio, are discussed. The entire phosphor measurement system, including relative advantages to conventional methods, choice of phosphors, bonding techniques, excitation sources and emission detection, is reviewed. Special attention is given to issues that may arise at high temperatures. A number of recent developments and applications are surveyed, with examples including: measurements in engines, hypersonic wind tunnel experiments, pyrolysis studies and droplet/spray/gas temperature determination. They show the technique is flexible and successful in measuring temperatures where conventional methods may prove to be unsuitable.

  15. Using Distributed Temperature Sensing for evaporation measurements: background, verification, and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilperoort, Bart; Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; van Iersel, Tara; Jiménez Rodríguez, Cesar; Luxemburg, Willem; Cisneros Vaca, Cesar; Ucer, Murat

    2017-04-01

    , with quality control applied to both methods. When comparing the daytime values, there is a high correlation (R2=0.75), a low bias (mean difference of ±15W/m2) and a good accuracy (standard deviation of the difference of 40W/m2) for both the latent and sensible heat flux. This can lead to a small error. Nonetheless, the results show that when the system is set up with care, and by eliminating sources of errors, the DTS based Bowen ratio is in agreement with an eddy covariance system, even above a tall forest canopy, which is notoriously hard to measure. Further applications of the DTS data in evaporation measurement studies are the flux-variance method (where the standard deviations of the air temperature and absolute humidity are used to estimate the sensible and latent heat fluxes), the surface-renewal method, and correcting the Bowen ratio for the non-unity of the eddy diffusivity ratios. These can all be used to gather additional data on the evaporation to increase the accuracy.

  16. Selection of fiber-optical components for temperature measurement for satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, P.; Kuhenuri Chami, N.; Koch, A. W.; Hurni, A.; Roner, M.; Obermaier, J.; Lemke, N. M. K.

    2017-11-01

    The Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) is a modular system for housekeeping measurements for space applications. The focus here is the fiber-optical module and the used fiber-Bragg gratings (FBGs) for temperature measurements at up to 100 measuring points. The fiber-optial module uses a tunable diode laser to scan through the wavelength spectrum and a passive optical network for reading back the reflections from the FBG sensors. The sensors are based on FBGs which show a temperature dependent shift in wavelength, allowing a high accuracy of measurement. The temperature at each sensor is derivated from the sensors Bragg wavelength shift by evaluating the measured spectrum with an FBG peak detection algorithm and by computing the corresponding temperature difference with regard to the calibration value. It is crucial to eliminate unwanted influence on the measurement accuracy through FBG wavelength shifts caused by other reasons than the temperature change. The paper presents gamma radiation test results up to 25 Mrad for standard UV-written FBGs in a bare fiber and in a mechanically housed version. This high total ionizing dose (TID) load comes from a possible location of the fiber outside the satellite's housing, like e.g. on the panels or directly embedded into the satellites structure. Due to the high shift in wavelength of the standard written gratings also the femto-second infrared (fs- IR) writing technique is investigated in more detail. Special focus is given to the deployed fibers for the external sensor network. These fibers have to be mechanically robust and the radiation induced attenuation must be low in order not to influence the system's performance. For this reason different fiber types have been considered and tested to high dose gamma radiation. Dedicated tests proved the absence of enhanced low dose rate sensitivity (ELDRS). Once the fiber has been finally selected, the fs-IR grating will be written to these fibers and the FBGs will be tested in order to

  17. Application of remote sensing to thermal pollution analysis. [satellite sea surface temperature measurement assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiser, H. W.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Sengupta, S.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive numerical model development program for near-field thermal plume discharge and far field general circulation in coastal regions is being carried on at the University of Miami Clean Energy Research Institute. The objective of the program is to develop a generalized, three-dimensional, predictive model for thermal pollution studies. Two regions of specific application of the model are the power plants sites at the Biscayne Bay and Hutchinson Island area along the Florida coastline. Remote sensing from aircraft as well as satellites are used in parallel with in situ measurements to provide information needed for the development and verification of the mathematical model. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to identify problems and limitations of the presently available satellite data and to develop methods for enhancing and enlarging thermal infrared displays for mesoscale sea surface temperature measurements.

  18. Applications of Optical Interferometer Techniques for Precision Measurements of Changes in Temperature, Growth and Refractive Index of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Reddy Bommareddi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical metrology techniques used to measure changes in thickness; temperature and refractive index are surveyed. Optical heterodyne detection principle and its applications for precision measurements of changes in thickness and temperature are discussed. Theoretical formulations are developed to estimate crystal growth rate, surface roughness and laser cooling/heating of solids. Applications of Michelson and Mach-Zehnder interferometers to measure temperature changes in laser heating of solids are described. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used to measure refractive index and concentration variations of solutions in crystal growth experiments. Additionally, fluorescence lifetime sensing and fluorescence ratio method are described for temperature measurement. For all the above techniques, uncertainty calculations are included.

  19. A technique of melting temperature measurement and its application for irradiated high-burnup MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namekawa, Takashi; Hirosawa, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    A melting temperature measurement technique for irradiated oxide fuels is described. In this technique, the melting temperature was determined from a thermal arrest on a heating curve of the specimen which was enclosed in a tungsten capsule to maintain constant chemical composition of the specimen during measurement. The measurement apparatus was installed in an alpha-tight steel box within a gamma-shielding cell and operated by remote handling. The temperature of the specimen was measured with a two-color pyrometer sighted on a black-body well at the bottom of the tungsten capsule. The diameter of the black-body well was optimized so that the uncertainties of measurement were reduced. To calibrate the measured temperature, two reference melting temperature materials, tantalum and molybdenum, were encapsulated and run before and after every oxide fuel test. The melting temperature data on fast reactor mixed oxide fuels irradiated up to 124 GWd/t were obtained. In addition, simulated high-burnup mixed oxide fuel up to 250 GWd/t by adding non-radioactive soluble fission products was examined. These data shows that the melting temperature decrease with increasing burnup and saturated at high burnup region. (author)

  20. Distributed Temperature Measurement in a Self-Burning Coal Waste Pile through a GIS Open Source Desktop Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Duarte

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Geographical Information Systems (GIS are often used to assess and monitor the environmental impacts caused by mining activities. The aim of this work was to develop a new application to produce dynamic maps for monitoring the temperature variations in a self-burning coal waste pile, under a GIS open source environment—GIS-ECOAL (freely available. The performance of the application was evaluated with distributed temperature measurements gathered in the S. Pedro da Cova (Portugal coal waste pile. In order to obtain the temperature data, an optical fiber cable was disposed over the affected area of the pile, with 42 location stakes acting as precisely-located control points for the temperature measurement. A monthly data set from July (15 min of interval was fed into the application and a video composed by several layouts with temperature measurements was created allowing for recognizing two main areas with higher temperatures. The field observations also allow the identification of these zones; however, the identification of an area with higher temperatures in the top of the studied area was only possible through the visualization of the images created by this application. The generated videos make possible the dynamic and continuous visualization of the combustion process in the monitored area.

  1. High-resolution transmission measurements of CO2 at high temperatures for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim; Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2012-01-01

    . The spectra have been recorded in a high-temperature flow gas cell and using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer at a nominal resolution of 0.125 cm-1. The volume fractions of CO2 in the measurements were 1,10 and 100%. The measurements have been validated by comparison with medium...

  2. Soil Moisture and Temperature Measuring Networks in the Tibetan Plateau and Their Hydrological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Chen, Yingying; Qin, Jun; Lu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Multi-sphere interactions over the Tibetan Plateau directly impact its surrounding climate and environment at a variety of spatiotemporal scales. Remote sensing and modeling are expected to provide hydro-meteorological data needed for these process studies, but in situ observations are required to support their calibration and validation. For this purpose, we have established two networks on the Tibetan Plateau to measure densely two state variables (soil moisture and temperature) and four soil depths (0 5, 10, 20, and 40 cm). The experimental area is characterized by low biomass, high soil moisture dynamic range, and typical freeze-thaw cycle. As auxiliary parameters of these networks, soil texture and soil organic carbon content are measured at each station to support further studies. In order to guarantee continuous and high-quality data, tremendous efforts have been made to protect the data logger from soil water intrusion, to calibrate soil moisture sensors, and to upscale the point measurements. One soil moisture network is located in a semi-humid area in central Tibetan Plateau (Naqu), which consists of 56 stations with their elevation varying over 4470 4950 m and covers three spatial scales (1.0, 0.3, 0.1 degree). The other is located in a semi-arid area in southern Tibetan Plateau (Pali), which consists of 25 stations and covers an area of 0.25 degree. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the former network were analyzed, and a new spatial upscaling method was developed to obtain the regional mean soil moisture truth from the point measurements. Our networks meet the requirement for evaluating a variety of soil moisture products, developing new algorithms, and analyzing soil moisture scaling. Three applications with the network data are presented in this paper. 1. Evaluation of Current remote sensing and LSM products. The in situ data have been used to evaluate AMSR-E, AMSR2, SMOS and SMAP products and four modeled outputs by the Global Land Data

  3. Application of Shear Plate Interferometry to Jet Diffusion Flame Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; OBrien, Chris J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1997-01-01

    diagnostics of flames are, however, necessarily limited to detection of radiative emission in the visible range, and offer only qualitative information about the nature of the processes in the flame. In particular, the study sought to understand the structure of the inhibitor-perturbed flames with regard to temperature and species concentration in the outer region of the flame. Whereas thermocouple measurements can be used in ground based studies, their implementation in drop-tower rigs is limited. A possible approach to determine the temperature field around the flame is to use interferometric techniques. The implementation and testing of a shear-plate interferometry technique is described below.

  4. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar Márquez, José Manuel; Martínez Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel; Gómez Melgar, Sergio

    2016-02-29

    This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE) systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain). Experimental results validate the proposed approach.

  5. High temperature measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  6. Application of two-colour pyrometry for measuring the surface temperature of a body activated by laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirillov, V M; Skvortsov, L A

    2006-01-01

    The features of contactless measurements of the surface temperature of bodies by the method of two-colour pyrometry of samples activated by periodic laser pulses are considered. The requirements imposed on the parameters of laser radiation and a measuring circuit are formulated. It is shown experimentally that surface temperatures close to room temperature can be measured with an error not exceeding 3% after elimination of the superfluous static component of the excess temperature. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. Advantages of laser photothermal radiometry with repetitively pulsed excitation of surfaces over the case when samples are subjected to harmonic amplitude-modulated laser radiation are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Application of neutron diffraction to measure residual strains in high temperature composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigal, A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental neutron diffraction technique was used to measure residual thermal strains developed in high temperature composites during postfabrication cooling. Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide (over the temperature range 20--950 degree C) and tungsten and saphikon fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide composites (at room temperature) were investigated. As a result of thermal expansion mismatch, compressive residual strains and stresses were generated in the silicon carbide fibers during cooldown. The axial residual strains were tensile in the matrix and were lower in nickel aluminide matrix as compared to those in titanium aluminide matrix. The average transverse residual strains in the matrix were compressive. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal-cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Study of ion cyclotron fluctuations. Application to the measurement of the ion temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, T.

    1982-02-01

    A diagnostic technique for measuring the ion temperature of tokamak-type plasmas was developed. A theoretical study was made of the form factor associated with the ion cyclotron waves; the influence of Te/Ti on the frequency of the extrema of the dispersion relations was demonstrated. The different effects able to modify the spectral density (in particular the drift velocity and the impurities) were investigated. The mechanisms of suprathermal excitation of cylotron waves in tokamaks were reviewed together with the various effects stabilizing the spectrum: collisions, shear of the magnetic field lines. The experimental realization of the diagnostic technique is based on Thomson scattering by the electron density fluctuations [fr

  9. Temperature measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oltman, B.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Romberg, G.P.; Prepejchal, W.

    1975-01-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material is exposed to a known amount of radiation and then exposed to the environment where temperature measurements are to be taken. After a predetermined time period, the TLD material is read in a known manner to determine the amount of radiation energy remaining in the TLD material. The difference between the energy originally stored by irradiation and that remaining after exposure to the temperature ofthe environment is a measure of the average temperature of the environment during the exposure. (U.S.)

  10. Energy Storage and Generation for Extreme Temperature and Pressure and Directional Measurement While Drilling Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, Riccardo [FastCAP Systems Corporation, Boston, MA (United States); Cooley, John [FastCAP Systems Corporation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-10-14

    FastCAP Systems Corporation has successfully completed all milestones defined by the award DE-EE0005503. Under this program, FastCAP developed three critical subassemblies to TRL3 demonstrating proof of concept of a geothermal MWD power source. This power source includes an energy harvester, electronics and a novel high temperature ultracapacitor (“ultracap”) rechargeable energy storage device suitable for geothermal exploration applications. FastCAP’s ruggedized ultracapacitor (ultracap) technology has been proven and commercialized in oil and gas exploration operating to rated temperatures of 150°C. Characteristics of this technology are that it is rechargeable and relatively high power. This technology was the basis for the advancements in rechargeable energy storage under this project. The ultracap performs reliably at 250°C and beyond and operates over a wide operating temperature range: -5°C to 250°C. The ultracap has significantly higher power density than lithium thionyl chloride batteries, a non-rechargeable incumbent used in oil and gas drilling today. Several hermetically sealed, prototype devices were tested in our laboratories at constant temperatures of 250°C showing no significant degradation over 2000 hours of operation. Other prototypes were tested at Sandia National Lab in the month of April, 2015 for a third party performance validation. These devices showed outstanding performance over 1000 hours of operation at three rated temperatures, 200°C, 225°C and 250°C, with negligible capacitance degradation and minimal equivalent series resistance (ESR) increase. Similarly, FastCAP’s ruggedized electronics have been proven and commercialized in oil and gas exploration operating to rated temperatures of 150°C. This technology was the basis for the advancements in downhole electronics under this project. Principal contributions here focused on design for manufacture innovations that have reduced the prototype build cycle time by a factor

  11. Measurement of temperature profiles in process-applications using fibre-optical methods; Prozessgeeignete Temperaturprofilmessungen mit faseroptischen Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seefeld, P. [Endress und Hauser Wetzer GmbH und Co.KG, Nesselwang (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Fibre-optical temperature measuring methods are offering an approach to detect temperature profiles. According to the NAMUR-Technology-Roadmap the detection of temperature profiles is representing an increased benefit. Intrinsic fibre-optical temperature measuring techniques are presented, known as OTDRmethod (Optical tine domain reflectometry) facilitating a distributed temperature measurement method that allows a resolution in the range of decimetres. For the purpose of such applications a suitable photoncounting device comprises mechanical robust fibre-optical components, 3 db Coupler, referenced Laser- Diode, Y-Coupler with integrated band-filter and APD (Avalanche Diode) used in a detection module. A VHDL-coded FBGA-board provides a basic control-device for - a Laser-Driver to generate adjustable exiting-pulses in the range of nanoseconds at rates up to 100 kHz. - a Photon-Counting module with a minimum opening width in the range of one nanosecond - that permits the co-addition of the photon-counts derived from the spectral resolved Stokes and Anti-Stokes band. (orig.)

  12. Strain and temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, P.A.E.; Fowler, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    A method of non-invasively measuring strain and temperature of an object, substantially simultaneously, using neutrons of selected energy levels is described. A pulsed neutron source is made to emit thermal and epithermal neutrons in a collimated beam directed at the object. Temperature is monitored by observing the thermal Doppler broadening of resonances in the neutron transmission characteristic for the epithermal neutrons and strain is measured from observations made of changes to the thermal neutron diffraction pattern. The object may be a gas turbine blade or a thrust bearing. (author)

  13. Temperature measurements by thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liermann, J.

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of a temperature (whatever the type of transducer used) raises three problems: the choice of transducer; where it should be placed; how it should be fixed and protected. These are the three main points examined, after a brief description of the most commonly used thermocouples [fr

  14. Thermal conductivity of silver loaded conductive epoxy from cryogenic to ambient temperature and its application for precision cryogenic noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amils, Ricardo I.; Gallego, Juan Daniel; Sebastián, José Luis; Muñoz, Sagrario; Martín, Agustín; Leuther, Arnulf

    2016-06-01

    The pressure to increase the sensitivity of instrumentation has pushed the use of cryogenic Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) technology into a growing number of fields. These areas range from radio astronomy and deep space communications to fundamental physics. In this context manufacturing for cryogenic environments requires a proper thermal knowledge of the materials to be able to achieve adequate design behavior. In this work, we present experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of a silver filled conductive epoxy (EPO-TEK H20E) which is widely used in cryogenic electronics applications. The characterization has been made using a sample preparation which mimics the practical use of this adhesive in the fabrication of cryogenic devices. We apply the data obtained to a detailed analysis of the effects of the conductive epoxy in a monolithic thermal noise source used for high accuracy cryogenic microwave noise measurements. In this application the epoxy plays a fundamental role since its limited thermal conductivity allows heating the chip with relatively low power. To our knowledge, the cryogenic thermal conductivity data of this epoxy has not been reported before in the literature in the 4-300 K temperature range. A second non-conductive epoxy (Gray Scotch-Weld 2216 B/A), also widely used in cryogenic applications, has been measured in order to validate the method by comparing with previous published data.

  15. The application of MI cable to measure temperatures in a sodium heat transfer experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, N.W.; Barrett, W.I.; Sheward, G.E.; Cameron, P.

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the design and manufacture of a complex instrumented heater plate assembly to investigate natural convection in a liquid sodium environment up to 400 0 C. The theory of the experiment and results obtained are discussed. The manufacture of the assembly required the application of a novel design to ensure the accurate positioning of the thermocouples and incorporation of heater cables into a flat plate. The various joining methods used in manufacture, both welding and brazing, are described and the quality procedures used to underwrite the integrity of the assembly for use in liquid sodium are discussed. The life of this assembly has far exceeded original expectations and underwrites the application of brazing in this demanding situation. (author)

  16. Radiometric temperature measurements fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhuomin M; Machin, Graham

    2009-01-01

    This book describes the theory of radiation thermometry, both at a primary level and for a variety of applications, such as in the materials processing industries and remote sensing. This book is written for those who will apply radiation thermometry in industrial practice; use radiation thermometers for scientific research; the radiation thermometry specialist in a national measurement institute; developers of radiation thermometers who are working to innovate products for instrument manufacturers, and developers of non-contact thermometry methods to address challenging thermometry problems.

  17. Low-cost multi-vehicle air temperature measurements for heat load assessment in local-scale climate applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuvela-Aloise, Maja; Weyss, Gernot; Aloise, Giulliano; Mifka, Boris; Löffelmann, Philemon; Hollosi, Brigitta; Nemec, Johana; Vucetic, Visnja

    2014-05-01

    In the recent years there has been a strong interest in exploring the potential of low-cost measurement devices as alternative source of meteorological monitoring data, especially in the urban areas where high-density observations become crucial for appropriate heat load assessment. One of the simple, but efficient approaches for gathering large amount of spatial data is through mobile measurement campaigns in which the sensors are attached to driving vehicles. However, non-standardized data collecting procedure, instrument quality, their response-time and design, variable device ventilation and radiation protection influence the reliability of the gathered data. We investigate what accuracy can be expected from the data collected through low-cost mobile measurements and whether the achieved quality of the data is sufficient for validation of the state-of-the-art local-scale climate models. We tested 5 types of temperature sensors and data loggers: Maxim iButton, Lascar EL-USB-2-LCD+ and Onset HOBO UX100-003 as market available devices and self-designed solar powered Arduino-based data loggers combined with the AOSONG AM2315 and Sensirion SHT21 temperature and humidity sensors. The devices were calibrated and tested in stationary mode at the Austrian Weather Service showing accuracy between 0.1°C and 0.8°C, which was mostly within the device specification range. In mobile mode, the best response-time was found for self-designed device with Arduino-based data logger and Sensirion SHT21 sensor. However, the device lacks the mechanical robustness and should be further improved for broad-range applications. We organized 4 measurement tours: two taking place in urban environment (Vienna, Austria in July 2011 and July 2013) and two in countryside with complex terrain of Mid-Adriatic islands (Hvar and Korcula, Croatia in August 2013). Measurements were taken on clear-sky, dry and hot days. We combined multiple devices attached to bicycle and cars with different

  18. Neutron ion temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-11-01

    One important use of fusion product diagnostics is in the determination of the deuterium ion temperature from the magnitude of the 2.5 MeV d(d,n) 3 He neutron emission. The detectors, calibration methods, and limitations of this technique are reviewed here with emphasis on procedures used at PPPL. In most tokamaks, the ion temperature deduced from neutrons is in reasonable agreement with the ion temperature deduced by other techniques

  19. A survey of temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltvold, J.R.

    1976-03-01

    Many different techniques for measuring temperature have been surveyed and are discussed. The concept of temperature and the physical phenomena used in temperature measurement are also discussed. Extensive tables are presented in which the range and accuracy of the various techniques and other related data are included. (author)

  20. Applications of satellite data to the studies of agricultural meteorology, 2: Relationship between air temperature and surface temperature measured by infrared thermal radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, I.; Tani, H.; Morikawa, S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed in order to establish interpretation keys for estimation of air temperature from satellite IR data. Field measurements were carried out over four kinds of land surfaces including seven different field crops on the university campus at Sapporo. The air temperature was compared with the surface temperature measured by infrared thermal radiometer (National ER2007, 8.5-12.5μm) and, also with other meteorological parameters (solar radiation, humidity and wind speed). Also perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) was measured to know vegetation density of lands by ho radio-spectralmeter (Figs. 1 & 2). Table 1 summarizes the measurements taken in these experiments.The correlation coefficients between air temperature and other meteorological parameters for each area are shown in Table 2. The best correlation coefficient for total data was obtained with surface temperature, and it suggests the possibility that air temperature may be estimated by satellite IR data since they are related to earth surface temperatures.Further analyses were done between air temperature and surface temperature measured with thermal infrared radiometer.The following conclusions may be drawn:(1) Air temperature from meteorological site was well correlated to surface temperature of lands that were covered with dense plant and water, for example, grass land, paddy field and rye field (Table 2).(2) The correlation coefficients and the regression equations on grass land, paddy field and rye field were almost the same (Fig. 3). The mean correlation coefficient for these three lands was 0.88 and the regression equation is given in Eq. (2).(3) There was good correlation on bare soil land also, but had large variations (Fig. 3).(4) The correlations on crop fields depend on the density of plant cover. Good correlation is obtained on dense vegetative fields.(5) Small variations about correlation coefficients were obtained for the time of day (Table 3).(6) On the other hand, large

  1. A real time measurement of junction temperature variation in high power IGBT modules for wind power converter application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghimire, Pramod; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; de Vega, Angel Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    is decreased at higher fundamental frequency due to change in on-state time from the change in output frequency. The junction temperature is estimated using the on-state collector-emitter voltage of the IGBT module. Lower output frequency is thermally a higher stressing zone for wind power converters, hence......This paper presents a real time measurement of on-state forward voltage and estimating the junction temperature for a high power IGBT module during a power converter operation. The power converter is realized as it can be used for a wind turbine system. The peak of the junction temperature...

  2. [Temperature Measurement with Bluetooth under Android Platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Shen, Hao; Luo, Changze

    2015-03-01

    To realize the real-time transmission of temperature data and display using the platform of intelligent mobile phone and bluetooth. Application of Arduino Uno R3 in temperature data acquisition of digital temperature sensor DS18B20 acquisition, through the HC-05 bluetooth transmits the data to the intelligent smart phone Android system, realizes transmission of temperature data. Using Java language to write applications program under Android development environment, can achieve real-time temperature data display, storage and drawing temperature fluctuations drawn graphics. Temperature sensor is experimentally tested to meet the body temperature measurement precision and accuracy. This paper can provide a reference for other smart phone mobile medical product development.

  3. The Application of Laser Diagnostics to the Measurement of Concentration and Temperature in Practical Methane-Air Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    1995-01-01

    The majority of natural gas, composed primarily of methane (CH_4), is consumed by practical devices that include Bunsen burners (used for industrial process and residential heating), and lean-premixed combustors (used for utility power generation and gas turbines). The goal of designing energy efficient, low-pollution burners and combustors is often most effectively realized through the use of numerical codes that model these devices. The accurate numerical modeling of these practical combustion devices frequently requires the non-intrusive measurements of various species and temperatures in flames for comparison and validation. The measurement of the pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO), however, is at the forefront of interest due to their nature as regulated pollutants. Thus, the concentration and temperature of various molecules (indicated in parenthesis) as they exist in Bunsen flames and lean-premixed combustors burning mixtures of CH_4 and air, were measured using the following non-intrusive techniques: line-of-sight, diode laser absorption (CO), laser Raman and Rayleigh scattering (CO, H_2, CO_2, H_2O, O_2, N_2, CH_4, and laser induced fluorescence (NO, OH, CO). The different diagnostic techniques each have their advantages and disadvantages. The absorption techniques were versatile at measuring both low- and high-level concentrations of CO, and when used in conjunction with computer tomographic reconstruction techniques, they also provide spatially resolved measurements. Raman and Rayleigh scattering proved to be perhaps the most powerful techniques due to their ability to simultaneously measure a wealth of different molecules and to provide an extremely accurate measurement of temperature while providing excellent temporal and spatial resolution. Raman scattering, however, is a weak process, thus the detection of anything much less than a percent mole fraction at flame temperatures is difficult. For species which require a higher degree

  4. Precision rectifier detectors for ac resistance bridge measurements with application to temperature control systems for irradiation creep experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, M. G.

    1977-05-01

    The suitability of several temperature measurement schemes for an irradiation creep experiment is examined. It is found that the specimen resistance can be used to measure and control the sample temperature if compensated for resistance drift due to radiation and annealing effects. A modified Kelvin bridge is presented that allows compensation for resistance drift by periodically checking the sample resistance at a controlled ambient temperature. A new phase-insensitive method for detecting the bridge error signals is presented. The phase-insensitive detector is formed by averaging the magnitude of two bridge voltages. Although this method is substantially less sensitive to stray reactances in the bridge than conventional phase-sensitive detectors, it is sensitive to gain stability and linearity of the rectifier circuits. Accuracy limitations of rectifier circuits are examined both theoretically and experimentally in great detail. Both hand analyses and computer simulations of rectifier errors are presented. Finally, the design of a temperature control system based on sample resistance measurement is presented. The prototype is shown to control a 316 stainless steel sample to within a 0.15/sup 0/C short term (10 sec) and a 0.03/sup 0/C long term (10 min) standard deviation at temperatures between 150 and 700/sup 0/C. The phase-insensitive detector typically contributes less than 10 ppM peak resistance measurement error (0.04/sup 0/C at 700/sup 0/C for 316 stainless steel or 0.005/sup 0/C at 150/sup 0/C for zirconium).

  5. High frequency inductive measurements of organic conductors with the application of high magnetic fields and low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Laurel E.

    Organic conductors are interesting to study due to their low dimensionality that leads to a number of competing low temperature ground states. Comprised of a number of different molecules that can be varied by the substitution of one atom for another, organic systems also provide a large number of similar compounds that lend themselves to comparison studies. Two such low-dimensional organic conductors, Per2[Pt(mnt)2] and (TMTSF)2ClO4, which are members of large families of compounds, are the topic of this dissertation. Both materials are considered quasi-one-dimensional and have a number of low temperature transitions, some of which can be studied via changes in the magnetic properties of the systems. The Per2[M(mnt)2] family of compounds provides a system for exploring the similarities and differences of the system's properties when the metal M has a localized spin (M = Pt, Ni, and Fe) versus when the metal is diamagnetic (M = Au, Cu, and Co). In the case of Per2[Pt(mnt)2] - one of the compounds of focus in this dissertation - the metallic perylene chains undergo a metal- insulator transition due to the formation of a charge density wave at Tc ~ 8 K, which also occurs in Per2[Au(mnt)2] at 12 K. However, unlike in the M = Au compound, an additional transition occurs in the M = Pt compound due to the localized Pt spins (S = 1/2) on the insulating Pt(mnt)2 chains - the spin chains of Per2[Pt(mnt)2] undergo a spin-Peierls transition at 8 K. One focus of the experimental work of this dissertation focuses on the magnetic properties of the spin chains in Per2[Pt(mnt)2], via inductive susceptibility measurements at temperatures down to 0.5 K and fields up to 60 T. The experimental results show a coupling of the spin-Peierls and charge density wave states below 8 K and 20 T, above which both states are suppressed. Further measurements show a second spin state transition occurs above 20 T that coincides with a field induced insulating state in the perylene chains. These

  6. Systematic approach for the calibration of humidity sensitive polyimide recoated fibre Bragg gratings for measuring humidity and temperature and their application for measuring moisture absorption in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T J; Lodeiro, M J; Gower, M R L; Sassi, M B

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic method for calibrating polyimide recoated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) optical fibres and the associated models used to measure temperature and relative humidity (RH) from 20 to 70 °C and 20% RH to 80% RH. The method was validated by comparing known values of temperature and RH with calculated values from two FBG sensors with different thicknesses of polyimide recoat. Results show good agreement, with a standard deviation error of 0.5 °C and 4.8% RH for temperature and humidity respectively. Drift in the measured wavelength was observed for both thicknesses of polyimide coating under the combined effect of elevated temperature and high humidity. This drift was reversed after a reduction in the humidity. Additional results are provided on the use of embedded polyimide recoated FBG optical fibres for measuring moisture ingress within polymers and composites. (paper)

  7. Application of SQUIDs to low temperature and high magnetic field measurements-Ultra low noise torque magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F; Naumann, M; Lühmann, Th; Mackenzie, A P; Hassinger, E

    2018-02-01

    Torque magnetometry is a key method to measure the magnetic anisotropy and quantum oscillations in metals. In order to resolve quantum oscillations in sub-millimeter sized samples, piezo-electric micro-cantilevers were introduced. In the case of strongly correlated metals with large Fermi surfaces and high cyclotron masses, magnetic torque resolving powers in excess of 10 4 are required at temperatures well below 1 K and magnetic fields beyond 10 T. Here, we present a new broadband read-out scheme for piezo-electric micro-cantilevers via Wheatstone-type resistance measurements in magnetic fields up to 15 T and temperatures down to 200 mK. By using a two-stage superconducting-quantum interference device as a null detector of a cold Wheatstone bridge, we were able to achieve a magnetic moment resolution of Δm = 4 × 10 -15 J/T at maximal field and 700 mK, outperforming conventional magnetometers by at least one order of magnitude in this temperature and magnetic field range. Exemplary de Haas-van Alphen measurement of a newly grown delafossite, PdRhO 2 , was used to show the superior performance of our setup.

  8. A novel contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeter using glad buffer rods for high temperature measurement. Application to the oil and gas industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Demartonne R. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Eletrica; Cheng-Kuei Jen; Yuu Ono [National Research Council (NRC), Quebec (Canada). Industrial Materials Institute

    2005-07-01

    Ultrasonic techniques are attractive for process monitoring and control because they are non-intrusive, robust and inexpensive. Two common concerns limiting the high temperature performance of conventional ultrasonic systems for flow measurement are related to transducers and couplants. A suitable approach to overcoming this drawback is to insert a thermal isolating buffer rod with good ultrasonic performance (e.g., high signal-to-noise ratio). This requirement is important because, a priori, the noises generated in the buffer rod may bury the desired signals, so that no meaningful information is extracted. Besides protecting the ultrasonic transducers from overheating in applications such as high temperature flow measurements, buffer rods are also a solution for the couplant between the probe and tested sample, since their probing end can be directly wetted by fluids. Here, we propose clad buffer rods driven by shear transducers as the main building block of contra propagating ultrasonic flowmeters for high temperature application. It is demonstrated that the superior signal-to-noise ratio exhibit by clad buffer rods compared to the reported non-clad counterparts improve precision in transit-time measurement, leading to more accurate flow speed determination. In addition, it is shown that clad buffer rods generate specific ultrasonic signals for temperature calibration of flowmeters, allowing temperature variation while still measuring accurately the flow speed. These results are of interest for the oil and gas industries. (author)

  9. Temperature measurement in the sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnamacharyulu, R.J.; Rao, L.V.G.

    ), their advantages and limitations are also touched upon. Calibration of various instruments used for temperature measurement in the sea and the special setup/facilities needed for this purpose are also discussed...

  10. Construction of an apparatus for nuclear orientation measurements at low temperatures. Application to neodymium-cobalt alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, E.

    1965-10-01

    We describe experiments along which has been studied the anisotropy of γ radiations emitted by oriented nuclei. We have used the great hyperfine fields acting on nuclei in ferromagnetic metals so as to produce alignment at low temperature. By irradiation we obtained a few cobalt 60 nuclei in our samples which were then cooled down to 0,01 K. The anisotropic rate of the 1,33 MeV γ radiation was measured in function of the sample temperature, using as thermometer the anisotropy of γ radiation emitted by cobalt 60 nuclei in a cobalt single crystal. Cobalt 60 was lined up in a cobalt nickel alloy (40% Ni). The hyperfine field at the cobalt was measured compared to the effective field in metallic cobalt: Heff(Co Ni)/Heff(Co metal) = 0.71 ± 0.12. These results are in good agreement with specific heat measurements made previously. Cobalt 60 has been polarised in a neodymium-cobalt alloy (NdCo 5 ). The field at the cobalt in NdCo 5 has been measured compared to the field in metallic cobalt and taking the non-saturation into account we found 165000 oersteds 5 ) [fr

  11. An automated system for experiments at low and very low temperatures. Application to dynamic specific heat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Wim Adrian

    1988-06-01

    The construction and performance of an automated, computer controlled cryogenic system for experiments at temperatures between a few millikelvins and 4K are described. The system consists of three main parts (1), (2) and (3). Part (1) is an He3-circulating dilution refrigerator system, capable of cooling fairly large and complicated experiments in a magnetically shielded region of 2dmcu down to 15mK in a continuous mode and down to 4mK after adiabatic demagnetization of a hyperfine enhanced nuclear magnet. Part (2) is a Faraday cage containing the sensitive electronic measuring equipment connected to experiments inside the refrigerator. Part (3) consists of two microcomputers, a minicomputer, and other equipment for automatic control of the experiments, for data acquisition, storage and conversion, and for displaying results. Low temperature thermometry is summarized.

  12. Michelson interferometer for measuring temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; wang, Anmin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate that temperature can be measured by a modified Michelson interferometer, where at least one reflected mirror is replaced by a thermalized sample. Both of two mirrors replaced by the corresponding two thermalized samples can help to approximatively improve the resolution of temperature up to twice than only one mirror replaced by a thermalized sample. For further improving the precision, a nonlinear medium can be employed. The Michelson interferometer is embedded in a gas displa...

  13. Michelson interferometer for measuring temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; Wang, An Min

    2017-09-01

    We investigate that temperature can be measured by a modified Michelson interferometer, where at least one reflected mirror is replaced by a thermalized sample. Both of two mirrors replaced by the corresponding two thermalized samples can help to approximatively improve the resolution of temperature up to twice than only one mirror replaced by a thermalized sample. For further improving the precision, a nonlinear medium can be employed. The Michelson interferometer is embedded in a gas displaying Kerr nonlinearity. We obtain the analytical equations and numerically calculate the precision with parameters within the reach of current technology, proving that the precision of temperature can be greatly enhanced by using a nonlinear medium. Our results show that one can create an accurate thermometer by measuring the photons in the Michelson interferometer, with no need to directly measure the population of thermalized sample.

  14. Single-resonance optical pumping spectroscopy and application in dressed-state measurement with atomic vapor cell at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qiangbing; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2010-06-21

    By monitoring the transmission of probe laser beam (also served as coupling laser beam) which is locked to a cycling hyperfine transition of cesium D(2) line, while pumping laser is scanned across cesium D(1) or D(2) lines, the single-resonance optical pumping (SROP) spectra are obtained with atomic vapor cell. The SROP spectra indicate the variation of the zero-velocity atoms population of one hyperfine fold of ground state, which is optically pumped into another hyperfine fold of ground state by pumping laser. With the virtue of Doppler-free linewidth, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), flat background and elimination of crossover resonance lines (CRLs), the SROP spectra with atomic vapor cell around room temperature can be employed to measure dressed-state splitting of ground state, which is normally detected with laser-cooled atomic sample only, even if the dressed-state splitting is much smaller than the Doppler-broaden linewidth at room temperature.

  15. Quantum interferometric measurements of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Marcin; Zwierz, Marcin

    2015-09-01

    We provide a detailed description of the quantum interferometric thermometer, which is a device that estimates the temperature of a sample from the measurements of the optical phase. We rigorously analyze the operation of such a device by studying the interaction of the optical probe system prepared in a single-mode Gaussian state with a heated sample modeled as a dissipative thermal reservoir. We find that this approach to thermometry is capable of measuring the temperature of a sample in the nanokelvin regime. Furthermore, we compare the fundamental precision of quantum interferometric thermometers with the theoretical precision offered by the classical idealized pyrometers, which infer the temperature from a measurement of the total thermal radiation emitted by the sample. We find that the interferometric thermometer provides a superior performance in temperature sensing even when compared with this idealized pyrometer. We predict that interferometric thermometers will prove useful for ultraprecise temperature sensing and stabilization of quantum optical experiments based on the nonlinear crystals and atomic vapors.

  16. Development of a high temperature electric resistance measuring apparatus and the applications to measurements for carbon materials. Koon denki teiko sokutei sochi no shisaku to tansokei zairyo eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S.; Kurumada, A.; Kawamata, K. (Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Sasaki, T.; Shibano, M. (Ibaraki University, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1990-12-20

    A trial fabrication was done to build a vertical type high temperature electric resistance measuring apparatus utilizing an ultra high temperature electric furnace using graphite as a heater for the purpose of studying application of carbon materials under ultra high temperatures. Electric specific resistance was measured on carbon materials to a temperature of up to 2,400 {degree}C. The test pieces are of composite material composed of fine grain isotropic graphite, electrode graphite for steel furnace made by Arc, and C/C. The electric resistance was obtained using a voltage drop method at a reference current of 100 mA, and the specific resistance was calculated using the test piece diameter and the distance between electrodes. The temperature was raised at a rate of 550-600 {degree}C/h. All the graphite materials have their own individual values of electric specific resistance at the room temperature. As the temperature is raised, the specific resistance decreases, shows a minimum value, and then increases gradually showing a nearly constant increase rate until the temperature approaches the graphitization temperature of 3000 {degree}C. At low temperatures, the current carrier mobility is constant, but at higher than the normal temperature, mobility reducing speed becomes dominant because of heat excitation scattering, which is believed to increase the electric specific resistance. 5 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. A Lagrangian model for laser-induced fluorescence and its application to measurements of plasma ion temperature and electrostatic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, F.; Skiff, F.

    2018-01-01

    Extensive information can be obtained on wave-particle interactions and wave fields by a direct measurement of perturbed ion distribution functions using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). For practical purposes, LIF is frequently performed on metastable states that are produced from neutral gas particles and ions in other electronic states. If the laser intensity is increased to obtain a better LIF signal, then optical pumping can produce systematic effects depending on the collision rates which control metastable population and lifetime. We numerically simulate the ion velocity distribution measurement and wave-detection process using a Lagrangian model for the LIF signal for the case where metastables are produced directly from neutrals. This case requires more strict precautions and is important for discharges with energetic primary electrons and a high density of neutrals. Some of the results also apply to metastables produced from pre-existing ions. The simulations show that optical pumping broadening affects the ion velocity distribution function f0(v) and its first-order perturbation f1(v,t) when the laser intensity is increased above a certain level. The results also suggest that ion temperature measurements are only accurate when the metastable ions can live longer than the ion-ion collision mean free time. For the purposes of wave detection, the wave period has to be significantly shorter than the lifetime of metastable ions for a direct interpretation. It is more generally true that metastable ions may be viewed as test-particles. As long as an appropriate model is available, LIF can be extended to a range of environments.

  18. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  19. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  20. Measurement of very rapidly variable temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elberg, S.; Mathonnet, P.

    1974-01-01

    Bibliographical research and visits to laboratories were undertaken in order to survey the different techniques used to measure rapidly variable temperatures, specifying the limits in maximum temperature and variation rate (time constant). On the basis of the bibliographical study these techniques were classified in three categories according to the physical meaning of their response time. Extension of the bibliographical research to methods using fast temperature variation measurement techniques and visits to research and industrial laboratories gave in an idea of the problems raised by the application of these methods. The use of these techniques in fields other than those for which they were developed can sometimes be awkward in the case of thermometric probe devices where the time constant cannot generally be specified [fr

  1. Piezoelectric accelerometers for ultrahigh temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shujun; Moses, Paul; Shrout, Thomas R.; Jiang Xiaoning; Lapsley, Michael

    2010-01-01

    High temperature sensors are of major importance to aerospace and energy related industries. In this letter, a high temperature monolithic compression-mode piezoelectric accelerometer was fabricated using YCa 4 O(BO 3 ) 3 (YCOB) single crystals. The performance of the sensor was tested as function of temperature up to 1000 deg. C and over a frequency range of 100-600 Hz. The accelerometer prototype was found to possess sensitivity of 2.4±0.4 pC/g, across the measured temperature and frequency range, indicating a low temperature coefficient. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited good stability over an extended dwell time at 900 deg. C, demonstrating that YCOB piezoelectric accelerometers are promising candidates for high temperature sensing applications.

  2. Strain sensing technology for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Dan

    1993-01-01

    This review discusses the status of strain sensing technology for high temperature applications. Technologies covered are those supported by NASA such as required for applications in hypersonic vehicles and engines, advanced subsonic engines, as well as material and structure development. The applications may be at temperatures of 540 C (1000 F) to temperatures in excess of 1400 C (2500 F). The most promising technologies at present are the resistance strain gage and remote sensing schemes. Resistance strain gages discussed include the BCL gage, the LaRC compensated gage, and the PdCr gage. Remote sensing schemes such as laser based speckle strain measurement, phase-shifling interferometry, and x-ray extensometry are discussed. Present status and limitations of these technologies are presented.

  3. Temperature measurement of accelerator cell solenoid loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Fan; Dong Pan; Dai Zhiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the research on temperature measurement of solenoid loop. The measuring temperature fiber is layered in solenoid loop for the accelerator cell. When the solenoid loop is supplied with high current form a constant current source, its temperature increases rapidly. The temperature fiber can measure the temperature of the solenoid loop and get temperature measurement rule. Experiment and simulation show temperature of interior solenoid loop the highest and it decreases from the interior to the exterior of solenoid loop. To control temperature of solenoid loop under 60 degree C, simulation displays load interval of constant current source with 80 A current should be at least is 17.5 minutes. (authors)

  4. Laser Pyrometer For Spot Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleman, D. D.; Allen, J. L.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Laser pyrometer makes temperature map by scanning measuring spot across target. Scanning laser pyrometer passively measures radiation emitted by scanned spot on target and calibrated by similar passive measurement on blackbody of known temperature. Laser beam turned on for active measurements of reflectances of target spot and reflectance standard. From measurements, temperature of target spot inferred. Pyrometer useful for non-contact measurement of temperature distributions in processing of materials.

  5. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  6. New algorithm for extreme temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damean, N.

    2000-01-01

    A new algorithm for measurement of extreme temperature is presented. This algorithm reduces the measurement of the unknown temperature to the solving of an optimal control problem, using a numerical computer. Based on this method, a new device for extreme temperature measurements is projected. It

  7. Device for the alternative option of temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargus, Jan; Nedoma, Jan; Fajkus, Marcel; Novak, Martin; Cubik, Jakub; Cvejn, Daniel; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has good optical properties, and its composition offers the possibility of use in many applications (industry, security device, medicine applications and etc.). We focused on the alternative option of temperature measurement in this article. Our approach is based on measuring changes of chromaticity correlated temperature corresponding to changes in temperature. Described device uses an optical fiber with a defined layer of PDMS and luminophore and we assume that it can find use also in the field of security. The article describes the process of making the prototype of the device and its verification based on laboratory results. The measured temperature depends mainly on the type of optical fiber and the measured temperature range is determined by the thermal resistance of used optical fiber. Using a calibration measurement can determine the value of temperature with an accuracy of +/- 2,5 %.

  8. Surface Temperature Measurement Using Hematite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring temperature via spectrophotometry principles are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on the temperature dependence of the reflection spectrum of hematite. Light reflected from these sensors can be measured to determine a temperature, based on changes in the reflection spectrum discussed herein.

  9. Development of a six channel Fabry-Perot interferometer for continuous measurement of electron temperature of Tokamak plasma. Application to current diffusion study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talvard, M.

