WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature liquid plasma

  1. A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model also emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Evidence that the Sun is a high density/high energy plasma is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

  2. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; R. Doerner; G. Antar; M. Baldwin; R. Conn; P. Efthimion; M. Finkenthal; D. Hoffman; B. Jones; S. Krashenninikov; H. Kugel; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; J. Menard; T. Munsat; D. Stutman; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; V. Soukhanovskii; D. Whyte; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov

    2002-10-15

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors.

  3. Liquid Lithium Limiter Effects on Tokamak Plasmas and Plasma-Liquid Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.; Efthimion, P.; Finkenthal, M.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Krashenninikov, S.; Kugel, H.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Stutman, D.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Whyte, D.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors

  4. Liquid lithium limiter effects on tokamak plasmas and plasma-liquid surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from the first experiments with a large area liquid lithium limiter in a magnetic fusion device, and its effect on improving plasma performance by reducing particle recycling. Using large area liquid metal surfaces in any major fusion device is unlikely before a test on a smaller scale. This has motivated its demonstration in the CDX-U spherical torus with a unique, fully toroidal lithium limiter. The highest current discharges were obtained with a liquid lithium limiter. There was a reduction in recycling, as indicated by a significant decrease in the deuterium-alpha emission and oxygen radiation. How these results might extrapolate to reactors is suggested in recycling/retention experiments with liquid lithium surfaces under high-flux deuterium and helium plasma bombardment in PISCES-B. Data on deuterium atoms retained in liquid lithium indicate retention of all incident ions until full volumetric conversion to lithium deuteride. The PISCES-B results also show a material loss mechanism that lowers the maximum operating temperature compared to that for the liquid surface equilibrium vapor pressure. This may restrict the lithium temperature in reactors. (author)

  5. Edge-plasma analysis for liquid-wall MFE concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    A thick flowing layer of liquid (e.g., flibe - a molten salt, or Sn 80 Li 20 - a liquid metal) protects the structural walls of the magnetic fusion configuration so that they can last the life of the plant even with intense 14 MeV neutron bombardment from the D-T fusion reaction. The surface temperature of the liquid rises as it passes from the inlet nozzles to the exit nozzles due to absorption of line and bremsstrahlung radiation, and neutrons. The surface temperature can be reduced by enhanced turbulent convection of hot surface liquid into the cooler interior. This surface temperature is affected by the temperature of liquid from a heat transport and energy recovery system. The evaporative flux from the wall driven by the surface temperature must also result in an acceptable impurity level in the core plasma. The shielding of the core by the edge plasma is modeled with a 2D-transport code for the DT and impurity ions; these impurity ions are either swept out to the divertor, or diffuse to the hot plasma core. An auxiliary plasma between the edge plasma and the liquid wall may further attenuate evaporating flux of atoms and molecules by ionization near the wall. (author)

  6. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  7. Microscopic Motion of Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components In A Diverted Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworski, M.A.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Morley, N.B.; Abrams, T.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kugel, H.; Majeski, R.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) have been identified as an alternative material for fusion plasma experiments. The use of a liquid conductor where significant magnetic fields are present is considered risky, with the possibility of macroscopic fluid motion and possible ejection into the plasma core. Analysis is carried out on thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) forces caused by temperature gradients in the liquid-container system itself in addition to scrape-off-layer currents interacting with the PFC from a diverted plasma. Capillary effects at the liquid-container interface will be examined which govern droplet ejection criteria. Stability of the interface is determined using linear stability methods. In addition to application to liquidmetal PFCs, thin film liquidmetal effects have application to current and future devices where off-normal events may liquefy portions of the first wall and other plasma facing components.

  8. Plasma interaction with liquid lithium: Measurements of retention and erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, M.J. E-mail: mbaldwin@ferp.ucsd.edu; Doerner, R.P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.G.; Conn, R.W

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports on recent studies of high flux deuterium and helium plasma interaction with liquid lithium in the Pisces-B edge plasma simulator facility. Deuterium retention is explored as a function of plasma ion fluence in the range 6x10{sup 19}-4x10{sup 22} atoms cm{sup -2} and exposure temperatures of 523-673 K. The results are consistent with full uptake of the deuterium ions incident on the liquid metal surface, independent of the temperature of the liquid lithium. Full uptake continues until the sample is volumetrically converted to lithium deuteride. Helium retention is not observed for fluences up to 5x10{sup 21} He atoms cm{sup -2}. Measurements of the erosion of lithium are found to be consistent with physical sputtering for the lithium solid phase. However, a mechanism that provides an increased evaporative-like yield and is related to ion impact events on the surface, dominates during the liquid phase leading to an enhanced loss rate for liquid lithium that is greater than the expected loss rate due to evaporation at elevated temperatures. Further, the material loss rate is found to depend linearly on the incident ion flux, even at very high temperature.

  9. Plasma-liquid system with rotational gliding discharge with liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Solomenko, O.V; Martysh, E.V.; Fedirchuk, I.I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-liquid system based on rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode was developed. Emission spectra of plasma of rotational gliding discharge with one liquid electrode were investigated. Discovered effective mechanism of controlling non-isothermal level of plasma in dynamic plasma-liquid systems. Major mechanism of expulsion of metal anode material from plasma-liquid systems with rotational discharges was shown.

  10. Plasmas in Multiphase Media: Bubble Enhanced Discharges in Liquids and Plasma/Liquid Phase Boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushner, Mark Jay [University of Michigan

    2014-07-10

    In this research project, the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with multi-phase media was computationally investigated. Multi-phase media includes liquids, particles, complex materials and porous surfaces. Although this investigation addressed fundamental plasma transport and chemical processes, the outcomes directly and beneficially affected applications including biotechnology, medicine and environmental remediation (e.g., water purification). During this project, we made advances in our understanding of the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas in the form of dielectric barrier discharges and plasma jets with organic materials and liquids. We also made advances in our ability to use computer modeling to represent these complex processes. We determined the method that atmospheric pressure plasmas flow along solid and liquid surfaces, and through endoscopic like tubes, deliver optical and high energy ion activation energy to organic and liquid surfaces, and produce reactivity in thin liquid layers, as might cover a wound. We determined the mechanisms whereby plasmas can deliver activation energy to the inside of liquids by sustaining plasmas in bubbles. These findings are important to the advancement of new technology areas such as plasma medicine

  11. Coupling of Plasmas and Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander David

    Plasma-liquids have exciting applications to several important socioeconomic areas, including agriculture, water treatment, and medicine. To realize their application potential, the basic physical and chemical phenomena of plasma-liquid systems must be better understood. Additionally, system designs must be optimized in order to maximize fluxes of critical plasma species to the liquid phase. With objectives to increase understanding of these systems and optimize their applications, we have performed both comprehensive modeling and experimental work. To date, models of plasma-liquids have focused on configurations where diffusion is the dominant transport process in both gas and liquid phases. However, convection plays a key role in many popular plasma source designs, including jets, corona discharges, and torches. In this dissertation, we model momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer in a convection-dominated system based on a corona discharge. We show that evaporative cooling produced by gas-phase convection can lead to a significant difference between gas and liquid phase bulk temperatures. Additionally, convection induced in the liquid phase by the gas phase flow substantially increases interfacial mass transfer of hydrophobic species like NO and NO2. Finally, liquid kinetic modeling suggests that concentrations of highly reactive species like OH and ONOOH are several orders of magnitude higher at the interface than in the solution bulk. Subsequent modeling has focused on coupling discharge physics with species transport at and through the interface. An assumption commonly seen in the literature is that interfacial loss coefficients of charged species like electrons are equal to unity. However, there is no experimental evidence to either deny or support this assumption. Without knowing the true interfacial behavior of electrons, we have explored the effects on key plasma-liquid variables of varying interfacial parameters like the electron and energy

  12. The Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Deuterium Retention in Solid and Liquid Lithium Films on Molybdenum Plasma-Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela

    2014-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) enable in-situ renewal of the surface, thereby offering a solution to neutron damage, erosion, and thermal fatigue experienced by solid PFCs. Lithium in particular has a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, which has resulted in reduced recycling and enhanced plasma performance on many fusion devices including TFTR, T11-M, FTU, CDX-U, LTX, TJ-II, and NSTX. A key component to the improvement in plasma performance is deuterium retention in Li; however, this process is not well understood in the complex tokamak environment. Recent surface science experiments conducted at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have used electron spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption to understand the mechanisms for D retention in Li coatings on Mo substrates. The experiments were designed to give monolayer-control of Li films and were conducted in ultrahigh vacuum under controlled environments. An electron cyclotron resonance plasma source was used to deliver a beam of deuterium ions to the surface over a range of ion energies. Our work shows that D is retained as LiD in metallic Li films. However, when oxygen is present in the film, either by diffusion from the subsurface at high temperature or as a contaminant during the deposition process, Li oxides are formed that retain D as LiOD. Experiments indicate that LiD is more thermally stable than LiOD, which decomposes to liberate D2 gas and D2O at temperatures 100 K lower than the LiD decomposition temperature. Other experiments show how D retention varies with substrate temperature to provide insight into the differences between solid and liquid lithium films. This work was supported by DOE Contract No. DE AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Effects of Large Area Liquid Lithium Limiters on Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gray, T.; Hoffman, D.; Jardin, S.; Kugel, H.; Marfuta, P.; Munsat, T.; Neumeyer, C.; Raftopoulos, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.W.; Maingi, R.; Menon, M.; Causey, R.; Buchenauer, D.; Ulrickson, M.; Jones, B.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a first wall has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter

  14. Effects of large area liquid lithium limiters on spherical torus plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gray, T.; Hoffman, D.; Jardin, S.; Kugel, H.; Marfuta, P.; Munsat, T.; Neumeyer, C.; Raftopoulos, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Seraydarian, R.P.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Baldwin, M.; Conn, R.W.; Maingi, R.; Menon, M.; Causey, R.; Buchenauer, D.; Ulrickson, M.; Jones, B.; Rodgers, D.

    2005-01-01

    Use of a large-area liquid lithium surface as a limiter has significantly improved the plasma performance in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Previous CDX-U experiments with a partially-covered toroidal lithium limiter tray have shown a decrease in impurities and the recycling of hydrogenic species. Improvements in loading techniques have permitted nearly full coverage of the tray surface with liquid lithium. Under these conditions, there was a large drop in the loop voltage needed to sustain the plasma current. The data are consistent with simulations that indicate more stable plasmas having broader current profiles, higher temperatures, and lowered impurities with liquid lithium walls. As further evidence for reduced recycling with a liquid lithium limiter, the gas puffing had to be increased by up to a factor of eight for the same plasma density achieved with an empty toroidal tray limiter

  15. Plasma Reforming of Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels in Non-Thermal Plasma-Liquid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    channel with liquid wall in the microporous media under the ultrasound cavitations has shown the following: · The action of the ultrasound field in the...microporous liquid which has a very large ratio of the plasma-liquid contact surface to the plasma volume. As is known the ultrasonic (US) cavitation is a very...2) and it ran over a flat dielectric surface of the magnetostrictive transmitter (5) which produced ultrasonic (US) cavitations , so the discharge

  16. A new facility for studying plasma interacting with flowing liquid lithium surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, X.; Ou, W.; Tian, S.; Wang, C.; Zhu, Z.; Wang, J.; Gou, F.; Yang, D.; Chen, S.

    2014-01-01

    A new facility to study plasmas interacting with flowing liquid lithium surface was designed and is constructing in Sichuan University. The integrated setup includes the liquid lithium circulating part and linear high density plasma generator. The circulating part is consisted of main loop, on-line monitor system, lithium purification system and temperature programmed desorption system. In our group a linear high density plasma generator was built in 2012. Three coils were mounted along the vessel to produce an axial magnetic field inside. The magnetic field strength is up to 0.45 T and work continuously. Experiments on plasmas interacting with free flowing liquid lithium surface will be performed

  17. Structure of liquid alkali metals as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, D.K.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-08-01

    The static structure factor of liquid alkali metals near freezing, and its dependence on temperature and pressure, are evaluated in an electron-ion plasma model from an accurate theoretical determination of the structure factor of the one-component classical plasma and electron-screening theory. Very good agreement is obtained with the available experimental data. (author)

  18. Exposure of liquid lithium confined in a capillary structure to high plasma fluxes in PILOT-PSI—Influence of temperature on D retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Rojo, A.B., E-mail: anabmr2010@hotmail.com [Ciemat, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Oyarzabal, E. [Ciemat, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fundación UNED Guzman el Bueno, 133, 28003 Madrid (Spain); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Tabarés, F.L. [Ciemat, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Av Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    Experiments on deuterium retention on liquid lithium confined in a capillary structure followed by ex-situ thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) at high plasma fluxes (∼10{sup 23} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}) and high temperatures (440 °C and 580 °C) have been performed. Deuterium plasmas were generated at the PILOT-PSI linear plasma device and the targets were a 30 mm diameter stainless steel disc, 5 mm thick, covered with a porous mesh and filled with lithium. The settings (current) of the plasma source were varied in order to get different sample surface temperatures during irradiation. The targets were kept at floating potential during the exposure. Hydrogen and Li emission signals were monitored during the plasma exposure and TDS analysis was made afterwards in a separated system. Decreased retention at high exposure temperatures was deduced from the analysis of the hydrogen emission signals. Nevertheless, the results from TDS signal analysis were not conclusive.

  19. ISTTOK tokamak plasmas influence on a liquid gallium jet dynamic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Nedzelskiy, I.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern in using free flowing liquid metals in fusion devices is related to their interaction with magnetic fields. On ISTTOK tokamak, liquid gallium jets are injected deep into the plasma along a vertical direction. The influence of the plasma interaction on the jet has been investigated monitoring the liquid metal behavior using a fast frame camera. A radial shift on its trajectory has been detected and found to depend on the toroidal magnetic field magnitude and principally on the plasma position within the chamber. The analysis performed to understand the dynamics of the jet perturbation by the plasma is presented in this paper. The jet surface temperature increase during this interaction has also been measured, using absolutely calibrated multichannel IR sensors, to evaluate the jet power exhaustion capability.

  20. ISTTOK tokamak plasmas influence on a liquid gallium jet dynamic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, R.B., E-mail: gomes@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Nedzelskiy, I. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E. [Association EURATOM/University of Latvia, Institute of Solid State Physics, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia)

    2011-08-01

    The main concern in using free flowing liquid metals in fusion devices is related to their interaction with magnetic fields. On ISTTOK tokamak, liquid gallium jets are injected deep into the plasma along a vertical direction. The influence of the plasma interaction on the jet has been investigated monitoring the liquid metal behavior using a fast frame camera. A radial shift on its trajectory has been detected and found to depend on the toroidal magnetic field magnitude and principally on the plasma position within the chamber. The analysis performed to understand the dynamics of the jet perturbation by the plasma is presented in this paper. The jet surface temperature increase during this interaction has also been measured, using absolutely calibrated multichannel IR sensors, to evaluate the jet power exhaustion capability.

  1. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K.

    2013-05-01

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (ne) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d104d1 2D3/2-3d104p1 2P3/2 at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (Te) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ˜590 nm.

  2. Transient effects caused by pulsed gas and liquid injections into low pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, D; Goeckner, M; Overzet, L; Chung, C W

    2010-01-01

    The fast injection of liquid droplets into a glow discharge causes significant time variations in the pressure, the chemical composition of the gas and the phases present (liquid and/or solid along with gas). While the variations can be large and important, very few studies, especially kinetic studies, have been published. In this paper we examine the changes brought about in argon plasma by injecting Ar (gas), N 2 (gas) hexane (gas) and hexane (liquid droplets). The changes in the RF capacitively coupled power (forward and reflected), electron and ion density (n e , n i ), electron temperature (T e ) and optical emissions were monitored during the injections. It was found that the Ar injection (pressure change only) caused expected variations. The electron temperature reduced, the plasma density increased and the optical emission intensity remained nearly constant. The N 2 and hexane gas injections (chemical composition and pressure changes) also followed expected trends. The plasma densities increased and electron temperature decreased while the optical emissions changed from argon to the injected gas. These all serve to highlight the fact that the injection of evaporating hexane droplets in the plasma caused very little change. This is because the number of injected droplets is too small to noticeably affect the plasma, even though the shift in the chemical composition of the gas caused by evaporation from those same droplets can be very significant. The net conclusion is that using liquid droplets to inject precursors for low pressure plasmas is both feasible and controllable.

  3. Fuel gas production by microwave plasma in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Tawara, Michinaga; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kenya

    2006-01-01

    We propose to apply plasma in liquid to replace gas-phase plasma because we expect much higher reaction rates for the chemical deposition of plasma in liquid than for chemical vapor deposition. A reactor for producing microwave plasma in a liquid could produce plasma in hydrocarbon liquids and waste oils. Generated gases consist of up to 81% hydrogen by volume. We confirmed that fuel gases such as methane and ethylene can be produced by microwave plasma in liquid

  4. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  5. Hydrogen and helium recycling from stirred liquid lithium under steady state plasma bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Yoshi, E-mail: hirooka.yoshihiko@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); The Graduate School for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Zhou, Haishan [The Graduate School for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ono, Masa [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    For improved core performance via edge plasma-wall boundary control, solid and liquid lithium has been used as a plasma-facing material in a number of confinement experiments over the past several decades. Unfortunately, it is unavoidable that lithium is saturated in the surface region with implanted hydrogenic species as well as oxygen-containing impurities. For steady state operation, a flowing liquid lithium divertor with forced convection would probably be required. In the present work, the effects of liquid stirring to simulate forced convection have been investigated on the behavior of hydrogen and helium recycling from molten lithium at temperatures up to ∼350 °C. Data indicate that liquid stirring reactivates hydrogen pumping via surface de-saturation and/or uncovering impurity films, but can also induce helium release via surface temperature change.

  6. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed

  7. Chemically reactive species in liquids generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas and their roles in plasma medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamaguchi, Satoshi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Plasmas whose gas temperatures are close to room temperature may be generated in ambient air or a gas at atmospheric pressure with the use of low-frequency high voltage or low-power radio-frequency (RF) or microwave power applied to electrodes. Such plasmas can serve as a powerful source of free radicals and/or chemically reactive species that arise from atoms and molecules of the ambient gas. Recently use of such plasmas for medical purposes has attracted much attention as they can be implemented in possible medical devices that can cause blood coagulation, heal wounds, facilitate angiogenesis, sterilize surgical devices as well as living tissues without harming healthy cells, and selectively inactivate cancer cells. Especially of interest among reactive species generated by atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APP) are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that are generated in liquid phase. Since most living tissues and cells are immersed in liquids (such as blood or culture media), reactive species generated by APPs in the gas phase are transported to the liquid phase and possibly converted to different types of reactive species therein before causing some influence on the tissues or cells. In this study, the rate equations are solved to evaluate concentrations of various reactive species in pure water that are originated by plasma reactions in atmosphere and possible effects of such species (including ROS/RNS) on living tissues and cells are discussed.

  8. Static gas-liquid interfacial direct current discharge plasmas using ionic liquid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, T.; Baba, K.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we have succeeded in creating the static and stable gas (plasmas)-liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field using a direct current discharge under a low gas pressure condition. It is clarified that the ionic liquid works as a nonmetal liquid electrode, and furthermore, a secondary electron emission coefficient of the ionic liquid is larger than that of conventional metal electrodes. The plasma potential structure of the gas-liquid interfacial region, and resultant interactions between the plasma and the ionic liquid are revealed by changing a polarity of the electrode in the ionic liquid. By utilizing the ionic liquid as a cathode electrode, the positive ions in the plasma region are found to be irradiated to the ionic liquid. This ion irradiation causes physical and chemical reactions at the gas-liquid interfacial region without the vaporization of the ionic liquid.

  9. Deuterium trapping in liquid lithium irradiated by deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarev, A.; Moshkunov, K.; Vizgalov, I.; Gasparyan, Yu.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid lithium was irradiated by deuterium plasma to a low fluence of 10 22 –10 23 D/m 2 , cooled down to room temperature, and then slowly heated. The temperature and release rate were measured during heating. Two plateaus on the temperature–time dependence were observed at 180 °C and 660 °C. The first one corresponds to melting of Li and the second one – either to melting or to decomposition of solid LiD. Features of deuterium release in TDS were interpreted in terms of decomposition of lithium deuterides formed during plasma irradiation

  10. Interactions of solid and liquid lithium with steady state hydrogen and helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Nishikawa, M.; Ohgaki, H.; Ohtsuka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of innovative Plasma-Facing Component (PFC) concepts, employing moving solid or liquid surfaces, have recently been proposed in order to resolve technical issues, associated with the applications of currently used PFCs in future steady state fusion devices. As the first step to evaluate the concept using flowing-liquids for PFCs, steady state hydrogen and helium plasma interactions with solid and standing liquid lithium have been investigated in the present work, using the H α and He-I spectroscopy at the ion bombarding energies up to 150eV and at the lithium temperatures between room temperature and 480 deg C. Data indicate that hydrogen recycling over liquid lithium is clearly reduced, relative to that over solid lithium, whereas helium recycling does not show the same trend. From the kinetic analysis of these recycling time constant data, the activation energies for the overall recycling processes have been evaluated to be 0.02±0.01eV, both for hydrogen and helium plasmas. Also, it has been found that the activation energy is nearly independent of ion bombarding energy. (author)

  11. Evaluation of compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Huang Jinhua; Peng Lilin; Yan Jiancheng

    2003-01-01

    A global model analysis of the compatibility of flowing liquid lithium curtain for blanket with core plasma has been performed. The relationships between the surface temperature of lithium curtain and mean effective plasma charges, fuel dilution and produced fusion power have been obtained. Results show that under normal circumstances, the evaporation of liquid lithium does not affect Z eff seriously, but affects fuel dilution and fusion power sensitively. The authors have investigated the relationships between the flow velocity of liquid lithium and its surface temperature rise based on the conditions of the option II of the fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) design with reversed shear configuration and fairly high power density. The authors concluded that the effects of evaporation from liquid lithium curtain for FEB-E on plasma are negligible even if the flow velocity of liquid lithium is as low as 0.5 m·s -1 . Finally, the sputtering yield of liquid lithium saturated by hydrogen isotopes is briefly discussed

  12. Laser ablated copper plasmas in liquid and gas ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2013-05-15

    The dynamics of copper ablated plasma plumes generated using laser ablation of copper targets in both liquid (de-ionized water) and gas (air) ambients is reported. Using time and space resolved visible emission spectroscopy (450-650 nm), the plasma plumes parameters are investigated. The electron density (n{sub e}) determined using Stark broadening of the Cu I (3d{sup 10}4d{sup 1} {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}-3d{sup 10}4p{sup 1} {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} at 521.8 nm) line is estimated and compared for both plasma plumes. The electron temperature (T{sub e}) was estimated using the relative line emission intensities of the neutral copper transitions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectral analysis of the ablated copper surface indicated abundance of spherical nanoparticles in liquid while those in air are amalgamates of irregular shapes. The nanoparticles suspended in the confining liquid form aggregates and exhibit a surface plasmon resonance at ∼590 nm.

  13. One-Step Reforming of CO2 and CH4 into High-Value Liquid Chemicals and Fuels at Room Temperature by Plasma-Driven Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Yi, Yanhui; Wu, Chunfei; Guo, Hongchen; Tu, Xin

    2017-10-23

    The conversion of CO 2 with CH 4 into liquid fuels and chemicals in a single-step catalytic process that bypasses the production of syngas remains a challenge. In this study, liquid fuels and chemicals (e.g., acetic acid, methanol, ethanol, and formaldehyde) were synthesized in a one-step process from CO 2 and CH 4 at room temperature (30 °C) and atmospheric pressure for the first time by using a novel plasma reactor with a water electrode. The total selectivity to oxygenates was approximately 50-60 %, with acetic acid being the major component at 40.2 % selectivity, the highest value reported for acetic acid thus far. Interestingly, the direct plasma synthesis of acetic acid from CH 4 and CO 2 is an ideal reaction with 100 % atom economy, but it is almost impossible by thermal catalysis owing to the significant thermodynamic barrier. The combination of plasma and catalyst in this process shows great potential for manipulating the distribution of liquid chemical products in a given process. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Josephson plasma resonance in vortex filament state of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yuji; Gaifullin, M.B.

    1996-01-01

    High temperature superconductors have the crystalline structure in which two-dimensional CuO 2 planes are piled in layers, consequently, the anisotropy of electroconductivity arises, and this brings about stable and low energy Josephson plasma in superconducting state. Also as to the vortex filament state of high temperature superconductors, the effect of thermal fluctuation due to low dimensionality, short coherence length and high transition temperature becomes conspicuous. In reality, these plasma and vortex filament state are related closely. Light reflection and plasma edge in superconducting state, Josephson plasma resonance in the vortex filament state of BiO 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ , the plasma vibration in Josephson junction, Josephson plasma in magnetic field, Josephson plasma in the liquid state of vortex filament, Josephson plasma in the solid state of vortex filament, and Josephson plasma in parallel magnetic field are reported. The Josephson plasma resonance is the experimental means for exploring vortex filament state from microscopic standpoint, and its development hereafter is expected. (K.I.)

  15. Plasma-liquid system with reverse vortex flow of 'tornado' type (TORNADO-LE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybalyuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya.; Olszewski, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the plasma in plasma-liquid system with reverse vortex flow of 'tornado' type are presented. Volt-ampere characteristic of discharge in the current range from 200 to 400 mA were measured. Emission spectra of plasma in range from 200 to 1100 nm were measured. Excitation temperatures (electronic T e * , vibrational T v * and rotational T r * ) were obtained. Emission spectra of hydroxyl OH were calculated.

  16. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  17. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T rot ), excitation temperature (T exc ), electron number density (n e ), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N 2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10 15 cm −3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source ( 3 volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary excitation source for laser-ablated (LA

  18. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  19. Characterization of fueling NSTX H-mode plasmas diverted to a liquid lithium divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R., E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kugel, H.W.; Abrams, T. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Allain, J.P. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Gerhardt, S.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Heim, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jaworski, M.A., E-mail: mjaworsk@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kallman, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mansfield, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); McLean, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Menard, J.; Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); and others

    2013-07-15

    Deuterium fueling experiments were conducted with the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). Lithium evaporation recoated the LLD surface to approximate flowing liquid Li to sustain D retention. In the first experiment with the diverted outer strike point on the LLD, the difference between the applied D gas input and the plasma D content reached very high values without disrupting the plasma, as would normally occur in the absence of Li pumping, and there was also little change in plasma D content. In the second experiment, constant fueling was applied, as the LLD temperature was varied to change the surface from solid to liquid. The D retention was relatively constant, and about the same as that for solid Li coatings on graphite, or twice that achieved without Li PFC coatings. Contamination of the LLD surface was also possible due to compound formation and erosion and redeposition from carbon PFCs.

  20. Synthetic Plasma Liquid Based Electronic Circuits Realization-A Novel Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Killol V; Kosta, ShivPrasad

    2016-09-01

    Biomedical research is contributing significant role in the field of biomedical engineering and applied science. It brings research and innovations to a different level. This study investigated artificial human blood -synthetic plasma liquid as conductive medium. Keeping in mind the conductivity of synthetic plasma, astable multivibrator as well as differential amplifier circuit were demonstrated. The circuits were given normal input voltages at regular temperature and ideal conditions. The result shows desired response which supports the novel concept. For both the circuits, phase shift of 180° achieved by analysing biological electronic circuits.

  1. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Amanda M.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma-liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed.

  2. Liquid-metal plasma-facing component research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Khodak, A.; Kaita, R.

    2013-12-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) have been proposed as a means of solving several problems facing the creation of economically viable fusion power reactors. Liquid metals face critical issues in three key areas: free-surface stability, material migration and demonstration of integrated scenarios. To date, few demonstrations exist of this approach in a diverted tokamak and we here provide an overview of such work on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The liquid lithium divertor (LLD) was installed and operated for the 2010 run campaign using evaporated coatings as the filling method. Despite a nominal liquid level exceeding the capillary structure and peak current densities into the PFCs exceeding 100 kA m-2, no macroscopic ejection events were observed. The stability can be understood from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability analysis. Capillary restraint and thermal-hydraulic considerations lead to a proposed liquid-metal PFCs scheme of actively-supplied, capillary-restrained systems. Even with state-of-the-art cooling techniques, design studies indicate that the surface temperature with divertor-relevant heat fluxes will still reach temperatures above 700 °C. At this point, one would expect significant vapor production from a liquid leading to a continuously vapor-shielded regime. Such high-temperature liquid lithium PFCs may be possible on the basis of momentum-balance arguments.

  3. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  4. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manard, Benjamin T. [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gonzalez, Jhanis J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sarkar, Arnab [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marcus, R. Kenneth [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (T{sub rot}), excitation temperature (T{sub exc}), electron number density (n{sub e}), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N{sub 2} and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ∼ 1000 K and ∼ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (< 1 mm{sup 3} volume), the LS-APGD is shown to be quite robust with plasma characteristics and temperatures being unaffected upon introduction of metal species, whether by liquid or laser ablation sample introduction. - Highlights: • Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) • LS-APGD as a secondary

  5. In-liquid plasma devices and methods of use thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-08-10

    Devices and methods for generating a plasma in a liquid are provided. A low- dielectric material can be placed in contact with the liquid to form an interface a distance from an anode. A voltage can be applied across the anode and a cathode submerged in the liquid to produce the plasma. A variety of devices are provided, including for continuous operation. The devices and methods can be used to generate a plasma in a variety of liquids, for example for water treatment, hydrocarbon reformation, or synthesis of nanomaterial.

  6. Air plasma treatment of liquid covered tissue: long timescale chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietz, Amanda M; Kushner, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown great promise for the treatment of wounds and cancerous tumors. In these applications, the sample is usually covered by a thin layer of a biological liquid. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by the plasma activate and are processed by the liquid before the plasma produced activation reaches the tissue. The synergy between the plasma and the liquid, including evaporation and the solvation of ions and neutrals, is critical to understanding the outcome of plasma treatment. The atmospheric pressure plasma sources used in these procedures are typically repetitively pulsed. The processes activated by the plasma sources have multiple timescales—from a few ns during the discharge pulse to many minutes for reactions in the liquid. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of plasma–liquid interactions and liquid phase chemistry using a global model with the goal of addressing this large dynamic range in timescales. In modeling air plasmas produced by a dielectric barrier discharge over liquid covered tissue, 5000 voltage pulses were simulated, followed by 5 min of afterglow. Due to the accumulation of long-lived species such as ozone and N x O y , the gas phase dynamics of the 5000th discharge pulse are different from those of the first pulse, particularly with regards to the negative ions. The consequences of applied voltage, gas flow, pulse repetition frequency, and the presence of organic molecules in the liquid on the gas and liquid reactive species are discussed. (paper)

  7. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  8. Liquid-metal plasma-facing component research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworski, M A; Khodak, A; Kaita, R

    2013-01-01

    Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) have been proposed as a means of solving several problems facing the creation of economically viable fusion power reactors. Liquid metals face critical issues in three key areas: free-surface stability, material migration and demonstration of integrated scenarios. To date, few demonstrations exist of this approach in a diverted tokamak and we here provide an overview of such work on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The liquid lithium divertor (LLD) was installed and operated for the 2010 run campaign using evaporated coatings as the filling method. Despite a nominal liquid level exceeding the capillary structure and peak current densities into the PFCs exceeding 100 kA m −2 , no macroscopic ejection events were observed. The stability can be understood from a Rayleigh–Taylor instability analysis. Capillary restraint and thermal-hydraulic considerations lead to a proposed liquid-metal PFCs scheme of actively-supplied, capillary-restrained systems. Even with state-of-the-art cooling techniques, design studies indicate that the surface temperature with divertor-relevant heat fluxes will still reach temperatures above 700 °C. At this point, one would expect significant vapor production from a liquid leading to a continuously vapor-shielded regime. Such high-temperature liquid lithium PFCs may be possible on the basis of momentum-balance arguments. (paper)

  9. Plasma inactivation of food-related microorganisms in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsili, Lisa; Espie, Steven; Anderson, J.G.John G.; MacGregor, S.J.Scott J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on a plasma process that inactivates microorganisms in liquids through the application of high-voltage pulses. These pulses result in breakdown of the gas and liquid layers, producing many active species such as UV photons, ozone, free radicals and free electrons. Several test microorganisms representing a range of problematic microorganisms were investigated. Significant reductions in microbial population were achieved, demonstrating the effectiveness of using the plasma discharge process to treat contaminated liquids

  10. Ionic debye screening in dense liquid plasmas observed for Li+p, d reactions with liquid Li target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, J.; Yonemura, H.; Toriyabe, Y.; Nakagawa, A.; Sugawara, T.; Wang Tieshan

    2009-01-01

    Thick target yields of α particles emitted in the 6 Li(d,α) 4 He and 7 Li(p,α) 4 He reactions were measured for Li target in the solid and liquid phase. Observed reaction rates for the liquid Li are always larger than those for the solid. This suggests that the stopping power of hydrogen ion in the liquid Li metal might be smaller than in the solid. Using the empirically obtained stopping power for the liquid Li, we have deduced the screening potentials of the Li+p and Li+d reactions in both phases. The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 500 eV larger than for the solid. This difference is attributed to the effect of liquefied Li + ions. It is concluded that the ionic screening is much stronger than the electronic screening in a low-temperature dense plasmas. (authors)

  11. Ionic Debye Screening in Dense Liquid Plasmas Observed for Li+p,d Reactions with Liquid Li Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Kasagi; H.Yonemura; Y.Toriyabe; A.Nakagawa; T.Sugawara; WANG Tie-shan

    2009-01-01

    Thick target yields of a particles emitted in the ~6Li(d,a)~4 He and ~7Li(p,a)~4 He reactions were measured for Li target in the solid and liquid phase.Observed reaction rates for the liquid Li are always larger than those for the solid.This suggests that the stopping power of hydrogen ion in the liquid Li metal might be smaller than in the solid.Using the empirically obtained stopping power for the liquid Li,we have deduced the screening potentials of the Li+p and Li+d reactions in both phases.The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 500 eV larger than for the solid.This difference is attributed to the effect of liquefied Li~+ ions.It is concluded that the ionic screening is much stronger than the electronic screening in a low-temperature dense plasmas.

  12. Ion irradiation effects on ionic liquids interfaced with rf discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, K.; Kaneko, T.; Hatakeyama, R.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of plasma ion irradiation toward a gas-liquid interface is investigated in a rf discharge system incorporating an ionic liquid. The introduction of the ionic liquid to the plasma causes the formation of a sheath electric field on the ionic liquid surface, resulting in the acceleration of the ions to the ionic liquid and the generation of secondary electrons from the ionic liquid by the ion irradiation. These effects are found to advance the discharge process and enhance the plasma production

  13. NSTX plasma operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W., E-mail: hkugel@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Allain, J.P. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Diallo, A.; Ellis, R.; Gerhardt, S.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Heim, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Maingi, R.; McLean, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Menard, J.; Mueller, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Ono, M.; Paul, S.F. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); and others

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NSTX 2010 experiments tested the effectiveness of maintaining the deuterium retention properties of a static liquid lithium molybdenum divertor surface when refreshed by lithium evaporation as an approximation to a flowing liquid lithium surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noteworthy improvements in plasma performance with the plasma strike point on the liquid lithium molybdenum divertor were obtained similar to those obtained previously with lithiated graphite. The role of lithium impurities in this result is discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inspection of the liquid lithium molybdenum divertor after the Campaign indicated mechanical damage to supports, and other hardware resulting from forces following plasma current disruptions. - Abstract: NSTX 2010 experiments were conducted using a molybdenum Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) surface installed on the outer part of the lower divertor. This tested the effectiveness of maintaining the deuterium retention properties of a static liquid lithium surface when refreshed by lithium evaporation as an approximation to a flowing liquid lithium surface. The LLD molybdenum front face has a 45% porosity to provide sufficient wetting to spread 37 g of lithium, and to retain it in the presence of magnetic forces. Lithium Evaporators were used to deposit lithium on the LLD surface. At the beginning of discharges, the LLD lithium surface ranged from solid to liquefied depending on the amount of applied and plasma heating. Noteworthy improvements in plasma performance were obtained similar to those obtained previously with lithiated graphite, e.g., ELM-free, quiescent edge, H-modes. During these experiments with the plasma outer strike point on the LLD, the rate of deuterium retention in the LLD, as indicated by the fueling needed to achieve and maintain stable plasma conditions, was the about the same as that for solid lithium coatings on the graphite prior to the installation of the

  14. Microwave plasma for hydrogen production from liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czylkowski Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen production by conversion of liquid compounds containing hydrogen was investigated experimentally. The waveguide-supplied metal cylinder-based microwave plasma source (MPS operated at frequency of 915 MHz at atmospheric pressure was used. The decomposition of ethanol, isopropanol and kerosene was performed employing plasma dry reforming process. The liquid was introduced into the plasma in the form of vapour. The amount of vapour ranged from 0.4 to 2.4 kg/h. Carbon dioxide with the flow rate ranged from 1200 to 2700 NL/h was used as a working gas. The absorbed microwave power was up to 6 kW. The effect of absorbed microwave power, liquid composition, liquid flow rate and working gas fl ow rate was analysed. All these parameters have a clear influence on the hydrogen production efficiency, which was described with such parameters as the hydrogen production rate [NL(H2/h] and the energy yield of hydrogen production [NL(H2/kWh]. The best achieved experimental results showed that the hydrogen production rate was up to 1116 NL(H2/h and the energy yield was 223 NL(H2 per kWh of absorbed microwave energy. The results were obtained in the case of isopropanol dry reforming. The presented catalyst-free microwave plasma method can be adapted for hydrogen production not only from ethanol, isopropanol and kerosene, but also from different other liquid compounds containing hydrogen, like gasoline, heavy oils and biofuels.

  15. [Study on the emission spectrum of microwave plasma in liquid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Yong-Jun; Liu, Hui

    2014-05-01

    After the technology of microwave discharge in liquid is realized for the first time in China, the basic physical phenomena and characteristic of microwave discharge in liquid is studied in order to lay a theoretical foundation of research on microwave discharge in liquid. In the present paper, the active particles generated by microwave discharge in liquid were detected using the emission spectrometer, and the statistical method of spectrum data of microwave discharge in liquid was also studied. The emission spectrometer and numerically controlled camera were used to detect synchronously the process of the initial discharge and stable discharge of microwave discharge in liquid. The results show that: the emission intensity of microwave plasma in liquid has a large fluctuation, and the spectrum intensity can be calculated using the average of 10 spectrum data points. The intensity of discharge is reflected by the plasma area in a certain extent, however, the variation gradient of the intensity of discharge is different from that of the plasma area. This is mainly because that, in the process of discharging, the discharge intensity is not only reflected by the plasma area, but also reflected by the brightness of the plasma.

  16. Micro-column plasma emission liquid chromatograph. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, D.D.

    1982-08-12

    In a direct current plasma emission spectrometer for use in combination with a microcolumn liquid chromatograph, an improved plasma source unit is claimed. The plasma source unit includes a quartz capillary tube having an inlet means, outlet off gas means and a pair of spaced electrodes defining a plasma region in the tube. The inlet means is connected to and adapted to receive eluant of the liquid chromatograph along with a stream of plasma-forming gas. There is an opening through the wall of the capillary tube penetrating into the plasma region. A soft glass capillary light pipe is disposed at the opening, is connected to the spectrometer, and is adapted to transmit light passing from the plasma region to the spectrometer. There is also a source of electromotive force connected to the electrodes sufficient to initiate and sustain a plasma in the plasma region of the tube.

  17. Analysis of a gas-liquid film plasma reactor for organic compound oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kevin [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Wang, Huijuan [School of Environmental and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Locke, Bruce R., E-mail: blocke@fsu.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Non-homogeneous filamentary plasma discharge formed along gas-liquid interface. • Hydrogen peroxide formed near interface favored over organic oxidation from liquid. • Post-plasma Fenton reactions lead to complete utilization of hydrogen peroxide. - Abstract: A pulsed electrical discharge plasma formed in a tubular reactor with flowing argon carrier gas and a liquid water film was analyzed using methylene blue as a liquid phase hydroxyl radical scavenger and simultaneous measurements of hydrogen peroxide formation. The effects of liquid flow rate, liquid conductivity, concentration of dye, and the addition of ferrous ion on dye decoloration and degradation were determined. Higher liquid flow rates and concentrations of dye resulted in less decoloration percentages and hydrogen peroxide formation due to initial liquid conductivity effects and lower residence times in the reactor. The highest decoloration energy yield of dye found in these studies was 5.2 g/kWh when using the higher liquid flow rate and adding the catalyst. The non-homogeneous nature of the plasma discharge favors the production of hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-liquid interface over the chemical oxidation of the organic in the bulk liquid phase and post-plasma reactions with the Fenton catalyst lead to complete utilization of the plasma-formed hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Mathematical Modeling of Liquid-fed Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaartikey Misra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid propellants are fast becoming attractive for pulsed plasma thrusters due to their high efficiency and low contamination issues. However, the complete plasma interaction and acceleration processes are still not very clear. Present paper develops a multi-layer numerical model for liquid propellant PPTs (pulsed plasma thrusters. The model is based on a quasi-steady flow assumption. The model proposes a possible acceleration mechanism for liquid-fed pulsed plasma thrusters and accurately predicts the propellant utilization capabilities and estimations for the fraction of propellant gas that is completely ionized and accelerated to high exit velocities. Validation of the numerical model and the assumptions on which the model is based on is achieved by comparing the experimental results and the simulation results for two different liquid-fed thrusters developed at the University of Tokyo. Simulation results shows that up-to 50 % of liquid propellant injected is completely ionized and accelerated to high exit velocities (>50 Km/s, whereas, neutral gas contribute to only 7 % of the total specific impulse and accelerated to low exit velocity (<4 Km/s. The model shows an accuracy up-to 92 % . Optimization methods are briefly discussed to ensure efficient propellant utilization and performance. The model acts as a tool to understand the background physics and to optimize the performance for liquid-fed PPTs.

  19. Microwave plasmas generated in bubbles immersed in liquids for hydrocarbons reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational modeling study of microwave plasma generated in cluster of atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in a liquid. We demonstrate that the use of microwaves allows the generation of a dense chemically active non-equilibrium plasma along the gas–liquid interface. Also, microwaves allow generation of overdense plasma in all the bubbles considered in the cluster which is possible because the collisional skin depth of the wave exceeds the bubble dimension. These features of microwave plasma generation in bubbles immersed in liquids are highly desirable for the large-scale liquid hydrocarbon reforming technologies. (letter)

  20. Liquid steel analysis by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, J.

    2002-11-01

    's concentration takes 7 s. A prototype device for on-site LIPS analysis of liquid steel in a metallurgical vessel was developed in cooperation with VAI (Voest Alpine Industrieanlagenbau) and tested successfully during the production process in a steel mill at Boehler Edelstahl in Kapfenberg / Austria. The device was attached to a VD (vacuum degassing) vessel by means of an industrial articulated arm, which served as a laser- and plasma-light guide. The concentrations of Cr, Ni and Mn in the steel melt and under reduced pressure were measured in-situ during 25 heats. In a second on-site measurement series, the prototype system was used to monitor the steel composition in a vacuum induction-melting furnace (VIM). It was found, that the temperature of the plasma depends on the ambient pressure. This affects the result of the LIPS measurement. (author)

  1. Temperature measurements in thermonuclear plasmas; Mesures des temperatures dans les plasmas thermonucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The temperatures needed to produce thermonuclear reactions are of the order of several million degrees Kelvin. Devising methods for measuring such temperatures has been the subject of research in many countries. In order to present the problem clearly and to demonstrate its importance, the author reviews the various conditions which must be fulfilled in order that reactions may be qualified as thermonuclear. The relationship between the temperature and the cross-section of the reactions is studied, and it is shown that the notion of temperature in the plasmas is complex, which leads to a consideration of the temperature of the ions and that of the electrons. None of the methods for the temperature measurements is completely satisfactory because of the hypotheses which must be made, and which are seldom fulfilled during high-intensity discharges in the plasmas. In practice it is necessary to use several methods simultaneously. (author) [French] Les temperatures necessaires pour produire des reactions thermonucleaires sont de l'ordre de plusieurs millions de degres Kelvin. Les methodes envisagees pour mesurer ces temperatures font l'objet de recherches dans de nombreux pays. Afin de preciser le probleme et de montrer son importance, l'auteur rappelle les conditions qui doivent etre reunies pour que des reactions puissent etre qualifiees thermonucleaires. Il etudie la relation entre la temperature et la section efficace des reactions et montre que la notion de temperature dans les plasmas est complexe, ce qui amene a considerer la temperature des ions et celle des electrons. Aucune des methodes de mesure des temperatures n'est completement satisfaisante en raison des hypotheses qu'elles exigent et qui sont rarement realisees lors des decharges a haute intensite dans les plasmas. En pratique, il est necessaire d'utiliser plusieurs methodes simultanement. (auteur)

  2. Exploring liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) concepts-Liquid metal film flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, M.; Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.; Morley, N.B.; Ni, M.; Miraghaie, R.; Burris, J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of fast moving liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has been looked upon with considerable interest over the past several years, both by the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. Flowing liquid walls provide an ever replenishing contact surface to the plasma, leading to very effective particle pumping and surface heat flux removal. A key feasibility issue for flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, pertains to their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior under the spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device. MHD forces hinder the development of a smooth and controllable liquid metal flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields

  3. A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun for nanomaterial synthesis in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuang; Wang, Kaile; Zuo, Shasha; Liu, Jiahui [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Jue, E-mail: zhangjue@pku.edu.cn; Fang, Jing [Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A handheld low temperature atmospheric pressure air plasma gun based on a dielectric barrier structure with hollow electrodes was proposed. The portable plasma gun with an embedded mini air pump was driven by a 12 V direct voltage battery. The air plasma jet generated from the gun could be touched without a common shock hazard. Besides working in air, the plasma gun can also work in water. The diagnostic result of optical emission spectroscopy showed the difference in reactive species of air plasma jet between in air and in water. The plasma gun was excited in 20 ml chloroauric acid aqueous solution with a concentration of 1.214 mM. A significant amount of gold nanoparticles were synthesized after 2 min continuous discharge. The plasma gun with these unique features is applicable in plasma medicine, etching, and s-nthesis of nanomaterials.

  4. Estimating plasma temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.K.; Iglesias, C.A.; Chen, M.H.; Rogers, F.J.

    1992-04-01

    Recent laser-produced plasma experiments have relied on spectroscopic comparisons with models to infer plasma temperatures. The models use an experimentally determined value for the matter density as input and treat the temperature as a free parameter to obtain a best fit to the experimental absorption spectrum. However, uncertainties in the ionization balance theories lead to inferred temperatures that are model dependent. We report results of a new approach which combines high=quality atomic data with an ionization balance obtained from systematic expansions of the grand canonical ensemble. The latter avoids the ad hoc cutoffs required in free energy minimization schemes and includes Coulomb corrections usually neglected in other models. Comparisons to experimental spectra show excellent agreement

  5. Characterization of a dielectric barrier discharge in contact with liquid and producing a plasma activated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neretti, G.; Taglioli, M.; Colonna, G.; Borghi, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work a low-temperature plasma source for the generation of plasma activated water (PAW) is developed and characterized. The plasma reactor was operated by means of an atmospheric-pressure air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The plasma generated is in contact with the water surface and is able to chemically activate the liquid medium. Electrodes were supplied by both sinusoidal and nanosecond-pulsed voltage waveforms. Treatment times were varied from 2 to 12 min to increase the energy dose released to the water by the DBD plasma. The physics of the discharge was studied by means of electrical, spectroscopic and imaging diagnostics. The interaction between the plasma and the liquid was investigated as well. Temperature and composition of the treated water were detected. Images of the discharges showed a filamentary behaviour in the sinusoidal case and a more homogeneous behaviour in the nanosecond-pulsed one. The images and the electrical measurements allowed to evaluate an average electron number density of about 4  ×  1019 and 6  ×  1017 m-3 for the sinusoidal and nanosecond-pulsed discharges respectively. Electron temperatures in the range of 2.1÷2.6 eV were measured by using spectroscopic diagnostics. Rotational temperatures in the range of 318-475 K were estimated by fitting synthetic spectra with the measured ones. Water temperature and pH level did not change significantly after the exposure to the DBD plasma. The production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide within the water was enhanced by increasing the plasma treatment time and the energy dose. Numerical simulations of the nanosecond-pulsed discharge were performed by using a self-consistent coupling of state-to-state kinetics of the air mixture with the Boltzmann equation of free electron kinetics. Temporal evolution of the electron energy distribution function shows departure from the Maxwellian distribution especially during the afterglow phase of the discharge. When

  6. Measurement and modeling of surface temperature dynamics of the NSTX liquid lithium divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A. G.; Gan, K. F.; Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T. K.; Maingi, R.; Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Nygren, R. E.; Skinner, C. H.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-07-01

    Dual-band infrared (IR) measurements of the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) are reported that demonstrate liquid Li is more effective at removing plasma heat flux than Li-conditioned graphite. Extended dwell of the outer strike point (OSP) on the LLD caused an incrementally larger area to be heated above the Li melting point through the discharge leading to enhanced D retention and plasma confinement. Measurement of Tsurface near the OSP demonstrates a significant reduction of the LLD surface temperature compared to that of Li-coated graphite at the same major radius. Modeling of these data with a 2-D simulation of the LLD structure in the DFLUX code suggests that the structure of the LLD was successful at handling up to q⊥,peak = 5 MW/m2 inter-ELM and up to 10 MW/m2 during ELMs from its plasma-facing surface as intended, and provide an innovative method for inferring the Li layer thickness.

  7. High-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics

  8. A cold plasma plume with a highly conductive liquid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guangliang; Chen Wenxing; Chen Shihua; Yang Size

    2008-01-01

    A cold dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma plume with one highly conductive liquid electrode has been developed to treat thermally sensitive materials, and its preliminary discharging characteristics have been studied. The averaged electron temperature and density is estimated to be 0.6eV and 10 11 /cm 3 , respectively. The length of plasma plume can reach 5 cm with helium gas (He), and the conductivity of the outer electrode affects the plume length obviously. This plasma plume could be touched by bare hand without causing any burning or painful sensation, which may provide potential application for safe aseptic skin care. Moreover, the oxidative particles (e.g., OH, O * , O 3 ) in the downstream oxygen (O2) gas of the plume have been applied to treat the landfill leachate. The results show that the activated O 2 gas can degrade the landfill leachate effectively, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and suspended solid (SS) can be decreased by 52%, 57%, 76% and 92%, respectively. (fluids, plasmas and electric discharges)

  9. Impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission following laser ablation in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilović, Marijana R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, the impact of the cavitation bubble on a plasma emission produced after the interaction of the strong focused laser radiation with the target in the liquid was studied. Several experimental techniques were applied to assess different aspects of the complex phenomena of the laser induced breakdown in the liquid media. The results of the fast photography, Schlieren and shadowgraphy techniques were compared with the results of simpler probe beam techniques, transmission and scattering. In addition, emission from the plasma was analysed using optical emission spectroscopy, with aim to relate the quality of the recorded spectral lines to the bubble properties. Bubble had proved to be more convenient surrounding than the liquid for the long lasting plasma emission, due to the high temperature and pressure state inside of it and significantly lower density, which causes less confined plasma. Changes in refractive index of the bubble were also monitored, although in the limited time interval, when the bubble was sufficiently expanded and the refractive index difference between the bubble and the water was large enough to produce glory rings and the bright spot in the bubble's centre. Reshaping of the plasma emission due to the optical properties of the bubble was detected and the need for careful optimization of the optical system was stressed. Contribution to the "Topical Issue: Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  10. Photoluminescence at room temperature of liquid-phase crystallized silicon on glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vetter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The room temperature photoluminescence (PL spectrum due band-to-band recombination in an only 8 μm thick liquid-phase crystallized silicon on glass solar cell absorber is measured over 3 orders of magnitude with a thin 400 μm thick optical fiber directly coupled to the spectrometer. High PL signal is achieved by the possibility to capture the PL spectrum very near to the silicon surface. The spectra measured within microcrystals of the absorber present the same features as spectra of crystalline silicon wafers without showing defect luminescence indicating the high electronic material quality of the liquid-phase multi-crystalline layer after hydrogen plasma treatment.

  11. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  12. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF6–N2 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin; Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF 6 is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF 6 –N 2 mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF 6 . This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF 6 –N 2 mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N 2 mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF 6 –N 2 plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N 2 on properties for SF 6 –N 2 plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF 6 –N 2 plasmas

  13. Investigations on interactions between the flowing liquid lithium limiter and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, J.; Zuo, G.Z.; Hu, J.S.; Sun, Z.; Li, J.G.; Zakharov, L.E.; Ruzic, D.N.; Xu, W.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Two different designs of flowing liquid lithium limiter were first tested for power exhaust and particle removal in HT-7 in 2012 autumn campaign. During the experiments, the reliability and compatibility of the limiters within Tokamak were experimentally demonstrated, and some positive results were achieved. It was found that the flowing liquid lithium limiter was effective for suppressing H concentration and led to a low ratio of H/(H + D). O impurity was slightly decreased by using limiters as well as when using a Li coating. A significant increase of the wall retention ratio was also observed which resulted from the outstanding D particles pumping ability of flowing liquid lithium limiters. The strong interaction between plasma and lithium surface could cause lithium ejection into plasma and lead to disruptions. The stable plasmas produced by uniform Li flow were in favor of lithium control. While the limiters were applied with a uniform Li flow, the normal plasma was easy to be obtained, and the energy confinement time increased from ∼0.025 s to 0.04 s. Furthermore, it was encouraging to note that the application of flowing liquid lithium limiters could further improve the confinement of plasma by ∼10% on the basis of Li coating. These remarkable results will help for the following design of flowing liquid lithium limiter in EAST to improve the plasma operation.

  14. Controlled gas-liquid interfacial plasmas for synthesis of nano-bio-carbon conjugate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2018-01-01

    Plasmas generated in contact with a liquid have been recognized to be a novel reactive field in nano-bio-carbon conjugate creation because several new chemical reactions have been yielded at the gas-liquid interface, which were induced by the physical dynamics of non-equilibrium plasmas. One is the ion irradiation to a liquid, which caused the spatially selective dissociation of the liquid and the generation of additive reducing and oxidizing agents, resulting in the spatially controlled synthesis of nanostructures. The other is the electron irradiation to a liquid, which directly enhanced the reduction action at the plasma-liquid interface, resulting in temporally controlled nanomaterial synthesis. Using this novel reaction field, gold nanoparticles with controlled interparticle distance were synthesized using carbon nanotubes as a template. Furthermore, nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates and nanocarbon-biomolecule conjugates were successfully synthesized by an aqueous-solution contact plasma and an electrolyte plasma, respectively, which were rapid and low-damage processes suitable for nano-bio-carbon conjugate materials.

  15. Modelling of a multi-temperature plasma composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liani, B.; Benallal, R.; Bentalha, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of plasma composition is very important for various plasma applications and prediction of plasma properties. The authors use the Saha equation and Debye length equation to calculate the non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium plasma composition. It has been shown that the model to 2T with T representing the temperature (electron temperature and heavy-particle temperature) described by Chen and Han [J. Phys. D 32(1999)1711] can be applied for a mixture of gases, where each atomic species has its own temperature, but the model to 4T is more general because it can be applicable to temperatures distant enough of the heavy particles. This can occur in a plasma composed of big- or macro-molecules. The electron temperature T e varies in the range 8000∼20000 K at atmospheric pressure. (authors)

  16. Valorization of biogas into liquid hydrocarbons in plasma-catalyst reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravech, Mehrdad; Rahmani, Abdelkader; Labidi, Sana; Saintini, Noiric

    2016-09-01

    Biogas represents an important source of renewable energy issued from biological degradation of biomass. It is planned to produce in Europe the amount of biogas equivalent to 6400 kWh electricity and 4500 kteo (kilo tons equivalent oil) in 2020. Currently the biogas is used in cogeneration engines to produce heat and electricity directly in farms or it is injected in gas networks after purification and odorisation. The aim of this work is to propose a third option that consists of valorization of biogas by transformation into liquid hydrocarbons like acetone, methanol, ethanol, acetic acid etc. These chemicals, among the most important feed materials for chemical industries, retain CO2 molecules participating to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and have high storage energy capacity. We developed a low temperature atmospheric plasma-catalyst reactor (surface dielectric barrier discharge) to transform biogas into chemicals. The conversion rates of CH4 and CO2 are respectively about 50% and 30% depending on operational conditions. The energetic cost is 25 eV/molecule. The yields of liquid hydrocarbon reaches currently 10% wt. More the 11 liquid chemicals are observed in the liquid fraction. Acknowledgements are due to SPC Programme Energie de demain.

  17. Measurement and modeling of surface temperature dynamics of the NSTX liquid lithium divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, A.G., E-mail: mclean@fusion.gat.com [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Gan, K.F. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Ahn, J.-W.; Gray, T.K.; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Nygren, R.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Skinner, C.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Soukhanovskii, V.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Dual-band infrared (IR) measurements of the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) are reported that demonstrate liquid Li is more effective at removing plasma heat flux than Li-conditioned graphite. Extended dwell of the outer strike point (OSP) on the LLD caused an incrementally larger area to be heated above the Li melting point through the discharge leading to enhanced D retention and plasma confinement. Measurement of T{sub surface} near the OSP demonstrates a significant reduction of the LLD surface temperature compared to that of Li-coated graphite at the same major radius. Modeling of these data with a 2-D simulation of the LLD structure in the DFLUX code suggests that the structure of the LLD was successful at handling up to q{sub ⊥,peak} = 5 MW/m{sup 2} inter-ELM and up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} during ELMs from its plasma-facing surface as intended, and provide an innovative method for inferring the Li layer thickness.

  18. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig, E-mail: cgerardi@anl.gov; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Distributed temperature sensors measured high-resolution liquid-sodium temperatures. • DTSs worked well up to 400 °C. • A single DTS simultaneously detected sodium level and temperature. - Abstract: Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400 °C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 μm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  19. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.H.; Wang, X.D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q.P.; Xie, H.L.; Xiao, T.Q.; Zhang, D.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for self-diffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q_6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts. - Graphical abstract: Atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, which both demonstrate the existence of a liquid structural change together with reported density, viscosity, electric resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power data.

  20. Study on Laser Induced Plasma Produced in Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, N.; Yamada, J.

    2003-01-01

    When an intense laser light is focused in liquid, a hot plasma is produced at the focal spot. The breakdown threshold and the transmittance of sodium choroids solution are observed using excimer laser or YAG laser. The breakdown threshold decreases with increasing NaCl concentration. Threshold intensity of plasma produced by YAG laser is lower than excimer laser. The behavior of plasma development is observed by a streak camera. The plasma produced by a YAG laser develops only backward. However, the plasma produced by excimer laser develops not only backward but also forward same as the plasma development in high-pressure gases

  1. Upgrades toward high-heat flux, liquid lithium plasma-facing components in the NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaworski, M.A., E-mail: mjaworsk@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Brooks, A.; Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Lopes-Cardozo, N. [TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Menard, J.; Ono, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Rindt, P. [TU/Eindhoven, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Tresemer, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • An upgrade path for the NSTX-U tokamak is proposed that maintains scientific productivity while enabling exploration of novel, liquid metal PFC. • Pre-filled liquid metal divertor targets are proposed as an intermediate step that mitigates technical and scientific risks associated with liquid metal PFC. • Analysis of leading edge features show a strong link between engineering design considerations and expected performance as a PFC. • A method for optimizing porous liquid metal targets restrained by capillary forces is provided indicating pore-sizes well within current technical capabilities. - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs) provide numerous potential advantages over solid-material components. One critique of the approach is the relatively less developed technologies associated with deploying these components in a fusion plasma-experiment. Exploration of the temperature limits of liquid lithium PFCs in a tokamak divertor and the corresponding consequences on core operation are a high priority informing the possibilities for future liquid lithium PFCs. An all-metal NSTX-U is envisioned to make direct comparison between all high-Z wall operation and liquid lithium PFCs in a single device. By executing the all-metal upgrades incrementally, scientific productivity will be maintained while enabling physics and engineering-science studies to further develop the solid- and liquid-metal components. Six major elements of a flowing liquid-metal divertor system are described and a three-step program for implementing this system is laid out. The upgrade steps involve the first high-Z divertor target upgrade in NSTX-U, pre-filled liquid metal targets and finally, an integrated, flowing liquid metal divertor target. Two example issues are described where the engineering and physics experiments are shown to be closely related in examining the prospects for future liquid metal PFCs.

  2. Containment of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, R.W.; Ferguson, H.R.P.; Fletcher, H. Jr.; Gardner, J.; Harrison, B.K.; Larsen, K.M.

    1973-01-01

    Apparatus is described for confining a high temperature plasma which comprises: 1) envelope means shaped to form a toroidal hollow chamber containing a plasma, 2) magnetic field line generating means for confining the plasma in a smooth toroidal shape without cusps. (R.L.)

  3. Design Constraints for Liquid-Protected Divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, S.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Yoda, M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on liquid-surface-protected plasma facing components has resulted in the establishment of operating windows for candidate liquids, as well as limits on the maximum allowable liquid surface temperature in order to limit plasma impurities from liquid evaporation. In this study, an additional constraint on the maximum allowable surface temperature gradient (i.e., heat flux gradient) has been quantified. Spatial variations in the wall and liquid surface temperatures are expected due to variations in the incident radiation and particle fluxes. Thermocapillary forces created by such temperature gradients can lead to film rupture and dry spot formation in regions of elevated local temperatures. Here, attention has been focused on ''non-flowing'' thin liquid films similar to those formed on the surface of porous wettedwall components. Future analyses will include the effects of macroscopic fluid motion, and MHD forces.A numerical model using the level contour reconstruction method was used to follow the evolution of the liquid free surface above a non-isothermal solid surface. The model was used to develop generalized charts for the maximum allowable spatial temperature gradients (i.e., the critical Marangoni number) as a function of the governing non-dimensional variables, viz. the Weber, Froude, and Prandtl numbers, and aspect ratio. Attention was focused on the asymptotic limit for thin liquid films (i.e., low aspect ratio) which provides a lower bound for the maximum allowable temperature gradients. Specific examples for lithium, Flibe, lithium-lead, tin, and gallium are presented. The generalized charts developed in this investigation will allow reactor designers to identify design windows for successful operation of liquid-protected plasma facing components for various coolants, film thicknesses, and operating conditions

  4. ELECTRON ENERGY DECAY IN HELIUM AFTERGLOW PLASMAS AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldan, P. D.; Cahn, J. H.; Goldstein, L.

    1963-10-15

    Studies of decaying afterglow plasmas in helium were ined near 4 deg K by immersion in a liquid helium bath. By means of a Maser Radiometer System, the electron temperature was followed below 200 deg K. Guided microwave propagation and wave interaction techniques premit determination of election number density and collision frequencies for momentum transfer. Electron temperature decay rates of the order of 150 mu sec/p(mm Hg alpha 4.2 deg K) were found. Since thermal relaxation by elastic collisions should be some two orders of magnitude faster than this, the electrons appear to be in quasiequilibrium with a slowly decaying internal heating source. Correlation of the expected decay rates of singlet metastable helium atoms with the electron temperature decay gives good agreement with the present experiment. (auth)

  5. Non-thermal plasma ethanol reforming in bubbles immersed in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Sharma, Ashish; Raja, Laxminarayan L

    2017-01-01

    Ethanol reforming in non-thermal plasma generated in atmospheric-pressure argon bubbles immersed in liquid ethanol/water solution is studied using a self-consistent multi-species fluid model. The influence of the dielectric constant of the liquid on the plasma dynamics and its effect on the generation of active species is analyzed. Several modes of discharge are obtained for large liquid dielectric constant. In these modes, we obtain either an axial streamer or a combination of two simultaneous streamers propagating along the bubble axis and near the liquid wall. The influence of these modes on the production of active species is also studied. The main reactions responsible for the generation of molecular hydrogen and light hydrocarbon species are analyzed. A possible mechanism of hydrogen generation in liquid phase is discussed. (paper)

  6. Application of low temperature plasmas for restoration/conservation of archaeological objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krčma, F.; Blahová, L.; Fojtíková, P.; Graham, W. G.; Grossmannová, H.; Hlochová, L.; Horák, J.; Janová, D.; Kelsey, C. P.; Kozáková, Z.; Mazánková, V.; Procházka, M.; Přikryl, R.; Řádková, L.; Sázavská, V.; Vašíček, M.; Veverková, R.; Zmrzlý, M.

    2014-12-01

    The low-temperature low-pressure hydrogen based plasmas were used to study the influence of processes and discharge conditions on corrosion removal. The capacitive coupled RF discharge in the continuous or pulsed regime was used at operating pressure of 100-200 Pa. Plasma treatment was monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. To be able to study influence of various process parameters, the model corroded samples with and without sandy incrustation were prepared. The SEM-EDX analyzes were carried out to verify corrosion removal efficiency. Experimental conditions were optimized for the selected most frequent materials of original metallic archaeological objects (iron, bronze, copper, and brass). Chlorides removal is based on hydrogen ion reactions while oxides are removed mainly by neutral species interactions. A special focus was kept for the samples temperature because it was necessary to avoid any metallographic changes in the material structure. The application of higher power pulsed regime with low duty cycle seems be the best treatment regime. The low pressure hydrogen plasma is not applicable for objects with a very broken structure or for nonmetallic objects due to the non-uniform heat stress. Due to this fact, the new developed plasmas generated in liquids were applied on selected original archaeological glass materials.

  7. Atomic processes in high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Y.

    1990-03-01

    Much theoretical and experimental efforts have been expended in recent years to study those atomic processes which are specially relevant to understanding high temperature laboratory plasmas. For magnetically confined fusion plasmas, the temperature range of interest spans from the hundreds of eV at plasma edges to 10 keV at the center of the plasma, where most of the impurity ions are nearly fully ionized. These highly stripped ions interact strongly with electrons in the plasma, leading to further excitation and ionization of the ions, as well as electron capture. Radiations are emitted during these processes, which easily escape to plasma container walls, thus cooling the plasma. One of the dominant modes of radiation emission has been identified with dielectronic recombination. This paper reviews this work

  8. Simulation of the formation of two-dimensional Coulomb liquids and solids in dusty plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, H.H.; Kushner, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Dust particle transport in low-temperature plasmas has recently received considerable attention due to the desire to minimize contamination of wafers during plasma processing of microelectronics devices. Laser light scattering observations of dust particles near wafers in reactive-ion-etching (RIE) radio frequency (rf) discharges have revealed clouds which display collective behavior. These observations have motivated experimental studies of the Coulomb liquid and solid properties of these systems. In this paper, we present results from a two-dimensional model for dust particle transport in RIE rf discharges in which we include particle-particle Coulomb interactions. We predict the formation of Coulomb liquids and solids. These predictions are based both on values of Γ>2 (liquid) and Γ>170 (solid), where Γ is the ratio of electrostatic potential energy to thermal energy, and on crystal-like structure in the pair correlation function. We find that Coulomb liquids and solids composed of trapped dust particles in RIE discharges are preferentially formed with increasing gas pressure, decreasing particle size, and decreasing rf power. We also observe the ejection of particles from dust crystals which completely fill trapping sites, as well as lattice disordering followed by annealing and refreezing. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  10. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, I; Baalrud, S D; Bogaerts, A; Bruggeman, P J; Cappelli, M; Colombo, V; Czarnetzki, U; Ebert, U; Eden, J G; Favia, P; Graves, D B; Hamaguchi, S; Hieftje, G; Hori, M

    2017-01-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges. (topical review)

  11. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norberg, Seth A; Johnsen, Eric; Tian, Wei; Kushner, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200 µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10 s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H 3 O + aq , O 3 − aq , and O 2 − aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OH aq , H 2 O 2aq , and O 3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, N x O y species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO 3aq and HOONO aq , which trace their origin to solvated N x O y , have low densities. (paper)

  12. Cloud-point extraction is compatible with liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the determination of antazoline in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Kojro, Grzegorz; Piotrowski, Roman; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-09-05

    Cloud-point extraction (CPE) is attracting increasing interest in a number of analytical fields, including bioanalysis, as it provides a simple, safe and environmentally-friendly sample preparation technique. However, there are only few reports on the application of this extraction technique in liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. In this study, CPE was used for the isolation of antazoline from human plasma. To date, only one method of antazoline isolation from plasma exists-liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). The aim of this study was to prove the compatibility of CPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS and the applicability of CPE to the determination of antazoline in spiked human plasma and clinical samples. Antazoline was isolated from human plasma using Triton X-114 as a surfactant. Xylometazoline was used as an internal standard. NaOH concentration, temperature and Triton X-114 concentration were optimized. The absolute matrix effect was carefully investigated. All validation experiments met international acceptance criteria and no significant relative matrix effect was observed. The compatibility of CPE and LC-ESI-MS/MS was confirmed using clinical plasma samples. The determination of antazoline concentration in human plasma in the range 10-2500ngmL(-1) by the CPE method led to results which are equivalent to those obtained by the widely used liquid-liquid extraction method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, L. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)]. E-mail: luciaff@usc.es; Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Zapata, M. [Dpto. de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, Universidade de Santiago, Campus Sur S/N, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2006-05-10

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a {approx}20 deg. C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27x10{sup -2}K{sup -1} for an operation electric field of 1.67x10{sup 6}Vm{sup -1} has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  14. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge as a secondary excitation source: Assessment of plasma characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manard, Benjamin T.; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.; Sarkar, Arnab; Dong, Meirong; Chirinos, Jose; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has been assessed as a secondary excitation source with a parametric evaluation regarding carrier gas flow rate, applied current, and electrode distance. With this parametric evaluation, plasma optical emission was monitored in order to obtain a fundamental understanding with regards to rotational temperature (Trot), excitation temperature (Texc), electron number density (ne), and plasma robustness. Incentive for these studies is not only for a greater overall fundamental knowledge of the APGD, but also in instrumenting a secondary excitation/ionization source following laser ablation (LA). Rotational temperatures were determined through experimentally fitting of the N2 and OH molecular emission bands while atomic excitation temperatures were calculated using a Boltzmann distribution of He and Mg atomic lines. The rotational and excitation temperatures were determined to be ~ 1000 K and ~ 2700 K respectively. Electron number density was calculated to be on the order of ~ 3 × 1015 cm- 3 utilizing Stark broadening effects of the Hα line of the Balmer series and a He I transition. In addition, those diagnostics were performed introducing magnesium (by solution feed and laser ablation) into the plasma in order to determine any perturbation under heavy matrix sampling. The so-called plasma robustness factor, derived by monitoring Mg II/Mg I emission ratios, is also employed as a reflection of potential perturbations in microplasma energetics across the various operation conditions and sample loadings. While truly a miniaturized source (laser ablation sample introduction.

  15. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of acidic drugs from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan-Pijuan, Mercedes; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    The new sample preparation concept “Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME)” was evaluated for extraction of the acidic drugs ketoprofen, fenoprofen, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, and gemfibrozil from human plasma samples. Plasma samples (250 μL) were loaded into individual......-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection of the individual acceptor solutions. Important PALME parameters including the chemical composition of the liquid membrane, extraction time, and sample pH were optimized, and the extraction performance was evaluated. Except for flurbiprofen, exhaustive...

  16. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redmer, R.

    1997-01-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied wthin linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). mercury within the MHNC scheme via effective ion-ion potentials which are derived from the polarization function within an extended RPA. The optical properties of dense plasmas, the shift

  17. Low-temperature plasma modelling and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its inception in the beginning of the twentieth century, low-temperature plasma science has become a major ¿eld of science. Low-temperature plasma sources and gas discharges are found in domestic, industrial, atmospheric and extra-terrestrial settings. Examples of domestic discharges are those

  18. Plasma-liquid interactions: a review and roadmap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruggeman, P.J.; Kushner, M.J.; Locke, B.R.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Graham, W.G.; Graves, D.B.; Hofman-Caris, R.C.H.M.; Maric, D.; Reid, J. P.; Ceriani, E.; Fernandez Rivas, D.; Foster, J.E.; Garrick, S.C.; Gorbanev, Y.; Hamaguchi, S.; Iza, F.; Jablonowski, H.; Klímová, E.; Kolb, J.; Krčma, F.; Lukeš, Petr; Machala, Z.; Marinov, I.; Mariotti, D.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Minakata, D.; Neyts, E.C.; Pawlat, J.; Petrovic, Z.Lj.; Pflieger, R.; Reuter, S.; Schram, D.C.; Schröter, S.; Shiraiwa, M.; Tarabová, B.; Tsai, P.A.; Verlet, J.R.R.; von Woedtke, T.; Wilson, K.R.; Yasui, K.; Zvereva, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2016), č. článku 053002. ISSN 0963-0252 Grant - others:European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) COST TD1208 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : non-equilibrium plasma * plasma–liquid interaction * diagnostics * modeling * reaction rate data sets * multiphase chemistry * photolysis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0963-0252/25/5/053002/meta

  19. Modeling the chemical kinetics of atmospheric plasma for cell treatment in a liquid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. Y.; Kang, S. K.; Lee, H. Wk.; Lee, H. W.; Kim, G. C.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have been known to be effective for living cell inactivation in a liquid solution but it is not clear yet which species are key factors for the cell treatment. Using a global model, we elucidate the processes through which pH level in the solution is changed from neutral to acidic after plasma exposure and key components with pH and air variation. First, pH level in a liquid solution is changed by He + and He(2 1 S) radicals. Second, O 3 density decreases as pH level in the solution decreases and air concentration decreases. It can be a method of removing O 3 that causes chest pain and damages lung tissue when the density is very high. H 2 O 2 , HO 2 , and NO radicals are found to be key factors for cell inactivation in the solution with pH and air variation.

  20. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  1. In-liquid plasma devices and methods of use thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min; Hamdan, Ahmad Bassam

    2017-01-01

    Devices and methods for generating a plasma in a liquid are provided. A low- dielectric material can be placed in contact with the liquid to form an interface a distance from an anode. A voltage can be applied across the anode and a cathode

  2. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection to determination of opium alkaloids in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Jouibari, Toraj; Fattahi, Nazir; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Pirsaheb, Meghdad

    2013-11-01

    A novel, simple, rapid and sensitive dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) combined with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV) was used to determine opium alkaloids in human plasma. During the extraction procedure, plasma protein was precipitated by using a mixture of zinc sulfate solution and acetonitrile. Some effective parameters on extraction were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions (extraction solvent: 30.0 μl 1-undecanol; disperser solvent: 470 μl acetone; pH: 9; salt addition: 1%(w/v) NaCl and extraction time: 0.5 min), calibration curves are linear in the range of 1.5-1000 μgl(-1) and limit of detections (LODs) are in the range of 0.5-5 μgl(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 100 μgl(-1) of morphine and codeine, 10.0 μgl(-1) of papaverine and 20.0 μgl(-1) of noscapine in diluted human plasma are in the range of 4.3-7.4% (n=5). Finally, the method was successfully applied in the determination of opium alkaloids in the actual human plasma samples. The relative recoveries of plasma samples spiked with alkaloids are 88-110.5%. The obtained results show that DLLME-SFO combined with HPLC-UV is a fast and simple method for the determination of opium alkaloids in human plasma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A universal reduced glass transition temperature for liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Data on the dependence of the glass transition temperature on the molecular structure for low-molecular-weight liquids are analyzed in order to determine whether Boyer's reduced glass transition temperature (1952) is a universal constant as proposed. It is shown that the Boyer ratio varies widely depending on the chemical nature of the molecule. It is pointed out that a characteristic temperature ratio, defined by the ratio of the sum of the melting temperature and the boiling temperature to the sum of the glass transition temperature and the boiling temperature, is a universal constant independent of the molecular structure of the liquid. The average value of the ratio obtained from data for 65 liquids is 1.15.

  4. HPLC/Fluorometric Detection of Carvedilol in Real Human Plasma Samples Using Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Arslan, Sakir

    2016-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed to quantify carvedilol in human plasma using an isocratic system with fluorescence detection. The method included a single-step liquid-liquid extraction with diethylether and ethylacetate mixture (3 : 1, v/v). HPLC separation was carried out by reversed-phase chromatography with a mobile phase composed of 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7)-acetonitrile (65 : 35, v/v), pumped at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Fluorescence detection was performed at 240 nm (excitation) and 330 nm (emission). The calibration curve for carvedilol was linear from 10 to 250 ng/mL. Intra- and interday precision values for carvedilol in human plasma were plasma averaged out to 91.8%. The limits of detection and quantification of carvedilol were 3.0 and 10 ng/mL, respectively. Also, the method was successfully applied to three patients with hypertension who had been given an oral tablet of 25 mg carvedilol. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Intermetallic and electrical insulator coatings on high-temperature alloys in liquid-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    In the design of liquid-metal cooling systems for fusion-reactor blanket, applications, the corrosion resistance of structural materials and the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its subsequent influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion are major concerns. When the system is cooled by liquid metals, insulator coatings are required on piping surfaces in contact with the coolant. The objective of this study is to develop stable corrosion-resistant electrical insulator coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coatings that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the structural wall, and Be-V intermetallic coatings for first-wall components that face the plasma. Vanadium and V-base alloys are leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor. Various intermetallic films were produced on V-alloys and on Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The intermetallic layers were developed by exposure of the materials to liquid Li containing 2 at temperatures of 500--1030 degree C. CaO electrical insulator coatings were produced by reaction of the oxygen-rich layer with <5 at. % Ca dissolved in liquid Li at 400--700 degree C. The reaction converted the oxygen-rich layer to an electrically insulating film. This coating method is applicable to reactor components because the liquid metal can be used over and over; only the solute within the liquid metal is consumed. This paper will discuss initial results on the nature of the coatings and their in-situ electrical resistivity characteristics in liquid Li at high temperatures

  6. Distributed temperature sensor testing in liquid sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardi, Craig; Bremer, Nathan; Lisowski, Darius; Lomperski, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Rayleigh-backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensors were immersed in sodium to obtain high-resolution liquid-sodium temperature measurements. Distributed temperature sensors (DTSs) functioned well up to 400°C in a liquid sodium environment. The DTSs measured sodium column temperature and the temperature of a complex geometrical pattern that leveraged the flexibility of fiber optics. A single Ø 360 lm OD sensor registered dozens of temperatures along a length of over one meter at 100 Hz. We also demonstrated the capability to use a single DTS to simultaneously detect thermal interfaces (e.g. sodium level) and measure temperature.

  7. Temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A temperature-dependent liquid metal flowrate control device includes a magnet and a ferromagnetic member defining therebetween a flow path for liquid metal, the ferromagnetic member being formed of a material having a curie temperature at which a change in the flow rate of the liquid metal is desired. According to the preferred embodiment the magnet is a cylindrical rod magnet axially disposed within a cylindrical member formed of a curie material and having iron pole pieces at the ends. A cylindrical iron shunt and a thin wall stainless steel barrier are disposed in the annulus between magnet and curie material. Below the curie temperature flow between steel barrier and curie material is impeded and above the curie temperature flow impedance is reduced

  8. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  9. Universality of the high-temperature viscosity limit of silicate liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Qiuju; Mauro, John C.; Ellison, Adam J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the high-temperature limit of liquid viscosity by analyzing measured viscosity curves for 946 silicate liquids and 31 other liquids including metallic, molecular, and ionic systems. Our results show no systematic dependence of the high-temperature viscosity limit on chemical...... composition for the studied liquids. Based on theMauro-Yue-Ellison-Gupta-Allan (MYEGA) model of liquid viscosity, the high-temperature viscosity limit of silicate liquids is 10−2.93 Pa·s. Having established this value, there are only two independent parameters governing the viscosity-temperature relation...

  10. Plasma Chemistry and Catalysis in Gases and Liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Parvulescu, Vasile I; Lukes, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a book that not only covers gases but also plasma methods in liquids, this is all set to become the standard reference on the topic. It considers the central aspects in plasma chemistry and plasma catalysis by focusing on the green and environmental applications, while also taking into account their practical and economic viability. With the topics addressed by an international group of major experts, this is a must-have for researchers, PhD students and postdocs specializing in the field.

  11. On the stability of the interface between dense plasma and liquid under electrical pulse discharge in liquid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starchyk, P.D.; Porytskyy, P.V.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that the most important influence on the plasma of electrical pulse discharges in liquid have the processes in a zone of its contact with condensed medium. The investigations of growth of corrugations are conducted which arise on an interface between both the plasma channels of electrical pulse discharges and limiting it liquid. It is shown that the growth of perturbations caused by Rayleigh-Taylor instability are nonlinearly saturated. It is established the interconnection between both the pointed perturbations and the parameters of a dense plasma of discharge channel

  12. Temperature measurements in thermonuclear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.

    1958-01-01

    The temperatures needed to produce thermonuclear reactions are of the order of several million degrees Kelvin. Devising methods for measuring such temperatures has been the subject of research in many countries. In order to present the problem clearly and to demonstrate its importance, the author reviews the various conditions which must be fulfilled in order that reactions may be qualified as thermonuclear. The relationship between the temperature and the cross-section of the reactions is studied, and it is shown that the notion of temperature in the plasmas is complex, which leads to a consideration of the temperature of the ions and that of the electrons. None of the methods for the temperature measurements is completely satisfactory because of the hypotheses which must be made, and which are seldom fulfilled during high-intensity discharges in the plasmas. In practice it is necessary to use several methods simultaneously. (author) [fr

  13. Determination of 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, T L; Benet, L Z

    1979-07-21

    Using 1-ml plasma samples, levels of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) as low as 5 ng/ml and azathioprine (AZA) as low as 40 ng/ml can be detected using a high-performance liquid chromatography reversed-phase column procedure following extraction. Both compounds were stable in frozen plasma for seven weeks. AZA stability in blood was temperature dependent; the half-lives of AZA breakdown to 6MP at 37 degrees were 28 and 46 min in blood drawn from two rhesus monkeys. Plasma levels of 6MP were measured in a rhesus monkey following 6MP (1.47 mg/kg) and AZA (3 mg/kg) intravenous administration. 6MP levels were also measured in three renal transplant patients on daily 50- and 100-mg AZA doses. Peak levels (45-75 ng/ml) were reached within an hour and 6MP levels were detected for up to 7 h.

  14. Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzic, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) project was able to establish the experimental conditions necessary for flowing liquid metal surfaces in order to be utilized as surfaces facing fusion relevant energetic plasma flux. The work has also addressed additional developments along with progressing along the timeline detailed in the proposal. A no-cost extension was requested to conduct other relevant experiment- specifically regarding the characterization droplet ejection during energetic plasma flux impact. A specially designed trench module, which could accommodate trenches with different aspect ratios was fabricated and installed in the TELS setup and plasma gun experiments were performed. Droplet ejection was characterized using high speed image acquisition and also surface mounted probes were used to characterize the plasma. The Gantt chart below had been provided with the original proposal, indicating the tasks to be performed in the third year of funding. These tasks are listed above in the progress report outline, and their progress status is detailed below.

  15. Measurement of temperature, electric conductivity and density of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevova, I.; Nefedov, A.; Oberman, F.; Urinson, A.

    1982-01-01

    Three instruments are briefly described developed by the High Temperatures Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences for the measurement of plasma temperature, electric conductivity and density. The temperature measuring instrument uses as a standard a light source whose temperature may significantly differ from plasma temperature because three light fluxes are compared, namely the flux emitted by the plasma, the flux emitted directly by the standard source, and the flux emitted by the standard source after passage through the plasma. The results of measurement are computer processed. Electric conductivity is measured using a coil placed in a probe which is automatically extended for a time of maximally 0.3 seconds into the plasma stream. The equipment for measuring plasma density consists of a special single-channel monochromator, a temperature gauge, a plasma pressure gauge, and of a computer for processing the results of measurement. (Ha)

  16. High temperature divertor plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi.

    1991-02-01

    High temperature divertor plasma operation has been proposed, which is expected to enhance the core energy confinement and eliminates the heat removal problem. In this approach, the heat flux is guided through divertor channel to a remote area with a large target surface, resulting in low heat load on the target plate. This allows pumping of the particles escaping from the core and hence maintaining of the high divertor temperature, which is comparable to the core temperature. The energy confinement is then determined by the diffusion coefficient of the core plasma, which has been observed to be much lower than the thermal diffusivity. (author)

  17. Determination of Levetiracetam in Human Plasma by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an antiepileptic drug that is clinically effective in generalized and partial epilepsy syndromes. The use of this drug has been increasing in clinical practice and intra- or -interindividual variability has been exhibited for special population. For this reason, bioanalytical methods are required for drug monitoring in biological matrices. So this work presents a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DLLME-GC-MS) for LEV quantification in human plasma. However, due to the matrix complexity a previous purification step is required. Unlike other pretreatment techniques presented in the literature, for the first time, a procedure employing ultrafiltration tubes Amicon® (10 kDa porous size) without organic solvent consumption was developed. GC-MS analyses were carried out using a linear temperature program, capillary fused silica column, and helium as the carrier gas. DLLME optimized parameters were type and volume of extraction and dispersing solvents, salt addition, and vortex agitation time. Under chosen parameters (extraction solvent: chloroform, 130 μL; dispersing solvent: isopropyl alcohol, 400 μL; no salt addition and no vortex agitation time), the method was completely validated and all parameters were in agreement with the literature recommendations. LEV was quantified in patient's plasma sample using less than 550 μL of organic solvent. PMID:27830105

  18. Determination of Levetiracetam in Human Plasma by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyce Kelly Steinhorst Alcantara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Levetiracetam (LEV is an antiepileptic drug that is clinically effective in generalized and partial epilepsy syndromes. The use of this drug has been increasing in clinical practice and intra- or -interindividual variability has been exhibited for special population. For this reason, bioanalytical methods are required for drug monitoring in biological matrices. So this work presents a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DLLME-GC-MS for LEV quantification in human plasma. However, due to the matrix complexity a previous purification step is required. Unlike other pretreatment techniques presented in the literature, for the first time, a procedure employing ultrafiltration tubes Amicon® (10 kDa porous size without organic solvent consumption was developed. GC-MS analyses were carried out using a linear temperature program, capillary fused silica column, and helium as the carrier gas. DLLME optimized parameters were type and volume of extraction and dispersing solvents, salt addition, and vortex agitation time. Under chosen parameters (extraction solvent: chloroform, 130 μL; dispersing solvent: isopropyl alcohol, 400 μL; no salt addition and no vortex agitation time, the method was completely validated and all parameters were in agreement with the literature recommendations. LEV was quantified in patient’s plasma sample using less than 550 μL of organic solvent.

  19. Deuterium retention in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Conn, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of deuterium retention in samples of lithium exposed in the liquid state to deuterium plasma are reported. Retention was measured as a function of plasma ion dose in the range 6x10 19 -4x10 22 D atoms and exposure temperature between 523 and 673 K using thermal desorption spectrometry. The results are consistent with the full uptake of all deuterium ions incident on the liquid metal surface and are found to be independent of the temperature of the liquid lithium over the range explored. Full uptake, consistent with very low recycling, continues until the sample is volumetrically converted to lithium deuteride. This occurs for exposure temperatures where the gas pressure during exposure was both below and slightly above the corresponding decomposition pressure for LiD in Li. (author)

  20. Estimation of post disruption plasma temperature for fast current quench Aditya plasma shots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, S.; Chowdhuri, M.B.; Joisa, Y.S.; Raval, J.V.; Ghosh, J.; Jha, R.

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of tokamak current quenches are an important issue for the determination of electromagnetic forces that act on the in-vessel components and vacuum vessel during major disruptions. It is observed that thermal quench is followed by a sharp current decay. Fast current quench disruptive plasma shots were investigated for ADITYA tokamak. The current decay time was determined for the selected shots, which were in the range of 0.8 msec to 2.5 msec. This current decay information was then applied to L/R model, frequently employed for the estimation of the current decay time in tokamak plasmas, considering plasma inductance and plasma resistivity. This methodology was adopted for the estimation of the post disruption plasma temperature using the experimentally observed current decay time for the fast current quench disruptive ADITYA plasma shots. The study reveals that for the identified shots there is a constant increase in the current decay time with the post disruption plasma temperature. The investigations also explore the behavior post disruption plasma temperature and the current decay time as a function of the edge safety factor, Q. Post disruption plasma temperature and the current decay time exhibits a decrease with the increase in the value Q. (author)

  1. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Bruce R.; Shih, Kai-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 × 10-2 to 80 g kWh-1. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  2. Review of the methods to form hydrogen peroxide in electrical discharge plasma with liquid water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, Bruce R; Shih, Kai-Yuan [Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This paper presents a review of the literature dealing with the formation of hydrogen peroxide from plasma processes. Energy yields for hydrogen peroxide generation by plasma from water span approximately three orders of magnitude from 4 x 10{sup -2} to 80 g kWh{sup -1}. A wide range of plasma processes from rf to pulsed, ac, and dc discharges directly in the liquid phase have similar energy yields and may thus be limited by radical quenching processes at the plasma-liquid interface. Reactor modification using discharges in bubbles and discharges over the liquid phase can provide modest improvements in energy yield over direct discharge in the liquid, but the interpretation is complicated by additional chemical reactions of gas phase components such as ozone and nitrogen oxides. The highest efficiency plasma process utilizes liquid water droplets that may enhance efficiency by sequestering hydrogen peroxide in the liquid and by suppressing decomposition reactions by radicals from the gas and at the interface. Kinetic simulations of water vapor reported in the literature suggest that plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide should approach 45% of the thermodynamics limit, and this fact coupled with experimental studies demonstrating improvements with the presence of the condensed liquid phase suggest that further improvements in energy yield may be possible. Plasma generation of hydrogen peroxide directly from water compares favorably with a number of other methods including electron beam, ultrasound, electrochemical and photochemical methods, and other chemical processes.

  3. Two-temperature transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fei; Chen, Zhexin; Wu, Yi, E-mail: wuyic51@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Guo, Anxiang; Liu, Zirui [Electric Power Research Institute of State Grid Shaanxi Electric Power Company, Xian (China)

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is widely adopted in electric power industry, especially in high-voltage circuit breakers and gas-insulated switchgear. However, the use of SF{sub 6} is limited by its high liquidation temperature and high global warming potential. Recently, research shows SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture, which shows environmental friendliness and good electrical properties, may be a feasible substitute for pure SF{sub 6}. This paper is devoted to the calculation of and transport coefficients of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} mixture under both LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) and non-LTE condition. The two–temperature mass action law was used to determine the composition. The transport coefficients were calculated by classical Chapman–Enskog method simplified by Devoto. The thermophysical properties are presented for electron temperatures of 300–40 000 K, ratios of electron to heavy species temperature of 1–10 and N{sub 2} mole fraction of 0%–100% at atmospheric pressure. The ionization processes under both LTE and non-LTE have been discussed. The results show that deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium significantly affect the properties of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma, especially before the plasma is fully ionized. The different influence of N{sub 2} on properties for SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasma in and out of LTE has been found. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of the behavior of SF{sub 6}–N{sub 2} plasmas.

  4. Criteria governing electron plasma waves in a two-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell, M.P.; Gledhill, I.M.A.; Hellberg, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Using a technique based on the saddle-points of the dielectric function, criteria are found which govern the behaviour of electron plasma waves in plasmas with two electron populations having different temperatures. (orig.)

  5. (Alpha-) quenching temperature dependence in liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Arnd; Lozza, Valentina; Krosigk, Belina von; Zuber, Kai [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) is an effective and promising detector material, which is and will be used by many small and large scale experiments. In order to perform correct signal identification and background suppression, a very good knowledge of LS properties is crucial. One of those is the light yield from alpha particles in liquid scintillator. This light output strongly quenched, approx. 10 times compared to that of electrons, and has been precisely studied at room temperature for various LS. Big scintillator experiments, such as SNO+ and maybe future large scale detectors, will operate at different temperatures. While a strong temperature dependence is well known for solid state scintillators, due to the different scintillation process, a quenching temperature dependence in LS is usually assumed negligible. On the other hand, inconsistencies in between measurements are often explained by potential temperature effects. This study investigates LAB based liquid scintillator with an intrinsic, dissolved alpha emitter and its behaviour with temperature change. In a small, cooled and heated setup, a stabilized read-out with two PMTs is realised. First results are presented.

  6. Microchannel-flowed-plasma modification of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled-monolayers for liquid crystal alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, W.; Chiang, C.-Y.; Underwood, I.