    1984-10-01

    It is shown how the properties of the electron cyclotron emission of a tokamak plasma can be used to measure the electron temperature. The design of a six channel Fabry-Perot interferometer is then described. This interferometer allows the measurement of the time evolution of the electron temperature profile of the plasma in the TFR tokamak. Using this technique interesting results have been obtained concerning the current penetration during the start up phase of a tokamak discharge [fr

  10. Junction temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters and their application to condition monitoring and active thermal control of power converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Liserre, Marco; Dupont, L.

    2013-01-01

    implementation of active thermal control to reduce losses and increase lifetime can be performed given an accurate knowledge of temperature. Temperature measurements via thermo-sensitive electrical parameters (TSEP) are one way to carry out immediate temperature readings on fully packaged devices. However......The temperature of a power semiconductor device is important for both its optimal operation and reliability. If the temperature is known during the operation of a converter, it can be used to monitor the health of power modules: a measurement of aging, scheduling of maintenance, or even...... scale implementation of these methods are discussed. Their potential use in the aforementioned goals in condition monitoring and active thermal control is also described....

  11. Temperature measurement by neutron resonance radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayers, J.; Baciocco, G.; Hannon, A.C.

    1988-03-01

    We present a new data analysis technique for obtaining temperatures from neutron resonance radiography measurements. The technique is applied to measurements on tantalum and rhenium foils, a high temperature engineering alloy and a model catalytic system. Temperatures have been obtained to an accuracy of better than ± 1 0 C in the temperature range 21 0 C to 600 0 C. The results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations. (author)

  12. Field of Temperature Measurement by Virtual Instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor HARGAŠ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces about temperature determination for given dot of picture through image analysis. Heat transfer is the transition of thermal energy from a heated item to a cooler item. Main method of measurement of temperature in image is Pattern Matching, color scale detection and model detection. We can measure temperature dependency at time for selected point of thermo vision images. This measurement gives idea about the heat transfer at time dependences.

  13. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided

  14. Design of measurement system for Doppler broadening profiles of annihilation radiations as a function of controlled specimen temperature and its applications for a study of metals in the thermal equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kawano, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement system for Doppler broadening profiles of annihilation radiation was developed. This system reads out data for energies of γ-rays from an analog to digital converter and those for specimen temperature from a digital-voltmeter coupled to a thermocouple. These two types of digital-quantities were stored in a memory matrix of 512 channels (energy) x 128 channels (temperature) x 4 byte (count). For this purpose, a memory board of 256 kbyte with 32-dynamic RAMs (64 kbits) was used. The data acquisition was controlled by a microcomputer. Temperature of the specimen was controlled by a programmable temperature controller, thus it can be varied in a desired way. This was useful for measurements in repeated temperature cycles. A sample heater with a compact size was developed in order to obtain a homogeneous temperature distribution in the specimen. Application of this system for a study of thermal vacancies in Al-dilute alloys was also shown. (author)

  15. Temperature Measurement and Numerical Prediction in Machining Inconel 718.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Álvarez, José; Tapetado, Alberto; Vázquez, Carmen; Miguélez, Henar

    2017-06-30

    Thermal issues are critical when machining Ni-based superalloy components designed for high temperature applications. The low thermal conductivity and extreme strain hardening of this family of materials results in elevated temperatures around the cutting area. This elevated temperature could lead to machining-induced damage such as phase changes and residual stresses, resulting in reduced service life of the component. Measurement of temperature during machining is crucial in order to control the cutting process, avoiding workpiece damage. On the other hand, the development of predictive tools based on numerical models helps in the definition of machining processes and the obtainment of difficult to measure parameters such as the penetration of the heated layer. However, the validation of numerical models strongly depends on the accurate measurement of physical parameters such as temperature, ensuring the calibration of the model. This paper focuses on the measurement and prediction of temperature during the machining of Ni-based superalloys. The temperature sensor was based on a fiber-optic two-color pyrometer developed for localized temperature measurements in turning of Inconel 718. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature in the range of 250 to 1200 °C. Temperature evolution is recorded in a lathe at different feed rates and cutting speeds. Measurements were used to calibrate a simplified numerical model for prediction of temperature fields during turning.

  16. Temperature Measurement and Numerical Prediction in Machining Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapetado, Alberto; Vázquez, Carmen; Miguélez, Henar

    2017-01-01

    Thermal issues are critical when machining Ni-based superalloy components designed for high temperature applications. The low thermal conductivity and extreme strain hardening of this family of materials results in elevated temperatures around the cutting area. This elevated temperature could lead to machining-induced damage such as phase changes and residual stresses, resulting in reduced service life of the component. Measurement of temperature during machining is crucial in order to control the cutting process, avoiding workpiece damage. On the other hand, the development of predictive tools based on numerical models helps in the definition of machining processes and the obtainment of difficult to measure parameters such as the penetration of the heated layer. However, the validation of numerical models strongly depends on the accurate measurement of physical parameters such as temperature, ensuring the calibration of the model. This paper focuses on the measurement and prediction of temperature during the machining of Ni-based superalloys. The temperature sensor was based on a fiber-optic two-color pyrometer developed for localized temperature measurements in turning of Inconel 718. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature in the range of 250 to 1200 °C. Temperature evolution is recorded in a lathe at different feed rates and cutting speeds. Measurements were used to calibrate a simplified numerical model for prediction of temperature fields during turning. PMID:28665312

  17. Quantitative shearography in axisymmetric gas temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerWege, Brad A.; O'Brien, Christopher J.; Hochgreb, Simone

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the use of shearing interferometry (shearography) for the quantitative measurement of gas temperatures in axisymmetric systems in which vibration and shock are substantial, and measurement time is limited. The setup and principle of operation of the interferometer are described, as well as Fourier-transform-based fringe pattern analysis, Abel transform, and sensitivity of the phase lead to temperature calculation. A helium jet and a Bunsen burner flame are shown as verification of the diagnostic. The accuracy of the measured temperature profile is shown to be limited by the Abel transform and is critically dependent on the reference temperature used.

  18. Minimizing noise-temperature measurement errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzried, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of noise-temperature measurement errors of low-noise amplifiers was performed. Results of this analysis can be used to optimize measurement schemes for minimum errors. For the cases evaluated, the effective noise temperature (Te) of a Ka-band maser can be measured most accurately by switching between an ambient and a 2-K cooled load without an isolation attenuator. A measurement accuracy of 0.3 K was obtained for this example.

  19. Temperature Sensitive Particle for Velocity and Temperature Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji; Iida, Masao

    2007-11-01

    Phosphorescence and fluorescence are often applied to measure the temperature and the concentration of oxygen. The intensity and the lifetime of phosphor depend on the temperature and the oxygen concentration, due to the quenching effect of the phosphor. The present study clarified the effects of temperature on the lifetime of phosphorescence of Porphyrins, Ru(bpy)3^2+ and the europium complex. The phosphorescence lifetime of oil solution / water solution / painted wall were measured with changing temperature and oxygen concentration. In addition, the optical property of the small particles incorporated with the europium complex was investigated in the oil/water. The lifetime was strongly affected by temperature. Then, the temperature sensitive particle (TSParticle) with metal complex was applied to measure temperature in Silicone oil (10cSt) two-dimensionally. Present study is the result of ?High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal? entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan(MEXT).

  20. Spectroscopic analysis applied to temperature measurement in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieffe-Prevost, P.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma temperature is defined only if the plasma is in a state near thermodynamic equilibrium. This plasma state is analysed in detail and spectroscopic methods for measuring the temperature are discussed. As an application the hydrogen arc of the National Institute of Metrology of the Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (Paris) is briefly described [fr

  1. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  2. Designing an accurate system for temperature measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochan Orest

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of compensation of changes in temperature field along the legs of inhomogeneous thermocouple, which measures a temperature of an object, is considered in this paper. This compensation is achieved by stabilization of the temperature field along the thermocouple. Such stabilization does not allow the error due to acquired thermoelectric inhomogeneity to manifest itself. There is also proposed the design of the furnace to stabilize temperature field along the legs of the thermocouple which measures the temperature of an object. This furnace is not integrated with the thermocouple mentioned above, therefore it is possible to replace this thermocouple with a new one when it get its legs considerably inhomogeneous.. There is designed the two loop measuring system with the ability of error correction which can use simultaneously a usual thermocouple as well as a thermocouple with controlled profile of temperature field. The latter can be used as a reference sensor for the former.

  3. Estimation of complete temperature fields from measured temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, S.T.; Roemer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In hyperthermia treatments, it is desirable to be able to predict complete tissue temperature fields from sampled temperatures taken at a few locations. This is a difficult problem in hyperthermia treatments since the tissue blood perfusion is unknown. An initial attempt to do this automatically using unconstrained optimization techniques to minimize the differences between steady state temperatures measured during a treatment and temperatures (at the same locations) predicted from treatment simulations has been previously reported. A second technique using transient temperatures following a step decrease in power has been developed. This technique, which appears to be able to better predict complete temperature fields is presented and both it and the steady state technique are applied to data from both simulated and experimental hyperthermia treatments. The results of applying the two techniques are compared for one-dimensional situations. One particularly important problem which the transient technique can solve (and the steady state technique does not seem to be able to do as well) is that of predicting the complete temperature field in situations where the true maximum and/or minimum temperatures present are not measured by the available instrumentation

  4. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  5. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, \\Dynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors". The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  6. Radiation measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.C.; Rogers, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    This 1990 symposium was the seventh in a series of meetings which began in 1964. The 300 participants from 23 countries and the 65 oral and 77 poster presentations were more than double the size of the 1985 symposium. Some of this increase derived from the broadened scope of the program. Previous meetings emphasized X-rays and gamma-rays, but it has been increasingly clear that distinction from other forms of radiation (i.e., electrons, alpha-particles and neutrons) was contrived. This broadening led to papers in fields such as ''airport'' monitors and arms control. However, most of the increase in size of the symposium is simply a reflection of the vigorous activity, both academic and industrial in radiation measurements and their many applications. The papers in these Proceedings are arranged by major topic without regard to whether the paper was invited or contributed, oral or poster. Discussion, although an important part of the meeting, was not recorded and therefore is not included in the Proceedings

  7. Measuring nanowire thermal conductivity at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Yang, Juekuan; Xiong, Yucheng; Huang, Baoling; Xu, Terry T.; Li, Deyu; Xu, Dongyan

    2018-02-01

    This work extends the micro-thermal-bridge method for thermal conductivity measurements of nanowires to high temperatures. The thermal-bridge method, based on a microfabricated device with two side-by-side suspended membranes with integrated platinum resistance heaters/thermometers, has been used to determine thermal conductivity of various nanowires/nanotubes/nanoribbons at relatively low temperatures. However, to date, thermal conductivity characterization of nanowires at temperatures above 600 K has seldom been reported presumably due to several technical difficulties including the instability of the microfabricated thermometers, radiation heat loss, and the effect of the background conductance on the measurement. Here we report on our attempt to address the aforementioned challenges and demonstrate thermal conductivity measurement of boron nanoribbons up to 740 K. To eliminate high temperature resistance instability, the device is first annealed at 1023 K for 5 min in an argon atmosphere. Two radiation shields are installed in the measurement chamber to minimize radiation heat loss from the measurement device to the surroundings; and the temperature of the device at each set point is calibrated by an additional thermocouple directly mounted on the chip carrier. The effect of the background conductance is eliminated by adopting a differential measurement scheme. With all these modifications, we successfully measured the thermal conductivity of boron nanoribbons over a wide temperature range from 27 K to 740 K. The measured thermal conductivity increases monotonically with temperature and reaches a plateau of ~2.5 W m‑1 K‑1 at approximately 400 K, with no clear signature of Umklapp scattering observed in the whole measurement temperature range.

  8. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere.

  9. General temperature field measurement by digital holography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít; Vít, Tomáš; Václavík, Jan; Kopecký, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2013), A319-A325 ISSN 1559-128X Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : digital holography * temperature field measurement * tomography Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2013

  10. Noise thermometry - a new temperature measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Rittinghaus, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal Johnson-Niquist noise is the basis of noise thermometry. This temperature measuring method is, e.g., of interest insofar as the noise thermometer gives absolute values as a primary thermometer and is in principle extensively independent of environmental influences and material properties. The resistance values of the measuring probe are about 10 Ohm to a few kOhm. The demands of electronics are high, the self-noise of the measuring apparatus must be as small as possible; a comparative measuring method is advantageous. 1 to 2,500 K are given as a possible temperature range. An accuracy of 0.1% could be achieved in laboratory measurements. Temperature measurements to be used in operation in a few nuclear reactors are mentioned. (HP/LH) [de

  11. Technology and education: First approach for measuring temperature with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    This poster session presents some ideas and approaches to understand concepts of thermal equilibrium, temperature and heat in order to bulid a man-nature relationship in a harmonious and responsible manner, emphasizing the interaction between science and technology, without neglecting the relationship of the environment and society, an approach to sustainability. It is proposed the development of practices that involve the use of modern technology, of easy access and low cost to measure temperature. We believe that the Arduino microcontroller and some temperature sensors can open the doors of innovation to carry out such practices. In this work we present some results of simple practices presented to a population of students between the ages of 16 and 17 years old. The practices in this proposal are: Zero law of thermodynamics and the concept of temperature, calibration of thermometers and measurement of temperature for heating and cooling of three different substances under the same physical conditions. Finally the student is asked to make an application that involves measuring of temperature and other physical parameters. Some suggestions are: to determine the temperature at which we take some food, measure the temperature difference at different rooms of a house, housing constructions that favour optimal condition, measure the temperature of different regions, measure of temperature trough different colour filters, solar activity and UV, propose applications to understand current problems such as global warming, etc. It is concluded that the Arduino practices and electrical sensors increase the cultural horizon of the students while awaking their interest to understand their operation, basic physics and its application from a modern perspective.

  12. Wideband filter radiometers for blackbody temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, L. P.; Bamber, C.; Gaertner, A. A.; Gerson, R. K.; Woods, D. J.; Woolliams, E. R.

    2010-10-01

    The use of high-temperature blackbody (HTBB) radiators to realize primary spectral irradiance scales requires that the operating temperature of the HTBB be accurately determined. We have developed five filter radiometers (FRs) to measure the temperature of the National Research Council of Canada's HTBB. The FRs are designed to minimize sensitivity to ambient temperature fluctuations. They incorporate air-spaced colored glass filters and a Si photodiode detector that are housed in a cell whose temperature is controlled to ±0.1°C by means of annular thermoelectric elements at the front and rear of the cell. These wideband filter radiometers operate in four different wavelength bands. The spectral responsivity measurements were performed in an underfill geometry for a power-mode calibration that is traceable to NRC's cryogenic radiometer. The spectral temperature sensitivity of each of these FRs has been measured. The apertures for these FRs were cold-formed by swaging machine-cut apertures onto precision dowel pins. A description of the filter radiometer design, fabrication and testing, together with a detailed uncertainty analysis, is presented. We derive the equations that relate the spectral irradiance measured by the FRs to the spectral radiance and temperature of the HTBB, and deal specifically with the change of index of refraction over the path of the radiation from the interior of the HTBB to the FRs. We believe these equations are more accurate than recently published derivations. Our measurements of the operating temperature of our HTBB working at temperatures near 2500 K, 2700 K and 2900 K, together with measurements using a pyrometer, show agreement between the five filter radiometers and with the pyrometer to within the estimated uncertainties.

  13. Aeronautical applications of high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, George E.; Luidens, Roger W.; Uherka, Kenneth; Hull, John

    1989-01-01

    The successful development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) could have a major impact on future aeronautical propulsion and aeronautical flight vehicle systems. A preliminary examination of the potential application of HTS for aeronautics indicates that significant benefits may be realized through the development and implementation of these newly discovered materials. Applications of high-temperature superconductors (currently substantiated at 95 k) were envisioned for several classes of aeronautical systems, including subsonic and supersonic transports, hypersonic aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, rotorcraft, and solar, microwave and laser powered aircraft. Introduced and described are the particular applications and potential benefits of high-temperature superconductors as related to aeronautics and/or aeronautical systems.

  14. Motor for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A high temperature motor has a stator with poles formed by wire windings, and a rotor with magnetic poles on a rotor shaft positioned coaxially within the stator. The stator and rotor are built up from stacks of magnetic-alloy laminations. The stator windings are made of high temperature magnet wire insulated with a vitreous enamel film, and the wire windings are bonded together with ceramic binder. A thin-walled cylinder is positioned coaxially between the rotor and the stator to prevent debris from the stator windings from reaching the rotor. The stator windings are wound on wire spools made of ceramic, thereby avoiding need for mica insulation and epoxy/adhesive. The stator and rotor are encased in a stator housing with rear and front end caps, and rear and front bearings for the rotor shaft are mounted on external sides of the end caps to keep debris from the motor migrating into the bearings' races.

  15. Potential aerospace applications of high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Raouf

    1994-12-01

    The recent discovery of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) with superconducting transition temperature, T(sub c), above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen has opened the door for using these materials in new and practical applications. These materials have zero resistance to electric current, have the capability of carrying large currents and as such have the potential to be used in high magnetic field applications. One of the space applications that can use superconductors is electromagnetic launch of payloads to low-earth-orbit. An electromagnetic gun-type launcher can be used in small payload systems that are launched at very high velocity, while sled-type magnetically levitated launcher can be used to launch larger payloads at smaller velocities. Both types of launchers are being studied by NASA and the aerospace industry. The use of superconductors will be essential in any of these types of launchers in order to produce the large magnetic fields required to obtain large thrust forces. Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) technology is mature enough and can be easily integrated in such systems. As for the HTS, many leading companies are currently producing HTS coils and magnets that potentially can be mass-produced for these launchers. It seems that designing and building a small-scale electromagnetic launcher is the next logical step toward seriously considering this method for launching payloads into low-earth-orbit. A second potential application is the use of HTS to build sensitive portable devices for the use in Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE). Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID's) are the most sensitive instruments for measuring changes in magnetic flux. By using HTS in SQUID's, one will be able to design a portable unit that uses liquid nitrogen or a cryocooler pump to explore the use of gradiometers or magnetometers to detect deep cracks or corrosion in structures. A third use is the replacement of Infra-Red (IR) sensor leads on

  16. Empirical Temperature Measurement in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Erik; Isella, Andrea; Boehler, Yann

    2018-02-01

    The accurate measurement of temperature in protoplanetary disks is critical to understanding many key features of disk evolution and planet formation, from disk chemistry and dynamics, to planetesimal formation. This paper explores the techniques available to determine temperatures from observations of single, optically thick molecular emission lines. Specific attention is given to issues such as the inclusion of optically thin emission, problems resulting from continuum subtraction, and complications of real observations. Effort is also made to detail the exact nature and morphology of the region emitting a given line. To properly study and quantify these effects, this paper considers a range of disk models, from simple pedagogical models to very detailed models including full radiative transfer. Finally, we show how the use of the wrong methods can lead to potentially severe misinterpretations of data, leading to incorrect measurements of disk temperature profiles. We show that the best way to estimate the temperature of emitting gas is to analyze the line peak emission map without subtracting continuum emission. Continuum subtraction, which is commonly applied to observations of line emission, systematically leads to underestimation of the gas temperature. We further show that once observational effects such as beam dilution and noise are accounted for, the line brightness temperature derived from the peak emission is reliably within 10%–15% of the physical temperature of the emitting region, assuming optically thick emission. The methodology described in this paper will be applied in future works to constrain the temperature, and related physical quantities, in protoplanetary disks observed with ALMA.

  17. Assessment of body temperature measurement options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund-Levander, Märtha; Grodzinsky, Ewa

    Assessment of body temperature is important for decisions in nursing care, medical diagnosis, treatment and the need of laboratory tests. The definition of normal body temperature as 37°C was established in the middle of the 19th century. Since then the technical design and the accuracy of thermometers has been much improved. Knowledge of physical influence on the individual body temperature, such as thermoregulation and hormones, are still not taken into consideration in body temperature assessment. It is time for a change; the unadjusted mode should be used, without adjusting to another site and the same site of measurement should be used as far as possible. Peripheral sites, such as the axillary and the forehead site, are not recommended as an assessment of core body temperature in adults. Frail elderly individuals might have a low normal body temperature and therefore be at risk of being assessed as non-febrile. As the ear site is close to the hypothalamus and quickly responds to changes in the set point temperature, it is a preferable and recommendable site for measurement of body temperature.

  18. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  19. Laboratory setup for temperature and humidity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eimre, Kristjan

    2015-01-01

    In active particle detectors, the temperature and humidity conditions must be under constant monitoring and control, as even small deviations from the norm cause changes to detector characteristics and result in a loss of precision. To monitor the temperature and humidity, different kinds of sensors are used, which must be calibrated beforehand to ensure their accuracy. To calibrate the large number of sensors that are needed for the particle detectors and other laboratory work, a calibration system is needed. The purpose of the current work was to develop a laboratory setup for temperature and humidity sensor measurements and calibration.

  20. Cutting temperature measurement and material machinability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedić Bogdan P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutting temperature is very important parameter of cutting process. Around 90% of heat generated during cutting process is then away by sawdust, and the rest is transferred to the tool and workpiece. In this research cutting temperature was measured with artificial thermocouples and question of investigation of metal machinability from aspect of cutting temperature was analyzed. For investigation of material machinability during turning artificial thermocouple was placed just below the cutting top of insert, and for drilling thermocouples were placed through screw holes on the face surface. In this way was obtained simple, reliable, economic and accurate method for investigation of cutting machinability.

  1. Temperature measurements of shock-compressed deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, N.C.; Ross, M.; Nellis, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    The authors measured the temperatures of single and double-shocked D 2 and H 2 up to 85 GPa (0.85 Mbar) and 5,200 K. While single shock temperatures, at pressures to 23 GPa, agree well with previous models, the double shock temperatures are as much as 40% lower than predicted. This is believed to be caused by molecular dissociation, and a new model of the hydrogen EOS at extreme conditions has been developed which correctly predicts their observations. These data and model have important implications for programs which use condensed-phase hydrogen in implosion systems

  2. Temperature, its measurement and control in industry - ITM '90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.; Blieck, L.; Jescheck, M.; Neubert, W.; Kunze, D.

    1990-01-01

    The publication refers to the new VDE/VDI guideline 3511 and explains its practical intentions and implications by thoroughly discussing the applications of temperature sensors and their limits of use. The current state of the art in temperature measuring is fully described by the discussion of the new temperature scale introduced recently, the ITS '90. The authors of the book look in detail at the particular requirements and conditions of infrared measuring techniques using radiation thermometers as defined in DIN 5496, the applications of microprocessors (DIN-measuring-field-bus, etc.), time program emitters, and measuring transducers (EX ib, etc.). A full chapter has been devoted to the subject of surface temperature measurement. Examples referring to practical applications in industry serve as an introduction to thermal control engineering, in particular with infrared sensors, for processes such as thermal forming. New, optical thermometers for the low temperature range have been given much attention. An annex presents comprehensive tables for calculation and conversion of thermal quantities. (orig./HP) With 192 figs., 134 refs [de

  3. Temperature measurements at the LMFBR core outlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argous, J.P.; Berger, R.; Casejuane, R.; Fournier, C.; Girard, J.P.

    1980-04-01

    Over the last few years the temperature sensors used to measure the subassembly outlet temperature in French designed LMFBRs have been modified, basically in an effort to reduce the dispersion of the chromel-alumel thermocouple time constant, and to extend the frequency spectrum of the measurement signals by adding a steel electrode to from a stainless steel-sodium thermocouple. The result of this evolution is the temperature probe immersed in sodium which will be used in the SUPER PHENIX reactor. This paper describes the tests already completed or in progress on this probe. It also presents measurement data on the two basic probe parameters: the thermoelectric power of the stainless steel-sodium thermocouple and the time constant of the chromel-alumel thermocouple

  4. Measuring temperature using MRI: a powerful and versatile technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert; Streicher, Markus

    2012-02-01

    The Larmor frequency of water protons has reliably linear temperature dependence. Since this frequency shift is easily measurable using relatively simple MRI techniques, a remarkable opportunity arises for uniquely non-invasive and accurate temperature evaluation, deep within any water-containing object. Major applications are appearing in the field of image-guided surgery. The cutting-edge papers collected in this Special Issue demonstrate both the versatility and the power of MRI thermometry.

  5. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  6. Potential applications of high temperature helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleicher, R.W. Jr.; Kennedy, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses the DOE MHTGR-SC program's recent activity to improve the economics of the MHTGR without sacrificing safety performance and two potential applications of high temperature helium, the MHTGR gas turbine plant and a process heat application for methanol production from coal

  7. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  8. Slot Antenna for Wireless Temperature Measurement Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Öncel; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel clover-slot antenna for a surface-acoustic-wave sensor based wireless temperature measurement system. The slot is described by a parametric locus curve that has the shape of a clover. The antenna is operated at high temperatures, in rough environments, and has a 43......% fractional bandwidth at the 2.4 GHz ISM-band. The slot antenna has been optimized for excitation by a passive chip soldered onto it. Measurement results are compared with simulation results and show good agreements....

  9. Characteristics of short distance field of a source radiating at electronic frequencies in a ionospheric plasma. Applications to density and electron temperature measurement by mutual impedance probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrie, R.

    1983-06-01

    Realization of a new type of radio-frequency probe, the mutual-impedance probe (or the quadrupole probe) is developed. Theoretical results obtained with a cold plasma description of the ionized medium with static magnetic field. Transfer impedance between two dipoles in an homogeneous hot and isotope plasma is then calculated. In equatorial ionosphere, measurements made by the H.F. quadrupole probe, in the Veronique rocket, during the Cisaspe experiment, have been interpreted with this hot plasma theory. The influence of a plasma drift with respect to the emitter dipole is analyzed. The influence of a static magnetic field in hot and homogeneous plasma, on the frequency response curve of the mutual impedance is studied. For, in ionospheric plasmas of auroral and polar zones, the earth magnetic field is no more negligible and gives to the plasma dielectric, strongly anisotropic, properties well described by the microscopic theory in hot magnetoplasma. The space time fast evolution of characteristics of plasma encountered in space experiments has been shown up with a new method of measurement the self-oscillating quadrupole probe. The work synthesis is put in a concrete form on the polar satellite Aureol-3 the first results of which are presented. This satellite allows a precise study of ionosphere auroral zones. At last, it is shown that methods developed for electron density and temperature measurements can be transposed in low frequency. In this case, measurements with quadrupole probe allow to get the ion average mass by lower hybrid frequency excitation [fr

  10. Saturation effects in Na lidar temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von der Gathen, P.

    1991-01-01

    Na atoms residing in the 80-110 km altitude region can be used to probe the Doppler-broadened hyperfine structure (hfs) of their D 2 resonance by ground-bases lidar and hence to deduce atmospheric temperatures. In principle, two different methods may be employed: (1) wavelength scanning of the hfs with a narrow-band laser and signal detection with a broad-band receiver, and (2) use of a broad-band laser and wavelength scanning of the hfs with a narrow-band receiver. These two methods are affected in different ways by laser-induced saturation in the Na layer, the effect on the measurements of sodium densities and of atmospheric temperatures being quite different. Density measurements are affected by the absolute level of saturation. Temperature measurements, however, are affected by the difference in saturation at the scanned wavelengths. If, additionally, observed signal levels are taken into account, method 1 is more efficient than method 2 for both types of measurements at nighttime, whereas a modified method 2 surpasses method 1 for temperature measurements at daytime

  11. Ion temperature measurements in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvreau, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Initial spectroscopic data from MS showed evidence of ion heating as deduced from the line widths of different ion species. Detailed measurements of OIV spectral emission line profiles in space and time revealed that heating takes place at early time, before spheromak formation and is occurring within the current discharge. The measured ion temperature is several times the electron temperature and cannot be explained by classical (Spitzer) resistivity. Classically, ions are expected to have lower temperatures than the electrons and therefore, lower temperatures than observed. High ion temperatures have been observed in different RFP's and Spheromaks but are usually associated with relaxation to the Taylor state and occur in the sustainment phase. During formation, the current delivered to start the discharge is not axisymmetric and as a consequence, X-points appear in the magnetic flux. A two dimensional analysis predicts that magnetic reconnection occurring at an X-point can give rise to high ion heating rates. A simple 0-dimensional calculation showed that within the first 20 μs, a conversion of mass flow kinetic energy into ion temperature could take place due to viscosity

  12. Low-temperature mobility measurements on CMOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairpetian, A.; Gitlin, D.; Viswanathan, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The surface channel mobility of carriers in eta- and rho-MOS transistors fabricated in a CMOS process was accurately determined at low temperatures down to 5 Κ. The mobility was obtained by an accurate measurement of the inversion charge density using a split C-V technique and the conductance at low drain voltages. The split C-V technique was validated at all temperatures using a one-dimensional Poisson solver (MOSCAP), which was modified for low-temperature application. The mobility dependence on the perpendicular electric field for different substrate bias values appears to have different temperature dependence for eta- and rho-channel devices. The electron mobility increases with a decrease in temperature at all gate voltages. On the other hand, the hole mobility exhibits a different temperature behavior depending upon whether the gate voltage corresponds to strong inversion or is near threshold

  13. Measurement of rotational temperature at Kolhapur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Mukherjee

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the hydroxyl rotational temperature for the (8,3 Meinel band have been reported from the observations of the ratio of the relative intensities of P1(2 and P1(4 lines of the OH(8,3 band at Kolhapur (16.8° N, 74.2° E, dip lat. 10.6° N in India during the period 1 November 2002-29 April 2003 using tilting-filter photometers. Mean values of rotational temperature have been computed for 60 nights. The monthly mean value of temperature lies in the range 194(±11-208(±18K. The mean rotational temperature obtained from all the measurements was found to be 202±15K. The results agree with other low-latitude measurements of rotational temperature using photometric airglow techniques. Quasi-periodic fluctuations with a period of about one to two hours have been prominent on many nights. Furthermore, the results show the general agreement between observations and model (MSIS-86 predictions.

  14. Measurement of rotational temperature at Kolhapur, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Mukherjee

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the hydroxyl rotational temperature for the (8,3 Meinel band have been reported from the observations of the ratio of the relative intensities of P1(2 and P1(4 lines of the OH(8,3 band at Kolhapur (16.8° N, 74.2° E, dip lat. 10.6° N in India during the period 1 November 2002-29 April 2003 using tilting-filter photometers. Mean values of rotational temperature have been computed for 60 nights. The monthly mean value of temperature lies in the range 194(±11-208(±18K. The mean rotational temperature obtained from all the measurements was found to be 202±15K. The results agree with other low-latitude measurements of rotational temperature using photometric airglow techniques. Quasi-periodic fluctuations with a period of about one to two hours have been prominent on many nights. Furthermore, the results show the general agreement between observations and model (MSIS-86 predictions.

  15. A Temperature Sensor using a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Timer for Very Wide Temperature Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik; Culley, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    A temperature sensor based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Timer was designed for extreme temperature applications. The sensor can operate under a wide temperature range from hot jet engine compartments to cryogenic space exploration missions. For example, in Jet Engine Distributed Control Architecture, the sensor must be able to operate at temperatures exceeding 150 C. For space missions, extremely low cryogenic temperatures need to be measured. The output of the sensor, which consisted of a stream of digitized pulses whose period was proportional to the sensed temperature, can be interfaced with a controller or a computer. The data acquisition system would then give a direct readout of the temperature through the use of a look-up table, a built-in algorithm, or a mathematical model. Because of the wide range of temperature measurement and because the sensor is made of carefully selected COTS parts, this work is directly applicable to the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics/Subsonic Fixed Wing Program--Jet Engine Distributed Engine Control Task and to the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. In the past, a temperature sensor was designed and built using an SOI operational amplifier, and a report was issued. This work used an SOI 555 timer as its core and is completely new work.

  16. Temperature measurements in ZT-40M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, E.M.; Haberstich, A.; Thomas, K.S.; Watt, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperatures derived from Thomson scattering and ultrasoft x-ray (USXR) measurements taken before and after machine modifications are compared for ZT-40M. Modifications were made to the magnetic field windings to reduce field errors and the joints in the aluminum shell were coated with joint compound to reduce resistance and make all joints electrically uniform. These modifications resulted in increased plasma lifetime in ZT-40M from less than 10 ms to over 20 ms. Thomson scattering measurements were made with a single-point Thomson scattering apparatus. The scattered spectrum is collected by a three-grating spectrometer. The soft x rays are collected by a two-foil differential transmission system whose foil ratios may be easily varied. Before modifications the Thomson scattering and soft x-ray temperatures agreed up until 3 to 4 ms into the discharge. After this time the Thomson scattering temperature decreased slowly while the soft x-ray ''temperature'' increased rapidly. field errors resulted in Thomson scattering and USXR ''temperature'' time histories remaining fairly flat out to 10 to 11 ms, but introduced a small discrepancy (about 50 eV) in the absolute value of the temperatures. This change may be due either to the change in foil thickness used or to changes in radial temperature profiles. Profile changes may have been caused by the addition of four poloidal limiters or improvements to the magnetic field topology. After modifications the temperatures from both Thomson scattering and USXR were lower and the plasma density was higher. This is probably a result of the lower plasma-wall interaction with the new configuration

  17. Two methods to measure granular gas temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastaing, J.-Y.; Géminard, J.-C.; Naert, A.

    2017-07-01

    Grains are vibrated so as to achieve a granular gas, here regarded as an archetype of a dissipative non equilibrium steady state (NESS). We report on two distinct and concordant experimental measures of the system effective temperature. To do so, a blade fastened to the shaft of a small DC-motor, immersed in the grains, behaves as a driven 1D Brownian rotator, which is used as both actuator and sensor simultaneously. On the one hand, the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, which involves a measure of the asymmetry of the energy exchanges between the rotator and the NESS reservoir, provides a first effective temperature. On the other hand, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which involves the relation between the spontaneous fluctuations and the response to a weak perturbation, defines a second, independent, effective temperature. Both methods, even though they are based on drastically different ideas, give nicely concordant results.

  18. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  19. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  20. Tokamak Plasmas: Electron temperature $(T_ {e}) $ measurements ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 55; Issue 5-6. Tokamak Plasmas : Electron temperature ( T e ) measurements by Thomson scattering system. R Rajesh B Ramesh Kumar S K Varshney Manoj Kumar Chhaya Chavda Aruna Thakkar N C Patel Ajai Kumar Aditya Team. Contributed Papers Volume 55 ...

  1. New methode of measurement of temperature flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slávka Grexová

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this article is a measurement of thermal flow under laboratory conditions. We define the thermal flow as an amount of heat transmitted through a surface of rock over a certain period of time. According to the Atlas of Geothermal Energy, thermal flow ranges from 40 to 120 mW/m2. It is not possible to measure it directly on the rock surface. The conventional ways of measurement is a “separation bar” thermic conduction measurement system or measurement of the temperature of the rock in two different places at selected underground depth intervals. These measurements and analyses are not sufficient to make a final conclusion. It is necessary to repeat the measurements under real conditions.

  2. Preparation and Application of Temperature Sensitive Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi

    2015-11-01

    Temperature sensitive painting (TSP) is a rapidly developing surface optical measurement technology, which uses temperature sensitive fluorescent probe molecular to obtain the temperature distribution on the surface of the model. Two different types of TSP material are prepared to apply in fluid mechanical experiments. Rhodamine is used as fluorescer and acetone as solvent for the first recipe, while rare earth material as fluorescer and zirconia as solvent for the second recipe. With proper calibration, surface temperature nephogram and temperature gradient nephogram is obtained based on the measured light intensity data, and transition location and heat flux is analyzed. Double layer - multi component TSP measurement technology and more strict calibration will be developed in the near future to get more precise heat flux distribution.

  3. Diamond micro-Raman thermometers for accurate gate temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Roland B.; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-26

    Determining the peak channel temperature in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors and other devices with high accuracy is an important and challenging issue. A surface-sensitive thermometric technique is demonstrated, utilizing Raman thermography and diamond microparticles to measure the gate temperature. This technique enhances peak channel temperature estimation, especially when it is applied in combination with standard micro-Raman thermography. Its application to other metal-covered areas of devices, such as field plates is demonstrated. Furthermore, this technique can be readily applied to other material/device systems.

  4. Diamond micro-Raman thermometers for accurate gate temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Roland B.; Pomeroy, James W.; Kuball, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Determining the peak channel temperature in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors and other devices with high accuracy is an important and challenging issue. A surface-sensitive thermometric technique is demonstrated, utilizing Raman thermography and diamond microparticles to measure the gate temperature. This technique enhances peak channel temperature estimation, especially when it is applied in combination with standard micro-Raman thermography. Its application to other metal-covered areas of devices, such as field plates is demonstrated. Furthermore, this technique can be readily applied to other material/device systems.

  5. Liquid temperature measuring method and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Fumi; Karasawa, Hirokazu.

    1995-01-01

    In the present invention, temperature of liquid metal in coolants in an FBR type reactor can accurately be measured at rapid response time. Namely, ultrasonic waves are emitted from an ultrasonic wave sensor disposed in the air to a guide wave tube. Ultrasonic waves are reflected at reflection plates disposed at front and back or upper and lower portions of a small hole disposed to the wave guide tube. The reflected waves are received by the sensor described above. The difference of the reaching time of the reflected waves from the reflecting plates disposed at the front and the back or the upper and lower portions is measured. The speed of sounds in this case is determined based on the size of the small hole and the distance of the upper and the lower reflection plates. The speed of sounds is determined by the formula below: V(m/s) = 2500 - 0.52 T, where T: temperature. The temperature of the liquid can easily be calculated based on the formula. Accordingly, since the speed of the ultrasonic waves from their emission to the reception is msec order, and the processing of the signals are simple, the temperature can be measured at a response time of several msecs. In addition, since the ultrasonic wave sensor is disposed at the outside of the reactor, no special countermeasure for environmental circumstances is necessary, to improve maintenance ability. (I.S.)

  6. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  7. Plasma temperature measurements in disruption simulated experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Results are reported of experiments to measure the temporal and spatial distributions of a temperature and radiation of a near surface plasma cloud appearing in the disruption simulated experiments. These measurements are needed to verificate the different numerical models of vapor shielding layer which appears to arise near the divertor plates surface and prevents them from the bulk of the incoming energy. Experiments with graphite and tungsten samples were carried out at the 2MK-200 plasma facility. Long CUSP trap was used as a source of high temperature deuterium plasma with a power density W = 10 MW/cm{sup 2} and time duration t = 20 mcs. Laser scattering, space and time resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy was employed to measure the plasma cloud temperature and radiation. The different behaviour of shielding layer parameters was shown for a graphite and tungsten samples. For a tungsten the sharp boundary existed between the incoming deuterium plasma and the thin layer of ablated material plasma and the strong gradient of electron temperature took place in this zone. For a graphite this boundary was broadened at the distance and the main part of the screening layer consisted of the mixture of the incoming deuterium and ablated carbon plasma. (orig.).

  8. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  9. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-07-10

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  10. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  11. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Usamentiaga

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed.

  12. Global rainbow refractometry for droplet temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascal Lemaitre; Emmanuel Porcheron; Amandine Nuboer; Philippe Brun; Pierre Cornet; Jeanne Malet; Jacques Vendel; Laurent Bouilloux [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire DSU/SERAC, BP 68, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gerard Grehan [UMR 6614 CORIA, Laboratoire d' Electromagnetisme et Systemes Particulaires Site Universitaire du Madrillet, Avenue de l' universite BP 12, 76 801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex, (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to establish an accurate database to characterize the heat and mass transfers between a spray and the atmosphere with thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident in the containment enclosure of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) has developed the TOSQAN experimental facility. This experiment is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics allowing to measure droplet size and velocity and gas concentrations [1]. The aim of this work is to present the Global Rainbow Thermometry (GRT), which is an advanced non-intrusive optical diagnostic, developed to measure the mean temperature of a set of falling droplets, in a measurement volume of 1 cm{sup 3}. The final paper will be divided in three parts. In the first one, we will explain the principle of the rainbow formation and how droplet temperature can be deduced from the rainbow analysis [2]. This part will be illustrated with the theoretical background on the rainbow and numerical simulations of the global rainbow. The second part will be devoted to present the global rainbow experimental set-up we have developed on optical table, its experimental qualification and finally its implementation on the TOSQAN facility [3]. Finally, we will present the temperature measurements achieved in TOSQAN for thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident. These measurements are useful to characterize the heat and mass transfers between the spraying droplets and the air-steam mixture composing the atmosphere. This analysis will be exposed in a two companion papers. References: [1] E. Porcheron, P. Brun, P. Cornet, J. Malet, J. Vendel. Optical diagnostics applied for single and multi-phase flow characterization in the TOSQAN facility dedicated for thermal hydraulic containment studies. NURETH-10 Seoul, Korea, October 5-9, 2003. [2] P

  13. Global rainbow refractometry for droplet temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascal Lemaitre; Emmanuel Porcheron; Amandine Nuboer; Philippe Brun; Pierre Cornet; Jeanne Malet; Jacques Vendel; Laurent Bouilloux; Gerard Grehan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to establish an accurate database to characterize the heat and mass transfers between a spray and the atmosphere with thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident in the containment enclosure of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN) has developed the TOSQAN experimental facility. This experiment is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics allowing to measure droplet size and velocity and gas concentrations [1]. The aim of this work is to present the Global Rainbow Thermometry (GRT), which is an advanced non-intrusive optical diagnostic, developed to measure the mean temperature of a set of falling droplets, in a measurement volume of 1 cm 3 . The final paper will be divided in three parts. In the first one, we will explain the principle of the rainbow formation and how droplet temperature can be deduced from the rainbow analysis [2]. This part will be illustrated with the theoretical background on the rainbow and numerical simulations of the global rainbow. The second part will be devoted to present the global rainbow experimental set-up we have developed on optical table, its experimental qualification and finally its implementation on the TOSQAN facility [3]. Finally, we will present the temperature measurements achieved in TOSQAN for thermal-hydraulic conditions representative of a hypothetical nuclear reactor accident. These measurements are useful to characterize the heat and mass transfers between the spraying droplets and the air-steam mixture composing the atmosphere. This analysis will be exposed in a two companion papers. References: [1] E. Porcheron, P. Brun, P. Cornet, J. Malet, J. Vendel. Optical diagnostics applied for single and multi-phase flow characterization in the TOSQAN facility dedicated for thermal hydraulic containment studies. NURETH-10 Seoul, Korea, October 5-9, 2003. [2] P

  14. Temperature measurement in French atomic piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weill, J.; Rastoix, G.

    1950-10-01

    In the Chatillon reactor the temperature is measured (1) in the interior of one of the vertical A1 cylinders filled with UO 2 (temperature interval 20 to 70 deg. C), and (2) in the center of the tank containing D 2 O (20 to 50 deg. C). The instruments used are silver-constantan thermocouples; the wires are insulated by SiO 2 sheaths, those immersed in D 2 O being placed within Al cases 10 mm diameter. In the Saclay reactor the temperature is taken (1) in the interior of 4 U rods (20 to 300 deg. C), (2) at 2 points of the D 2 O mass (20 to 60 deg. C), (3) at one point in graphite (20 to 100 deg. C), and (4) at 5 points in the catalytic setup (200 deg. C). Copper-constantan couples are used (Ag-constantan is not suitable above 150 deg. C); the wires are enclosed in a sheath of glass fabric. In both reactors the accuracy of the temperature measurements is 0.5 deg. C. (author)

  15. Measurements of temperature on LHC thermal models

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C

    2001-01-01

    Full-scale thermal models for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator cryogenic system have been studied at CERN and at Fermilab. Thermal measurements based on two different models permitted us to evaluate the performance of the LHC dipole cryostats as well as to validate the LHC Interaction Region (IR) inner triplet cooling scheme. The experimental procedures made use of temperature sensors supplied by industry and assembled on specially designed supports. The described thermal models took the advantage of advances in cryogenic thermometry which will be implemented in the future LHC accelerator to meet the strict requirements of the LHC for precision, accuracy, reliability, and ease-of-use. The sensors used in the temperature measurement of the superfluid (He II) systems are the primary focus of this paper, although some aspects of the LHC control system and signal conditioning are also reviewed. (15 refs).

  16. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06{mu}m as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs.

  17. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06μm as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, S.