    2013-01-01

    We report that a chemical patterning technique based on local plasma modification of self-assembled monolayers has been utilized to fabricate surfaces for domain liquid crystal alignment. Highly hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayers deposited on glass substrates coated with Indium-Tin-Oxide were brought into contact with elastomeric stamps comprising trenches on a micro scale, and then exposed to an oxygen plasma. In the regions exposed to the plasma the monolayer was etched away leaving a patterned surface that exhibited surface energy differences between surface domains. The surfaces that bear the micropatterns have been shown to be capable of producing patterned alignment of nematic liquid crystal. - Highlights: • Chemical surface-patterning is used to fabricate liquid crystal alignment surface. • Highly hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane monolayer is deposited on substrate. • O 2 plasma flow is used to etch the monolayer to form patterned surface. • The patterned surface exhibits surface energy differences between surface domains. • The surface borne the micropatterns is capable of domain liquid crystal alignment

  7. Determination of five antiarrhythmic drugs in human plasma by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouyban, Abolghasem; Sorouraddin, Mohammad Hossein; Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Fazeli-Bakhtiyari, Rana

    2015-03-01

    A fast and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitation of five antiarrhythmic drugs (metoprolol, propranolol, carvedilol, diltiazem, and verapamil) in human plasma samples. It involves dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of the desired drugs from 660 µL plasma and separation using isocratic elution with UV detection at 200 nm. The complete separation of all analytes was achieved within 7 min. Acetonitrile (as disperser solvent) resulting from the protein precipitation procedure was mixed with 100 µL dichloromethane (as an extraction solvent) and rapidly injected into 5 mL aqueous solution (pH 11.5) containing 1% (w/v), NaCl. After centrifugation, the sedimented phase containing enriched analytes was collected and evaporated to dryness. The residue was re-dissolved in 50 µL de-ionized water (acidified to pH 3) and injected into the HPLC system for analysis. Under the optimal conditions, the enrichment factors and extraction recoveries ranged between 4.4-10.8 and 33-82%, respectively. The suggested method was linear (r(2) ≥0.997) over a dynamic range of 0.02-0.80 µg mL(-1) in plasma. The intra- and inter-days relative standard deviation (RSD%) and relative error (RE%) values of the method were below 20%, which shows good precision and accuracy. Finally, this method was applied to the analysis of real plasma samples obtained from the patients treated with these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous Emission Spectrum Measurement for Electron Temperature Determination in Low-Temperature Collisional Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiuyan; Li Hong; Chen Zhipeng; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-01-01

    Continuous emission spectrum measurement is applied for the inconvenient diagnostics of low-temperature collisional plasmas. According to the physical mechanism of continuous emission, a simplified model is presented to analyze the spectrum in low temperature plasma. The validity of this model is discussed in a wide range of discharge parameters, including electron temperature and ionization degree. Through the simplified model, the continuous emission spectrum in a collisional argon internal inductively coupled plasma is experimentally measured to determine the electron temperature distribution for different gas pressures and radio-frequency powers. The inverse Abel transform is also applied for a better spatially resoluted results. Meanwhile, the result of the continuous emission spectrum measurement is compared to that of the electrostatic double probes, which indicates the effectiveness of this method. (low temperature plasma)

  9. Measurement of density and electron temperature of a decaying plasma in 4.2 K helium gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, T.; Minami, K.

    1986-01-01

    As is well known, the coupling constant Γ of a plasma is defined as the ratio of the average Coulomb energy to the average kinetic energy. Plasmas with Γ not much less than unity are called strongly coupled plasmas or non-ideal plasmas. Such plasmas, high density or low temperature, can be produced by laser implosion, shock waves etc. In the present report, the authors' attempt to generate a non-ideal plasma in a different way from previous ones. They observe a late period of a decaying plasma in helium gases at a temperature less than 4.2 K. An afterglow in cryogenic helium gases was studied previously. In that study, the authors measured the density of the order of 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ by the method of transmission of X-band microwaves. In the present case, plasma is observed in a cylindrical cavity of TE/sub 011/ mode at 2.83 GHz immersed in liquid helium. The size of the cavity is 166 mm inner diameter and 83 mm length. One end wall is made by thin mesh through which plasmas produced by pulse discharge of 750 A, 1 μsec are fed. The loaded Q without plasma is 5300. The pressure of helium gas is changed from 0.03 to 1.3 Torr

  10. Temperature measurement in low pressure plasmas. Temperaturmessungen im Niederdruckplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbauer, K.A.; Wilting, H.; Schramm, G. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Histologie und Embryologie)

    1989-11-01

    The present work discusses the influence of various parameters on the substrate temperature in a low pressure plasma. The measurement method chosen utilized Signotherm (Merck) temperature sensors embedded in silicon between two glass substrates. All measurements were made in a 200 G Plasma Processor from Technics Plasma GmbH. The substrate temperature is dependent on the process time, the RF power, the process gas and the position in the chamber. The substrate temperature increases with increasing process time and increasing power. Due to the location of the microwave port from the magnetron to the chamber, the substrate temperature is highest in the center of the chamber. Measurements performed in an air plasma yielded higher results than in an oxygen plasma. (orig.).

  11. Technological uses of low temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of low temperature plasma sources considered include; arc discharge, high pressure discharge, low pressure discharge and flame. The problems of uniform heating of a gas are discussed and it is considered that the most reliable technique is the magnetically rotated arc, but expanded discharges of one kind or another are likely to be serious competitors in the future. The uses of low temperature plasma in chemistry and combustion are considered. The potential for plasma chemistry lies with processes in which the reactions occur in the plasma itself or its neighbouring gas phase, including those which require the vaporization of liquefaction of a refractory material and also highly endothermic reactions. The production of thixotropic silica and acetylene are discussed as examples of such reactions. The field of plasma and combustion including; ignition, flame ionization and soot formation, and the MHD generator, is considered. (U.K.)

  12. Evaluation of liquid metal protection of a limiter/divertor in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The liquid metal protection concept is proposed mainly to prolong the lifetime of a divertor or a limiter in a fusion reactor. This attractive idea for protection requires studying a wide range of problems associated with the use of liquid-metals in fusion reactors. In this work the protection by liquid-metals has concentrated on predictions of the loss rate of the film to the plasma, the operating surface temperatures required for the film, and the potential tritium inventory requirement. The effect of plasma disruptions on the liquid metal film is also evaluated. Other problems such as liquid metal compatibility with structural materials, magnetic field effects, and the effect of liquid metal contamination on plasma performance are discussed. Three candidate liquid-metals are evaluated, i.e., lithium, gallium, and tin. A wide range of reactor operating conditions valid for both near term machines (INTOR and ITER) and for the next generation commercial reactors (TPSS) are considered. This study has indicated that the evaporation rate for candidate liquid metals can be kept below the sputtering range for reasonable operating temperatures and plasma edge conditions. At higher temperatures, evaporation dominates the losses. Impurity transport calculations indicate that impurities from the plate should not reach the main plasma. One or two millimeters of liquid films can protect the structure from severe plasma disruptions. Depending on the design of the liquid metal protection system, the tritium inventory in the liquid film is predicted to be on the order of a few grams. 16 refs., 5 figs

  13. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT PHASE BEHAVIOR AND PROTEIN PARTITIONING IN GIANT PLASMA MEMBRANE VESICLES

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, SA; Stinson, BM; Go, M; Carmona, LM; Reminick, JI; Fang, X; Baumgart, T

    2010-01-01

    Liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phase coexistence has been suggested to partition the plasma membrane of biological cells into lateral compartments, allowing for enrichment or depletion of functionally relevant molecules. This dynamic partitioning might be involved in fine-tuning cellular signaling fidelity through coupling to the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition. In earlier work, giant plasma membrane vesicles, obtained by chemically induced blebbing from cultured...

  14. Foundations of low-temperature plasma enhanced materials synthesis and etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP)-based synthesis of advanced materials has played a transformational role in multiple industries, including the semiconductor industry, liquid crystal displays, coatings and renewable energy. Similarly, the plasma-based transfer of lithographically defined resist patterns into other materials, e.g. silicon, SiO2, Si3N4 and other electronic materials, has led to the production of nanometer scale devices that are the basis of the information technology, microsystems, and many other technologies based on patterned films or substrates. In this article we review the scientific foundations of both LTP-based materials synthesis at low substrate temperature and LTP-based isotropic and directional etching used to transfer lithographically produced resist patterns into underlying materials. We cover the fundamental principles that are the basis of successful application of the LTP techniques to technological uses and provide an understanding of technological factors that may control or limit material synthesis or surface processing with the use of LTP. We precede these sections with a general discussion of plasma surface interactions, the LTP-generated particle fluxes including electrons, ions, radicals, excited neutrals and photons that simultaneously contact and modify surfaces. The surfaces can be in the line of sight of the discharge or hidden from direct interaction for structured substrates. All parts of the article are extensively referenced, which is intended to help the reader study the topics discussed here in more detail.

  15. Platinum catalyst formed on carbon nanotube by the in-liquid plasma method for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Akira; Almowarai, Anas; Ueno, Yutaro

    2015-12-01

    In-liquid plasma was generated in the carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion fluid using platinum electrodes. The generated plasma spattered the surface of the platinum electrodes and dispersed platinum particles into the CNT dispersion. Therefore, the platinum nanoparticles were successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion. The platinum nanoparticles were applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) as a catalyst. The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method. - Highlights: • The platinum catalyst was successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion by the in-liquid plasma method. • The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method.

  16. Temperature quenching in LAB based liquid scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, A.; Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute for Nuclear- and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany); Hans, S.; Yeh, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Chemistry Devision, Upton, NY (United States); Junghans, A.R.; Koegler, T.; Wagner, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Krosigk, B. v. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute for Nuclear- and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany); University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lozza, V. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute for Nuclear- and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2018-01-15

    The effect of temperature changes on the light output of LAB based liquid scintillator is investigated in a range from -5 to 30 C with α-particles and electrons in a small scale setup. Two PMTs observe the scintillator liquid inside a cylindrically shaped aluminum cuvette that is heated or cooled and the temperature dependent PMT sensitivity is monitored and corrected. The α-emitting isotopes in dissolved radon gas and in natural Samarium (bound to a LAB solution) excite the liquid scintillator mixtures and changes in light output with temperature variation are observed by fitting light output spectra. Furthermore, also changes in light output by compton electrons, which are generated from external calibration γ-ray sources, is analysed with varying temperature. Assuming a linear behaviour, a combined negative temperature coefficient of (-0.29 ± 0.01)%/ C is found. Considering hints for a particle type dependency, electrons show (-0.17 ± 0.02)%/ C, whereas the temperature dependency seems stronger for α-particles, with (-0.35 ± 0.03)%/ C. Due to a high sampling rate, a pulse shape analysis can be performed and shows an enhanced slow decay component at lower temperatures, pointing to reduced non-radiative triplet state de-excitations. (orig.)

  17. Spectroscopic analysis applied to temperature measurement in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieffe-Prevost, P.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma temperature is defined only if the plasma is in a state near thermodynamic equilibrium. This plasma state is analysed in detail and spectroscopic methods for measuring the temperature are discussed. As an application the hydrogen arc of the National Institute of Metrology of the Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (Paris) is briefly described [fr

  18. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    research. Finally, analysis of emission spectra obtained from the OH(A-X) band at 308 nm by the excited hydroxyl radical was performed to quantify the temperature parameters of the plasma. Boltzmann analysis was performed to quantify the rotational temperature of OH which correlates well to the liquid temperature, and Stark broadening of the ionic lines belonging to hydrogen and oxygen was analysed to estimate electron temperature. It was found that the liquid temperature remained close to bulk temperature with T_(n,i)<500 K, and that the electron temperature was very high Te˜6-10 eV. Finally, based on the characterization of the plasma parameters, several potential avenues for applications of this regime of plasma will be suggested. The complex physical and chemical dynamics established when plasma is generated within a liquid medium has unlocked new and fascinating possibilities in the areas of biomedicine, water treatment, material synthesis and nanoscience. The high density, low temperature plasma formed could potentially be harnessed to unlock new applications across these fields and more.

  19. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria for (water + 1-propanol or acetone + β-citronellol) at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hengde; Han, Yongtao; Huang, Cheng; Yang, Chufen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for systems composed of β-citronellol and aqueous 1-propanol or acetone are presented. Distribution ratios of 1-propanol and acetone in the mixtures are examined. The effect of the temperature on the ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibria is evaluated and discussed. - Highlights: • Ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibria containing β-citronellol are presented. • Distribution ratios of 1-propanol and acetone in the mixtures are examined. • The effect on the temperature of the systems is evaluated and discussed. - Abstract: On this paper, experimental (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (LLE) results are presented for systems composed of β-citronellol and aqueous 1-propanol or acetone. To evaluate the phase separation properties of β-citronellol in aqueous mixtures, LLE values for the ternary systems (water + 1-propanol + β-citronellol) and (water + acetone + β-citronellol) were determined with a tie-line method at T = (283.15, 298.15, and 313.15 ± 0.02) K and atmospheric pressure. The reliability of the experimental tie-lines was verified by the Hand and Bachman equations. Ternary phase diagrams, distribution ratios of 1-propanol and acetone in the mixtures are shown. The effect of the temperature on the ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibria was examined and discussed. The experimental LLE values were satisfactorily correlated by extended UNIQUAC and modified UNIQUAC models

  20. Measuring brightness temperature distributions of plasma bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirko, V.I.; Stadnichenko, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of restoration of brightness temperature distribution along plasma jet on the base of a simple ultra high- speed photography and subsequent photometric treatment is shown. The developed technique has been applied for finding spectral radiation intensity and brightness temperature of plasma jets of a tubular gas-cumulative charge and explosive plasma compressor. The problem of shock wave front has been successfully solved and thus distribution of above parameters beginning from the region preceeding the shock wave has been obtained [ru

  1. Study of ultrasound-assisted radio-frequency plasma discharges in n-dodecane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerotto, Elisabeth; De Schepper, Peter; Nikiforov, Anton Y.; Brems, Steven; Shamiryan, Denis; Boullart, Werner; Leys, Christophe; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates the generation of a stable plasma phase in a liquid hydrocarbon (n-dodecane) by means of ultrasound (US) and radio-frequency (RF) or electromagnetic radiation. It is demonstrated for the first time that ultrasonic aided RF plasma discharges can be generated in a liquid. Plasma discharges are obtained for different gas mixtures at a pressure of 12 kPa and at low ignition powers (100 W for RF and 2.4 W cm-2 for US). Direct carbon deposition from the liquid precursor on Cu, Ni, SiO2 and Si substrates has been obtained and no apparent compositional or structural difference among the substrate materials was observed. Characterization of the deposited solid phase revealed an amorphous structure. In addition, structural changes in the liquid precursor after plasma treatment have been analysed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) allowed the estimation of several plasma characteristic temperatures. The plasma excitation temperature was estimated to be about 2.3-2.4 eV. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of the discharge in n-dodecane with Ar as a feed gas were 1400 K and 6500 K, respectively. In Ar/O2 plasma, an increased rotational (1630 K) and vibrational temperature (7200 K) were obtained.

  2. Remote and direct plasma regions for low-temperature growth of carbon nanotubes on glass substrates for display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabatabaei, M K; Ghafouri fard, H; Koohsorkhi, J; Khatami, S; Mohajerzadeh, S

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on glass substrates is introduced in this study. A two-stage plasma was used to achieve low-temperature and vertically aligned CNTs. Ni deposited on indium tin oxide/glass substrate was used as the catalyst and hydrogen and acetylene were used as gas feeds. In this investigation a new technique was developed to grow vertically aligned CNTs at temperatures below 400 deg. C while CNT growth by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition required high temperatures. Low-temperature growth of vertically aligned CNTs was suitable for the fabrication of micro-lens and self-oriented displays on glass substrates. Also, we have reported a new configuration for CNT-based display by means of controlling the refractive index of liquid crystal around the CNT by applying a proper voltage to the top and bottom array.

  3. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Arc generators of low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, Cz.; Niewiedzial, R.; Siwiec, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is a review of works concerning investigation and use of low-temperature plasma in arc plasma generators made in Electric Power Institute of PP. There are discussed: analytical approach to a problem of volt-current and operational characteristics of DC arc plasma generators, determination of limits of their stable work and possibilities of their use to technological aims. (author)

  5. Simultaneous determination of atorvastatin and valsartan in human plasma by solid-based disperser liquid-liquid microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, Mir Ali; Khorram, Parisa; Pazhohan, Azar

    2016-04-01

    A simple, sensitive, and efficient method has been developed for simultaneous estimation of valsartan and atorvastatin in human plasma by combination of solid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. In the proposed method, 1,2-dibromoethane (extraction solvent) is added on a sugar cube (as a solid disperser) and it is introduced into plasma sample containing the analytes. After manual shaking and centrifugation, the resultant sedimented phase is subjected to back extraction into a small volume of sodium hydrogen carbonate solution using air-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction. Then the cloudy solution is centrifuged and the obtained aqueous phase is transferred into a microtube and analyzed by the separation system. Under the optimal conditions, extraction recoveries are obtained in the range of 81-90%. Calibration curves plotted in drug-free plasma sample are linear in the ranges of 5-5000μgL(-1) for valsartan and 10-5000μgL(-1) for atorvastatin with the coefficients of determination higher than 0.997. Limits of detection and quantification of the studied analytes in plasma sample are 0.30-2.6 and 1.0-8.2μgL(-1), respectively. Intra-day (n=6) and inter-days (n=4) precisions of the method are satisfactory with relative standard deviations less than 7.4% (at three levels of 10, 500, and 2000μgL(-1), each analyte). These data suggest that the method can be successfully applied to determine trace amounts of valsartan and atorvastatin in human plasma samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of metal ions in fusion plasmas using emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tale, I.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Latvian and Portugal Associations are performing development of advanced plasma - facing system using the liquid metal limiter. The objectives of this project require study of the influence of the liquid metal limiter on the main plasma parameters, including concentration of evaporated metal atoms in plasma. The fusion plasmas are related to the dense hot plasmas. The required average ion temperature according to the ITER project (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is 8,0 keV (9,3 x 10 7 0 K), the average electron temperature - 8,9 keV (1,04 x 10 8 0 K). Plasma temperature operated in the research tokamak ISSTOK, involved in testing of liquid metal limiter concept is considerably less, being of order of 10 50 K. The ionization degree of metal atoms considerably depends on the plasma ion temperature. Density of metal vapours in plasma can be estimated using the following two spectroscopic methods: The fluorescence of the multiple ionised metal ions in steady state concentration; The charge exchange emission during ionisation of evaporated metal ions. In the first step of development of testing system of metal vapours the equipment and instrumentation for charge exchange spectroscopy of Ga and In has been elaborated taking into account the following features of plasma emission. The Ga emission lines occur on the background high temperature plasma black body emission and stray light. Radial distribution of Ga in plasma in the facing plane of Ga flux is desirable

  7. Effects of emitted electron temperature on the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Wang, H.; Raitses, Y.; Sydorenko, D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that electron emission from a surface significantly affects the sheath surrounding that surface. Typical fluid theory of a planar sheath with emitted electrons assumes that the plasma electrons follow the Boltzmann relation and the emitted electrons are emitted with zero energy and predicts a potential drop of 1.03T e /e across the sheath in the floating condition. By considering the modified velocity distribution function caused by plasma electrons lost to the wall and the half-Maxwellian distribution of the emitted electrons, it is shown that ratio of plasma electron temperature to emitted electron temperature significantly affects the sheath potential when the plasma electron temperature is within an order of magnitude of the emitted electron temperature. When the plasma electron temperature equals the emitted electron temperature the emissive sheath potential goes to zero. One dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the predictions made by this theory. The effects of the addition of a monoenergetic electron beam to the Maxwellian plasma electrons were explored, showing that the emissive sheath potential is close to the beam energy only when the emitted electron flux is less than the beam flux

  8. Experiments with liquid metal walls: Status of the lithium tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, Robert, E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlake, John [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Abstarct: Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the current drive experiment-upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  9. Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, Robert; Berzak, Laura; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M.; Jones, Andrew; Kozub, Thomas; Kugel, Henry; Leblanc, Benoit; Logan, Nicholas; Lucia, Matthew; Lundberg, Daniel; Majeski, Richard; Mansfield, Dennis; Menard, Jonathan; Spaleta, Jeffrey; Strickler, Trevor; Timberlak, John

    2010-01-01

    Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions.

  10. Oscillatory vapour shielding of liquid metal walls in nuclear fusion devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eden, G G; Kvon, V; van de Sanden, M C M; Morgan, T W

    2017-08-04

    Providing an efficacious plasma facing surface between the extreme plasma heat exhaust and the structural materials of nuclear fusion devices is a major challenge on the road to electricity production by fusion power plants. The performance of solid plasma facing surfaces may become critically reduced over time due to progressing damage accumulation. Liquid metals, however, are now gaining interest in solving the challenge of extreme heat flux hitting the reactor walls. A key advantage of liquid metals is the use of vapour shielding to reduce the plasma exhaust. Here we demonstrate that this phenomenon is oscillatory by nature. The dynamics of a Sn vapour cloud are investigated by exposing liquid Sn targets to H and He plasmas at heat fluxes greater than 5 MW m -2 . The observations indicate the presence of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and liquid target ruled by recombinatory processes in the plasma, leading to an approximately stable surface temperature.Vapour shielding is one of the interesting mechanisms for reducing the heat load to plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Here the authors report on the observation of a dynamic equilibrium between the plasma and the divertor liquid Sn surface leading to an overall stable surface temperature.

  11. Observation of electron plasma waves in plasma of two-temperature electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezawa, Shunjiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu.

    1981-01-01

    Propagation of electron plasma waves in a large and unmagnetized plasma containing two Maxwellian distributions of electrons is studied experimentally. Two kinds of plasma sources which supply electrons of different temperature are used. The temperature ratio is about 3 and the density ratio of hot to cool electrons is varied from 0 to 0.5. A small contamination of hot electrons enhances the Landau damping of the principal mode known as the Bohm-Gross mode. When the density of hot electrons is larger than about 0.2, two modes are observed. The results agree with theoretical dispersion relations when excitation efficiencies of the modes are considered. (author)

  12. The approximate determination of the critical temperature of a liquid by measuring surface tension versus the temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroto, J A; Nieves, F J de las; Quesada-Perez, M

    2004-01-01

    A classical experience in a physics student laboratory is to determine the surface tension of a liquid versus the temperature and to check the linear appearance of the obtained graph. In this work we show a simple method to estimate the critical temperature of three liquids by using experimental data of surface tension at different temperatures. By a logarithm fitting between surface tension and temperature, the critical temperature can be determined and compared with data from the literature. For two liquids (butanol and nitrobenzene) the comparison is acceptable but the differences are too high for the third liquid (water). By discussing the results it seems to be clear that the difference between the critical temperature of the liquid and the maximum temperature of the surface tension measurements is the determining factor in obtaining acceptable results. From this study it is possible to obtain more information on the liquid characteristics from surface tension measurements that are currently carried out in a student laboratory. Besides, in this paper it is shown how to select the most suitable liquids which provide both acceptable values for the critical temperature and measurements of the surface tension at moderate temperatures. The complementary use of numerical methods permits us to offer a complete experience for the students with a simple laboratory experiment which we recommend for physics students in advanced university courses

  13. Behavior of liquid Li-Sn alloy as plasma facing material on ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, J.P.S., E-mail: jpsloureiro@ipfn.tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Tabarés, F.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Ciemat, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Gomes, R.; Alves, E.; Mateus, R.; Pereira, T.; Alves, H.; Figueiredo, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2017-04-15

    The high power loads impinging on the first wall and particularly the divertor of fusion reactors is a decisive factor to the success of nuclear fusion. An alternative to solid plasma facing components is the use of liquid metals such as lithium or tin due to the regenerative properties of the liquid surface. Another suitable candidate is the eutectic lithium tin alloy (30 at.% Li) which is suggested to display beneficial properties of both its constituent elements. The application of these materials as liquid metal plasma facing components depends on several factors such as their affinity to retain hydrogenic isotopes and the discharge performance degradation induced by the enhanced impurity contamination, among others. An experimental setup has been developed to produce and expose samples to ISTTOK plasmas on both liquid and solid states. Samples of Li-Sn alloy were exposed at ISTTOK to deuterium plasmas. Post-mortem analysis of the samples was performed by means of ion beam diagnostics. To quantify the fuel retention on the samples the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique was applied. Complementary, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was used for determination material composition, particularly of impurities, on the samples. Regardless of the high sensitivity of these techniques no deuterium was detected in the samples. Emission of the Li-I 670.7 nm line indicates that there was interaction of the plasma with the samples. Alternative reasons for the low retention of this material are discussed. Lithium segregation to the surface of the sample was observed.

  14. Control of ROS and RNS productions in liquid in atmospheric pressure plasma-jet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Ito, Taiki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Ikeda, Junichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal plasma jets are of current interest in biomedical applications such as wound disinfection and even treatment of cancer tumors. Beneficial therapeutic effects in medical applications are attributed to excited species of oxygen and nitrogen from air. However, to control the production of these species in the plasma jet is difficult because their production is strongly dependent on concentration of nitrogen and oxygen from ambient air into the plasma jet. In this study, we analyze the discharge characteristics and the ROS and RNS productions in liquid in low- and high-frequency plasma-jet systems. Our experiments demonstrated the marked effects of surrounding gas near the plasma jet on ROS and RNS productions in liquid. By controlling the surround gas, the O2 and N2 main plasma jets are selectively produced even in open air. We also show that the concentration ratio of NO2- to H2O2 in liquid is precisely tuned from 0 to 0.18 in deionized water by changing N2 gas ratio (N2 / (N2 +O2)) in the main discharge gas, where high NO2- ratio is obtained at N2 gas ratio at N2 / (N2 +O2) = 0 . 8 . The low-frequency plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas is an effective plasma source for ROS and RNS productions in liquid, and can be a useful tool for biomedical applications. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  15. Development of plasma bolometers using fiber-optic temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, M. L., E-mail: reinkeml@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Han, M.; Liu, G. [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Eden, G. G. van [Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Evenblij, R.; Haverdings, M. [Technobis, Pyrietstraat 2, 1812 SC Alkmaar (Netherlands); Stratton, B. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of radiated power in magnetically confined plasmas are important for exhaust studies in present experiments and expected to be a critical diagnostic for future fusion reactors. Resistive bolometer sensors have long been utilized in tokamaks and helical devices but suffer from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Results are shown from initial testing of a new bolometer concept based on fiber-optic temperature sensor technology. A small, 80 μm diameter, 200 μm long silicon pillar attached to the end of a single mode fiber-optic cable acts as a Fabry–Pérot cavity when broadband light, λ{sub o} ∼ 1550 nm, is transmitted along the fiber. Changes in temperature alter the optical path length of the cavity primarily through the thermo-optic effect, resulting in a shift of fringes reflected from the pillar detected using an I-MON 512 OEM spectrometer. While initially designed for use in liquids, this sensor has ideal properties for use as a plasma bolometer: a time constant, in air, of ∼150 ms, strong absorption in the spectral range of plasma emission, immunity to local EMI, and the ability to measure changes in temperature remotely. Its compact design offers unique opportunities for integration into the vacuum environment in places unsuitable for a resistive bolometer. Using a variable focus 5 mW, 405 nm, modulating laser, the signal to noise ratio versus power density of various bolometer technologies are directly compared, estimating the noise equivalent power density (NEPD). Present tests show the fiber-optic bolometer to have NEPD of 5-10 W/m{sup 2} when compared to those of the resistive bolometer which can achieve <0.5 W/m{sup 2} in the laboratory, but this can degrade to 1-2 W/m{sup 2} or worse when installed on a tokamak. Concepts are discussed to improve the signal to noise ratio of this new fiber-optic bolometer by reducing the pillar height and adding thin metallic coatings, along with improving the spectral resolution of the interrogator.

  16. Glass Transitions and Low-Frequency Dynamics of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, O.; Inamura, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Hamaguchi, H.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the heat capacity and neutrion quasi- and inelastic scattering spectra of some salts of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ion bmim+, which is a typical cation of room-temperature ionic liquids, and its derivatives. The heat capacity measurements revealed that the room-temperature ionic liquids have glass transitions as molecular liquids. The temperature dependence of configurational entropy demonstrated that the room-temperature ionic liquids are 'fragile liquids'. Both heat capacity and inelastic neutron scattering data revealed that the glassy phases exhibit large low-energy excitations usually called 'boson peak'. The quasielastic neutron scattering data showed that so-called 'fast process' appears around Tg as in molecular and polymer glasses. The temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient derived from the neutron scattering data indicated that the orientation of bmim+ ions and/or butyl-groups of bmim+ ions is highly disordered and very flexible in an ionic liquid phase

  17. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  18. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-01-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm 3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  19. A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Inoue, Toru

    2009-06-01

    In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm3 regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

  20. On the quantification of the dissolved hydroxyl radicals in the plasma-liquid system using the molecular probe method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yupengxue; Gong, Xinning; He, Bangbang; Li, Xiaofei; Cao, Dianyu; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bing Hui; Huo Liu, Qing

    2018-04-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radical is one of the most important reactive species produced by plasma-liquid interactions, and the OH in liquid phase (dissolved OH radical, OHdis) takes effect in many plasma-based applications due to its high reactivity. Therefore, the quantification of the OHdis in a plasma-liquid system is of great importance, and a molecular probe method usually used for the OHdis detection might be applied. Herein, we investigate the validity of using the molecular probe method to estimate the [OHdis] in the plasma-liquid system. Dimethyl sulfoxide is used as the molecular probe to estimate the [OHdis] in an air plasma-liquid system, and usually the estimation of [OHdis] is deduced by quantifying the OHdis-induced derivative, the formaldehyde (HCHO). The analysis indicates that the true concentration of the OHdis should be estimated from the sum of three terms: the formed HCHO, the existing OH scavengers, and the H2O2 formed from the OHdis. The results show that the measured [HCHO] needs to be corrected since the HCHO consumption is not negligible in the plasma-liquid system. We conclude from the results and the analysis that the molecular probe method generally underestimates the [OHdis] in the plasma-liquid system. If one wants to obtain the true concentration of the OHdis in the plasma-liquid system, one needs to know the consumption behavior of the OHdis-induced derivatives, the information of the OH scavengers (such as hydrated electron, atomic hydrogen besides the molecular probe), and also the knowledge of the H2O2 formed from the OHdis.

  1. Liquid assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition with a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schäfer, J.; Fricke, K.; Mika, Filip; Pokorná, Zuzana; Zajíčková, L.; Foest, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 630, MAY 30 (2017), s. 71-78 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : plasma jet * liquid assisted plasma enhanced chemical * vapour deposition * silicon oxide Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016

  2. Liquid oxygen liquid acquisition device bubble point tests with high pressure lox at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurns, J. M.; Hartwig, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    When transferring propellant in space, it is most efficient to transfer single phase liquid from a propellant tank to an engine. In earth's gravity field or under acceleration, propellant transfer is fairly simple. However, in low gravity, withdrawing single-phase fluid becomes a challenge. A variety of propellant management devices (PMDs) are used to ensure single-phase flow. One type of PMD, a liquid acquisition device (LAD) takes advantage of capillary flow and surface tension to acquire liquid. The present work reports on testing with liquid oxygen (LOX) at elevated pressures (and thus temperatures) (maximum pressure 1724 kPa and maximum temperature 122 K) as part of NASA's continuing cryogenic LAD development program. These tests evaluate LAD performance for LOX stored in higher pressure vessels that may be used in propellant systems using pressure fed engines. Test data shows a significant drop in LAD bubble point values at higher liquid temperatures, consistent with lower liquid surface tension at those temperatures. Test data also indicates that there are no first order effects of helium solubility in LOX on LAD bubble point prediction. Test results here extend the range of data for LOX fluid conditions, and provide insight into factors affecting predicting LAD bubble point pressures.

  3. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  4. On improved understanding of plasma-chemical processes in complex low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röpcke, Jürgen; Loffhagen, Detlef; von Wahl, Eric; Nave, Andy S. C.; Hamann, Stephan; van Helden, Jean-Piere H.; Lang, Norbert; Kersten, Holger

    2018-05-01

    Over the last years, chemical sensing using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with methods of mid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (MIR-LAS) in the molecular fingerprint region from 3 to 20 μm, which contains strong rotational-vibrational absorption bands of a large variety of gaseous species. This optical approach established powerful in situ diagnostic tools to study plasma-chemical processes of complex low-temperature plasmas. The methods of MIR-LAS enable to detect stable and transient molecular species in ground and excited states and to measure the concentrations and temperatures of reactive species in plasmas. Since kinetic processes are inherent to discharges ignited in molecular gases, high time resolution on sub-second timescales is frequently desired for fundamental studies as well as for process monitoring in applied research and industry. In addition to high sensitivity and good temporal resolution, the capacity for broad spectral coverage enabling multicomponent detection is further expanding the use of OES and MIR-LAS techniques. Based on selected examples, this paper reports on recent achievements in the understanding of complex low-temperature plasmas. Recently, a link with chemical modeling of the plasma has been provided, which is the ultimate objective for a better understanding of the chemical and reaction kinetic processes occurring in the plasma. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas", edited by Jürgen Meichsner, Michael Bonitz, Holger Fehske, Alexander Piel.

  5. Spectroscopic diagnosis of plasma in atmospheric pressure negative pulsed gas-liquid discharge with nozzle-cylinder electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, SUN; Zhan, TAO; Zhipeng, ZHU; Dong, WANG; Wenjun, PAN

    2018-05-01

    The plasma characteristics of a gas-liquid phase discharge reactor were investigated by optical and electrical methods. The nozzle-cylinder electrode in the discharge reactor was supplied with a negative nanosecond pulsed generator. The optical emission spectrum diagnosis revealed that OH (A2∑+ → X2Π, 306–309 nm), N2 (C3Π→B3Πg, 337 nm), O (3p5p→3s5s0, 777.2 nm) and O (3p3p→3s3s0, 844.6 nm) were produced in the discharge plasma channels. The electron temperature (T e) was calculated from the emission relative intensity ratio between the atomic O 777.2 nm and 844.6 nm, and it increased with the applied voltage and the pulsed frequency and fell within the range of 0.5–0.8 eV. The gas temperature (T g) that was measured by Lifbase was in a range from 400 K to 600 K.

  6. Generator of the low-temperature heterogeneous plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Chinnov, V. F.; Sargsyan, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    A generator of low-temperature dc plasma with an expanding channel of an output electrode for gas-thermal spraying was designed and constructed. The delivery of the sprayed powder into the cathode and anode arc-binding zones or into the plasma jet below the anode binding was realized. The electrophysical characteristics of both the plasma torch and the heterogeneous plasma flow with Al2O3 powder are studied. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of a plasma torch depends on the gas flow rate. If the flow rate varies from 1 to 3 g/s, the falling CVC becomes gradually increasing. The speed and temperature of the sprayed powder are determined.

  7. Using Three-Body Recombination to Extract Electron Temperatures of Ultracold Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R. S.; Zhang, X. L.; Rolston, S. L.

    2007-01-01

    Three-body recombination, an important collisional process in plasmas, increases dramatically at low electron temperatures, with an accepted scaling of T e -9/2 . We measure three-body recombination in an ultracold neutral xenon plasma by detecting recombination-created Rydberg atoms using a microwave-ionization technique. With the accepted theory (expected to be applicable for weakly coupled plasmas) and our measured rates, we extract the plasma temperatures, which are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements early in the plasma lifetime. The resulting electron temperatures indicate that the plasma continues to cool to temperatures below 1 K

  8. Electrochemical applications of room temperature ionic liquids in nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) have invaded all branches of science. They are also receiving an upsurge, in recent years, for possible applications in various stages of nuclear fuel cycle. Ionic liquids are compounds composed entirely of ions existing in liquid state and RTILs are ionic liquids molten at temperatures lower than 373 K. RTILs are generally made up of an organic cation and an inorganic or an organic anion. Room temperature ionic liquids have several fascinating properties, which are unique to a particular combination of cation and anion. The properties such as insignificant vapor pressure, amazing ability to dissolve organic and inorganic compounds, wide electrochemical window are the specific advantages when dealing with application of RTILs for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The ionic liquids are regarded as designer or tailor-made solvents as their properties can be tuned for desired application by appropriate cation-anion combinations. An excellent review by Wilkes describes about the historical perspectives of room temperature ionic liquids, pioneers in that area, events and the products delivered till 2001. Furthermore, several comprehensive reviews have been made on room temperature ionic liquids by various authors

  9. Foundations of low-temperature plasma physics—an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Keudell, A.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.

    2017-11-01

    The use of plasmas as a reactive mixture of ions, electrons and neutrals is at the core of numerous technologies in industry, enabling applications in microelectronics, automotives, packaging, environment and medicine. Recently, even the use of plasmas in medical applications has made great progress. The dominant character of a plasma is often its non equilibrium nature with different temperatures for the individual species in a plasma, the ions, electrons and neutrals. This opens up a multitude of reaction pathways which are inaccessible to conventional methods in chemistry, for example. The understanding of plasmas requires expertise in plasma physics, plasma chemistry and in electrical engineering. This first paper in a series of foundation papers on low temperature plasma science is intended to provide the very basics of plasmas as a common starting point for the more in-depth discussion of particular plasma generation methods, plasma modeling and diagnostics in the other foundation papers. In this first paper of the series, the common terminology, definitions and main concepts are introduced. The covered aspects start with the basic definitions and include further plasma equilibria, particle collisions and transport, sheaths and discharge breakdowns.

  10. Characteristics of a non-volatile liquid propellant in liquid-fed ablative pulsed plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Schönherr, Tony; Koizumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    In the past several decades, the use of electric propulsion in spacecraft has experienced tremendous growth. With the increasing adoption of small satellites in the kilogram range, suitable propulsion systems will be necessary in the near future. Pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs) were the first form of electric propulsion to be deployed in orbit, and are highly suitable for small satellites due to their inherent simplicity. However, their lifetime is limited by disadvantages such as carbon deposition leading to thruster failure, and complicated feeding systems required due to the conventional use of solid propellants (usually polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)). A promising alternative to solid propellants has recently emerged in the form of non-volatile liquids that are stable in vacuum. This study presents a broad comparison of the non-volatile liquid perfluoropolyether (PFPE) and solid PTFE as propellants on a PPT with a common design base. We show that liquid PFPE can be successfully used as a propellant, and exhibits similar plasma discharge properties to conventional solid PTFE, but with a mass bit that is an order of magnitude higher for an identical ablation area. We also demonstrate that the liquid PFPE propellant has exceptional resistance to carbon deposition, completely negating one of the major causes of thruster failure, while solid PTFE exhibited considerable carbon build-up. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to examine the elemental compositions of the surface deposition on the electrodes and the ablation area of the propellant (or PFPE encapsulator). The results show that based on its physical characteristics and behavior, non-volatile liquid PFPE is an extremely promising propellant for use in PPTs, with an extensive scope available for future research and development.

  11. Heat Capacity of Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulechka, Yauheni U.

    2010-09-01

    Experimental data on heat capacity of room-temperature ionic liquids in the liquid state were compiled and critically evaluated. The compilation contains data for 102 aprotic ionic liquids from 63 literature references and covers the period of time from 1998 through the end of February 2010. Parameters of correlating equations for temperature dependence of the heat capacities were developed.

  12. The influence of exothermic reactions on the nonequilibrium level of discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, V.Ya.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Prysiazhnevych, I.V.; Martysh, Eu.V.

    2013-01-01

    The comparative analysis of plasma parameters of transverse arc and discharge in the gas channel with liquid wall was made for different working gas and liquids (for air, distilled water and for its mixtures with ethanol). Electronic excitation temperatures Te of atoms, vibrational Tv and rotational Tr temperatures of molecules in the generated plasma were determined by optical emission spectroscopy. It was shown that both discharges generate nonequilibrium plasma in the case of working gas air and working liquid-distilled water. Adding a fuel (ethanol) into the plasma system with O 2 leads to the increasing of rotational and vibrational temperatures of molecules, which became equal to each other within the errors. This may indicate that the exothermic reactions reduce the level of nonthermality of the generated plasma as a result of additional energy supply for heavy components in the process of complete combustion of hydrocarbons.

  13. Temperature Measurements of Dense Plasmas by Detailed Balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Ropke, G; Reinholz, H; Thiele, R; Fortmann, C; Forster, E; Cao, L; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas at high electron densities of n e = 10 20 - 10 26 cm -3 and moderate temperatures T e = 1 - 20 eV are important for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. These plasmas are usually referred to as Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and are characterized by a coupling parameter of Λ ∼> 1 where correlations become important. The characterization of such plasmas is still a challenging task due to the lack of direct measurement techniques for temperatures and densities. They propose to measure the Thomson scattering spectrum of vacuum-UV radiation off density fluctuations in the plasma. Collective Thomson scattering provides accurate data for the electron temperature applying first principles. Further, this method takes advantage of the spectral asymmetry resulting from detailed balance and is independent of collisional effects in these dense systems

  14. Synthesis of surfactant-free electrostatically stabilized gold nanoparticles by plasma-induced liquid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J.; Němcová, L.; Maguire, P.; Graham, W. G.; Mariotti, D.

    2013-06-01

    Plasma-induced non-equilibrium liquid chemistry is used to synthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) without using any reducing or capping agents. The morphology and optical properties of the synthesized AuNPs are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Plasma processing parameters affect the particle shape and size and the rate of the AuNP synthesis process. Particles of different shapes (e.g. spherical, triangular, hexagonal, pentagonal, etc) are synthesized in aqueous solutions. In particular, the size of the AuNPs can be tuned from 5 nm to several hundred nanometres by varying the initial gold precursor (HAuCl4) concentration from 2.5 μM to 1 mM. In order to reveal details of the basic plasma-liquid interactions that lead to AuNP synthesis, we have measured the solution pH, conductivity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration of the liquid after plasma processing, and conclude that H2O2 plays the role of the reducing agent which converts Au+3 ions to Au0 atoms, leading to nucleation growth of the AuNPs.

  15. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the quantitative determination of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor quizartinib in mouse plasma using salting-out liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retmana, Irene A; Wang, Jing; Schinkel, Alfred H; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2017-01-01

    A bioanalytical assay for quizartinib -a potent, and selective FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor- in mouse plasma was developed and validated. Salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE), using acetonitrile and magnesium sulfate, was selected as sample pretreatment with deuterated quizartinib

  16. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  17. High-performance liquid chromatographic radioenzymatic assay for plasma catecyholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaniecki, T.S.; Corder, C.N.; McDonald, R.H. Jr.; Feldman, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A new assay method for plasma catecholamimes (CA) requiring only 50 μl has been developed, which uses high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (D), and epinephrine (E) compounds found in plasma are radioactively o-methylated with S-[methyl- 3 H]-adenosyl-L-methionine ( 3 H-SAM) 3 H-SAM by the reaction of catechol-o-methyl transferase (COMT). The reaction is terminated and a standard mixture of nonradioactive o-methylated analogues of NE, D, and E is added to act as a carrier. Following separation by HPLC, the D,L-normetanephrine (NMN), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyl-amine or 3-methoxytyramine (3-MOT), and metanephrine (MN) radioactive peaks are collected which represent NE, D, and E, respectively. Then MNM and MN are oxidized to vanillin, and 3-MOT is acetylated. The products are subsequently separated by solvent extraction. This is necessary in order to avoid high radioactive blanks and to allow quantitation of the radioactivity by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The mean supine levels of NE, D, and E in normal subjects were respectively 182, 33, and 87 pg/ml of plasma. Similar assays on patients with pheochromocytoma revealed 797, 80, and 470 pg/ml

  18. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forster, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use in measuring pressures in liquid at high temperatures, especially such as liquid sodium or liquid potassium, comprises a soft diaphragm in contact with the liquid. The soft diaphragm is coupled mechanically to a stiff diaphragm. Pressure is measured by measuring the displacement of both diaphragms, typically by measuring the capacitance between the stiff diaphragm and a fixed plate when the stiff diaphragm is deflected in response to the measured pressure through mechanical coupling from the soft diaphragm. Absolute calibration is achieved by admitting gas under pressure to the region between diaphragms and to the region between the stiff diaphragm and the fixed plate, breaking the coupling between the soft and stiff diaphragms. The apparatus can be calibrated rapidly and absolutely

  20. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Method for Determination of Dipyridamole in Human Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAVOOD BEIGI BAND ARAB ADI

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid and specific high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure is reported for"nquantitative determination of dipyridamole in human -plasma. The assay uses a reversed-phase"nhigh-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC and UV detection at 280nm and has a limit"nof detection of approximately 5ng/mL. The mobile phase consists of MeOH-H20 (60:40"nadjusted to pH 3.3. Dipyridamole was extracted from plasma by back-extraction procedure, with"npropranolol as the internal standard. The reproducibility of the method is satisfactory

  1. 2-D Temperature Mapping in Fluorocarbon Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Kristen L.; Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2005-09-01

    Two-dimensional maps of rotational temperature in CF4 plasmas were determined using planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of CF A2Σ+ - X2Π (1,0). Rotational temperatures are expected to be in equilibrium with gas temperatures under the present conditions. Experiments were performed in a capacitively-coupled, parallel-plate reactor at pressures from 27 Pa to 107 Pa and powers of 10 W to 30 W. The effects of electrode cooling and having a wafer present were also examined. Measured temperatures ranged between 273 K±15 K and 480 K±15 K. The strong temperature gradients found in these plasmas can have serious effects on density measurements that probe a single rotational level, as well as on reaction rate constants and interpretation of density gradients.

  2. Analysis of drugs of abuse in human plasma by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, P; Regenjo, M; Bermejo, A M; Fernández, A M; Lorenzo, R A; Carro, A M

    2015-04-01

    Opioids and cocaine are widely used at present, both for recreational purposes and as drugs of abuse. This raises the need to develop new analytical methods specifically designed for the simultaneous detection of several drugs of abuse in biological samples. In this work, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was assessed as a new sample treatment for the simultaneous extraction of morphine (MOR), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), cocaine (COC), benzoylecgonine (BZE) and methadone (MET) from human plasma. Preliminary assays were done before developing an experimental design based on a Uniform Network Doehlert which allowed the optimum extraction conditions to be identified, namely: a volume of extractant solvent (chloroform) and dispersant solvent (acetonitrile) of 220 µl and 3.2 ml, respectively; 0.2 g of NaCl as a salting-out additive; pH 10.6 and ultrasound stirring for 3.5 min. The resulting extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA), using an XBridge® RP18 column (250 × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm particle size). Calibration graphs were linear over the concentration range 0.1-10 µg ml⁻¹, and detection limits ranged from 13.9 to 28.5 ng ml⁻¹. Precision calculated at three different concentration levels in plasma was included in the range 0.1-6.8% RSD. Recoveries of the five drugs were all higher than 84% on average. Finally the proposed method was successfully applied to 22 plasma samples from heroin, cocaine and/or methadone users, and the most frequently detected drug was benzoylecgonine, followed by methadone, cocaine and morphine. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Electrostatic fluctuations measured in low temperature helical plasmas with low collisionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ikeda, R.; Ito, T.; Toi, K.; Suzuki, C.; Matsunaga, G.