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs

  18. Measurement of polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients for semivolatile organic compounds as a function of temperature: Application to passive air sampler monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Paula; Harner, Tom; Eng, Anita

    2017-05-01

    Polyurethane foam - air partition coefficients (K PUF-air ) for 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 10 alkyl-substituted PAHs, 4 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and dibenzothiophene were measured as a function of temperature over the range 5 °C-35 °C, using a generator column approach. Enthalpies of PUF-to-air transfer (ΔH PUF-air , kJ/mol) were determined from the slopes of log K PUF-air versus 1000/T (K), and have an average value of 81.2 ± 7.03 kJ/mol. The log K PUF-air values at 22 °C ranged from 4.99 to 7.25. A relationship for log K PUF-air versus log K OA was shown to agree with a previous relationship based on only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and derived from long-term indoor uptake study experiments. The results also confirm that the existing K OA -based model for predicting log K PUF-air values is accurate. This new information is important in the derivation of uptake profiles and effective air sampling volumes for PUF disk samplers so that results can be reported in units of concentration in air. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High temperature applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The meeting was organized to review industry/user needs designs, status of technology and the associated economics for high temperature applications. It was attended by approximately 100 participants from nine countries. The participants presented 17 papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2006-09-30

    The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating

  1. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2003-09-01

    During this reporting period, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement literature, the ultrasonic application and its background study in cleaning application, and spray coating process are completed. The gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted. Four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was applied to analyze the test data. The analysis shows that all four factors are significant to the temperature measurements in the gasifier simulator (cold model). The regression analysis for the case with the normalized room temperature shows that linear model fits the temperature data with 82% accuracy (18% error). The regression analysis for the case without the normalized room temperature shows 72.5% accuracy (27.5% error). The nonlinear regression analysis indicates a better fit than that of the linear regression. The nonlinear regression model's accuracy is 88.7% (11.3% error) for normalized room temperature case, which is better than the linear regression analysis. The hot model thermocouple sleeve design and fabrication are completed. The gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication are completed. The system tests of the gasifier simulator (hot model) have been conducted and some modifications have been made. Based on the system tests and results analysis, the gasifier simulator (hot model) has met the proposed design requirement and the ready for system test. The ultrasonic cleaning method is under evaluation and will be further studied for the gasifier simulator (hot model) application. The progress of this project has been on schedule.

  2. Modern measurements fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Petri, D; Carbone, P; Catelani, M

    2015-01-01

    This book explores the modern role of measurement science for both the technically most advanced applications and in everyday and will help readers gain the necessary skills to specialize their knowledge for a specific field in measurement. Modern Measurements is divided into two parts. Part I (Fundamentals) presents a model of the modern measurement activity and the already recalled fundamental bricks. It starts with a general description that introduces these bricks and the uncertainty concept. The next chapters provide an overview of these bricks and finishes (Chapter 7) with a more general and complex model that encompasses both traditional (hard) measurements and (soft) measurements, aimed at quantifying non-physical concepts, such as quality, satisfaction, comfort, etc. Part II (Applications) is aimed at showing how the concepts presented in Part I can be usefully applied to design and implement measurements in some very impor ant and broad fields. The editors cover System Identification (Chapter 8...

  3. Creep behavior of materials for high-temperature reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.; Hartnagel, W.; Iischner, B.; Schepp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) application are selected according to their creep behavior. For two alloys--Incoloy-800 used for the live steam tubing of the thorium high-temperature reactor and Inconel-617 evaluated for tubings in advanced HTGRs--creep curves are measured and described by equations. A microstructural interpretation is given. An essential result is that nonstable microstructures determine the creep behavior

  4. Sea Surface Temperatures (SST): Significance and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S. F.

    2006-05-01

    Oceans cover 71 percent of Earth's surface and control the global climate. Quoted global mean temperature values and trends, largely based on land thermometers, differ substantially -" mainly because of uncertainties about SST. The ongoing controversy about the relative importance of natural climate changes and Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) revolves mainly around disparities between temperature trends of the atmosphere and surface (in the tropics and SH, i.e. mostly SST). Accurate measurement of SST is difficult. Geographic coverage is poor and there are many different techniques, each with its own problems and uncertainties: Water temperatures from buckets and ship-engine inlets; fixed and floating buoys; air temperatures from shipboard and island stations; and remote sensing from satellites using IR and microwaves. As is evident, each technique refers to a different level below the air-water interface. Drifter buoys (at around 50 cm) measure temperatures in the euphotic layers that are generally warmer than the bulk mixed layer sampled by ships (typically around 10 m). The IR emission arises from a 10-micron-thick skin that interacts dynamically with the underlying "mixed layer." The microwave data depend also on emissivity and therefore on surface roughness and sea state. SST data derived from corals provide some support for instrumental data but are not conclusive. The majority of corals show a warming trend since 1979; others show cooling or are ambiguous. There are different ways of interpreting this result. Physical optics dictates that the downwelling IR radiation from atmospheric greenhouse gases is absorbed in the first instance within the skin. Only direct measurements can establish how much of this energy is shared with the bulk mixed layer (to which the usual SST values refer.). SST controls evaporation and therefore global precipitation. SST influences tropical cyclones and sea-level rise; but there is lively debate on those issues. Changes in

  5. Temperature measuring element in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takashi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To easily measure the partial maximum temperature at a portion within the nuclear reactor where the connection with the external portion is difficult. Constitution: Sodium, potassium or the alloy thereof with high heat expansion coefficient is packed into an elastic vessel having elastic walls contained in a capsule. A piercing member formed into an acute triangle is attached to one end in the direction of expansion and contraction of the elastic container. The two sides of the triangle form an acute knife edge. A diaphragm is disposed within a capsule at a position opposed to the sharpened direction of the piercing member. Such a capsule is placed in a predetermined position of the nuclear reactor. The elastic vessel causes thermal expansion displacement depending on the temperature at a certain position, by which the top end of the pierce member penetrates through the diaphragm. A pierced scar of a penetration length depending on the temperature is resulted to the diaphragm. The length of the piercing damage is electroscopically observed and compared with the calibration curve to recognize the maximum temperature in the predetermined portion of the nuclear reactor. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Uncertainty evaluation in transition temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillaud, C. [Electricite de France, Avoine (France); Augendre, H. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); Bethmont, M. [Electricite de France, Ecuelles (France)

    1996-12-31

    The pressure vessel surveillance program is mainly based on the transition temperature change assessment, a change which is induced by neutron irradiation. Uncertainties in Charpy test measurements are well known; however, the authors are less familiar with uncertainties due to general procedures governing experiments, which can be significant and therefore must be taken into account. In fact, procedures specify neither the number of specimens needed to obtain a transition curve, nor the choice of test temperatures, nor the fitting method for the transition curve. A study has been conducted to determine the influence of the experimental procedure on the accuracy of transition temperature determination, and the initial results are presented in this paper. Two EDF laboratories performed Charpy tests on the surveillance program reference metal, using 8, 16, 24, 32 and 64 specimens to evaluate how the number of specimens affects the transition temperature. The influence of the scatter of mechanical properties has also been studied at two levels of irradiation. The authors have evaluated the effect of different sampling strategies and investigated a new fitting method, which is based on a simultaneous fitting of all curves with common constraints on parameters.

  7. Temperature measurements during laser skin welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Choi, Bernard; Welch, Ashley J.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    A thermal camera was used to measure surface temperatures during laser skin welding to provide feedback for optimization of the laser parameters. Two-cm-long, full- thickness incisions were made in guinea pig skin. India ink was used as an absorber. Continuous-wave, 1.06-μm, Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the incisions, producing a pulse duration of approximately 100 ms. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6, 4.0, and 8.0 s were studied with total operation times of 3, 5, and 10 min, respectively. A laser spot diameter of 5 mm was used with the power constant at 10 W. Thermal images were obtained at 30 frames per second with a thermal camera detecting 3.5 micrometers radiation. Surface temperatures were recorded at 0, 1, and 6 mm from the center line of the incision. Cooling durations between scans of 1.6 s and 4.0 s in vitro resulted in temperatures at the weld site remaining above ~65°C for prolonged periods of time. Cooling durations between scans as long as 8.0 s were sufficient both in vitro and in vivo to prevent a significant rise in baseline temperatures at the weld site over time.

  8. Downhole temperature tool accurately measures well bore profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloud, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that an inexpensive temperature tool provides accurate temperatures measurements during drilling operations for better design of cement jobs, workovers, well stimulation, and well bore hydraulics. Valid temperature data during specific wellbore operations can improve initial job design, fluid testing, and slurry placement, ultimately enhancing well bore performance. This improvement applies to cement slurries, breaker activation for slurries, breaker activation for stimulation and profile control, and fluid rheological properties for all downhole operations. The temperature tool has been run standalone mounted inside drill pipe, on slick wire line and braided cable, and as a free-falltool. It has also been run piggyback on both directional surveys (slick line and free-fall) and standard logging runs. This temperature measuring system has been used extensively in field well bores to depths of 20,000 ft. The temperature tool is completely reusable in the field, ever similar to the standard directional survey tools used on may drilling rigs. The system includes a small, rugged, programmable temperature sensor, a standard body housing, various adapters for specific applications, and a personal computer (PC) interface

  9. Compensation systems for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, Balzej T

    2004-01-01

    The book is dedicated to the behaviour of ductile materials at cryogenic temperatures, structural stability issues and reliability oriented parametric optimisation of compensation systems containing the corrugated bellows. The problems of local and global stability of systems containing bellows, coupling between the low-cycle fatigue and stability as well as evolution of plastic strain fields, micro-damage and strain induced phase transformation in the corrugated shells at cryogenic temperatures are presented. As a special feature reliability oriented optimum design of compensation systems under strength, stability, fatigue and geometrical constraints is discussed. The relevant applications in the particle accelerators and cryogenic transfer lines are shown.

  10. Comparison Testings between Two High-temperature Strain Measurement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, J.-F.; Castelli, M. G.; Androjna, D.; Blue, C.; Blue, R.; Lin, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of a newly developed resistance strain gage, the PdCr temperature-compensated wire strain gage, to that of a conventional high-temperature extensometry. The evaluation of the two strain measurement systems was conducted through the application of various thermal and mechanical loading spectra using a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system equipped with quartz lamp heating. The purpose of the testing was not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the testing environment typically employed when characterizing the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials. Strain measurement capabilities to 8OO C were investigated with a nickel base superalloy IN100 substrate material, and application to titanium matrix composite (TMC) materials was examined with the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 08 system. PdCr strain gages installed by three attachment techniques, namely, flame spraying, spot welding and rapid infrared joining were investigated.

  11. Apparatus for accurately measuring high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.

    The present invention is a thermometer used for measuring furnace temperatures in the range of about 1800/sup 0/ to 2700/sup 0/C. The thermometer comprises a broadband multicolor thermal radiation sensor positioned to be in optical alignment with the end of a blackbody sight tube extending into the furnace. A valve-shutter arrangement is positioned between the radiation sensor and the sight tube and a chamber for containing a charge of high pressure gas is positioned between the valve-shutter arrangement and the radiation sensor. A momentary opening of the valve shutter arrangement allows a pulse of the high gas to purge the sight tube of air-borne thermal radiation contaminants which permits the radiation sensor to accurately measure the thermal radiation emanating from the end of the sight tube.

  12. Comparison of MODIS-derived land surface temperature with air temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2017-09-01

    Air surface temperature is an important parameter for a wide range of applications such as agriculture, hydrology and climate change studies. Air temperature data is usually obtained from measurements made in meteorological stations, providing only limited information about spatial patterns over wide areas. The use of remote sensing data can help overcome this problem, particularly in areas with low station density, having the potential to improve the estimation of air surface temperature at both regional and global scales. Land Surface (skin) Temperatures (LST) derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Terra and Aqua satellite platforms provide spatial estimates of near-surface temperature values. In this study, LST values from MODIS are compared to groundbased near surface air (Tair) measurements obtained from 14 observational stations during 2011 to 2015, covering coastal, mountainous and urban areas over Cyprus. Combining Terra and Aqua LST-8 Day and Night acquisitions into a mean monthly value, provide a large number of LST observations and a better overall agreement with Tair. Comparison between mean monthly LSTs and mean monthly Tair for all sites and all seasons pooled together yields a very high correlation and biases. In addition, the presented high standard deviation can be explained by the influence of surface heterogeneity within MODIS 1km2 grid cells, the presence of undetected clouds and the inherent difference between LST and Tair. However, MODIS LST data proved to be a reliable proxy for surface temperature and mostly for studies requiring temperature reconstruction in areas with lack of observational stations.

  13. High temperature superconductors applications in telecommunications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.A.; Li, J.; Zhang, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: to discuss high temperature superconductors with specific reference to their employment in telecommunications applications; and to discuss a few of the limitations of the normally employed two-fluid model. While the debate on the actual usage of high temperature superconductors in the design of electronic and telecommunications devices-obvious advantages versus practical difficulties-needs to be settled in the near future, it is of great interest to investigate the parameters and the assumptions that will be employed in such designs. This paper deals with the issue of providing the microwave design engineer with performance data for such superconducting waveguides. The values of conductivity and surface resistance, which are the primary determining factors of a waveguide performance, are computed based on the two-fluid model. A comparison between two models-a theoretical one in terms of microscopic parameters (termed Model A) and an experimental fit in terms of macroscopic parameters (termed Model B)-shows the limitations and the resulting ambiguities of the two-fluid model at high frequencies and at temperatures close to the transition temperature. The validity of the two-fluid model is then discussed. Our preliminary results show that the electrical transport description in the normal and superconducting phases as they are formulated in the two-fluid model needs to be modified to incorporate the new and special features of high temperature superconductors. Parameters describing the waveguide performance-conductivity, surface resistance and attenuation constant-will be computed. Potential applications in communications networks and large scale integrated circuits will be discussed. Some of the ongoing work will be reported. In particular, a brief proposal is made to investigate of the effects of electromagnetic interference and the concomitant notion of electromagnetic compatibility (EMI/EMC) of high T c superconductors

  14. MTF measurement of IR optics in different temperature ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alexander; Duncker, Hannes; Dumitrescu, Eugen

    2017-10-01

    Infrared (IR) optical systems are at the core of many military, civilian and manufacturing applications and perform mission critical functions. To reliably fulfill the demanding requirements imposed on today's high performance IR optics, highly accurate, reproducible and fast lens testing is of crucial importance. Testing the optical performance within different temperature ranges becomes key in many military applications. Due to highly complex IR-Applications in the fields of aerospace, military and automotive industries, MTF Measurement under realistic environmental conditions become more and more relevant. A Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) test bench with an integrated thermal chamber allows measuring several sample sizes in a temperature range from -40 °C to +120°C. To reach reliable measurement results under these difficult conditions, a specially developed temperature stable design including an insulating vacuum are used. The main function of this instrument is the measurement of the MTF both on- and off-axis at up to +/-70° field angle, as well as measurement of effective focal length, flange focal length and distortion. The vertical configuration of the system guarantees a small overall footprint. By integrating a high-resolution IR camera with focal plane array (FPA) in the detection unit, time consuming measurement procedures such as scanning slit with liquid nitrogen cooled detectors can be avoided. The specified absolute accuracy of +/- 3% MTF is validated using internationally traceable reference optics. Together with a complete and intuitive software solution, this makes the instrument a turn-key device for today's state-of- the-art optical testing.

  15. Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors for Cryogenic Temperature Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L; Iacobaeus, C; Lund-Jensen, B; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F

    2007-01-01

    There are several proposals and projects today for building LXe Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) for dark matter search. An important element of these TPCs are the photomultipliers operating either inside LXe or in vapors above the liquid. We have recently demonstrated that photosensitive gaseous detectors (wire type and hole-type) can operate perfectly well until temperatures of LN2. In this paper results of systematic studies of operation of the photosensitive version of these detectors (combined with reflective or semi-transparent CsI photocathodes) in the temperature interval of 300-150 K are presented. In particular, it was demonstrated that both sealed and flushed by a gas detectors could operate at a quite stable fashion in a year/time scale. Obtained results, in particular the long-term stability of photosensitive gaseous detectors, strongly indicate that they can be cheap and simple alternatives to photomultipliers or avalanche solid-state detectors in LXe TPC applications.

  16. Random measures, theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kallenberg, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Offering the first comprehensive treatment of the theory of random measures, this book has a very broad scope, ranging from basic properties of Poisson and related processes to the modern theories of convergence, stationarity, Palm measures, conditioning, and compensation. The three large final chapters focus on applications within the areas of stochastic geometry, excursion theory, and branching processes. Although this theory plays a fundamental role in most areas of modern probability, much of it, including the most basic material, has previously been available only in scores of journal articles. The book is primarily directed towards researchers and advanced graduate students in stochastic processes and related areas.

  17. Foams theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Saad A

    1996-01-01

    This volume discusses the physics and physical processes of foam and foaming. It delineates various measurement techniques for characterizing foams and foam properties as well as the chemistry and application of foams. The use of foams in the textile industry, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, firefighting and mineral floatation are highlighted, and the connection between the microstructure and physical properties of foam are detailed. Coverage includes nonaqueous foams and silicone antifoams, and more.

  18. Crowdsourcing urban air temperature measurements using smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Crowdsourced data from cell phone battery temperature sensors could be used to contribute to improved real-time, high-resolution air temperature estimates in urban areas, a new study shows. Temperature observations in cities are in some cases currently limited to a few weather stations, but there are millions of smartphone users in many cities. The batteries in cell phones have temperature sensors to avoid damage to the phone.

  19. Initial Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of Ion Temperature in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.S. Medley; R.E. Bell; M.P. Petrov; A.L. Roquemore; and E.V. Suvorkin

    2002-07-08

    The Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) utilizes a PPPL-designed E||B spectrometer which measures the energy spectra of minority H and bulk D species simultaneously with 39 energy channels per mass specie and a time resolution of 1 msec. The calibrated energy range is E = 0.5-150 keV and the energy resolution varies from (delta)E/E = 3-7% over the surface of the microchannel plate detector. The NPA measures thermal Maxwellian ion spectra to obtain line integrated ion temperatures, T{sub i}. For line integral electron densities below neL {approx} 3.5 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -2}, good agreement is observed between the line integrated NPA T{sub i} and the central T{sub i}(0) measured by the spatially localized CHarge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CHERS) diagnostic. However, with increasingly higher n{sub eL} the NPA T{sub i} falls below the central T{sub i}(0) measured by CHERS because the charge exchange neutral emissivity weights the line integrated NPA measurement outboard of the plasma core. An analytic neutral analysis code, DOUBLE, has been applied to the NPA data to correct for this effect and restore agreement with T{sub i}(0) measured by CHERS. A description of the NPA diagnostic on NSTX and initial ion temperature measurements along with an illustration of application of the DOUBLE code are presented.

  20. High-temperature archeointensity measurements from Mesopotamia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, Yves; Le Goff, Maxime

    2006-01-01

    We present new archeointensity results obtained from 127 potsherds and baked brick fragments dated from the last four millennia BC which were collected from different Syrian archeological excavations. High temperature magnetization measurements were carried out using a laboratory-built triaxial vibrating sample magnetometer (Triaxe), and ancient field intensity determinations were derived from the experimental procedure described by Le Goff and Gallet [Le Goff and Gallet. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 229 (2004) 31-43]. As some of the studied samples were previously analyzed using the classical Thellier and Thellier [Thellier and Thellier . Ann. Geophys. 15 (1959) 285-376] method revised by Coe [Coe. J. Geophys. Res. 72 (1967) 3247-3262], a comparison of the results is made from the two methods. The differences both at the fragment and site levels are mostly within ± 5%, which strengthens the validity of the experimental procedure developed for the Triaxe. The new data help to better constrain the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Mesopotamia during archeological times, with the probable occurrence of an archeomagnetic jerk around 2800-2600 BC.

  1. Two-Color Pyrometer for Process Temperature Measurement During Machining

    OpenAIRE

    Tapetado Moraleda, Alberto; Díaz Álvarez, José; Miguélez Garrido, María Henar; Vázquez García, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    A fast fiber-optic two-color pyrometer operating on the optical communication bands is designed for temperature measurements in machining processes. Off-the-shelf low-loss fiber-optic demultiplexers and optoelectronics equipment are used in order to obtain a cost-effective sensing solution while reducing both the temperature measurement error and the minimum measurable temperature. The system is capable of measuring highly localized temperatures without using collimation lens. The designed py...

  2. Low temperature fiber optic pyrometer for fast time resolved temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsch, M.; Bosselmann, T.; Gaenshirt, D.; Kaiser, J.; Villnow, M.; Banda, M.

    2016-05-01

    Low temperature Pyrometry at temperatures beyond 150°C is limited in the measurement speed due to slow pyroelectric detectors. To detect the circumferential temperature distribution of fast rotating machines a novel Fiber Optical Pyrometer Type is presented here.

  3. Precise Temperature Measurement for Increasing the Survival of Newborn Babies in Incubator Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Frischer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Precise temperature measurement is essential in a wide range of applications in the medical environment, however the regarding the problem of temperature measurement inside a simple incubator, neither a simple nor a low cost solution have been proposed yet. Given that standard temperature sensors don’t satisfy the necessary expectations, the problem is not measuring temperature, but rather achieving the desired sensitivity. In response, this paper introduces a novel hardware design as well as the implementation that increases measurement sensitivity in defined temperature intervals at low cost.

  4. Application for Measurement in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav MAHDAL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with wireless sensor networks, which are based on IEEE 802.15.4 standard. The development kit from Jennic company was used for wireless measuring of values and for creation of sensor network. For this purposes the sensor boards with wireless modules with marking JN5139 were used. These boards provide sensors (sensor of temperature, relative humidity and light sensor but also another interface, which helps to develop applications. Modules are programmed in Integrated Development Environment (IDE, which integrates C function library and C++ compiler and linker. The visualization application was created for monitoring of wireless sensor network. There is the possibility of local and wireless measurement. For creation of this application the SCADA/HMI system, Control Web 5 was used. This SCADA/HMI system enables to communicate with all wireless modules through base station (network's coordinator. The application also enables initialisation and network setting the any wireless module communicating with the base station. The advantage is the remote configuration and control of network. The application also enables the gathering, converting, viewing and archiving of incoming data from particular modules.

  5. Hybrid-type temperature sensor for in situ measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuchi, Tohru; Hiraka, Kensuke

    2006-11-01

    A hybrid-type surface temperature sensor combines the contact and noncontact methods, which allows us to overcome the shortcomings of both methods. The hybrid-type surface thermometer is composed mainly of two components: a metal film sheet that makes contact with an object and a radiometer that is used to detect the radiance of the rear surface of the metal film, which is actually a modified radiation thermometer. Temperature measurement using the hybrid-type thermometer with a several tens micrometer thick Hastelloy sheet, a highly heat and corrosion resistant alloy, is possible with a systematic error of -0.5K and random errors of ±0.5K, in the temperature range from 900to1000K. This thermometer provides a useful means for calibration of in situ temperature measurement in various processes, especially in the silicon semiconductor industry. This article introduces the basic idea of the hybrid-type surface sensor, presents experimental results and discussions, and finally describes some applications.

  6. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  7. Active silicon x-ray for measuring electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, R.T.

    1994-07-01

    Silicon diodes are commonly used for x-ray measurements in the soft x-ray region between a few hundred ev and 20 keV. Recent work by Cho has shown that the charge collecting region in an underbiased silicon detector is the depletion depth plus some contribution from a region near the depleted region due to charge-diffusion. The depletion depth can be fully characterized as a function of the applied bias voltage and is roughly proportional to the squart root of the bias voltage. We propose a technique to exploit this effect to use the silicon within the detector as an actively controlled x-ray filter. With reasonable silicon manufacturing methods, a silicon diode detector can be constructed in which the sensitivity of the collected charge to the impinging photon energy spectrum can be changed dynamically in the visible to above the 20 keV range. This type of detector could be used to measure the electron temperature in, for example, a tokamak plasma by sweeping the applied bias voltage during a plasma discharge. The detector samples different parts of the energy spectrum during the bias sweep, and the data collected contains enough information to determine the electron temperature. Benefits and limitations of this technique will be discussed along with comparisons to similar methods for measuring electron temperature and other applications of an active silicon x-ray filter

  8. Actual evaporation estimation from infrared measurement of soil surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pognant

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the hydrological cycle, actual evaporation represents the second most important process in terms of volumes of water transported, second only to the precipitation phenomena. Several methods for the estimation of the Ea were proposed by researchers in scientific literature, but the estimation of the Ea from potential evapotranspiration often requires the knowledge of hard-to-find parameters (e.g.: vegetation morphology, vegetation cover, interception of rainfall by the canopy, evaporation from the canopy surface and uptake of water by plant roots and many existing database are characterized by missing or incomplete information that leads to a rough estimation of the actual evaporation amount. Starting from the above considerations, the aim of this study is to develop and validate a method for the estimation of the Ea based on two steps: i the potential evaporation estimation by using the meteorological data (i.e. Penman-Monteith; ii application of a correction factor based on the infrared soil surface temperature measurements. The dataset used in this study were collected during two measurement campaigns conducted both in a plain testing site (Grugliasco, Italy, and in a mountain South-East facing slope (Cogne, Italy. During those periods, hourly measurement of air temperature, wind speed, infrared surface temperature, soil heat flux, and soil water content were collected. Results from the dataset collected in the two testing sites show a good agreement between the proposed method and reference methods used for the Ea estimation.

  9. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  10. Spectroscopic temperature measurements of non-equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, C.A.; Glenzer, S.H.; Lee, R.W.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The characterization of laser-produced plasmas has required the application of spectroscopic techniques to non-standard conditions where kinetics models have not been extensively tested. The plasmas are produced by the Nova laser for the study of inertial confinement fusion, can be mm in size, and evolve on sub-nanosecond time scales. These targets typically achieve electron temperatures from 2-4 keV and electron densities of 10 20 -10 22 cm -3 . The authors have measured the electron temperature of two types of targets: bags of gas and hohlraums, Au cylinders with laser entrance holes in the flat ends. By comparing data from different targets, they examine the time-dependence of spectroscopic plasma diagnostics

  11. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  12. 7 CFR 28.301 - Measurement: humidity; temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Measurement: humidity; temperature. 28.301 Section 28... for Length of Staple § 28.301 Measurement: humidity; temperature. The length of staple of any cotton... its fibers under a relative humidity of the atmosphere of 65 percent and a temperature of 70° F. ...

  13. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  14. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Low Temperature Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Gonzalez, A.; Barmatz, M.

    1996-01-01

    The most common temperature controller used in low temperature experiments is the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller due to its simplicity and robustness. However, the performance of temperature regulation using the PID controller depends on initial parameter setup, which often requires operator's expert knowledge on the system. In this paper, we present a computer-assisted temperature controller based on the well known.

  15. Measuring the temperature of hot nuclear fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuenschel, S.; Bonasera, A.; May, L.W.; Souliotis, G.A.; Tripathi, R.; Galanopoulos, S.; Kohley, Z.; Hagel, K.; Shetty, D.V.; Huseman, K.; Soisson, S.N.; Stein, B.C.; Yennello, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    A new thermometer based on fragment momentum fluctuations is presented. This thermometer exhibited residual contamination from the collective motion of the fragments along the beam axis. For this reason, the transverse direction has been explored. Additionally, a mass dependence was observed for this thermometer. This mass dependence may be the result of the Fermi momentum of nucleons or the different properties of the fragments (binding energy, spin, etc.) which might be more sensitive to different densities and temperatures of the exploding fragments. We expect some of these aspects to be smaller for protons (and/or neutrons); consequently, the proton transverse momentum fluctuations were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the source.

  16. Temperature measurements on a HSLA-100 steel confinement vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohsen, R.A.

    1998-05-07

    Temperature measurements have been made on HSLA-100 steel confinement vessel number 6-2-3-1. These measurements are intended to give a view of the vessel temperature response under conditions similar to operational conditions, starting from worst case. The vessel`s temperature must be above the minimum operating temperature when used to contain an explosive event to ensure that the vessel material has the desired crack arrest properties. Several series of temperature measurements have been conducted over 24 and 48 hour periods during February 1998. These tests were intended to demonstrate that after running the heaters in the environmental shelter for some time, (1) the vessel warms up to temperatures well above the minimum operating temperature, (2) that through-thickness temperature gradients are negligible, and (3) that the temperature differences from one part of the vessel to another are small.

  17. Low Temperature Hall Measurements of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonavita, Ange1o

    2004-01-01

    .... No features suggesting annealing were found below a temperature of 340K. Temperature dependant Hall effect measurements were taken over a range of 100K to 340K recording resistivity, carrier densities, and mobility...

  18. Isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient measurement in TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A.

    2002-01-01

    Direct measurement of an isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient at room temperatures in TRIGA Mark II research reactor at Jozef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana is presented. Temperature reactivity coefficient was measured in the temperature range between 15 o C and 25 o C. All reactivity measurements were performed at almost zero reactor power to reduce or completely eliminate nuclear heating. Slow and steady temperature decrease was controlled using the reactor tank cooling system. In this way the temperatures of fuel, of moderator and of coolant were kept in equilibrium throughout the measurements. It was found out that TRIGA reactor core loaded with standard fuel elements with stainless steel cladding has small positive isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient in this temperature range.(author)

  19. Investigation of temperature correction for tire/pavement noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    The Volpe Center Acoustics Facility, in support of the Federal Highway Administration, : investigated the influence of temperature on tire/pavement noise in order to provide guidance on correcting for temperature variations in measured sound levels. ...

  20. Comparison of noninvasive MRT-procedures for the temperature measurement for the application during medical thermal therapies; Vergleich nichtinvasiver MRT-Verfahren zur Temperaturmessung fuer den Einsatz bei medizinischen Thermotherapien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademaker, G.; Jenne, J.W.; Rastert, R.; Roeder, D.; Schad, L.R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abt. Biophysik und Medizinische Strahlenphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Novel methods for hyperthermia tumor therapy, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), require accurate non-invasive temperature monitoring. Non-invasive temperature measurement using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is based on the analysis of changes in longitudinal relaxation time (T1), diffusion coefficient (D), or water proton resonance frequency (PRF). The purpose of this study was the development and comparative analysis of the three different approaches of MRI temperature monitoring (T1, D, and PRF). Measurements in phantoms (e.g., ultrasound gel) resulted in the following percent changes: T1-relaxation time: 1.98%/ C; diffusion coefficient: 2.22%/ C; and PRF: -0,0101 ppm/ C. All measurements were in good agreement with the literature. Temperature resolutions could also be measured from the inverse correlation of the data over the whole calibration range: T1: 2.1{+-}0.6 C; D: 0.93{+-}0.2 C; and PRF: 1.4{+-}0.3 C. The diffusion and PRF methods were not applicable in fatty tissue. The use of the diffusion method was restricted due to prolonged echo time and anisotropic diffusion in tissue. Initial tests with rabbit muscle tissue in vivo indicated that MR thermometry via T1 and PRF procedures is feasible to monitor the local heating process induced by HIFU. The ultrasound applicators in the MR scanner did not substantially interfere with image quality. (orig.) [German] Neue Hyperthermieverfahren zur Tumortherapie basieren auf hochenergetischem fokussiertem ultraschall (HIFU) oder laserinduzierter thermotherapie (LITT). Fuer diese Verfahren ist eine genaue nichtinvasive Temperaturkontrolle erforderlich. Die nichtinvasiven Temperaturdarstellungen mit der magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) basieren auf Aenderung der longitudinalen Relaxationszeit (T{sub 1}), des diffusionskoeffizienten (D) oder der protonenresonanzfrequenz (PRF). Das Ziel waren die Entwicklung und der Vergleich der drei unterschiedlichen Methoden (T

  1. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  2. Experimental relations between airborne and ground measured wheat canopy temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Goettelman, R. C.; Leroy, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments using ground-based measurements of canopy temperatures have shown that plant temperatures are good indicators of plant water stress, and thus are useful for assessing water requirements and predicting yields. An intensive 23-day airborne- and ground-measurement program was conducted in Phoenix, Arizona in 1977 to compare airborne-acquired wheat canopy temperatures with simultaneous ground measurements. For canopies that covered at least 85 percent of the soil surface, airborne measurements differed from ground measurements of plant temperature by less than 2 C. Regardless of the amount of plant cover, the airborne measurements were virtually identical to ground-nadir measurements, and thus represent a combination of plant temperature and solid background temperature.

  3. Headset Bluetooth and cell phone based continuous central body temperature measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, J Miguel; Pereira, Bruno; Paiva, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The accurate measure of the central temperature is a very important physiologic indicator in several clinical applications, namely, in the characterization and diagnosis of sleep disorders. In this paper a simple system is described to continuously measure the body temperature at the ear. An electronic temperature sensor is coupled to the microphone of a common commercial auricular Bluetooth device that sends the temperature measurements to a mobile phone to which is paired. The measurements are stored at the mobile phone and periodically sent to a medical facility by email or SMS (short messaging service).

  4. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    tics—emission lines. Dwivedi, Curdt & Wilhelm (1997, 1999a) carried out an observing sequence based on a theoretical study by Dwivedi & Mohan (1995), with intercombination/forbidden. Ne VI and Mg VI lines, which are formed at essentially the same temperature. (4 × 105 K), according to Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  5. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Zhang, Pu [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Wenzhong, E-mail: lwz7410@hust.edu.cn [School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Image Processing and Intelligent Control, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  6. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  7. Design and Implementation of High Precision Temperature Measurement Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianzhen; Yu, Weiyu; Zhang, Zhijian; Liu, Hancheng

    2018-03-01

    Large-scale neutrino detector requires calibration of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and electronic system in the detector, performed by plotting the calibration source with a group of designated coordinates in the acrylic sphere. Where the calibration source positioning is based on the principle of ultrasonic ranging, the transmission speed of ultrasonic in liquid scintillator of acrylic sphere is related to temperature. This paper presents a temperature measurement unit based on STM32L031 and single-line bus digital temperature sensor TSic506. The measurement data of the temperature measurement unit can help the ultrasonic ranging to be more accurate. The test results show that the temperature measurement error is within ±0.1°C, which satisfies the requirement of calibration source positioning. Take energy-saving measures, with 3.7V/50mAH lithium battery-powered, the temperature measurement unit can work continuously more than 24 hours.

  8. ATTREX-Aircraft_RemoteSensing_Temperature_Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This collection consists of the observational data from the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) spectral and broad band irradiance measurements covering...

  9. Nonequilibrium shock layer temperature profiles from arc jet radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Harvel E.; Yuen, Eric; Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram

    1989-01-01

    Shock layer temperature profiles are obtained through analysis of radiation from shock layers produced by a blunt body inserted in arc jet flow. Spectral measurements have been made in a nitrogen flow of 54.4 gm/s at an enthalpy of 8.72 MJ/kg. Vibrational temperatures for N2+ are obtained by matching spectral regions from arc jet spectra with spectra generated using the NEQAIR code. Temperature profiles obtained from the radiation layers show a vibrational temperature higher than the rotational temperature near the front of the shock and both temperatures decrease as the flow approaches the body. The spectral measurements are made and analysis completed for four distances, from the surface of the blunt body. The corresponding shock layer thickness is approximately 3.6 cm. Although the shock layer appears to be in thermal nonequilibrium, the measured rotational temperature approaches the single temperature results of viscous shock layer calculations at this test condition.

  10. High temperature superconductors in electromagnetic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richens, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    The design, construction, and characterization of a High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnet is described. The design stage has involved the development of computer software for the calculation of the critical current of a solenoid wound from anisotropic HTS conductor. This calculation can be performed for a variety of problems including those involving magnetic materials such as iron by the incorporation of finite element electromagnetic analysis software. This has enabled the optimization of the magnet's performance. The HTS magnet is wound from 190 m of silver-matrix Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 powder-in-tube tape conductor supplied by Intermagnetics General Corporation. The dimensions are 70 mm bore and 70 mm length, and it consists of 728 turns. Iron end-plates were utilized in order to reduce the radial magnetic field, and consequently increase the performance by ∼ 20%. The magnet has been operated in liquid cryogens and has achieved engineering current densities of 900 A cm -2 at 77 K and 6680 A cm -2 at 4.2 K. The HTS magnet has been operated by conduction-cooling on a mechanical refrigerator at various temperatures in the range 12 to 50 K. The thermal stability in this relatively low cooling-power system has been assessed. An engineering current density of 5600 A cm -2 was achieved at 12 K. Measurements of the strain dependence of the critical current in a variety of HTS conductors, including powder-in-tube and dip-coated, have been made using a novel single loop tensometer that enables the insertion of a reasonably long length of conductor into the bore of a high-field magnet. (author)

  11. The liner brightness temperature measurement by two channel optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulish, M. I.; Dudin, S. V.; Ushnurtsev, A. E.; Mintsev, V. B.

    2018-01-01

    Measurability of liner inner surface brightness temperature by two channel optical pyrometer is shown. Liner is compressed by detonation products in large-scale experiment. Absolute radiant intensity values were obtained by measuring optical system channel calibration involving tungsten and xenon radiation sources. Three ways of surface brightness temperature measurement are presented at wavelengths of 620 and 850 nm. Using the developed procedure copper and steel liners behavior (brightness temperature, average speed) under compression by detonation products are evaluated.

  12. Temperature Measurement of a Glass Material Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Temperature measurement of a substance that is transparent using the traditional 1-color, 2-color and other pyrometers has been difficult. The radiation detected by pyrometers do not come from a well defined location in the transparent body. The multiwavelength pyrometer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center can measure the surface temperature of many materials. We show in this paper that it also measures the surface and a bulk subsurface temperature of transparent materials like glass.

  13. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  14. Solar energy control system. [temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, J. R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  15. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO 2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  16. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  17. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  18. LIDAR for atmospheric backscatter and temperature measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key capabilities of a multifunctional atmospheric lidar. This lidar could be part of a Surface Weather Station to measure atmospheric...

  19. Measurement of magnetic properties at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This picture shows part of the low-mu permeameter to measure permeability of stainless steels and other low-mu materials used in superconducting magnets. The sample, a 5 mm diam., 45 mm long rod, is suspended to long leads before being inserted in the test cryostat. For the measurement the sample is surrounded by a flux- measuring coil and placed in the field of a superconducting solenoid. At a given field the sample is removed.During the removal, the voltage induced in the flux-measuring coil is time integrated giving the flux variation. This equipment was developed to select stainless steels and other low-mu materials used in the ISR Prototype Superconducting Qaudrupole. The person is W.Ansorge.

  20. Influence of pre-measurement thermal treatment on OSL of synthetic quartz measured at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, Y.D.; Gandhi, Y.H.

    2008-01-01

    Much effort has been made to study the influence of pre-measurement thermal treatment and ionizing radiation on quartz specimens owing to its use in a large number of applications. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) being a structured and sensitive phenomenon promises to correlate the responsible color center and luminescence emission. OSL studies on quartz with such conditions can reveal many significant results. The aim of the present investigation is to understand the effect of annealing temperature on OSL characteristics of synthetic quartz recorded at room temperature. At identical annealing duration and β-dose, the shape of OSL decay curve remains non-exponential; when specimens annealed at lower temperature (∼400 deg. C). The shape of decay curve changes to exponential in nature along with rise in OSL intensity when the specimen was given higher temperature of annealing (>400 deg. C). The effects of such protocol on pattern of OSL sensitivity as well as area under the OSL decay curve are also presented here. The presence of shallow traps, when OSL decay curve was recorded at room temperature seems to be responsible for the changes in OSL pattern. The influence of shallow traps is attributed to non-exponential decay of OSL recorded at room temperature

  1. Critical current measurements of high-temperature superconducting short samples at a wide range of temperatures and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongjun; Liu, Huajun; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Huahui; Ci, Lu; Shi, Yi; Lei, Lei

    2018-01-01

    High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS) are potential materials for high-field magnets, low-loss transmission cables, and Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) due to their high upper critical magnetic field (Hc2) and critical temperature (Tc). The critical current (Ic) of HTS, which is one of the most important parameters for superconductor application, depends strongly on the magnetic fields and temperatures. A new Ic measurement system that can carry out accurate Ic measurement for HTS short samples with various temperatures (4.2-80 K), magnetic fields (0-14 T), and angles of the magnetic field (0°-90°) has been developed. The Ic measurement system mainly consists of a measurement holder, temperature-control system, background magnet, test cryostat, data acquisition system, and DC power supply. The accuracy of temperature control is better than ±0.1 K over the 20-80 K range and ±0.05 K when measured below 20 K. The maximum current is over 1000 A with a measurement uncertainty of 1%. The system had been successfully used for YBa2Cu3O7-x(YBCO) tapes Ic determination with different temperatures and magnetic fields.

  2. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  3. Measurement of temperature fluctuations and anomalous transport ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (b) Displacement of plasma from the centre of the vacuum vessel; horizontal displacement ¡А ( ve means ... vacuum vessel) and the ion saturation current Б× drawn by the pair is obtained by measur- ing the voltage drop ... sheared E- xB rotation (plasma rotation) as observed in other machines [8]. The fluctuation induced ...

  4. Upgrade of the cooling water temperature measures system for HLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Weiqun; Liu Gongfa; Bao Xun; Jiang Siyuan; Li Weimin; He Duohui

    2007-01-01

    The cooling water temperature measures system for HLS (Hefei Light Source) adopts EPICS to the developing platform and takes the intelligence temperature cruise instrument for the front control instrument. Data of temperatures are required by IOCs through Serial Port Communication, archived and searched by Channel Archiver. The system can monitor the real-time temperatures of many channels cooling water and has the function of history data storage, and data network search. (authors)

  5. Development of electron temperature measuring system by silicon drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Xianying; Yang Jinwei; Liao Min

    2007-12-01

    Soft X-ray spectroscopy with two channels Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) are adopted for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak in 2005. The working principle, design and first operation of the SDD soft X-ray spectroscopy are introduced. The measuring results of electron temperature are also presented. The results show that the SDD is very good detector for electron temperature measuring on HL-2A tokamak. These will become a solid basic work to establish SDD array for electron temperature profiling. (authors)

  6. MPPT Technique Based on Current and Temperature Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Vicente, Eduardo Moreira; Moreno, Robson Luiz; Ribeiro, Enio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method based on the measurement of temperature and short-circuit current, in a simple and efficient approach. These measurements, which can precisely define the maximum power point (MPP), have not been used together in other existing techniques. The temperature is measured with a low cost sensor and the solar irradiance is estimated through the relationship of the measured short-circuit current and its reference. Fast tracking spee...

  7. Applications of the IITRI compression test fixture at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe an application of the IITRI compression test fixture at elevated temperature (589K) was described as well as the present compressive moduli and ultimate strains of HTS/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide material. Considerable care was taken in specimen fabrication to minimize back-to-back strain variations due to specimen bending. The effects of specimen width and temperature were studied for various laminate orientations. The IITRI specimen was analyzed using three dimensional finite elements to determine the magnitude and location of stress concentrations to assess their potential effects on measured moduli and ultimate strains. Stress concentrations are of concern since end constraints, free-edge effects, and thermal effects add to the three dimensional nature of stresses in a specimen.

  8. Measurement of relative permittivity of LTCC ceramic at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiulin; Kang, Hao; Qin, Li; Xiong, Jijun; Zhou, Zhaoying; Zhang, Wendong; Luo, Tao; Xue, Chenyang; Liu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Devices based on LTCC (low-temperature co-fired ceramic) technology are more widely applied in high temperature environments, and the temperature-dependent properties of the LTCC material play an important role in measurements of the characteristics of these devices at high temperature. In this paper, the temperature-dependence of the relative permittivity of DuPont 951 LTCC ceramic is studied from room temperature to 500 °C. An expression for relative permittivity is obtained, which relates the relative permittivity to the resonant frequency, inductance, parasitic capacitance and electrode capacitance of the LTCC sample. Of these properties, the electrode capacitance is the most strongly temperature-dependent. The LTCC sample resonant frequency, inductance and parasitic capacitance were measured (from room temperature to 500 °C) with a high temperature measurement system comprising a muffle furnace and network analyzer. We found that the resonant frequency reduced and the inductance and parasitic capacitance increased slightly as the temperature increases. The relative permittivity can be calculated from experimental frequency, inductance and parasitic capacitance measurements. Calculating results show that the relative permittivity of DuPont 951 LTCC ceramic ceramic increases to 8.21 from room temperature to 500 °C.

  9. Measurement of relative permittivity of LTCC ceramic at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiulin Tan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Devices based on LTCC (low-temperature co-fired ceramic technology are more widely applied in high temperature environments, and the temperature-dependent properties of the LTCC material play an important role in measurements of the characteristics of these devices at high temperature. In this paper, the temperature-dependence of the relative permittivity of DuPont 951 LTCC ceramic is studied from room temperature to 500 °C. An expression for relative permittivity is obtained, which relates the relative permittivity to the resonant frequency, inductance, parasitic capacitance and electrode capacitance of the LTCC sample. Of these properties, the electrode capacitance is the most strongly temperature-dependent. The LTCC sample resonant frequency, inductance and parasitic capacitance were measured (from room temperature to 500 °C with a high temperature measurement system comprising a muffle furnace and network analyzer. We found that the resonant frequency reduced and the inductance and parasitic capacitance increased slightly as the temperature increases. The relative permittivity can be calculated from experimental frequency, inductance and parasitic capacitance measurements. Calculating results show that the relative permittivity of DuPont 951 LTCC ceramic ceramic increases to 8.21 from room temperature to 500 °C.

  10. Measurement of local void fraction at elevated temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.; Trabold, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Significant advances have recently been made in analytical and computational methods for the prediction of local thermal-hydraulic conditions in gas/liquid two-phase flows. There is, however, a need for extensive experimental data, for the dual purposes of constitutive relation development and code qualification. There is especially true of systems involving complicated geometries and/or extreme flow conditions for which little, if any, applicable information exists in the open literature. For the tests described in the present paper, a novel electrical probe has been applied to measure the void fraction in atmospheric pressure air/water flows, and steam/water mixtures at high temperature and pressure. The data acquired in the latter experiments are compared with the results of a one-dimensional two-fluid computational analysis

  11. Measuring transient high temperature thermal phenomena in hostile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenden, B.B.; Hartman, J.S.; Reich, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    The design of equipment for measuring temperature and strain in a rapidly heated and pressurized cylinder of stainless steel is discussed. Simultaneous cinematography of the full circumference of the cylinder without interference with temperature and strain measurements is also illustrated. The integrated system uses a reflective chamber for the sample and requires careful consideration of the spectral energy distribution utilized by each instrument

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of routine postoperative body temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Hester; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Goossens, Astrid; Speelman, Peter; Legemate, Dink A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On surgical wards, body temperature is routinely measured, but there is no proof that this is useful for detecting postoperative infection. The aim of this study was to compare temperature measurements (the test) with the confirmed absence or presence of a postoperative infection (the

  13. An array for measuring detailed soil temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature dynamics can provide insights into soil variables which are much more difficult or impossible to measure. We designed an array to measure temperature at precise depth increments. Data was collected to determine if the construction materials influence surface and near-surface tempera...

  14. Thermocouple design for measuring temperatures of small insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.A. Hanson; R.C. Venette

    2013-01-01

    Contact thermocouples often are used to measure surface body temperature changes of insects during cold exposure. However, small temperature changes of minute insects can be difficult to detect, particularly during the measurement of supercooling points. We developed two thermocouple designs, which use 0.51 mm diameter or 0.127 mm diameter copper-constantan wires, to...

  15. Three-wavelength pyrometer for measuring flame temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashdollar, K L

    1979-08-01

    This paper describes a pyrometer that measures the continuum radiation from particles in a flame or explosion at three wavelengths (0.8 microm, 0.9 microm, and 1.0 microm). The particle temperature is calculated from the radiation data using the Planck equation. Temperatures measured for coal dust explosions in a closed vessel are presented.

  16. Noncontact measurement of high temperature using optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.

    1990-01-01

    The primary goal of this research program was the investigation and application of noncontact temperature measurement techniques using optical techniques and optical fiber methods. In particular, a pyrometer utilizing an infrared optical light pipe and a multiwavelength filtering approach was designed, revised, and tested. This work was motivated by the need to measure the temperatures of small metallic pellets (approximately 3 mm diameter) in free fall at the Microgravity Materials Processing Drop Tube at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. In addition, research under this program investigated the adaptation of holography technology to optical fiber sensors, and also examined the use of rare-earth dopants in optical fibers for use in measuring temperature. The pyrometer development effort involved both theoretical analysis and experimental tests. For the analysis, a mathematical model based on radiative transfer principles was derived. Key parameter values representative of the drop tube system, such as particle size, tube diameter and length, and particle temperature, were used to determine an estimate of the radiant flux that will be incident on the face of an optical fiber or light pipe used to collect radiation from the incandescent falling particle. An extension of this work examined the advantage of inclining or tilting the collecting fiber to increase the time that the falling particle remains in the fiber field-of-view. Those results indicate that increases in total power collected of about 15 percent may be realized by tilting the fiber. In order to determine the suitability of alternative light pipes and optical fibers, and experimental set-up for measuring the transmittance and insertion loss of infrared fibers considered for use in the pyrometer was assembled. A zirconium fluoride optical fiber and several bundles of hollow core fiber of varying diameters were tested. A prototype two-color pyrometer was assembled and tested at Virginia Tech, and then

  17. A Two-Line Absorption Instrument for Scramjet Temperature and Water Vapor Concentration Measurement in HYPULSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    A three beam water vapor sensor system has been modified to provide for near simultaneous temperature measurement. The system employs a tunable diode laser to scan spectral line of water vapor. The application to measurements in a scramjet combustor environment of a shock tunnel facility is discussed. This report presents and discusses die initial calibration of the measurement system.

  18. Direct measurement high resolution wide range extreme temperature optical sensor using an all-silicon carbide probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mumtaz; Riza, Nabeel A

    2009-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a temperature sensing method using an all-silicon carbide probe that combines wavelength-tuned signal processing for coarse measurements and classical Fabry-Perot etalon peak shift for fine measurements. This method gives direct unambiguous temperature measurements with a high temperature resolution over a wide temperature range. Specifically, temperature measurements from room temperature to 1000 degrees C are experimentally demonstrated with an estimated resolution varying from 0.66 degrees C at room temperature to 0.12 degrees C at 1000 degrees C. The proposed sensor has applications in next-generation greener gas turbines for power production.

  19. Solar cell junction temperature measurement of PV module

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, B.J.

    2011-02-01

    The present study develops a simple non-destructive method to measure the solar cell junction temperature of PV module. The PV module was put in the environmental chamber with precise temperature control to keep the solar PV module as well as the cell junction in thermal equilibrium with the chamber. The open-circuit voltage of PV module Voc is then measured using a short pulse of solar irradiation provided by a solar simulator. Repeating the measurements at different environment temperature (40-80°C) and solar irradiation S (200-1000W/m2), the correlation between the open-circuit voltage Voc, the junction temperature Tj, and solar irradiation S is derived.The fundamental correlation of the PV module is utilized for on-site monitoring of solar cell junction temperature using the measured Voc and S at a short time instant with open circuit. The junction temperature Tj is then determined using the measured S and Voc through the fundamental correlation. The outdoor test results show that the junction temperature measured using the present method, Tjo, is more accurate. The maximum error using the average surface temperature Tave as the junction temperature is 4.8 °C underestimation; while the maximum error using the present method is 1.3 °C underestimation. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Multi-channel temperature measurement system for automotive battery stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewczuk, Radoslaw; Wojtkowski, Wojciech

    2017-08-01

    A multi-channel temperature measurement system for monitoring of automotive battery stack is presented in the paper. The presented system is a complete battery temperature measuring system for hybrid / electric vehicles that incorporates multi-channel temperature measurements with digital temperature sensors communicating through 1-Wire buses, individual 1-Wire bus for each sensor for parallel computing (parallel measurements instead of sequential), FPGA device which collects data from sensors and translates it for CAN bus frames. CAN bus is incorporated for communication with car Battery Management System and uses additional CAN bus controller which communicates with FPGA device through SPI bus. The described system can parallel measure up to 12 temperatures but can be easily extended in the future in case of additional needs. The structure of the system as well as particular devices are described in the paper. Selected results of experimental investigations which show proper operation of the system are presented as well.

  1. Effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Ralph P; Towle-Millard, Heather A; Rankin, David C; Roush, James K

    2013-03-01

    To measure the effect of warm compress application on tissue temperature in healthy dogs. 10 healthy mixed-breed dogs. Dogs were sedated with hydromorphone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) and diazepam (0.25 mg/kg, IV). Three 24-gauge thermocouple needles were inserted to a depth of 0.5 cm (superficial), 1.0 cm (middle), and 1.5 cm (deep) into a shaved, lumbar, epaxial region to measure tissue temperature. Warm (47°C) compresses were applied with gravity dependence for periods of 5, 10, and 20 minutes. Tissue temperature was recorded before compress application and at intervals for up to 80 minutes after application. Control data were collected while dogs received identical sedation but with no warm compress. Mean temperature associated with 5 minutes of heat application at the superficial, middle, and deep depths was significantly increased, compared with the control temperature. Application for 10 minutes significantly increased the temperature at all depths, compared with 5 minutes of application. Mean temperature associated with 20 minutes of application was not different at the superficial or middle depths, compared with 10 minutes of application. Temperature at the deep depth associated with 10 minutes of application was significantly higher, compared with 20 minutes of application, but all temperature increases at this depth were minimal. Results suggested that application of a warm compress should be performed for 10 minutes. Changes in temperature at a tissue depth of 1.5 cm were minimal or not detected. The optimal compress temperature to achieve therapeutic benefits was not determined.

  2. Study on a transient optical fiber high temperature measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lulu; Liu, Yusha; Wang, Yutian

    2009-07-01

    High temperature is one of the most important parameters in the fields of scientific research and industrial production. At present, thermocouple, thermo resistive and radiance thermometer are already technologically mature which can be adopted to measure the general temperature, but when it comes to the transient high temperature that changes pretty quickly in wretched conditions, those traditional pyrometers can not meet the requirements any more. In this paper, we designed a transient optical high temperature measurement system. First, design of the temperature measurement probe. The system took blackbody cavity sensor together with optical fiber to receive the measured signal, here, the integrated emissivity model of the blackbody cavity was established and the optimum structure parameters were confirmed. Secondly, design of the entire temperature measurement system. A contact-noncontact measurement method was applied, which is to make the blackbody cavity and the measured high-temperature source contact, the fiber probe and the blackbody cavity noncontact, as a result, the error caused by contact measurement is overcame and the precision is guaranteed at the same time. In addition, a fiber grating was introduced as the wavelength filter device which can realize the dynamic filter of narrow-band signals and reduce the impact of background light. Thirdly, signal processing. In this part, we applied labVIEW software and wavelet analysis method. All of the signal acquisition and processing were realized in the labVIEW environment. Through calling matlab in labVIEW, the signals from optical fiber detector were wavelet denoised and decomposed, thus the temperature information was extracted, and the temperature value was obtained. On basis of wavelet transformation, the paper adopted the 4dB wavelet with horizontal scale of 5 to realize the feature extraction and noise removal, parts of the signals before and after the wavelet noise removal were given and analyzed

  3. Controlling LPG temperature for SI engine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceviz, Mehmet Akif; Kaleli, Alirıza; Güner, Erdoğan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the LPG temperature on the engine performance and the exhaust emission characteristics have been investigated experimentally on an SI engine. In conventional injection systems, the LPG temperature increases excessively during the phase change in pressure regulator, and reduces the engine volumetric efficiency. According to the test results, engine performance and NO emission characteristics can be improved by controlling the LPG temperature before injecting to the engine intake manifold. A new control system taking into account the results of the study has been developed and tested. In order to control the LPG temperature, the coolant flow rate in pressure regulator circuit was arranged by using a control valve activated by a PID controller unit. Results of the study showed that the engine brake power loss can be increased by about 1.85% and NO emissions can be decreased by about 2% as compared to the operation with the original LPG injection system. - Highlights: • Effects of the LPG temperature have been examined. • Engine performance characteristics and exhaust emissions have been studied. • Results reveal that the LPG temperature should be kept in a range. • A prototype LPG temperature control system has been successfully developed

  4. Quantification of in situ temperature measurements on a PBI-based high temperature PEMFC unit cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Ali, Syed Talat; Møller, Per

    2010-01-01

    The temperature is a very important operating parameter for all types of fuel cells. In the present work distributed in situ temperature measurements are presented on a polybenzimidazole based high temperature PEM fuel cell (HT-PEM). A total of 16 T-type thermocouples were embedded on both the an...

  5. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment

  6. Mechanical vapor compression refrigeration for low temperature industrial applications today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    If the super conductor industry settles out at a temperature of -100 0 F or above, mechanical refrigeration will be vying for the cooling business. Today there very definitely is a break point in the application of equipment at approximately -120 0 F or 189 0 K. Other technologies are generally utilized below this level. However, with market potential comes invention and breakthroughs in refrigeration can also occur. Today standard refrigeration systems are cost effective, reliable and produced in the millions for high temperature applications of +10 0 F to +40 0 F evaporator temperature. Lower temperatures require additional hardware, consume additional power and are produced today in limited quantities for special applications

  7. Temperature lags of luminescence measurements in a commercial luminescence reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitis, George [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kiyak, Nafiye G. [ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile, 34980 Istanbul (Turkey); Polymeris, George S., E-mail: gspolymeris@ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beşevler, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    The temperature recorded in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence equipments is not the temperature of the sample but that of the heating element on which the thermocouple is attached. Depending upon the rate of heating, a temperature difference appears between the samples and the heating element, termed as temperature lag, which could have serious effects on the curve shapes and trapping parameters. In the present work the temperature lag effect is studied in a newly developed luminescence equipment measuring both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that the temperature lag could be large for heating rates above 2 K/s and it is strongly dependent upon the sample holder. A simple approximation method is proposed in order to both predict as well as correct for temperature lag effects in luminescence measurements.

  8. How is it possible to measure a nuclear temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods for the measurement of nuclear temperatures are summarized. The concepts of hot nuclei and temperature are defined. The nuclear equation of state is presented. The statistical theory of hot nuclei decay properties is analyzed. The obtention of the excitation energy from the recoil velocity measurement is considered in the case of complete and incomplete fusion. The measurements of temperature and excitation energy from the properties of decay products are reviewed. The study shows that no measurement method is perfect. Moreover, it is necessary to select events for which the degree of dissipation of the incident energy is estimated

  9. Method for independent strain and temperature measurement in polymeric tensile test specimen using embedded FBG sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    to calculate independently the strain and temperature are presented in the article, together with a measurement resolution study. This multi-parameter measurement method was applied to an epoxy tensile specimen, tested in a unidirectional tensile test machine with a temperature controlled cabinet. A full......A novel method to obtain independent strain and temperature measurements using embedded Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) in polymeric tensile test specimens is presented in this paper. The FBG strain and temperature cross-sensitivity was decoupled using two single mode FBG sensors, which were embedded...... of temperature, from 40 C to -10 C. The consistency of the expected theoretical results with the calibration procedure and the experimental validation shows that this proposed method is applicable to measure accurate strain and temperature in polymers during static or fatigue tensile testing. Two different...

  10. Measuring temperatures with modified Kleiber 270B pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osch, E.V. van.

    1995-05-01

    At ECN a fast pyrometer is being used as a diagnostic tool for plasma disruption simulation experiments on candidate plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion devices such as NET or ITER. The pyrometer is being used to measure the surface temperature response of the materials to short pulse high heat loads as induced by high power laser or electron beam, simulating the disrupting plasma's energy deposition. A procedure to measure surface temperatures without having to know surface emissivity in advance is described. The formulae needed in this procedure to obtain the correct temperature, starting from the initial incorrect temperature reading, are derived. Inversely, the formula to determine the emissivity of the surface when its temperature is known is equally derived. Finally, a small study on background level sensitivity is presented, showing the, in general, small effect of background on the temperature measurement. (orig.)

  11. Design for ASIC reliability for low-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Mojaradi, Mohammad; Westergard, Lynett; Billman, Curtis; Cozy, Scott; Burke, Gary; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to design for reliability for low temperature applications without requiring process improvement. The developed hot carrier aging lifetime projection model takes into account both the transistor substrate current profile and temperature profile to determine the minimum transistor size needed in order to meet reliability requirements. The methodology is applicable for automotive, military, and space applications, where there can be varying temperature ranges. A case study utilizing this methodology is given to design for reliability into a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a Mars exploration mission.

  12. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark...... and wood particles treated with additive. A two-color technique with subtraction of the background light was used to estimate particle temperatures during experiments. A transmission-emission technique was used tomeasure the gas temperature in the reactor tube. Gas temperature measurements were in good...... agreement with thermocouple readings. Gas lines and bands from CO, CO2 and H2O can be observed in the spectra. CO was only observed at the first measuring port (100ms) with the strongest CO-signal seen during experiments with straw particles. Variations in gas concentration (CO2 and H2O) and the signal from...

  13. Spectral and temperature-dependent infrared emissivity measurements of painted metals for improved temperature estimation during laser damage testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Keenan, Cameron; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-10-01

    A database of spectral and temperature-dependent emissivities was created for painted Al-alloy laser-damage-testing targets for the purpose of improving the uncertainty to which temperature on the front and back target surfaces may be estimated during laser-damage testing. Previous temperature estimates had been made by fitting an assumed gray-body radiance curve to the calibrated spectral radiance data collected from the back surface using a Telops Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (IFTS). In this work, temperature-dependent spectral emissivity measurements of the samples were made from room temperature to 500 °C using a Surface Optics Corp. SOC-100 Hemispherical Directional Reflectometer (HDR) with Nicolet FTS. Of particular interest was a high-temperature matte-black enamel paint used to coat the rear surfaces of the Al-alloy samples. The paint had been assumed to have a spectrally flat and temperatureinvariant emissivity. However, the data collected using the HDR showed both spectral variation and temperature dependence. The uncertainty in back-surface temperature estimation during laser-damage testing made using the measured emissivities was improved from greater than +10 °C to less than +5 °C for IFTS pixels away from the laser burn-through hole, where temperatures never exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR measurements. At beam center, where temperatures exceeded those used in the SOC-100 HDR, uncertainty in temperature estimates grew beyond those made assuming gray-body emissivity. Accurate temperature estimations during laser-damage testing are useful in informing a predictive model for future high-energy-laser weapon applications.

  14. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  15. Application of process analytical technology for monitoring freeze-drying of an amorphous protein formulation: use of complementary tools for real-time product temperature measurements and endpoint detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneid, Stefan C; Johnson, Robert E; Lewis, Lavinia M; Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning

    2015-05-01

    Process analytical technology (PAT) and quality by design have gained importance in all areas of pharmaceutical development and manufacturing. One important method for monitoring of critical product attributes and process optimization in laboratory scale freeze-drying is manometric temperature measurement (MTM). A drawback of this innovative technology is that problems are encountered when processing high-concentrated amorphous materials, particularly protein formulations. In this study, a model solution of bovine serum albumin and sucrose was lyophilized at both conservative and aggressive primary drying conditions. Different temperature sensors were employed to monitor product temperatures. The residual moisture content at primary drying endpoints as indicated by temperature sensors and batch PAT methods was quantified from extracted sample vials. The data from temperature probes were then used to recalculate critical product parameters, and the results were compared with MTM data. The drying endpoints indicated by the temperature sensors were not suitable for endpoint indication, in contrast to the batch methods endpoints. The accuracy of MTM Pice data was found to be influenced by water reabsorption. Recalculation of Rp and Pice values based on data from temperature sensors and weighed vials was possible. Overall, extensive information about critical product parameters could be obtained using data from complementary PAT tools. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, Nadine N.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the un-perfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid 3D temperature mapping at 7 T. Methods The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA−) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Results Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2–4 minutes. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. PMID:24549755

  17. A possibility of local measurements of ion temperature in a high-temperature plasma by laser induced ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M

    2012-01-01

    A new diagnostic for local measurements of ion temperature and drift velocity in fusion plasmas is proposed in the paper. The diagnostic is based on laser induced ionization of excited hydrogen and deuterium atoms from the levels which ionization energy less than the laser photon energy. A high intensive laser beam ionizes nearly all the excited atoms in the beam region resulting in a quench of spontaneous line emission of the appropriate optical transitions. The measurements of the quenching emission have been used in the past for local measurements of hydrogen atom density in tokamak plasma. The idea of the new diagnostic is spectral resolution of the quenching emission. The measured spectrum relates directly to the velocity distribution of the excited atoms. This distribution is strongly coupled to the distribution of the hydrogen atoms at the ground state. So, the spectral resolution of quenching emission is a way of local measurements of the temperature and drift velocity of hydrogen atoms in plasma. The temperature of hydrogen atoms is well coupled to the local ion temperature as long as the mean free path of the atoms is shorter than the ion gradient length in plasma. In this case the new diagnostic can provide local measurements of ion temperature in plasma. The paper considers technical capabilities of the diagnostic, physical restrictions of its application and interpretation of the measurements.

  18. Temperature measurements in fluid flows (eventually reactive, multi-phase...) using optical methods; Mesure des temperatures dans les ecoulements (eventuellement reactifs, multiphasiques...) par methodes optiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `radiations` section of the French association of thermal engineers. This book of proceedings contains 8 papers entitled: `simultaneous temperature and NO concentration measurements in a hydrogen-air turbulent flame`; `application of iodine laser induced fluorescence to temperature, pressure and velocity measurements`; `Doppler phase measurement of refractive index and temperature`; `experimental and numerical study of temperature fields of particulates in plasma jets`; `measurement and determination of temperatures and concentrations of hot exhaust gases with FTIR emission spectroscopy`; `combustion control in gas turbines using CO{sub 2} emission spectroscopy`; `analysis of gases temperature fields and particulate jets. Application to hydrogen-air, kerosene stato-reactors and to solid propellant jets`; `restitution of temperature and species profiles in pre-mixing flames by inversion of transmission and IR emission data. (J.S.)

  19. Construction of an apparatus for measuring the low-temperature thermal conductivity before and after neutron irradiation. Application to uranium dioxide (1963); Realisation d'un appareil pour la mesure de la conductibilite thermique a basse temperature avant et apres irradiation neutronique. Application au dioxyde d'uranium (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethoux, O. [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-09-15

    An apparatus has been studied and built which makes it possible to alternatively irradiate a sample at room temperature in the reactor 'Melusine' at the Grenoble Nuclear Research Centre, and to measure its thermal conductivity between 20 and 100 deg. K in perfect safety. The results obtained on UO{sub 2} have made it possible on the one hand to check experimentally that the spin-phonon diffusion leads to a thermal resistance independent of temperature above 30 deg. K, and on the other hand to propose a simple theory which takes into count the role played by the damage due to U-235 fission products in the decrease of thermal conductivity after irradiation. (author) [French] Un appareil permettant alternativement d'irradier un echantillon a temperature ambiante dans le reacteur ''Melusine'' du C.E.N.G., et de mesurer sa conductibilite thermique entre 20 et 100 deg. K en toute securite, a ete etudie et construit Les resultats obtenus sur UO{sub 2} ont permis, d'une part, de verifier experimentalement que la diffusion spin-phonon conduit a une resistance thermique independante de la temperature au-dessus de 30 deg. K, et, d'autre part, de proposer une theorie simple tenant compte du role joue par les degats dus aux produits de fission de l'uranium 235, dans la deterioration de la conductibilite thermique apres irradiation. (auteur)

  20. A method enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantlović, Miloš; Stanković, Srđan; Jokić, Ivana; Lazić, Žarko; Smiljanić, Milče; Obradov, Marko; Vukelić, Branko; Jakšić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a high-performance, simple and low-cost method for simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor. The proposed measurement method utilizes the parasitic temperature sensitivity of the sensing element for both pressure measurement correction and temperature measurement. A parametric mathematical model of the sensor was established and its parameters were calculated using the obtained characterization data. Based on the model, a real-time sensor correction for both pressure and temperature measurements was implemented in a target measurement system. The proposed method was verified experimentally on a group of typical industrial-grade piezoresistive sensors. The obtained results indicate that the method enables the pressure measurement performance to exceed that of typical digital industrial pressure transmitters, achieving at the same time the temperature measurement performance comparable to industrial-grade platinum resistance temperature sensors. The presented work is directly applicable in industrial instrumentation, where it can add temperature measurement capability to the existing pressure measurement instruments, requiring little or no additional hardware, and without adverse effects on pressure measurement performance. (paper)

  1. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola W. Meyer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses.

  2. Thermoacoustic measurement of the temperature during microwave thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Cunguang; Xing, Da; Nie, Liming

    2009-08-01

    Microwave thermotherapy (MT) has been an important treatment in oncology. The measurement of temperature during microwave thermotherapy is vital to ensure the safety of normal tissues. Thermoacoustic signals induced are temperature dependent. This phenomenon demonstrates that the thermal parameters are closely related to the generation of thermoacoustic pressure. Here we present the studies on pulsed microwave-induced thermoacoustic signals toward temperature monitoring of tissue thermotherapy. A high power pulsed microwave was used as thermoacoustic excitation source and heating source simultaneously, thermoacoustic pressure was captured by a multi-element linear transducer array. Excellent agreement was obtained between the inversion calculation results and the actual measurement temperature. The results suggest that thermoacoustic signals can be used to monitor thermotherapy temperature, and has the potential of reconstruct the temperature distribution by filter back-projection algorithm. This method has a great potential to develop into an integrated system for pulsed microwave thermotherapy and curative effect monitoring.

  3. Noncontact true temperature measurement. [of levitated sample using laser pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark C.; Allen, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A laser pyrometer has been developed for acquiring the true temperature of a levitated sample. The laser beam is first expanded to cover the entire cross-sectional surface of the target. For calibration of such a system, the reflectivity signal of an ideal 0.95 cm diameter gold-coated sphere (reflectivity = 0.99) is used as the reference for any other real targets. The emissivity of the real target can then be calculated. The overall system constant is obtained by passively measuring the radiance of a blackbody furnace (emissivity = 1.0) at a known, arbitrary temperature. Since the photo sensor used is highly linear over the entire operating temperature range, the true temperature of the target can then be computed. Preliminary results indicate that true temperatures thus obtained are in excellent correlation with thermocouple measured temperatures.

  4. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carola W.; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses. PMID:28824441

  5. The realization of temperature controller for small resistance measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobecki, Jakub; Walendziuk, Wojciech; Idzkowski, Adam

    2017-08-01

    This paper concerns the issues of construction and experimental tests of a temperature stabilization system for small resistance increments measurement circuits. After switching the system on, a PCB board heats up and the long-term temperature drift altered the measurement result. The aim of this work is reducing the time of achieving constant nominal temperature by the measurement system, which would enable decreasing the time of measurements in the steady state. Moreover, the influence of temperatures higher than the nominal on the measurement results and the obtained heating curve were tested. During the working process, the circuit heats up to about 32 °C spontaneously, and it has the time to reach steady state of about 1200 s. Implementing a USART terminal on the PC and an NI USB-6341 data acquisition card makes recording the data (concerning temperature and resistance) in the digital form and its further processing easier. It also enables changing the quantity of the regulator settings. This paper presents sample results of measurements for several temperature values and the characteristics of the temperature and resistance changes in time as well as their comparison with the output values. The object identification is accomplished due to the Ziegler-Nichols method. The algorithm of determining the step characteristics parameters and examples of computations of the regulator settings are included together with example characteristics of the object regulation.

  6. The extent of temporal smearing in surface-temperature histories derived from borehole temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of borehole temperature data to resolve past climatic events is investigated using Backus-Gilbert inversion methods. Two experimental approaches are considered: (1) the data consist of a single borehole temperature profile, and (2) the data consist of climatically-induced temperature transients measured within a borehole during a monitoring experiment. The sensitivity of the data's resolving power to the vertical distribution of the measurements, temperature measurement errors, the inclusion of a local meteorological record, and the duration of a monitoring experiment, are investigated. The results can be used to help interpret existing surface temperature histories derived from borehole temperature data and to optimize future experiments for the detection of climatic signals. ?? 1992.

  7. Surface temperature measurements of heterogeneous explosives by IR emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, B.F.; Funk, D.J.; Dickson, P.M.; Fugard, C.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-03-01

    The authors present measurements of the integrated IR emission (1--5 {micro}m) from both the heterogeneous explosive PBX 9501 and pure HMX at calibrated temperatures from 300 C to 2,500 C. The IR power emitted as a function of temperature is that expected of a black body, attenuated by a unique temperature independent constant which the authors report as the thermal emissivity. The authors have utilized this calibration of IR emission in measurements of the surface temperature from PBX 9501 subject to 1 GPa, two dimensional impact, and spontaneous ignition in unconfined cookoff. They demonstrate that the measurement of IR emission in this spectral region provides a temperature probe of sufficient sensitivity to resolve the thermal response from the solid explosive throughout the range of weak mechanical perturbation, prolonged heating to ignition, and combustion.

  8. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J E; Marrese-Reading, C M; Thornber, B; Dang, L; Johnson, L K; Katz, I

    2007-09-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed.

  9. The electronic temperature control and measurements reactor fuel rig circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowacki, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The electronic circuits of two digital temperature meters developed for the thermocouple of Ni-NiCr type are described. The output thermocouple signal as converted by means of voltage-to-freguency converter. The frequency is measured by a digital scaler controled by quartz generator signals. One of the described meter is coupled with digital temperature controler which drives the power stage of the reactor rig heater. The internal rig temperature is measured by the thermocouple providing the input signal to the mentioned voltage-to-frequency converter, that means the circuits work in the negative feedback loop. The converter frequency-to-voltage ratio is automatically adjusted to match to thermocouple sensitivity changes in the course of the temperature variations. The accuracy of measuring system is of order of +- 1degC for thermocouple temperature changes from 523 K up to 973 K (50degC up to 700degC). (author)

  10. Low-Cost Wireless Temperature Measurement: Design, Manufacture, and Testing of a PCB-Based Wireless Passive Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Yang, Yong; Hong, Yingping; Liang, Ting; Yao, Zong; Chen, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Jijun

    2018-02-10

    Low-cost wireless temperature measurement has significant value in the food industry, logistics, agriculture, portable medical equipment, intelligent wireless health monitoring, and many areas in everyday life. A wireless passive temperature sensor based on PCB (Printed Circuit Board) materials is reported in this paper. The advantages of the sensor include simple mechanical structure, convenient processing, low-cost, and easiness in integration. The temperature-sensitive structure of the sensor is a dielectric-loaded resonant cavity, consisting of the PCB substrate. The sensitive structure also integrates a patch antenna for the transmission of temperature signals. The temperature sensing mechanism of the sensor is the dielectric constant of the PCB substrate changes with temperature, which causes the resonant frequency variation of the resonator. Then the temperature can be measured by detecting the changes in the sensor's working frequency. The PCB-based wireless passive temperature sensor prototype is prepared through theoretical design, parameter analysis, software simulation, and experimental testing. The high- and low-temperature sensing performance of the sensor is tested, respectively. The resonant frequency decreases from 2.434 GHz to 2.379 GHz as the temperature increases from -40 °C to 125 °C. The fitting curve proves that the experimental data have good linearity. Three repetitive tests proved that the sensor possess well repeatability. The average sensitivity is 347.45 KHz / ℃ from repetitive measurements conducted three times. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the PCB-based wireless passive sensor, which provides a low-cost temperature sensing solution for everyday life, modern agriculture, thriving intelligent health devices, and so on, and also enriches PCB product lines and applications.

  11. Deformation measurements of materials at low temperatures using laser speckle photography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumio Nakahara; Yukihide Maeda; Kazunori Matsumura; Shigeyoshi Hisada; Takeyoshi Fujita; Kiyoshi Sugihara

    1992-01-01

    The authors observed deformations of several materials during cooling down process from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature using the laser speckle photography method. The in-plane displacements were measured by the image plane speckle photography and the out-of-plane displacement gradients by the defocused speckle photography. The results of measurements of in-plane displacement are compared with those of FEM analysis. The applicability of laser speckle photography method to cryogenic engineering are also discussed

  12. INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2005-04-01

    The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the ultrasonic vibration application for cleaning method were completed in this reporting period. Within the systematic tests on the ultrasonic vibration application, the ambient temperature and high temperature status condition were tested separately. The sticky dirt on the thermocouple tip was simulated by the cement-covered layer on the thermocouple tip. At the ambient temperature status, four (4) factors were considered as the input factors affecting the response variable of peeling off rate. The input factors include the shape of the cement-covered layer (thickness and length), the ultrasonic vibration output power, and application time. At the high temperature tests, four (4) different environments were considered as the experimental parameters including air flow supply, water and air supply environment, water/air/fine dust particle supply, and air/water/ammonia/fine dust particle supply environment. The factorial design method was used in the experiment design with twelve (12) data sets of readings. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results from systematic tests. The ANOVA results show that the thickness and length of the cement-covered layer have the significant impact on the peeling off rate of ultrasonic vibration application at the ambient temperature environment. For the high temperature tests, the different environments do not seem to have significant impact on the temperature changes. These results may indicate that the ultrasonic vibration is one of best cleaning methods for the thermocouple tip.

  13. Magnetometry and electrical transport measurements of high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Mun Keat [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-13

    Prior to preparing and performing measurements in pulsed magnetic fields, it is necessary to characterize them. For the cuprates such as HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), measurements of the superconducting temperature is essential. This experiment comprises just such a characterization of Hg1201 crystals to be used for pulsed magnetic field measurements.

  14. Two particle correlation studies and measurement of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, T.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Banerjee, K.; Dey, A.; Ghosh, T.K.; Mukherjee, G.; Gupta, D.; Meena, J.K.; Roy, A.; Dhara, P.; Banerjee, S.R.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain more detailed information about the emission temperatures, we have measured two particle correlation function at small relative momenta for the reaction 20 Ne+ 12 C at 145 MeV. Here, we report the temperature extracted from the correlation studies and compared it with those obtained from slope thermometer

  15. Miniature ingestible telemeter devices to measure deep-body temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J. M.; Fryer, T. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A telemetry device comprised of a pill-size ingestible transmitter developed to obtain deep body temperature measurements of a human is described. The device has particular utility in the medical field where deep body temperatures provide an indication of general health.

  16. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  17. Prediction of human core body temperature using non-invasive measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermann, Reto; Wyss, Eva; Annaheim, Simon; Psikuta, Agnes; Davey, Sarah; Rossi, René Michel

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of core body temperature is an efficient method for monitoring heat stress amongst workers in hot conditions. However, invasive measurement of core body temperature (e.g. rectal, intestinal, oesophageal temperature) is impractical for such applications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define relevant non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature under various conditions. We conducted two human subject studies with different experimental protocols, different environmental temperatures (10 °C, 30 °C) and different subjects. In both studies the same non-invasive measurement methods (skin temperature, skin heat flux, heart rate) were applied. A principle component analysis was conducted to extract independent factors, which were then used in a linear regression model. We identified six parameters (three skin temperatures, two skin heat fluxes and heart rate), which were included for the calculation of two factors. The predictive value of these factors for core body temperature was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The calculated root mean square deviation (rmsd) was in the range from 0.28 °C to 0.34 °C for all environmental conditions. These errors are similar to previous models using non-invasive measures to predict core body temperature. The results from this study illustrate that multiple physiological parameters (e.g. skin temperature and skin heat fluxes) are needed to predict core body temperature. In addition, the physiological measurements chosen in this study and the algorithm defined in this work are potentially applicable as real-time core body temperature monitoring to assess health risk in broad range of working conditions.

  18. A high-stability non-contact dilatometer for low-amplitude temperature-modulated measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckabauer, Martin; Sprengel, Wolfgang; Würschum, Roland [Institute of Materials Physics, Graz University of Technology, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2016-07-15

    Temperature modulated thermophysical measurements can deliver valuable insights into the phase transformation behavior of many different materials. While especially for non-metallic systems at low temperatures numerous powerful methods exist, no high-temperature device suitable for modulated measurements of bulk metallic alloy samples is available for routine use. In this work a dilatometer for temperature modulated isothermal and non-isothermal measurements in the temperature range from room temperature to 1300 K is presented. The length measuring system is based on a two-beam Michelson laser interferometer with an incremental resolution of 20 pm. The non-contact measurement principle allows for resolving sinusoidal length change signals with amplitudes in the sub-500 nm range and physically decouples the length measuring system from the temperature modulation and heating control. To demonstrate the low-amplitude capabilities, results for the thermal expansion of nickel for two different modulation frequencies are presented. These results prove that the novel method can be used to routinely resolve length-change signals of metallic samples with temperature amplitudes well below 1 K. This high resolution in combination with the non-contact measurement principle significantly extends the application range of modulated dilatometry towards high-stability phase transformation measurements on complex alloys.

  19. Time-Resolved Surface Temperature Measurement for Pulsed Ablative Thrusters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    .... The diagnostic draws on heritage from the experimental dynamic crack propagation community which has used photovoltaic infrared detectors to measure temperature rise in materials in the process of fracture...

  20. On bias of kinetic temperature measurements in complex plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, M.; Moseev, D.; Salewski, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic temperature in complex plasmas is often measured using particle tracking velocimetry. Here, we introduce a criterion which minimizes the probability of faulty tracking of particles with normally distributed random displacements in consecutive frames. Faulty particle tracking results i...

  1. Lower atmospheric temperature profile measurements using a Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman lidar system was used to measure the temperature profile of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The system consists of a tripled Nd-YAG laser and a 1.5 meter diameter telescope. Two photomultipliers are used at the output of the telescope to allow for measurements at both the laser wavelength and at the Raman shifted wavelength due to atmospheric nitrogen. The signal from the photomultipliers is recorded as photon counts in 1 microsec bins. The results of a number of laser shots are summed together to provide atmospheric returns which have acceptable signal to noise characteristics. Measurements of the Raman nitrogen return were acquired up to an altitude in excess of 20 km. Temperature profiles were retrieved from the attenuation corrected Raman nitrogen return assuming the atmosphere to be in hydrostatic equilibrium and using the ideal gas law. Retrieved temperature profiles are shown compared with independent temperature measurements.

  2. Automated measurement of cattle surface temperature and its correlation with rectal temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongXiang Kou

    Full Text Available The body temperature of cattle varies regularly with both the reproductive cycle and disease status. Establishing an automatic method for monitoring body temperature may facilitate better management of reproduction and disease control in cattle. Here, we developed an Automatic Measurement System for Cattle's Surface Temperature (AMSCST to measure the temperature of metatarsus by attaching a special shell designed to fit the anatomy of cattle's hind leg. Using AMSCST, the surface temperature (ST on the metatarsus of the hind leg was successively measured during 24 hours a day with an interval of one hour in three tested seasons. Based on ST and rectal temperature (RT detected by AMSCST and mercury thermometer, respectively, a linear mixed model was established, regarding both the time point and seasonal factors as the fixed effects. Unary linear correlation and Bland-Altman analysis results indicated that the temperatures measured by AMSCST were closely correlated to those measured by mercury thermometer (R2 = 0.998, suggesting that the AMSCST is an accurate and reliable way to detect cattle's body temperature. Statistical analysis showed that the differences of STs among the three seasons, or among the different time points were significant (P<0.05, and the differences of RTs among the different time points were similarly significant (P<0.05. The prediction accuracy of the mixed model was verified by 10-fold cross validation. The average difference between measured RT and predicted RT was about 0.10 ± 0.10°C with the association coefficient of 0.644, indicating the feasibility of this model in measuring cattle body temperature. Therefore, an automated technology for accurately measuring cattle body temperature was accomplished by inventing an optimal device and establishing the AMSCST system.

  3. Combined NMR moisture, temperature and pressure measurements during heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pel L.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For model validation, quantitative measurements of the evolution of moisture, temperature, and pressure distributions in time are needed. For this purpose, we have developed an NMR setup to measure the moisture transport in heated building materials. The measured combined moisture content and temperature profiles give a unique insight in the moisture transport and dehydration kinetics inside concrete during fire. These measurements give the first quantitative proof for the build-up of a moisture peak due to the vapor pressure build-up. In this study we have also combined for the first time the measurement of the moisture and temperature profiles with the measurement of the pressure at one position, which show that the pressure build up is directly related to the moisture profiles.

  4. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Moises E. [Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

  5. Wet method for measuring starch gelatinization temperature using electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sanchez, E; Figueroa, J D C; Gaytan-Martínez, M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop a method for obtaining the gelatinization temperature of starches by using electrical conductivity. Native starches from corn, rice, potato, and wheat were prepared with different proportions of water and heated from room temperature to 90 degrees C, in a device especially designed for monitoring the electrical conductivity as a function of temperature. The results showed a linear trend of the electrical conductivity with the temperature until it reaches the onset gelatinization temperature. After that point, the electrical conductivity presented an increment or decrement depending on the water content in the sample and it was related to starch swelling and gelatinization phenomena. At the end gelatinization temperature, the conductivity becomes stable and linear, indicating that there are no more changes of phase. The starch gelatinization parameter, which was evaluated in the 4 types of starches using the electrical conductivity, was compared with those obtained by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). The onset temperature at which the electrical conductivity increased or decreased was found to be similar to that obtained by DSC. Also, the final temperature at which the electrical conductivity returned to linearity matched the end gelatinization temperature of the DSC. Further, a wet method for measuring the onset, peak, and end gelatinization temperatures as a function of temperature using the electrical conductivity curves is presented for a starch-water suspension.

  6. Temperature and voltage measurement in quantum systems far from equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Abhay; Stafford, Charles A.

    2016-10-01

    We show that a local measurement of temperature and voltage for a quantum system in steady state, arbitrarily far from equilibrium, with arbitrary interactions within the system, is unique when it exists. This is interpreted as a consequence of the second law of thermodynamics. We further derive a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a solution. In this regard, we find that a positive temperature solution exists whenever there is no net population inversion. However, when there is a net population inversion, we may characterize the system with a unique negative temperature. Voltage and temperature measurements are treated on an equal footing: They are simultaneously measured in a noninvasive manner, via a weakly coupled thermoelectric probe, defined by requiring vanishing charge and heat dissipation into the probe. Our results strongly suggest that a local temperature measurement without a simultaneous local voltage measurement, or vice versa, is a misleading characterization of the state of a nonequilibrium quantum electron system. These results provide a firm mathematical foundation for voltage and temperature measurements far from equilibrium.

  7. MPPT Technique Based on Current and Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Moreira Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new maximum power point tracking (MPPT method based on the measurement of temperature and short-circuit current, in a simple and efficient approach. These measurements, which can precisely define the maximum power point (MPP, have not been used together in other existing techniques. The temperature is measured with a low cost sensor and the solar irradiance is estimated through the relationship of the measured short-circuit current and its reference. Fast tracking speed and stable steady-state operation are advantages of this technique, which presents higher performance when compared to other well-known techniques.

  8. Continuous temperature measurements on the pouring stand for casting moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Leśniewski

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of temperature measurements of liquid iron alloys obtained by means of the pyrometer, PDR-1800 series, are presented in the paper. The measurements were performed in conditions determined by the kind of a pouring device. The results obtained for bottom-tap ladles were supplemented by laboratory measurements. These results allow explaining significant differences in the results of temperature measurements performed in pouring ladles by means of the pyrometric method and immersible thermocouple, which - in turn - improves assessment of metal thermal parameters in pouring devices.

  9. Ring to measure magnetic permeability at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    While for magn. permeability measurements at room temperature a split-coil permeameter is used (see photo 7708553X), for measurements at cryogenic temperatures the excitation and the flux-measuring coils are wound directly on the ring sample by means of a toroidal winding machine. The ring in the picture was made to select the mild steel for the ISR Prototype Superconducting Quadrupole(see photo 7702690X). The excitation coil was wound with 1 mm diam. copper wire and had about 2730 turns. For measurements at 4.2 K a max. current of 90 A was used. See also photos 7708553X,7708100,7708103.

  10. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  11. FFTF fuel assembly outlet temperature measurements and comparison to predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.R.

    1984-06-01

    The data from the FFTF core outlet thermocouples have been valuable in verifying the performance of the core assemblies. The data have been useful to the experimental program and as an aid in understanding some reactor operating phenomena. The thermocouple reliability and repeatability have been good. Almost all of the fueled positions in the core have 3 operable thermocouples and every position has at least one. Differences between the measured assembly outlet temperatures and the calculated outlet temperatures have generally been small. Where significant differences have occurred, an explanation has been found. The difference between the measured and calculated outlet temperatures for each assembly remains constant during the cycle

  12. Evaluation of Raytek infrared pyrometer for continuous propellant temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Mark D.

    1990-01-01

    The primary purpose of this evaluation was to determine if the Raytek IR pyrometer that was installed in the 600 gallon propellant mixers could be used to provide a continuous, accurate, reliable measurement of the propellant temperature during mixing. The Raytek infrared sensor is not recommended to be used for controlling propellant temperature nor for inspection buy-off. The first part of the evaluation was to determine the accuracy of the sensor in measuring the propellant temperature. The second part was to determine the reliability of the air purge design in preventing contamination of the IR window.