    2004-01-01

    Electrostatic fluctuations have been measured by Langmuir probes from edge to core plasma region in low temperature helical plasmas which are produced by 2.45 GHz microwaves at very low field less than 0.1 T. The principal dimensionless parameters of the plasmas, that is, the normalized electron-ion collision frequency ν ei , and averaged plasma β φ and others are in the same range of them in high temperature plasmas, except the normalized gyro radius ρ s . The data on fluctuation characteristics from the dimensionally similar low temperature plasmas may give an important insight into the understanding of turbulent transport in high temperature plasmas. Dependences of fluctuation amplitudes on the radial electric field shear, ρ s and ν ei are investigated. Electrostatic fluctuations propagating in electron-diamagnetic drift direction have been observed in the plasma edge region and in ion-diamagnetic drift direction in the plasma core region. (authors)

  4. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  5. Temperature and emissivity determination of liquid steel S235

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpp, H.; Sperl, A.; Kozakov, R.; Gött, G.; Uhrlandt, D.; Wilhelm, G.

    2012-06-01

    Temperature determination of liquid metals is difficult but a necessary tool for improving materials and processes such as arc welding in the metal-working industry. A method to determine the surface temperature of the weld pool is described. A TIG welding process and absolute calibrated optical emission spectroscopy are used. This method is combined with high-speed photography. 2D temperature profiles are obtained. The emissivity of the radiating surface has an important influence on the temperature determination. A temperature dependent emissivity for liquid steel is given for the spectral region between 650 and 850 nm.

  6. Temperature and emissivity determination of liquid steel S235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schöpp, H; Kozakov, R; Gött, G; Uhrlandt, D; Sperl, A; Wilhelm, G

    2012-01-01

    Temperature determination of liquid metals is difficult but a necessary tool for improving materials and processes such as arc welding in the metal-working industry. A method to determine the surface temperature of the weld pool is described. A TIG welding process and absolute calibrated optical emission spectroscopy are used. This method is combined with high-speed photography. 2D temperature profiles are obtained. The emissivity of the radiating surface has an important influence on the temperature determination. A temperature dependent emissivity for liquid steel is given for the spectral region between 650 and 850 nm. (paper)

  7. Quantitative detection of plasma-generated radicals in liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresp, H; Hammer, M U; Winter, J; Reuter, S; Weltmann, K-D

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the qualitative and quantitative detection of oxygen radicals in liquids after plasma treatment with an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is investigated. Absolute values for · OH and O 2 ·- radical concentration and their net production rate in plasma-treated liquids are determined without the use of additional scavenging chemicals such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) or mannitol (D-MAN). The main oxygen-centred radical generation in PBS was found to originate from the superoxide radical. It is shown that hidden parameters such as the manufacturer of chemical components could have a big influence on the comparability and reproducibility of the results. Finally, the effect of a shielding gas device for the investigated plasma jet with a shielding gas composition of varying oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio on radical generation after plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline solution was investigated. (paper)

  8. Luminescence of high density electron-hole plasma in CdS and CdSe in a wide temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Shionoya, S.

    1983-01-01

    Time-resolved spectra of the spontaneous luminescence of the high density electron-hole plasma (EHP) in CdS and CdSe are observed in a wide range of temperature which is surely higher than the calculated critical temperature for electron-hole liquid formation, in order to carry forward discussion on dynamic nature of the EHP previously observed in 4.2 K experiments. Spectra in the late stage are analyzed, and obtained values of the reduced bandgap energy and chemical potential are compared with those theoretically calculated for higher temperatures. The aspects of the change of the spectral shape in the late stage are hard to understand. Unfortunately no clear conclusion is drawn on the nature of the EHP produced at 4.2 K. The only thing one can say is that the condensed electron-hole liquid state, which is in equilibrium with the exciton state, is not realized. (author)

  9. Liquid metals as a divertor plasma-facing material explored using the Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI linear devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T. W.; Rindt, P.; van Eden, G. G.; Kvon, V.; Jaworksi, M. A.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.

    2018-01-01

    For DEMO and beyond, liquid metal plasma-facing components are considered due to their resilience to erosion through flowed replacement, potential for cooling beyond conduction and inherent immunity to many of the issues of neutron loading compared to solid materials. The development curve of liquid metals is behind that of e.g. tungsten however, and tokamak-based research is currently somewhat limited in scope. Therefore, investigation into linear plasma devices can provide faster progress under controlled and well-diagnosed conditions in assessing many of the issues surrounding the use of liquid metals. The linear plasma devices Magnum-PSI and Pilot-PSI are capable of producing DEMO-relevant plasma fluxes, which well replicate expected divertor conditions, and the exploration of physics issues for tin (Sn) and lithium (Li) such as vapour shielding, erosion under high particle flux loading and overall power handling are reviewed here. A deeper understanding of erosion and deposition through this work indicates that stannane formation may play an important role in enhancing Sn erosion, while on the other hand the strong hydrogen isotope affinity reduces the evaporation rate and sputtering yields for Li. In combination with the strong redeposition rates, which have been observed under this type of high-density plasma, this implies that an increase in the operational temperature range, implying a power handling range of 20-25 MW m-2 for Sn and up to 12.5 MW m-2 for Li could be achieved. Vapour shielding may be expected to act as a self-protection mechanism in reducing the heat load to the substrate for off-normal events in the case of Sn, but may potentially be a continual mode of operation for Li.

  10. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance

  11. Spherical Torus Plasma Interactions with Large-area Liquid Lithium Surfaces in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Kaita; R. Majeski; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith

    2002-01-18

    The Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

  12. The physics of the low-temperature plasma in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracik, J.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of low-temperature plasma research in Czechoslovakia since 1954 and its main results are pointed out. In the first years, various processes in electric discharges and electromagnetic acceleration of plasma clusters were studied at Czechoslovak universities and in the Institute of Physics. In the study of ionization waves, Czechoslovak physicists achieved world priority. Later on, low-temperature plasma investigation began in the Institute of Plasma Physics, founded in 1959. The issues of plasma interaction with the solid state and plasma applications in plasma chemistry were studied mainly by its Department of Applied Plasma Physics. The main effort of this group, transferred recently to the Institute of Physics, is aimed at thin film production and plasma-surface interactions; similar experimental studies are also carried out at universities in Brno and Bratislava. Last but not least, arc spraying of powder materials using water-cooled plasmatrons is being developed by the Department of Plasma Technology of the Institute of Plasma Physics. (J.U.)

  13. Liquid lithium surface control and its effect on plasma performance in the HT-7 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, G.Z.; Ren, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, J.S., E-mail: hujs@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Sun, Z.; Yang, Q.X.; Li, J.G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zakharov, L.E. [Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Ruzic, David N. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Strong interaction between plasma and Li would cause strong Li emission and lead to disruptive plasmas, and probable reasons were analyzed. • Serious Li would be emitted from the free statics surface mainly due to J × B force leading to plasma instable and disruptions. • CPS surface would partially suppress the emission and be beneficial for plasma operation. • Li emission from flowing LLLs on free surfaces on SS trenches and on SS plate were compared. - Abstract: Experiments with liquid lithium limiters (LLLs) have been successfully performed in HT-7 since 2009 and the effects of different limiter surface structures on the ejection of Li droplets have been studied and compared. The experiments have demonstrated that strong interaction between the plasma and the liquid surface can cause intense Li efflux in the form of ejected Li droplets – which can, in turn, lead to plasma disruptions. The details of the LLL plasma-facing surface were observed to be extremely important in determining performance. Five different LLLs were evaluated in this work: two types of static free-surface limiters and three types of flowing liquid Li (FLLL) structures. It has been demonstrated that a FLLL with a slowly flowing thin liquid Li film on vertical flow plate which was pre-treated with evaporated Li was much less susceptible to Li droplet ejection than any of the other structures tested in this work. It was further observed that the plasmas run against this type of limiter were reproducibly well-behaved. These results provide technical references for the design of FLLLs in future tokamaks so as to avoid strong Li ejection and to decrease disruptive plasmas.

  14. Pumping liquid metal at high temperatures up to 1,673 kelvin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amy, C.; Budenstein, D.; Bagepalli, M.; England, D.; Deangelis, F.; Wilk, G.; Jarrett, C.; Kelsall, C.; Hirschey, J.; Wen, H.; Chavan, A.; Gilleland, B.; Yuan, C.; Chueh, W. C.; Sandhage, K. H.; Kawajiri, Y.; Henry, A.

    2017-10-01

    Heat is fundamental to power generation and many industrial processes, and is most useful at high temperatures because it can be converted more efficiently to other types of energy. However, efficient transportation, storage and conversion of heat at extreme temperatures (more than about 1,300 kelvin) is impractical for many applications. Liquid metals can be very effective media for transferring heat at high temperatures, but liquid-metal pumping has been limited by the corrosion of metal infrastructures. Here we demonstrate a ceramic, mechanical pump that can be used to continuously circulate liquid tin at temperatures of around 1,473-1,673 kelvin. Our approach to liquid-metal pumping is enabled by the use of ceramics for the mechanical and sealing components, but owing to the brittle nature of ceramics their use requires careful engineering. Our set-up enables effective heat transfer using a liquid at previously unattainable temperatures, and could be used for thermal storage and transport, electric power production, and chemical or materials processing.

  15. Temperature of thermal plasma jets: A time resolved approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahasrabudhe, S N; Joshi, N K; Barve, D N; Ghorui, S; Tiwari, N; Das, A K, E-mail: sns@barc.gov.i [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Boltzmann Plot method is routinely used for temperature measurement of thermal plasma jets emanating from plasma torches. Here, it is implicitly assumed that the plasma jet is 'steady' in time. However, most of the experimenters do not take into account the variations due to ripple in the high current DC power supplies used to run plasma torches. If a 3-phase transductor type of power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 150 Hz and if 3- phase SCR based power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 300 Hz. The electrical power fed to plasma torch varies at ripple frequency. In time scale, it is about 3.3 to 6.7 ms for one cycle of ripple and it is much larger than the arc root movement times which are within 0.2 ms. Fast photography of plasma jets shows that the luminosity of plasma jet also varies exactly like the ripple in the power supply voltage and thus with the power. Intensity of line radiations varies nonlinearly with the instantaneous power fed to the torch and the simple time average of line intensities taken for calculation of temperature is not appropriate. In this paper, these variations and their effect on temperature determination are discussed and a method to get appropriate data is suggested. With a small adaptation discussed here, this method can be used to get temperature profile of plasma jet within a short time.

  16. Dense high-temperature plasma transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatova, Sh.G.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the transport processes in dense high-temperature semiclassical plasma are studied on the base of the kinetic equation, where the semiclassical potential was used, in its collision integral. The coefficient of plasma electrical conductivity, viscosity and thermal conductivity were received. There were compared with the other authors' results. The Grad's method was used obtaining of viscosity and thermal coefficients. (author)

  17. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  18. Characteristics of Droplets Ejected from Liquid Propellants Ablated by Laser Pulses in Laser Plasma Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhiyuan; Gao Hua; Fan Zhenjun; Xing Jie

    2014-01-01

    The angular distribution and pressure force of droplets ejected from liquid water and glycerol ablated by nanosecond laser pulses are investigated under different viscosities in laser plasma propulsion. It is shown that with increasing viscosity, the distribution angles present a decrease tendency for two liquids, and the angular distribution of glycerol is smaller than that of water. A smaller distribution leads to a higher pressure force generation. The results indicate that ablation can be controlled by varying the viscosity of liquid propellant in laser plasma propulsion

  19. Passive Temperature Stabilization of Silicon Photonic Devices Using Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Ptasinski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we explore the negative thermo-optic properties of liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonic integrated circuits. Photonic circuits are playing an increasing role in communications and computing, but they suffer from temperature dependent performance variation. Most existing techniques aimed at compensation of thermal effects rely on power hungry Joule heating. We show that integrating a liquid crystal cladding helps to minimize the effects of a temperature dependent drift. The advantage of liquid crystals lies in their high negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the infrared wavelengths.

  20. In-liquid arc plasma jet and its application to phenol degradation

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jing-Lin Lin

    2018-02-07

    We present a new method for achieving chemical reactions induced by plasmas with liquids—an in-liquid arc plasma jet system—designed to have a few advantages over the existing methods. High-speed imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were adopted to highlight the physical aspects of the in-liquid arc plasma jet system, and the feasibility of the system was investigated in a wastewater treatment case with phenol as the model contaminant. We found that the specific energy input is a reasonable parameter by which to characterize the overall process. The phenol removal reaction could be modeled as a pseudo-first-order reaction, and the reaction constant became smaller as the phenol concentration increased. However, complete decomposition of the phenol into water and carbon dioxide required very high energy because the final intermediate, oxalic acid, is relatively stable. Detailed chemical and physical analyses, including byproducts, ions, solution acidity, and conductivity, were conducted to evaluate this new method for use in the appropriate applications.

  1. Influence of Gas-Liquid Interface on Temperature Wave of Pulsating Heat Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the interface on the amplitude and phase of the temperature wave and the relationship between the attenuation of the temperature wave and the gas-liquid two-phase physical parameters are studied during the operation of the pulsating heat pipe. The numerical simulation shows that the existence of the phase interface changes the direction of the temperature gradient during the propagation of the temperature wave, which increases the additional “thermal resistance.” The relative size of the gas-liquid two-phase thermal conductivity affects the propagation direction of heat flow at phase interface directly. The blockage of the gas plug causes hysteresis in the phase of the temperature wave, the relative size of the gas-liquid two-phase temperature coefficient will gradually increase the phase of the temperature wave, and the time when the heat flow reaches the peak value is also advanced. The attenuation of the temperature wave is almost irrelevant to the absolute value of the density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of the gas-liquid two phases, and the ratio of the thermal conductivity of the gas-liquid two phases is related. When the temperature of the heat pipe was changed, the difference of heat storage ability between gas and liquid will lead to the phenomenon of heat reflux and becomes more pronounced with the increases of the temperature wave.

  2. The concept of temperature in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livadiotis, G.

    2017-12-01

    Independently of the initial distribution function, once the system is thermalized, its particles are stabilized into a specific distribution function parametrized by a temperature. Classical particle systems in thermal equilibrium have their phase-space distribution stabilized into a Maxwell-Boltzmann function. In contrast, space plasmas are particle systems frequently described by stationary states out of thermal equilibrium, namely, their distribution is stabilized into a function that is typically described by kappa distributions. The temperature is well-defined for systems at thermal equilibrium or stationary states described by kappa distributions. This is based on the equivalence of the two fundamental definitions of temperature, that is (i) the kinetic definition of Maxwell (1866) and (ii) the thermodynamic definition of Clausius (1862). This equivalence holds either for Maxwellians or kappa distributions, leading also to the equipartition theorem. The temperature and kappa index (together with density) are globally independent parameters characterizing the kappa distribution. While there is no equation of state or any universal relation connecting these parameters, various local relations may exist along the streamlines of space plasmas. Observations revealed several types of such local relations among plasma thermal parameters.

  3. Internal modes in high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, G.B.

    1983-02-01

    The linear stability of current-carrying toroidal plamsas is examined to determine the possibility of exciting global internal modes. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory provides a useful framework for the analysis of these modes, which involve a kinking of the central portion of the plasma column. Non-ideal effects can also be important, and these are treated for high-temperature regimes where the plasma is collisionless

  4. VUV/XUV measurements of impurity emission in plasmas with liquid lithium surfaces on LTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael; Stutman, Dan; Bell, Ronald E; Boyle, Dennis; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Tom; Lucia, Matthew; Majeski, Richard; Merino, Enrique; Schmitt, John; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Clementson, Joel; Kubota, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    The VUV/XUV spectrum has been measured on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) using a transmission grating imaging spectrometer (TGIS) coupled to a direct-detection x-ray charge-coupled device camera. TGIS data show significant changes in the ratios between the lithium and oxygen impurity line emission during discharges with varying lithium wall conditions. Lithium coatings that have been passivated by lengthy exposure to significant levels of impurities contribute to a large O/Li ratio measured during LTX plasma discharges. Furthermore, previous results have indicated that a passivated lithium film on the plasma facing components will function as a stronger impurity source when in the form of a hot liquid layer compared to a solid lithium layer. However, recent TGIS measurements of plasma discharges in LTX with hot stainless steel boundary shells and a fresh liquid lithium coating show lower O/Li impurity line ratios when compared to discharges with a solid lithium film on cool shells. These new measurements help elucidate the somewhat contradictory results of the effects of solid and liquid lithium on plasma confinement observed in previous experiments. (paper)

  5. Quantitative determination of total cesium in highly active liquid waste by using liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Van-Khoai; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Taguchi, Shigeo; Takamura, Yuzuru; Surugaya, Naoki; Kuno, Takehiko

    2018-06-01

    A sensitive analytical method for determination of total cesium (Cs) in highly active liquid waste (HALW) by using modified liquid electrode plasma optical emission spectrometry (LEP-OES) is developed in this study. The instrument is modified to measure radioactive samples in a glove box. The effects of important factors, including pulsed voltage sequence and nitric acid concentration, on the emission of Cs are investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are 0.005 mg/L and 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The achieved LOD is one order lower than that of recently developed spectroscopic methods using liquid discharge plasma. The developed method is validated by subjecting a simulated HALW sample to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recoveries obtained from a spike-and-recovery test are 96-102%, implying good accuracy. The method is successfully applied to the quantification of Cs in a real HALW sample at the Tokai reprocessing plant in Japan. Apart from dilution and filtration of the HALW sample, no other pre-treatment process is required. The results agree well with the values obtained using gamma spectrometry. The developed method offers a reliable technique for rapid analysis of total Cs in HALW samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of the argon plasma temperature by use of pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fanhou; Jing Fuqian

    2002-01-01

    The author describes in detail how to use pyrometer to measure the plasma temperature. The temperatures of shock-generated argon plasmas are given in the present work. Measured results of temperature-pressure curve are compared with calculated results using Saha-Debye-Huckel model, which are in good agreement

  7. Liquid Metals as Plasma-facing Materials for Fusion Energy Systems: From Atoms to Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Koel, Bruce E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bernasek, Steven L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Carter, Emily A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Debenedetti, Pablo G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The objective of our studies was to advance our fundamental understanding of liquid metals as plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems, with a broad scope: from atoms to tokamaks. The flow of liquid metals offers solutions to significant problems of the plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems. Candidate metals include lithium, tin, gallium, and their eutectic combinations. However, such liquid metal solutions can only be designed efficiently if a range of scientific and engineering issues are resolved that require advances in fundamental fluid dynamics, materials science and surface science. In our research we investigated a range of significant and timely problems relevant to current and proposed engineering designs for fusion reactors, including high-heat flux configurations that are being considered by leading fusion energy groups world-wide. Using experimental and theoretical tools spanning atomistic to continuum descriptions of liquid metals, and bridging surface chemistry, wetting/dewetting and flow, our research has advanced the science and engineering of fusion energy materials and systems. Specifically, we developed a combined experimental and theoretical program to investigate flows of liquid metals in fusion-relevant geometries, including equilibrium and stability of thin-film flows, e.g. wetting and dewetting, effects of electromagnetic and thermocapillary fields on liquid metal thin-film flows, and how chemical interactions and the properties of the surface are influenced by impurities and in turn affect the surface wetting characteristics, the surface tension, and its gradients. Because high-heat flux configurations produce evaporation and sputtering, which forces rearrangement of the liquid, and any dewetting exposes the substrate to damage from the plasma, our studies addressed such evaporatively driven liquid flows and measured and simulated properties of the different bulk phases and material interfaces. The range of our studies

  8. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  9. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib in mouse plasma using salting-out liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparidans, Rolf W; van Hoppe, Stephanie; Rood, Johannes J M; Schinkel, Alfred H; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay for afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of the ErbB (erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog) tyrosine kinase family, was developed and validated. Plasma samples were pre-treated using salting-out

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Liquid Phosphorus at High Temperature and Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yanning; Zhao Gang; Liu Changsong; Zhu Zhengang

    2008-01-01

    By performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the microstructure, dynamical and electronic properties of liquid phosphorus (P) under high temperature and pressure. In our simulations, the calculated coordination number (CN) changes discontinuously with density, and seems to increase rapidly after liquid P is compressed to 2.5 g/cm 3 . Under compression, liquid P shows the first-order liquid-liquid phase transition from the molecular liquid composed of the tetrahedral P 4 molecules to complex polymeric form with three-dimensional network structure, accompanied by the nonmetal to metal transition of the electronic structure. The order parameters Q 6 and Q 4 are sensitive to the microstructural change of liquid P. By calculating diffusion coefficients, we show the dynamical anomaly of liquid P by compression. At lower temperatures, a maximum exists at the diffusion coefficients as a function of density; at higher temperatures, the anomalous behavior is weakened. The excess entropy shows the same phenomena as the diffusion coefficients. By analysis of the angle distribution functions and angular limited triplet correlation functions, we can clearly find that the Peierls distortion in polymeric form of liquid P is reduced by further compression

  11. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Eichwald, Olivier; Merbahi, Nofel; Frongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy

  12. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Frongia, Céline; Eichwald, Olivier; Ducommun, Bernard; Merbahi, Nofel; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy.

  13. Determination of flomoxef in human plasma by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsova, Oxana Yu; Paramonov, Sergey A; Vasilevich, Natalya I; Kazyulkin, Denis N; Vlasova, Ekaterina; Engsig, Michael

    2013-12-01

    A specific, sensitive, rapid and reproducible method for the determination of flomoxef in human plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Flomoxef was detected using an electrospay ionization method operated in negative-ion mode. Chromatographic separation was performed in gradient elution mode on a Luna® C18(2) column (3 μM, 20 × 4.0 mm) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and runtime 3.5 min. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% formic acid as additive. Extraction of flomoxef from plasma and precipitation of plasma proteins was performed with acetonitrile with an absolute recovery of 86.4 ± 1.6%. The calibration curve was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.999 over the concentration range 10-5000 ng/mL and the lower limit of quantification was 10 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precisions were flomoxef revealed that it could be successfully analyzed at 4 ºС over 24 h, but it was unstable in solutions at room temperature during short-term storage (4 h) and several freeze-thaw cycles. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  15. Study on factors affecting the droplet temperature in plasma MIG welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat, Sarizam Bin; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yusoff, Mahani

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was discussed based on the measurements of the droplet temperature for a wide range of MIG currents with different plasma electrode diameters. The measurements of the droplet temperatures were conducted using a two color temperature measurement method. The droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were then compared with those in the conventional MIG welding. As a result, the droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was found to be reduced in comparison with the conventional MIG welding under the same MIG current. Especially when the small plasma electrode diameter was used, the decrease in the droplet temperature reached maximally 500 K. Also, for a particular WFS, the droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were lower than those in the conventional MIG welding. It is suggested that the use of plasma contributes to reducing the local heat input into the base metal by the droplet. The presence of the plasma surrounding the wire is considered to increase the electron density in its vicinity, resulting in the arc attachment expanding upwards along the wire surface to disperse the MIG current. This dispersion of MIG current causes a decrease in current density on the droplet surface, lowering the droplet temperature. Furthermore, dispersed MIG current also weakens the electromagnetic pinch force acting on the neck of the wire above the droplet. This leads to a larger droplet diameter with increased surface area through lower frequency of droplet detachment to decrease the MIG current density on the droplet surface, as compared to the conventional MIG welding at the same MIG current. Thus, the lower droplet temperature is caused by the reduction of heat flux into the droplet. Consequently, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was clarified.

  16. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium of (dibutyl ether + methanol + water) at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce, Alberto; Rodriguez, Hector; Rodriguez, Oscar; Soto, Ana

    2005-01-01

    (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data for the ternary system (dibutyl ether + methanol + water) were experimentally determined at T = (298.15, 308.15, and 318.15) K. The experimental results were correlated by means of the NRTL and UNIQUAC equations, the best results being achieved with the UNIQUAC equation, both for the individual correlations at each temperature and for the overall correlation considering all the three experimental data sets. The experimental tie-lines were also compared to the values predicted by the UNIFAC method

  17. Properties of plasma sheath with ion temperature in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyuan; Wang Feng; Sun Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    The plasma sheath properties in a strong magnetic field are investigated in this work using a steady state two-fluid model. The motion of ions is affected heavily by the strong magnetic field in fusion devices; meanwhile, the effect of ion temperature cannot be neglected for the plasma in such devices. A criterion for the plasma sheath in a strong magnetic field, which differs from the well-known Bohm criterion for low temperature plasma sheath, is established theoretically with a fluid model. The fluid model is then solved numerically to obtain detailed sheath information under different ion temperatures, plasma densities, and magnetic field strengths.

  18. Volatility of coal liquids at high temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G M; Johnston, R H; Hwang, S C; Tsonopoulos, C

    1981-01-01

    The volatility of coal liquids has been experimentally determined at 700-880 F and about 2000 psia. These measurements were made in a flow apparatus to minimize thermal decomposition effects at high temperatures. Three coal liquids in mixture with Hat2, methane, and Hat2S were investigated. Measurements were also made up to 900 F on the vapor pressure of pure compounds found in coal liquids and on the equilibrium pressure of narrow coal liquid cuts. These data were used to develop a new method for the prediction of the critical point and the superatmospheric vapour pressures of aromatic fractions that is superior to the Maxwell-Bonnell correlation. The VLE data on coal liquids and some recent high-temperature VLE data on binaries of aromatics with Hat2 or methane were analyzed with a modified Chao-Seader correlation and a modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state. Both VLE correlations are shown to be equivalent in the prediction of the volatility of coal liquids, when the new vapour pressure procedure is used.

  19. Surface studies of liquid metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastasz, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metals and alloys have been proposed for use in nuclear fusion reactors to serve as replaceable plasma-facing surfaces that remove particles and heat from reacting plasmas. Several materials are being considered for this purpose including lithium, gallium, and tin as well as some of the alloys made from these elements. In order to better understand the properties of liquid surfaces, the technique of low-energy ion scattering was used to examine the surface composition of several of these materials in vacuum as a function of temperature. Oxygen is found to rapidly segregate to the surface of several metallic liquids. The segregation process can be interpreted using a simple thermodynamic model based on Gibbs theory. In the case of an alloy of Sn and Li, Li also segregates to the liquid surface. This provides a means to produce a surface enriched in Li, which is more plasma compatible than Sn, without the need to handle large quantities of liquid Li. (author)

  20. Time-temperature superposition in viscous liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    2001-01-01

    with a reduced time definition based on a recently proposed expression for the relaxation time, where G [infinity] reflects the fictive temperature. All parameters entering the reduced time were determined from independent measurements of the frequency-dependent shear modulus of the equilibrium liquid....

  1. Liquid jets for fast plasma termination in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Putvinskij, S.V.; Parks, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Recent simulations by Putvisnkij et al. (PSI Conference, 1996) have shown that introducing impurities into the plasma in order to mitigate adverse disruption effects in ITER may actually be deleterious because of a potentially unwelcome phenomenon: generation of multi-MeV runaway electrons by the collisional avalanche mechanism (Rosenbluth, M.N., et al., in Fusion Energy 1996 (Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Montreal, 1996) Vol. 2, IAEA, Vienna (in press) Paper FP-26). The injection of a liquid hydrogen jet to deliver a massive density increase is proposed as a means of avoiding runaways, while providing the same beneficial effects as impurities. A discussion of many jet related topics, such as ablation/penetration, jet breakup time and stability, is presented. Owing to an ablation pressure instability, it is predicted that the jet will quickly break up into a regular chain of droplets with dimensions of approximately the size of the jet radius. It is found that while deep penetration in the plasma can easily be achieved, bubble growth and disruptive boiling (flashing) during the propagation in the vacuum gap between the nozzle exit and the plasma are the main processes limiting the jet survival time. Calculations indicate that for ITER reference parameters, the jet can remain coherent in vacuum for a distance ∼ 1 m before disintegrating. On the basis of this present understanding, the prospect for the safe termination of ITER discharges by high density liquid jet injection appears promising. (author). 20 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Role of atom--atom inelastic collisions in two-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunc, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of inelastic atom--atom collisions to the production of electrons and excited atoms in two-temperature (with electron temperature T/sub e/, atomic temperature T/sub a/, and atomic density N/sub a/), steady-state, nonequilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma is investigated. The results are valid for plasmas having large amounts of atomic hydrogen as one of the plasma components, so that e--H and H--H inelastic collisions and interaction of these atoms with radiation dominate the production of electrons and excited hydrogen atoms. Densities of electrons and excited atoms are calculated in low-temperature plasma, with T/sub e/ and T/sub a/≤8000 K and 10 16 cm -3 ≤N/sub a/≤10 18 cm -3 , and with different degrees of the reabsorption of radiation. The results indicate that inelastic atom--atom collisions are important for production of electrons and excited atoms in partially ionized plasmas with medium and high atomic density and temperatures below 8000 K

  3. Ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization of sulfonamides in river water, honey, milk, and animal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xu; Su Rui; Zhao Xin; Liu Zhuang; Zhang Yupu; Li Dan; Li Xueyuan; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Ziming, E-mail: analchem@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-11-30

    Graphical abstract: The extraction and derivatization efficiency of SAs is dependent on type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of disperser, microwave power and irradiation time, volume of derivatization reagent, pH of sample solution as well as ionic strength. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new, rapid and sensitive method for determining sulfonamides (SAs) was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Derivatization, extraction and preconcentration of SAs were performed in one step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-based MADLLME and derivatization were first applied for the determination of SAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trace SAs in river water, honey, milk, and pig plasma were determined. - Abstract: The ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-based MADLLME) and derivatization was applied for the pretreatment of six sulfonamides (SAs) prior to the determination by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). By adding methanol (disperser), fluorescamine solution (derivatization reagent) and ionic liquid (extraction solvent) into sample, extraction, derivatization, and preconcentration were continuously performed. Several experimental parameters, such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of disperser, amount of derivatization reagent, microwave power, microwave irradiation time, pH of sample solution, and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. When the microwave power was 240 W, the analytes could be derivatized and extracted simultaneously within 90 s. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water, honey, milk, and pig plasma samples, and the recoveries of analytes obtained were in the range of 95.0-110.8, 95.4-106.3, 95.0-108.3, and 95.7-107.7, respectively. The relative standard deviations varied between 1.5% and 7.3% (n = 5). The results showed that the proposed method was a rapid, convenient and feasible method for the determination

  4. Liquid structure and temperature invariance of sound velocity in supercooled Bi melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emuna, M.; Mayo, M.; Makov, G.; Greenberg, Y.; Caspi, E. N.; Yahel, E.; Beuneu, B.

    2014-01-01

    Structural rearrangement of liquid Bi in the vicinity of the melting point has been proposed due to the unique temperature invariant sound velocity observed above the melting temperature, the low symmetry of Bi in the solid phase and the necessity of overheating to achieve supercooling. The existence of this structural rearrangement is examined by measurements on supercooled Bi. The sound velocity of liquid Bi was measured into the supercooled region to high accuracy and it was found to be invariant over a temperature range of ∼60°, from 35° above the melting point to ∼25° into the supercooled region. The structural origin of this phenomenon was explored by neutron diffraction structural measurements in the supercooled temperature range. These measurements indicate a continuous modification of the short range order in the melt. The structure of the liquid is analyzed within a quasi-crystalline model and is found to evolve continuously, similar to other known liquid pnictide systems. The results are discussed in the context of two competing hypotheses proposed to explain properties of liquid Bi near the melting: (i) liquid bismuth undergoes a structural rearrangement slightly above melting and (ii) liquid Bi exhibits a broad maximum in the sound velocity located incidentally at the melting temperature

  5. A simple high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of linezolid in human plasma and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shuuji; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yoshinari, Masami; Matsumoto, Taichi; Jimi, Shiro; Togawa, Atsushi; Takata, Tohru; Takamatsu, Yasushi

    2015-09-01

    Linezolid is an antimicrobial agent for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-positive infections. A practical high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the determination of linezolid in human plasma and saliva. Linezolid and an internal standard (o-ethoxybenzamide) were extracted from plasma and saliva with ethyl acetate and analyzed on a Capcell Pak C18 MG column with UV detection at 254 nm. The calibration curve was linear through the range 0.5-50 µg/mL using a 200 μL sample volume. The intra- and interday precisions were all plasma and 5.60% for saliva. The accuracies ranged from 98.8 to 110% for both matrices. The mean recoveries of linezolid were 80.8% for plasma and 79.0% for saliva. This method was used to determine the plasma and saliva concentrations of linezolid in healthy volunteers who were orally administered a 600 mg dose of linezolid. Our liquid-liquid extraction procedure is easy and requires a small volume of plasma or saliva (200 μL). This small volume can be advantageous in clinical pharmacokinetic studies, especially if children participate. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Temperature dependence on mutual solubility of binary (methanol + limonene) mixture and (liquid + liquid) equilibria of ternary (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Kazuhiro; Li Xiaoli; Li Hengde

    2009-01-01

    Mutual solubility data of the binary (methanol + limonene) mixture at the temperatures ranging from 288.15 K close to upper critical solution temperature, and ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium (tie-lines) of the (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixture at the temperatures (288.15, 298.15, and 308.15) K have been obtained. The experimental results have been represented accurately in terms of the extended and modified UNIQUAC models with binary parameters, compared with the UNIQUAC model. The temperature dependence of binary and ternary (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for the binary (methanol + limonene) and ternary (methanol + ethanol + limonene) mixtures could be calculated successfully using the extended and modified UNIQUAC model

  7. The Liquid Lithium Limiter control system on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertocchi, A.; Panella, M.; Vitale, V.; Sinibaldi, S.

    2006-01-01

    In the second half of 2005, a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with capillary porous system configuration was installed for testing on the FTU tokamak. The liquid lithium flows through capillaries from a reservoir to the side facing the plasma to form a thin liquid lithium film. The system is composed of three stainless steel sections, which contain two thermocouples each. A heating system brings the Li temperature to about 200 o C allowing the liquid to flow. This temperature, monitored by thermocouples, needs to be controlled. [M. Apicella, G. Mazzitelli et al., First experiment with Lithium Limiter on FTU, 17 o International Conference on Plasma Surface Interaction in Controlled Fusion Devices, 22 - 26 May 2006, Hefei Anhui, China]. To carry out this experimental procedure, some new features have been introduced in the existent control system based on Opto22 TM modules and a CORBA/PHP/MySQL software architecture [A. Bertocchi, S. Podda, V. Vitale, Fusion Eng. Des. 74 (2005) 787-791]. The historical data storage to keep the lithium temperature evolution has been added. Two graphical tools - developed in MATLab and Java environments respectively to monitor the lithium temperature coming from thermocouples - have been also implemented. The control system allows regulating the heater temperature in each section of the LLL to reach operational conditions, where the temperature adjustment can be performed either automatically through a specific control law or manually by the operator. During plasma operations the system switches off the limiter power supply to prevent instruments damage. Moreover, in the same experimental context, a first approach to automatically obtain executable code - starting from control laws designed by Simulink TM tool - has been realized. (author)

  8. Destruction of chlorine-containing organic agents in a system plasma - liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, V.Ya.; Yukhymenko, V.V.; Babich, I.L.; Slyusarenko, Y.I.; Tarasova, Ya.B.

    2005-01-01

    The plasma chemical destruction of persistent toxic agent 1,1-di(4-chlorophenol)-2,2,2-threechlorethane (DDT) in water solutions is researched in this work. The destruction of agricultural pesticide containing DDT was carried out in water solution at atmospheric pressure with usage of plasma treatment on the basis of secondary discharges with a 'liquid' electrode, and of combination of a plasma method with reagent method. The comparative analysis of results of the physical-chemical analysis and biological test of toxicity of solutions is carried out and the optimum regimes for destruction and detoxication of DDT in water are determined

  9. Production of a large diameter ECR plasma with low electron temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Mayuko; Hishikawa, Yasuhiro; Tsuchiya, Hayato; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    A large diameter plasma over 300 mm in diameter is produced by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges using a cylindrical vacuum chamber of 400 mm in inner diameter. It is found that the plasma uniformity is improved by adding the nitrogen gas to pure Ar plasma. The electron temperature is decreased by adding the nitrogen gas. It is considered that the electron energy is absorbed in the vibrational energy of nitrogen molecules and the electron temperature decreases. Therefore, the adjunction of the nitrogen gas is considered to be effective for producing uniform and low electron temperature plasma

  10. MICROWAVE NOISE MEASUREMENT OF ELECTRON TEMPERATURES IN AFTERGLOW PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiby, Jr., C. C.; McBee, W. D.

    1963-10-15

    Transient electron temperatures in afterglow plasmas were determined for He (5 and 10 torr), Ne, and Ne plus or minus 5% Ar (2.4 and 24 torr) by combining measurements of plasma microwave noise power, and plasma reflectivity and absorptivity. Use of a low-noise parametric preamplifier permitted continuous detection during the afterglow of noise power at 5.5 Bc in a 1 Mc bandwidth. Electron temperature decays were a function of pressure and gas but were slower than predicted by electron energy loss mechanisms. The addition of argon altered the electron density decay in the neon afterglow but the electron temperature decay was not appreciably changed. Resonances in detected noise power vs time in the afterglow were observed for two of the three plasma waveguide geometries studied. These resonances correlate with observed resonances in absorptivity and occur over the same range of electron densities for a given geometry independent of gas type and pressure. (auth)

  11. Towards understanding hydrophobic recovery of plasma treated polymers: Storing in high polarity liquids suppresses hydrophobic recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Chaniel, Gilad; Grynyov, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of hydrophobic recovery was studied for cold air plasma treated polyethylene films. Plasma-treated polymer films were immersed into liquids with very different polarities such as ethanol, acetone, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and carbon disulphide. Hydrophobic recovery was studied by measurement of contact angles. Immersion into high polarity liquids slows markedly the hydrophobic recovery. We relate this slowing to dipole–dipole interaction of polar groups of the polymer with those of the liquids. This kind of interaction becomes decisive when polar groups of polymer chains are at least partially spatially fixed.

  12. Experimental Research of Inactivation Effect of Low-Temperature Plasma on Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xingmin; Yuan Yukang; Sun Yanzhou; Yuan Wang; Fengling, Peng; Qiu Yuchang

    2006-01-01

    The killing logarithms index in killing a vegetative form in an explosure of about 90 s and a spore in an explosure of about 120 s, by using a low-temperature plasma produced by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), reached 5. The speed in killing the strains tested, by using a low-temperature plasma, was the highest with E. Coli, then S. Aureus and B. Subtilis var niger spore. The results of the scanning electron microscope showed that the low-temperature plasma destroyed the outer structure of the bacteria and that the vegetative form was more susceptible to the inactivation effect of the low-temperature plasma than was the spore. This indicated that the effects of the high voltage and high velocity particle flow, in plasma, penetrating through the outer structure of the bacteria might play a dominant role during the inactivation of the bacteria

  13. A two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium modeling of DC arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Haiyang; Wu Bin

    2011-01-01

    To a better understanding of non-equilibrium characteristics of DC arc plasma,a two-dimensional axisymmetric two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium (2T-NCE) model is applied for direct current arc argon plasma generator with water-cooled constrictor at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the electron temperature and heavy particle temperature has a relationship under different working parameters, indicating that DC arc plasma has a strong non-equilibrium characteristic, and the variation is obvious. (authors)

  14. Determination of suvorexant in human plasma using 96-well liquid-liquid extraction and HPLC with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidinger, S A; Simpson, R C; Mangin, E; Woolf, E J

    2015-10-01

    A method, using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC-MS/MS), was developed for the determination of suvorexant (MK-4305, Belsomra(®)), a selective dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment insomnia, in human plasma over the concentration range of 1-1000ng/mL. Stable isotope labeled (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant was used as an internal standard. The sample preparation procedure utilized liquid-liquid extraction, in the 96-well format, of a 100μL plasma sample with methyl t-butyl ether. The compounds were chromatographed under isocratic conditions on a Waters dC18 (50×2.1mm, 3μm) column with a mobile phase consisting of 30/70 (v/v %) 10mM ammonium formate, pH3/acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. Multiple reaction monitoring of the precursor-to-product ion pairs for suvorexant (m/z 451→186) and (13)C(2)H3-suvorexant (m/z 455→190) on an Applied Biosystems API 4000 tandem mass spectrometer was used for quantitation. Intraday assay precision, assessed in six different lots of control plasma, was within 10% CV at all concentrations, while assay accuracy ranged from 95.6 to 105.0% of nominal. Quality control (QC) samples in plasma were stored at -20°C. Initial within day analysis of QCs after one freeze-thaw cycle showed accuracy within 9.5% of nominal with precision (CV) of 6.7% or less. The plasma QC samples were demonstrated to be stable for up to 25 months at -20°C. The method described has been used to support clinical studies during Phase I through III of clinical development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated heat transport simulation of high ion temperature plasma of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sakai, A.

    2014-10-01

    A first dynamical simulation of high ion temperature plasma with carbon pellet injection of LHD is performed by the integrated simulation GNET-TD + TASK3D. NBI heating deposition of time evolving plasma is evaluated by the 5D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET-TD and the heat transport of multi-ion species plasma (e, H, He, C) is studied by the integrated transport simulation code, TASK3D. Achievement of high ion temperature plasma is attributed to the 1) increase of heating power per ion due to the temporal increase of effective charge, 2) reduction of effective neoclassical transport with impurities, 3) reduction of turbulence transport. The reduction of turbulence transport is most significant contribution to achieve the high ion temperature and the reduction of the turbulent transport from the L-mode plasma (normal hydrogen plasma) is evaluated to be a factor about five by using integrated heat transport simulation code. Applying the Z effective dependent turbulent reduction model we obtain a similar time behavior of ion temperature after the C pellet injection with the experimental results. (author)

  16. Handheld low-temperature plasma probe for portable "point-and-shoot" ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Joshua S; Shelley, Jacob T; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-16

    We describe a handheld, wireless low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization source and its performance on a benchtop and a miniature mass spectrometer. The source, which is inexpensive to build and operate, is battery-powered and utilizes miniature helium cylinders or air as the discharge gas. Comparison of a conventional, large-scale LTP source against the handheld LTP source, which uses less helium and power than the large-scale version, revealed that the handheld source had similar or slightly better analytical performance. Another advantage of the handheld LTP source is the ability to quickly interrogate a gaseous, liquid, or solid sample without requiring any setup time. A small, 7.4-V Li-polymer battery is able to sustain plasma for 2 h continuously, while the miniature helium cylinder supplies gas flow for approximately 8 continuous hours. Long-distance ion transfer was achieved for distances up to 1 m.

  17. Synthesis of surfactant-free electrostatically stabilized gold nanoparticles by plasma-induced liquid chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, J; Maguire, P; Mariotti, D; Němcová, L; Graham, W G

    2013-01-01

    Plasma-induced non-equilibrium liquid chemistry is used to synthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) without using any reducing or capping agents. The morphology and optical properties of the synthesized AuNPs are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. Plasma processing parameters affect the particle shape and size and the rate of the AuNP synthesis process. Particles of different shapes (e.g. spherical, triangular, hexagonal, pentagonal, etc) are synthesized in aqueous solutions. In particular, the size of the AuNPs can be tuned from 5 nm to several hundred nanometres by varying the initial gold precursor (HAuCl 4 ) concentration from 2.5 μM to 1 mM. In order to reveal details of the basic plasma–liquid interactions that lead to AuNP synthesis, we have measured the solution pH, conductivity and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) concentration of the liquid after plasma processing, and conclude that H 2 O 2 plays the role of the reducing agent which converts Au +3 ions to Au 0 atoms, leading to nucleation growth of the AuNPs. (paper)

  18. Evaporation studies of liquid oxide fuel at very high temperatures using laser beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bober, M.; Breitung, W.; Karow, H.U.; Schretzmann, K.

    1976-11-01

    Evaporation experiments with oxide fuel are carried out based laser beam heating of the fuel specimen surface. The measuring quantities are the recoil momentum of the target, the evaporation area, the evaporation time and the mass and momentum of the supersonic vapor jet expanding into vacuum, and the thermal radiation density of the evaporating surface. From the mechanical measuring quantities we derive the vapor pressure of the target material and, in a first approach, also the evaporation temperature by applying a gas dynamic evaluation model. In a second approach, after having measured the spectral emissivity of liquid UO 2 at 633 nm, we determine the evaporation temperature at the liquid surface also from its thermal radiation. For the determination of the vapor pressure from the measured quantities a gas dynamic evaluation model has been developed. An application limit of the measuring technique is given by onset of plasma interaction of the vapor plume with the incident laser beam at temperatures above 4500 K. Experimental values for the saturated vapor pressure of UO 2 are presented, determined from three series of laser evaporation measurements obtained at temperatures around 3500 K, 3950 K, and 4200 K. The average vapor pressures found are 0.6 bar, 3 bar, and 7 bar, respectively. Laser vapor pressure measurements performed by other authors and theoretical extrapolations of the UO 2 vapor pressure curve known from literature show fairly good agreement within their confidence interval with the vapor pressure measurements reported here. (orig./HR) [de

  19. Plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane at low temperatures: numerical analysis of gas-phase chemical mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goujard, Valentin; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Okazaki, Ken [Department of Mechanical and Control Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro, 1528552, Tokyo (Japan); Agiral, Anil, E-mail: tnozaki@mech.titech.ac.jp [Mesoscale Chemical Systems, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-07-13

    Methane partial oxidation was investigated using a plasma microreactor. The experiments were performed at 5 and 300 deg. C. Microreactor configuration allows an efficient evacuation of the heat generated by methane partial oxidation and dielectric barrier discharges, allowing at the same time a better temperature control. At 5 deg. C, liquid condensation of low vapour pressure compounds, such as formaldehyde and methanol, occurs. {sup 1}H-NMR analysis allowed us to demonstrate significant CH{sub 3}OOH formation during plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane. Conversion and product selectivity were discussed for both temperatures. In the second part of this work, a numerical simulation was performed and a gas-phase chemical mechanism was proposed and discussed. From the comparison between the experimental results and the simulation it was found that CH{sub 3}OO{center_dot} formation has a determinant role in oxygenated compound production, since its fast formation disfavoured radical recombination. At 5 deg. C the oxidation leads mainly towards oxygenated compound formation, and plasma dissociation was the major phenomenon responsible for CH{sub 4} conversion. At 300 deg. C, higher CH{sub 4} conversion resulted from oxidative reactions induced by {center_dot}OH radicals with a chemistry predominantly oxidative, producing CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O.