  13. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures.

  14. Influence of temperature to quenching on liquid scintillation measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    The amount of quench is measured with liquid scintillation spectrometer changing the temperature of the sample. The range of the changed temperature is between 0 deg C and 35 deg C. The measurement is carried out for three kinds of unquenched standard, two quenched standards and fifteen kinds of scintillation cocktail and the mixed sample. It is confirmed that the amount of quench increases for all samples as the temperature rises. The influence of the changed amount of quench to the quench correction is examined. (author)

  15. Dielectric properties measurement system at cryogenic temperatures and microwave frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, J.; Ibarra, A.; Margineda, J.; Zamarro, J. M.; Hernandez, A.

    1994-07-01

    A system based on the resonant cavity method has been developed to measure the permittivity and loss tangent at 12-18 GHz over the temperature range 80 K to 300 K. Changes of permittivity as low as 0.01 % in the range 1 to 30, and 3 x 10{sup 6} for loss tangent values below 10{sup 2}, can be obtained without requiring temperature stability. The thermal expansion coefficient and resistivity factor of copper have been measured between 80 K and 300 K. Permittivity of sapphire and loss tangent of alumina of 99.9 % purity in the same temperature range are presented. (Author) 23 refs.

  16. Modeling the wet bulb globe temperature using standard meteorological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljegren, James C; Carhart, Richard A; Lawday, Philip; Tschopp, Stephen; Sharp, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. Army has a need for continuous, accurate estimates of the wet bulb globe temperature to protect soldiers and civilian workers from heat-related injuries, including those involved in the storage and destruction of aging chemical munitions at depots across the United States. At these depots, workers must don protective clothing that increases their risk of heat-related injury. Because of the difficulty in making continuous, accurate measurements of wet bulb globe temperature outdoors, the authors have developed a model of the wet bulb globe temperature that relies only on standard meteorological data available at each storage depot for input. The model is composed of separate submodels of the natural wet bulb and globe temperatures that are based on fundamental principles of heat and mass transfer, has no site-dependent parameters, and achieves an accuracy of better than 1 degree C based on comparisons with wet bulb globe temperature measurements at all depots.

  17. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  18. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiuyan; Li Hong; Chen Zhipeng; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnostics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron temperature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method. (low temperature plasma)

  19. High Resolution Temperature Measurement of Liquid Stainless Steel Using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Devesse

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A contactless temperature measurement system is presented based on a hyperspectral line camera that captures the spectra in the visible and near infrared (VNIR region of a large set of closely spaced points. The measured spectra are used in a nonlinear least squares optimization routine to calculate a one-dimensional temperature profile with high spatial resolution. Measurements of a liquid melt pool of AISI 316L stainless steel show that the system is able to determine the absolute temperatures with an accuracy of 10%. The measurements are made with a spatial resolution of 12 µm/pixel, justifying its use in applications where high temperature measurements with high spatial detail are desired, such as in the laser material processing and additive manufacturing fields.

  20. Soil temperature variability in complex terrain measured using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes but magnitude and nature of Ts variability in a landscape setting are rarely documented. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (FO-DTS) potentially measure Ts at high density over a large extent. ...

  1. A nonintrusive temperature measuring system for estimating deep body temperature in bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S Y; Lee, W K; Baek, H J; Park, K S

    2012-01-01

    Deep body temperature is an important indicator that reflects human being's overall physiological states. Existing deep body temperature monitoring systems are too invasive to apply to awake patients for a long time. Therefore, we proposed a nonintrusive deep body temperature measuring system. To estimate deep body temperature nonintrusively, a dual-heat-flux probe and double-sensor probes were embedded in a neck pillow. When a patient uses the neck pillow to rest, the deep body temperature can be assessed using one of the thermometer probes embedded in the neck pillow. We could estimate deep body temperature in 3 different sleep positions. Also, to reduce the initial response time of dual-heat-flux thermometer which measures body temperature in supine position, we employed the curve-fitting method to one subject. And thereby, we could obtain the deep body temperature in a minute. This result shows the possibility that the system can be used as practical temperature monitoring system with appropriate curve-fitting model. In the next study, we would try to establish a general fitting model that can be applied to all of the subjects. In addition, we are planning to extract meaningful health information such as sleep structure analysis from deep body temperature data which are acquired from this system.

  2. The Role of ADC-Based Thermometry in Measuring Brain Intraventricular Temperature in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Matthias W; Stern, Steven E; Oshmyansky, Alexander; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    To determine the feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-based thermometry to assess intraventricular temperature in children. ADC maps were generated from diffusion tensor imaging data, which were acquired with diffusion gradients along 20 noncollinear directions using a b-value of 1000 s/mm(2) . The intraventricular temperature was calculated based on intraventricular ADC values and the mode method as previously reported. The calculated intraventricular temperature was validated with an estimated brain temperature based on temporal artery temperature measurements. We included 120 children in this study (49 females, 71 males, mean age 6.63 years), 15 consecutive children for each of the following age groups: 0-1, 1-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-14, and 14-18 years. Forty-three children had a normal brain MRI and 77 children had an abnormal brain scan. Polynomial fitting to the temperature distribution and subsequent calculation of mode values was performed. A correlation coefficient and a coefficient of determination were calculated between ADC calculated temperatures and estimated brain temperatures. Linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the two temperature measures. ADC-based intraventricular temperatures ranged between 31.5 and 39.6 °C, although estimated brain temperatures ranged between 36.3 and 38.1 °C. The difference between the temperatures is larger for children with more than 8,000 voxels within the lateral ventricles compared to children with less than 8,000 voxels. The correlation coefficient between ADC-based temperatures and the estimated brain temperatures is .1, the respective R(2) is .01 indicating that 1% of the changes in estimated brain temperatures are attributable to corresponding changes in ADC-based temperature measurements (P = .275). ADC-based thermometry has limited application in the pediatric population mainly due to a small ventricular size. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. X3 expansion tube driver gas spectroscopy and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, V.; Gildfind, D.; Lewis, S.; James, C.

    2017-11-01

    The University of Queensland's X3 facility is a large, free-piston driven expansion tube used for super-orbital and high Mach number scramjet aerothermodynamic studies. During recent development of new scramjet test flow conditions, experimentally measured shock speeds were found to be significantly lower than that predicted by initial driver performance calculations. These calculations were based on ideal, isentropic compression of the driver gas and indicated that loss mechanisms, not accounted for in the preliminary analysis, were significant. The critical determinant of shock speed is peak driver gas sound speed, which for a given gas composition depends on the peak driver gas temperature. This temperature may be inaccurately estimated if an incorrect fill temperature is assumed, or if heat losses during driver gas compression are significant but not accounted for. For this study, the ideal predicted peak temperature was 3750 K, without accounting for losses. However, a much lower driver temperature of 2400 K is suggested based on measured experimental shock speeds. This study aimed to measure initial and peak driver gas temperatures for a representative X3 operating condition. Examination of the transient temperatures of the driver gas and compression tube steel wall during the initial fill process showed that once the filling process was complete, the steady-state driver gas temperature closely matched the tube wall temperature. Therefore, while assuming the gas is initially at the ambient laboratory temperature is not a significant source of error, it can be entirely mitigated by simply monitoring tube wall temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to determine the driver gas spectra after diaphragm rupture; the driver gas emission spectrum exhibited a significant continuum radiation component, with prominent spectral lines attributed to contamination of the gas. A graybody approximation of the continuum suggested a peak driver gas temperature of

  4. Noninvasive ultrasonic measurements of temperature distribution and heat fluxes in nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yunlu; Skliar, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    application of this new method to temperature and heat flux measurements in DSC and other nuclear systems. (authors)

  5. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  6. Inverse analysis of inner surface temperature history from outer surface temperature measurement of a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S; Ioka, S; Onchi, S; Matsumoto, Y

    2010-01-01

    When slug flow runs through a pipe, nonuniform and time-varying thermal stresses develop and there is a possibility that thermal fatigue occurs. Therefore it is necessary to know the temperature distributions and the stress distributions in the pipe for the integrity assessment of the pipe. It is, however, difficult to measure the inner surface temperature directly. Therefore establishment of the estimation method of the temperature history on inner surface of pipe is needed. As a basic study on the estimation method of the temperature history on the inner surface of a pipe with slug flow, this paper presents an estimation method of the temperature on the inner surface of a plate from the temperature on the outer surface. The relationship between the temperature history on the outer surface and the inner surface is obtained analytically. Using the results of the mathematical analysis, the inverse analysis method of the inner surface temperature history estimation from the outer surface temperature history is proposed. It is found that the inner surface temperature history can be estimated from the outer surface temperature history by applying the inverse analysis method, even when it is expressed by the multiple frequency components.

  7. Mold temperature measurement for glass-pressing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The largest use of radiation thermometers within Corning Glass Works is for mold temperature measurement for the glass-pressing process. Pressing television panels at today's high quality would be very difficult without a mold temperature measurement system and the computer manipulation of the quality control data to supervise the mold temperature control loop. The most critical part of a television panel is the inside surface curvature. The ideal surface is usually defined as a spherical surface. The tolerance for a normal TV panel is +-0.30 mm (+-0.012 in.). High resolution display panels are more critical, having a dimensional tolerance only one half as large as TV panels. Panel curvature is a direct (but negative) function of mold temperature. Every 1 0 C increase in mold temperature results in the panel center being 0.025 mm (0.001 in.) shorter (flatter). Random dimensional variations within a panel take up most of the dimensional tolerance. The result is that each mold is controlled to its own individual temperature set point, +-1 0 C. Hot panel and cold panel curvature measurements are correlated by a process computer and used to update the mold temperature set points. The same computer adjusts the mold cooling air to maintain the required mold temperatures. From the temperature measurement standpoint, the significant problem is the changing emissivity of the mold surface when the mold is new or reconditioned. The selection of a radiation thermometer with a short wavelength was an obvious choice to minimize the effect of emissivity variations

  8. Online junction temperature measurement using peak gate current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Nick; Munk-Nielsen, Stig; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A new method for junction temperature measurement of MOS-gated power semiconductor switches is presented. The measurement method involves detecting the peak voltage over the external gate resistor of an IGBT or MOSFET during turn-on. This voltage is directly proportional to the peak gate current...

  9. In-core moderator temperature measurement within candu reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, N.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature profile of the D 2O moderator inside a CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor, within the calandria vessel, was measured by means of a specially instrumented probe introduced within the core. Measurements were made under steady and transient reactor conditions using two different sensors, viz. resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and type K chromel-alumel thermocouples. The results established the feasibility of in-core moderatortemperature measurement and indicated that the thermocouples used were relatively not affected by the intense radiation fields thus producing more accurate data.

  10. Space potential, temperature, and density profile measurements on RENTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoch, P.M.

    1983-05-01

    Radial profiles of the space potential, electron temperature, and density have been measured on RENTOR with a heavy-ion-beam probe. The potential profile has been compared to predictions from a stochastic magnetic field fluctuation theory, using the measured temperature and density profiles. The comparison shows strong qualitative agreement in that the potential is positive and the order of T/sub e//e. There is some quantitative disagreement in that the measured radial electric fields are somewhat smaller than the theoretical predictions. To facilitate this comparison, a detailed analysis of the possible errors has been completed

  11. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2005-10-01

    The objectives of this project during this semi-annual reporting period are to test the effects of coating layer of the thermal couple on the temperature measurement and to screen out the significant factors affecting the temperature reading under different operational conditions. The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray coated thermal couples were completed in this reporting period. The comparison tests of coated and uncoated thermal couples were conducted under various operational conditions. The temperature changes were recorded and the temperature differences were calculated to describe the thermal spray coating effect on the thermal couples. To record the temperature data accurately, the computerized data acquisition system (DAS) was adopted to the temperature reading. The DAS could record the data with the accuracy of 0.1 C and the recording parameters are configurable. In these experiments, DAS was set as reading one data for every one (1) minute. The operational conditions are the combination of three parameters: air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and the amount of fine dust particles. The results from the temperature readings show the temperature of uncoated thermal couple is uniformly higher than that of coated thermal couple for each operational condition. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was computed based on the results from systematic tests to screen out the significant factors and/or interactions. The temperature difference was used as dependent variable and three operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water/ammonia flow rate and amount of fine dust particle) were used as independent factors. The ANOVA results show that the operational parameters are not the statistically significant factors affecting the temperature readings which indicate that the coated thermal couple could be applied to temperature measurement in gasifier. The actual temperature reading with the coated thermal couple in

  12. Measurement of critical temperature as a function of field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInturff, A. D.; Ishibashi, K.; Heard, G. D.

    The critical temperature has been measured for various magnet conductors as a function of the perpendicular applied magnetic field. The isothermal environment was provided by a variable temperature cryostat which fits into the bore of a 10 telsa solenoid. The temperature gradient across the sample volume was measured to be less than 25 millikelvins. The superconducting to normal state transition was measured resistively, using sample current densities from 0.01 to 2 A cm -2. The maximum applied magnetic field was 10 T and varied less than 0.5% in the sample volume. The critical transport current range of the samples measured from tens to thousands of amperes in the presence of a 10 T perpendicular magnetic field at 4.2 K.

  13. Measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The papers in this volume were presented at an ASTM symposium held on 20 June 1983 in conjunction with the 24th Annual Rock Mechanics Symposium at Texas A and M University, College Station, TX. The purpose of these papers is to present recent developments in the measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures, and to examine and interpret the data produced by such measurement. The need for measuring rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures has become increasingly important in recent years. Location and design of nuclear waste repositories, development of geothermal energy sites, and design and construction of deep excavations for civil, military, and mining engineering require significantly improved capabilities for measuring rock properties under conditions substantially different from those prevailing in most laboratory and in situ work. The development of high-pressure, high-temperature capabilities is also significant for the analysis of tectonic processes

  14. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  15. Water temperature and concentration measurements within the expanding blast wave of a high explosive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, J R; Lightstone, J M; Piecuch, S; Koch, J D

    2011-01-01

    We present an application of absorption spectroscopy to directly measure temperature and concentration histories of water vapor within the expansion of a high explosive detonation. While the approach of absorption spectroscopy is well established, the combination of a fast, near-infrared array, broadband light source, and rigid gauge allow the first application of time-resolved absorption measurements in an explosive environment. The instrument is demonstrated using pentaerythritol tetranitrate with a sampling rate of 20 kHz for 20 ms following detonation. Absorption by water vapor is measured between 1335 and 1380 nm. Water temperatures are determined by fitting experimental transmission spectra to a simulated database. Water mole fractions are deduced following the temperature assignment. The sources of uncertainty and their impact on the results are discussed. These measurements will aid the development of chemical-specific reaction models and the predictive capability in technical fields including combustion and detonation science

  16. Mechanisms of Low-Temperature Nitridation Technology on a TaN Thin Film Resistor for Temperature Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huey-Ru; Chen, Ying-Chung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chu, Tian-Jian; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Chuang, Nai-Chuan; Wang, Kao-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    In this letter, we propose a novel low-temperature nitridation technology on a tantalum nitride (TaN) thin film resistor (TFR) through supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2) treatment for temperature sensor applications. We also found that the sensitivity of temperature of the TaN TFR was improved about 10.2 %, which can be demonstrated from measurement of temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). In order to understand the mechanism of SCCO2 nitridation on the TaN TFR, the carrier conduction mechanism of the device was analyzed through current fitting. The current conduction mechanism of the TaN TFR changes from hopping to a Schottky emission after the low-temperature SCCO2 nitridation treatment. A model of vacancy passivation in TaN grains with nitrogen and by SCCO2 nitridation treatment is eventually proposed to increase the isolation ability in TaN TFR, which causes the transfer of current conduction mechanisms.

  17. Is Oral Temperature an Accurate Measurement of Deep Body Temperature? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Ganio, Matthew S.; Casa, Douglas J.; Vingren, Jakob; Klau, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Oral temperature might not be a valid method to assess core body temperature. However, many clinicians, including athletic trainers, use it rather than criterion standard methods, such as rectal thermometry. Objective: To critically evaluate original research addressing the validity of using oral temperature as a measurement of core body temperature during periods of rest and changing core temperature. Data Sources: In July 2010, we searched the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTDiscus, Academic Search Premier, and the Cochrane Library for the following concepts: core body temperature, oral, and thermometers. Controlled vocabulary was used, when available, as well as key words and variations of those key words. The search was limited to articles focusing on temperature readings and studies involving human participants. Data Synthesis: Original research was reviewed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria and subsequently were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. All 16 were included in the review because they met the minimal PEDro score of 4 points (of 10 possible points), with all but 2 scoring 5 points. A critical review of these studies indicated a disparity between oral and criterion standard temperature methods (eg, rectal and esophageal) specifically as the temperature increased. The difference was −0.50°C ± 0.31°C at rest and −0.58°C ± 0.75°C during a nonsteady state. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that, regardless of whether the assessment is recorded at rest or during periods of changing core temperature, oral temperature is an unsuitable diagnostic tool for determining body temperature because many measures demonstrated differences greater than the predetermined validity threshold of 0.27°C (0.5°F). In addition, the differences were greatest at the highest rectal temperatures. Oral temperature cannot

  18. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G. D.; Powell, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.008 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.0010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding

  19. High temperature superconductors in electromagnetic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Richens, P E

    2000-01-01

    powder-in-tube and dip-coated, have been made using a novel single loop tensometer that enables the insertion of a reasonably long length of conductor into the bore of a high-field magnet. The design, construction, and characterization of a High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) magnet is described. The design stage has involved the development of computer software for the calculation of the critical current of a solenoid wound from anisotropic HTS conductor. This calculation can be performed for a variety of problems including those involving magnetic materials such as iron by the incorporation of finite element electromagnetic analysis software. This has enabled the optimization of the magnet's performance. The HTS magnet is wound from 190 m of silver-matrix Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 1 sub 0 powder-in-tube tape conductor supplied by Intermagnetics General Corporation. The dimensions are 70 mm bore and 70 mm length, and it consists of 728 turns. Iron end-plates were utilized in order to reduc...

  20. Ex situ calibration technique for simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements inside water droplets using temperature-sensitive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji

    2017-07-01

    Phosphorescence-based temperature measurements usually employ in situ calibration in macro-scale flow domains. However, the application of conventional in situ calibration in millimetre scales such as in 2 mm droplets is difficult because temperature probing using an intrusive technique such as thermocouple-based measurement can deform a droplet interface and even its integrity. Therefore, in this paper we propose an ex situ calibration technique for combined 2D fluid temperature and flow velocity measurements inside pendant droplets using thermographic phosphorescence and particle image velocimetry. This calibration technique has the potential to perform measurements not only inside droplets but also in other small-scale fluid domains that are sensitive to intrusive temperature probing. To develop this technique, the effect of local phosphorescence intensity on the phosphorescence decay constant (initial intensity effect) was studied and quantified. We observed that the phosphorescence light intensity of the first image among the decay image series affects the local decay constants as the coefficient of a half sigmoid function. This novel ex situ calibration technique was used to investigate high-spatial-resolution temperature and flow velocity distributions inside a pendant water droplet located in an air stream, and an anti-distortion algorithm was used to correct the optical distortion induced by the curved surface of the droplet. The measured temperature and velocity fields were found to be reasonable and consistent with those obtained in previous studies. The proposed technique is expected to be useful in conducting further investigations on the mechanisms of heat and mass transfers between droplets and carrier gases. Furthermore, it can potentially improve our understanding of the heat and mass exchange mechanisms within a droplet’s internal flow structures and temperature gradients.

  1. High-temperature absorbed dose measurements in the megagray range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, P.; Ardonceau, J.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1988-01-01

    Organic conductors of the tetraselenotetracene family have been tested as ''high-temperature'' absorbed dose dosimeters. They were heated up to 120 0 C and irradiated at this temperature with 1-MeV electrons in order to simulate, in a short time, a much longer γ-ray irradiation. The electric resistance increase of the crystal can be considered a good measurement of the absorbed dose in the range 10 6 Gy to a few 10 8 Gy and presumably one order of magnitude more. This dosimeter also permits on-line (in-situ) measurements of the absorbed dose without removing the sensor from the irradiation site. The respective advantages of organic and inorganic dosimeters at these temperature and dose ranges are also discussed. In this connection, we outline new, but negative, results concerning the possible use of silica as a high-temperature, high-dose dosimeter. (author)

  2. Fuel centerline temperature measurement experiment in JMTR, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroei; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Sezaki, Katsuji; Komukai, Bunsaku

    1980-11-01

    Fuel centerline temperature measurement experiment which is the most fundamental for the LWR fuel safety study, is planned to conduct in JMTR using OWL-1 loop facility. Irradiation of the first test assembly was completed. In this paper, the comparison between measured fuel centerline temperature data and predicted ones by JAERI's FREG-4 code which is a computer program to calculate fuel temperature distribution is made. Furthermore, the data analysis method such as how to estimate local linear power and inpile behavior of the instrumentations are described. The maximum fuel center temperature was 1250 0 C at steady state, the maximum linear power was 320 W/cm, and the maximum burnup was about 1600 MWD/T. (author)

  3. Gas Temperature Measurement in a Glow Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloneker, Kenneth; Podder, Nirmol; McCurdy, William E.; Shi, Shi

    2009-10-01

    In this study a relatively inexpensive quartz protected thermocouple is used to measure the gas temperature in the positive column of a glow discharge plasma. For simplicity a K-type thermocouple is used to interpret the gas temperature from the sensor voltage at pressures from 0.5 Torr to 15 Torr and discharge currents from 5 mA to 120 mA. Gas temperature is investigated as a function of the gas pressure at fixed discharge currents and as a function of discharge current at fixed gas pressures in three different gas species (Ar, N2, and He). An infinite cylinder model is used to compute the average gas temperature of the discharge from joule heating and gas thermal conductivity. The model and measurement data agree within 1% to 10% depending on plasma parameters. Data for all three gases have a similar quasi-linear increasing error as compared to the model.

  4. Measuring Skin Temperatures with the IASI Hyperspectral Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safieddine, S.; George, M.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.

    2017-12-01

    Although the role of satellites in observing the variability of the Earth system has increased in recent decades, remote-sensing observations are still underexploited to accurately assess climate change fingerprints, in particular temperature variations. The IASI - Flux and Temperature (IASI-FT) project aims at providing new benchmarks for temperature observations using the calibrated radiances measured twice a day at any location by the IASI thermal infrared instrument on the suite of MetOp satellites (2006-2025). The main challenge is to achieve the accuracy and stability needed for climate studies, particularly that required for climate trends. Time series for land and sea skin surface temperatures are derived and compared with in situ measurements and atmospheric reanalysis. The observed trends are analyzed at seasonal and regional scales in order to disentangle natural (weather/dynamical) variability and human-induced climate forcings.

  5. Prediction and measurement of selected phase transformation temperatures of steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiník O.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with precise determination of phase transformation temperatures of steel. A series of experimental measurements were carried out by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA and Direct Thermal Analysis (TA to obtain temperatures very close to the equilibrium temperatures. There are presented results from the high temperatures region, above 1000°C, with focus on the solidus temperatures (TS, peritectic transition (TP and liquidus (TL of multicomponent steels. The data obtained were verified by statistical evaluation and compared with computational thermodynamic and empirical calculations. The calculations were performed using 15 empirical equations obtained by literature research (10 for TL and 5 for TS, as well as by software InterDendritic Solidification (IDS and Thermo-Calc (2015b, TCFE8; TC. It was verified that both thermo-analytical methods used are set correctly; the results are reproducible, comparable and close to equilibrium state.

  6. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High-temperature superconductors in application - fight for the top

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    For the superconductor market two-digit growth rates are predicted until after the year 2000. The decrosslinking of the high temperature superconductors initiated a worldwide race for first applications. The report considers the situation of raw materials and the application potentials in the USA, Japan and Western Europe. (orig.) [de

  8. Tack Measurements of Prepreg Tape at Variable Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Christopher; Palmieri, Frank L.; Forghani, Alireza; Hickmott, Curtis; Bedayat, Houman; Coxon, Brian; Poursartip, Anoush; Grimsley, Brian

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s Advanced Composites Project has established the goal of achieving a 30 percent reduction in the timeline for certification of primary composite structures for application on commercial aircraft. Prepreg tack is one of several critical parameters affecting composite manufacturing by automated fiber placement (AFP). Tack plays a central role in the prevention of wrinkles and puckers that can occur during AFP, thus knowledge of tack variation arising from a myriad of manufacturing and environmental conditions is imperative for the prediction of defects during AFP. A full design of experiments was performed to experimentally characterize tack on 0.25-inch slit-tape tow IM7/8552-1 prepreg using probe tack testing. Several process parameters (contact force, contact time, retraction speed, and probe diameter) as well as environmental parameters (temperature and humidity) were varied such that the entire parameter space could be efficiently evaluated. Mid-point experimental conditions (i.e., parameters not at either extrema) were included to enable prediction of curvature in relationships and repeat measurements were performed to characterize experimental error. Collectively, these experiments enable determination of primary dependencies as well as multi-parameter relationships. Slit-tape tow samples were mounted to the bottom plate of a rheometer parallel plate fixture using a jig to prevent modification of the active area to be interrogated with the top plate, a polished stainless steel probe, during tack testing. The probe surface was slowly brought into contact with the pre-preg surface until a pre-determined normal force was achieved (2-30 newtons). After a specified dwell time (0.02-10 seconds), during which the probe substrate interaction was maintained under displacement control, the probe was retracted from the surface (0.1-50 millimeters per second). Initial results indicated a clear dependence of tack strength on several parameters, with a particularly

  9. Construction of an apparatus for nuclear orientation measurements at low temperatures. Application to neodymium-cobalt alloy; Realisation d'un appareil pour des mesures d'orientation nucleaire a basse temperature. Application a l'alliage neodyme-cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-10-01

    We describe experiments along which has been studied the anisotropy of {gamma} radiations emitted by oriented nuclei. We have used the great hyperfine fields acting on nuclei in ferromagnetic metals so as to produce alignment at low temperature. By irradiation we obtained a few cobalt 60 nuclei in our samples which were then cooled down to 0,01 K. The anisotropic rate of the 1,33 MeV {gamma} radiation was measured in function of the sample temperature, using as thermometer the anisotropy of {gamma} radiation emitted by cobalt 60 nuclei in a cobalt single crystal. Cobalt 60 was lined up in a cobalt nickel alloy (40% Ni). The hyperfine field at the cobalt was measured compared to the effective field in metallic cobalt: Heff(Co Ni)/Heff(Co metal) = 0.71 {+-} 0.12. These results are in good agreement with specific heat measurements made previously. Cobalt 60 has been polarised in a neodymium-cobalt alloy (NdCo{sub 5}). The field at the cobalt in NdCo{sub 5} has been measured compared to the field in metallic cobalt and taking the non-saturation into account we found 165000 oersteds < Heff(NdCo{sub 5}) < 220000 oersteds. (author) [French] Nous decrivons des experiences au cours desquelles nous avons etudie l'anisotropie de rayonnements {gamma} emis par des noyaux orientes. Nous avons utilise les grands champs hyperfins agissant sur las noyaux dans les metaux ferromagnetiques pour produire l'alignement a basse temperature. Par irradiation nous avons obtenu quelques noyaux de cobalt 60 dans nos echantillons qui furent ensuite refroidis a 0,01 K. Le degre d'anisotropie du rayonnement {gamma} de 1,33 MeV fut mesure en fonction de la temperature de l'echantillon en utilisant l'anisotropie du rayonnement {gamma} de noyaux de cobalt 60 dans un monocristal de cobalt metallique utilise comme thermometre. Le cobalt 60 a ete aligne dans un alliage de cobalt-nickel (40% Ni). Le champ hyperfin au niveau du cobalt a ete mesure par rapport au champ effectif

  10. Kinetic methods for measuring the temperature of clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Grigorii N

    2011-01-01

    The temperature (internal energy) of clusters and nanoparticles is an important physical parameter which affects many of their properties and the character of processes they are involved in. At the same time, determining the temperature of free clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams is a rather complicated problem because the temperature of small particles depends on their size. In this paper, recently developed kinetic methods for measuring the temperature of clusters and nanoparticles in molecular beams are reviewed. The definition of temperature in the present context is given, and how the temperature affects the properties of and the processes involving the particles is discussed. The temperature behavior of clusters and nanoparticles near a phase transition point is analyzed. Early methods for measuring the temperature of large clusters are briefly described. It is shown that, compared to other methods, new kinetic methods are more universal and applicable for determining the temperature of clusters and nanoparticles of practically any size and composition. The future development and applications of these methods are outlined. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. High Temperature Antenna Measurement System with GSG or GS Contact Probing Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.

    2009-01-01

    Applications that require data transmission at high temperatures are becoming more common due to growing commercial and military needs. Antennas are an indispensable part of these systems and the ability to characterize them at elevated temperatures is quite complicated with little or no information being reported on the subject [1]. This paper describes a measurement system that can characterize planar antennas up 600 C with ground-signal-ground (GSG) or ground-signal (GS) probe contacts. The return loss and radiation patterns of a folded slot antenna (FSA), designed to operate at 5 GHz (no ground plane on back side) and fabricated on an alumina substrate, are presented at room temperature (RT) and 250 C [2]. All measurements were made with Agilent's Precision Network Analyzer (PNA) E8361. The return loss and radiation patterns were also measured on a Styrofoam chuck to illustrate the effect the high temperature measurement system has on the patterns.

  12. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, R. A.; Walker, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques for containerless study of high temperature processes and material properties was studied. Gas jet and electromagnetic levitation and electromagnetic and laser heating techniques are used with LIF in earth-based containerless high temperature experiments. Included are the development of an apparatus and its use in the studies of (1) chemical reactions on Al2O3, molybdenum, tungsten and LaB6 specimens, (2) methods for noncontact specimen temperature measurement, (3) levitation jet properties and (4) radiative lifetime and collisional energy transfer rates for electronically excited atoms.

  13. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica De Miguel-Soto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG, and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  14. Study of Optical Fiber Sensors for Cryogenic Temperature Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel-Soto, Veronica; Leandro, Daniel; Lopez-Aldaba, Aitor; Beato-López, Juan Jesus; Pérez-Landazábal, José Ignacio; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Jamier, Raphael; Roy, Philippe; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2017-11-30

    In this work, the performance of five different fiber optic sensors at cryogenic temperatures has been analyzed. A photonic crystal fiber Fabry-Pérot interferometer, two Sagnac interferometers, a commercial fiber Bragg grating (FBG), and a π-phase shifted fiber Bragg grating interrogated in a random distributed feedback fiber laser have been studied. Their sensitivities and resolutions as sensors for cryogenic temperatures have been compared regarding their advantages and disadvantages. Additionally, the results have been compared with the given by a commercial optical backscatter reflectometer that allowed for distributed temperature measurements of a single mode fiber.

  15. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna

    2017-01-05

    Flame quenching by heat loss to a surface continues to be an active area of combustion research. Close wall temperature measurements in an isothermal wall-stabilized flame are reported in this work. Conventional N-vibrational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K). Methane/air and ethylene/air stoichiometric flames for various global strain rates based on exit bulk velocities are plotted and compared. CH* chemiluminescence is employed to determine the flame location relative to the wall. Flame locations are shown to move closer to the wall with increasing strain rates in addition to higher near-wall temperatures. Peak temperatures for ethylene are considerably higher (~250-300K) than peak temperatures for methane. Preheat zone profiles are similar for different strain rates across fuels. This work demonstrates close wall precise temperature measurments using CARS.

  16. Measurement of temperature elevation in tissue for the optimum and safe use of scalpel-type ultrasonic surgery devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, C; Nuernberger, H; Reimann, H P

    2004-01-01

    Using temperature sensors of specific design, the temperature elevation during application of a Harmonic Scalpel was determined in liver tissue. The influence of different treatment techniques and application parameters on the heat produced was determined. The measurements can be used to assess the risk of harmful bioeffects and to optimise performance and treatment techniques with respect to minimum thermal load

  17. Effect of the Thermocouple on Measuring the Temperature Discontinuity at a Liquid-Vapor Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohammad Amin; Nobes, David S; Elliott, Janet A W

    2017-07-18

    The coupled heat and mass transfer that occurs in evaporation is of interest in a large number of fields such as evaporative cooling, distillation, drying, coating, printing, crystallization, welding, atmospheric processes, and pool fires. The temperature jump that occurs at an evaporating interface is of central importance to understanding this complex process. Over the past three decades, thermocouples have been widely used to measure the interfacial temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface during evaporation. However, the reliability of these measurements has not been investigated so far. In this study, a numerical simulation of a thermocouple when it measures the interfacial temperatures at a liquid-vapor interface is conducted to understand the possible effects of the thermocouple on the measured temperature and features in the temperature profile. The differential equations of heat transfer in the solid and fluids as well as the momentum transfer in the fluids are coupled together and solved numerically subject to appropriate boundary conditions between the solid and fluids. The results of the numerical simulation showed that while thermocouples can measure the interfacial temperatures in the liquid correctly, they fail to read the actual interfacial temperatures in the vapor. As the results of our numerical study suggest, the temperature jumps at a liquid-vapor interface measured experimentally by using a thermocouple are larger than what really exists at the interface. For a typical experimental study of evaporation of water at low pressure, it was found that the temperature jumps measured by a thermocouple are overestimated by almost 50%. However, the revised temperature jumps are still in agreement with the statistical rate theory of interfacial transport. As well as addressing the specific application of the liquid-vapor temperature jump, this paper provides significant insight into the role that heat transfer plays in the operation of thermocouples

  18. [Comparison of different methods of temperature measurment in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Momcilo; Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Berenji, Karolina

    2008-01-01

    The consequences of failing to notice fever in children can be serious. On the other hand, false positive reading can result in unnecesery investigation or diagnostic approach. The aim of this study was to compare different ways of body temperature measurement. This prospective study was carried out on Pediatric Department of General Hospital in Subotica during 10 months (March-December 2006). In 263 children aged 1 month to 18 years of age, the body temperature was obtained from 4 measurement sites: tactile assesment, forehead and ear by electronic thermometer, rectal temperature in small children (up to 2 years of age) or axillar temperature in older children by mercury thermometer. Tympanic thermometry was considered as a standard for fever detection. The sensitivity of rectal temperature to detect fever is 46.67%, while specificity is 92.19%. The sensitivity of fever detection by electronic thermometry on the forehead is lower according to rectal thermometry - 36.08%, while specificity is 95.18%. The lowest values ofsensitivity are recorded in axillar thermometry (35.82%), specificity is 90.20%. The correlation coefficient is higher between tympanic and rectal temperature measurement (r=0.5076, pchildren and tympanic thermometry in children over 2 years of age.

  19. Measurement error models, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Buonaccorsi, John P

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, comprehensive strategies for treating measurement error in complex models and accounting for the use of extra data to estimate measurement error parameters have emerged. Focusing on both established and novel approaches, ""Measurement Error: Models, Methods, and Applications"" provides an overview of the main techniques and illustrates their application in various models. It describes the impacts of measurement errors on naive analyses that ignore them and presents ways to correct for them across a variety of statistical models, from simple one-sample problems to regres

  20. Artefacts in intracavitary temperature measurements during regional hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, H P; Berg, C A T Van den; Haaren, P M A Van; Crezee, J

    2007-01-01

    For adequate hyperthermia treatments, reliable temperature information during treatment is essential. During regional hyperthermia, temperature information is preferably obtained non-invasively from intracavitary or intraluminal measurements to avoid implant risks for the patient. However, for intracavitary or intraluminal thermometry optimal tissue contact is less natural as for invasive thermometry. In this study, the reliability of intraluminal/intracavitary measurements was examined in phantom experiments and in a numerical model for various extents of thermal contact between thermometry and the surroundings. Both thermocouple probes and fibre optic probes were investigated. Temperature rises after a 30 s power pulse of the 70 MHz AMC-4 hyperthermia system were measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom using a multisensor thermocouple probe placed centrally in a hollow tube. The tube was filled with (1) air (2) distilled water or (3) saline solution that mimics the properties of tissue, simulating situations with (1) bad thermal contact and no power dissipation in the tube (2) good thermal contact but no power dissipation or (3) good thermal contact and tissue representative power dissipation. For numerical simulations, a cylindrical symmetric model of a thermocouple probe or a fibre optic probe in a cavity was developed. The cavity was modelled as air, distilled water or saline solution. A generalised E-Field distribution was assumed, resulting in a power deposition. With this power deposition, the temperature rise after a 30 s power pulse was calculated. When thermal contact was bad (1), both phantom measurements and simulations with a thermocouple probe showed very high temperature rises (>0.5 0 C), which are artefacts due to self-heating of the thermocouple probe, since no power is dissipated in air. Simulations with a fibre optic probe showed almost no temperature rise when the cavity was filled with air. When thermal contact was good, but no power was

  1. Reconstructing bottom water temperatures from measurements of temperature and thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesner, F.; Lechleiter, A.; Müller, C.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of oceanic bottom water temperatures is a complicated task, even in relatively easy-to-access basins like the North or Baltic seas. Here, a method to determine annual bottom water temperature variations from inverse modeling of instantaneous measurements of temperatures and sediment thermal properties is presented. This concept is similar to climate reconstructions over several thousand years from deep borehole data. However, in contrast, the presented method aims at reconstructing the recent temperature history of the last year from sediment thermal properties and temperatures from only a few meters depth. For solving the heat equation, a commonly used forward model is introduced and analyzed: knowing the bottom water temperature variations for the preceding years and the thermal properties of the sediments, the forward model determines the sediment temperature field. The bottom water temperature variation is modeled as an annual cosine defined by the mean temperature, the amplitude and a phase shift. As the forward model operator is non-linear but low-dimensional, common inversion schemes such as the Newton algorithm can be utilized. The algorithms are tested for artificial data with different noise levels and for two measured data sets: from the North Sea and from the Davis Strait. Both algorithms used show stable and satisfying results with reconstruction errors in the same magnitude as the initial data error. In particular, the artificial data sets are reproduced with accuracy within the bounds of the artificial noise level. Furthermore, the results for the measured North Sea data show small variances and resemble the bottom water temperature variations recorded from a nearby monitoring site with relative errors smaller than 1 % in all parameters.

  2. Sensitive Dependence of Gibbs Measures at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Daniel; Rivera-Letelier, Juan

    2015-09-01

    The Gibbs measures of an interaction can behave chaotically as the temperature drops to zero. We observe that for some classical lattice systems there are interactions exhibiting a related phenomenon of sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures: An arbitrarily small perturbation of the interaction can produce significant changes in the low-temperature behavior of its Gibbs measures. For some one-dimensional XY models we exhibit sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures for a (nearest-neighbor) interaction given by a smooth function, and for perturbations that are small in the smooth category. We also exhibit sensitive dependence of Gibbs measures for an interaction on a classical lattice system with finite-state space. This interaction decreases exponentially as a function of the distance between sites; it is given by a Lipschitz continuous potential in the configuration space. The perturbations are small in the Lipschitz topology. As a by-product we solve some problems stated by Chazottes and Hochman.

  3. Effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-digital image correlation measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Bing

    2015-11-25

    In laboratory and especially non-laboratory stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) applications, the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters of the cameras used in the system may change slightly due to the camera warm-up effect and possible variations in ambient temperature. Because these camera parameters are generally calibrated once prior to measurements and considered to be unaltered during the whole measurement period, the changes in these parameters unavoidably induce displacement/strain errors. In this study, the effect of temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements is investigated experimentally. To quantify the errors associated with camera or ambient temperature changes, surface displacements and strains of a stationary optical quartz glass plate with near-zero thermal expansion were continuously measured using a regular stereo-DIC system. The results confirm that (1) temperature variations in the cameras and ambient environment have a considerable influence on the displacements and strains measured by stereo-DIC due to the slightly altered extrinsic and intrinsic camera parameters; and (2) the corresponding displacement and strain errors correlate with temperature changes. For the specific stereo-DIC configuration used in this work, the temperature-induced strain errors were estimated to be approximately 30–50 με/°C. To minimize the adverse effect of camera temperature variations on stereo-DIC measurements, two simple but effective solutions are suggested.

  4. Estimation of piping temperature fluctuations based on external strain measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.; Maye, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the difficulty to carry out measurements at the inner sides of nuclear reactor piping subjected to thermal transients, temperature and stress variations in the pipe walls are estimated by means of external thermocouples and strain-gauges. This inverse problem is solved by spectral analysis. Since the wall harmonic transfer function (response to a harmonic load) is known, the inner side signal will be obtained by convolution of the inverse transfer function of the system and of the strain measurement enables detection of internal temperature fluctuations in a frequency range beyond the scope of the thermocouples. (authors). 5 figs., 3 refs

  5. Temperature dependence of the Brewer global UV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Lakkala, Kaisa; Berjon, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Doppler, Lionel; Feister, Uwe; Heikkila, Anu; Karppinen, Tomi; Karhu, Juha M.; Koskela, Tapani; Garane, Katerina; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Savastiouk, Volodya

    2017-11-01

    Spectral measurements of global UV irradiance recorded by Brewer spectrophotometers can be significantly affected by instrument-specific optical and mechanical features. Thus, proper corrections are needed in order to reduce the associated uncertainties to within acceptable levels. The present study aims to contribute to the reduction of uncertainties originating from changes in the Brewer internal temperature, which affect the performance of the optical and electronic parts, and subsequently the response of the instrument. Until now, measurements of the irradiance from various types of lamps at different temperatures have been used to characterize the instruments' temperature dependence. The use of 50 W lamps was found to induce errors in the characterization due to changes in the transmissivity of the Teflon diffuser as it warms up by the heat of the lamp. In contrast, the use of 200 or 1000 W lamps is considered more appropriate because they are positioned at longer distances from the diffuser so that warming is negligible. Temperature gradients inside the instrument can cause mechanical stresses which can affect the instrument's optical characteristics. Therefore, during the temperature-dependence characterization procedure warming or cooling must be slow enough to minimize these effects. In this study, results of the temperature characterization of eight different Brewer spectrophotometers operating in Greece, Finland, Germany and Spain are presented. It was found that the instruments' response changes differently in different temperature regions due to different responses of the diffusers' transmittance. The temperature correction factors derived for the Brewer spectrophotometers operating at Thessaloniki, Greece, and Sodankylä, Finland, were evaluated and were found to remove the temperature dependence of the instruments' sensitivity.

  6. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  7. Liquid level measurement on coolant pipeline using Raman distributed temperature sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, M.; Sosamma, S.; Babu Rao, C.; Murali, N.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Optical fibre based Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS) has been widely used for temperature monitoring in oil pipe line, power cable and environmental monitoring. Recently it has gained importance in nuclear reactor owing to its advantages like continuous, distributed temperature monitoring and immunity from electromagnetic interference. It is important to monitor temperature based level measurement in sodium capacities and in coolant pipelines for Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). This particular application is used for filling and draining sodium in storage tank of sodium circuits of Fast breeder reactor. There are different conventional methods to find out the sodium level in the storage tank of sodium cooled reactors. They are continuous level measurement and discontinuous level measurement. For continuous level measurement, mutual inductance type level probes are used. The disadvantage of using this method is it needs a temperature compensation circuit. For discontinuous level measurement, resistance type discontinuous level probe and mutual inductance type discontinuous level probe are used. In resistance type discontinuous level probe, each level needs a separate probe. To overcome these disadvantages, RDTS is used for level measurement based distributed temperature from optical fibre as sensor. The feasibility of using RDTS for measurement of temperature based level measurement sensor is studied using a specially designed test set-up and using hot water, instead of sodium. The test set-up consist of vertically erected Stainless Steel (SS) pipe of length 2m and diameter 10cm, with provision for filling and draining out the liquid. Bare graded index multimode fibre is laid straight along the length of the of the SS pipe. The SS pipe is filled with hot water at various levels. The hot water in the SS pipe is maintained at constant temperature by insulating the SS pipe. The temperature profile of the hot water at various levels is measured using RDTS. The

  8. Research on position calibration method in infrared scanning temperature measurement system of rotary kiln

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shao-sheng; You, Chang-hui; Guo, Zhong-yuan; Cheng, Ya-jun; Yu, Liang-bing

    2016-11-01

    Aiming at the large error in the equal-interval locating method, a precise position calibration method is proposed. The proposed method improves the location measurement accuracy by introducing some feature temperature points to divide the rotary kiln into several segments, then the equal-interval locating method was applied to each segment, ultimately, a position calibration data more closing to the actual situation was got. The feature temperature points can be selected from the temperature points of kiln tyres or the highest temperature point and so on. Taking the practical application into consideration, the best result is obtained, when four feature temperature points was introduced to divide the rotary kiln into five segments. The experiment result shows that compared with the equal-interval method, the accuracy of the proposed method has raised about 5.6 times when four feature temperature points is used.

  9. Core-temperature sensor ingestion timing and measurement variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domitrovich, Joseph W; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2010-01-01

    Telemetric core-temperature monitoring is becoming more widely used as a noninvasive means of monitoring core temperature during athletic events. To determine the effects of sensor ingestion timing on serial measures of core temperature during continuous exercise. Crossover study. Outdoor dirt track at an average ambient temperature of 4.4°C ± 4.1°C and relative humidity of 74.1% ± 11.0%. Seven healthy, active participants (3 men, 4 women; age  =  27.0 ± 7.5 years, height  =  172.9 ± 6.8 cm, body mass  =  67.5 ± 6.1 kg, percentage body fat  =  12.7% ± 6.9%, peak oxygen uptake [Vo(2peak)]  =  54.4 ± 6.9 mL•kg⁻¹•min⁻¹) completed the study. Participants completed a 45-minute exercise trial at approximately 70% Vo(2peak). They consumed core-temperature sensors at 24 hours (P1) and 40 minutes (P2) before exercise. Core temperature was recorded continuously (1-minute intervals) using a wireless data logger worn by the participants. All data were analyzed using a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (trial × time), Pearson product moment correlation, and Bland-Altman plot. Fifteen comparisons were made between P1 and P2. The main effect of time indicated an increase in core temperature compared with the initial temperature. However, we did not find a main effect for trial or a trial × time interaction, indicating no differences in core temperature between the sensors (P1  =  38.3°C ± 0.2°C, P2  =  38.3°C ± 0.4°C). We found no differences in the temperature recordings between the 2 sensors. These results suggest that assumed sensor location (upper or lower gastrointestinal tract) does not appreciably alter the transmission of reliable and repeatable measures of core temperature during continuous running in the cold.

  10. Real-time temperature field measurement based on acoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Yong; Jia, Jiabin; Polydorides, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic tomography can be used to measure the temperature field from the time-of-flight (TOF). In order to capture real-time temperature field changes and accurately yield quantitative temperature images, two improvements to the conventional acoustic tomography system are studied: simultaneous acoustic transmission and TOF collection along multiple ray paths, and an offline iteration reconstruction algorithm. During system operation, all the acoustic transceivers send modulated and filtered wideband Kasami sequences simultaneously to facilitate fast and accurate TOF measurements using cross-correlation detection. For image reconstruction, the iteration process is separated and executed offline beforehand to shorten computation time for online temperature field reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed methods are validated in the simulation study. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the processing time per frame from 160 ms to 20 ms, while the reconstruction error remains less than 5%. Hence, the proposed method has great potential in the measurement of rapid temperature change with good temporal and spatial resolution. (paper)

  11. Photoacoustic temperature measurements for monitoring of thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiou-Han; Wei, Chen-Wei; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Li, Pai-Chi

    2009-02-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy is a new cancer thermotherapy method based on surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. It is important to measure the temperature during thermotherapy for safety and efficacy. In this study, we apply a photoacoustic (PA) method for real-time, non-invasive temperature measurements. In particular, this method can be effectively combined with a photothermal therapy system that we developed in parallel. The method is based on the fact that the PA pressure amplitude is linearly related to temperature. To explore its potential, a home-made, 20 MHz PA transducer was used, in which an optical fiber was inserted in its center for emitting laser pulses while the PA signal was simultaneously detected. Continuous wave (CW) laser was used to heat the subject, including both phantoms and mice. The temperature of the region of interest was also measured by a fine-needle thermal couple. Results show that the temperature was linearly proportional to the PA signal with good correlation with the CW laser irradiation. The in vivo study also demonstrated potential of this technique.

  12. Constituent Ion Temperatures Measured in the Topside Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C. T.; Heelis, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Plasma temperatures in the ionosphere are associated with both the dynamics and structure of the neutral and charge particles. The temperatures are determined by solar energy inputs and energy exchange between charged particles and neutrals. Previous observations show that during daytime the O+ temperature is generally higher when the fractional contribution of H+ to the plasma is high. Further simulations confirm that the daytime heat balance between the H+ and O+ always keeps the H+ at a temperature higher than the O+. In addition the plasma transport parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field influences the plasma temperature through adiabatic heating and cooling effects. These processes are also important during the nighttime, when the source of photoionization is absent. In this work we examine a more sophisticated analysis procedure to extract individual mass dependent ion temperature and apply it on the DMSP F15 RPA measurements. The result shows that the daytime TH+ is a few hundred degrees higher than the TO+ and the nighttime temperature difference between TH+ and TO+ is indicative of mass dependent adiabatic heating and cooling processes across the equatorial region.

  13. On Possibility of Detonation Products Temperature Measurements of Emulsion Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvestrov V. V.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The new view on the structure of the radiance signal recorded by optical pyrometer and the preliminary results of brightness detonation temperature of the emulsion explosive are presented. The structure of an optical signal observed is typical for the heterogeneous explosives. First, there is the short temperature spike to 2500 ÷ 3300 K connecting with a formation of “hot spots” assembly that fire the matrix capable of exothermal reaction. Then the relaxation of radiance to equilibrium level is observed that corresponds to brightness temperature 1840 ÷ 2260 K of explosion products at detonation pressure 1 ÷ 11 GPa. Experimental results are compared with the calculations of other authors. The detonation temperature of the investigated explosive is measured for the first time.

  14. CARS Temperature Measurements in a Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, S. A.; Danehy, P. M.; Magnotti, G.; Cutler, A. D.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements were made in a combustion-heated supersonic axi-symmetric free jet from a nozzle with a diameter of 6.35 cm using dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS). The resulting mean and standard deviation temperature maps are presented. The temperature results show that the gas temperature on the centerline remains constant for approximately 5 nozzle diameters. As the heated gas mixes with the ambient air further downstream the mean temperature decreases. The standard deviation map shows evidence of the increase of turbulence in the shear layer as the jet proceeds downstream and mixes with the ambient air. The challenges of collecting data in a harsh environment are discussed along with influences to the data. The yield of the data collected is presented and possible improvements to the yield is presented are discussed.

  15. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  16. Electrical measurement of absolute temperature and temperature transients in a buried nanostructure under ultrafast optical heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. F.; Hu, X. K.; Liebing, N.; Böhnert, T.; Costa, J. D.; Tarequzzaman, M.; Ferreira, R.; Sievers, S.; Bieler, M.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2017-06-01

    We report absolute temperature measurements in a buried nanostructure with a sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. For this purpose, we take advantage of the temperature dependence of the resistance of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) as detected by a fast sampling oscilloscope. After calibrating the measurement setup using steady-state electric heating, we are able to quantify temperature changes in the MTJ induced by femtosecond optical heating of the metal contact lying several 100 nm above the MTJ. We find that a femtosecond pulse train with an average power of 400 mW and a repetition rate of 76 MHz leads to a constant temperature increase of 80 K and a temporally varying temperature change of 2 K in the MTJ. The maximum temperature change in the MTJ occurs 4 ns after the femtosecond laser pulses hit the metal contact, which is supported by simulations. Our work provides a scheme to quantitatively study local temperatures in nanoscale structures and might be important for the testing of nanoscale thermal transport simulations.

  17. Review on an Advanced High-Temperature Measurement Technology: The Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber thermometry technology for high-temperature measurement is briefly reviewed in this paper. The principles, characteristics, recent progresses and advantages of the technology are described. Examples of using the technology are introduced. Many blackbody, infrared, and fluorescence optical thermometers are developed for practical applications.

  18. Estimating local heat transfer coefficients from thin wall temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazizov, I. M.; Davletshin, I. A.; Paereliy, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    An approach to experimental estimation of local heat transfer coefficient on a plane wall has been described. The approach is based on measurements of heat-transfer fluid and wall temperatures during some certain time of wall cooling. The wall was a thin plate, a printed circuit board, made of composite epoxy material covered with a copper layer. The temperature field can be considered uniform across the plate thickness when heat transfer is moderate and thermal resistance of the plate in transversal direction is low. This significantly simplifies the heat balance written for the wall sections that is used to estimate the heat transfer coefficient. The copper layer on the plate etched to form a single strip acted as resistance thermometers that measured the local temperature of the wall.

  19. Measured energy savings from using night temperature setback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Wrench, L.E.; O'Neill, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The measured energy savings resulting from using night temperature setback in typical light-construction wooden office buildings was determined. Researchers installed monitoring equipment in a six-building sample of two-story wooden buildings at Fort Devens, Massachusetts. Data obtained during both single-setting and night-setback operating modes were used to develop models of each building's heat consumption as a function of the difference between inside and outside temperature. These models were used to estimate seasonal savings that could be obtained from the use of night-setback thermostat control. The measured savings in heating energy from using night temperature setback for the six Fort Devens buildings ranged from 14% to 25%; the mean savings was 19.2%. Based on an energy cost of $0.65/therm of natural gas, the estimated average cost savings of using automatic setback thermostats in these buildings is $780 per year per building

  20. Parametrization of optimum filter passbands for rotational Raman temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammann, Eva; Behrendt, Andreas

    2015-11-30

    We revisit the methodology of rotational Raman temperature measurements covering both lidar and non-range-resolved measurements, e.g., for aircraft control. The results of detailed optimization calculations are presented for the commonly used extraction of signals from the anti-Stokes branch. Different background conditions and realistic shapes of the filter transmission curves are taken into account. Practical uncertainties of the central passbands and widths are discussed. We found a simple parametrization for the optimum filter passband shifts depending on the atmospheric temperature range of interest and the background. The approximation errors of this parametrization are smaller than 2% for temperatures between 200 and 300 K and smaller than 4% between 180 and 200 K.

  1. Ultra sound absorption measurements in rock samples at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, C.; Berckhemer, H.

    1974-01-01

    A new technique, comparable with the reverberation method in room acoustics, is described. It allows Q-measurements at rock samples of arbitrary shape in the frequency range of 50 to 600 kHz in vacuum (.1 mtorr) and at low temperatures (+20 to -180 C). The method was developed in particular to investigate rock samples under lunar conditions. Ultrasound absorption has been measured at volcanics, breccia, gabbros, feldspar and quartz of different grain size and texture yielding the following results: evacuation raises Q mainly through lowering the humidity in the rock. In a dry compact rock, the effect of evacuation is small. With decreasing temperature, Q generally increases. Between +20 and -30 C, Q does not change much. With further decrease of temperature in many cases distinct anomalies appear, where Q becomes frequency dependent.

  2. Temperature Measurements of Dense Plasmas by Detailed Balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Ropke, G; Reinholz, H; Thiele, R; Fortmann, C; Forster, E; Cao, L; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas at high electron densities of n e = 10 20 - 10 26 cm -3 and moderate temperatures T e = 1 - 20 eV are important for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. These plasmas are usually referred to as Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and are characterized by a coupling parameter of Λ ∼> 1 where correlations become important. The characterization of such plasmas is still a challenging task due to the lack of direct measurement techniques for temperatures and densities. They propose to measure the Thomson scattering spectrum of vacuum-UV radiation off density fluctuations in the plasma. Collective Thomson scattering provides accurate data for the electron temperature applying first principles. Further, this method takes advantage of the spectral asymmetry resulting from detailed balance and is independent of collisional effects in these dense systems

  3. Temperature measurement of an axisymmetric flame using phase shift holographic interferometry with fast Fourier transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieng, S. M.; Lai, W. Z.

    Because of the importance of the temperature scalar measurements in combination diagonostics, application of phase shift holographic interferometry to temperature measurement of an axisymmetrically premixed flame was experimentally investigated. The test apparatus is an axisymmetric Bunsen burner. Propane of 99 percent purity is used as the gaseous fuel. A fast Fourier transform, a more efficient and accurate approach for Abel inversion, is used for reconstructed the axisymmetric temperature field from the interferometric data. The temperature distribution is compared with the thermocouple-measured values. The comparison shows that the proposed technique is satisfactory. The result errors are analyzed in detail. It is shown that this technique overcomes most of the earlier problems and limitations detrimental to the conventional holographic interferometry.

  4. Survey of potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, R.B.; Bourne, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the authors present a survey of the potential electronic applications of high temperature superconductor (HTSC) thin films. During the past four years there has been substantial speculation on this topic. The authors will cover only a small fraction of the potential electronic applications that have been identified. Their treatment is influenced by the developments over the past few years in materials and device development and in market analysis. They present their view of the most promising potential applications. Superconductors have two important properties that make them attractive for electronic applications. These are (a) low surface resistance at high frequencies, and (b) the Josephson effect

  5. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    •calibrating the contributions from the feed assembly and receiver. The thermodynamic temperature of the CMB is estimated to be. 3.45 ± 0.78 K. Key words. Cosmic microwave background — cosmology: observations. 1. Introduction. The spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has been measured by the.

  6. Tokamak Plasmas: Measurement of temperature fluctuations and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 55; Issue 5-6. Tokamak Plasmas : Measurement of temperature fluctuations and anomalous transport in the SINP tokamak. R Kumar S K Saha. Contributed Papers Volume 55 Issue 5-6 November-December 2000 pp ...

  7. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  8. Elevated-temperature luminescence measurements to improve spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej

    2018-01-01

    Various branches of applied physics use luminescence based methods to investigate light-emitting specimens with high spatial resolution. A key problem is that luminescence signals lack all the advantages of high locality (i.e. of high spatial resolution) when structures with strong built-in electric field are measured. Such fields exist intentionally in most photonic structures, and occur unintentionally in many other materials. In this case, as a result of beam-induced current generation and its outflow, information that indicates irregularities, nonuniformities and inhomogeneities, such as defects, is lost. We show that to avoid nonlocality and enable truly local luminescence measurements, an elevated measurement temperature as high as 350 K (or even higher) is, perhaps surprisingly, advantageous. This is in contrast to a widely used approach, where cryogenic temperatures, or at least room temperature, are recommended. The elevated temperature of a specimen, together with the current outflow being limited by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, is shown to improve the spatial resolution of luminescence measurements greatly. All conclusions drawn using the example of cathodoluminescence are useful for other luminescence techniques.

  9. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 74; Issue 6. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser-induced copper plasma by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion emissions. V K Unnikrishnan Kamlesh Alti V B Kartha C Santhosh G P Gupta B M Suri. Research Articles ...

  10. Radon measurements with charcoal canisters temperature and humidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Miloš Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon testing by using open-faced charcoal canisters is a cheap and fast screening method. Many laboratories perform the sampling and measurements according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency method - EPA 520. According to this method, no corrections for temperature are applied and corrections for humidity are based on canister mass gain. The EPA method is practiced in the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences with recycled canisters. In the course of measurements, it was established that the mass gain of the recycled canisters differs from mass gain measured by Environmental Protection Agency in an active atmosphere. In order to quantify and correct these discrepancies, in the laboratory, canisters were exposed for periods of 3 and 4 days between February 2015 and December 2015. Temperature and humidity were monitored continuously and mass gain measured. No significant correlation between mass gain and temperature was found. Based on Environmental Protection Agency calibration data, functional dependence of mass gain on humidity was determined, yielding Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves. The results of mass gain measurements of recycled canisters were plotted against these curves and a discrepancy confirmed. After correcting the independent variable in the curve equation and calculating the corrected mass gain for recycled canisters, the agreement between measured mass gain and Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves was attained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009: New Technologies for Monitoring and Protection of Environment from Harmful Chemical Substances and Radiation Impact

  11. Fiber-optical method of pyrometric measurement of melts temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharenko, V. A.; Veprikova, Ya R.

    2018-01-01

    There is a scientific problem of non-contact measurement of the temperature of metal melts now. The problem is related to the need to achieve the specified measurement errors in conditions of uncertainty of the blackness coefficients of the radiating surfaces. The aim of this work is to substantiate the new method of measurement in which the influence of the blackness coefficient is eliminated. The task consisted in calculating the design and material of special crucible placed in the molten metal, which is an emitter in the form of blackbody (BB). The methods are based on the classical concepts of thermal radiation and calculations based on the Planck function. To solve the problem, the geometry of the crucible was calculated on the basis of the Goofy method which forms the emitter of a blackbody at the immersed in the melt. The paper describes the pyrometric device based on fiber optic pyrometer for temperature measurement of melts, which implements the proposed method of measurement using a special crucible. The emitter is formed by the melt in this crucible, the temperature within which is measured by means of fiber optic pyrometer. Based on the results of experimental studies, the radiation coefficient ε‧ > 0.999, which confirms the theoretical and computational justification is given in the article

  12. Cryocooler applications for high-temperature superconductor magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemann, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    The efficiency and stability of rotational magnetic suspension systems are enhanced by the use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnetic bearings. Fundamental aspects of the HTS magnetic bearings and rotational magnetic suspension are presented. HTS cooling can be by liquid cryogen bath immersion or by direct conduction, and thus there are various applications and integration issues for cryocoolers. Among the numerous cryocooler aspects to be considered are installation; operating temperature; losses; and vacuum pumping

  13. Thin-film resistance temperature detector array for the measurement of temperature distribution inside a phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jai Kyoung; Hyun, Jaeyub; Doh, Il; Ahn, Bongyoung; Kim, Yong Tae

    2018-02-01

    A thin-film resistance temperature detector (RTD) array is proposed to measure the temperature distribution inside a phantom. HIFU (high-intensity focused ultrasound) is a non-invasive treatment method using focused ultrasound to heat up a localized region, so it is important to measure the temperature distribution without affecting the ultrasonic field and heat conduction. The present 25 µm thick PI (polyimide) film is transparent not only to an ultrasonic field, because its thickness is much smaller than the wavelength of ultrasound, but also to heat conduction, owing to its negligible thermal mass compared to the phantom. A total of 33 RTDs consisting of Pt resistors and interconnection lines were patterned on a PI substrate using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) technology, and a polymer phantom was fabricated with the film at the center. The expanded uncertainty of the RTDs was 0.8 K. In the experimental study using a 1 MHz HIFU transducer, the maximum temperature inside the phantom was measured as 70.1 °C just after a HIFU excitation of 6.4 W for 180 s. The time responses of the RTDs at different positions also showed the residual heat transfer inside the phantom after HIFU excitation. HIFU results with the phantom showed that a thin-film RTD array can measure the temperature distribution inside a phantom.

  14. Core Temperature Measurement During Submaximal Exercise: Esophageal, Rectal, and Intestinal Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if intestinal temperature (Tin) might be in acceptable alternative to esophageal (Tes) and rectal temperature (Trec) to assess thermoregulation during supine exercise. We hypothesized that Tin would have values similar to Tes and a response time similar to Trec, but the rate of temperature change across time would not be different between measurement sites. Seven subjects completed a continuous supine protocol of 20 min of rest, 20 min of cycle exercise at 40% peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk), 20 min of cycle exercise at 65% V02pk, and 20 min of recovery. Tes, Trec, and Tin were recorded each min throughout the test. Temperatures were not different after 20 min of rest, but Trec was less than the Tes and Tin at the end of the 40% and 65% VO2pk stages. After 20 min of recovery, Tes was less than either Trec or Tin, which were not different from each other. Time to threshold for increased temperature from rest was greater for Trec than Tes but not different from Tin. Time to reach peak temperature was greater for Tin and Trec than Tes. Similarly, time to a decrease in temperature after exercise was greater for Trec than Tes, but not different from Tin. The rate of temperature change from threshold to the end of the 40% VO2pk stage was not different between measurement sites. However, the rate of change during recovery was more negative for Tes than Tin and Trec, which were different from each other. Measurement of Tin may he an acceptable alternative to Tes and Trec with an understanding of its limitations.

  15. Survey of high-temperature nuclear heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, N.; Schaefer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear heat application at high temperatures can be divided into two areas - use of high-temperature steam up to 550 deg. C and use of high-temperature helium up to about 950 deg. C. Techniques of high-temperature steam and heat production and application are being developed in several IAEA Member States. In all these countries the use of steam for other than electricity production is still in a project definition phase. Plans are being discussed about using steam in chemical industries, oil refineries and for new synfuel producing plants. The use of nuclear generated steam for oil recovery from sands and shale is also being considered. High-temperature nuclear process heat production gives new possibilities for the application of nuclear energy - hard coals, lignites, heavy oils, fuels with problems concerning transport, handling and pollution can be converted into gaseous or liquid energy carriers with no loss of their energy contents. The main methods for this conversion are hydrogasification with hydrogen generated by nuclear heated steam reformers and steam gasification. These techniques will allow countries with large coal resources to replace an important part of their natural gas and oil consumption. Even countries with no fossil fuels can benefit from high-temperature nuclear heat - hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting, nuclear steel making, ammonia production and the chemical heat-pipe system are examples in this direction. (author)

  16. A comparison of four methods of normal newborn temperature measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sganga, A; Wallace, R; Kiehl, E; Irving, T; Witter, L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (a) compare newborn temperature measurements obtained by digital disposable, electronic, and tympanic thermometers with glass mercury thermometers, and (b) compare financial implications of each method. In this correlational study, 12 perinatal and neonatal nurses obtained temperature measurements of 184 newborns between 1 and 168 hours of age. The stratified convenience sample was selected using medical records numbers. Temperature instruments included glass thermometer, tympanic thermometer, electronic thermometer, and a digital thermometer. Data were analyzed by Pearson r coefficients, mean, standard deviation, and range using an SPSS statistical package. The glass thermometer, electronic thermometer, and digital thermometer temperature assessments were highly correlated (0.748-1.0). The tympanic thermometer had a low correlation coefficient (0.35). Use of the glass thermometer had the highest accompanying cost. Tympanic thermometers were the most cost effective. In healthy newborns, the use of electronic and digital thermometers can be encouraged if there is concern about using glass thermometers. These results cannot be extrapolated to sick infants. While tympanic thermometers had the lowest associated cost, their lack of correlation with the gold standard glass thermometers for accurate temperature assessment makes them a poor choice for healthy newborns.

  17. Application of high precision temperature control technology in infrared testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haiyuan; Cheng, Yong; Zhu, Mengzhen; Chu, Hua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    In allusion to the demand of infrared system test, the principle of Infrared target simulator and the function of the temperature control are presented. The key technology of High precision temperature control is discussed, which include temperature gathering, PID control and power drive. The design scheme of temperature gathering is put forward. In order to reduce the measure error, discontinuously current and four-wire connection for the platinum thermal resistance are adopted. A 24-bits AD chip is used to improve the acquisition precision. Fuzzy PID controller is designed because of the large time constant and continuous disturbance of the environment temperature, which result in little overshoot, rapid response, high steady-state accuracy. Double power operational amplifiers are used to drive the TEC. Experiments show that the key performances such as temperature control precision and response speed meet the requirements.

  18. Directional radiometric measurements of row-crop temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The variability of directional sensor response for a cotton row crop in Phoenix, Arizona was measured for various solar zenith angles. The geometric structure of the canopy was described with regard to height, width, spacing, and shape of rows. In addition, radiometric temperature data were collected on four scene components: sunlit and shaded vegetation and sunlit and shaded soil. These data were used to test the predictions and assumptions of a modified version of the row crop model of Jackson et al. (1979), which predicts the thermal infrared response of a sensor as a function of sensor view angle, component temperature, and geometrical structure of the canopy. The field data showed sensor response differentials as great as 16.2 C when going from a zenith view angle of 0 deg to one of 80 deg normal to the row direction. The rms deviation between the predicted and measured sensor response for all measurement periods and view angles was 0.96 C.

  19. Thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures at LASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broggi, F.; Pedrini, D.; Rossi, L.

    1995-08-01

    Here the improvement realised to have better control of the reference junction temperature and measurements carried out on Nb 3 Sn cut out from 2 different coils (named LASA3 and LASA5), showing the difference between the longitudinal and the transverse thermal conductivity, is described. Two different methods of data analysis are presented, the DAM (derivative approximated method) and the TCI (thermal conductivity integral. The data analysis for the tungsten and the LASA5 coil has been done according to the two methods showing that the TCI method with polynomial functions is not adequate to describe the thermal conductivity. Only a polynomial fit based on the TCI method but limited at a lower order than the nominal, when the data are well distributed along the range of measurements, can describe reasonably the thermal conductivity dependence with the temperature. Finally the measurements on a rod of BSCCO 2212 high T c superconductor are presented

  20. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Rinaldi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty.

  1. Temperature measurement in WTE boilers using suction pyrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-11-15

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty.

  2. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  3. Electron temperature measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Manabu; Tashiro, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    In order to make clear the physical grounds of deviations from LTE (Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) in the atmospheric helium TIG arcs electron temperature and LTE temperature obtained from electron number density were measured by using of line-profile analysis of the laser scattering method without an assumption of LTE. The experimental results showed that in comparison with the argon TIG arcs, the region where a deviation from LTE occurs tends to expand in higher arc current because the plasma reaches the similar state to LTE within shorter distance from the cathode due to the slower cathode jet velocity

  4. A Mueller bridge set for cryogenic temperature measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1966-01-01

    An a.c. Mueller bridge set for resistance thermometry at cryogenic temperature is described. A commercial tuned null detector is used at an operating frequency of 1025 c/s. The set includes a high stability oscillator, line reject filter, phase shifter, Q multiplier and selector box. The latter...... permits the dissipation in the thermometers not being measured to be maintained at the operating level with direct current. A temperature change of the order of 10 μdegK can be detected with 10-8 W applied to the thermometer....

  5. A sensitive optical pyrometer for shock-temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    A new optical system was used to determine temperatures above 2400 K in shocked materials by measuring the spectral radiance of sub-microsecond pulses of light emitted from initially transparent solid samples in the visible and near infrared (450 to 900 nm). The high sensitivity of this optical pyrometer is attributed to the small number of channels, large aperture (0.03 steradian), the large bandwidth per channel (40 nm), and large photodiode detection area (0.2 sq cm). Improved calibration techniques reduce systematic errors encountered in previous shock-temperature experiments.

  6. Determining noncondensible gas fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures using wet and dry bulb temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, P.; Bowman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The work reported in this note was undertaken to provide a method of determining the noncondensible gas fractions in a steam-gas mixture such as might be found in large reactor safety experiment like LOFT. In essence, the method used involves measuring the wet and dry bulb temperatures and using an algorithm, in place of the psychometric chart, to determine the partial pressure of the noncondensible gas in the mixture. In accomplishing this, the authors did the following: (1) extended the use of wet and dry-bulb temperature readings to determine mixture composition up to a temperature of 589 K and a pressure of 4.13 x 10 6 Pa. (2) developed an algorithm to reduce the data (3) found which materials would survive those temperatures

  7. Measurement of the body surface temperature by the method of laser photothermal radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsov, L A; Kirillov, V M

    2003-01-01

    The specific features of contactless measurements of the body surface temperature by the method of repetitively pulsed laser photothermal radiometry are considered and the requirements to the parameters of the laser and measurement scheme are formulated. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. The advantages of laser photothermal radiometry over the conventional passive radiometric method are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  9. VIS-NIR multispectral synchronous imaging pyrometer for high-temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Tian, Jibin

    2017-06-01

    A visible-infrared multispectral synchronous imaging pyrometer was developed for simultaneous, multispectral, two-dimensional high temperature measurements. The multispectral image pyrometer uses prism separation construction in the spectrum range of 650-950 nm and multi-sensor fusion of three CCD sensors for high-temperature measurements. The pyrometer had 650-750 nm, 750-850 nm, and 850-950 nm channels all with the same optical path. The wavelength choice for each channel is flexible with three center wavelengths (700 nm, 810 nm, and 920 nm) with a full width at half maximum of the spectrum of 3 nm used here. The three image sensors were precisely aligned to avoid spectrum artifacts by micro-mechanical adjustments of the sensors relative to each other to position them within a quarter pixel of each other. The pyrometer was calibrated with the standard blackbody source, and the temperature measurement uncertainty was within 0.21 °C-0.99 °C in the temperatures of 600 °C-1800 °C for the blackbody measurements. The pyrometer was then used to measure the leading edge temperatures of a ceramics model exposed to high-enthalpy plasma aerodynamic heating environment to verify the system applicability. The measured temperature ranges are 701-991 °C, 701-1134 °C, and 701-834 °C at the heating transient, steady state, and cooling transient times. A significant temperature gradient (170 °C/mm) was observed away from the leading edge facing the plasma jet during the steady state heating time. The temperature non-uniformity on the surface occurs during the entire aerodynamic heating process. However, the temperature distribution becomes more uniform after the heater is shut down and the experimental model is naturally cooled. This result shows that the multispectral simultaneous image measurement mode provides a wider temperature range for one imaging measurement of high spatial temperature gradients in transient applications.

  10. VIS-NIR multispectral synchronous imaging pyrometer for high-temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Tian, Jibin

    2017-06-01

    A visible-infrared multispectral synchronous imaging pyrometer was developed for simultaneous, multispectral, two-dimensional high temperature measurements. The multispectral image pyrometer uses prism separation construction in the spectrum range of 650-950 nm and multi-sensor fusion of three CCD sensors for high-temperature measurements. The pyrometer had 650-750 nm, 750-850 nm, and 850-950 nm channels all with the same optical path. The wavelength choice for each channel is flexible with three center wavelengths (700 nm, 810 nm, and 920 nm) with a full width at half maximum of the spectrum of 3 nm used here. The three image sensors were precisely aligned to avoid spectrum artifacts by micro-mechanical adjustments of the sensors relative to each other to position them within a quarter pixel of each other. The pyrometer was calibrated with the standard blackbody source, and the temperature measurement uncertainty was within 0.21 °C-0.99 °C in the temperatures of 600 °C-1800 °C for the blackbody measurements. The pyrometer was then used to measure the leading edge temperatures of a ceramics model exposed to high-enthalpy plasma aerodynamic heating environment to verify the system applicability. The measured temperature ranges are 701-991 °C, 701-1134 °C, and 701-834 °C at the heating transient, steady state, and cooling transient times. A significant temperature gradient (170 °C/mm) was observed away from the leading edge facing the plasma jet during the steady state heating time. The temperature non-uniformity on the surface occurs during the entire aerodynamic heating process. However, the temperature distribution becomes more uniform after the heater is shut down and the experimental model is naturally cooled. This result shows that the multispectral simultaneous image measurement mode provides a wider temperature range for one imaging measurement of high spatial temperature gradients in transient applications.

  11. Real-time measurement of aerosol particle concentration at high temperatures; Hiukkaspitoisuuden reaaliaikainen mittaaminen korkeassa laempoetilassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskinen, J.; Hautanen, J.; Laitinen, A. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Physics

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a new method for continuous aerosol particle concentration measurement at elevated temperatures (up to 800-1000 deg C). The measured property of the aerosol particles is the so called Fuchs surface area. This quantity is relevant for diffusion limited mass transfer to particles. The principle of the method is as follows. First, aerosol particles are charged electrically by diffusion charging process. The charging takes place at high temperature. After the charging, aerosol is diluted and cooled. Finally, aerosol particles are collected and the total charge carried by the aerosol particles is measured. Particle collection and charge measurement take place at low temperature. Benefits of this measurement method are: particles are charged in-situ, charge of the particles is not affected by the temperature and pressure changes after sampling, particle collection and charge measurement are carried out outside the process conditions, and the measured quantity is well defined. The results of this study can be used when the formation of the fly ash particles is studied. Another field of applications is the study and the development of gasification processes. Possibly, the method can also be used for the monitoring the operation of the high temperature particle collection devices. (orig.)

  12. Temperature Measurement Technique Using Phosphorescence of Porphyrin Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kura, Kentaro; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2007-11-01

    LIF have been developed to measure the temperature, pH and the oxygen concentration in the fluid. However, the frequent excitation of the fluorescent dye causes the quenching effect. In addition, two color LIF should be applied in order to cancel the effect of non-uniform light intensity of excitation. The phosphor emitting the phosphorescence for a few milliseconds by an excitation was measured at the high time resolution, while the phosphorescence lifetime is the function of the temperature. As the phosphorescence dyes, PtTFPP and PdTFPP were tested. Those mixed with Coumarin30 were also demonstrated. These dyes were excited by a CW laser with the wavelength of 405nm. As the result, it was clarified to be able to measure the temperature using these dyes and this laser. Present study is the result of ``High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal'' entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT).

  13. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  14. SXR Continuum Radiation Transmitted Through Metallic Filters: An Analytical Approach To Fast Electron Temperature Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Kramer, T.; Stutman, D.; Finkentha, M.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.

    2010-08-26

    A new set of analytic formulae describes the transmission of soft X-ray (SXR) continuum radiation through a metallic foil for its application to fast electron temperature measurements in fusion plasmas. This novel approach shows good agreement with numerical calculations over a wide range of plasma temperatures in contrast with the solutions obtained when using a transmission approximated by a single-Heaviside function [S. von Goeler, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 20, 599, (1999)]. The new analytic formulae can improve the interpretation of the experimental results and thus contribute in obtaining fast teperature measurements in between intermittent Thomson Scattering data.

  15. Photoacoustic technique to measure temperature effects on microbubble viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jordan S.; Stobbe, David M.; Borden, Mark A.; Murray, Todd W.

    2018-03-01

    Phospholipid-coated microbubbles are being developed for several biomedical applications, but little is known about the effect of temperature on the viscoelastic properties of the shell. Here, we report on the use of a photoacoustic technique to study the shell properties of individual microbubbles as a function of temperature. The microbubbles were driven into small-amplitude oscillations by ultrasound waves generated from the absorption of an intensity-modulated infrared laser, and these oscillations were detected by forward-light scattering of a second blue laser. The drive laser modulation frequency was swept to determine the resonant response of 2-4 μm radius microbubbles. Lipid shell elasticity and viscosity were determined by modeling the microbubble response as a linear harmonic oscillator. The results from slow heating showed a linear decrease in elasticity and viscosity between 21 and 53 °C and a corresponding increase in the maximum oscillation amplitude. Rapid heating to 38 °C, on the other hand, showed a transient response in the viscoelastic properties, suggesting shell rupture and reformation during microbubble growth and subsequent dissolution. These effects are important for biomedical applications, which require warming of the microbubbles to body temperature.

  16. Multiwavelength Pyrometer Developed for Use at Elevated Temperatures in Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel L.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a unique multiwavelength pyrometer for aerospace applications. It has been shown to be a useful and versatile instrument for measuring the surface temperatures of ceramic zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and alumina, even when their emissivity is unknown. The introduction of fiber optics into the pyrometer has greatly increased the ease of using this instrument. Direct comparison of measurements obtained using the pyrometer and thin film thermocouples on a sample provided independent verification of pyrometry temperature measurement. Application of the pyrometer has also included simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurement in a transparent material, the measurement of combustion gas temperatures in the flames of an atmospheric burner, the measurement of the temperature distribution appearing on a large surface from the recording of just a single radiation spectrum emitted from this nonuniform temperature surface, and the measurement of some optical properties for special aeronautical materials-such as nanostructured layers. The multiwavelength pyrometer temperature is obtained from a radiation spectrum recorded over a broad wavelength region by transforming it into a straight line segment(s) in part or all of the spectral region. The intercept of the line segment(s) with the vertical axis at zero wavelength gives the inverse of the temperature. In a two-color pyrometer, the two data points are also amenable to this analysis to determine the unknown temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength-independent emissivity. Its two (and minimum) pieces of data are sufficient to determine this straight line. However, a multiwavelength pyrometer not only has improved accuracy but also confirms that the wavelength-independent emissivity assumption is valid when a multitude of data points are shown to lie on a simple straight line.

  17. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  18. Methods of Temperature and Emission Measure Determination of Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirtain, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.

    2002-05-01

    Recent observational results from both SOHO-EIT and TRACE indicate that coronal loops are isothermal along their length (axially). These results are obtained from a narrowband filter ratio method that assumes that the plasma is isothermal along the line of sight (radially). However, these temperatures vary greatly from those derived from differential emission measure (DEM) curves produced from spectral lines recorded by SOHO-CDS. The DEM results indicate that the loops are neither axially nor radially isothermal. This discrepancy was investigated by Schmelz et al. (2001). They chose pairs of iron lines from the same CDS data set to mimic the EIT and TRACE loop results. Ratios of different lines gave different temperatures, indicating that the plasma was not radially isothermal. In addition the results indicated that the loop was axially isothermal, even though the DEM analysis of the same data showed this result to be false. Here we have analyzed the EIT data for the CDS loop published by Schmelz et al. (2001). We took the ratios of the 171-to-195 and 195-to-284 filter data, and made temperature maps of the loop. The results indicate that the loop is axially isothermal, but different temperatures were found for each pair of filters. Both ratio techniques force the resultant temperature to lie within the range where the response functions (for filters) or the emissivity functions (for lines) overlap; isothermal loops are therefore a byproduct of the analysis. This conclusion strengthens support for the idea that temperature and emission measure results from filter ratio methods may be misleading or even drastically wrong. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783.

  19. Characterization of piezoelectric materials for simultaneous strain and temperature sensing for ultra-low frequency applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Mohammad Nouroz; Seethaler, Rudolf; Alam, M Shahria

    2015-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are used extensively in a number of sensing applications ranging from aerospace industries to medical diagnostics. Piezoelectric materials generate charge when they are subjected to strain. However, since measuring charge is difficult at low frequencies, traditional piezoelectric sensors are limited to dynamic applications. In this research an alternative technique is proposed to determine static strain that relies upon the measurement of piezoelectric capacitance and resistance using piezoelectric sensors. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the capacitance and resistance of a piezoelectric patch sensor was characterized for a wide range of strain and temperature. The study shows that the piezoelectric capacitance is sensitive to both strain and temperature while the resistance is mostly dependent on the temperature variation. The findings can be implemented to obtain thermally compensated static strain from piezoelectric sensors, which does not require an additional temperature sensor. (paper)

  20. Proceedings, phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedell, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Phenomenology and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1991, was sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Materials Science, the Advanced Studies Program on High Temperature Superconductivity Theory (ASP) and the Exploratory Research and Development Center. This is the second symposium in the series. High Temperature Superconductivity, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1989, also published by Addison Wesley, focused on the cutting-edge theoretical and experimental issues in high temperature superconductors. This symposium, with its focus on the phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors, gives a complementary review of the aspects of the field closely related to the impact of high temperature superconductors on technology. The objective of ASP is to advance the field on a broad front with no specific point of view by bringing a team of leading academic theorists into a joint effort with the theoretical and experimental scientists of a major DOE national laboratory. The ASP consisted of fellows led by Robert Schrieffer (UCSB and now FSU) joined by David Pines (University of illinois), Elihu Abrahams (Rutgers), Sebastian Doniach (Stanford), and Maurice Rice (ETH, Zurich) and theoretical and experimental staff of Los Alamos National Laboratory. This synergism of academic, laboratory, theoretical and experimental research produced a level of interaction and excitement that would not be possible otherwise. This publication and the previous one in the series are just examples of how this approach to advancing science can achieve significant contributions

  1. Measuring core body temperature with a non-invasive sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazgaoker, Savyon; Ketko, Itay; Yanovich, Ran; Heled, Yuval; Epstein, Yoram

    2017-05-01

    In various occupations, workers may be exposed to extreme environmental conditions and physical activities. Under these conditions the ability to follow the workers' body temperature may protect them from overheating that may lead to heat related injuries. The "Dräger" Double Sensor (DS) is a novel device for assessing body-core temperature (T c ). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the DS in measuring T c under heat stress. Seventeen male participants performed a three stage protocol: 30min rest in a thermal comfort environment (20-22°C, 50% relative humidity), followed by an exposure to a hot environment of 40°C, 40% relative humidity -30min at rest and 60min of exercise (walking on a treadmill at 5km/h and 2% elevation). Simultaneously temperatures measured by the DS (T DS ) and by rectal temperature (T re ) (YSI-401 thermistor) were recorded and then compared. During the three stages of the study the average temperature obtained by the DS was within±0.3°C of rectal measurement. The correlation between T DS and T re was significantly better during the heat exposures phases than during resting under comfort conditions. These preliminary results are promising for potential use of the DS by workers under field conditions and especially under environmental heat stress or when dressed in protective garments. For this goal, further investigations are required to validate the accuracy of the DS under various levels of heat stress, clothing and working levels. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. K. [Johnson Research LLC, Pueblo West, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  3. Temperature measurement on neurological pulse generators during MR scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alesch François

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to manufacturers of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI machines, and implantable neurological pulse generators (IPGs, MRI is contraindicated for patients with IPGs. A major argument for this restriction is the risk to induce heat in the leads due to the electromagnetic field, which could be dangerous for the surrounding brain parenchyma. The temperature change on the surface of the case of an ITREL-III (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN and the lead tip during MRI was determined. An anatomical realistic and a cubic phantom, filled with phantom material mimicking human tissue, and a typical lead configuration were used to imitate a patient who carries an IPG for deep brain stimulation. The measurements were performed in a 1.5 T and a 3.0 T MRI. 2.1°C temperature increases at the lead tip uncovered the lead tip as the most critical part concerning heating problems in IPGs. Temperature increases in other locations were low compared to the one at the lead tip. The measured temperature increase of 2.1°C can not be considered as harmful to the patient. Comparison with the results of other studies revealed the avoidance of loops as a practical method to reduce heating during MRI procedures.

  4. Measurement of Laser Weld Temperatures for 3D Model Input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagel, Daryl [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grossetete, Grant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maccallum, Danny O. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Laser welding is a key joining process used extensively in the manufacture and assembly of critical components for several weapons systems. Sandia National Laboratories advances the understanding of the laser welding process through coupled experimentation and modeling. This report summarizes the experimental portion of the research program, which focused on measuring temperatures and thermal history of laser welds on steel plates. To increase confidence in measurement accuracy, researchers utilized multiple complementary techniques to acquire temperatures during laser welding. This data serves as input to and validation of 3D laser welding models aimed at predicting microstructure and the formation of defects and their impact on weld-joint reliability, a crucial step in rapid prototyping of weapons components.

  5. Dual purpose pyrometer for temperature and solidification velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.

    1990-01-01

    A dual purpose pyrometer is described that allows both accurate radiance temperature measurement and fast temporal response. The system uses two silicon photodiodes with separate optical paths derived from a common spot on the sample. The optical bandwidths and response times of each detection circuit are tailored to the function of each radiometer. The radiance temperature of electromagnetically levitated metallic samples is measured over a narrow optical bandwidth with a high-gain silicon detector. The velocity of solidification of undercooled melts can be deduced from the rise time of the second silicon detector which samples a broad optical bandwidth and has a fast response time. Results from experiments on the undercooling and solidification behavior of electromagnetically levitated pure nickel show that the solidification velocity approaches 17 m/s at high undercooling.

  6. Laser measurement technology fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donges, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Laser measurement technology has evolved in the last years in a versatile and reflationary way. Today, its methods are indispensable for research and development activities as well as for production technology. Every physicist and engineer should therefore gain a working knowledge of laser measurement technology. This book closes the gap of existing textbooks. It introduces in a comprehensible presentation laser measurement technology in all its aspects. Numerous figures, graphs and tables allow for a fast access into the matter. In the first part of the book the important physical and optical basics are described being necessary to understand laser measurement technology. In the second part technically significant measuring methods are explained and application examples are presented. Target groups of this textbook are students of natural and engineering sciences as well as working physicists and engineers, who are interested to make themselves familiar with laser measurement technology and its fascinating p...

  7. Research of temperature field measurement using a flexible temperature sensor array for robot sensing skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Siyu; Li, Ruiqi; Yang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Caixia

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a novel temperature sensor array by dispensing conductive composites on a flexible printed circuit board which is able to acquire the ambient temperature. The flexible temperature sensor array was fabricated by using carbon fiber-filled silicon rubber based composites on a flexible polyimide circuit board, which can both ensure their high flexibility. It found that CF with 12 wt% could be served as the best conductive filler for higher temperature sensitivity and better stability comparing with some other proportion for dynamic range from 30&° to 90°. The preparation of the temperature sensitive material has also been described in detail. Connecting the flexible sensor array with a data acquisition card and a personal computer (PC), some heat sources with different shapes were loaded on the sensor array; the detected results were shown in the interface by LabVIEW software. The measured temperature contours are in good agreement with the shapes and amplitudes of different heat sources. Furthermore, in consideration of the heat dissipation in the air, the relationship between the resistance and the distance of heat sources with sensor array was also detected to verify the accuracy of the sensor array, which is also a preparation for our future work. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the developed flexible sensor array, and it can be used as humanoid artificial skin for sensation system of robots.