  20. Biomedical applications using low temperature plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xiujuan; Jiang Nan

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature plasma technology and biomedicine are two different subjects, but the combination of the two may play a critical role in modern science and technology. The 21 st century is believed to be a biotechnology century. Plasma technology is becoming a widely used platform for the fabrication of biomaterials and biomedical devices. In this paper some of the technologies used for material surface modification are briefly introduced. Some biomedical applications using plasma technology are described, followed by suggestions as to how a bridge between plasma technology and biomedicine can be built. A pulsed plasma technique that is used for surface functionalization is discussed in detail as an example of this kind of bridge or combination. Finally, it is pointed out that the combination of biomedical and plasma technology will be an important development for revolutionary 21st century technologies that requires different experts from different fields to work together. (authors)

  1. Chromatographic behavior of small organic compounds in low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motono, Tomohiro; Nagai, Takashi; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime

    2015-07-01

    Low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography, in which a loop injector, column, and detection cell were refrigerated at -35ºC, using liquid carbon dioxide as the mobile phase was developed. Small organic compounds (polyaromatic hydrocarbons, alkylbenzenes, and quinones) were separated by low-temperature high-performance liquid chromatography at temperatures from -35 to -5ºC. The combination of liquid carbon dioxide mobile phase with an octadecyl-silica (C18 ) column provided reversed phase mode separation, and a bare silica-gel column resulted in normal phase mode separation. In both the cases, nonlinear behavior at approximately -15ºC was found in the relationship between the temperature and the retention factors of the analytes (van't Hoff plots). In contrast to general trends in high-performance liquid chromatography, the decrease in temperature enhanced the separation efficiency of both the columns. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Synthesis of Nanomaterials by the Pulsed Plasma in Liquid and their Bio-medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omurzak, E.; Abdullaeva, Z.; Satyvaldiev, A.; Zhasnakunov, Z.; Kelgenbaeva, Z.; Akai Tegin, R. Adil; Syrgakbek kyzy, D.; Doolotkeldieva, T.; Bobusheva, S.; Mashimo, T.

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed plasma in liquid is a simple, ecologically friendly, cost-efficient method based on electrical discharge between two metal electrodes submerged into a dielectric liquid. We synthesized carbon-encapsulated Fe (Fe@C) magnetic nanoparticles with low cytotoxicity using pulsed plasma in a liquid. Body-centered cubic Fe core nanoparticles showed good crystalline structures with an average size between 20 and 30 nm were encapsulated in onion-like carbon coatings with a thickness of 2-10 nm. Thermal gravimetric analysis showed a high stability of the as-synthesized samples under thermal treatment and oxidation. Cytotoxicity measurements showed higher cancer cell viability than samples synthesized by different methods. Carbon coated ZnO nanorods with about 20 nm thickness and 150 nm length were synthesized by this method using different surfactant materials such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Cu and Ag nanoparticles of about 10 nm in size were also synthesized by the pulsed plasma in aquatic solution of 0.2 % gelatine as surfactant material. These nanoparticles showed high antibacterial activity for Erwinia amylovora and Escherichia coli.

  3. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q o and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry

  4. Time-dependent electron temperature diagnostics for high-power aluminum z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Mock, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    Time-resolved x-ray pinhole photographs and time-integrated radially-resolved x-ray crystal-spectrometer measurements of azimuthally-symmetric aluminum-wire implosions suggest that the densest phase of the pinch is composed of a hot plasma core surrounded by a cooler plasma halo. The slope of the free-bound x-ray continuum, provides a time-resolved, model-independent diagnostic of the core electron temperature. A simultaneous measurement of the time-resolved K-shell line spectra provides the electron temperature of the spatially averaged plasma. Together, the two diagnostics support a 1-D Radiation-Hydrodynamic model prediction of a plasma whose thermalization on axis produces steep radial gradients in temperature, from temperatures in excess of a kilovolt in the core to below a kilovolt in the surrounding plasma halo

  5. Application of low-temperature plasma for the synthesis of hydrogenated graphene (graphane)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Katarzhis, V. A.; Kiselev, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The possibility of a direct synthesis of hydrogenated graphene in decomposition of methane by means of low-temperature plasma was investigated. A DC plasma torch with an expanding channel-anode, a vortex gas supply and a self-setting arc length was used as a generator of low-temperature plasma. Argon was used as the plasma-forming gas. The temperatures of argon plasma and with methane addition to it were determined on the basis of spectral measurements. The synthesis products were characterized by electron microscopy and thermogravimetry. The effect of hydrogenated graphene as a nanomodifier on the properties of the cubic boron nitride based functional ceramics was investigated.

  6. The Liquid Lithium Limiter control system on FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertocchi, A; Panella, M; Vitale, V [Associazione EURATOM- ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy); Sinibaldi, S [Rome University ' ' Tor Vergata ' ' , Informatics, Systems and Production Dept., Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    In the second half of 2005, a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with capillary porous system configuration was installed for testing on the FTU tokamak. The liquid lithium flows through capillaries from a reservoir to the side facing the plasma to form a thin liquid lithium film. The system is composed of three stainless steel sections, which contain two thermocouples each. A heating system brings the Li temperature to about 200 {sup o}C allowing the liquid to flow. This temperature, monitored by thermocouples, needs to be controlled. [M. Apicella, G. Mazzitelli et al., First experiment with Lithium Limiter on FTU, 17{sup o} International Conference on Plasma Surface Interaction in Controlled Fusion Devices, 22 - 26 May 2006, Hefei Anhui, China]. To carry out this experimental procedure, some new features have been introduced in the existent control system based on Opto22{sup TM} modules and a CORBA/PHP/MySQL software architecture [A. Bertocchi, S. Podda, V. Vitale, Fusion Eng. Des. 74 (2005) 787-791]. The historical data storage to keep the lithium temperature evolution has been added. Two graphical tools - developed in MATLab and Java environments respectively to monitor the lithium temperature coming from thermocouples - have been also implemented. The control system allows regulating the heater temperature in each section of the LLL to reach operational conditions, where the temperature adjustment can be performed either automatically through a specific control law or manually by the operator. During plasma operations the system switches off the limiter power supply to prevent instruments damage. Moreover, in the same experimental context, a first approach to automatically obtain executable code - starting from control laws designed by Simulink{sup TM} tool - has been realized. (author)

  7. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  8. Temperature-Frequency Converter Using a Liquid Crystal Cell as a Sensing Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Isidro Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new temperature-frequency converter based on the variation of the dielectric permittivity of the Liquid Crystal (LC material with temperature has been demonstrated. Unlike other temperature sensors based on liquid crystal processing optical signals for determining the temperature, this work presents a system that is able to sense temperature by using only electrical signals. The variation of the dielectric permittivity with temperature is used to modify the capacitance of a plain capacitor using a LC material as non-ideal dielectric. An electric oscillator with an output frequency depending on variable capacitance made of a twisted-nematic (TN liquid crystal (LC cell has been built. The output frequency is related to the temperature of LC cell through the equations associated to the oscillator circuit. The experimental results show excellent temperature sensitivity, with a variation of 0.40% of the initial frequency per degree Celsius in the temperature range from −6 °C to 110 °C.

  9. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  10. Helicon plasma ion temperature measurements and observed ion cyclotron heating in proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, C. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Isler, R. C.; Martin, E. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caneses, J. F.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Kafle, N.; Rapp, J.

    2018-01-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) linear plasma device is a test bed for exploring and developing plasma source concepts to be employed in the future steady-state linear device Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) that will study plasma-material interactions for the nuclear fusion program. The concept foresees using a helicon plasma source supplemented with electron and ion heating systems to reach necessary plasma conditions. In this paper, we discuss ion temperature measurements obtained from Doppler broadening of spectral lines from argon ion test particles. Plasmas produced with helicon heating alone have average ion temperatures downstream of the Helicon antenna in the range of 3 ± 1 eV; ion temperature increases to 10 ± 3 eV are observed with the addition of ion cyclotron heating (ICH). The temperatures are higher at the edge than the center of the plasma either with or without ICH. This type of profile is observed with electrons as well. A one-dimensional RF antenna model is used to show where heating of the plasma is expected.

  11. Ionic liquids and ionic liquid acids with high temperature stability for fuel cell and other high temperature applications, method of making and cell employing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, C Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Broadview Heights, OH; Belieres, Jean-Philippe [Chandler, AZ; Yoshizawa, Masahiro [Tokyo, JP

    2011-01-11

    Disclosed are developments in high temperature fuel cells including ionic liquids with high temperature stability and the storage of inorganic acids as di-anion salts of low volatility. The formation of ionically conducting liquids of this type having conductivities of unprecedented magnitude for non-aqueous systems is described. The stability of the di-anion configuration is shown to play a role in the high performance of the non-corrosive proton-transfer ionic liquids as high temperature fuel cell electrolytes. Performance of simple H.sub.2(g) electrolyte/O.sub.2(g) fuel cells with the new electrolytes is described. Superior performance both at ambient temperature and temperatures up to and above 200.degree. C. are achieved. Both neutral proton transfer salts and the acid salts with HSO.sup.-.sub.4 anions, give good results, the bisulphate case being particularly good at low temperatures and very high temperatures. The performance of all electrolytes is improved by the addition of a small amount of involatile base of pK.sub.a value intermediate between those of the acid and base that make the bulk electrolyte. The preferred case is the imidazole-doped ethylammonium hydrogensulfate which yields behavior superior in all respects to that of the industry standard phosphoric acid electrolyte.

  12. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination of total budesonide levels in dog plasma after inhalation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Seija; Melamies, Marika; Rajamäki, Minna; Vainio, Outi; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method to quantify budesonide in dog plasma samples was developed and fully validated. Liquid-liquid extraction was followed by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. After reconstitution of the analytes in the mobile phase, samples were analysed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with isocratic elution. d8-Budesonide was used as an internal standard, and characteristic transitions of d8-budesonide and budesonide were used for quantification. The method was validated with respect to selectivity, specificity, linearity, recovery, repeatability, reproducibility and limits of detection and quantification. The validated method was successfully applied to monitor the plasma levels of budesonide in dogs exposed to clinical doses of inhaled and intravenous drug.

  13. Mathematical Model-Based Temperature Preparation of Liquid-Propellant Components Cooled by Liquid Nitrogen in the Heat Exchanger with a Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Pavlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Before fuelling the tanks of missiles, boosters, and spacecraft with liquid-propellant components (LPC their temperature preparation is needed. The missile-system ground equipment performs this operation during prelaunch processing of space-purpose missiles (SPM. Usually, the fuel cooling is necessary to increase its density and provide heat compensation during prelaunch operation of SPM. The fuel temperature control systems (FTCS using different principles of operation and types of coolants are applied for fuel cooling.To determine parameters of LPC cooling process through the fuel heat exchange in the heat exchanger with coolant, which is cooled by liquid nitrogen upon contact heat exchange in the coolant reservoir, a mathematical model of this process and a design technique are necessary. Both allow us to determine design parameters of the cooling system and the required liquid nitrogen reserve to cool LPC to the appropriate temperature.The article presents an overview of foreign and domestic publications on cooling processes research and implementation using cryogenic products such as liquid nitrogen. The article draws a conclusion that it is necessary to determine the parameters of LPC cooling process through the fuel heat exchange in the heat exchanger with coolant, which is liquid nitrogen-cooled upon contact heat exchange in the coolant reservoir allowing to define rational propellant cooling conditions to the specified temperature.The mathematical model describes the set task on the assumption that a heat exchange between the LPC and the coolant in the heat exchanger and with the environment through the walls of tanks and pipelines of circulation loops is quasi-stationary.The obtained curves allow us to calculate temperature changes of LPC and coolant, cooling time and liquid nitrogen consumption, depending on the process parameters such as a flow rate of liquid nitrogen, initial coolant temperature, pump characteristics, thermal

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes sensor for organic liquid detection at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Deepti; Khare, Neeraj; Vankar, V. D.

    2016-04-01

    We have explored the possibility of using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as room temperature chemical sensor for the detection of organic liquids such as ethanol, propanol, methanol and toluene. MWCNTs were synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) technique. The interdigitated electrodes were fabricated by conventional photolithography technique. The sensor was fabricated by drop depositing MWCNT suspension onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensing properties of MWCNTs sensor was studied for organic liquids detection. The resistance of sensor was found to increase upon exposure to these liquids. Sensor shows good reversibility and fast response at room temperature. Charge transfer between the organic liquid and sensing element is the dominant sensing mechanism.

  15. Freezing of liquid alkali metals as screened ionic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badirkhan, Z.; Rovere, M.; Tosi, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The relationship between Wigner crystallization of the classical ionic plasma and the liquid-solid transition of alkali metals is examined within the density wave theory of freezing. Freezing of the classical plasma on a rigid neutralizing background into the bcc structure is first re-evaluated, in view of recent progress in the determination of its thermodynamic functions by simulation and of the known difficulties of the theory relating to the order parameter at the (200) star of reciprocal lattice vectors. Freezing into the fcc structure is also considered in this context and found to be unfavoured. On allowing for long-wavelength deformability of the background, the ensuing appearance of a volume change on freezing into the bcc structure is accompanied by reduced stability of the fluid phase and by an increase in the entropy of melting. Freezing of alkali metals into the bcc structure is next evaluated, taking their ionic pair structure as that of an ionic plasma reference fluid screened by conduction electrons and asking that the correct ionic coupling strength at liquid-solid coexistence should be approximately reproduced. The ensuring values of the volume and entropy changes across the phase transition, as estimated from the theory by two alternative routes, are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The order parameters of the phase transition, excepting the (200) one, conform rather closely to a Gaussian behaviour and yield a Lindemann ratio in reasonable agreement with the empirical value for melting of bcc crystals. It is suggested that ionic ordering at the (200) star in the metal may be (i) assisted by medium range ordering in the conduction electrons, as indicated by differences in X-ray and neutron diffraction intensities from the liquid, and/or (ii) quite small in the hot bcc solid. Such a possible premelting behaviour of bcc metals should be worth testing experimentally by diffraction. (author). 48 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Simulation and analysis on fields of temperature and flow rate of liquid LIPB in DRAGON-I loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q.; Zhang, M.; Gao, S.; Wu, Y. [Chinese Academy of Science (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2007-07-01

    LiPb loop is the most important experimental facility used to study key issues for liquid metal LiPb blanket of fusion reactors. The first thermal convection LiPb loop DRAGON-I was built in 2005 in ASIPP (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science), China. The temperatures for the hot leg and cold leg in the loop are 480 C and 420 C, respectively. It is necessary to do research on features and distributions of the fields of temperature and flow rate for liquid metal LiPb in the loop for safe operation of loop and analysis of corrosion behavior of materials used in it. The fields of LiPb temperature and flow rate in the loop were simulated by the popular commercial CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software FLUENT in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) models. In the simulations and calculations, segregated solver and viscous models of k-epsilon etc. were selected, the properties of LiPb and material of loop pipe were input and the boundary conditions were setup. It was shown that the results for 2D and 3D models were comparable, the temperature field of liquid LiPb was found to be changed continuously between hot leg and cold leg of the loop because of their temperature difference, the temperature of outer-pipes are about 20 C averagely higher than that of the LiPb in the same section of the pipe, the maximum value of thermal stress of pipes was identified near to the bottom of the hot leg. So two or three heating sections in the hot leg might be needed to heat the outer-pipes of hot leg in order to keep the constant temperature of 480 C along the hot leg. The flow rate of LiPb was revealed to be about 0.2 m/s in theory, and it fluctuated little inside the pipe except for the places of upper two corners of the loop. These results will be helpful for the analysis of corrosion behavior of materials with liquid LiPb. (orig.)

  17. Stability analysis of high temperature superconducting coil in liquid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it is expected that hydrogen plays an important role in energy source including electric power in near future. Liquid hydrogen has high potential for cooling down superconducting coil wound with high temperature superconductors (HTS), such as BSCCO, YBCO. In this paper, we study stabilities of the coils wound with BSCCO tapes, which are immersed in the liquid hydrogen, and compare stability results with those cooled by liquid helium. We treat a minimum propagation zone (MPZ) theory to evaluate the coil stability considering boiling heat flux of the liquid hydrogen, and specific heat, heat conduction and resistivity of HTS materials as a function of temperature. It is found that the coil cooled by the liquid hydrogen has higher stability margin than that cooled by the liquid helium. We compare the stability margins of both coils wound with Bi-2223/Ag tape and Bi-2212/Ag tape in liquid hydrogen. As a result, it is found that the stability of Bi-2212 coil is equivalent to that of Bi-2223 coil in low and high magnetic field, while the maximum current of Bi-2212 coil exceeds a little bit that of Bi-2223 coil in both magnetic fields

  18. Low Temperature Reduction of Alumina Using Fluorine Containing Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. R. G. Reddy

    2007-09-01

    The major objective of the project is to establish the feasibility of using specific ionic liquids capable of sustaining aluminum electrolysis near room temperature at laboratory and batch recirculation scales. It will explore new technologies for aluminum and other valuable metal extraction and process methods. The new technology will overcome many of the limitations associated with high temperatures processes such as high energy consumption and corrosion attack. Furthermore, ionic liquids are non-toxic and could be recycled after purification, thus minimizing extraction reagent losses and environmental pollutant emissions. Ionic liquids are mixture of inorganic and organic salts which are liquid at room temperature and have wide operational temperature range. During the last several years, they were emerging as novel electrolytes for extracting and refining of aluminum metals and/or alloys, which are otherwise impossible using aqueous media. The superior high temperature characteristics and high solvating capabilities of ionic liquids provide a unique solution to high temperature organic solvent problems associated with device internal pressure build-up, corrosion, and thermal stability. However their applications have not yet been fully implemented due to the insufficient understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms involved in processing of aluminum with ionic liquids. Laboratory aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquids has been investigated in chloride and bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide based ionic liquids. The electrowinning process yielded current density in the range of 200-500 A/m2, and current efficiency of about 90%. The results indicated that high purity aluminum (>99.99%) can be obtained as cathodic deposits. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry studies have shown that initial stages of aluminum electrodeposition in ionic liquid electrolyte at 30°C was found to be quasi-reversible, with the charge transfer coefficient (0.40). Nucleation

  19. A simple and sensitive HPLC method for analysis of imipramine in human plasma with UV detection and liquid-liquid extraction: Application in bioequivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Emami, Jaber

    2016-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods employing ultraviolet (UV) detector are not sufficiently sensitive to measure the low plasma concentrations following single oral dose of imipramine. Therefore, in the present study a simple, rapid and yet sensitive HPLC method with UV detection was developed and validated for quantitation of imipramine in human plasma samples. An efficient liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of imipramine from plasma with the mixture of hexane/isoamyl alcohol (98:2) and back extraction of the drug in acidic medium concomitant with evaporation of organic phase allowed the use of UV detector to conveniently measure plasma levels of this compound as low level as 3 ng/ml. Separation was achieved on a μ-Bondapak C18 HPLC column using sodium hydrogen phosphate solution (0.01 M)/acetonitrile (60/40 v/v) at pH 3.5 ± 0.1 at 1.5 ml/min. Trimipramine was used as the internal standard for analysis of plasma samples. The retention times for imipramine and trimipramine were 4.3 and 5.2 min, respectively. Calibration curve was linear in the range of 3-40 ng/ml using human plasma with the average extraction recovery of 85 ± 5%. Imipramine was found to be stable in plasma samples with no evidence of degradation during three freeze-thaw cycles and three months storage at -70°C. The current validated method was finally applied in bioequivalence studies of two different imipramine products according to a standard two-way crossover design with a two weeks washout period.

  20. Quantitative determination of 21-hydroxy-deflazacort in human plasma using gradient semi-microbore liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, D L; Burmaster, S D; Eichmeier, L S

    1994-01-01

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic procedure to quantitate the deflazacort metabolite 21-hydroxy-deflazacort (DF-21OH) in human plasma was developed and validated. DF-21OH and fludrocortisone acetate (internal standard, IS) were isolated from human plasma (2 mL) by solid-phase extraction onto C-18 cartridges. Potential interferences were selectively removed and analytes were eluted with ethyl acetate. Following evaporation, the residue was reconstituted for HPLC analysis. Separation was achieved by gradient elution using a 5 microns YMC Basic column (2.0 x 100 mm) with mobile phases consisting of 20% methanol and 50% acetonitrile in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 3) at a temperature of 50 degrees C. Flow rate was maintained at 0.3 mL/min., and analytes were quantified spectrophotometrically at 246 nm. The assay was validated over the range 1.0 to 500 ng/mL DF-21OH. Calibration curves were prepared using a weighted (1/concentration) nonlinear quadratic regression algorithm. Peak-height ratios were proportional to the amount of DF-21OH added to plasma. Assay precision (%RSD) ranged from 4.2 to 11%, with a corresponding assay accuracy (% relative error) of +/- 2.8%. Absolute recovery of DF-21OH from plasma was 78-86% over the concentration range. The minimum quantitation limit was 1.0 ng/mL.

  1. Temperature effect on protection diode for plasma-process induced charging damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Zhichun; Scarpa, A.; Smits, Sander M.; Kuper, F.G.; Salm, Cora

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the leakage current of different drain-well diodes for plasma-charging protection has been simulated at high temperature. The simulation shows that the high ambient temperature, especially during plasma deposition process, enormously enhances the efficacy of the protection diodes in

  2. Temperature and pressure dependent osmotic pressure in liquid sodium-cesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, R.I.M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of the osmotic pressure in terms of the concentration fluctuations of mixtures and the equations of state of the pure liquids is considered. The temperature and pressure dependent experimentally measured concentration-concentration correlations in the long wavelength limit of liquid sodium-cesium alloys are used to demonstrate the appreciable dependence of the temperature and pressure on the osmotic pressure as a function of concentration. Introducing interchange energies as functions of temperature and pressure, our analysis is consistent with the Flory model. Thus, a formalism for evaluating the state dependent osmotic pressure is developed and our numerical work is considered to be an extension of the calculations of Rashid and March in the sense that a temperature and pressure dependent interchange energy parameter that more closely parameterizes the state dependent concentration fluctuations in the liquid alloys, is used. (author)

  3. Integrated discharge scenario for high-temperature helical plasma on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Murakami, S.

    2014-10-01

    Discharge scenario of high temperature plasma with helical configuration has been significantly progressed. The increase of central ion temperature due to reduction of wall recycling was clearly observed. The neutral particle profile was measured with a high-dynamic range of Balmer-α spectroscopy, and the reduction of neutral density was identified after helium conditioning main discharges. The peaking of ion heating profile and the reduction of charge exchange loss of energetic ions play an important role for improvement of ion heat transport in the core. The ion ITB and electron ITB have been successfully integrated due to superposition of centrally focused electron cyclotron heating to the ion ITB plasma, and the high temperature regime of T i ∼T e has been significantly extended. The normalized temperature gradient of ion and electron (R/L T ) were observed to exceed 10, indicating the significant improvement of both ion and electron heat transports at the barrier position. The positive radial electric field was observed by heavy ion beam probe, while the negative radial electric field was observed in ion ITB plasmas. The ion temperature gradient was observed to decrease with the increase of temperature ratio (T e /T i ). This experiment demonstrated that the profile control is a key to combine ion ITB and electron ITB and have a potential to improve the performance of helical plasmas. (author)

  4. Gas Temperature Measurement in a Glow Discharge Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloneker, Kenneth; Podder, Nirmol; McCurdy, William E.; Shi, Shi

    2009-10-01

    In this study a relatively inexpensive quartz protected thermocouple is used to measure the gas temperature in the positive column of a glow discharge plasma. For simplicity a K-type thermocouple is used to interpret the gas temperature from the sensor voltage at pressures from 0.5 Torr to 15 Torr and discharge currents from 5 mA to 120 mA. Gas temperature is investigated as a function of the gas pressure at fixed discharge currents and as a function of discharge current at fixed gas pressures in three different gas species (Ar, N2, and He). An infinite cylinder model is used to compute the average gas temperature of the discharge from joule heating and gas thermal conductivity. The model and measurement data agree within 1% to 10% depending on plasma parameters. Data for all three gases have a similar quasi-linear increasing error as compared to the model.

  5. Development of a high energy pulsed plasma simulator for the study of liquid lithium trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, S., E-mail: jung73@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Christenson, M.; Curreli, D. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Bryniarski, C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States); Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D.N. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana 61801 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A pulse device for a liquid lithium trench study is developed. • It consists of a coaxial plasma gun, a theta pinch, and guiding magnets. • A large energy enhancement is observed with the use of the plasma gun. • A further increase in energy and velocity is observed with the theta pinch. - Abstract: To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid-lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device [1], a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. The plasma is characterized using a triple Langmuir probe, optical methods, and a calorimeter. Clear advantages have been observed with the application of a coaxial plasma accelerator as a pre-ionization source. The experimental results of the plasma gun in conjunction with the existing theta pinch show a significant improvement from the previous energy deposition by a factor of 14 or higher, resulting in a maximum energy and heat flux of 0.065 ± 0.002 MJ/m{sup 2} and 0.43 ± 0.01 GW/m{sup 2}. A few ways to further increase the plasma heat flux for LiMIT experiments are discussed.

  6. Development of a high energy pulsed plasma simulator for the study of liquid lithium trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.; Christenson, M.; Curreli, D.; Bryniarski, C.; Andruczyk, D.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A pulse device for a liquid lithium trench study is developed. • It consists of a coaxial plasma gun, a theta pinch, and guiding magnets. • A large energy enhancement is observed with the use of the plasma gun. • A further increase in energy and velocity is observed with the theta pinch. - Abstract: To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid-lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device [1], a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. The plasma is characterized using a triple Langmuir probe, optical methods, and a calorimeter. Clear advantages have been observed with the application of a coaxial plasma accelerator as a pre-ionization source. The experimental results of the plasma gun in conjunction with the existing theta pinch show a significant improvement from the previous energy deposition by a factor of 14 or higher, resulting in a maximum energy and heat flux of 0.065 ± 0.002 MJ/m 2 and 0.43 ± 0.01 GW/m 2 . A few ways to further increase the plasma heat flux for LiMIT experiments are discussed

  7. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Vitske, Rudolf Evaldovich; Kondratyuk, Alexey Alekseevich

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 [mu]m in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition ...

  8. Excitation of cavitation bubbles in low-temperature liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Harada, Shingo

    2017-06-01

    We excited a cavitation bubble by irradiating a Nd:YAG laser pulse onto a titanium target that was installed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature below the boiling point. To our knowledge, this is the first experiment in which a cavitation bubble has been successfully excited in liquid nitrogen. We compared the cavitation bubble in liquid nitrogen with that in water on the basis of an equation reported by Florschuetz and Chao [J. Heat Transfer 87, 209 (1965)].

  9. Wetting properties of liquid lithium on lithium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krat, S.A., E-mail: stepan.krat@gmail.com [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Popkov, A.S. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Pisarev, A.A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fiflis, Peter; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma Material Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Contact angles of liquid lithium and Li{sub 3}N, Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were measured. • Liquid lithium wets lithium compounds at relatively low temperatures: Li{sub 3}N at 257 °C, Li{sub 2}O at 259 °C, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 323 °C. • Li wets Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 3}N better than previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta, TZM, stainless steel). • Li wets Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} better than most previously measured fusion-relevant materials (W, Mo, Ta). - Abstract: Liquid metal plasma facing components (LMPFC) have shown a potential to supplant solid plasma facing components materials in the high heat flux regions of magnetic confinement fusion reactors due to the reduction or elimination of concerns over melting, wall damage, and erosion. To design a workable LMPFC, one must understand how liquid metal interacts with solid underlying structures. Wetting is an important factor in such interaction, several designs of LMPFC require liquid metal to wet the underlying solid structures. The wetting of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, oxide, and carbonate) by 200 °C liquid lithium at various surface temperature from 230 to 330 °C was studied by means of contact angle measurements. Wetting temperatures, defined as the temperature above which the contact angle is less than 90°, were measured. The wetting temperature was 257 °C for nitride, 259 °C for oxide, and 323 °C for carbonate. Surface tensions of solid lithium compounds were calculated from the contact angle measurements.

  10. A special cell morphology of saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling Dajun; Cao Jinxiang

    2003-01-01

    A special cell morphology, cavity-like cells, was found in posterities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated by low-temperature air plasma with different powers. The feature of the special morphology indicates that the cavity-like cells may be formed by cellular mutation effect induced by the plasma, instead of direct cellular damage by the plasma. The results suggest that the cellular mutation effect of the low-temperature plasma is a complex process

  11. Emission spectroscopy of highly ionized high-temperature plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belevtsev, A A; Chinnov, V F; Isakaev, E Kh [Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-01

    This paper deals with advanced studies on the optical emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure highly ionized high-temperature argon and nitrogen plasma jets generated by a powerful arc plasmatron. The emission spectra are taken in the 200-1000 nm range with a spectral resolution of {approx}0.01-0.02 nm. The exposure times are 6 x 10{sup -6}-2 x 10{sup -2} s, the spatial resolution is 0.02-0.03 mm. The recorded jet spectra are abundant in spectral lines originating from different ionization stages. In nitrogen plasmas, tens of vibronic bands are also observed. To interpret and process these spectra such that plasma characteristics can be derived, a purpose-developed automated processing system is applied. The use of a CCD camera at the spectrograph output allows a simultaneous recording of the spectral and chord intensity distributions of spectral lines, which can yet belong to the overlapped spectra of the first and second orders of interference. The modern optical diagnostic means and methods used permit the determination of spatial distributions of electron number densities and temperatures and evaluation of rotational temperatures. The radial profiles of the irradiating plasma components can also be obtained. Special attention is given to the method of deriving rotational temperatures using vibronic bands with an incompletely identified rotational structure.

  12. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-01-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3

  13. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galechyan, G.A. [Institute of Applied Problem of Physics, Yerevan (Armenia); Anna, P.R. [Raritan Valley Community College, Somerville, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO{sub 2} laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall.

  14. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galechyan, G.A.; Anna, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO 2 laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall

  15. Excitation temperature of a solution plasma during nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Genki, E-mail: genki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Nakasugi, Yuki; Akiyama, Tomohiro [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    Excitation temperature of a solution plasma was investigated by spectroscopic measurements to control the nanoparticle synthesis. In the experiments, the effects of edge shielding, applied voltage, and electrode material on the plasma were investigated. When the edge of the Ni electrode wire was shielded by a quartz glass tube, the plasma was uniformly generated together with metallic Ni nanoparticles. The emission spectrum of this electrode contained OH, H{sub α}, H{sub β}, Na, O, and Ni lines. Without an edge-shielded electrode, the continuous infrared radiation emitted at the edge created a high temperature on the electrode surface, producing oxidized coarse particles as a result. The excitation temperature was estimated from the Boltzmann plot. When the voltages were varied at the edge-shielded electrode with low average surface temperature by using different electrolyte concentrations, the excitation temperature of current-concentration spots increased with an increase in the voltage. The size of the Ni nanoparticles decreased at high excitation temperatures. Although the formation of nanoparticles via melting and solidification of the electrode surface has been considered in the past, vaporization of the electrode surface could occur at a high excitation temperature to produce small particles. Moreover, we studied the effects of electrodes of Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag, W, Pt, Au, and various alloys of stainless steel and Cu–Ni alloys. With the exception of Ti, the excitation temperatures ranged from 3500 to 5500 K and the particle size depended on both the excitation temperature and electrode-material properties.

  16. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  17. An overview of plasma-in-liquid experimental studies at the University of Michigan's Plasma Science and Technology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John; Howard, Cameron; Sommers, Bradley

    2010-11-01

    Plasma production or plasma injection in liquid water affords one the opportunity to nonthermally inject advanced oxidation processes into water for the purpose of sterilization or chemical processing. Limitations of current injection approaches include limited throughput capacity, electrode erosion, and reduced process volume. Currently we are investigating two potential approaches to circumventing these issues. These include direct plasma injection using an underwater DBD plasma jet and the direct excitation of underwater isolated bubbles via a pulsed electric field. Presented here are results from these ongoing tests, which include a comparative study of the effectiveness of microdischarge, and plasma jet direct injection approaches on the decomposition of Methylene Blue dye. Additionally, an approach to excitation of isolated bubbles using pulsed electric fields is also discussed. Streamer propagation dynamics such as surface propagation and the observed excitation of surface waves on electrode-attached and free bubbles are also discussed.

  18. Generation of high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with liquid electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lifang; Mao Zhiguo; Yin Zengqian; Ran Junxia

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for generating atmospheric pressure plasma using a dielectric barrier discharge reactor with two liquid electrodes. Four distinct kinds of discharge, including stochastic filaments, regular square pattern, glow-like discharge, and Turing stripe pattern, are observed in argon with a flow rate of 9 slm. The electrical and optical characteristics of the device are investigated. Results show that high-power-density atmospheric pressure plasma with high duty ratio in space and time can be obtained. The influence of wall charges on discharge power and duty ratio has been discussed

  19. Ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography designated for bioavailability studies of felodipine combinations in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sameh; Atia, Noha N; Bakr Ali, Marwa Fathy

    2017-03-01

    Felodipine (FLD), a calcium channel antagonist, is commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypertension either with Metoprolol (MET) or Ramipril (RAM) in two different drug combinations. FLD has high plasma protein binding ability affecting its extraction recoveries from plasma samples. Hence, a specific ultrasound assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (UA-DLLME) method coupled with HPLC using photodiode array detector was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of FLD, MET and RAM in rat plasma after oral administration of these combinations. The factors affecting UA-DLLME were carefully optimized. In this study, UA-DLLME method could provide simple and efficient plasma extraction procedures with superior recovery results. Under optimum condition, all target drugs were separated within 13min. The validation procedures was carried out in agreement with US-FDA guidelines and shown to be suitable for anticipated purposes. Linear calibration ranges were obtained in the range 0.05-2.0μgmL -1 for FLD and MET and 0.1-2.0μgmL -1 for RAM with detection limits of 0.013-0.031μgmL -1 for all the studied drug combinations. The%RSD for inter-day and intra-day precisions was in range of 0.63-3.85% and the accuracy results were in the range of 92.13-100.5%. The validated UA-DLLME-HPLC method was successfully applied for the bioavailability studies of FLD, MET and RAM. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated for all the investigated drugs in rats after single-dose administrations of two different drug combinations. Although FLD was bioequivalent in the two formulations, a small increase in plasma levels of MET and RAM was found in the presence of FLD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The determination of fenspiride in human plasma and urine by liquid chromatography with electrochemical or ultraviolet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauveur, C; Baune, A; Vergnes, N; Jeanniot, J P

    1989-01-01

    A selective and sensitive method for the determination of fenspiride in biological fluids is described. The method involves liquid-liquid extraction followed by separation on a reversed-phase column with electrochemical detection for low levels of the drug in plasma (less than or equal to 100 ng ml-1) or UV absorption for higher concentrations in plasma or urine. The method is suitable for pharmacokinetic analyses and drug monitoring studies.

  1. Ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and derivatization of sulfonamides in river water, honey, milk, and animal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Su, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Zhuang; Zhang, Yupu; Li, Dan; Li, Xueyuan; Zhang, Hanqi; Wang, Ziming

    2011-11-30

    The ionic liquid-based microwave-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-based MADLLME) and derivatization was applied for the pretreatment of six sulfonamides (SAs) prior to the determination by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). By adding methanol (disperser), fluorescamine solution (derivatization reagent) and ionic liquid (extraction solvent) into sample, extraction, derivatization, and preconcentration were continuously performed. Several experimental parameters, such as the type and volume of extraction solvent, the type and volume of disperser, amount of derivatization reagent, microwave power, microwave irradiation time, pH of sample solution, and ionic strength were investigated and optimized. When the microwave power was 240 W, the analytes could be derivatized and extracted simultaneously within 90 s. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of river water, honey, milk, and pig plasma samples, and the recoveries of analytes obtained were in the range of 95.0-110.8, 95.4-106.3, 95.0-108.3, and 95.7-107.7, respectively. The relative standard deviations varied between 1.5% and 7.3% (n=5). The results showed that the proposed method was a rapid, convenient and feasible method for the determination of SAs in liquid samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recovery time of high temperature superconducting tapes exposed in liquid nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng, Jie; Zeng, Weina; Yao, Zhihao; Zhao, Anfeng; Hu, Daoyu; Hong, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel method based on a sequence of AC pulses is presented. • Liquid nitrogen temperature is used as criterion to judge whether the sample has recovered. • Recovery time of some tape doesn't increase with the amplitude of fault current. • This phenomenon is caused by boiling heat transfer process of liquid nitrogen. • This phenomenon can be used in optimizing both the limiting rate and reclosing system. - Abstract: The recovery time is a crucial parameter to high temperature superconducting tapes, especially in power applications. The cooperation between the reclosing device and the superconducting facilities mostly relies on the recovery time of the superconducting tapes. In this paper, a novel method is presented to measure the recovery time of several different superconducting samples. In this method criterion used to judge whether the sample has recovered is the liquid nitrogen temperature, instead of the critical temperature. An interesting phenomenon is observed during the testing of superconducting samples exposed in the liquid nitrogen. Theoretical explanations of this phenomenon are presented from the aspect of heat transfer. Optimization strategy of recovery characteristics based on this phenomenon is also briefly discussed.

  3. Electron temperature measurement by a helium line intensity ratio method in helicon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, R.F.; Kline, J.L.; Scime, E.E.

    2001-01-01

    Electron temperature measurements in helicon plasmas are difficult. The presence of intense rf fields in the plasma complicates the interpretation of Langmuir probe measurements. Furthermore, the non-negligible ion temperature in the plasma considerably shortens the lifetime of conventional Langmuir probes. A spectroscopic technique based on the relative intensities of neutral helium lines is used to measure the electron temperature in the HELIX (Hot hELicon eXperiment) plasma [P. A. Keiter et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2741 (1997)]. This nonintrusive diagnostic is based on the fact that electron impact excitation rate coefficients for helium singlet and triplet states differ as a function of the electron temperature. The different aspects related to the validity of this technique to measure the electron temperature in rf generated plasmas are discussed in this paper. At low plasma density (n e ≤10 11 cm -3 ), this diagnostic is believed to be very reliable since the population of the emitting level can be easily estimated with reasonable accuracy by assuming that all excitation originates from the ground state (steady-state corona model). At higher density, secondary processes (excitation transfer, excitation from metastable, cascading) become more important and a more complex collisional radiative model must be used to predict the electron temperature. In this work, different helium transitions are examined and a suitable transition pair is identified. For an electron temperature of 10 eV, the line ratio is measured as a function of plasma density and compared to values predicted by models. The measured line ratio function is in good agreement with theory and the data suggest that the excitation transfer is the dominant secondary process in high-density plasmas

  4. Rotating structures in low temperature magnetized plasmas - Insight from particle simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eBoeuf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The EXB configuration of various low temperature plasma devices is often responsible for the formation of rotating structures and instabilities leading to anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. In these devices, electrons are strongly magnetized while ions are weakly or not magnetized and this leads to specific physical phenomena that are not present in fusion plasmas where both electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. In this paper we describe basic phenomena involving rotating plasma structures in simple configurations of low temperature EXB plasma devices on the basis of PIC-MCC (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions simulations. We focus on three examples: rotating electron vortices and rotating spokes in cylindrical magnetrons, and azimuthal electron-cyclotron drift instability in Hall thrusters. The simulations are not intended to give definite answers to the many physics issues related to low temperature EXB plasma devices but are used to illustrate and discuss some of the basic questions that need further studies.

  5. A possibility of local measurements of ion temperature in a high-temperature plasma by laser induced ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M

    2012-01-01

    A new diagnostic for local measurements of ion temperature and drift velocity in fusion plasmas is proposed in the paper. The diagnostic is based on laser induced ionization of excited hydrogen and deuterium atoms from the levels which ionization energy less than the laser photon energy. A high intensive laser beam ionizes nearly all the excited atoms in the beam region resulting in a quench of spontaneous line emission of the appropriate optical transitions. The measurements of the quenching emission have been used in the past for local measurements of hydrogen atom density in tokamak plasma. The idea of the new diagnostic is spectral resolution of the quenching emission. The measured spectrum relates directly to the velocity distribution of the excited atoms. This distribution is strongly coupled to the distribution of the hydrogen atoms at the ground state. So, the spectral resolution of quenching emission is a way of local measurements of the temperature and drift velocity of hydrogen atoms in plasma. The temperature of hydrogen atoms is well coupled to the local ion temperature as long as the mean free path of the atoms is shorter than the ion gradient length in plasma. In this case the new diagnostic can provide local measurements of ion temperature in plasma. The paper considers technical capabilities of the diagnostic, physical restrictions of its application and interpretation of the measurements.

  6. The ionization length in plasmas with finite temperature ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, N.; Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.; Duhovnik, J.

    2009-12-01

    The ionization length is an important quantity which up to now has been precisely determined only in plasmas which assume that the ions are born at rest, i.e., in discharges known as "cold ion-source" plasmas. Presented here are the results of our calculations of the ionization lengths in plasmas with an arbitrary ion source temperature. Harrison and Thompson (H&T) [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] found the values of this quantity for the cases of several ion strength potential profiles in the well-known Tonks-Langmuir [Phys. Rev. 34, 876 (1929)] discharge, which is characterized by "cold" ion temperature. This scenario is also known as the "singular" ion-source discharge. The H&T analytic result covers cases of ion sources proportional to exp(βΦ) with Φ the normalized plasma potential and β =0,1,2 values, which correspond to particular physical scenarios. Many years following H&T's work, Bissell and Johnson (B&J) [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] developed a model with the so-called "warm" ion-source temperature, i.e., "regular" ion source, under B&J's particular assumption that the ionization strength is proportional to the local electron density. However, it appears that B&J were not interested in determining the ionization length at all. The importance of this quantity to theoretical modeling was recognized by Riemann, who recently answered all the questions of the most advanced up-to-date plasma-sheath boundary theory with cold ions [K.-U. Riemann, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063508 (2006)] but still without the stiff warm ion-source case solution, which is highly resistant to solution via any available analytic method. The present article is an extension of H&T's results obtained for a single point only with ion source temperature Tn=0 to arbitrary finite ion source temperatures. The approach applied in this work is based on the method recently developed by Kos et al. [Phys. Plasmas 16, 093503 (2009)].

  7. The plasma-wall interaction region: a key low temperature plasma for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counsell, G F

    2002-01-01

    The plasma-wall interaction region of a fusion device provides the interface between the hot core plasma and the material surfaces. To obtain acceptably low levels of erosion from these surfaces requires most of the power leaving the core to be radiated. This is accomplished in existing devices by encouraging plasma detachment, in which the hot plasma arriving in the region is cooled by volume recombination and ion-neutral momentum transfer with a dense population of neutrals recycled from the surface. The result is a low temperature (1 eV e e >10 19 m -3 ) but weakly ionized (n 0 >10 20 m -3 , n e /n 0 <0.1) plasma found nowhere else in the fusion environment. This plasma provides many of the conditions found in industrial plasmas exploiting plasma chemistry and the presence of carbon in the region (in the form of carbon-fibre composite used in the plasma facing materials) can result in the formation of deposited hydrocarbon films. The plasma-wall interaction region is therefore among the most difficult in fusion to model, requiring an understanding of atomic, molecular and surface physics issues

  8. Computation and measurement of a plasma temperature using the emission lines of copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassi, M.; Pierre, L.; Benard, J.; Cahen, C.

    1994-01-01

    The use of copper emission lines for temperature measurement in plasma environments is presented. The article features the problems encountered with such a measurement method when used in a stationary and a non-stationary plasma. In the first case, we were concerned with the temperature measurements in the jet of a 2 MW industrial plasma torche. The plasma was stationary and the measurement geometry allowed the use of the Abel inversion method to recover the temperature profiles in the plasma jet. The limitations of the measurement method on the jet boundaries as well as the cooling of the plasma by entrainement of cold air are discussed. In the second case, a non-stationary plasma in a 1.4 MW electric furnace was studied. This study allowed to feature the role of the detector dynamics as related to the dynamics of the observed medium. The obtained measurements show only a probable temperature in the immediate proximity of the arc. Finally, we conclude on the validity of copper as a tracer and the use of spontaneous emission spectroscopy, and easy method to implement, compared to other sophisticated temperature measurement methods. (orig.)

  9. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  10. The measurement of plasma temperature by height scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katzenstein, J.

    1976-04-01

    One of the most accurate methods for the determination of the electron and ion temperature of a plasma is the measurement of the spectrum of the light scattered from a monoshromatic laser beam by the plasma electrons. The simple case of uncorrelated electrons is treated in detail showing the scattered spectrum to be a simple Gaussian whose half-breadth is proportional to the mean electron thermal velocity hence the square root of electron temperature. The results of a more general treatment are also reviewed which takes into account electron-ion correlations. Experimental requirements on the laser, the spetral instrumentation, and the data analysis are discussed. (author)

  11. Low temperature plasma near a tokamak reactor limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Analytic and two-dimensional computational solutions for the plasma parameters near a toroidally symmetric limiter are illustrated for the projected parameters of a Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX). The temperature near the limiter plate is below 20 eV, except when the density 10 cm inside the limiter contact is 8 x 10 13 cm -3 or less and the thermal diffusivity in the edge region is 2 x 10 4 cm 2 /s or less. Extrapolation of recent experimental data suggests that neither of these conditions is likely to be met near ignition in TFCX, so a low plasma temperature near the limiter should be considered a likely possibility

  12. Temperature determination from a real plasma from line self-reversal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salakhov, M.K.; Fishman, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    The coefficient Z = M/sub infinity/Y/sub infinity/ is determined on the basis of the actual structure of a plasma (the M/sub infinity/ and Y/sub infinity/ coefficients in Bartels's theory). The absorption and emission spectra are utilized as recorded in a transverse section of the plasma, which are used in determining the actual course of the atomic concentration and the half-width of the thin-layer line. An iterative scheme is set up for determining the temperature. A mathematical experiment has been performed and the temperature distribution has been determined in the plasma of a low-voltage pulsed discharge

  13. Microdynamics of dusty plasma liquids in narrow channel: from disorder to order

    CERN Document Server

    Woon Wei Yen; Deng L Iwen; Lin, I

    2003-01-01

    We report direct observations on the microscopic dynamics of dusty plasma liquid confined in a narrow gap. We measure the horizontal and transverse displacement histograms as well as the transverse particle density distributions from particle trajectories. Under confinement, the liquid forms a layer structure. The dust particle motion at boundaries show anisotropy and three outermost layers is found due to the pinching effect of the boundaries. When the gap width is reduced to below 7d (d = inter-layer width), the dust particle motion in the central region shows a transition from isotropic motion to anisotropic discrete hopping motion, leading to a slower dynamics and layer structure through the whole liquid.

  14. Influence of the temperature on the (liquid + liquid) phase equilibria of (water + 1-propanl + linalool or geraniol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Li; Li, Hengde; Huang, Cheng; Feng, Yuqing; Chu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Yuying; Tan, Wei; Qin, Yanlin; Sun, Dalei; Fang, Yanxiong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Ternary LLEs containing linalool and geraniol are presented. • Distribution ratios of 1-propanol in the mixtures are examined. • Influence of the temperature on the LLE is studied. • The LLE data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC models. - Abstract: Linalool and geraniol are the primary components of rose oil, palmarosa oil, and citronella oil and many other essential oils, and two important compounds used in the flavour and fragrance, cosmetic or pharmaceutical industries. Phase equilibria (LLE, VLE, solubility, etc.) and related thermodynamic properties of a mixture are essential in the processes design and control of mass transfer process. In this work, experimental (liquid + liquid) equilibria data of the systems (water + 1-propanl + linalool) and (water + 1-propanl + geraniol) are presented. The (liquid + liquid) equilibria of both systems were determined with a tie-line method at T = (283.15, 298.15 and 313.15) K under atmospheric pressure. The well-known Hand, Bachman and Othmer–Tobias equations were used to test the reliability of the experimental values. The influence of the temperature on the (liquid + liquid) phase equilibria of the mixtures, the binodal curves and distribution ratios of 1-propanl are shown and discussed. Moreover, the NRTL and UNIQUAC models were applied to fit the data for both ternary systems. The interaction parameters obtained from both models successfully correlated the equilibrium compositions. Furthermore, the ternary systems could be represented using the binary parameters of the thermodynamic model with a function of temperature.

  15. Ideal laser-beam propagation through high-temperature ignition Hohlraum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; Dixit, S; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2007-02-23

    We demonstrate that a blue (3omega, 351 nm) laser beam with an intensity of 2 x 10(15) W cm(-2) propagates nearly within the original beam cone through a millimeter scale, T(e)=3.5 keV high density (n(e)=5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. The beam produced less than 1% total backscatter at these high temperatures and densities; the resulting transmission is greater than 90%. Scaling of the electron temperature in the plasma shows that the plasma becomes transparent for uniform electron temperatures above 3 keV. These results are consistent with linear theory thresholds for both filamentation and backscatter instabilities inferred from detailed hydrodynamic simulations. This provides a strong justification for current inertial confinement fusion designs to remain below these thresholds.

  16. Nonlinear quantum fluid equations for a finite temperature Fermi plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, Bengt; Shukla, Padma K

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear quantum electron fluid equations are derived, taking into account the moments of the Wigner equation and by using the Fermi-Dirac equilibrium distribution for electrons with an arbitrary temperature. A simplified formalism with the assumptions of incompressibility of the distribution function is used to close the moments in velocity space. The nonlinear quantum diffraction effects into the fluid equations are incorporated. In the high-temperature limit, we retain the nonlinear fluid equations for a dense hot plasma and in the low-temperature limit, we retain the correct fluid equations for a fully degenerate plasma

  17. Single uniform FBG for simultaneous measurement of liquid level and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, Xuewen; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a novel scheme for simultaneous measurement of liquid level and temperature based on a simple uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG) by monitoring both the short-wavelength-loss peaks and its Bragg resonance. The liquid level can be measured from the amplitude changes of the short-wavelength-loss peaks, while temperature can be measured from the wavelength shift of the Bragg resonance. Both theoretical simulation results and experimental results are presented. Such a scheme has some advantages including robustness, simplicity, flexibility in choosing sensitivity and simultaneous temperature measurement capability

  18. Divertor, thermonuclear device and method of neutralizing high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Hideo.

    1995-01-01

    The thermonuclear device comprises a thermonuclear reactor for taking place fusion reactions to emit fusion plasmas, and a divertor made of a hydrogen occluding material, and the divertor is disposed at a position being in contact with the fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction. The divertor is heated by fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction, and hydrogen is released from the hydrogen occluding material as a constituent material. A gas blanket is formed by the released hydrogen to cool and neutralize the supplied high temperature nuclear fusion plasmas. This prevents the high temperature plasmas from hitting against the divertor, elimination of the divertor by melting and evaporation, and solve a problem of processing a divertor activated by neutrons. In addition, it is possible to utilize hydrogen isotopes of fuels effectively and remove unnecessary helium. Inflow of impurities from out of the system can also be prevented. (N.H.)

  19. Temperature-induced structural changes in fluorozirconate glasses and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, S.; Youngman, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    The atomic structure and its temperature dependence in fluorozirconate glasses and supercooled liquids have been studied with high-resolution and high-temperature 19 F and 23 Na nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 19 F NMR spectra in these glasses show the presence of multiple F environments. Temperature dependence of the 19 F magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra indicates a progressive change in the average F coordination environment in the glass structure, besides motional narrowing due to substantial mobility of F - ions. The observed change in the average 19 F NMR chemical shift is consistent with progressive breaking of the Zr-F-Zr linkages in the glass structure with increasing temperature. The onset of such a change in F speciation is observed at temperatures well below T g . This result is evidence of changes in the average equilibrium structure in an inorganic glass-forming liquid at T g , albeit on a local scale. The 23 Na NMR spectra indicate that the cations in these glasses become significantly mobile only at temperatures T≥T g , which allows for the onset of global structural relaxation and viscous flow

  20. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria of {benzene + cyclohexane + two ionic liquids} at different temperature and atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakal, Salem A.; Shen, Chong; Li, Chun-xi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium for two quaternary and two ternary systems were measured. ► The components include cyclohexane, benzene, [MIM][BF4], [MIM][ClO4] and [MMIM][DMP]. ► The (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data can be well correlated by the NRTL model. ► Separation of benzene and cyclohexane by pure ILs and their mixtures were discussed. - Abstract: (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data of the following ternary and quaternary systems at different temperatures and mass fractions of ionic liquids (ILs) were measured at atmospheric pressure, i.e., {cyclohexane + benzene + 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([MMIM][DMP])} at 298.2 K, {cyclohexane + benzene + 1-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([MIM][BF 4 ])} at 338.2 K, {cyclohexane + benzene + [MIM][BF 4 ] + [MMIM][DMP]} at (298.2 and 313.2) K, and {cyclohexane + benzene + 1-methylimidazolium perchlorate [MIM][ClO 4 ] + [MMIM][DMP]} at 298.2 K. The results indicate that both selectivity and distribution factor of the IL mixture for benzene are lower than that of pure IL [MMIM][DMP] at a specified condition, and decrease with the increase of the mass fraction of [MIM][BF 4 ] or [MIM][ClO 4 ] in its mixture of [MMIM][DMP] and the mole fraction of benzene. The extremely high selectivity of [MIM][BF 4 ] and [MIM][ClO 4 ] for aromatic compounds as predicted by the COSMOS-RS model is not justified by the present experimental results, and on the contrary, they show a relatively lower selectivity and extraction capacity for benzene than [MMIM][DMP].

  1. Quantification of pramipexole in human plasma by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using tamsulosin as internal standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna V S; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Shrivastava, Wishu; Mudigonda, Koteshwara; Maurya, Santosh; Ajjala, Devender

    2007-11-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the quantification of pramipexole in human plasma. Following liquid-liquid extraction, the analytes were separated using an isocratic mobile phase on a reverse-phase column and analyzed by MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using the respective [M + H](+) ions, m/z 212/152 for pramipexole and m/z 409/228 for the IS. The method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 200-8000 pg/mL for pramipexole in human plasma. The lower limit of quantification was 200 pg/mL with a relative standard deviation of less than 8%. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve range. A run time of 3.5 min for each sample made it possible to analyze more than 200 human plasma samples per day. The validated method has been successfully used to analyze human plasma samples for application in pharmacokinetic, bioavailability or bioequivalence studies. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Plasma temperature during methylene blue/light treatment influences virus inactivation capacity and product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemann, U; Handke, W; Sumian, C; Alvarez, I; Reichenberg, S; Müller, T H; Seltsam, A

    2018-02-27

    Photodynamic treatment using methylene blue (MB) and visible light is in routine use for pathogen inactivation of human plasma in different countries. Ambient and product temperature conditions for human plasma during production may vary between production sites. The influence of different temperature conditions on virus inactivation capacity and plasma quality of the THERAFLEX MB-Plasma procedure was investigated in this study. Plasma units equilibrated to 5 ± 2°C, room temperature (22 ± 2°C) or 30 ± 2°C were treated with MB/light and comparatively assessed for the inactivation capacity for three different viruses, concentrations of MB and its photoproducts, activity of various plasma coagulation factors and clotting time. Reduced solubility of the MB pill was observed at 5 ± 2°C. Photocatalytic degradation of MB increased with increasing temperature, and the greatest formation of photoproducts (mainly azure B) occurred at 30 ± 2°C. Inactivation of suid herpesvirus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus and vesicular stomatitis virus was significantly lower at 5 ± 2°C than at higher temperatures. MB/light treatment affected clotting times and the activity of almost all investigated plasma proteins. Factor VIII (-17·7 ± 8·3%, 22 ± 2°C) and fibrinogen (-14·4 ± 16·4%, 22 ± 2°C) showed the highest decreases in activity. Increasing plasma temperatures resulted in greater changes in clotting time and higher losses of plasma coagulation factor activity. Temperature conditions for THERAFLEX MB-Plasma treatment must be carefully controlled to assure uniform quality of pathogen-reduced plasma in routine production. Inactivation of cooled plasma is not recommended. © 2018 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  3. Optimized method for the determination of itopride in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptácek, Pavel; Klíma, Josef; Macek, Jan

    2009-03-15

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection for the determination of itopride in human plasma is reported. The sample preparation was based on liquid-liquid extraction of itopride from plasma with t-butylmethylether and dichloromethane (70:30, v/v) mixture followed by a back extraction of the analyte to the phosphate buffer (pH 3.2). Liquid chromatography was performed on an octadecylsilica column (55 mm x 4 mm, 3 microm particles), the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-triethylamine-15 mM dihydrogenpotassium phosphate (14.5:0.5:85, v/v/v), pH of the mobile phase was adjusted to 4.8. The run time was 3 min. The fluorimetric detector was operated at 250/342 nm (excitation/emission wavelength). Naratriptan was used as the internal standard. The limit of quantitation was 9.5 ng/ml using 0.5 ml of plasma. The method precision and inaccuracy were less than 8%. The assay was applied to the analysis of samples from a bioequivalence study.

  4. Transport properties of glass-forming liquids suggest that dynamic crossover temperature is as important as the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Branca, Caterina; Corsaro, Carmelo; Leone, Nancy; Spooren, Jeroen; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-12-28

    It is becoming common practice to partition glass-forming liquids into two classes based on the dependence of the shear viscosity η on temperature T. In an Arrhenius plot, ln η vs 1/T, a strong liquid shows linear behavior whereas a fragile liquid exhibits an upward curvature [super-Arrhenius (SA) behavior], a situation customarily described by using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law. Here we analyze existing data of the transport coefficients of 84 glass-forming liquids. We show the data are consistent, on decreasing temperature, with the onset of a well-defined dynamical crossover η(×), where η(×) has the same value, η(×) ≈ 10(3) Poise, for all 84 liquids. The crossover temperature, T(×), located well above the calorimetric glass transition temperature T(g), marks significant variations in the system thermodynamics, evidenced by the change of the SA-like T dependence above T(×) to Arrhenius behavior below T(×). We also show that below T(×) the familiar Stokes-Einstein relation D/T ∼ η(-1) breaks down and is replaced by a fractional form D/T ∼ η(-ζ), with ζ ≈ 0.85.

  5. Temperature control system for liquid-fed ceramic melters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    A temperature-feedback system has been developed for controlling electrical power to liquid-fed ceramic melters (LFCM). Software, written for a microcomputer-based data acquisition and process monitoring system, compares glass temperatures with a temperature setpoint and adjusts the electrical power accordingly. Included in the control algorithm are steps to reject failed thermocouples, spatially average the glass temperatures, smooth the averaged temperatures over time using a digital filter, and detect foaming in the glass. The temperature control system has proved effective during all phases of melter operation including startup, steady operation, loss of feed, and shutdown. This system replaces current, power, and resistance feedback control systems used previously in controlling the LFCM process

  6. W/Cu composites produced by low temperature Pulse Plasma Sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, M.S.; Fortuna, E.; Michalski, A.J.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFCs) must withstand the thermal, mechanical and neutron loads under cyclic mode of operation and vacuum. Despite that PFCs of ITER and demonstration reactors must assure reliability and long in service lifetime. For that reason PFCs are designed to be made of beryllium, tungsten or carbon fibre composites armours and copper based heat sink material. Such design concepts can only be used if joining methods of these dissimilar materials are resolved. Several techniques have been developed for joining W and Cu e. g. casting of pure Cu onto W, high temperature brazing, direct diffusion bonding or CVDs of W onto Cu. The main problem in the development of such joints is the large difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion, CTE (alpha Cu > 4 alpha W) and elastic modula (ECu > 0.2 EW). These differences result in large stresses at the W/Cu interfaces during manufacturing and/or during operation, which may lead to cracking or delamination reducing lifetime of the components. Possible solution to this problem is the use of W-Cu composites (FGM). W-Cu composites are widely used for spark erosion electrodes, in heavy duty circuit breakers and as heat sinks of microelectronic devices. They are commonly produced by infiltration of a porous sintered tungsten by liquid copper. Other technological route is powder metallurgy. Coatings can be produced by low pressure plasma spraying. All these methods, however, are known to have some disadvantages. For infiltration there is a 30 wt.% limit of Cu content while for powder metallurgy and plasma spraying techniques porosity is of concern. In our work the W-Cu composites of different composition were produced by pulse plasma sintering (PPS). This new method utilizes pulsed high electric discharges to heat the powders under uniaxial load. The arc discharges clean surface of powder particles and intensify diffusion. The total sintering time is reduced to several minutes. In our investigations various

  7. Pedestal Temperature Model for Type III ELMy H-mode Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buangam, W.; Suwanna, S.; Onjun, T.; Poolyarat, N.; Picha, R.; Singhsomroje, W.

    2009-07-01

    Full text: It is widely known that the improved performance of H-mode plasma results mainly from a formation of the pedestal, which is a narrow region of strong pressure gradient near the edge of plasma. A predictive capability for the conditions at the top of the pedestal is important, especially for predictive simulations of future experiments. New models for predicting the temperature values at the top of the pedestal for type III ELMy H-mode plasma are developed by using two different approaches: a theory-based approaches and an empirical approach. For a theory-based approach, a model is developed based on the calculation of thermal energy in the pedestal region and on accepted scaling laws of energy confinement time. For an empirical model, a scaling law for pedestal temperature in terms of plasma controlled parameters, such as plasma current, magnetic field, heating power, is deduced from experimental data. Predictions from these models are compared with experimental data from the Pedestal International Database. Statistical quantities, such as Root-Mean Square Error (RMSE) and offset values, are computed to quantify the predictive capability of the models. It is found that the theory-based model predicts the pedestal temperature values moderately well yielding RMSE between 30% and 40%. The IPB98(y,3) scaling law yields with best agreement with RMSE of 30.4%. The empirical model predicts the pedestal temperature value with better agreement, yield RMSE of 25.9%

  8. Evidence for a temperature-driven structural transformation in liquid bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, Y.; Dariel, M.P.; Greenberg, Y.; Yahel, E.; Caspi, E.N.; Makov, G.; Benmore, C.; Beuneu, B.

    2009-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of liquid bismuth have been explored from the melting point to 1100 C degrees by high-resolution measurements of the density, the heat capacity and the static structure factor. These physical properties display a number of anomalies. In particular, we have observed evidence for the presence of a temperature-driven liquid-liquid structural transformation that takes place at ambient pressure. The latter is characterized by a density discontinuity that occurs at 740 C degrees. Differential thermal analysis measurements revealed the endo-thermal nature of this transformation. A rearrangement of liquid bismuth structure was found by neutron diffraction measurements, supporting the existence of a liquid-liquid transformation far above the liquidus. (authors)

  9. Correlations in a partially degenerate electron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chihara, Junzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    The density-functional theory proves that an ion-electron mixture can be treated as a one-component liquid interacting only via a pairwise interaction in the evaluation of the ion-ion radial distribution function (RDF), and provides a set of integral equations: one is an integral equation for the ion-ion RDF and another for an effective ion-ion interaction, which depends on the ion-ion RDF. This formulation gives a set of integral equation to calculate plasma structures with combined use of the electron-electron correlations in a partially degenerate electron plasma. Therefore, it is important for this purpose to determine the electron-electron correlations at a arbitrary temperature. Here, they are calculated by the quantal version of the hypernetted chain (HNC) equation. On the basis of the jellium-vacancy model, the ionic and electronic structures of rubidium are calculated for the range from liquid metal to plasma states by increasing the temperature at the fixed density using the electron-correlation results. (author)

  10. One-step extraction of polar drugs from plasma by Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilařová, Veronika; Sultani, Mumtaz; Ask, Kristine Skoglund

    2017-01-01

    in the pores of a thin polymeric membrane, a well-known extraction principle also used in hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME). However, the new PALME technique offers a more user-friendly setup in which the supported liquid membrane is incorporated in a 96 well plate system. Thus, high......The new microextraction technique named parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME) was introduced as an alternative approach to liquid-liquid extraction of charged analytes from aqueous samples. The concept is based on extraction of analytes across a supported liquid membrane sustained...... for extraction of polar basic drugs was developed in the present work. The basic drugs hydralazine, ephedrine, metaraminol, salbutamol, and cimetidine were used as model analytes, and were extracted from alkalized human plasma into an aqueous solution via the supported liquid membrane. The extraction...

  11. Operational Characteristics of Liquid Lithium Divertor in NSTX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Abrams, T.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Leblanc, B.; Mansfield, D.; Mueller, D.; Paul, S.; Roquemore, A. L.; Scotti, F.; Skinner, C. H.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Maingi, R.; Nygren, R.; Raman, R.; Sabbagh, S.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2010-11-01

    Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) have resulted in improved plasma performance on NSTX in deuterium H-mode plasmas with neutral beam heating.^ Salient results included improved electron confinement and ELM suppression. In CDX-U, the use of lithium-coated PFC's and a large-area liquid lithium limiter resulted in a six-fold increase in global energy confinement time. A Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) has been installed in NSTX for the 2010 run campaign. The LLD PFC consists of a thin film of lithium on a temperature-controlled substrate to keep the lithium liquefied between shots, and handle heat loads during plasmas. This capability was demonstrated when the LLD withstood a strike point on its surface during discharges with up to 4 MW of neutral beam heating.

  12. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  13. Hydrogen and helium recycling from a JxB-force convected liquid metal Ga{sub 67}In{sub 20.5}Sn{sub 12.5} under steady state plasma bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Yoshi, E-mail: hirooka.yoshihiko@nifs.ac.jp [National institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Bi, Hailin [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Shimada, Michiya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Kamikita, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ono, Masa [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    A series of first-of-a-kind laboratory-scale experiments on the JxB-force convected liquid metal divertor concept have been carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to ∼200 °C, employing a eutectic alloy: Ga{sub 67}In{sub 20.5}Sn{sub 12.5}, the melting point of which is 10.5 °C. The electrical current conducted through the alloy is set at about 70A and the magnetic field is set at about 700 G. It has reproducibly been observed that hydrogen as well as helium particle recycling is noticeably reduced under steady state plasma bombardment when the liquid is convected by the JxB force.

  14. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Na; Li Jie; Wu Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO 2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O 2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO 2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO 2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  15. Direct high-temperature ohmic heating of metals as liquid pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, A V; Cahill, J A; Liddell, W L; Murphy, W J; Stokes, C S

    1968-05-03

    When a sufficiently high electric current is passed through a liquid metal, the electromagnetic pressure pinches off the liquid metal and interrupts the flow of current. For the first time the pinch effect has been overcome by use of centrifugal acceleration. By rotation of a pipe of liquid metal, tin or bismuth or their alloys, at sufficiently high speed, it can be heated electrically without intermission of the electric current. One may now heat liquid metallic substances, by resistive (ohmic) heating, to 5000 degrees K and perhaps higher temperatures.

  16. Engineering: Liquid metal pumped at a record temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrinou, Konstantina

    2017-10-01

    Although liquid metals are effective fluids for heat transfer, pumping them at high temperatures is limited by their corrosiveness to solid metals. A clever pump design addresses this challenge using only ceramics. See Article p.199

  17. Plasma phase transition in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Filinov, V S; Levashov, P R; Fortov, V E; Ebeling, W; Schlanges, M; Koch, S W

    2003-01-01

    Plasma phase transitions in dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas are investigated by direct path integral Monte Carlo methods. The phase boundary of the electron-hole liquid in germanium is calculated and is found to agree reasonably well with the known experimental results. Analogous behaviour is found for high-density hydrogen. For a temperature of T = 10 000 K it is shown that the internal energy is lowered due to droplet formation for densities between 10 sup 2 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 and 10 sup 2 sup 4 cm sup - sup 3.

  18. Liquid-liquid miscibility and volumetric properties of aqueous solutions of ionic liquids as a function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Silu; Jacquemin, Johan; Husson, Pascale; Hardacre, Christopher; Costa Gomes, Margarida F.

    2009-01-01

    The volumetric properties of seven {water + ionic liquid} binary mixtures have been studied as a function of temperature from (293 to 343) K. The phase behaviour of the systems was first investigated using a nephelometric method and excess molar volumes were calculated from densities measured using an Anton Paar densimeter and fitted using a Redlich-Kister type equation. Two ionic liquids fully miscible with water (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C 1 C 4 Im][BF 4 ]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([C 1 C 2 Im][EtSO 4 ])) and five ionic liquids only partially miscible with water (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C 1 C 2 Im][NTf 2 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C 1 C 4 Im][NTf 2 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C 1 C 4 Im][PF 6 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C 1 C 4 Pyrro][NTf 2 ]), and butyltrimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([N 4111 ][NTf 2 ])) were chosen. Small excess volumes (less than 0.5 cm 3 . mol -1 at 298 K) are obtained compared with the molar volumes of the pure components (less than 0.3% of the molar volume of the pure ionic liquid). For all the considered systems, except for {[C 1 C 2 Im][EtSO 4 ] + water}, positive excess molar volumes were calculated. Finally, an increase of the non-ideality character is observed for all the systems as temperature increases.

  19. Simultaneous determination of midazolam and 1'-hydroxymidazolam in human plasma by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenkui; Luo, Suyi; Smith, Harold T; Tse, Francis L S

    2007-08-01

    A sensitive and simple liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of midazolam and 1'-hydroxymidazolam in human plasma has been developed and validated with a dynamic range of 0.1-250 ng/mL. The analysis was based on semi-automated liquid-liquid extraction followed by evaporation of the extraction solvent, reconstitution and chromatography on a reversed-phase C(18) column. The mobile phase consists of 5 mm ammonium acetate and methanol and runs in gradient at a flow rate of 0.25 mL/min with column temperature of approximately 20 degrees C. The entire column effluent was transferred into the LC-MS/MS interface operated in positive electrospray ionization mode. The chromatographic run time was 4.3 min per injection, with retention times for midazolam, 1'-hydroxymidazolaml and the internal standard, triazolam, of 2.5, 2.3 and 2.1 min, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precision (RSD %) and accuracy (bias %) of the quality control samples were <15.0% and within +/-13%, respectively. The current method has been applied to a clinical drug-drug interaction study in human. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Solid density, low temperature plasma formation in a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.; Maestas, M.D.; Shepherd, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the ability of the authors to produce solid density, low temperature plasmas in polyurethane capillary discharges. The initial capillary diameter is 20 μm. The plasma is produced by discharging a one Ohm parallel plate waterline and Marx generator system through the capillary. A peak current of 340 kA in 300 ns heats the inner wall of the capillary, and the plasma expands into the surrounding material. The authors studied the evolution of the discharge using current and voltage probes, axial and radial streak photography, axial x-ray diode array and schlieren photography, and have estimated the peak temperature of the discharge to be approximately 10 eV and the density to be near 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/. This indicates that the plasma may approach the strongly coupled regime. They discuss their interpretation of the data and compare their results with theoretical models of the plasma dynamics

  1. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  2. Temperature dependence on plasma-induced damage and chemical reactions in GaN etching processes using chlorine plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zecheng; Ishikawa, Kenji; Imamura, Masato; Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2018-06-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) on GaN was optimally reduced by high-temperature chlorine plasma etching. Energetic ion bombardments primarily induced PID involving stoichiometry, surface roughness, and photoluminescence (PL) degradation. Chemical reactions under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and chlorine radical exposure at temperatures higher than 400 °C can be controlled by taking into account the synergism of simultaneous photon and radical irradiations to effectively reduce PID.

  3. Density of Liquid Steel over Temperature Range of 1 803-1 873 K

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang

    2004-01-01

    The density of three kinds of liquid steel was measured by a modified sessile drop method over the temperature range of 1 803-1 873 K. It is found that the density of liquid steels decreases with increasing temperature and carbon content in steel. Both of the density and its absolute temperature coefficient of studied steels are smaller than the literature values of pure iron. The molar volume of the steels increases with increasing temperature.

  4. Improved Temperature Diagnostic for Non-Neutral Plasmas with Single-Electron Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanman, Sabrina; Evans, Lenny; Fajans, Joel; Hunter, Eric; Nelson, Cheyenne; Sierra, Carlos; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma temperature diagnostics in a Penning-Malmberg trap are essential for reliably obtaining cold, non-neutral plasmas. We have developed a setup for detecting the initial electrons that escape from a trapped pure electron plasma as the confining electrode potential is slowly reduced. The setup minimizes external noise by using a silicon photomultiplier to capture light emitted from an MCP-amplified phosphor screen. To take advantage of this enhanced resolution, we have developed a new plasma temperature diagnostic analysis procedure which takes discrete electron arrival times as input. We have run extensive simulations comparing this new discrete algorithm to our existing exponential fitting algorithm. These simulations are used to explore the behavior of these two temperature diagnostic procedures at low N and at high electronic noise. This work was supported by the DOE DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the NSF 1500538-PHY.

  5. Spectroscopic determination of temperatures in plasmas generated by arc torches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašláni, Alan; Sember, Viktor; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 133, July (2017), s. 14-20 ISSN 0584-8547 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-19444S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Arc plasma torch * Optical emission spectroscopy * Temperature * Boltzmann plot Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.241, year: 2016

  6. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period

  7. Measurement of thermal plasma jet temperature and velocity by laser light lineshape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Two important parameters of thermal plasma jets are kinetic or gas temperatures and flow velocity. Gas temperatures have been traditionally measured using emission spectroscopy, but this method depends on either the generally unrealistic assumption of the existence of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) within the plasma, or the use of various non-LTE or partial LTE models to relate the intensity of the emission lines to the gas temperature. Plasma jet velocities have been measured using laser Doppler velocimetry on particles injected into the plasma. However, this method is intrusive and it is not known how well the particle velocities represent the gas velocity. Recently, plasma jet velocities have been measured from the Doppler shift of laser light scattered by the plasma. In this case, the Doppler shift was determined from the difference in the transmission profile of a high resolution monochromator between red shifted and blue shifted scattered light. A direct approach to measuring localized temperatures and velocities is afforded by high resolution scattered light lineshape measurements. The linewidth of laser light scattered by atoms and ions can be related to the kinetic temperature without LTE assumptions, while a shift in the peak position relative to the incident laser lineshape yields the gas velocity. We report in this paper work underway to measure gas temperatures and velocities in an argon thermal plasma jet using high resolution lineshape analysis of scattered laser light

  8. Liquid temperature measuring method and device therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Fumi; Karasawa, Hirokazu

    1995-06-02

    In the present invention, temperature of liquid metal in coolants in an FBR type reactor can accurately be measured at rapid response time. Namely, ultrasonic waves are emitted from an ultrasonic wave sensor disposed in the air to a guide wave tube. Ultrasonic waves are reflected at reflection plates disposed at front and back or upper and lower portions of a small hole disposed to the wave guide tube. The reflected waves are received by the sensor described above. The difference of the reaching time of the reflected waves from the reflecting plates disposed at the front and the back or the upper and lower portions is measured. The speed of sounds in this case is determined based on the size of the small hole and the distance of the upper and the lower reflection plates. The speed of sounds is determined by the formula below: V(m/s) = 2500 - 0.52 T, where T: temperature. The temperature of the liquid can easily be calculated based on the formula. Accordingly, since the speed of the ultrasonic waves from their emission to the reception is msec order, and the processing of the signals are simple, the temperature can be measured at a response time of several msecs. In addition, since the ultrasonic wave sensor is disposed at the outside of the reactor, no special countermeasure for environmental circumstances is necessary, to improve maintenance ability. (I.S.).

  9. Liquid lithium limiter experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive eXperiment - Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R=34 cm, a=22 cm, B toroidal 2 kG, I P =100 kA, T e (0)∼100 eV, n e (0)∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium limited discharges are consistent with Z effective <1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced. (author)

  10. Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R = 34 cm, a = 22 cm, B toroidal = 2 kG, I P = 100 kA, T e (0) = 100 eV, n e (0) ∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium tray limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium-limited discharges are consistent with Z effective < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced

  11. Formation and termination of High ion temperature mode in Heliotron/torsatron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Kondo, K.; Nagasaki, K.

    1997-01-01

    Physics of the formation and termination of High ion temperature mode (high T i mode) are studied by controlling density profiles and radial electric field. High ion temperature mode is observed for neutral beam heated plasmas in Heliotron/torsatron plasmas (Heliotron-E). This high T i mode plasma is characterized by a peaked ion temperature profile and is associated with a peaked electron density profile produced by neutral beam fueling with low wall recycling. This high T i mode is terminated by flattening the electron density caused by either gas puffing or second harmonic ECH (core density 'pump-out'). (author)

  12. Comparison of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction for the determination of fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil in water and biological fluids by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, Mohammad; Khalili Boroujeni, Malihe; Hajialiakbari Bidgoli, Ali Akbar

    2011-06-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (HF-LLLME) combined with HPLC-DAD have been applied for the determination of three narcotic drugs (alfentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil) in biological samples (human plasma and urine). Different DLLME parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as type and volume of the extraction solvent and the disperser solvent, concentration of NaOH, and salt addition were investigated. In the HF-LLLME, the effects of important parameters including organic solvent type, concentration of NaOH as donor solution, concentration of H(2)SO(4) as acceptor phase, salt addition, stirring rate, temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The results showed that both extraction methods exhibited good linearity, precision, enrichment factor, and detection limit. Under optimal condition, the limits of detection ranged from 0.4 to 1.9 μg/L and from 1.1 to 2.3 μg/L for DLLME and HF-LLLME, respectively. For DLLME, the intra- and inter-day precisions were 1.7-6.4% and 14.2-15.9%, respectively; and for HF-LLLME were 0.7-5.2% and 3.3-10.1%, respectively. The enrichment factors were from 275 to 325 and 190 to 237 for DLLME and HF-LLLME, respectively. The applicability of the proposed methods was investigated by analyzing biological samples. For analysis of human plasma and urine samples, HF-LLLME showed higher precision, more effective sample clean-up, higher extraction efficiency, lower organic solvent consumption than DLLME.

  13. Hydrogen plasma enhanced alignment on CNT-STM tips grown by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, Fa-Kuei; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Ueda, Kazuyuki; Ohira, Yutaka; Tanji, Takayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown directly on a scanning tunneling microscopy tip by liquid catalyst-assisted microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and effects of hydrogen plasma treatment on the tip have been investigated in detail by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The unaligned CNTs on the as-grown tip apex have been realigned and reshaped by subsequent hydrogen plasma treatment. The diameter of CNTs is enlarged mainly due to amorphous layers being re-sputtered over their outer shells

  14. Determination of atenolol in human plasma using ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Mohsen; Farahani, Hadi; Papan, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-06-01

    An efficient analytical method called ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of atenolol in human plasma. A hydrophobic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) was formed by the addition of a hydrophilic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) to a sample solution containing an ion-pairing agent during microextraction. The analyte was extracted into the ionic liquid phase while the microextraction solvent was dispersed throughout the sample by utilizing ultrasound. The sample was then centrifuged, and the extracting phase retracted into the microsyringe and injected to liquid chromatography. After optimization, the calibration curve showed linearity in the range of 2-750 ng/mL with the regression coefficient corresponding to 0.998. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) and quantification (S/N = 10) were 0.5 and 2 ng/mL, respectively. A reasonable relative recovery range of 90-96.7% and satisfactory intra-assay (4.8-5.1%, n = 6) and interassay (5.0-5.6%, n = 9) precision along with a substantial sample clean-up demonstrated good performance of the procedure. It was applied for the determination of atenolol in human plasma after oral administration and some pharmacokinetic data were obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A Novel High-Sensitivity, Low-Power, Liquid Crystal Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Algorri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel temperature sensor based on nematic liquid crystal permittivity as a sensing magnitude, is presented. This sensor consists of a specific micrometric structure that gives considerable advantages from other previous related liquid crystal (LC sensors. The analytical study reveals that permittivity change with temperature is introduced in a hyperbolic cosine function, increasing the sensitivity term considerably. The experimental data has been obtained for ranges from −6 °C to 100 °C. Despite this, following the LC datasheet, theoretical ranges from −40 °C to 109 °C could be achieved. These results have revealed maximum sensitivities of 33 mVrms/°C for certain temperature ranges; three times more than of most silicon temperature sensors. As it was predicted by the analytical study, the micrometric size of the proposed structure produces a high output voltage. Moreover the voltage’s sensitivity to temperature response can be controlled by the applied voltage. This response allows temperature measurements to be carried out without any amplification or conditioning circuitry, with very low power consumption.

  16. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  17. Temperature diagnostics of a non-thermal plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Jan

    2013-09-01

    The study reflects the concept of the temperature as a physical quantity resulting from the second thermodynamic law. The reliability of different approaches of the temperature diagnostics of open non-equilibrium systems is discussed using examples of low temperature atmospheric pressure discharges. The focus of this work is a miniaturized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet for local surface treatment at ambient atmosphere. The micro-discharge is driven with a capacitively coupled radio frequency electric field at 27.12 MHz and fed with argon at rates of about 1 slm through the capillary with an inner diameter of 4 mm. The discharge consists of several contracted filaments with diameter around 300 μm which are rotating azimuthally in the capillary in a self-organized manner. While the measured temperatures of the filament core exceed 700 K, the heat impact on a target below the plasma jet remains limited leading to target temperatures below 400 K. Different kinds of temperatures and energy transport processes are proposed and experimentally investigated. Nevertheless, a reliable and detailed temperature diagnostics is a challenge. We report on a novel diagnostics approach for the spatially and temporally resolved measurement of the gas temperature based on the optical properties of the plasma. Laser Schlieren Deflectometry is adapted to explore temperature profiles of filaments and their behaviour. In parallel, the method demonstrates a fundamental Fermat's principle of minimal energy. Information acquired with this method plays an important role for the optimization of local thin film deposition and surface functionalization by means of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The work was supported in part by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB-TR 24.

  18. Low plasma edge temperatures for the self-pumped limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, W.K.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-03-01

    Transport code calculations have been performed to study the operation of an INTOR-like tokamak plasma from which helium is removed by a self-pumped limiter, which traps helium, but not hydrogen, in its surface layers. To prevent saturation by helium, the surface is renewed by continuous injection of the surface material (vanadium in this study) into the scrape-off layer. The presence of the injected vanadium leads to plasma temperatures well below 50 eV in the scrape-off layer, with supplementary rf heating. Operation in this edge temperature regime is essential for the use of medium- and high-Z limiter coatings

  19. Atomic processes in high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Y.

    1991-07-01

    This is the final report on the project Atomic Processes in High Temperature Plasmas', which has been completed in June 30, 1991. The original contract started in 1978. The dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients were calculated for ions with the number of electrons N = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, and 12. The result was then used to construct a new and improved rate formula. Other important resonant processes, which are closely related to DR, were also studied to interpret experiments and to test the DR theory. The plasma field and the density effects on the rate coefficients was found to be important, and a consistent correction procedure is being developed. The available data on the DR rates and their accuracy do not yet fully meet the requirement for plasma modeling; there are serious gaps in the available data, and the currently adopted theoretical procedure needs improvements. Critical assessment of the current status of the DR problem is presented, and possible future work needed is summarized

  20. Transitions through critical temperatures in nematic liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala; Ockendon, John; Howell, Peter; Surovyatkina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    We obtain estimates for critical nematic liquid crystal (LC) temperatures under the action of a slowly varying temperature-dependent control variable. We show that biaxiality has a negligible effect within our model and that these delay estimates are well described by a purely uniaxial model. The static theory predicts two critical temperatures: the supercooling temperature below which the isotropic phase loses stability and the superheating temperature above which the ordered nematic states do not exist. In contrast to the static problem, the isotropic phase exhibits a memory effect below the supercooling temperature in the dynamic framework. This delayed loss of stability is independent of the rate of change of temperature and depends purely on the initial value of the temperature. We also show how our results can be used to improve estimates for LC material constants. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Transitions through critical temperatures in nematic liquid crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Majumdar, Apala

    2013-08-06

    We obtain estimates for critical nematic liquid crystal (LC) temperatures under the action of a slowly varying temperature-dependent control variable. We show that biaxiality has a negligible effect within our model and that these delay estimates are well described by a purely uniaxial model. The static theory predicts two critical temperatures: the supercooling temperature below which the isotropic phase loses stability and the superheating temperature above which the ordered nematic states do not exist. In contrast to the static problem, the isotropic phase exhibits a memory effect below the supercooling temperature in the dynamic framework. This delayed loss of stability is independent of the rate of change of temperature and depends purely on the initial value of the temperature. We also show how our results can be used to improve estimates for LC material constants. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  2. Investigating the solvent and temperature effects on the cyclohexadienyl radical in an ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Becky; Cormier, P.J.; Lauzon, J.M.; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2009-01-01

    The cyclohexadienyl radical was studied in a novel green solvent; tetradecyl (trihexyl) phosphonium chloride ionic liquid (IL 101). Both the solvent effects and how the hyperfine coupling changes with respect to temperature have been examined and compared to literature. This was done through experimental muon techniques at the TRIUMF National Laboratory in Canada as well as through ab initio calculations. The ionic liquid solvent effects were found to be consistent with other solvents, when assuming ionic liquids to be a combination of ion pairs. In ionic liquid the hyperfine coupling constants of the proton and reduced muon decreased linearly with increasing temperature. The analysis showed that the majority of this relationship is due to a vibrational effect, although the solvent density plays a role too. The temperature effect on the entropy of the system was determined to be negligible. The temperature coefficient of the reduced muon hyperfine coupling was larger than that of the proton in IL 101 due to the effects of nearby ionic liquid molecules.

  3. Investigating the solvent and temperature effects on the cyclohexadienyl radical in an ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Becky; Cormier, P.J.; Lauzon, J.M. [Department of Chemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, E4L 1G3 (Canada); Ghandi, Khashayar, E-mail: kghandi@mta.c [Department of Chemistry, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, E4L 1G3 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    The cyclohexadienyl radical was studied in a novel green solvent; tetradecyl (trihexyl) phosphonium chloride ionic liquid (IL 101). Both the solvent effects and how the hyperfine coupling changes with respect to temperature have been examined and compared to literature. This was done through experimental muon techniques at the TRIUMF National Laboratory in Canada as well as through ab initio calculations. The ionic liquid solvent effects were found to be consistent with other solvents, when assuming ionic liquids to be a combination of ion pairs. In ionic liquid the hyperfine coupling constants of the proton and reduced muon decreased linearly with increasing temperature. The analysis showed that the majority of this relationship is due to a vibrational effect, although the solvent density plays a role too. The temperature effect on the entropy of the system was determined to be negligible. The temperature coefficient of the reduced muon hyperfine coupling was larger than that of the proton in IL 101 due to the effects of nearby ionic liquid molecules.

  4. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs.

  5. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masayuki

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs

  6. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gounder, J.D.; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-01-01

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 °C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 °C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled laboratory

  7. Development of a laser-induced plasma probe to measure gas phase plasma signals at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gounder, J.D., E-mail: James.Gounder@dlr.de; Kutne, P.; Meier, W.

    2012-08-15

    The ability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for on line simultaneous measurement of elemental concentrations has led to its application in a wide number of processes. The simplicity of the technique allows its application to harsh environments such as present in boilers, furnaces and gasifiers. This paper presents the design of a probe using a custom optic which transforms a round beam into a ring (Donut) beam, which is used for forming a plasma in an atmosphere of nitrogen at high pressure (20 bar) and temperature (200 Degree-Sign C). The LIBS experiments were performed using a high pressure cell to characterize and test the effectiveness of the donut beam transmitted through the LIBS probe and collect plasma signal in back scatter mode. The first tests used the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser, pulse width 7 ns, to form a plasma in nitrogen gas at five different pressures (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 bar) and three different gas temperatures (25, 100 and 200 Degree-Sign C). The uniqueness of this probe is the custom made optic used for reshaping the round laser beam into a ring (Donut) shaped laser beam, which is fed into the probe and focused to form a plasma at the measurement point. The plasma signal is collected and collimated using the laser focusing lens and is reflected from the laser beam axis onto an achromatic lens by a high reflection mirror mounted in the center section of the donut laser beam. The effect of gas pressure and temperature on N(I) lines in the high pressure cell experiment shows that the line intensity decreases with pressure and increases with temperature. Mean plasma temperature was calculated using the ratios of N(I) line intensities ranging from 7400 K to 8900 K at 1 bar and 2400 K to 3200 K at 20 bar for the three different gas temperatures. The results show that as a proof of principle the donut beam optics in combination with the LIBS probe can be used for performing extensive LIBS measurements in well controlled

  8. Radial Distribution Functions of Strongly Coupled Two-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-10-01

    We present tests of three theoretical models for the radial distribution functions (RDFs) in two-temperature strongly coupled plasmas. RDFs are useful in extending plasma thermodynamics and kinetic theory to strong coupling, but they are usually known only for thermal equilibrium or for approximate one-component model plasmas. Accurate two-component modeling is necessary to understand the impact of strong coupling on inter-species transport, e.g., ambipolar diffusion and electron-ion temperature relaxation. We demonstrate that the Seuferling-Vogel-Toeppfer (SVT) extension of the hypernetted chain equations not only gives accurate RDFs (as compared with classical molecular dynamics simulations), but also has a simple connection with the Yukawa OCP model. This connection gives a practical means to recover the structure of the electron background from knowledge of the ion-ion RDF alone. Using the model RDFs in Effective Potential Theory, we report the first predictions of inter-species transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas far from equilibrium. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1453736, AFSOR Award No. FA9550-16-1-0221, and used XSEDE computational resources.

  9. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-10-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the "plasma pencil," a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  10. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the 'plasma pencil', a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  11. Confinement improvement in high-ion temperature plasmas heated with high-energy negative-NBI in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Morita, S.; Ikeda, K.

    2006-10-01

    The increase in the ion temperature due to transport improvement has been observed in plasmas heated with high-energy negative-NBI, in which electrons are dominantly heated, in Large Helical Device (LHD). When the centrally focused ECRH is superposed on the NBI plasma, the ion temperature is observed to rise, accompanied by formation of the electron-ITB. This is ascribed to the ion transport improvement with the transition to the neoclassical electron root with a positive radial electric field. In high-Z plasmas, the ion temperature is increased with an increase in the ion heating power, and reaches 13.5keV. The central ion temperature increases with an increase in a gradient of the electron temperature in an outer plasma region of ρ=0.8, suggesting the ion transport improvement in the outer plasma region induced by the neoclassical electron root. These results indicate the effectiveness of the electron-root scenario for obtaining high-ion temperature plasmas in helical systems. (author)

  12. A newly validated high-performance liquid chromatography method with diode array ultraviolet detection for analysis of the antimalarial drug primaquine in the blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Ana Paula Barbosa do; Borborema, Manoella; Ribeiro, Stephan; De-Oliveira, Ana Cecilia Xavier; Paumgartten, Francisco Jose Roma; Moreira, Davyson de Lima

    2017-01-01

    Primaquine (PQ) diphosphate is an 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial drug with unique therapeutic properties. It is the only drug that prevents relapses of Plasmodium vivax or Plasmodium ovale infections. In this study, a fast, sensitive, cost-effective, and robust method for the extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array ultraviolet detection (HPLC-DAD-UV ) analysis of PQ in the blood plasma was developed and validated. After plasma protein precipitation, PQ was obtained by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by HPLC-DAD-UV with a modified-silica cyanopropyl column (250mm × 4.6mm i.d. × 5μm) as the stationary phase and a mixture of acetonitrile and 10mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH = 3.80) (45:55) as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 1.0mL·min-1, the oven temperature was 50OC, and absorbance was measured at 264nm. The method was validated for linearity, intra-day and inter-day precision, accuracy, recovery, and robustness. The detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) limits were 1.0 and 3.5ng·mL-1, respectively. The method was used to analyze the plasma of female DBA-2 mice treated with 20mg.kg-1 (oral) PQ diphosphate. By combining a simple, low-cost extraction procedure with a sensitive, precise, accurate, and robust method, it was possible to analyze PQ in small volumes of plasma. The new method presents lower LOD and LOQ limits and requires a shorter analysis time and smaller plasma volumes than those of previously reported HPLC methods with DAD-UV detection. The new validated method is suitable for kinetic studies of PQ in small rodents, including mouse models for the study of malaria.