  8. High resolution temperature measurements in the borehole Yaxcopoil-1, Mexico

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wilhelm, H.; Heidinger, P.; Šafanda, Jan; Čermák, Vladimír; Burkhardt, H.; Popov, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2004), s. 813-819 ISSN 1086-9379 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/03/0997; GA AV ČR KSK3012103 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) WI687/17-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : temperature measurements * borehole * Mexico Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.673, year: 2004

  9. Gas temperature measurements in short duration turbomachinery test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattafesta, L. N.; Epstein, A. H.

    1988-07-01

    Thermocouple rakes for use in short-duration turbomachinery test facilities have been developed using very fine thermocouples. Geometry variations were parametrically tested and showed that bare quartz junction supports (76 microns in diameter) yielded superior performance, and were rugged enough to survive considerable impact damage. Using very low cost signal conditioning electronics, temperature accuracies of 0.3 percent were realized yielding turbine efficiency measurements at the 1-percent level. Ongoing work to improve this accuracy is described.

  10. Estimating Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Using Standard Meteorological Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    The heat stress management program at the Department of Energy''s Savannah River Site (SRS) requires implementation of protective controls on outdoor work based on observed values of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). To ensure continued compliance with heat stress program requirements, a computer algorithm was developed which calculates an estimate of WBGT using standard meteorological measurements. In addition, scripts were developed to generate a calculation every 15 minutes and post the results to an Intranet web site

  11. PCPV instrumentation and measurement techniques at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemann, H.

    1978-11-01

    Strain measurement within the structural concrete of the prototype Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel have been performed during a one year operation at elevated temperatures up to 120 0 C. Laboratory investigations on the properties of the gauges and the concrete mix are applied to separate the different contributions to the strain data. A decrease of creep and loss of prestress and the arise of stable conditions is observed. (author)

  12. Applications of high-temperature superconductors in power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, John R

    2003-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in the late 1980s, many materials and families of materials have been discovered that exhibit superconductivity at temperatures well above 20 K. Of these, several families of HTSs have been developed for use in electrical power applications. Demonstration of devices such as motors, generators, transmission lines, transformers, fault-current limiters, and flywheels in which HTSs and bulk HTSs have been used has proceeded to ever larger scales. First-generation wire, made from bismuth-based copper oxides, was used in many demonstrations. The rapid development of second-generation wire, made by depositing thin films of yttrium-based copper oxide on metallic substrates, is expected to further accelerate commercial applications. Bulk HTSs, in which large single-grain crystals are used as basic magnetic components, have also been developed and have potential for electrical power applications

  13. Measuring the temperature history of isochorically heated warm dense metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, Chris; Kim, J.; Park, J.; Moody, J.; Emig, J.; Heeter, B.; Dozieres, M.; Beg, Fn; McLean, Hs

    2017-10-01

    A pump-probe platform has been designed for soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy near edge structure measurements in isochorically heated Al or Cu samples with temperature of 10s to 100s of eV. The method is compatible with dual picosecond-class laser systems and may be used to measure the temperature of the sample heated directly by the pump laser or by a laser-driven proton beam Knowledge of the temperature history of warm dense samples will aid equation of state measurements. First, various low- to mid-Z targets were evaluated for their suitability as continuum X-ray backlighters over the range 200-1800 eV using a 10 J picosecond-class laser with relativistic peak intensity Alloys were found to be more suitable than single-element backlighters. Second, the heated sample package was designed with consideration of target thickness and tamp layers using atomic physics codes. The results of the first demonstration attempts will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-SC0014600.

  14. Note: A temperature-stable low-noise transimpedance amplifier for microcurrent measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Shi, Xueyou; Zhao, Kai; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2017-02-01

    Temperature stability and noise characteristics often run contradictory in microcurrent (e.g., pA-scale) measurement instruments because low-noise performance requires high-value resistors with relatively poor temperature coefficients. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier with high-temperature stability, which involves an active compensation mechanism to overcome the temperature drift mainly caused by high-value resistors, is presented. The implementation uses a specially designed R-2R compensating network to provide programmable current gain with extra-fine trimming resolution. The temperature drifts of all components (e.g., feedback resistors, operational amplifiers, and the R-2R network itself) are compensated simultaneously. Therefore, both low-temperature drift and ultra-low-noise performance can be achieved. With a current gain of 1011 V/A, the internal current noise density was about 0.4 fA/√Hz, and the average temperature coefficient was 4.3 ppm/K at 0-50 °C. The amplifier module maintains accuracy across a wide temperature range without additional thermal stabilization, and its compact size makes it especially suitable for high-precision, low-current measurement in outdoor environments for applications such as electrochemical emission supervision, air pollution particles analysis, radiation monitoring, and bioelectricity.

  15. Power System State Estimation Accuracy Enhancement Using Temperature Measurements of Overhead Line Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wydra Michał

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Power system state estimation is a process of real-time online modeling of an electric power system. The estimation is performed with the application of a static model of the system and current measurements of electrical quantities that are encumbered with an error. Usually, a model of the estimated system is also encumbered with an uncertainty, especially power line resistances that depend on the temperature of conductors. At present, a considerable development of technologies for dynamic power line rating can be observed. Typically, devices for dynamic line rating are installed directly on the conductors and measure basic electric parameters such as the current and voltage as well as non-electric ones as the surface temperature of conductors, their expansion, stress or the conductor sag angle relative to the plumb line. The objective of this paper is to present a method for power system state estimation that uses temperature measurements of overhead line conductors as supplementary measurements that enhance the model quality and thereby the estimation accuracy. Power system state estimation is presented together with a method of using the temperature measurements of power line conductors for updating the static power system model in the state estimation process. The results obtained with that method have been analyzed based on the estimation calculations performed for an example system - with and without taking into account the conductor temperature measurements. The final part of the article includes conclusions and suggestions for the further research.

  16. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    for combined heat and moisture transport in materials. There is a need for further elaboration of the importance of these issues, and it is the intent of this paper to contribute to such elaboration. The paper seeks to contribute to the knowledge base about such sorption characteristic by presenting some new...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  17. Laser metrology in fluid mechanics granulometry, temperature and concentration measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Boutier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In fluid mechanics, non-intrusive measurements are fundamental in order to improve knowledge of the behavior and main physical phenomena of flows in order to further validate codes.The principles and characteristics of the different techniques available in laser metrology are described in detail in this book.Velocity, temperature and concentration measurements by spectroscopic techniques based on light scattered by molecules are achieved by different techniques: laser-induced fluorescence, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering using lasers and parametric sources, and absorption sp

  18. Measurement of ocean temperature and salinity via microwave radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, H.-J. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Sea-surface temperature with an accuracy of 1 C and salinity with an accuracy of 1% were measured with a 1.43 and 2.65 GHz radiometer system after correcting for the influence of cosmic radiation, intervening atmosphere, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers are a third-generation system using null-balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from aircraft over bay regions and coastal areas of the Atlantic resulted in contour maps with spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  19. Optical fiber sensors for process refractometry and temperature measuring based on curved fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willsch, R.; Schwotzer, G.; Haubenreisser, W.; Jahn, J.U.

    1986-01-01

    Based on U-shape curved multimode fibers with defined bending radii intensity-modulated optical sensors for the determination of refractive index changes in liquids and related measurands (solution concentration, mixing ratio and others) in process-refractometry and for temperature measuring under special environmental conditions have been developed. The optoelectronic transmitting and receiving units are performed in modular technique and can be used in multi-purpose applications. The principles, performance and characteristical properties of these sensors are described and their possibilities of application in process measuring and automation are discussed by some selected examples. (orig.) [de

  20. Spectroscopy for Industrial Applications: High-Temperature Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Grosch, Helge; Clausen, Sønnik

    The continuous development of the spectroscopic databases brings new perspectives in the environmental and industrial on-line process control, monitoring and stimulates further optical sensor developments. This is because no calibration gases are needed and, in general, temperature-dependent spec......The continuous development of the spectroscopic databases brings new perspectives in the environmental and industrial on-line process control, monitoring and stimulates further optical sensor developments. This is because no calibration gases are needed and, in general, temperature...... line list. High-temperature NH3 absorption spectra have been used in the analysis of in situ high-resolution IRabsorption measurements on the producer gas in low-temperature gasication processon a large scale. High-resolution UV temperature-dependent absorption cross-sectionsof phenol are reported...... for the rst time. All UV data have been calibrated byrelevant GC/MS measurements. Use of the data is demonstrated by the analysis ofin situ UV absorption measurements on a small-scale low-temperature gasier. Acomparison between in situ, gas extraction and conventional gas sampling measurementsis presented...

  1. submitter Experimental temperature measurements for the energy amplifier test

    CERN Document Server

    Calero, J; Gallego, E; Gálvez, J; García Tabares, L; González, E; Jaren, J; López, C; Lorente, A; Martínez Val, J M; Oropesa, J; Rubbia, C; Rubio, J A; Saldana, F; Tamarit, J; Vieira, S

    1996-01-01

    A uranium thermometer has been designed and built in order to make local power measurements in the First Energy Amplifier Test (FEAT). Due to the experimental conditions power measurements of tens to hundreds of nW were required, implying a sensitivity in the temperature change measurements of the order of 1 mK. A uranium thermometer accurate enough to match that sensitivity has been built. The thermometer is able to determine the absolute energetic gain obtained in a tiny subcritical uranium assembly exposed to a proton beam of kinetic energies between 600 MeV and 2.75 GeV. In addition, the thermometer measurements have provided information about the spatial power distribution and the shape of the neutron spallation cascade.

  2. Impact of Measurement Error on Synchrophasor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yilu [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gracia, Jose R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ewing, Paul D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhao, Jiecheng [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tan, Jin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wu, Ling [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhan, Lingwei [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Phasor measurement units (PMUs), a type of synchrophasor, are powerful diagnostic tools that can help avert catastrophic failures in the power grid. Because of this, PMU measurement errors are particularly worrisome. This report examines the internal and external factors contributing to PMU phase angle and frequency measurement errors and gives a reasonable explanation for them. It also analyzes the impact of those measurement errors on several synchrophasor applications: event location detection, oscillation detection, islanding detection, and dynamic line rating. The primary finding is that dynamic line rating is more likely to be influenced by measurement error. Other findings include the possibility of reporting nonoscillatory activity as an oscillation as the result of error, failing to detect oscillations submerged by error, and the unlikely impact of error on event location and islanding detection.

  3. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1998-01-01

    As a new method of radiation measurements, several optical methods using optical fiber sensors have been developed. One is the application of 'radio-luminescence' from the optical fiber itself such as plastic scintillating fibers. Other researches are made to develop the 'combined-sensors' by combination of optical fibers and scintillating materials. Using the time domain method of optical fiber sensors, the profile of radiation distribution along the optical fiber can be easily determined. A multi-parameter sensing system for measurement of radiation, temperature, stress, etc, are also expected using these optical fiber sensors. (author)

  4. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  5. Radiometric measurement of temperature distributions in solar cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, E. F.; Giannola, P. S.

    1989-03-01

    An engineering tool incorporating a scanning infrared radiometer, an image digitizer, a microcomputer, and the software to drive the system was developed to allow remote mapping of the temperature distribution in solar cavity receivers. Using enclosure analysis, the infrared image processing program extracts the irradiance map from the radiosity map of the cavity to yield an emissive power map. Using the calibration curve of the radiometer and the emissivity of the surface of the cavity, the emissive power map is transformed into a temperature map. The system was tested by comparing its calculated temperatures to temperatures measured by thermocouples at several locations on the surfaces of heated model cavity receivers. The average relative error for the cavities ranged from 4.6 percent to 34.9 percent, with the relative error on the base usually less than half that on the wall. Some work was also carried out to compensate the detected radiosity field for the system transfer function error of the scanner system.

  6. Use of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer in Several Elevated Temperature Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    2001-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer was developed for applications unique to aerospace environments. It was shown to be a useful and versatile technique for measuring temperature, even when the emissivity is unknown. It has also been used to measure the surface temperatures of ceramic zircomia thermal barrier coatings and alumina. The close agreement between pyrometer and thin film thermocouple temperatures provided an independent check. Other applications of the multiwavelength pyrometer are simultaneous surface and bulk temperature measurements of a transparent material, and combustion gas temperature measurement using a special probe interfaced to the multiwavelength pyrometer via an optical fiber. The multiwavelength pyrometer determined temperature by transforming the radiation spectrum in a broad wavelength region to produce a straight line (in a certain spectral region), whose intercept in the vertical axis gives the temperature. Implicit in a two-color pyrometer is the assumption of wavelength independent emissivity. Though the two data points of a two-color pyrometer similarly processed would result immediately in a similar straight line to give the unknown temperature, the two-color pyrometer lacks the greater data redundancy of the multiwavelength pyrometer, which enables it to do so with improved accuracy. It also confirms that emissivity is indeed wavelength independent, as evidenced by a multitude of the data lying on a simple straight line. The multiwavelength pyrometer was also used to study the optical transmission properties of a nanostructured material from which a quadratic exponential functional frequency dependence of its spectral transmission was determined. Finally, by operating the multiwavelength pyrometer in a very wide field of view mode, the surface temperature distribution of a large hot surface was obtained through measurement of just a single radiation spectrum.

  7. Measuring artificial recharge with fiber optic distributed temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew W; Bauer, Brian; Hutchinson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat was used as a tracer to measure infiltration rates from a recharge basin. The propagation of diurnal oscillation of surface water temperature into the basin bed was monitored along a transect using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FODTS). The propagation rate was related to downward specific discharge using standard theory of heat advection and dispersion in saturated porous media. An estimate of the temporal variation of heat propagation was achieved using a wavelet transform to find the phase lag between the surface temperature diurnal oscillation and the correlated oscillation at 0.33 and 0.98 m below the bed surface. The wavelet results compared well to a constant velocity model of thermal advection and dispersion during periods of relatively constant discharge rates. The apparent dispersion of heat was found to be due primarily to hydrodynamic mechanisms rather than thermal diffusion. Specific discharge estimates using the FODTS technique also compared well to water balance estimates over a four month period, although there were occasional deviations that have yet to be adequately explained. The FODTS technique is superior to water balance in that it produces estimates of infiltration rate every meter along the cable transect, every half hour. These high resolution measurements highlighted areas of low infiltration and demonstrated the degradation of basin efficiency due to source waters of high suspended solids. FODTS monitoring promises to be a useful tool for diagnosing basin performance in an era of increasing groundwater demand. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  9. Registered Report: Measuring Unconscious Deception Detection by Skin Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisabeth Van 't Veer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Findings from the deception detection literature suggest that although people are not skilled in consciously detecting a liar, they may intuit that something about the person telling a lie is off. In the current proposal, we argue that observing a liar influences the observer’s physiology even though the observer may not be consciously aware of being lied to (i.e., the observers’ direct deception judgment does not accurately differentiate between liars and truth-tellers. To test this hypothesis, participants’ finger temperature will be measured while they watch videos of persons who are either honest or dishonest about their identity. We hypothesize that skin temperature will be lower when observing a liar than when observing a truth-teller. Additionally, we test whether perceiving a liar influences finger skin temperature differently when an individual is, or is not, alerted to the possibility of deceit. We do this by varying participants’ awareness of the fact that they might be lied to. Next to measuring physiological responses to liars and truth-tellers, self-reported direct and indirect veracity judgments (i.e., trustworthiness and liking of the target persons will be assessed. We hypothesize that indirect veracity judgments will better distinguish between liars and truth-tellers than direct veracity judgments.

  10. CARS temperature measurements in a hypersonic propulsion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Smith, M. W.; Antcliff, R. R.; Northam, G. B.; Cutler, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Static-temperature measurements performed in a reacting vitiated air-hydrogen Mach-2 flow in a duct in Test Cell 2 at NASA LaRC by using a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system are discussed. The hypersonic propulsion Test Cell 2 hardware is outlined with emphasis on optical access ports and safety features in the design of the Test Cell. Such design considerations as vibration, noise, contamination from flow field or atmospheric-borne dust, unwanted laser- and electrically-induced combustion, and movement of the sampling volume in the flow are presented. The CARS system is described, and focus is placed on the principle and components of system-to-monochromator signal coupling. Contour plots of scramjet combustor static temperature in a reacting-flow region are presented for three stations, and it is noted that the measurements reveal such features in the flow as maximum temperature near the model wall in the region of the injector footprint.

  11. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R 2  = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. - Highlights: • The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. • Distinct diurnal and temporal Brightness Temperature behavior divide the city into four segments. • We assess air temperature from satellite surface temperature (R 2  = 0.81). - The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the last 30 years. Distinct diurnal and temporal Surface Temperature behavior divide the city into four different segments.

  12. Air temperature measurements based on the speed of sound to compensate long distance interferometric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrua Milena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to measure the real time temperature distribution along an interferometer path based on the propagation of acoustic waves is presented. It exploits the high sensitivity of the speed of sound in air to the air temperature. In particular, it takes advantage of a special set-up where the generation of the acoustic waves is synchronous with the amplitude modulation of a laser source. A photodetector converts the laser light to an electronic signal considered as reference, while the incoming acoustic waves are focused on a microphone and generate a second signal. In this condition, the phase difference between the two signals substantially depends on the temperature of the air volume interposed between the sources and the receivers. The comparison with the traditional temperature sensors highlighted the limit of the latter in case of fast temperature variations and the advantage of a measurement integrated along the optical path instead of a sampling measurement. The capability of the acoustic method to compensate the interferometric distance measurements due to air temperature variations has been demonstrated for distances up to 27 m.

  13. Non-graphite crucible for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Pfeiler, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A multi-piece crucible for high temperature applications comprises a tubular side wall member having a lip on the inside surface and a bottom member or members forming a container for containing a melt of a material during a high temperature melt-casting operations. The multi-piece design prevents cracking of the crucible or leakage of the melt from the crucible during the melt-casting operation. The lip of the tubular member supports the bottom member. The contacting surfaces where the lip of the tubular side wall member contacts the bottom member of the multi-piece crucible contains a ceramic sealing material. The ceramic sealing material forms a seal sufficient to prevent the melt of the material from leaking out of the multi-piece crucible during the melt-casting process. The multi-piece crucible is made of a material which is chemically inert to the melt and has structural integrity at the melting point temperature of the melt, or of a material coated with such a material. The multi-piece crucible is contained in a thermal can assembly of a high temperature induction furnace during a high temperature melt-casting operation. One embodiment of the multi-piece crucible comprises a tubular member having a vertical slot filled with a ceramic sealing material to provide expansion of the tubular member without cracking during the high temperature melt-casting operation.

  14. Temperature dependent measurement of internal damping of austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oravcová Monika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed on the analysis of the internal damping changes of austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316L and AISI 316Ti depending from temperature. In experimental measurements only resonance method was used which is based on continuous excitation of oscillations of the specimens and the whole apparatus vibrates at the frequency near to the resonance. Microplastic processes and dissipation of energy within the metals are evaluated and investigated by internal damping measurements. Damping capacity of materials is closely tied to the presence of defects including second phase particles and voids. By measuring the energy dissipation in the material, we can determine the elastic characteristics, Youngs modulus, the level of stress relaxation and many other.

  15. Embedded DAQ System Design for Temperature and Humidity Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarique Rafique Memon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have proposed a cost effective DAQ (Data Acquisition system design useful for local industries by using user friendly LABVIEW (Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Electronic Workbench. The proposed system can measure and control different industrial parameters which can be presented in graphical icon format. The system design is proposed for 8-channels, whereas tested and recorded for two parameters i.e. temperature and RH (Relative Humidity. Both parameters are set as per upper and lower limits and controlled using relays. Embedded system is developed using standard microcontroller to acquire and process the analog data and plug-in for further processing using serial interface with PC using LABVIEW. The designed system is capable of monitoring and recording the corresponding linkage between temperature and humidity in industrial unit's and indicates the abnormalities within the process and control those abnormalities through relays

  16. Zircaloy sheathed thermocouples for PWR fuel rod temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.V.; Wesley, R.D.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Small diameter zircaloy sheathed thermocouples have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Surface mounted thermocouples were developed to measure the temperature of zircaloy clad fuel rods used in the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP), and embedded thermocouples were developed for use by the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program for support tests using zircaloy clad electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulators. The first objective of this developmental effort was to produce zircaloy sheathed thermocouples to replace titanium sheathed thermocouples and thereby eliminate the long-term corrosion of the titanium-to-zircaloy attachment weld. The second objective was to reduce the sheath diameter to obtain faster thermal response and minimize cladding temperature disturbance due to thermocouple attachment

  17. The Measurement and Interpretation of Transformation Temperatures in Nitinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerig, T. W.; Pelton, A. R.; Bhattacharya, K.

    2017-12-01

    A previous paper (Duerig and Bhattacharya in Shap Mem Superelasticity 1:153-161, 2015) introduced several engineering considerations surrounding the R-phase in Nitinol and highlighted a common, if not pervasive, misconception regarding the use of the term Af by the medical device industry. This paper brings additional data to bear on the issue and proposes more accurate terminology. Moreover, a variety of tools are used to establish the forward and reverse stress-temperature phase diagrams for a superelastic wire typical of that used in medical devices. Once established, the two most common methods of measuring transformation temperatures, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Bend Free Recovery, are tested against the observed behavior. Light is also shed upon the origin of the Clausius-Clapeyron ratio (d σ/d T), the triple point, and why such large variations are reported in superelastic alloys.

  18. Remote sensing of temperature and wind using acoustic travel-time measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Manuela; Fischer, Gabi; Raabe, Armin; Weisse, Frank [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie; Ziemann, Astrid [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Meteorologie

    2013-04-15

    A remote sensing technique to detect area-averaged temperature and flow properties within an area under investigation, utilizing acoustic travel-time measurements, is introduced. This technique uses the dependency of the speed of acoustic signals on the meteorological parameters temperature and wind along the propagation path. The method itself is scalable: It is applicable for investigation areas with an extent of some hundred square metres as well as for small-scale areas in the range of one square metre. Moreover, an arrangement of the acoustic transducers at several height levels makes it possible to determine profiles and gradients of the meteorological quantities. With the help of two examples the potential of this remote sensing technique for simultaneously measuring averaged temperature and flow fields is demonstrated. A comparison of time histories of temperature and wind values derived from acoustic travel-time measurements with point measurements shows a qualitative agreement whereas calculated root-mean-square errors differ for the two example applications. They amount to 1.4 K and 0.3 m/s for transducer distances of 60 m and 0.4 K and 0.2 m/s for transducer distances in the range of one metre. (orig.)

  19. Hydroxyl temperature and intensity measurements during noctilucent cloud displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Taylor

    Full Text Available Two Fourier transform spectrometers have been used to investigate the properties of the near-infrared hydroxyl (OH nightglow emission under high-latitude summertime conditions and any association with noctilucent clouds (NLCs. The measurements were made from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska (65.1°N, 147.5°W, during August 1986. Simultaneous photographic observations of the northern twilight sky were made from Gulkana, Alaska (62.2°N, 145.5°W, approximately 340 km to the south to establish the presence of NLCs over the spectrometer site. Data exhibiting significant short-term variations in the relative intensity (as much as 50–100% and rotational temperature (typically 5–15 K were recorded on six occasions when NLCs were observed. Joint measurements were also obtained on several "cloud-free" nights. No obvious relationship was found linking the mean OH intensity or its variation with the occurrence of NLCs. However, a clear tendency was found for the mean OH temperature to be lower on NLC nights than on cloud-free nights. In particular, a significant fraction of the OH(3–1 band spectra recorded by each instrument (16–57% exhibited temperatures below ~154 K on NLC nights compared with <3% on cloud-free nights. This result is qualitatively consistent with current models for ice particle nucleation and growth, but the mean OH temperature on NLC nights (~156 K was significantly higher than would be expected for long-term particle growth in this region. These observations raise questions concerning the expected proximity of the high-latitude, summertime OH layer and the NLC growth region.

  20. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  1. Development and application of group importance measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskin, F.E.; Huang, Min; Sasser, M.K.; Stack, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    As part of a complete Level I probabilistic safety analysis of the K Production Reactor, three traditional importance measures-risk reduction, partial derivative, and variance reduction-have been extended to permit analyses of the relative importance of groups of basic and initiating events. None of the group importance measures require Monte Carlo sampling for their quantification. The group importance measures are quantified for the overall fuel damage equation and for dominant accident sequences using the following event groups: initiating events, electrical failures, instrumentation failures, common-cause failures, human errors, and nonrecovery events. Additional analyses are presented using other event groups. Collectively, these applications indicate both the utility and the versatility of the group importance measures

  2. An ultra-low-power CMOS temperature sensor for RFID applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Conghui; Gao Peijun; Che Wenyi; Tan Xi; Yan Na; Min Hao

    2009-01-01

    An ultra-low-power CMOS temperature sensor with analog-to-digital readout circuitry for RFID applications was implemented in a 0.18-μm CMOS process. To achieve ultra-low power consumption, an error model is proposed and the corresponding novel temperature sensor front-end with a new double-measure method is presented. Analog-to-digital conversion is accomplished by a sigma-delta converter. The complete system consumes only 26 μA and 1.8 V for continuous operation and achieves an accuracy of ±0.65 deg. C from -20 to 120 deg. C after calibration at one temperature.

  3. Industrial Heat Pump for a High Temperature District Heating Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Claus Nørgaard

    Domestic heat pumps for shallow geothermal heating of family houses are popular and the range and supply of standard solutions is large. However, in applications for large capacities and temperatures, like district heating in the mega Watt range, standard solutions for high temperatures are scarce...... and usually not suitable off-the-shelf, which demands customized industrial heat pumps to be designed to fit the specific application. At the Brædstrup CHP plant in Denmark, a pilot project deployed in 2012, is being tested involving a seasonal thermal energy storage system in underground boreholes, charged...... by excess thermal energy from thermal solar panels. An industrial heat pump system using the natural refrigerant ammonia, is extracting the thermal energy from the storage when needed, and produce hot water at 85°C, for the district heating grid. The heat pump also acts as contributor to electricity grid...

  4. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  5. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  6. Corrosion resistant coatings suitable for elevated temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S [San Antonio, TX; Cheruvu, Narayana Sastry [San Antonio, TX; Liang, Wuwei [Austin, TX

    2012-07-31

    The present invention relates to corrosion resistance coatings suitable for elevated temperature applications, which employ compositions of iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and/or aluminum (Al). The compositions may be configured to regulate the diffusion of metals between a coating and a substrate, which may then influence coating performance, via the formation of an inter-diffusion barrier layer. The inter-diffusion barrier layer may comprise a face-centered cubic phase.

  7. Temperature-Dependent Coercive Field Measured by a Quantum Dot Strain Gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Keil, Robert; Zopf, Michael; Ding, Fei; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2017-12-13

    Coercive fields of piezoelectric materials can be strongly influenced by environmental temperature. We investigate this influence using a heterostructure consisting of a single crystal piezoelectric film and a quantum dots containing membrane. Applying electric field leads to a physical deformation of the piezoelectric film, thereby inducing strain in the quantum dots and thus modifying their optical properties. The wavelength of the quantum dot emission shows butterfly-like loops, from which the coercive fields are directly derived. The results suggest that coercive fields at cryogenic temperatures are strongly increased, yielding values several tens of times larger than those at room temperature. We adapt a theoretical model to fit the measured data with very high agreement. Our work provides an efficient framework for predicting the properties of ferroelectric materials and advocating their practical applications, especially at low temperatures.

  8. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell

    2005-10-31

    Development of practical, high-temperature optical claddings for improved waveguiding in sapphire fibers continued during the reporting period. A set of designed experiments using the Taguchi method was undertaken to efficiently determine the optimal set of processing variables to yield clad fibers with good optical and mechanical properties. Eighteen samples of sapphire fibers were prepared with spinel claddings, each with a unique set of variables. Statistical analyses of the results were then used to predict the set of factors that would result in a spinel cladding with the optimal geometrical, mechanical, and optical properties. To confirm the predictions of the Taguchi analysis, sapphire fibers were clad with the magnesium aluminate spinel coating using the predicted optimal set of factors. In general, the clad fibers demonstrated high quality, exceeding the best results obtained during the Phase I effort. Tests of the high-temperature stability of the clad fibers were also conducted. The results indicated that the clad fibers were stable at temperatures up to 1300 C for the duration of the three day test. At the higher temperatures, some changes in the geometry of the fibers were observed. The design, fabrication, and testing of a sapphire sensor for measurement of temperature was undertaken. The specific sensor configuration uses a polished sapphire wafer as the temperature-sensitive element. The wafer is attached to a sapphire fiber (clad or unclad), and interrogated as a Fabry-Perot sensor. Methods for assembling the sensor were investigated. A prototype sensor was fabricated and tested at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Results were difficult to interpret, due to the presence of modal noise which was found to result from the use of a spectrometer that was not designed for use with multimode fibers. A spectrometer optimized for use of multimode fiber has been obtained, and further evaluation of the sapphire temperature sensor is continuing.

  9. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  10. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  11. Electrochemical noise measurements of stainless steel in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis-Juarez, C.R.; Malo, J.M.; Uruchurtu, J.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion in a high purity aqueous environment simulating a boiling water reactor (BWR) is addressed in this work. This condition necessitates autoclave experiments under high pressure and temperature. Long-term electrochemical noise measurements were explored as a mean to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. An experimental set up, designed to insulate the working electrode from external interference, made possible to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking in slow strain rate tests for sensitized and solution annealed 304 stainless steel at 288 o C. Time-series analysis showed variations in the signature of the current density series due to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC)

  12. Measurement of the temperature coefficient of ratio transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.; Shaumeyer, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the temperature coefficient of the output of several ratio transformers at ratios near 0.500,000 using an ac bridge and a dual-phase, lock-in amplifier. The two orthogonal output components were each resolved to +/- ppb of the bridge drive signal. The results for three commercial ratio transformers between 20 and 50 C range from 0.5 to 100 ppb/K for the signal component in phase with the bridge drive, and from 4 to 300 ppb/K for the quadrature component.

  13. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantsker, E.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO 3 -YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz -1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room

  14. High transition-temperature SQUID magnetometers and practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantsker, Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    The design, fabrication and performance of SQUID magnetometers based on thin films of the high-transition temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) are described. Essential to the achieving high magnetic field resolution at low frequencies is the elimination of 1/f flux noise due to thermally activated hopping of flux vortices between pinning sites in the superconducting films. Through improvements in processing, 1/f noise in single layer YBCO thin films and YBCO-SrTiO3-YBCO trilayers was systematically reduced to allow fabrication of sensitive SQUID magnetometers. Both single-layer directly coupled SQUID magnetometers and multilayer magnetometers were fabricated, based on the dc SQUID with bicrystal grain boundary Josephson junctions. Multilayer magnetometers had a lower magnetic field noise for a given physical size due to greater effective sensing areas. A magnetometer consisting of a SQUID inductively coupled to the multiturn input coil of a flux transformer in a flip-chip arrangement had a field noise of 27 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 8.5 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A multiloop multilayer SQUID magnetometer had a field noise of 37 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 Hz and 18 fT Hz-1/2 at 1 kHz. A three-axis SQUID magnetometer for geophysical applications was constructed and operated in the field in the presence of 60 Hz and radiofrequency noise. Clinical quality magnetocardiograms were measured using multilayer SQUID magnetometers in a magnetically shielded room.

  15. In - situ temperature measurement to determine the machining behavior of different tool coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, T.; Engering, G.; Lahres, M.; Pecher, U.; Damm, S.; Doerr, J.; Huehsam, A.

    2001-01-01

    A research project for the development of dry lubricant coatings for the cutting tools of different machining operations demanded the generation of certain experimental techniques to attain knowledge about the coatings behavior. The solution developed compares the coatings by observing their temperature behavior during the machining process. A method of in-situ temperature measurement during turning formed the basis of this solution. The method of measurement was further modified for other operations. In addition to the thermographic recording during dry turning, solutions for dry threading, dry drilling and dry milling were also developed. The experimental set-ups were generated were generated in collaboration with several project partners. For each machining operation investigated, a specific device was developed, which made the in-situ temperature measurement possible using the high resolution thermographic camera. The results were such, that it became possible to attain knowledge about the coating's in-process temperature behavior for each of the processes investigated. Furthermore the individual coatings are compared among themselves and with uncoated tools. The combination of the temperature and wear measurement yields the possibility for optimization and further development of suitable self-lubricant coated tools for dry machining applications. (author)

  16. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part II Dynamic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The second part of the article describes the technology of marine engine diagnostics making use of dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. Little-known achievements of Prof. S. Rutkowski of the Naval College in Gdynia (now: Polish Naval Academy in this area are presented. A novel approach is proposed which consists in the use of the measured exhaust gas temperature dynamics for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the enthalpy flux of successive pressure pulses of the exhaust gas supplying the marine engine turbocompressor. General design assumptions are presented for the measuring and diagnostic system which makes use of a sheathed thermocouple installed in the engine exhaust gas manifold. The corrected thermal inertia of the thermocouple enables to reproduce a real time-history of exhaust gas temperature changes.

  17. Temperature diagnostics of ECR plasma by measurement of electron bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthurirangan, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Desai, C. A.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-07-01

    The x-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum emitted by the electron population in a 14.5 GHz ECR plasma source has been measured using a NaI(Tl) detector, and hence the electron temperature of the higher energy electron population in the plasma has been determined. The x-ray spectra for Ne and Ar gases have been systematically studied as a function of inlet gas pressure from 7 × 10-7 mbar to 7 × 10-5 mbar and for input microwave power ˜1 W to ˜300 W. At the highest input power and optimum pressure conditions, the end point bremsstrahlung energies are seen to reach ˜700 keV. The estimated electron temperatures (Te) were found to be in the range 20 keV-80 keV. The Te is found to be peaking at a pressure of 1 × 10-5 mbar for both gases. The Te is seen to increase with increasing input power in the intermediate power region, i.e., between 100 and 200 W, but shows different behaviour for different gases in the low and high power regions. Both gases show very weak dependence of electron temperature on inlet gas pressure, but the trends in each gas are different.

  18. Temperature diagnostics of ECR plasma by measurement of electron bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasthurirangan, S. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Department of Physics, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 (India); Agnihotri, A. N.; Desai, C. A.; Tribedi, L. C. [Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The x-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum emitted by the electron population in a 14.5 GHz ECR plasma source has been measured using a NaI(Tl) detector, and hence the electron temperature of the higher energy electron population in the plasma has been determined. The x-ray spectra for Ne and Ar gases have been systematically studied as a function of inlet gas pressure from 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mbar to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar and for input microwave power {approx}1 W to {approx}300 W. At the highest input power and optimum pressure conditions, the end point bremsstrahlung energies are seen to reach {approx}700 keV. The estimated electron temperatures (T{sub e}) were found to be in the range 20 keV-80 keV. The T{sub e} is found to be peaking at a pressure of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar for both gases. The T{sub e} is seen to increase with increasing input power in the intermediate power region, i.e., between 100 and 200 W, but shows different behaviour for different gases in the low and high power regions. Both gases show very weak dependence of electron temperature on inlet gas pressure, but the trends in each gas are different.

  19. Ultra light weight refractory material for high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finke, V.; Kern, H. [Rath GmbH, Meissen (Germany); Springer, M. [Aug. Rath jun. GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The requirements on companies running high temperature processes, i.e. at temperatures about 1000 C and above, have increased dramatically within the last few years. For technological, economical and ecological purposes each application has to be checked carefully. As well the political discussion regarding environmental pollution, greenhouse effect and emission trading and the guidelines for climate and environmental protection exert massive influence on thermal process technology and pose an appropriate challenge for the companies. Next to costs of labour and raw materials the costs for energy and environmental costs play a decisive role more and more. The pressure on the management thereby incurred may have a lasting effect on innovations regarding increase of energy efficiency, decrease of CO{sub 2}-emission and often on non negligible increase of productivity. Mainly against the background of the highly scheduled European aims for emission reduction and also in consideration of the still proceeding globalisation the usage of state-of-the-art refractory technics in thermal process technology is of particular importance for business success, for reducing of environmental impact and last but not least for conservation and safeguarding of jobs in Europe and Germany. The applications for products made from high-temperature insulation wool in high temperature applications have strongly increased during the last five years. Especially the production capacities of polycrystalline wool (aluminium oxide wool e.g. Altra B72) have been doubled within the last three years. Primarily ultra light weight products made from HTIW are used in industrial furnaces with application temperatures above 1000 C and / or with high thermo-mechanical (thermal shock) and chemical exposure. The outstanding and essential advantages of these materials are obviously: Ultra light weight material with high resilience and flexibility, Optimised energy consumption (energy saving up to 50% compared

  20. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-08-15

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R(2)=0.946 and R(2)=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Temperature and species measurement in a quenching boundary layer on a flat-flame burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuto, Takayuki; Kronemayer, Helmut; Lewerich, Burkhard; Brübach, Jan; Fujikawa, Taketoshi; Akihama, Kazuhiro; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2010-10-01

    A detailed understanding of transport phenomena and reactions in near-wall boundary layers of combustion chambers is essential for further reducing pollutant emissions and improving thermal efficiencies of internal combustion engines. In a model experiment, the potential of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was investigated for measurements inside the boundary layer connected to flame-wall interaction at atmospheric pressure. Temperature and species distributions were measured in the quenching boundary layer formed close to a cooled metal surface located parallel to the flow of a premixed methane/air flat flame. Multi-line NO-LIF thermometry provided gas-phase temperature distributions. In addition, flame species OH, CH2O and CO were monitored by single-photon (OH, CH2O) and two-photon (CO) excitation LIF, respectively. The temperature dependence of the OH-LIF signal intensities was corrected for using the measured gas-phase temperature distributions. The spatial line-pair resolution of the imaging system was 22 μm determined by imaging microscopic line pairs printed on a resolution target. The experimental results show the expected flame quenching behavior in the boundary layer and they reveal the potential and limitations of the applied diagnostics techniques. Limitations in spatial resolution are attributed to refraction of fluorescence radiation propagating through steep temperature gradients in the boundary layer. For the present experimental arrangements, the applied diagnostics techniques are applicable as close to the wall as 200 μm with measurement precision then exceeding the 15-25% limit for species detection, with estimates of double this value for the case of H2CO due to the unknown effect of the Boltzmann fraction corrections not included in the data evaluation process. Temperature measurements are believed to be accurate within 50 K in the near-wall zone, which amounts to roughly 10% at the lower temperatures encountered in this region of the flames.

  2. Heat capacity mapping mission. [satellite for earth surface temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), part of a series of Applications Explorers Missions, is designed to provide data on surface heating as a response to solar energy input. The data is obtained by a two channel scanning radiometer, with one channel covering the visible and near-IR band between 0.5 and 1.1 micrometers, and the other covering the thermal-IR between 10.5 and 12.5 micrometers. The temperature range covered lies between 260 and 340 K, in 0.3 deg steps, with an accuracy at 280 K of plus or minus 0.5 K. Nominal altitude is 620 km, with a ground swath 700 km wide.

  3. Application of infrared camera to bituminous concrete pavements: measuring vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janků, Michal; Stryk, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Infrared thermography (IR) has been used for decades in certain fields. However, the technological level of advancement of measuring devices has not been sufficient for some applications. Over the recent years, good quality thermal cameras with high resolution and very high thermal sensitivity have started to appear on the market. The development in the field of measuring technologies allowed the use of infrared thermography in new fields and for larger number of users. This article describes the research in progress in Transport Research Centre with a focus on the use of infrared thermography for diagnostics of bituminous road pavements. A measuring vehicle, equipped with a thermal camera, digital camera and GPS sensor, was designed for the diagnostics of pavements. New, highly sensitive, thermal cameras allow to measure very small temperature differences from the moving vehicle. This study shows the potential of a high-speed inspection without lane closures while using IR thermography.

  4. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: a pyrometer for measuring ground temperature on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor's main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  5. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS, an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment.

  6. The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station Ground Temperature Sensor: A Pyrometer for Measuring Ground Temperature on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Zorzano, María P.; Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Esteban, Blanca; Ramos, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We describe the parameters that drive the design and modeling of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS), an instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, and report preliminary test results. REMS GTS is a lightweight, low-power, and low cost pyrometer for measuring the Martian surface kinematic temperature. The sensor’s main feature is its innovative design, based on a simple mechanical structure with no moving parts. It includes an in-flight calibration system that permits sensor recalibration when sensor sensitivity has been degraded by deposition of dust over the optics. This paper provides the first results of a GTS engineering model working in a Martian-like, extreme environment. PMID:22163405

  7. Development of Metal Oxide Nanostructure-based Optical Sensors for Fossil Fuel Derived Gases Measurement at High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kevin P. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    This final technical report details research works performed supported by a Department of Energy grant (DE-FE0003859), which was awarded under the University Coal Research Program administrated by National Energy Technology Laboratory. This research program studied high temperature fiber sensor for harsh environment applications. It developed two fiber optical sensor platform technology including regenerative fiber Bragg grating sensors and distributed fiber optical sensing based on Rayleigh backscattering optical frequency domain reflectometry. Through the studies of chemical and thermal regenerative techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) fabrication, high-temperature stable FBG sensors were successfully developed and fabricated in air-hole microstructured fibers, high-attenuation fibers, rare-earth doped fibers, and standard telecommunication fibers. By optimizing the laser processing and thermal annealing procedures, fiber grating sensors with stable performance up to 1100°C have been developed. Using these temperature-stable FBG gratings as sensor platform, fiber optical flow, temperature, pressure, and chemical sensors have been developed to operate at high temperatures up to 800°C. Through the integration of on-fiber functional coating, the use of application-specific air-hole microstructural fiber, and application of active fiber sensing scheme, distributed fiber sensor for temperature, pressure, flow, liquid level, and chemical sensing have been demonstrated with high spatial resolution (1-cm or better) with wide temperature ranges. These include the demonstration of 1) liquid level sensing from 77K to the room temperature, pressure/temperature sensing from the room temperature to 800C and from the 15psi to 2000 psi, and hydrogen concentration measurement from 0.2% to 10% with temperature ranges from the room temperature to 700°C. Optical sensors developed by this program has broken several technical records including flow sensors with the highest

  8. Radiation temperature measurement method for semitransparent materials using one-channel infrared pyrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tairan; Liu, Jiangfan; Zong, Anzhou

    2014-10-10

    Semitransparent zinc sulfide (ZnS) crystal materials are widely used as the infrared-transmitting windows for optical instruments operating in long wavelengths. This paper describes a temperature measurement method for high-temperature ZnS materials using the one-channel optical pyrometer based on a theoretical model of radiation transfer in semitransparent plates. Numerical analyses of the radiation properties of ZnS plate are used to optimize the spectral band for the optical pyrometry. The optimized measurement spectral band is based on a trade-off between the measurement radiation intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the ZnS material. The effective waveband emittance of one-dimensional (1D) ZnS plates is analyzed for various experimental conditions (temperatures, thicknesses, and direction angles) for the one-channel infrared pyrometer with the optimized measurement spectral response. The analysis can be used to improve radiation temperature measurements of semitransparent ZnS materials in applications.

  9. Development of a method for estimating oesophageal temperature by multi-locational temperature measurement inside the external auditory canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Hirofumi; Horie, Seichi; Kawanami, Shoko; Inoue, Jinro; Iijima, Yoshinori; Sato, Kiyoharu; Abe, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to develop a practical method to estimate oesophageal temperature by measuring multi-locational auditory canal temperatures. This method can be applied to prevent heatstroke by simultaneously and continuously monitoring the core temperatures of people working under hot environments. We asked 11 healthy male volunteers to exercise, generating 80 W for 45 min in a climatic chamber set at 24, 32 and 40 °C, at 50% relative humidity. We also exposed the participants to radiation at 32 °C. We continuously measured temperatures at the oesophagus, rectum and three different locations along the external auditory canal. We developed equations for estimating oesophageal temperatures from auditory canal temperatures and compared their fitness and errors. The rectal temperature increased or decreased faster than oesophageal temperature at the start or end of exercise in all conditions. Estimated temperature showed good similarity with oesophageal temperature, and the square of the correlation coefficient of the best fitting model reached 0.904. We observed intermediate values between rectal and oesophageal temperatures during the rest phase. Even under the condition with radiation, estimated oesophageal temperature demonstrated concordant movement with oesophageal temperature at around 0.1 °C overestimation. Our method measured temperatures at three different locations along the external auditory canal. We confirmed that the approach can credibly estimate the oesophageal temperature from 24 to 40 °C for people performing exercise in the same place in a windless environment.