  13. A newly validated high-performance liquid chromatography method with diode array ultraviolet detection for analysis of the antimalarial drug primaquine in the blood plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Barbosa do Carmo

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Primaquine (PQ diphosphate is an 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial drug with unique therapeutic properties. It is the only drug that prevents relapses of Plasmodium vivax or Plasmodium ovale infections. In this study, a fast, sensitive, cost-effective, and robust method for the extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array ultraviolet detection (HPLC-DAD-UV analysis of PQ in the blood plasma was developed and validated. METHODS: After plasma protein precipitation, PQ was obtained by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by HPLC-DAD-UV with a modified-silica cyanopropyl column (250mm × 4.6mm i.d. × 5μm as the stationary phase and a mixture of acetonitrile and 10mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH = 3.80 (45:55 as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 1.0mL·min-1, the oven temperature was 50OC, and absorbance was measured at 264nm. The method was validated for linearity, intra-day and inter-day precision, accuracy, recovery, and robustness. The detection (LOD and quantification (LOQ limits were 1.0 and 3.5ng·mL-1, respectively. The method was used to analyze the plasma of female DBA-2 mice treated with 20mg.kg-1 (oral PQ diphosphate. RESULTS: By combining a simple, low-cost extraction procedure with a sensitive, precise, accurate, and robust method, it was possible to analyze PQ in small volumes of plasma. The new method presents lower LOD and LOQ limits and requires a shorter analysis time and smaller plasma volumes than those of previously reported HPLC methods with DAD-UV detection. CONCLUSIONS: The new validated method is suitable for kinetic studies of PQ in small rodents, including mouse models for the study of malaria.

  14. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years

  15. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David B., E-mail: graves@berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  16. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  17. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction of new psychoactive substances in plasma and whole blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vårdal, Linda; Askildsen, Hilde-Merete; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction (PALME) was combined with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS) and the potential for screening of new psychoactive substances (NPS) was investigated for the first time. PALME was performed in 96-well format...... comprising a donor plate, a supported liquid membrane (SLM), and an acceptor plate. Uncharged NPS were extracted from plasma or whole blood, across an organic SLM, and into an aqueous acceptor solution, facilitated by a pH gradient. MDAI (5,6-methylenedioxy-2-aminoindane), methylone, PFA (para...

  18. X-ray Heating and Electron Temperature of Laboratory Photoionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Roberto; Lockard, Tom; Mayes, Daniel C.; Loisel, Guillaume; Bailey, James E.; Rochau, Gregory; Abdallah, J.; Golovkin, I.

    2018-06-01

    In separate experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories two different samples were employed to produce and characterize photoionized plasmas. One was a gas cell filled with neon, and the other was a thin silicon layer coated with plastic. Both samples were driven by the broadband x-ray flux produced at the collapse of a wire array z-pinch implosion. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the charge state distribution, and the electron temperature was extracted from a Li-like ion level population ratio. To interpret the temperature measurement, we performed Boltzmann kinetics and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We found that non-equilibrium atomic physics and the coupling of the radiation flux to the atomic level population kinetics play a critical role in modeling the x-ray heating of photoionized plasmas. In spite of being driven by similar x-ray drives, differences of ionization and charged state distributions in the neon and silicon plasmas are reflected in the plasma heating and observed electron temperatures.This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  19. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2016-01-01

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic...

  20. Investigation of the connection between plasma temperature and electrode temperature in metal-halide lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, D.C.; Gleixner, K.H.; Lieder, G.H.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial profiles of electrode temperatures and plasma temperatures have been measured on 'real' HID lamps filled with a commercial metal-halide compound. The absolute accuracy of pyrometric determination of electrode tip temperatures was ±30 K, while the determination of plasma core temperatures, using a modified Bartels method, has an accuracy of ±100 K. We could deduce a close correlation between the plasma temperature in front of an electrode T p and its tip temperature T t due to the influence of the cataphoresis. If T p is reduced at the cathode the T t value has also lowered, whereas T p at the anode is raised together with its T t data. This correlation disappears at ballast frequencies above 100 Hz, whereas the cataphoresis influence on T p continues up to 500 Hz. Based on the latter limit, a rough estimation of the cataphoresis velocity delivers 700 cm s -1 . As a tentative interpretation, we suggest that the connection between T p and T t is caused by an increase of the ion part of the total current at the cathode due to Na accumulation before it. Thus, the cathode has to emit fewer electrons and works at a lower temperature. Further results are the temporal behaviour of T t depends on the ballast type. For vertical operation the strong influence of convection on T t has also to be taken into account. Above 100 Hz, where only convection plays a role, the upper electrode T t exceeds the T t value of the lower electrode by nearly 400 K. This discrepancy one may explain, tentatively, by convection heating of the upper electrode and convection cooling of the lower one. (author)

  1. The ICARUS Front-end Preamplifier Working at Liquid Argon Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baibussinov, B; Casagrande, F; Cennini, P; Centro, S; Curioni, A; Meng, G; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rubbia, C; Sergiampietri, F; Ventura, S

    2011-01-01

    We describe characteristics and performance of the low-noise front-end preamplifier used in the ICARUS 50-litre liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber installed in the CERN West Area Neutrino Facility during the 1997-98 neutrino runs. The preamplifiers were designed to work immersed in ultra-pure liquid Argon at a temperature of 87K.

  2. Second topical conference on high-temperature plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahoda, F.C.; Freese, K.B.

    1978-02-01

    This report contains the program and abstracts of papers presented at the Second American Physical Society Topical Conference on High Temperature Plasma Diagnostics, March 1-3, 1978, Santa Fe, New Mexico

  3. Scalar perturbations in two-temperature cosmological plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moortgat, J.B.; Marklund, M.

    2006-01-01

    We study the properties of density perturbations of a two-component plasma with a temperature difference on a homogeneous and isotropic background. For this purpose, we extend the general relativistic gauge-invariant and covariant (GIC) perturbation theory to include a multifluid with a particular

  4. A novel freeze-dried storage and preparation method for the determination of mycophenolic acid in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Qiang, Wei; Li, Ying; Cheng, Zeneng; Xie, Mengmeng

    2017-09-01

    Plasma samples were conventionally stored at freezing conditions until the time of detection. Such a technique, when carried out over an extended period, is energy consuming; in addition, preparation and transportation of stored samples is inconvenient. In this study, a freeze-dried storage and preparation method was proposed to determine the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in plasma. Fresh plasma samples were freeze-dried using a device, and then stored at ambient temperature. After the stored samples were soaked with methanol spiked with the internal standard, high-performance liquid chromatography was conducted to detect MPA. The proposed method was demonstrated to be precise and accurate over the linear range of 0.5-50 μg mL -1 , with both intra- and inter-day precision being plasma concentration, time point of maximum plasma concentration and elimination half-life, among others, were consistent with the results in the published study. This proposed technique was proved to be simple, reproducible and energy saving. This approach could also simplify the storage and analysis of samples in clinical and scientific drug research. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The effect of low temperature plasma on DNA damage of maize seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrin, F.; Ondriasova, K.; Kyzek, S.; Galova, E.; Medvecka, V.; Zahoranova, A.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that the low temperature plasma shows antimicrobial and disinfecting effects. It also supports the seed germination and it is used in many fields of common life. But there is just a few scientific papers dealing with the genotoxic properties of plasma. In our work, we try to determine the relative rate of DNA double strand breaks formation resulting from the low temperature plasma treatment in the seeds of Zea mays L. using the constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE). We compared DNA damage in seedlings resulting from plasma and zeocin treatment with seedlings, which seeds were treated just with zeocin. (authors)

  6. The liquid lithium limiter control system on FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertocchi, A. [EURATOM-ENEA Association, Frascati Research Center, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)], E-mail: bertocchi@frascati.enea.it; Di Donna, M [Department of Informatics, Systems and Productions, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Panella, M; Vitale, V [EURATOM-ENEA Association, Frascati Research Center, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Rome) (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    In the second half of 2005, a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with capillary porous system (CPS) configuration was installed to test on Tokamak FTU. The liquid lithium flows through capillaries from a reservoir to the side faced to the plasma to form a thin lithium film as wall coating. The system includes three stainless steel cases, which contain two thermocouples each one. A heating system brings the Li temperature about 200 deg. C to allow the liquid to flow. This temperature, monitored by thermocouples, needs to be controlled. To carry out this experimental procedure, some new features have been introduced in the existent control system based on Opto22{sup TM} modules and a CORBA/PHP/MySQL software architecture. The historical data storage to keep the lithium temperature evolution has been added. Two graphical tools - developed in MATLAB{sup TM} and Java environments, respectively, to monitor the lithium temperature coming from thermocouples - have been also implemented. The LLL control system allows to regulate the heater temperature in each unit to reach operational conditions, where the temperature adjustment can be performed either automatically through a specific control law or manually by the operator. During the plasma shot the system switches off the limiter power supply to prevent instruments damage. Moreover, in the same experimental context, a first approach to automatically obtain executable code - starting from control laws designed by Simulink{sup TM} tool - has been realized.

  7. The liquid lithium limiter control system on FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertocchi, A.; Di Donna, M.; Panella, M.; Vitale, V.

    2007-01-01

    In the second half of 2005, a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) with capillary porous system (CPS) configuration was installed to test on Tokamak FTU. The liquid lithium flows through capillaries from a reservoir to the side faced to the plasma to form a thin lithium film as wall coating. The system includes three stainless steel cases, which contain two thermocouples each one. A heating system brings the Li temperature about 200 deg. C to allow the liquid to flow. This temperature, monitored by thermocouples, needs to be controlled. To carry out this experimental procedure, some new features have been introduced in the existent control system based on Opto22 TM modules and a CORBA/PHP/MySQL software architecture. The historical data storage to keep the lithium temperature evolution has been added. Two graphical tools - developed in MATLAB TM and Java environments, respectively, to monitor the lithium temperature coming from thermocouples - have been also implemented. The LLL control system allows to regulate the heater temperature in each unit to reach operational conditions, where the temperature adjustment can be performed either automatically through a specific control law or manually by the operator. During the plasma shot the system switches off the limiter power supply to prevent instruments damage. Moreover, in the same experimental context, a first approach to automatically obtain executable code - starting from control laws designed by Simulink TM tool - has been realized

  8. High-temperature vitrification of Hanford residual-liquid waste in a continuous melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.

    1980-04-01

    Over 270 kg of high-temperature borosilicate glass have been produced in a series of three short-term tests in the High-Temperature Ceramic Melter vitrification system at PNL. The glass produced was formulated to vitrify simulated Hanford residual-liquid waste. The tests were designed to (1) demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-temperature, continuous-vitrification technology for the immobilization of the residual-liquid waste, (2) test the airlift draining technique utilized by the high-temperature melter, (3) compare glass produced in this process to residual-liquid glass produced under laboratory conditions, (4) investigate cesium volatility from the melter during waste processing, and (5) determine the maximum residual-liquid glass production rate in the high-temperature melter. The three tests with the residual-liquid composition confirmed the viability of the continuous-melting vitrification technique for the immobilization of this waste. The airlift draining technique was demonstrated in these tests and the glass produced from the melter was shown to be less porous than the laboratory-produced glass. The final glass produced from the second test was compared to a glass of the same composition produced under laboratory conditions. The comparative tests found the glasses to be indistinguishable, as the small differences in the test results fell within the precision range of the characterization testing equipment. The cesium volatility was examined in the final test. This examination showed that 0.44 wt % of the cesium (assumed to be cesium oxide) was volatilized, which translates to a volatilization rate of 115 mg/cm 2 -h

  9. SPECTROSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS IN ELECTRONIC TEMPERATURE OF PHOTOIONISE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Ferouani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, which have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 --- 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 --- 1s2 1 S0  as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 --- 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(z+x+y/w of O6+ and Ne8+  according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969 [1], this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed [2].

  10. DIAGNOSTIC SPECTROSCOPIQUE EN TEMPERATURE ELECTRONIQUE DES PLASMAS PHOTOIONISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K Ferouani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the diagnostics in electronic temperature of a plasma purely photoionized, based on the intensity ration of lines emitted by ions helium-like, witch have an atomic number Z relatively small. We considered the three lines corresponding to the transitions starting from the excited levels 1s2l towards the fundamental level 1s2 1S0, like appropriate lines. More precisely, the line of resonance w due to the transition 1s2p 1P1 1s2 1 S0, the line of intercombinaison (x,y 1s2p 3 P2,1 1s2 1 S0 as well as prohibited line z due to the transition 1s2 3 S1 1s2 1 S0. These lines appear clearly in the spectra of astrophysical plasmas. As helium-like ion, we chose two, the oxygen O6+ (Z=8 and neon Ne8+ (Z=10. We carried out calculations of the ration of lines intensity G=(zxy/w of O6+ and Ne8+ according to the electronic temperature in the range going from 105 to 107 K. We will see that, like it was shown by Gabriel and Jordan in 1969, this intensity ration can be very sensitive to the temperature electronic and practically independent of the electronic density. Consequently, the ration G can be used to determine in a reliable way the electronic temperature of plasma observed.

  11. Survivability of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) in bovine plasma submitted to spray drying processing and held at different time by temperature storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujols, Joan; Segalés, Joaquim

    2014-12-05

    Bovine plasma was inoculated with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) at an average final titer of 4.2 log10 TCID50/mL to determine the effect of spray drying on viral inactivation. Using a laboratory scale drier, inoculated plasma was spray dried at 200 °C inlet temperature and either 70 or 80 °C throughout substance. Both liquid and dried samples were subjected to three passages on VERO cell monolayers to determine PEDV infectivity. Results indicated liquid samples contained infective virus, but none of the spray dried samples were infectious. Also, survivability of PEDV inoculated on spray dried bovine plasma (SDBP) and stored at 4, 12 or 22 °C was determined for 7, 14 and 21 days. Commercial SDBP powder was inoculated with PEDV to an average final titer of 2.8 log10 TCID50/g. Five samples per time and temperature conditions were subjected to three passages on VERO cell monolayers to determine PEDV infectivity. The virus was non-infectious for all samples stored at 22 °C at 7, 14 and 21 days. PEDV was infective in 1 out of 5 samples stored at 12 °C at 7 days, but none of the samples stored for 14 and 21 days were infectious in cell culture. For samples stored at 4 °C, 4 out of 5 samples were infectious at 7 days, 1 out of 5 samples were infectious at 14 days, but none were infectious at 21 days. In summary, PEDV was not infectious on cell culture within 7 days when stored at room temperature and within 21 days when stored at refrigerated temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature effects on the structure of liquid D-methanol through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, the liquid consists of deuterated methanol and neutron data was collected on the high- diffractometer at Dhruva, BARC. The corrected data at elevated temperatures (BP (boiling point) and double the BP) show that there is a large change in the H-bonded structure of this liquid. The pre-peak or hump, known to be ...

  13. Improving Erosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings by Elevating the Deposition Temperature Based on the Critical Bonding Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shu-Wei; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2018-01-01

    Interlamellar bonding within plasma-sprayed coatings is one of the most important factors dominating the properties and performance of coatings. The interface bonding between lamellae significantly influences the erosion behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings. In this study, TiO2 and Al2O3 coatings with different microstructures were deposited at different deposition temperatures based on the critical bonding temperature concept. The erosion behavior of ceramic coatings was investigated. It was revealed that the coatings prepared at room temperature exhibit a typical lamellar structure with numerous unbonded interfaces, whereas the coatings deposited at the temperature above the critical bonding temperature present a dense structure with well-bonded interfaces. The erosion rate decreases sharply with the improvement of interlamellar bonding when the deposition temperature increases to the critical bonding temperature. In addition, the erosion mechanisms of ceramic coatings were examined. The unbonded interfaces in the conventional coatings act as pre-cracks accelerating the erosion of coatings. Thus, controlling interlamellar bonding formation based on the critical bonding temperature is an effective approach to improve the erosion resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings.

  14. Topics in low-temperature Fermi liquid theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Several topics in quantum liquids are discussed including the elementary excitation spectrum of 3 He under pressure, spin-polarized 3 He, and an early attempt to formulate a Fermi liquid theory to describe the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties of the heavy-electron systems UPt 3 . The elementary excitation spectrum of ordinary liquid 3 He is calculated at several pressures using the polarization potential theory of Aldrich and Pines together with a simple model to describe the effect of multipair excitation. The effective interactions between quasi particles in fully spin-polarized 3 He are obtained from physical arguments and sum rules. The interactions between two down-spin impurities and that between an up and down spin are also deduced. The regime of small polarization is considered next. Using the phenomenological model of Bedell and Sanchez-Castro together with an ansatz form for the spin-flip interaction, a large increase in the singlet scattering rate as a function of polarization is obtained

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Piroxicam Using Temperature-Controlled Ionic Liquid Dispersive Liquid Phase Microextraction Followed By Stopped-Flow Injection Spectrofluorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ganjali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Piroxicam (PXM belongs to the wide class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. PXM has been widely applied in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, gonarthrosis, osteoarthritis, backaches, neuralgia, mialgia. In the presented work, a green and benign sample pretreatment method called temperature-controlled ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction (TCIL-DLPME was followed with stopped-flow injection spectrofluorimetry (SFIS for quantitation of PXM in pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples.Methods:Temperature-controlled ionic liquid dispersive liquid phase microextraction (TCIL-DLPME was applied as an environmentally friendly sample enrichment method to extract and isolate PXM prior to quantitation. Dispersion of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim][PF6] ionic liquid (IL through the sample aqueous solution was performed by applying a relatively high temperature. PXM was extracted into the extractor, and after phase separation, PXM in the final solution was determined by stopped-flow injection spectrofluorimetry (SFIS.Results and Major Conclusion:Different factors affecting the designed method such as IL amount, diluting agent, pH and temperature were investigated in details and optimized. The method provided a linear dynamic range of 0.2-150 μg l-1, a limit of detection (LOD of 0.046 μg l-1 and a relative standard deviation (RSD of 3.1%. Furthermore, in order to demonstrate the analytical applicability of the recommended method, it was applied for quantitation of PXM in real samples.

  16. Temperature relaxation in collisional non equilibrium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potapenko, I.F.; Bobylev, A.V.; Azevedo, C.A.; Assis, A.S. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. We study the relaxation of a space uniform plasma composed of electrons and one species of ions. To simplified the consideration, standard approach is usually accepted: the distribution functions are considered to be a Maxwellian with time dependent electron T{sub e}(t) and ion T{sub i}(t) temperatures. This approach imposes a severe restriction on the electron/ion distributions that could be very far from the equilibrium. In the present work the problem is investigated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic Fokker - Planck equation, which is widely used for the description of collisional plasmas. This equation has many applications in plasma physics as an intrinsic part of physical models, both analytical and numerical. A new detailed description of this classical problem of the collisional plasma kinetic theory is given. A deeper examination of the problem shows that the unusual perturbation theory can not be used. The part of the perturbation of the electron distribution has the character of a boundary layer in the neighborhood of small velocities. In this work the boundary layer is thoroughly studied. The correct distribution electron function is given. Nonmonotonic character of the distribution relaxation in the tail region is observed. The corrected formula for temperature equalization is obtained. The comparison of the calculation results with the asymptotic approach is made. We should stress the important role of the completely conservative different scheme used here, which keeps the symmetric properties of the nonlinear exact equation. This allows us to make calculations without numerical error accumulations, except for machine errors. (author)

  17. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  18. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  19. Electron mobility in nonpolar liquids: the effect of molecular structure, temperature and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    A survey is given on the mobility of excess electrons in liquid hydrocarbons and related compounds. It was found that the mobility is strongly influenced by the molecular structure of the liquid, by the temperature, and by the electric field strength. The mobility in hydrocarbons increases as the shape of the molecule approaches a sphere. The temperature coefficient is positive in most liquids over a limited temperature although exceptions have been observed in liquid methane. The field dependence of the mobility in high mobility liquids (>10 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ) showed a decrease of the mobility at higher field strengths while in low mobility liquids ( 2 V -1 s -1 ) it showed an increase. These results are discussed on the basis of the extended and the localized electron models. The predictions of these theories are compared with the experimental results and conclusions on the validity of the underlying assumptions are drawn. (author)

  20. Plasma Surface Interactions Common to Advanced Fusion Wall Materials and EUV Lithography - Lithium and Tin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Alman, D. A.; Jurczyk, B. E.; Stubbers, R.; Coventry, M. D.; Neumann, M. J.; Olczak, W.; Qiu, H.

    2004-09-01

    Advanced plasma facing components (PFCs) are needed to protect walls in future high power fusion devices. In the semiconductor industry, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources are needed for next generation lithography. Lithium and tin are candidate materials in both areas, with liquid Li and Sn plasma material interactions being critical. The Plasma Material Interaction Group at the University of Illinois is leveraging liquid metal experimental and computational facilities to benefit both fields. The Ion surface InterAction eXperiment (IIAX) has measured liquid Li and Sn sputtering, showing an enhancement in erosion with temperature for light ion bombardment. Surface Cleaning of Optics by Plasma Exposure (SCOPE) measures erosion and damage of EUV mirror samples, and tests cleaning recipes with a helicon plasma. The Flowing LIquid surface Retention Experiment (FLIRE) measures the He and H retention in flowing liquid metals, with retention coefficients varying between 0.001 at 500 eV to 0.01 at 4000 eV.

  1. [The spectra of a laser-produced plasma source with CO2, O2 and CF4 liquid aerosol spray target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-Liang; Chen, Bo

    2008-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) source with liquid aerosol spray target and nanosecond laser was developed, based on both soft X-ray radiation metrology and extreme ultraviolet projection lithography (EUVL). The LPP source is composed of a stainless steel solenoid valve whose temperature can be continuously controlled, a Nd : YAG laser with pulse width, working wavelength and pulse energy being 7 ns, 1.064 microm and 1J respectively, and a pulse generator which can synchronously control the valve and the laser. A standard General Valve Corporation series 99 stainless steel solenoid valve with copper gasket seals and a Kel-F poppet are used in order to minimize leakage and poppet deformation during high-pressure cryogenic operation. A close fitting copper cooling jacket surrounds the valve body. The jacket clamps a copper coolant carrying tube 3 mm in diameter, which is fed by an automatically pressurized liquid nitrogen-filled dewar. The valve temperature can be controlled between 77 and 473 K. For sufficiently high backing pressure and low temperature, the valve reservoir gas can undergo a gas-to-liquid phase transition. Upon valve pulsing, the liquid is ejected into a vacuum and breaks up into droplets, which is called liquid aerosol spray target. For the above-mentioned LPP source, firstly, by the use of Cowan program on the basis of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the authors computed the radiative transition wavelengths and probabilities in soft X-ray region for O4+, O5+, O6+, O7+, F5+, F6+ and F7+ ions which were correspondingly produced from the interaction of the 10(11)-10(12) W x cm(-2) power laser with liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray targets. Secondly, the authors measured the spectra of liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray target LPP sources in the 6-20 nm band for the 8 x 10(11) W x cm(-2) laser irradiance. The measured results were compared with the Cowan calculated results ones, and the radiative transition wavelength and probability for the

  2. Theoretical analysis and experimental study on breakaway torque of large-diameter magnetic liquid seal at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haina; Li, Decai; Wang, Qinglei; Zhang, Zhili

    2013-07-01

    The existing researches of the magnetic liquid rotation seal have been mainly oriented to the seal at normal temperature and the seal with the smaller shaft diameter less than 100 mm. However, the large-diameter magnetic liquid rotation seal at low temperature has not been reported both in theory and in application up to now. A key factor restricting the application of the large-diameter magnetic liquid rotation seal at low temperature is the high breakaway torque. In this paper, the factors that influence the breakaway torque including the number of seal stages, the injected quantity of magnetic liquid and the standing time at normal temperature are studied. Two kinds of magnetic liquid with variable content of large particles are prepared first, and a seal feedthrough with 140 mm shaft diameter is used in the experiments. All experiments are carried out in a low temperature chamber with a temperature range from 200°C to -100°C. Different numbers of seal stages are tested under the same condition to study the relation between the breakaway torque and the number of seal stages. Variable quantity of magnetic liquid is injected in the seal gap to get the relation curve of the breakaway torque and the injecting quantity of magnetic liquid. In the experiment for studying the relation between the breakaway torque and the standing time at the normal temperature, the seal feedtrough is laid at normal temperature for different period of time before it is put in the low temperature chamber. The experimental results show that the breakaway torque is proportional to the number of seal stages, the injected quantity of magnetic liquid and the standing time at the normal temperature. Meanwhile, the experimental results are analyzed and the torque formula of magnetic liquid rotation seal at low temperature is deduced from the Navier-Stokes equation on the base of the model of magnetic liquid rotation seal. The presented research can make wider application of the magnetic liquid

  3. A compact new incoherent Thomson scattering diagnostic for low-temperature plasma studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Benjamin; Tsikata, Sedina; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Minea, Tiberiu; Fils, Jérôme

    2018-05-01

    Incoherent Thomson scattering (ITS) has a long history of application for the determination of electron density and temperature in dense fusion plasmas, and in recent years, has been increasingly extended to studies in low-temperature plasma environments. In this work, the design and preliminary implementation of a new, sensitive and uniquely compact ITS platform known as Thomson scattering experiments for low temperature ion sources are described. Measurements have been performed on a hollow cathode plasma source, providing access to electron densities as low as 1016 m‑3 and electron temperatures of a few eV and below. This achievement has been made possible by the implementation of a narrow volume Bragg grating notch filter for the attenuation of stray light, a feature which guarantees compactness and reduced transmission losses in comparison to standard ITS platforms.

  4. Observation of high-temperature bubbles in an ECR plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2018-05-01

    Creation and annihilation of high-temperature bubbles have been observed in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The electron temperature in the bubble core is three times higher than that in the ambient region, and the size perpendicular to the magnetic field is much smaller than the plasma diameter. Formation of a bubble accompanies large negative spikes in the floating potential of a Langmuir probe, and the spatiotemporal behavior of the bubble has been visualized with a high-impedance wire grid detector. It is found that the bubble is in a prolate spheroidal shape with the axis along the magnetic field and occurs randomly in time and independently in space.

  5. 13. TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.

    2000-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. ω pe >> (Omega) ce in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K i . This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B 0 ∼ 2 kG, e > ∼ 10 13 cm -3 and T e ∼ 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be ≤ T e and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T e . Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where ω pe >> (Omega) ce

  6. X-ray spectroscopic study of high-temperature plasmas by curved crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru.

    1983-07-01

    Extensive studies have been carried out on the structure of X-ray spectra from the highly stripped ions of first transition elements and their behavior in high temperature plasma, using a high resolution crystal spectrometer. Calculation was made on the design and the use of a curved crystal spectrometer for plasma diagnostics. A Johann type crystal spectrometer for measuring X-ray lines was constructed on the basis of the calculation. The characteristics of curved crystals of LiF, Ge and quartz used for the measurement of Kα lines from first transition elements were investigated. Vacuum sparks have been formed for producing high temperature plasma which emits X-ray lines from highly stripped ions. Two different structures of vacuum spark plasma were shown, that is, thermalized point plasma and extended plasma associated with non-thermal electrons. The X-ray lines from the extended plasma, those associated with the K shell from the point plasma and the Kα lines of Ti through Zn from the point plasma have been observed. (Kako, I.)

  7. Phase separation temperatures of a liquid mixture: Dynamic light scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dangudom, K.; Wongtawatnugool, C.; Lacharojana, S.

    2010-01-01

    Light scattering intensity measurements and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) techniques were employed in an investigation of liquid-liquid phase separation behaviour of a mixture of cyclohexane and methanol at seven different compositions. It was found that, except for one composition (29% methanol), the temperature at which the scattering intensity was a maximum did not coincide with the one where the diffusion coefficient was a minimum, as would be for the case of a vapour-liquid system. The difference may be explained in terms of the local density fluctuation and the random walk problem responsible for the peak intensity and the minimum in the diffusion coefficient, respectively. The definition of phase separation temperature, as determined from diffusion process, was also proposed in this work.

  8. Low-temperature plasma techniques in surface modification of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiangfen; Xie Hankun; Zhang Jing

    2002-01-01

    Since synthetic polymers usually can not meet the biocompatibility and bio-functional demands of the human body, surface treatment is a prerequisite for them to be used as biomaterials. A very effective surface modification method, plasma treatment, is introduced. By immobilizing the bio-active molecules with low temperature plasma, polymer surfaces can be modified to fully satisfy the requirements of biomaterials

  9. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  10. Thermal diffusivity measurements of liquid materials at high temperature with the ''laser flash'' method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, Claude; Vandevelde, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Two solutions, one analytical and the other numerical are proposed to solve the thermokinetic problem encountered when measuring the thermal diffusivity of liquid materials at very high temperature (T>3123K). The liquid material is contained in a parallel faced vessel. This liquid is traversed by a short thermal pulse from a relaxed laser. The temperature response of the back face of the measurement cell is analysed. The first model proposed which does not take thermal losses into consideration, is a mathematical model derived from the ''two layer model'' (Larson and Koyama, 1968) extended to ''three layers''. In order to take the possibility of thermal losses to the external environment at high temperature into consideration, a Crank-Nicolson (1947) type numerical model utilizing finite differences is employed. These thermokinetic studies were performed in order to interpret temperature response curves obtained from the back face of a tungsten-liquid UO 2 -tungsten thermal wall, the purpose of the measurements made being to determine the thermal properties of liquid uranium oxide [fr

  11. Influence of Low-Temperature Plasma Treatment on The Liquid Filtration Efficiency of Melt-Blown PP Nonwovens in The Conditions of Simulated Use of Respiratory Protective Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majchrzycka Katarzyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Filtering nonwovens produced with melt-blown technology are one of the most basic materials used in the construction of respiratory protective equipment (RPE against harmful aerosols, including bio- and nanoaerosols. The improvement of their filtering properties can be achieved by the development of quasi-permanent electric charge on the fibres. Usually corona discharge method is utilized for this purpose. In the presented study, it was assumed that the low-temperature plasma treatment could be applied as an alternative method for the manufacturing of conventional electret nonwovens for the RPE construction. Low temperature plasma treatment of polypropylene nonwovens was carried out with various process gases (argon, nitrogen, oxygen or air in a wide range of process parameters (gas flow velocity, time of treatment and power supplied to the reactor electrodes. After the modification, nonwovens were evaluated in terms of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist. The stability of the modification results was tested after 12 months of storage and after conditioning at elevated temperature and relative humidity conditions. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy and ATR-IR spectroscopy were used to assess changes in surface topography and chemical composition of the fibres. The modification of melt-blown nonwovens with nitrogen, oxygen and air plasma did not result in a satisfactory improvement of the filtration efficiency. In case of argon plasma treatment, up to 82% increase of filtration efficiency of paraffin oil mist was observed in relation to untreated samples. This effect was stable after 12 months of storage in normal conditions and after thermal conditioning in (70 ± 3°C for 24 h. The use of low-temperature plasma treatment was proven to be a promising improvement direction of filtering properties of nonwovens used for the protection of respiratory tract against harmful aerosols.

  12. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-01-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N 2 C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation

  13. Analytical solution and numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Haibing; Xu, Liuxun; Yang, Yugui; Li, Longqi

    2018-05-01

    Artificial liquid nitrogen freezing technology is widely used in urban underground engineering due to its technical advantages, such as simple freezing system, high freezing speed, low freezing temperature, high strength of frozen soil, and absence of pollution. However, technical difficulties such as undefined range of liquid nitrogen freezing and thickness of frozen wall gradually emerge during the application process. Thus, the analytical solution of the freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is established considering the freezing temperature of soil and the constant temperature of freezing pipe wall. This solution is then applied in a liquid nitrogen freezing project. Calculation results show that the radius of freezing front of liquid nitrogen is proportional to the square root of freezing time. The radius of the freezing front also decreases with decreased the freezing temperature, and the temperature gradient of soil decreases with increased distance from the freezing pipe. The radius of cooling zone in the unfrozen area is approximately four times the radius of the freezing front. Meanwhile, the numerical simulation of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe is conducted using the Abaqus finite-element program. Results show that the numerical simulation of soil temperature distribution law well agrees with the analytical solution, further verifies the reliability of the established analytical solution of the liquid nitrogen freezing-temperature field of a single pipe.

  14. Theory of high temperature plasmas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Liu, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    This is a report on the technical progress in our analytic studies of high-temperature fusion plasmas. We also emphasize that the research summarized here makes extensive use of computational methods and therefore forms a strong interface with our numerical modeling program which is discussed later in the report

  15. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-01-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential

  16. In-situ high-temperature Raman spectroscopic studies of aluminosilicate liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Isabelle; Gillet, Philippe; Poe, Brent T.; McMillan, Paul F.

    1995-03-01

    We have measured in-situ Raman spectra of aluminosilicate glasses and liquids with albite (NaAlSi3 O8) and anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) compositions at high temperatures, through their glass transition range up to 1700 and 2000 K, respectively. For these experiments, we have used a wire-loop heating device coupled with micro-Raman spectroscopy, in order to achieve effective spatial filtering of the extraneous thermal radiation. A major concern in this work is the development of methodology for reliably extracting the first and second order contributions to the Raman scattering spectra of aluminosilicate glasses and liquids from the high temperature experimental data, and analyzing these in terms of vibrational (anharmonic) and configurational changes. The changes in the first order Raman spectra with temperature are subtle. The principal low frequency band remains nearly constant with increasing temperature, indicating little change in the T-O-T angle, and that the angle bending vibration is quite harmonic. This is in contrast to vitreous SiO2, studied previously. Above Tg, intensity changes in the 560 590 cm-1 regions of both sets of spectra indicate configurational changes in the supercooled liquids, associated with formation of additional Al-O-Al linkages, or 3-membered (Al, Si)-containing rings. Additional intensity at 800 cm-1 reflects also some rearrangement of the Si-O-Al network.

  17. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  18. Temperature profiles in a steam-liquid sodium jet. Application to wastage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K.H.

    1983-12-01

    The first part of this work presents a certain number of recalls concerning wastage, jets, sonic jets, turbulent jets reactive or not. The aim of this thesis is to group the theoretical formulas concerning gaseous jets in liquids, to determine from experiments the temperature distributions inside the reactive jet, and to establish correlations between the theory and the experiments carried out to obtain a model representative of the temperature distribution in steam jets into liquid sodium. The theoretical development is presented (differential and integral approaches), as also the experiments (JONAS) developed to determine the temperature distribution. The field of validity of experiments and approximations is then defined in view of application to wastage [fr

  19. Viscosity of two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma modified by a perpendicular magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Lin, Wei; Murillo, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    Transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled dusty plasmas have been investigated in detail, but never for viscosity with a strong perpendicular magnetic field; here, we examine this scenario using Langevin dynamics simulations of 2D liquids with a binary Yukawa interparticle interaction. The shear viscosity η of 2D liquid dusty plasma is estimated from the simulation data using the Green-Kubo relation, which is the integration of the shear stress autocorrelation function. It is found that, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, the shear viscosity of 2D liquid dusty plasma is modified substantially. When the magnetic field is increased, its viscosity increases at low temperatures, while at high temperatures its viscosity diminishes. It is determined that these different variational trends of η arise from the different behaviors of the kinetic and potential parts of the shear stress under external magnetic fields.

  20. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  1. Cooperative microexcitations in 2+1D chain-bundle dusty plasma liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Io, C.-W.; Chan, C.-L.; Lin I

    2010-01-01

    Through direct visualization at the discrete level, the microexcitations in cold 2+1D dusty plasma liquids formed by negatively charged dusts suspended in low pressure gaseous discharges were experimentally investigated, in which the downward ion flow wake field induces strong vertical coupling and chain bundle structure. It is found that the horizontal structure and motion are similar to those of the two-dimensional liquid. Different types of basic cooperative chain excitations: straight vertical chains with small amplitude jittering, chain tilting-restraightening, bundle twisting-restraightening, and chain breaking-reconnection, are observed. The region with good (poor) horizontal structural order prefers the straight (tilted or broken) chains with little (large) titling and tilting rate.

  2. Absolute and convective instability of a liquid sheet with transverse temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Qing-Fei; Yang, Li-Jun; Tong, Ming-Xi; Wang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The spatial–temporal instability of a liquid sheet with thermal effects was studied. • The flow can transit to absolutely unstable with certain flow parameters. • The effects of non-dimensional parameters on the transition were studied. -- Abstract: The spatial–temporal instability behavior of a viscous liquid sheet with temperature difference between the two surfaces was investigated theoretically. The practical situation motivating this investigation is liquid sheet heated by ambient gas, usually encountered in industrial heat transfer and liquid propellant rocket engines. The existing dispersion relation was used, to explore the spatial–temporal instability of viscous liquid sheets with a nonuniform temperature profile, by setting both the wave number and frequency complex. A parametric study was performed in both sinuous and varicose modes to test the influence of dimensionless numbers on the transition between absolute and convective instability of the flow. For a small value of liquid Weber number, or a great value of gas-to-liquid density ratio, the flow was found to be absolutely unstable. The absolute instability was enhanced by increasing the liquid viscosity. It was found that variation of the Marangoni number hardly influenced the absolute instability of the sinuous mode of oscillations; however it slightly affected the absolute instability in the varicose mode

  3. Stereospecific high-performance liquid chromatographic assay of sotalol in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R A; Foster, R T; Bhanji, N H

    1991-09-01

    A convenient high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay was developed for determination of sotalol (STL) enantiomers in plasma. Following addition of the internal standard (IS; racemic atenolol), enantiomers of STL and IS were extracted using ethyl acetate. After evaporation of the organic layer, samples were derivatized with a solution of S-(+)-1-(1-naphthyl)ethyl isocyanate (NEIC). The resulting diastereomers were chromatographed with normal-phase HPLC with chloroform:hexane:methanol [65:33:2 (v/v)] as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 2 ml/min. The fluorescence detection wavelength was set at 220 nm for excitation with no emission filter. The suitability of the assay for pharmacokinetic studies was determined by measuring STL enantiomers in the plasma of a healthy subject after administration of a single 160-mg oral, racemic dose of STL.

  4. Plasma capric acid concentrations in healthy subjects determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rojeet; Hui, Shu-Ping; Imai, Hiromitsu; Hashimoto, Satoru; Uemura, Naoto; Takeda, Seiji; Fuda, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Akira; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    Capric acid (FA10:0, decanoic acid) is a medium-chain fatty acid abundant in tropical oils such as coconut oil, whereas small amounts are present in milk of goat, cow, and human. Orally ingested FA10:0 is transported to the liver and quickly burnt within it. Only few reports are available for FA10:0 concentrations in human plasma. Fasting (n = 5, male/female = 3/2, age 31 ± 9.3 years old) and non-fasting (n = 106, male/female = 44/62, age 21.9 ± 3.2 years old) blood samples were collected from apparently healthy Japanese volunteers. The total FA10:0 in the plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography after derivatization with 2-nitrophenylhydrazine followed by UV detection. Inter and intra-assay coefficient of variation of FA10:0 assay at three different concentrations ranged in 1.7-3.9 and 1.3-5.4%, respectively, with an analytical recovery of 95.2-104.0%. FA10:0 concentration was below detection limit (0.1 µmol/L) in each fasting human plasma. FA10:0 was not detected in 50 (47.2%) of 106 non-fasting blood samples, while 29 (27.4%) plasma samples contained FA10:0 less than or equal to 0.5 µmol/L (0.4 ± 0.1), and 27 (25.5%) contained it at more than 0.5 µmol/L (0.9 ± 0.3). A half of the non-fasting plasma samples contained detectable FA10:0. This simple, precise, and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography method might be useful for monitoring plasma FA10:0 during medium-chain triglycerides therapy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The effect of low-temperature plasma on model organism Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maronek, M.; Mentelova, L.; Kyzek, S.; Kovacik, D.

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of various chemicals in our life creates a need to evaluate whether they pose a threat to human body. There are many methods capable of detecting potential mutagenic or genotoxic effect. The Smart test was chosen to test mutagenic effect of low-temperature plasma, which is nowadays used in medicine, material decontamination and degradation of pharmaceuticals. When a mutational event during larval development occurs, spots on the wings are being formed. The frequency and size of the spots reveals the mutagenic potency of the tested substance. To evaluate the mutagenic effect of low-temperature plasma, larvae were treated with multiple doses. Our results show that plasma did not exhibit any mutagenic effect in all of the tested doses. Next we studied if it could work as an antimutagenic agent. Experiments with plasma along with ethyl methanesulphonate (EMS), a known mutagen, suggest that plasma treatment did reduce the negative effect of EMS, thus this agents could possess antimutagenic effect. (authors)

  6. Impurities, temperature, and density in a miniature electrostatic plasma and current source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Craig, D.J.; Fiksel, G.; Sarff, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    We have spectroscopically investigated the Sterling Scientific miniature electrostatic plasma source-a plasma gun. This gun is a clean source of high density (10 19 - 10 20 m -3 ), low temperature (5 - 15 eV) plasma. A key result of our investigation is that molybdenum from the gun electrodes is largely trapped in the internal gun discharge; only a small amount escapes in the plasma flowing out of the gun. In addition, the gun plasma parameters actually improve (even lower impurity contamination and higher ion temperature) when up to 1 kA of electron current is extracted from the gun via the application of an external bias. This improvement occurs because the internal gun anode no longer acts as the current return for the internal gun discharge. The gun plasma is a virtual plasma electrode capable of sourcing an electron emission current density of 1 kA/cm 2 . The high emission current, small size (3 - 4 cm diameter), and low impurity generation make this gun attractive for a variety of fusion and plasma technology applications

  7. Gas Transport Properties of PEBAX®/Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Gel Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bernardo, P.; Jansen, J. C.; Bazzarelli, F.; Tasselli, F.; Fuoco, A.; Friess, K.; Izák, Pavel; Jarmarová, Veronika; Kačírková, Marie; Clarizia, G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 97, SI (2012), s. 73-82 ISSN 1383-5866. [Conference on Ionic Liquids in Separation and Purification Technology (ILSEPT) /1./. Sitges, 04.09.2011-07.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/10/1194 Grant - others:RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2010-00009 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : room temperature ionic liquid * ionic liquid * polymer gel Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2012

  8. Direct and controllable nitric oxide delivery into biological media and living cells by a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrynin, D; Friedman, G [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Arjunan, K; Clyne, A Morss [School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fridman, A, E-mail: alisam@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, College of Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-02-23

    Nitric oxide has great potential for improving wound healing through both inflammatory and vascularization processes. Nitric oxide can be produced in high concentrations by atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas. We measured the physical characteristics and nitric oxide production of a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma, as well as plasma-produced nitric oxide delivery into liquid and endothelial cells. The plasma temperature was calculated as 9030 {+-} 320 K by the Boltzmann method, which was adequate to produce nitric oxide, although the average gas temperature was near room temperature. The plasma produced significant UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide, but these were prevented from reaching the cells by adding a straight or curved tube extension to the plasma device. Plasma-produced nitric oxide in gas reached 2000 ppm and rapidly diffused into liquid and cells. Cells remained viable following plasma treatment and showed a linear increase in cGMP concentration with plasma treatment, indicating an intracellular functional response to PHD plasma NO. These data suggest that this plasma may provide a novel method for delivering NO locally and directly for enhanced wound healing.

  9. Direct and controllable nitric oxide delivery into biological media and living cells by a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrynin, D; Friedman, G; Arjunan, K; Clyne, A Morss; Fridman, A

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide has great potential for improving wound healing through both inflammatory and vascularization processes. Nitric oxide can be produced in high concentrations by atmospheric pressure thermal plasmas. We measured the physical characteristics and nitric oxide production of a pin-to-hole spark discharge (PHD) plasma, as well as plasma-produced nitric oxide delivery into liquid and endothelial cells. The plasma temperature was calculated as 9030 ± 320 K by the Boltzmann method, which was adequate to produce nitric oxide, although the average gas temperature was near room temperature. The plasma produced significant UV radiation and hydrogen peroxide, but these were prevented from reaching the cells by adding a straight or curved tube extension to the plasma device. Plasma-produced nitric oxide in gas reached 2000 ppm and rapidly diffused into liquid and cells. Cells remained viable following plasma treatment and showed a linear increase in cGMP concentration with plasma treatment, indicating an intracellular functional response to PHD plasma NO. These data suggest that this plasma may provide a novel method for delivering NO locally and directly for enhanced wound healing.

  10. Clearing of ventilating emissions in low temperature environment of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansurov, R. Sh; Rafalskaya, T. A.

    2017-11-01

    The method of high-temperature processing of streams of the ventilating air which is a subject clearing from organic pollutions is developed. Data about its efficiency, including on a number of economic parameters are obtained. Results of work are recommended for use, first of all, by development clearing plasma-thermal reactors (CPTR) for clearing air, especially from toxic substances, and also for large technological clearing installations, containing organic ventilating emissions (OVE). It is created experimental CPTR. Laws of the expiration of a plasma jet in stream of OVE limited by cylindrical walls, water-cooled channel are experimentally investigated. Dependences of a trajectory and long-range the plasma jet blown radially in stream of OVE are received. Heat exchange of stream of OVE with walls of CPTR after blowing a plasma jet is experimentally investigated; dependences of distribution of temperatures on length of a reactor and a thermal stream in a wall of channel of CPTR are received. Are investigated chemical compound of OVE after plasma-thermal clearing, some experimental data by formation of oxides of nitrogen and mono-oxide of carbon during clearing are received.