  10. A fully automated temperature-dependent resistance measurement setup using van der Pauw method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shivendra Kumar; Manivannan, Anbarasu

    2018-03-01

    The van der Pauw (VDP) method is widely used to identify the resistance of planar homogeneous samples with four contacts placed on its periphery. We have developed a fully automated thin film resistance measurement setup using the VDP method with the capability of precisely measuring a wide range of thin film resistances from few mΩ up to 10 GΩ under controlled temperatures from room-temperature up to 600 °C. The setup utilizes a robust, custom-designed switching network board (SNB) for measuring current-voltage characteristics automatically at four different source-measure configurations based on the VDP method. Moreover, SNB is connected with low noise shielded coaxial cables that reduce the effect of leakage current as well as the capacitance in the circuit thereby enhancing the accuracy of measurement. In order to enable precise and accurate resistance measurement of the sample, wide range of sourcing currents/voltages are pre-determined with the capability of auto-tuning for ˜12 orders of variation in the resistances. Furthermore, the setup has been calibrated with standard samples and also employed to investigate temperature dependent resistance (few Ω-10 GΩ) measurements for various chalcogenide based phase change thin films (Ge2Sb2Te5, Ag5In5Sb60Te30, and In3SbTe2). This setup would be highly helpful for measurement of temperature-dependent resistance of wide range of materials, i.e., metals, semiconductors, and insulators illuminating information about structural change upon temperature as reflected by change in resistances, which are useful for numerous applications.

  11. Temperature and time stability of whole blood lactate: implications for feasibility of pre-hospital measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Timothy R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the time and temperature stability of whole blood lactate using experimental conditions applicable to the out-of-hospital environment. Findings We performed a prospective, clinical laboratory-based study at an academic hospital. Whole blood lactate was obtained by venipuncture from five post-prandial, resting subjects. Blood was stored in lithium heparinized vacutainers in three temperature conditions: 1 room temperature (20°C, 2 wrapped in a portable, instant ice pack (0°C, or 3 wet ice (0°C. Lactate concentrations (mmol/L were measured at 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes after sampling, and compared using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mean baseline lactate among resting subjects (N = 5 was 1.24 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.49,1.98 mmol/L. After 30 minutes, lactate concentration increased, on average, by 0.08 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.02,0.13 mmol/L, 0.18 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.07,0.28 mmol/L, and 0.36 mmol/L (95%CI: 0.24,0.47 mmol/L when stored in wet ice, ice pack, and room temperature, respectively. The increase in lactate was similar in samples wrapped in portable ice pack or stored in wet ice at all time points (p > 0.05, and met criteria for equivalence at 30 minutes. However, lactate measurements from whole blood stored at room temperature were significantly greater, on average, than wet ice or portable ice pack within five and ten minutes, respectively (p Conclusions Whole blood lactate measurements using samples stored in a portable ice pack are similar to wet ice for up to 30 minutes. These conditions are applicable to the out-of-hospital environment, and should inform future studies of pre-hospital measurement of lactate.

  12. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  13. Direct Measurement of Gas Temperatures by Radiation Thermometry near 4.3 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynon, T. G. R.

    2003-09-01

    An infra-red thermometer can measure gas temperature if its operating waveband is coincident with an absorption band in the target gas. Of particular interest are thermometers operating at wavelengths on the long-wavelength edge of the strong 4.3 μm carbon dioxide absorption band. These are used to monitor gas temperatures in industrial boilers and incinerators and have potential for use in a variety of combustion plants. If the gas path is optically thick (i.e. the thermometer does not "see through" to a back wall) and is of uniform temperature, then the thermometer will read the gas temperature directly. The presence of an optically thick condition depends on the absorption strength, path length, gas concentration, temperature and pressure. So-called band models can be used to analyze the situation. They can estimate the "penetration" of the thermometer into the gas. They can also estimate the thermometer reading if the gas temperature is non-uniform and/or if the optically thick condition is not well met. This paper develops such a model based on data published by NASA and verified by laboratory measurements in a tube furnace. The model is then extended to allow some estimation of the effect of particulates. Calculations presented are for a particular thermometer spectral response, but data is referenced to allow extension to other CO2 band instruments. The model aims to allow straightforward assessment of the applicability of these instruments in industrial situations.

  14. Implementation of Moderator Circulation Test Temperature Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yeong Muk; Hong, Seok Boong; Kim, Min Seok; Choi, Hwa Rim; Kim, Hyung Shin

    2016-01-01

    Moderator Circulation Test(MCT) facility is 1/4 scale facility designed to reproduce the important characteristics of moderator circulation in a CANDU6 calandria under a range of operating conditions. MCT is an equipment with 380 acrylic pipes instead of the heater rods and a preliminary measurement of velocity field using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) is performed under the iso-thermal test conditions. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started implementation of MCT Temperature Measurement System (TMS) using multiple infrared sensors. To control multiple infrared sensors, MCT TMS is implemented using National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The MCT TMS is implemented to measure sensor data of multiple infrared sensors using the LabVIEW. The 35 sensor pipes of MCT TMS are divided into 2 ports to meet the minimum measurement time of 0.2 seconds. The software of MCT TMS is designed using collection function and processing function. The MCT TMS has the function of monitoring the states of multiple infrared sensors. The GUI screen of MCT TMS is composed of sensor pipe categories for user

  15. Implementation of Moderator Circulation Test Temperature Measurement System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yeong Muk; Hong, Seok Boong; Kim, Min Seok; Choi, Hwa Rim [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Shin [Chungnam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Moderator Circulation Test(MCT) facility is 1/4 scale facility designed to reproduce the important characteristics of moderator circulation in a CANDU6 calandria under a range of operating conditions. MCT is an equipment with 380 acrylic pipes instead of the heater rods and a preliminary measurement of velocity field using PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry) is performed under the iso-thermal test conditions. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started implementation of MCT Temperature Measurement System (TMS) using multiple infrared sensors. To control multiple infrared sensors, MCT TMS is implemented using National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The MCT TMS is implemented to measure sensor data of multiple infrared sensors using the LabVIEW. The 35 sensor pipes of MCT TMS are divided into 2 ports to meet the minimum measurement time of 0.2 seconds. The software of MCT TMS is designed using collection function and processing function. The MCT TMS has the function of monitoring the states of multiple infrared sensors. The GUI screen of MCT TMS is composed of sensor pipe categories for user.

  16. Selective solar absorber emittance measurement at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Philémon; Braillon, Julien; Raccurt, Olivier

    2017-06-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The characterization of a material in such condition is complicated and requires advanced apparatuses, and different measurement methods exist for the determination of the two quantities of relevance regarding an absorber, which are its emittance and its solar absorbance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for measure the emittance of this solar absorber at elevated temperature. In this paper, we present an optical bench developed for emittance measurement on absorbers is conditions of use. Results will be shown, with a discussion of some factors of influence over this measurement and how to control them.

  17. 1-3 piezoelectric composites for high temperature transducer applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Zhang, Shujun; Xu, Zhuo; Wen, Fei; Geng, Xuecang; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Shrout, Thomas R

    2013-04-24

    High temperature Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 /epoxy 1-3 composites were fabricated using the dice and fill method. The epoxy filler was modified with glass spheres in order to improve the thermal reliability of the composites at elevated temperatures. Temperature dependent dielectric and electromechanical properties of the composites were measured after aging at 250°C with different dwelling times. Obvious cracks were observed and the electrodes were damaged in the composite with unmodified epoxy after 200 hours, leading to the failure of the composite. In contrast, composites with >12 vol% glass sphere loaded epoxies were found to exhibit minimal electrical property variation after aging for 500 hours, with dielectric permittivity, piezoelectric coefficient and electromechanical coupling being on the order of 940, 310pC/N and 57%, respectively. This is due to the improved thermal expansion behavior of the modified filler.

  18. 3D thermography for improving temperature measurements in thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. W.; Simpson, R.; Parian, J. A.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.; Sablerolle, S.; Ertel, H.

    2017-09-01

    simulator. The results are presented here with estimated temperature measurement uncertainties and defined confidence levels according to the internationally accepted Guide to Uncertainty of Measurement as used in the IEC/ISO17025 test and measurement standard. This work is understood to represent the first application of well-understood thermal imaging theory, commercial photogrammetry software, and open-source ray-tracing software (adapted to realize the Planck function for thermal wavebands and target emission), and to produce from these elements a complete system for determining true surface temperatures for complex spacecraft-testing applications.

  19. Assessment of very high temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Spiewak, I.; Gambill, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    In April 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) authorized General Atomic Company, General Electric Company, and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory to assess the available technology for producing process heat utilizing a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The VHTR is defined as a gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactor. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been given a lead role in evaluating the VHTR reactor studies and potential applications of the VHTR. Process temperatures up to the 760 to 871 0 C range appear to be achievable with near-term technology. The major development considerations are high temperature materials, the safety questions (especially regarding the need for an intermediate heat exchanger) and the process heat exchanger. The potential advantages of the VHTR over competing fossil energy sources are conservation of fossil fuels and reduced atmospheric impacts. Costs are developed for nuclear process heat supplied from a 3000-MW(th) VHTR. The range of cost in process applications is competitive with current fossil fuel alternatives

  20. Spatiotemporal infrared measurement of interface temperatures during water droplet evaporation on a nonwetting substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandramohan, Aditya; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-01-01

    High-fidelity experimental characterization of sessile droplet evaporation is required to understand the interdependent physical mechanisms that drive the evaporation. In particular, cooling of the interface due to release of the latent heat of evaporation, which is not accounted for in simplified vapor-diffusion-based models of droplet evaporation, may significantly suppress the evaporation rate on nonwetting substrates, which support tall droplet shapes. This suppression is counteracted by convective mass transfer from the droplet to the air. While prior numerical modeling studies have identified the importance of these mechanisms, there is no direct experimental evidence of their influence on the interfacial temperature distribution. Infrared thermography is used here to simultaneously measure the droplet volume, contact angle, and spatially resolved interface temperatures for water droplets on a nonwetting substrate. The technique is calibrated and validated to quantify the temperature measurement accuracy; a correction is employed to account for reflections from the surroundings when imaging the evaporating droplets. Spatiotemporally resolved interface temperature data, obtained via infrared thermography measurements, allow for an improved prediction of the evaporation rate and can be utilized to monitor temperature-controlled processes in droplets for various lab-on-a-chip applications.

  1. In vivo heating pattern of an implantable single loop applicator measured at S-band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, A.; Roelofs, T.; Weaver, P.; Maturan, A.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have measured the temperatures achieved by an implantable applicator buried in both normal and tumor tissue. The temperature distribution correlated with that measured in phantom material; high temperatures were achieved at the center of the coil, lower temperatures near the edges but within the coil, and much lower temperatures outside the coil. Sheathed in PTFE teflon the coil is compatible with tissue for long-term implantation. This device appeared well-suited for long-term invasive hyperthermia since it delivered a heat dose to a specific tumor volume while sparing the surrounding normal tissue and was found to be biocompatible with normal tissue

  2. Measures of risk importance and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.; Davis, T.C.; Denning, R.S.; Saltos, N.

    1983-07-01

    This work is part of a project being conducted for the Division of Risk Analysis (DRA) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The objectives of the project are to evaluate the importances of containment, the different safety functions, and other various contributers as assessed in probabilistic risk analyses and to identify generic conclusions regarding the importances. Effective display of the importances is an important part of these objectives. To address these objectives, measures of risk importance need to be first identified and then they need to be evaluated for the different risk analyses which have been performed. This report describes the risk importance measures that were defined and were applied to the risk analyses which were performed as part of the Reactor Safety Study Methodology Applications Program (RSSMAP). The risk importance measures defined in this report measure the importance of features not only with regard to risk reduction but also with regard to reliability assurance, or risk maintenance. The goal of this report is not to identify new mathematical formulas for risk importance but to show how importance measures can be interpreted and can be applied

  3. Quality measures in applications of image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriete, A; Naim, M; Schafer, L

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new method for the estimation of image quality in image restoration applications. We demonstrate this technique on a simulated data set of fluorescent beads, in comparison with restoration by three different deconvolution methods. Both the number of iterations and a regularisation factor are varied to enforce changes in the resulting image quality. First, the data sets are directly compared by an accuracy measure. These values serve to validate the image quality descriptor, which is developed on the basis of optical information theory. This most general measure takes into account the spectral energies and the noise, weighted in a logarithmic fashion. It is demonstrated that this method is particularly helpful as a user-oriented method to control the output of iterative image restorations and to eliminate the guesswork in choosing a suitable number of iterations.

  4. Assessment of potential solder candidates for high temperature applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the package with different solders of different melting temperatures. High Pb containing alloys where the lead levels can be above 85% by weight, is one of the solders currently being used in this technology. Responding to market pressure i.e. need for green electronic products there is now an increasing......Multi-Chip module (MCM) technology is a specialized electronic packaging technology recently gaining momentum due to the miniaturization drive in the microelectronics industry. The step soldering approach is being employed in the MCM technology. This method is used to solder various levels...... pressure to eliminate lead containing materials despite the fact that materials for high Pb containing alloys are currently not affected by any legislations. A tentative assessment was carried out to determine the potential solder candidates for high temperature applications based on the solidification...

  5. Spatio-temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A Alexandra; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989-2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R(2) = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model's results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The spatial and temporal behavior of brightness temperature in Tel-Aviv and its application to air temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, Ran; Chudnovsky, A. Alexandra; Schwarts, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This study applies remote sensing technology to assess and examine the spatial and temporal Brightness Temperature (BT) profile in the city of Tel-Aviv, Israel over the last 30 years using Landsat imagery. The location of warmest and coldest zones are constant over the studied period. Distinct diurnal and temporal BT behavior divide the city into four different segments. As an example of future application, we applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to correlate Landsat BT data with monitored air temperature (Tair) measurements using 14 images for 1989–2014. Our preliminary results show a good model performance with R2 = 0.81. Furthermore, based on the model’s results, we analyzed the spatial profile of Tair within the study domain for representative days. PMID:26499933

  7. Assessment for Melting Temperature Measurement of Nucleic Acid by HRM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution melting (HRM, with a high sensitivity to distinguish the nucleic acid species with small variations, has been widely applied in the mutation scanning, methylation analysis, and genotyping. For the aim of extending HRM for the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid secondary structures on sequence dependence, we investigated effects of the dye of EvaGreen, metal ions, and impurities (such as dNTPs on melting temperature (Tm measurement by HRM. The accuracy of HRM was assessed as compared with UV melting method, and little difference between the two methods was found when the DNA Tm was higher than 40°C. Both insufficiency and excessiveness of EvaGreen were found to give rise to a little bit higher Tm, showing that the proportion of dye should be considered for precise Tm measurement of nucleic acids. Finally, HRM method was also successfully used to measure Tms of DNA triplex, hairpin, and RNA duplex. In conclusion, HRM can be applied in the evaluation of thermal stability of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA or secondary structural elements (even when dNTPs are present.

  8. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  9. A mid-infrared laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderover, Jeremy

    A mid-infrared (mid-IR) absorption sensor based on quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology has been developed and demonstrated for high-temperature thermometry and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements in combustion environments. The sensor probes the high-intensity fundamental CO ro-vibrational band at 4.6 mum enabling sensitive measurement of CO and temperature at kHz acquisition rates. Because the sensor operates in the mid-IR CO fundamental band it is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than most of the previously developed CO combustion sensors which utilized absorption in the near-IR overtone bands and mature traditional telecommunications-based diode lasers. The sensor has been demonstrated and validated under operation in both scanned-wavelength absorption and wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS) modes in room-temperature gas cell and high-temperature shock tube experiments with known and specified gas conditions. The sensor has also been demonstrated for CO and temperature measurements in an atmospheric premixed ethylene/air McKenna burner flat flame for a range of equivalence ratios (phi = 0.7-1.4). Demonstration of the sensor under scanned-wavelength direct absorption operation was performed in a room-temperature gas cell (297 K and 0.001-1 atm) allowing validation of the line strengths and line shapes predicted by the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic database. Application of the sensor in scanned-wavelength mode, at 1-2 kHz acquisition bandwidths, to specified high-temperature shock-heated gases (950-3400 K, 1 atm) provided validation of the sensor for measurements under the high-temperature conditions found in combustion devices. The scanned-wavelength shock tube measurements yielded temperature determinations that deviated by only +/-1.2% (1-sigma deviation) with the reflected shock temperatures and CO mole fraction determinations that deviated by that specified CO mole fraction by only +/-1.5% (1-sigma deviation). These deviations are in fact smaller

  10. Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willa, K.; Diao, Z.; Campanini, D.; Welp, U.; Divan, R.; Hudl, M.; Islam, Z.; Kwok, W.-K.; Rydh, A.

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-δ crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  11. OVERVIEW OF WORK PIECE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES FOR MACHINING OF Ti6Al4V#

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J.T. Conradie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Ti6Al4V is one of the most widely used titanium alloys in aerospace applications, but its machining remains a challenge. Comprehensive research has been done in the past, mainly investigating tool failure of various materials. Less research has been done to investigate the thermal effect of machining on work piece quality, including fatigue performance. Temperature measurement is considered to be a key enabling technology. This study presents an overview of current temperature measurement techniques for machined and tool surfaces. Two categories of methods were investigated: slower contact, and faster optical methods. Optical fibre two colour pyrometry experiments are reported that demonstrate the technique’s adequate response time. The infrared camera temperature measurement experiments synchronised temperature measurement with visual observation, aimed at mechanism analysis. The results corresponded with the literature.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Ti6Al4V is een van die mees gewilde lugvaart allooie, maar sy masjinering is ’n uitdaging. Bestaande navorsing dek beitelslytasie omvattend. Die termiese effek van masjinering op werkstuk integriteit, insluitend vermoeiingleeftyd, het egter veel minder dekking geniet. Temperatuurmeting wat in hierdie studie ondersoek word, word as ’n sleuteltegnologie beskou. Twee kategorië metodes is ondersoek, nl stadige kontakmetodes en optiese metodes met vinnige respons, wat die meting van oorgangsverskynsels moontlik maak. Eksperimentele werk wat beide optiese vesel tweekleurpirometrie en termiese kamera tegnieke insluit bewys die tegnieke as geskik vir die benodigde navorsing.

  12. In situ laser measurement of oxygen concentration and flue gas temperature utilizing chemical reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanen, J; Sorvajärvi, T; Toivonen, J

    2017-12-01

    Combustion research requires detailed localized information on the dynamic combustion conditions to improve the accuracy of the simulations and, hence, improve the performance of the combustion processes. We have applied chemical reaction kinetics of potassium to measure the local temperature and O 2 concentration in flue gas. An excess of free atomic potassium is created in the measurement volume by a photofragmenting precursor molecule such as potassium chloride or KOH which are widely released from solid fuels. The decay of the induced potassium concentration is followed with an absorption measurement using a narrow-linewidth diode laser. The temperature and O 2 concentration are solved from the decay curve features using equations obtained from calibration measurements in a temperature range of 800°C-1000°C and in O 2 concentrations of 0.1%-21%. The local flue gas temperature and O 2 concentration were recorded in real time during devolatilization, char burning, and ash cooking phases of combustion in a single-particle reactor with a 5 Hz repetition rate. The method can be further extended to other target species and applications where the chemical dynamics can be disturbed with photofragmentation.

  13. Electrochemical noise measurements of stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arganis-Juarez, C.R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares Km. 36.5, Carretera Federal Mexico-Toluca, Municipio de Ocoyoacac, C.P. 52045, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Malo, J.M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas Av. Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, C.P. 62490, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)], E-mail: jmmalo@iie.org.mx; Uruchurtu, J. [Centro de Investigaciones en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2007-12-15

    Corrosion in a high purity aqueous environment simulating a boiling water reactor (BWR) is addressed in this work. This condition necessitates autoclave experiments under high pressure and temperature. Long-term electrochemical noise measurements were explored as a mean to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking phenomenon. An experimental set up, designed to insulate the working electrode from external interference, made possible to detect and monitor stress corrosion cracking in slow strain rate tests for sensitized and solution annealed 304 stainless steel at 288 {sup o}C. Time-series analysis showed variations in the signature of the current density series due to transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC)

  14. Temperature in subsonic and supersonic radiation fronts measured at OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Heather; Kline, John; Lanier, Nick; Perry, Ted; Fontes, Chris; Fryer, Chris; Brown, Colin; Morton, John

    2017-10-01

    Propagation of heat fronts relevant to astrophysical plasmas is challenging in the supersonic regime. Plasma Te changes affect opacity and equation of state without hydrodynamic change. In the subsonic phase density perturbations form at material interfaces as the plasma responds to radiation pressure of the front. Recent experiments at OMEGA studied this transition in aerogel foams driven by a hohlraum. In COAX, two orthogonal backlighters drive x-ray radiography and K-shell absorption spectroscopy to diagnose the subsonic shape of the front and supersonic Te profiles. Past experiments used absorption spectroscopy in chlorinated foams to measure the heat front; however, Cl dopant is not suitable for higher material temperatures at NIF. COAX has developed use of Sc and Ti dopants to diagnose Te between 60-100eV and 100-180eV. Analysis with PrismSPECT using OPLIB tabular opacity data will evaluate the platform's ability to advance radiation transport in this regime.

  15. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  16. NASA CYGNSS Satellite Measurements and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. J.; Ruf, C. S.; Baker, N. L.; Green, D. S.; Stough, T.

    2017-12-01

    NASA launched the CYGNSS mission 15 December 2016 which comprises a constellation of eight satellites flying in a low inclination (tropical) Earth orbit. Each satellite measures up to four independent GPS signals scattered by the ocean, to obtain surface roughness, near surface wind speed, and air-sea latent heat flux. Utilizing such a large number of satellites, these measurements which are uniquely able to penetrate clouds and heavy precipitation, allows CYGNSS to frequently sample tropical cyclone intensification and of the diurnal cycle of winds. Additionally, data retrievals over land have proven effective to map surface water and soil moisture. Engineering commissioning of the constellation was successfully completed in March 2017 and the mission is now conducting science measurements. An overview of the CYGNSS system, mission and measurement concept will be presented, together with highlights of early on-orbit performance. Scientific results obtained during the 2017 hurricane season and featured at the NASA CYGNSS Applications Workshop in Monterey, CA 31 October - 2 November 2, 2017 will also be presented.

  17. Elevated temperature erosion studies on some materials for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianren.

    1991-01-01

    The surface degradation of materials due to high temperature erosion or combined erosion corrosion is a serious problem in many industrial and aeronautical applications. As such, it has become an important design consideration in many situations. The materials investigated in the present studies are stainless steels, Ti-6Al-4V, alumina ceramics, with and without silicate glassy phase, and zirconia. These are some of the potential materials for use in the high temperature erosive-corrosive environments. The erosion or erosion-corrosion experiments were performed in a high temperature sand-blast type of test rig. The variables studied included the temperature, material composition, heat treatment condition, impingement velocity and angle, erodent concentration, etc. The morphological features of the eroded or eroded-corroded surfaces, substrate deformation, and oxide characteristics were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis. The scratch test, single ball impact, and indentation tests were used to understand the behavior of oxide film in particle impacts. Based on these studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the mechanical or combined mechanical and chemical actions in erosion was developed

  18. Magnetostrictive device for high-temperature sound and vibration measurement in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, R.; Podgorski, J.

    1977-01-01

    The demands on the monitoring systems in nuclear power stations are increasing continuously, not only because of more stringent safety requirements but also for reasons of plant availability and thus economic efficiency. The noise and vibration measurements which therefore have to be taken make it necessary to provide measuring devices with a high degree of efficiency, adequate sensitivity and resistance to high temperatures, radiation and corrosion. Probes using the magnetostrictive effect, whereby a ferromagnetic core changes its length in a magnetic field - a phenomenon which has been known for approximately fifty years - fulfill all the conditions for application in nuclear power stations. (orig.) [de

  19. Small reactors for low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    In accordance with the Member States' calls for information exchange in the field of nuclear heat application (NHA) two IAEA meetings were organized already in 1976 and 1977. After this ''promising period'', the development of relevant programmes in IAEA Member States was slowed down and therefore only after several years interruption a new Technical Committee Meeting with a Workshop was organized in late 1983, to review the status of NHA, after a few new specific plans appeared in some IAEA Member States in the early 1980's for the use of heat from existing or constructed NPPs and for developing nuclear heating plants (NHP). In June 1987 an Advisory Group Meeting was convened in Winnipeg, Canada, to discuss and formulate a state-of-the-art review on ''Small Reactors for Low Temperature Nuclear Heat Application''. Information on this subject gained up to 1987 in the Member States whose experts attended this meeting is embodied in the present Technical Report. Figs and tabs

  20. New alloys for high temperature applications in incineration plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinz, H.P.; Koeck, W.

    1993-01-01

    The hot components of incineration plants exposed to temperatures between 800 and 1,200 C like boilers, grates, thermocouple sheaths and nozzles suffer from severe joint slag and hot gas attack. Considering corrosion resistance only, ceramic materials show excellent performance under these conditions. But because of the ceramics' brittleness metallic materials exhibit an overall advantage although being corroded faster. Within the class of suitable metals PM-ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened)-superalloys based on iron or nickel and PM-Cr-base-alloys are among the most promising ones. This can be derived from various laboratory and field tests which were performed up to now. Laboratory oxidation tests indicate that these new alloys can be used at temperatures up to 1,300 C in hot air. High temperature erosion tests with quartz particles show that PM 2,000 (Fe 19,5Cr5,5Al0,5Ti0,5Y 2 O 3 ) and Ducropur (99.7% Cr) have almost the same resistance against particle impact as alumina or zirconia at 900 C. The corresponding laboratory and field tests under typical joint slag and hot gas conditions at temperatures up to 1,200 C show good results for PM 2,000 and already lead to the actual application of boiler components. Extensive testing has been performed in the field of municipal waste incineration. Depending on temperature, slag and hot gas composition selected grades of the PM-ODS and Cr-base-alloy-group give satisfactory results in the field tests. In the pulp industry black liquor, an alkaline solution with high concentrations of organic waste, is incinerated for the recovery of caustic soda. Flame sprayed coatings of Ducrolloy Cr50Ni give a sixfold increase of the lifetime of the burner nozzles compared to unprotected stainless steel

  1. Coiling Temperature Control Using Temperature Measurement Method for the Hot Rolled Strip in the Water Cooling Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Shigemasa; Tachibana, Hisayoshi; Honda, Tatsuro; Uematsu, Chihiro

    In the hot strip mill, the quality of the strip greatly depends on the cooling process between the last stand in the finishing mill and the coilers. Therefore, it is important to carefully control the coiling temperature to regulate the mechanical properties of the strip. To realize high accuracy of coiling temperature, a new coiling temperature control using temperature measurement method for the hot rolled strip in the water cooling banks has been developed. The features of the new coiling temperature control are as follows: (i) New feedforward control adjusts ON/OFF swiching of cooling headers according to the strip temperature measured in the water cooling banks. (ii) New feedforward control is achieved by dynamic control function. This coiling temperature control has been in operation successfully since 2008 at Kashima Steel Works and improved the accuracy of coiling temperature of high strength steel considerably.

  2. High-temperature superconducting materials for power system applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of High-Temperature Superconductivity (HTS), essential for power system applications, in 1986 there has been a rapid progress in developing superconducting materials, wires and applications. Especially for large-scale power applications like rotating machines, transformers, cables, fault current limiters and superconducting magnetic energy storage devices a number of recent successful prototypes underlined the feasibility and superior technical performance of superconductor technology. A key to a successful application is the HTS material and its main parameters like e.g. E-J-curve, AC loss, homogeneity and cost performance ratio. This extended abstract describes the state-of-the-art of HTS material development and the main requirements and future R and D topics. The so-called second generation HTS wire is the most promising material mainly due to its low cost perspectives. This material is commercially available since 2006 and present manufacturing lengths exceed 1000 meters. The critical currents in long lengths have reached levels of more than 300 Amps per cm width and the performance of short samples with more than 1000 amps per cm width underline the future potential to further increase the current density. For the first time since the discovery of HTS material 2G HTS material has a chance to beat the cost performance ratio of copper. (orig.)

  3. Anisole fluorescence spectroscopy for temperature measurements with a Hg (Xe) arc lamp excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, P.; Kanumuri, S. S.; Bonnety, J.; Tran, K.-H.; Serio, B.; Bonnet, D.; Luc, J.; Lavayssiere, M.

    2017-04-01

    The main contribution of this study is to propose time-resolved measurements to determine temperature with a novel source of continuous excitation for an induced fluorescence technique with laser diagnosis based on tracer-induced fluorescence, which has become a major tool for experimental studies of fluid dynamics in reaction flows. We use a Hg (Xe) arc lamp as a continuous light source that has a wide range of emissions in wavelength. With this setup, one can reach high spatial and temporal resolution (temperature, pressure, species concentration, and velocity) to acquire quantitative data for the control of fluid thermal systems, such as engines, combustion chambers, furnaces, and reactors. A fluorescence study was performed on various tracers and their configurations. We focus on an anisole tracer using a broad wavelength of excitations. We propose a calibration to achieve temperature measurements in the range of 493-773 K and from 0.2 to 3.5 MPa of pressure. The temperature-dependent fluorescence is based on a two-line technique. The results give a better understanding of the influence of temperature and pressure in a nitrogen bath gas on the fluorescence photophysics in the UV domain. High temporal resolution was acquired using a high-speed intensified camera setup. The application of the photomultipliers manages the time-scale evolution of the flow in continuous emission and this eliminates the signal-to-noise ratio impact.

  4. Soft-X-ray electron temperature measurements on TORTUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    1984-02-01

    During June and July 1982, some 250 discharges were produced in the TORTUR tokamak. The discharges can be characterized roughly by the predischarge current peak of 40 to 45 kA at 2 ms, followed by a current plateau of 30 to 40 kA which lasted 20 to 30 ms. At 5 ms, Thomson scattering indicated a central Tsub(e) of about 900 eV which fell to a lasting temperature of 600 to 400 eV in discharges that were stigmatized 'mildly turbulent' for their high ohmic dissipation. Soft-X-ray measurements of Tsub(e) were carried out with PLATO, a 4-channel X-ray detector, in which two surface barrier diodes and two channeltrons were mounted. Tsub(e) was determined by means of the absorber foil technique. To that end four exchangeable Be absorber foils ranging in thickness from 30 to 100 micron were mounted in each channel. Every single discharge yielded 3 independent, time-resolved (resolution 100 μs) measurements of Tsub(e). (Auth.)

  5. High speed 2-dimensional temperature measurements of nanothermite composites: Probing thermal vs. Gas generation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Rohit J.; Kline, Dylan J.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates the reaction dynamics of metastable intermolecular composites through high speed spectrometry, pressure measurements, and high-speed color camera pyrometry. Eight mixtures including Al/CuO and Al/Fe2O3/xWO3 (x being the oxidizer mol. %) were reacted in a constant volume pressure cell as a means of tuning gas release and adiabatic temperature. A direct correlation between gas release, peak pressure, and pressurization rate was observed, but it did not correlate with temperature. When WO3 was varied as part of the stoichiometric oxidizer content, it was found that Al/Fe2O3/70% WO3 achieved the highest pressures and shortest burn time despite a fairly constant temperature between mixtures, suggesting an interplay between the endothermic Fe2O3 decomposition and the higher adiabatic flame temperature sustained by the Al/WO3 reaction in the composite. It is proposed that the lower ignition temperature of Al/WO3 leads to the initiation of the composite and its higher flame temperature enhances the gasification of Fe2O3, thus improving advection and propagation as part of a feedback loop that drives the reaction. Direct evidence of such gas release promoting reactivity was obtained through high speed pyrometry videos of the reaction. These results set the stage for nanoenergetic materials that can be tuned for specific applications through carefully chosen oxidizer mixtures.

  6. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor: reformer application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This Application Study evaluates the HTGR-R with a core outlet temperature of 850 0 C as a near-term Lead Project and as a vehicle to long-term HTGR Program objectives. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-R technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-R markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-R plants, and the evaluation of the program scope and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-R technology through the completion of the Lead Project. In order to properly assess the potential of the HTGR-R and the suitability of the HTGR-R as a Lead Project, additional work must be performed before a final judgment is rendered. Design trade-off studies and alternative applications must be investigated to determine if a commercial potential exists for the HTGR-R at 850 0 C. If commercial incentives are only identified for the HTGR-R with core outlet temperatures greater than 850 0 C, the design and development program duration and cost and the demonstration path for the HTGR-R must be reassessed

  7. Potential of low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    At present, more than one third of the fossil fuel currently used is being consumed to produce space heating and to meet industrial needs in many countries of the world. Imported oil still represents a large portion of this fossil fuel and despite its present relatively low price future market evolutions with consequent upward cost revisions cannot be excluded. Thus the displacement of the fossil fuel by cheaper low-temperature heat produced in nuclear power plants is a matter which deserves careful consideration. Technico-economic studies in many countries have shown that the use of nuclear heat is fully competitive with most of fossil-fuelled plants, the higher investment costs being offset by lower production cost. Another point in favour of heat generation by nuclear source is its indisputable advantage in terms of benefits to the environment. The IAEA activity plans for 1985-86 concentrate on information exchange with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications of heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and existing power plants backfitted for additional heat applications. The information gained up to 1985 was discussed during the Advisory Group Meeting on the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Applications held in the Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland in September 1985 and, is included in the present Technical Document

  8. Nuclear reactor application for high temperature power industrial processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollezhal', N.A.; Zaicho, N.D.; Alexeev, A.M.; Baturov, B.B.; Karyakin, Yu.I.; Nazarov, E.K.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Protzenko, A.M.; Chernyaev, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    This report gives the results of considerations on industrial heat and technology processes (in chemistry, steelmaking, etc.) from the point of view of possible ways, technical conditions and nuclear safety requirements for the use of high temperature reactors in these processes. Possible variants of energy-technological diagrams of nuclear-steelmaking, methane steam-reforming reaction and other processes, taking into account the specific character of nuclear fuel are also given. Technical possibilities and economic conditions of the usage of different types of high temperature reactors (gas cooled reactors and reactors which have other means of transport of nuclear heat) in heat processes are examined. The report has an analysis of the problem, that arises with the application of nuclear reactors in energy-technological plants and an evaluation of solutions of this problem. There is a reason to suppose that we will benefit from the use of high temperature reactors in comparison with the production based on high quality fossil fuel [ru

  9. Magnetic refrigeration--towards room-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, E.; Tegus, O.; Li, X.W.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Modern society relies very much on readily available cooling. Magnetic refrigeration based on the magneto-caloric effect (MCE) has become a promising competitive technology for the conventional gas-compression/expansion technique in use today. Recently, there have been two breakthroughs in magnetic-refrigeration research: one is that American scientists demonstrated the world's first room-temperature, permanent-magnet, magnetic refrigerator; the other one is that we discovered a new class of magnetic refrigerant materials for room-temperature applications. The new materials are manganese-iron-phosphorus-arsenic (MnFe(P,As)) compounds. This new material has important advantages over existing magnetic coolants: it exhibits a huge MCE, which is larger than that of Gd metal; and its operating temperature can be tuned from about 150 to about 335 K by adjusting the P/As ratio. Here we report on further improvement of the materials by increasing the Mn content. The large entropy change is attributed to a field-induced first-order phase transition enhancing the effect of the applied magnetic field. Addition of Mn reduces the thermal hysteresis, which is intrinsic to the first-order transition. This implies that already moderate applied magnetic fields of below 2 T may suffice

  10. SMEX03 Surface and Soil Temperature Measurements: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains land surface temperature and soil temperature data at depths of 1 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm collected during the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003...

  11. Northern Mariana Islands Marine Monitoring Team Sea Temperature Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site specific monitoring of sea temperature is conducted using submersible temperature dataloggers at selected sites and depths around the islands of Saipan and Rota.

  12. Artifacts in the measurement of skin temperature under infant radiant warmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, M H; Edwards, N K

    1985-01-01

    All skin temperature probes measure, to some extent, operative temperature as well as skin temperature, and thus artifactually measure a temperature different from true skin temperature. To assess the magnitude and direction of these artifacts in the measurement of surface temperature in radiant warmers designed for human infants, the artifactual deviation of measured surface temperatures from mean surface temperature was determined under a short-wavelength warmer and a long-wavelength radiant warmer, using a copper ball as an experimental model. The measurements were made using both a disk-shaped thermistor and a tubular thermistor. All measurements were made near the top of the hemisphere of the ball facing the heating element of the warmer. In all cases, the average artifact was negative. That is, even on the surface of the ball near the radiant heat source, the surface temperature probes recorded an artifactually low temperature. In the analogous clinical setting, a somewhat larger negative artifact would be expected.

  13. Measuring surface temperature of isolated neutron stars and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Marcus Alton

    New and exciting results for measuring neutron star surface temperatures began with the successful launch of the Chandra X-ray observatory. Among these results are new detections of neutron star surface temperatures which have made it possible to seriously test neutron star thermal evolution theories. The important new temperature determination of the Vela pulsar (Pavlov, et al., 2001a) requires a non-standard cooling scenario to explain it. Apart from this result, we have measured PSR B1055-52's surface temperature in this thesis, determining that it can be explained by standard cooling with heating. Our spectral fit of the combined data from ROSAT and Chandra have shown that a three component model, two thermal blackbodies and an non-thermal power-law, is required to explain the data. Furthermore, our phase resolved spectroscopy has begun to shed light on the geometry of the hot spot on PSR B1055-52's surface as well as the structure of the magnetospheric radiation. Also, there is strong evidence for a thermal distribution over its surface. Most importantly, the fact that PSR B1055-52 does not have a hydrogen atmosphere has been firmly established. To reconcile these two key observations, on the Vela pulsar and PSR B1055-52, we tested neutron star cooling with neutrino processes including the Cooper pair neutrino emission process. Overall, it has been found that a phase change associated with pions being present in the cores of more massive neutron stars explains all current of the data. A transition from neutron matter to pion condensates in the central stellar core explains the difference between standard and non-standard cooling scenarios, because the superfluid suppression of pion cooling will reduce the emissivity of the pion direct URCA process substantially. A neutron star with a mass of [Special characters omitted.] with a medium stiffness equation of state and a T72 type neutron superfluid models the standard cooling case well. A neutron star of [Special

  14. New experimental device for high-temperature normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honnerová, Petra; Martan, Jiří; Kučera, Martin; Honner, Milan; Hameury, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A new experimental device for normal spectral emissivity measurements of coatings in the infrared spectral range from 1.38 μm to 26 μm and in the temperature range from 550 K to 1250 K is presented. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) is used for the detection of sample and blackbody spectral radiation. Sample heating is achieved by a fiber laser with a scanning head. Surface temperature is measured by two methods. The first method uses an infrared camera and a reference coating with known effective emissivity, the second method is based on the combination of Christiansen wavelength with contact and noncontact surface temperature measurement. Application of the method is shown on the example of a high-temperature high-emissivity coating. Experimental results obtained with this apparatus are compared with the results performed by a direct method of Laboratoire National d’Essais (LNE) in France. The differences in the spectra are analyzed. (paper)

  15. Ion temperature profile measurements using the far line wings of Hα

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson, R.D.; Boedo, J.; Rowan, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents ion temperature profiles for the outer half of the TEXT plasma using the Doppler broadened far line wings of the H α line profile. The technique depends on the assumption that the hydrogen neutrals have equilibrated with the ions through charge exchange collisions. Data reduction depends upon going far enough out on the line wing that the intensity profile is characteristic of the hottest portion of the plasma along the line of sight, thus removing the need for an inversion procedure. A Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to measure the line profiles because of its superior instrumental profile. This technique is compared with the charge exchange technique and Doppler broadening of impurities. The application to ion temperature measurements using a diagnostic neutral beam is also discussed

  16. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and pressure by a single fiber Bragg grating with a broadened reflection spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Qiao, Xueguang; Jia, Zhenan; Zhao, Qida; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2006-05-01

    Simultaneous measurement of temperature and pressure with a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based on a broadened reflection spectrum is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A novel double-hole structure of a cantilever beam is designed, and a FBG is affixed on the nonuniform strain area of the cantilever beam. The Bragg reflection bandwidth is sensitive to the spatially gradient strain but is free from the spatially uniform temperature. The wavelength peak shift and the bandwidth broadening of the FBG with a change of temperature and pressure allow for simultaneous discrimination between the temperature and the pressure effects. Standard deviation errors of 1.4 degrees C and 1.8 kPa were obtained with temperature and pressure ranges of 20 degrees C-100 degrees C and 0-80 kPa, respectively. This novel and low-cost sensor approach has considerable potential applications for temperature-insensitive strain measurement.

  17. Temperature measurement of burning aluminum powder based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huijuan; Hao, Xiaojian; Hu, Xiaotao

    2018-01-01

    In the case of conventional contact temperature measurement, there is a delay phenomenon and high temperature resistant materials limitation. By using the faster response speed and theoretically no upper limit of the non-contact temperature method, the measurement system based on the principle of double line atomic emission spectroscopy temperature measurement is put forward, the structure and theory of temperature measuring device are introduced. According to the atomic spectrum database (ASD), Aluminum(Al) I 690.6 nm and Al I 708.5 nm are selected as the two lines in the temperature measurement. The intensity ratio of the two emission lines was measured by a spectrometer to obtain the temperature of Al burning in pure oxygen, and the result compared to the temperature measured by the thermocouple. It turns out that the temperature correlation between the two methods is good, and it proves the feasibility of the method.

  18. Improving high-temperature measurements in nuclear reactors with Mo/Nb thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, J. F.; Fourmentel, D.; Legrand, A.; Fourrez, S.

    2008-01-01

    Many irradiation experiments performed in research reactors are used to assess the effects of nuclear radiations on material or fuel sample properties, and are therefore a crucial stage in most qualification and innovation studies regarding nuclear technologies. However, monitoring these experiments requires accurate and reliable instrumentation. Among all measurement systems implemented in irradiation devices, temperature-and more particularly high-temperature (above 1000 degrees C)-is a major parameter for future experiments related, for example, to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Program or the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project. In this context, the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) develops and qualifies innovative in-pile instrumentation for its irradiation experiments in current and future research reactors. Logically, a significant part of these research and development programs concerns the improvement of in-pile high-temperature measurements. This article describes the development and qualification of innovative high-temperature thermocouples specifically designed for in-pile applications. This key study has been achieved with technical contributions from the Thermocoax Company. This new kind of thermocouple is based on molybdenum and niobium thermo-elements, which remain nearly unchanged by thermal neutron flux even under harsh nuclear environments, whereas typical high-temperature thermocouples such as Type C or Type S are altered by significant drifts caused by material transmutations under the same conditions. This improvement has a significant impact on the temperature measurement capabilities for future irradiation experiments. Details of the successive stages of this development are given, including the results of prototype qualification tests and the manufacturing process. (authors)

  19. Measures and applications of quantum correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information theory is built upon the realisation that quantum resources like coherence and entanglement can be exploited for novel or enhanced ways of transmitting and manipulating information, such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, and quantum computing. We now know that there is potentially much more than entanglement behind the power of quantum information processing. There exist more general forms of non-classical correlations, stemming from fundamental principles such as the necessary disturbance induced by a local measurement, or the persistence of quantum coherence in all possible local bases. These signatures can be identified and are resilient in almost all quantum states, and have been linked to the enhanced performance of certain quantum protocols over classical ones in noisy conditions. Their presence represents, among other things, one of the most essential manifestations of quantumness in cooperative systems, from the subatomic to the macroscopic domain. In this work we give an overview of the current quest for a proper understanding and characterisation of the frontier between classical and quantum correlations (QCs) in composite states. We focus on various approaches to define and quantify general QCs, based on different yet interlinked physical perspectives, and comment on the operational significance of the ensuing measures for quantum technology tasks such as information encoding, distribution, discrimination and metrology. We then provide a broader outlook of a few applications in which quantumness beyond entanglement looks fit to play a key role. (topical review)

  20. Determination of temperature and concentrations of main components in flames by fitting measured Raman spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sepman, A. V.; Toro, V.V.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    The procedure of deriving flame temperature and major species concentrations by fitting measured Raman spectra in hydrocarbon flames is described. The approach simplifies the calibration procedure to determine temperature and major species concentrations from the measured Raman spectra. The