  11. Determination of vandetanib in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Johnson, Jennifer; Wang, Fan; Yang, Lei; Broniscer, Alberto; Stewart, Clinton F

    2011-09-01

    A sensitive and precise LC-ESI-MS/MS method for the determination of vandetanib (ZD6474) in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using [(13)C,d(3)]-ZD6474 as an internal standard (ISTD) was developed and validated. Sample preparation consisted of a simple liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether containing 0.1% or 0.5% ammonium hydroxide. ZD6474 and ISTD were separated on a Kinetex C18 column (2.6 μm, 50 mm × 2.1 mm) at ambient temperature with an isocratic mobile phase (acetonitrile/10mM ammonium formate=50/50, v/v, at pH 5.0) delivered at 0.11 mL/min. The retention time of both compounds was at 1.60 min in a runtime of three min. Detection was achieved by an API-3200 LC-MS/MS system, monitoring m/z 475.1/112.1 and m/z 479.1/116.2 for vandetanib and ISTD, respectively. The method was linear in the range of 0.25-50 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.990) for the CSF curve and from 1.0 to 3000 ng/mL (R(2) ≥ 0.992) for the plasma curve. The mean recovery for vandetanib was 80%. Within-day and between-day precisions were ≤ 8.8% and ≤ 5.9% for CSF and plasma, respectively. Within-day and between-day accuracies ranged from 95.0 to 98.5% for CSF, and from 104.0 to 108.5% for plasma. Analysis of plasma from six different sources showed no matrix effect for vandetanib (MF=0.98, %CV ≤ 4.97, n=6). This method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmacokinetic samples from children with brain tumors treated with oral vandetanib. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostics of atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc discharge with metal and liquid anodes by multiple laser-aided methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Shirai, Naoki; Tomita, Kentaro; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    The density and temperature of electrons and key heavy particles were measured in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed-dc helium discharge plasma with a nitrogen molecular impurity generated using system with a liquid or metal anode and a metal cathode. To obtain these parameters, we conducted experiments using several laser-aided methods: Thomson scattering spectroscopy to obtain the spatial profiles of electron density and temperature, Raman scattering spectroscopy to obtain the neutral molecular nitrogen rotational temperature, phase-modulated dispersion interferometry to determine the temporal variation of the electron density, and time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy to analyze the temporal variation of the helium metastable atom density. The electron density and temperature measured by Thomson scattering varied from 2.4  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.8 eV at the center of the discharge to 0.8  ×  1014 cm-3 and 1.5 eV near the outer edge of the plasma in the case of the metal anode, respectively. The electron density obtained with the liquid anode was approximately 20% smaller than that obtained with the metal anode, while the electron temperature was not significantly affected by the anode material. The molecular nitrogen rotational temperatures were 1200 K with the metal anode and 1650 K with the liquid anode at the outer edge of the plasma column. The density of helium metastable atoms decreased by a factor of two when using the liquid anode.

  13. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 10 5 Ω/sq.

  14. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-02-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 105 Ω/sq.

  15. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  16. Influence of temperature to quenching on liquid scintillation measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    The amount of quench is measured with liquid scintillation spectrometer changing the temperature of the sample. The range of the changed temperature is between 0 deg C and 35 deg C. The measurement is carried out for three kinds of unquenched standard, two quenched standards and fifteen kinds of scintillation cocktail and the mixed sample. It is confirmed that the amount of quench increases for all samples as the temperature rises. The influence of the changed amount of quench to the quench correction is examined. (author)

  17. Search for the first-order liquid-to-liquid phase transition in low-temperature confined water by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin; Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Kao-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the α-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  18. Determination of plasma temperature and electron density in river sediment plasma using calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austria, Elmer S. Jr.; Lamorena-Lim, Rheo B.

    2015-01-01

    Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) technique is an approach used to quantitatively measure elemental composition of samples without the use of standard reference materials (SRMs). Due to the unavailability of most SRMs for specific samples, the CF-LIBS approach is steadily becoming more prevalent. CF-LIBS also minimizes interferences from the sample matrix by accounting spectral line intensifies of different elements. The first part of the CF-LIBS algorithm is the calculation of plasma temperature and electron density of the sample while the second part deals with the self-absorption correction and quantitative elemental analysis. In this study, the precursor parameters for the algorithm - plasma temperature and electron density - were measured through the neutral atom and ion line emissions of Fe and Cu in the time window of 0.1 to 10 μs. Plasma from river sediment samples were produced by a 1064 nm nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at atmospheric pressure. The plasma temperature and electron density were calculated from the Boltzmann plot and Saha-Boltzmann equation methods, respectively. These precursor parameters can be used in calculating the time window wherein the plasma is optically thin at local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for quantitative multi-elemental analysis. (author)

  19. The physics and chemistry of room-temperature liquid-filled ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of excess electrons in non-polar liquids, such as tetramethylsilane and 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane, which are suitable for room-temperature liquid-filled ionization chambers are reviewed. Such properties as mobility, ionization yield, conduction band energy, trapping, and the influence of the electric field are considered. (orig.)

  20. Determination of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate in Human Plasma Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Q-Tof Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egom, Emmanuel E.; Fitzgerald, Ross; Canning, Rebecca; Pharithi, Rebabonye B.; Murphy, Colin; Maher, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) components distinct from cholesterol, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), may account for the anti-atherothrombotic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. The current method for the determination of plasma levels of S1P as well as levels associated with HDL particles is still cumbersome an assay method to be worldwide practical. Recently, a simplified protocol based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the sensitive and specific quantification of plasma levels of S1P with good accuracy has been reported. This work utilized a triple quadrupole (QqQ)-based LC-MS/MS system. Here we adapt that method for the determination of plasma levels of S1P using a quadrupole time of flight (Q-Tof) based LC-MS system. Calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.05 to 2 µM. The lower limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.05 µM. The concentration of S1P in human plasma was determined to be 1 ± 0.09 µM (n = 6). The average accuracy over the stated range of the method was found to be 100 ± 5.9% with precision at the LOQ better than 10% when predicting the calibration standards. The concentration of plasma S1P in the prepared samples was stable for 24 h at room temperature. We have demonstrated the quantification of plasma S1P using Q-Tof based LC-MS with very good sensitivity, accuracy, and precision that can used for future studies in this field. PMID:28820460

  1. Liquid level measurement on coolant pipeline using Raman distributed temperature sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, M.; Sosamma, S.; Babu Rao, C.; Murali, N.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-01-01

    Optical fibre based Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS) has been widely used for temperature monitoring in oil pipe line, power cable and environmental monitoring. Recently it has gained importance in nuclear reactor owing to its advantages like continuous, distributed temperature monitoring and immunity from electromagnetic interference. It is important to monitor temperature based level measurement in sodium capacities and in coolant pipelines for Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). This particular application is used for filling and draining sodium in storage tank of sodium circuits of Fast breeder reactor. There are different conventional methods to find out the sodium level in the storage tank of sodium cooled reactors. They are continuous level measurement and discontinuous level measurement. For continuous level measurement, mutual inductance type level probes are used. The disadvantage of using this method is it needs a temperature compensation circuit. For discontinuous level measurement, resistance type discontinuous level probe and mutual inductance type discontinuous level probe are used. In resistance type discontinuous level probe, each level needs a separate probe. To overcome these disadvantages, RDTS is used for level measurement based distributed temperature from optical fibre as sensor. The feasibility of using RDTS for measurement of temperature based level measurement sensor is studied using a specially designed test set-up and using hot water, instead of sodium. The test set-up consist of vertically erected Stainless Steel (SS) pipe of length 2m and diameter 10cm, with provision for filling and draining out the liquid. Bare graded index multimode fibre is laid straight along the length of the of the SS pipe. The SS pipe is filled with hot water at various levels. The hot water in the SS pipe is maintained at constant temperature by insulating the SS pipe. The temperature profile of the hot water at various levels is measured using RDTS. The

  2. Potential Formation in Front of an Electron Emitting Electrode in a Two-Electron Temperature Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyergyek, T.; Cercek, M.; Erzen, D.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potential formation in the pre-sheath region of a floating electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied theoretically in a two-electron-temperature plasma using a static kinetic plasma-sheath model. Dependence of the collector floating potential, the plasma potential in the pre-sheath region, and the critical emission coefficient on the hot electron density and temperature is calculated. It is found that for high hot to cool electron temperature ratio a double layer like solutions exist in a certain range of hot to cool electron densities

  3. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of metoprolol tartrate and ramipril in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, K Veeran; Mandal, Uttam; Senthamil Selvan, P; Sam Solomon, W D; Ghosh, Animesh; Sarkar, Amlan Kanti; Agarwal, Sangita; Nageswar Rao, T; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2007-10-15

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of metoprolol tartrate (MT) and ramipril, in human plasma. Both the drugs were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with diethyl ether-dichloromethane (70:30, v/v). The chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed-phase C8 column with a mobile phase of 10 mM ammonium formate-methanol (3:97, v/v). The protonated analyte was quantitated in positive ionization by multiple reaction monitoring with a mass spectrometer. The method was validated over the concentration range of 5-500 ng/ml for metoprolol and ramipril in human plasma. The precursor to product ion transitions of m/z 268.0-103.10 and m/z 417.20-117.20 were used to measure metoprolol and ramipril, respectively.

  4. Absolute decay parametric instability of high-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zozulya, A.A.; Silin, V.P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1986-01-01

    A new absolute decay parametric instability having wide spatial localization region is shown to be possible near critical plasma density. Its excitation is conditioned by distributed feedback of counter-running Langmuir waves occurring during parametric decay of incident and reflected pumping wave components. In a hot plasma with the temperature of the order of kiloelectronvolt its threshold is lower than that of a known convective decay parametric instability. Minimum absolute instability threshold is shown to be realized under conditions of spatial parametric resonance of higher orders

  5. Sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantification of hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, N V S; Vishwottam, K N; Manoj, S; Koteshwara, M; Wishu, S; Varma, D P

    2005-12-01

    A simple, rapid, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of hydrochlorothiazide (I), a common diuretic and anti-hypertensive agent. The analyte and internal standard, tamsulosin (II) were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction with diethyl ether-dichloromethane (70:30, v/v) using a Glas-Col Multi-Pulse Vortexer. The chromatographic separation was performed on a reversed-phase column (Waters symmetry C18) with a mobile phase of 10 mm ammonium acetate-methanol (15:85, v/v). The protonated analyte was quantitated in negative ionization by multiple reaction monitoring with a mass spectrometer. The mass transitions m/z 296.1 solidus in circle 205.0 and m/z 407.2 solidus in circle 184.9 were used to measure I and II, respectively. The assay exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.5-200 ng/mL for hydrochlorothiazide in human plasma. The lower limit of quantitation was 500 pg/mL, with a relative standard deviation of less than 9%. Acceptable precision and accuracy were obtained for concentrations over the standard curve ranges. A run time of 2.5 min for each sample made it possible to analyze a throughput of more than 400 human plasma samples per day. The validated method has been successfully used to analyze human plasma samples for application in pharmacokinetic, bioavailability or bioequivalence studies. (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Powder free PECVD epitaxial silicon by plasma pulsing or increasing the growth temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanghua; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.

    2018-06-01

    Crystalline silicon thin films are promising candidates for low cost and flexible photovoltaics. Among various synthesis techniques, epitaxial growth via low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is an interesting choice because of two low temperature related benefits: low thermal budget and better doping profile control. However, increasing the growth rate is a tricky issue because the agglomeration of clusters required for epitaxy leads to powder formation in the plasma. In this work, we have measured precisely the time evolution of the self-bias voltage in silane/hydrogen plasmas at millisecond time scale, for different values of the direct-current bias voltage applied to the radio frequency (RF) electrode and growth temperatures. We demonstrate that the decisive factor to increase the epitaxial growth rate, i.e. the inhibition of the agglomeration of plasma-born clusters, can be obtained by decreasing the RF OFF time or increasing the growth temperature. The influence of these two parameters on the growth rate and epitaxial film quality is also presented.

  7. Effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium for aqueous solution of nonionic surfactant and salt: Experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foroutan, Masumeh [Physical Chemistry Department, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Enghelab Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: foroutan@khayam.ut.ac.ir; Heidari, Nosrat; Mohammadlou, Maryam [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sojahrood, Amin Jafari [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Uremia University, Uremia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The effect of temperature on the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium of the aqueous solution of surfactant polyoxyethylene cetylether (with abbreviation name Brij 58) and diammonium hydrogen phosphate has been investigated at T = (303.15, 313.15, 323.15, and 333.15) K. The Flory-Huggins equation with two electrostatic terms (Debye-Huckle and Pitzer-Debye-Huckle equations) was used to correlate the phase behavior of this system. Good agreement has been found between experimental and calculated data from both models. The results indicated that the enlargement of the two-phase region upon increasing the temperature. Additionally temperature dependency of the parameters of the Flory-Huggins model has been calculated.

  8. Improved method for the determination of serotonin in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography using on-line sample pre-treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takkenberg, B.; Endert, E.; van Ingen, H. E.; Ackermans, M.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method for the determination of serotonin in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP), by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection and direct plasma injection, is described. The chromatographic system comprises a strong

  9. Magnetomotive room temperature dicationic ionic liquid: a new concept toward centrifuge-less dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiraghi, Asadollah; Shokri, Masood; Seidi, Shahram; Godajdar, Bijan Mombani

    2015-01-09

    A new centrifuge-less dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction technique based on application of magnetomotive room temperature dicationic ionic liquid followed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed for preconcentration and determination of trace amount of gold and silver in water and ore samples, for the first time. Magnetic ionic liquids not only have the excellent properties of ionic liquids but also exhibit strong response to an external magnetic field. These properties provide more advantages and potential application prospects for magnetic ionic liquids than conventional ones in the fields of extraction processes. In this work, thio-Michler's ketone (TMK) was used as chelating agent to form Ag/Au-TMK complexes. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency including extraction time, rate of vortex agitator, pH of sample solution, concentration of the chelating agent, volume of ionic liquid as well as effects of interfering species were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were 3.2 and 7.3ngL(-1) with the preconcentration factors of 245 and 240 for Au and Ag, respectively. The precision values (RSD%, n=7) were 5.3% and 5.8% at the concentration level of 0.05μgL(-1) for Au and Ag, respectively. The relative recoveries for the spiked samples were in the acceptable range of 96-104.5%. The results demonstrated that except Hg(2+), no remarkable interferences are created by other various ions in the determination of Au and Ag, so that the tolerance limits (WIon/WAu or Ag) of major cations and anions were in the range of 250-1000. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of Au and Ag in some water and ore samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Acoustic levitator for containerless measurements on low temperature liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmore, Chris J [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weber, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Rey, Charles A A [Charles Ray, Inc.

    2009-01-01

    A single-axis acoustic levitator was constructed and used to levitate liquid and solid drops at temperatures from -40 to +40 C. The levitator consisted of: (i) two acoustic transducers mounted on a rigid vertical support that was bolted to an optical breadboard, (ii) a acoustic power supply that controlled acoustic intensity, relative phase of the drive to the transducers, and could modulate the acoustic forces at frequencies up to 1kHz, (iii) a video camera, and (iv) a system for providing a stream of controlled temperature gas flow over the sample. The acoustic transducers were operated at their resonant frequency of ~ 22 kHz and could produce sound pressure levels up to 160 dB. The force applied by the acoustic field could be modulated using a frequency generator to excite oscillations in the sample. Sample temperature was controlled using a modified Cryostream Plus and measured using thermocouples and an infrared thermal imager. The levitator was installed at x-ray beamline 11 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source and used to investigate the structure of supercooled liquids.

  11. Influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition in a low-pressure plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition into low-pressure plasma is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. Depending on the emitter temperature, different modes of discharge operation are obtained. The mode type depends on the plasma frequency and does not depend on the ratio between the densities of beam and plasma electrons. Namely, plasma is stable when the plasma frequency is small. For this plasma, the energy transfer from emitted electrons to plasma electrons is inefficient. The increase in the plasma frequency results first in the excitation of two-stream electron instability. However, since the thermal velocity of plasma electrons is smaller than the electrostatic wave velocity, the resonant wave-particle interaction is inefficient for the energy deposition into the plasma. Further increase in the plasma frequency leads to the distortion of beam of emitted electrons. Then, the electrostatic wave generated due to two-stream instability decays into multiple slower waves. Phase velocities of these waves are comparable with the thermal velocity of plasma electrons which makes possible the resonant wave-particle interaction. This results in the efficient energy deposition from emitted electrons into the plasma.

  12. High-temperature reactors for underground liquid-fuels production with direct carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    The world faces two major challenges: (1) reducing dependence on oil from unstable parts of the world and (2) minimizing greenhouse gas emissions. Oil provides 39% of the energy needs of the United States, and oil refineries consume over 7% of the total energy. The world is running out of light crude oil and is increasingly using heavier fossil feedstocks such as heavy oils, tar sands, oil shale, and coal for the production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel). With heavier feedstocks, more energy is needed to convert the feedstocks into liquid fuels. In the extreme case of coal liquefaction, the energy consumed in the liquefaction process is almost twice the energy value of the liquid fuel. This trend implies large increases in carbon dioxide releases per liter of liquid transport fuel that is produced. It is proposed that high-temperature nuclear heat be used to refine hydrocarbon feedstocks (heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale, and coal) 'in situ ', i.e., underground. Using these resources for liquid fuel production would potentially enable the United States to become an exporter of oil while sequestering carbon from the refining process underground as carbon. This option has become potentially viable because of three technical developments: precision drilling, underground isolation of geological formations with freeze walls, and the understanding that the slow heating of heavy hydrocarbons (versus fast heating) increases the yield of light oils while producing a high-carbon solid residue. Required peak reactor temperatures are near 700 deg. C-temperatures within the current capabilities of high-temperature reactors. (authors)

  13. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koban, Ina; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Kocher, Thomas; Matthes, Rutger; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Kramer, Axel; Sietmann, Rabea; Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log 10 reduction factor of 1.5, the log 10 reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  14. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koban, Ina; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Kocher, Thomas [Unit of Periodontology, Dental School, University of Greifswald, Rotgerberstr. 8, 17475 Greifswald (Germany); Matthes, Rutger; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Kramer, Axel [Institute for Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University of Greifswald, Walther-Rathenau-Str. 49 a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Sietmann, Rabea [Institute of Microbiology, University of Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 15, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter, E-mail: ina.koban@uni-greifswald.d [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log{sub 10} reduction factor of 1.5, the log{sub 10} reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  15. Temperature-triggered release of a liquid cross-linker micro-encapsulated in a glassy polymer for low temperature curing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senatore, D.; Cate, ten A.T.; Laven, J.; Benthem, van R.A.T.M.; With, de G.

    2013-01-01

    In order to prevent a liquid epoxy cross-linker from premature, Arrhenius-law predicted, reaction with an acid-functional polyester resin, the liquid cross-linker has been physically separated from the resin by encapsulation while release is only possible by a temperature-controlled trigger. The

  16. Influence of the choice of internal temperatures on the composition of CxHyOzNt plasmas out of thermodynamic equilibrium: Application to CH2 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koalaga, Zacharie

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of the choice of internal temperatures on the composition of C x H y O z N t plasmas out of thermodynamic equilibrium. The numerical calculation is specially performed for CH 2 plasma in the pressure range 0.1-1 MPa and for the electron temperature range 5000-30 000 K. Precisely, the investigation of this plasma allows one to show that the choice of internal temperatures can have more influence on plasma composition than the choice of the form of the two-temperature Saha and Guldberg-Waage laws. Indeed, for one of the supposed hypotheses, it is observed that the two forms of the two-temperature system used here can give the same equilibrium composition by uncoupling the excitation temperature of the diatomic and the monatomic species. Great attention must then be given to the adopted hypothesis for internal temperature and not only to the form of the two temperature system used. An accurate comparison between the two models requires the measurement of plasma parameters such as the various internal temperatures and the species concentration. Therefore, we have also carried out an analysis of the potential experimental diagnostics of these plasma parameters. Such diagnostics can help to test and validate theoretical models

  17. Electrostatic and electromagnetic traps for high-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrent'ev, O.A.

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of thermal isolation are considered for a high-temperature plasma in systems with electrostatic as well as electric and magnetic fields. Specific types of traps are discussed, together with diagnostic methods and fundamental experimental results. (U.S.)

  18. Is the boundary layer of an ionic liquid equally lubricating at higher temperature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjalmarsson, Nicklas; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2016-04-07

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the effect of temperature on normal forces and friction for the room temperature ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), confined between mica and a silica colloid probe at 25 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C. Force curves revealed a strong fluid dynamic influence at room temperature, which was greatly reduced at elevated temperatures due to the reduced liquid viscosity. A fluid dynamic analysis reveals that bulk viscosity is manifested at large separation but that EAN displays a nonzero slip, indicating a region of different viscosity near the surface. At high temperatures, the reduction in fluid dynamic force reveals step-like force curves, similar to those found at room temperature using much lower scan rates. The ionic liquid boundary layer remains adsorbed to the solid surface even at high temperature, which provides a mechanism for lubrication when fluid dynamic lubrication is strongly reduced. The friction data reveals a decrease in absolute friction force with increasing temperature, which is associated with increased thermal motion and reduced viscosity of the near surface layers but, consistent with the normal force data, boundary layer lubrication was unaffected. The implications for ILs as lubricants are discussed in terms of the behaviour of this well characterised system.

  19. Ion-pair vortex assisted liquid-liquid microextraction with back extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-UV for the determination of metformin in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshishani, Anas; Makahleh, Ahmad; Yap, Hui Fang; Gubartallah, Elbaleeq Adam; Salhimi, Salizawati Muhamad; Saad, Bahruddin

    2016-12-01

    A new sample preparation method, ion-pair vortex assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME-BE), for the determination of a highly polar anti-diabetic drug (metformin) in plasma sample was developed. The VALLME-BE was performed by diluting the plasma in borate buffer and extracted to 150µL 1-octanol containing 0.2M di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as intermediate phase. The drug was next back-extracted into 20µL of 0.075M HCl solution. The effects of pH, ion-pair concentration, type of organic solvent, volume of extraction phases, ionic strength, vortexing and centrifugation times on the extraction efficiency were investigated. The optimum conditions were at pH 9.3, 60s vortexing and 2min centrifugation. The microextract, contained metformin and buformin (internal standard), was directly injected into a HPLC unit using C1 column (250mm×4.6mm×10µm) and detected at 235nm. The method was validated and calibration curve was linear with r 2 >0.99 over the range of 20-2000µgL -1 . The limits of detection and quantitation were 1.4 and 4.1µgL -1 , respectively. The accuracy was within 94.8-108% of the nominal concentration. The relative standard deviation for inter- and intra-day precision was less than 10.8%. The method was conveniently applied for the determination of metformin in plasma samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments of polyamide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yiu Wan Joanne

    Polyamides have found widespread application in various industrial sectors, for example, they are used in apparel, home furnishings and similar uses. However, the requirements for high quality performance products are continually increasing and these promote a variety of surface treatments for polymer modification. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments are ideally suited for polyamide modification because they can change the physical and chemical properties of the material without affecting its bulk features. This project aimed to study the modification of polyamides by UV excimer laser irradiation and low temperature plasma treatment. The morphological changes in the resulting samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The chemical modifications were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). Change in degree of crystallinity was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After high-fluence laser irradiation, topographical results showed that ripples of micrometer size form on the fibre surface. By contrast, sub-micrometer size structures form on the polyamide surface when the applied laser energy is well below its ablation threshold. After high-fluence laser irradiation, chemical studies showed that the surface oxygen content of polyamide is reduced. A reverse result is obtained with low-fluence treatment. The DSC result showed no significant change in degree of crystallinity in either high-fluence or low-fluence treated samples. The same modifications in polyamide surfaces were studied after low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen, argon or tetrafluoromethane gas. The most significant result was that the surface oxygen content of polyamide increased after oxygen and argon plasma treatments. Both treatments induced many hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxylic acid (-COOH

  1. Mirror plasma apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A mirror plasma apparatus which utilizes shielding by arc discharge to form a blanket plasma and lithium walls to reduce neutron damage to the wall of the apparatus. An embodiment involves a rotating liquid lithium blanket for a tandem mirror plasma apparatus wherein the first wall of the central mirror cell is made of liquid lithium which is spun with angular velocity great enough to keep the liquid lithium against the first material wall, a blanket plasma preventing the lithium vapor from contaminating the plasma

  2. Electron conductivity model for dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.; More, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    An electron conductivity model for dense plasmas is described which gives a consistent and complete set of transport coefficients including not only electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, but also thermoelectric power, and Hall, Nernst, Ettinghausen, and Leduc--Righi coefficients. The model is useful for simulating plasma experiments with strong magnetic fields. The coefficients apply over a wide range of plasma temperature and density and are expressed in a computationally simple form. Different formulas are used for the electron relaxation time in plasma, liquid, and solid phases. Comparisons with recent calculations and available experimental measurement show the model gives results which are sufficiently accurate for many practical applications

  3. Determination of Flurbiprofen in Human Plasma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2015-10-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for determination of flurbiprofen in human plasma. The method was validated on an Ace C18 column using UV detection. The mobile phase was acetonitrile-0.05 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate solution (60:40, v/v) adjusted to pH 3.5 with phosphoric acid. The calibration curve was linear between the concentration range of 0.10-5.0 μg/mL. Intra- and inter-day precision values for flurbiprofen in plasma were flurbiprofen from human plasma were between 93.0 and 98.9%. The limits of detection and quantification of flurbiprofen were 0.03 and 0.10 μg/mL, respectively. In addition, this assay was applied to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of flurbiprofen in six healthy Turkish volunteers who had been given 100 mg flurbiprofen. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  5. Preliminary experimental study of liquid lithium water interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, X.M.; Tong, L.L.; Cao, X.W., E-mail: caoxuewu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Explosive reaction occurs when lithium temperature is over 300 °C. • The violence of liquid lithium water interaction increases with the initial temperature of liquid lithium. • The interaction is suppressed when the initial water temperature is above 70 °C. • Steam explosion is not ignorable in the risk assessment of liquid lithium water interaction. • Explosion strength of liquid lithium water interaction is evaluated by explosive yield. - Abstract: Liquid lithium is the best candidate for a material with low Z and low activation, and is one of the important choices for plasma facing materials in magnetic fusion devices. However, liquid lithium reacts violently with water under the conditions of loss of coolant accidents. The release of large heats and hydrogen could result in the dramatic increase of temperature and pressure. The lithium–water explosion has large effect on the safety of fusion devices, which is an important content for the safety assessment of fusion devices. As a preliminary investigation of liquid lithium water interaction, the test facility has been built and experiments have been conducted under different conditions. The initial temperature of lithium droplet ranged from 200 °C to 600 °C and water temperature was varied between 20 °C and 90 °C. Lithium droplets were released into the test section with excess water. The shape of lithium droplet and steam generated around the lithium were observed by the high speed camera. At the same time, the pressure and temperature in the test section were recorded during the violent interactions. The preliminary experimental results indicate that the initial temperature of lithium and water has an effect on the violence of liquid lithium water interaction.

  6. Tunnel probes for measurements of the electron and ion temperature in fusion plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunn, J. P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Balan, P.; Ionita, C.; Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Pánek, Radomír; Bařina, O.; Hrach, R.; Vicher, M.; Van Oost, G.; Van Rompuy, T.; Martines, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 10 (2004), s. 4328-4330 ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/15th./. San Diego, 19.04.2004-22.04.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0786 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Tokamak * electron temperature * ion temperature * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  7. Spectral measurements of electron temperature in nonequilibrium highly ionized He plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, O V; Chinnov, V F; Kavyrshin, D I; Ageev, A G

    2016-01-01

    It has been experimentally shown that highly ionized He arc plasma does not achieve local thermodynamic equilibrium expected for plasmas with electron concentrations above 1 × 10 16 cm -3 like argon plasma. We have found that the reason for this deviation is strong nonisotropy of plasma. Triple electron recombination with temperatures of 2.5-3 eV is almost absent. Charged particles move from the arc ( r = 1 mm) to chamber walls due to ambipolar diffusion creating ionization nonequilibrium over the excited states rendering Boltzmann distribution and Saha equation inapplicable for determining electron temperature. A method for determining electron temperature is suggested that is based on using the relative intensities of the atomic and ion lines. Its advantage lies in an energy gap between these lines’ states over 50 eV that reduces the influence of nonequilibrium on the result. This influence can be taken into account if the ionization energies of emitting states of atom and ion have close values. The suggested method can be expanded for any media including those with dimensional nonisotropy that have both atomic and ion lines in their emission spectra. (paper)

  8. Characterization of the liquid Li-solid Mo (1 1 0) interface from classical molecular dynamics for plasma-facing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Joseph R.; Chen, Mohan; Fürstenberg, Sven; Stillinger, Frank H.; Carter, Emily A.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2017-11-01

    An understanding of the wetting properties and a characterization of the interface between liquid lithium (Li) and solid molybdenum (Mo) are relevant to assessing the efficacy of Li as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. In this work, a new second-nearest neighbor modified embedded-atom method (2NN MEAM) force field is parameterized to describe the interactions between Li and Mo. The new force field reproduces several benchmark properties obtained from first-principles quantum mechanics simulations, including binding curves for Li at three different adsorption sites and the corresponding forces on Li atoms adsorbed on the Mo (1 1 0) surface. This force field is then used to study the wetting of liquid Li on the (1 1 0) surface of Mo and to examine the Li-Mo interface using molecular dynamics simulations. From droplet simulations, we find that liquid Li tends to completely wet the perfect Mo (1 1 0) surface, in contradiction with previous experimental measurements that found non-zero contact angles for liquid Li on a Mo substrate. However, these experiments were not carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions or with a perfect (1 1 0) Mo surface, suggesting that the presence of impurities, such as oxygen, and surface structure play a crucial role in this wetting process. From thin-film simulations, it is observed that the first layer of Li on the Mo (1 1 0) surface has many solid-like properties such as a low mobility and a larger degree of ordering when compared to layers further away from the surface, even at temperatures well above the bulk melting temperature of Li. These findings are consistent with temperature-programmed desorption experiments.

  9. Correlation Between Superheated Liquid Fragility And Onset Temperature Of Crystallization For Al-Based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous alloys or metallic glasses have attracted significant interest in the materials science and engineering communities due to their unique physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. The viscous flow of amorphous alloys exhibiting high strain rate sensitivity and homogeneous deformation is considered to be an important characteristic in thermoplastic forming processes performed within the supercooled liquid region because it allows superplastic-like deformation behavior. Here, the correlation between the superheated liquid fragility, and the onset temperature of crystallization for Al-based alloys, is investigated. The activation energy for viscous flow of the liquid is also investigated. There is a negative correlation between the parameter of superheated liquid fragility and the onset temperature of crystallization in the same Al-based alloy system. The activation energy decreases as the onset temperature of crystallization increases. This indicates that the stability of a superheated liquid can affect the thermal stability of the amorphous alloy. It also means that a liquid with a large superheated liquid fragility, when rapidly solidified, forms an amorphous alloy with a low thermal stability.

  10. Determination of the neuropharmacological drug nodakenin in rat plasma and brain tissues by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: Application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingshi; Yan, Huiyu; Xu, Jingbo; Ma, Hongxi

    2017-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry detection using selected reaction monitoring in positive ionization mode was developed and validated for the quantification of nodakenin in rat plasma and brain. Pareruptorin A was used as internal standard. A single step liquid-liquid extraction was used for plasma and brain sample preparation. The method was validated with respect to selectivity, precision, accuracy, linearity, limit of quantification, recovery, matrix effect and stability. Lower limit of quantification of nodakenin was 2.0 ng/mL in plasma and brain tissue homogenates. Linear calibration curves were obtained over concentration ranges of 2.0-1000 ng/mL in plasma and brain tissue homogenates for nodakenin. Intra-day and inter-day precisions (relative standard deviation, RSD) were <15% in both biological media. This assay was successfully applied to plasma and brain pharmacokinetic studies of nodakenin in rats after intravenous administration. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Structure factor of liquid alkali metals using a classical-plasma reference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, G.; Tosi, M. P.

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents calculations of the liquid structure factor of the alkali metals near freezing, starting from the classical plasma of bare ions as reference liquid. The indirect ion-ion interaction arising from electronic screening is treated by an optimized random phase approximation (ORPA), imposing physical requirements as in the original ORPA scheme developed by Weeks, Chandler and Andersen for liquids with strongly repulsive core potentials. A comparison of the results with computer simulation data for a model of liquid rubidium shows that the present approach overcomes the well-known difficulties met in applying to these metals the standard ORPA based on a reference liquid of neutral hard spheres. The optimization scheme is also shown to be equivalent to a reduction of the range of the indirect interaction in momentum space, as proposed empirically in an earlier work. Comparison with experiment for the other alkalis shows that a good overall representation of the data can be obtained for sodium, potassium and cesium, but not for lithium, when one uses a very simple form of the electron-ion potential adjusted to the liquid compressibility. The small-angle scattering region is finally examined more carefully in the light of recent data of Waseda, with a view to possible refinements of the pseudopotential model.

  12. Time-resolved tomographic measurements of temperatures in a thermal plasma jet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlína, Jan; Šonský, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2010), s. 1-9 ISSN 0022-3727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : thermal plasma jet * optical diagnostics * temperature distribution Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2010

  13. The measurement of single particle temperature in plasma sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Bolsaitis, P.P.; Elliott, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining the size, velocity, temperature, and relative number density of particles entrained in high temperature flow fields is described. In determining the particle temperature from a two-color pyrometery technique, assumptions about the relative spectral emissivity of the particle are required. For situations in which the particle surface undergoes chemical reactions the assumption of grey body behavior is shown to introduce large Temperature measurement uncertainties. Results from isolated, laser heated, single particle measurements and in-flight data from the plasma spraying of WC-Co are presented. 10 refs., 5 figs

  14. Determination of composition and physical properties of partially ionized plasmas in the function of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporowski, B.

    1992-01-01

    The investigations of various kinds of partially ionized plasma were conducted for the pressure of 0.1 MPa and in the range of temperature of 298.15 K to 24000 K. The physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma depend mainly of their composition and temperature. The composition of particular kinds of partially ionized plasmas varies also in the function of temperature. Simultaneous going on of physical and chemical processes in plasma is the reason of difficulties in the calculations of plasma's physical properties. The use of the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics for the calculations of physical properties of partially ionized plasma is impossible. There are enough exact methods for measuring of physical properties of partially ionized plasma. For these reasons the theoretical method using the base of statistic physics was used to calculate the composition and physical properties of various kinds of partially ionized plasma. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  15. Measurement of Temperature in the Steam Arcjet During Plasma Arc Cutting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašláni, Alan; Sember, Viktor; Stehrer, T.; Pauser, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2013), s. 593-604 ISSN 0272-4324 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2070 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma arc cutting * Optical emission spectroscopy * Plasma temperature * Steam torch Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.599, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs11090-013-9443-y.pdf

  16. Plasma parameters of the cathode spot explosive electron emission cell obtained from the model of liquid-metal jet tearing and electrical explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2018-05-01

    A model has been developed for the explosive electron emission cell pulse of a vacuum discharge cathode spot that describes the ignition and extinction of the explosive pulse. The pulse is initiated due to hydrodynamic tearing of a liquid-metal jet which propagates from the preceding cell crater boundary and draws the ion current from the plasma produced by the preceding explosion. Once the jet neck has been resistively heated to a critical temperature (˜1 eV), the plasma starts expanding and decreasing in density, which corresponds to the extinction phase. Numerical and analytical solutions have been obtained that describe both the time behavior of the pulse plasma parameters and their average values. For the cell plasma, the momentum per transferred charge has been estimated to be some tens of g cm/(s C), which is consistent with the known measurements of ion velocity, ion erosion rate, and specific recoil force. This supports the model of the pressure-gradient-driven plasma acceleration mechanism for the explosive cathode spot cells. The ohmic electric field within the explosive current-carrying plasma has been estimated to be some tens of kV/cm, which is consistent with the known experimental data on cathode potential fall and explosive cell plasma size. This supports the model that assumes the ohmic nature of the cathode potential fall in a vacuum discharge.

  17. Recombination in deuterium plasma at cryogenic temperatures (down to 130 K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, O.; Glosik, J.; Pysanenko, A.; Zakouril, P.; Plasil, R.; Tichy, M. [Prague Charles Univ., Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Czech Republic)

    2004-07-01

    The ions H{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 3}{sup +} play an important role in the kinetics of media of astrophysical interest but also in laboratory produced plasmas (discharges, fusion plasmas). In the presented study variable temperature flowing afterglow with Langmuir probe (VT-FALP) was used to study plasma decay in D{sub 2}/He mixture at temperatures down to 130 K and total pressure up to 10 Torr. Large extend of partial number densities of D{sub 2} (10{sup 12} - 3 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) were used in the experiments. Langmuir probes and mass spectrometers were applied to monitor decay of the plasma during the afterglow. The study is a continuation of our previous measurements of recombination rate coefficients of D{sub 3}{sup +} and D{sub 5}{sup +} ions. In these studies we observed dependence of the recombination rate coefficient on partial pressure of deuterium indicating that third-body assisted recombination is efficient and significantly contributes to recombination in decaying deuterium-containing plasma. (authors)

  18. Impact of nonlocal electron heat transport on the high temperature plasmas of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Inagaki, S.; Tokuzawa, T.

    2006-10-01

    Edge cooling experiments with a tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in the Large Helical Device (LHD) show a significant rise of core electron temperature (the maximum rise is around 1 keV) as well as in many tokamaks. This experimental result indicates the possible presence of the nonlocality of electron heat transport in plasmas where turbulence as a cause of anomalous transport is dominated. The nonlocal electron temperature rise in the LHD takes place in almost the same parametric domain (e.g. in a low density) as in the tokamaks. Meanwhile, the experimental results of LHD show some new aspects of nonlocal electron temperature rise, for example the delay of the nonlocal rise of core electron temperature relative to the pellet penetration time increases with the increase in collisionality in the core plasma and the decrease in electron temperature gradient scale length in the outer region of the plasma. (author)

  19. Impact of nonlocal electron heat transport on the high temperature plasmas of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Inagaki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C.; Tokuzawa, T.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Kalinina, D.; Sudo, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Komori, A.

    2007-01-01

    Edge cooling experiments with a tracer-encapsulated solid pellet in the large helical device (LHD) show a significant rise in core electron temperature (the maximum rise is around 1 keV) as well as in many tokamaks. This experimental result indicates the possible presence of the nonlocality of electron heat transport in plasmas where turbulence as a cause of anomalous transport dominates. The nonlocal electron temperature rise in the LHD takes place in almost the same parametric domain (e.g. in a low density) as in the tokamaks. Meanwhile, the experimental results of LHD show some new aspects of nonlocal electron temperature rise, for example the delay in the nonlocal rise of core electron temperature relative to the pellet penetration time increases with the increase both in the collisionality in the core plasma and the electron temperature gradient scale length in the outer region of the plasma

  20. Sensitive determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma by matrix solid-phase dispersion with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC with diode array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Li, Xuwen; Li, Lanjie; Li, Min; Liu, Ying; Wu, Qian; Li, Peng; Jin, Yongri

    2016-05-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma was developed using matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The plasma sample was directly purified by matrix solid-phase dispersion and the eluate obtained was concentrated and further clarified by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Some important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as type and amount of dispersing sorbent, type and volume of elution solvent, type and volume of extraction solvent, salt concentration as well as sample solution pH, were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method has good repeatability and reproducibility with intraday and interday relative standard deviations lower than 5.44 and 5.75%, respectively. The recoveries of the aconitum alkaloids ranged from 73.81 to 101.82%, and the detection limits were achieved within the range of 1.6-2.1 ng/mL. The proposed method offered the advantages of good applicability, sensitivity, simplicity, and feasibility, which makes it suitable for the determination of trace amounts of aconitum alkaloids in human plasma samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Temperature dependence of transport coefficients of 'simple liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... has been investigated. The study carried out at two densities, r* = 0.60 and r* = 0.95. Result shows erratic variations of the shear viscosity in the two lattices structures. KeyWords: Temperature effect, face centred, simple cubic, transport properties, simple liquid. [Global Jnl Pure & Appl. Sci. Vol.9(3) 2003: 403-406] ...

  2. Speciation of mercury in water samples by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiaoyu; Han Yi; Liu Xinli; Duan Taicheng; Chen Hangting

    2011-01-01

    The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of mercury in water samples was described. Firstly methylmercury (MeHg + ) and mercury (Hg 2+ ) were complexed with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, and then the complexes were extracted into carbon tetrachloride by using DLLME. Under the optimized conditions, the enrichment factors of 138 and 350 for MeHg + and Hg 2+ were obtained from only 5.00 mL sample solution. The detection limits of the analytes (as Hg) were 0.0076 ng mL -1 for MeHg + and 0.0014 ng mL -1 for Hg 2+ , respectively. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.5 ng mL -1 MeHg + and Hg 2+ were 6.9% and 4.4%, respectively. Standard reference material of seawater (GBW(E)080042) was analyzed to verify the accuracy of the method and the results were in good agreement with the certified values. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the speciation of mercury in three environmental water samples.

  3. Recent Liquid Lithium Limiter Experiments in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Gray, T.; Marfuta, P.; Spaleta, J.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Rodgers, D.; Angelini, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) provide a first-ever test of large area liquid lithium surfaces as a tokamak first wall, to gain engineering experience with a liquid metal first wall, and to investigate whether very low recycling plasma regimes can be accessed with lithium walls. The CDX-U is a compact (R=34 cm, a=22 cm, B toroidal = 2 kG, I P =100 kA, T e (0) ∼ 100 eV, n e (0) ∼ 5 x 10 19 m -3 ) spherical torus at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A toroidal liquid lithium pool limiter with an area of 2000 cm 2 (half the total plasma limiting surface) has been installed in CDX-U. Tokamak discharges which used the liquid lithium pool limiter required a fourfold lower loop voltage to sustain the plasma current, and a factor of 5-8 increase in gas fueling to achieve a comparable density, indicating that recycling is strongly reduced. Modeling of the discharges demonstrated that the lithium limited discharges are consistent with Z effective < 1.2 (compared to 2.4 for the pre-lithium discharges), a broadened current channel, and a 25% increase in the core electron temperature. Spectroscopic measurements indicate that edge oxygen and carbon radiation are strongly reduced

  4. Study of mixed radiative thermal mass transfer in the case of spherical liquide particle evaporation in a high temperature thermal air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garandeau, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a semi-transparent non-isothermal medium with spherical configuration has been studied. Limit conditions have been detailed, among which the semi-transparent inner sphere case is a new case. Enthalpy and matter transfer equations related to these different cases have been established. An adimensional study of local conservation laws allowed to reveal a parameter set characteristic of radiation coupled phenomena thermal conduction, convection, diffusion. Transfer equations in the case of evaporation of a liquid spherical particle in an air thermal plasma have been simplified. An analytical solution for matter transfer is proposed. Numerical solution of radiative problems and matter transfer has been realized [fr

  5. Temperature dependence of the bulk and surface properties of liquid Zn-Cd alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awe, O.E. [University of Ibadan, Department of Physics, Ibadan (Nigeria); Azeez, A.A. [African University of Science and Technology, Abuja (Nigeria)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of temperature on the bulk and surface properties of liquid Zn-Cd alloys have been theoretically investigated, using a combination of self association model, Darken's thermodynamic equation for diffusion, empirical model for viscosity and a statistical mechanics model. The results from this study show that change in temperature resulted in cross-over effects in bulk and surface properties. We also found that with an increase in temperature, a pronounced asymmetry of viscosity isotherm is significantly reduced, and viscosity isotherm exhibited anomalous behaviour. Our results reveal that the homocoordination tendency in Zn-Cd liquid alloys is not strong and reduces with increasing temperature. The study further suggests a pronounced segregation of Cd-atoms at the surface of Zn-Cd liquid alloys and the extent of segregation reduces with temperature. We as well found that, in addition to the reported understanding that size-factor determines the compositional location of asymmetry of the viscosity isotherm, temperature is an operating parameter that has effect, not only on the composition of asymmetry, but also on the magnitude of asymmetry. In all the properties investigated, the most pronounced effect of temperature (52.9 %) is on the viscosity while the least effect (7.1 %) is on the surface tension. (orig.)

  6. Quark-Gluon Soup -- The Perfectly Liquid Phase of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    At temperatures above about 150 MeV and energy densities exceeding 500 MeV/fm3, quarks and gluons exist in the form of a plasma of free color charges that is about 1000 times hotter and a billion times denser than any other plasma ever created in the laboratory. This quark-gluon plasma (QGP) turns out to be strongly coupled, flowing like a liquid. About 35 years ago, the nuclear physics community started a program of relativistic heavy-ion collisions with the goal of producing and studying QGP under controlled laboratory conditions. This article recounts the story of its successful creation in collider experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory and CERN and the subsequent discovery of its almost perfectly liquid nature, and reports on the recent quantitatively precise determination of its thermodynamic and transport properties.

  7. High-speed three-dimensional plasma temperature determination of axially symmetric free-burning arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, B; Ekkert, K; Bachmann, J-P; Marques, J-L; Schein, J; Kozakov, R; Gött, G; Schöpp, H; Uhrlandt, D

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an experimental technique that allows for high-speed, three-dimensional determination of electron density and temperature in axially symmetric free-burning arcs. Optical filters with narrow spectral bands of 487.5–488.5 nm and 689–699 nm are utilized to gain two-dimensional spectral information of a free-burning argon tungsten inert gas arc. A setup of mirrors allows one to image identical arc sections of the two spectral bands onto a single camera chip. Two-different Abel inversion algorithms have been developed to reconstruct the original radial distribution of emission coefficients detected with each spectral window and to confirm the results. With the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium we calculate emission coefficients as a function of temperature by application of the Saha equation, the ideal gas law, the quasineutral gas condition and the NIST compilation of spectral lines. Ratios of calculated emission coefficients are compared with measured ones yielding local plasma temperatures. In the case of axial symmetry the three-dimensional plasma temperature distributions have been determined at dc currents of 100, 125, 150 and 200 A yielding temperatures up to 20000 K in the hot cathode region. These measurements have been validated by four different techniques utilizing a high-resolution spectrometer at different positions in the plasma. Plasma temperatures show good agreement throughout the different methods. Additionally spatially resolved transient plasma temperatures have been measured of a dc pulsed process employing a high-speed frame rate of 33000 frames per second showing the modulation of the arc isothermals with time and providing information about the sensitivity of the experimental approach. (paper)

  8. Determination of trimethyllead reference material using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hai; Wei Chao; Wang Jun; Chao Jingbo; Zhou Tao; Chen Dazhou

    2005-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS) was combined, and the chromatography conditions were optimized. The stability and homogeneity of a trimethyllead reference material were determined using this method. (authors)

  9. 13th TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. BARNES

    2000-07-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau} > 2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves which can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large K{sub i}. This talk reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0} {approx} 2 kG, {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e} {approx} 10 - 200 eV. Results will be presented for both direct detection of EBWs and for mode-converted EBW emission. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {le} T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe was employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Changes in the mode conversion efficiency may explain the observation of mode-converted EBW radiation temperatures below T{sub e}. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe} >> {Omega}{sub ce}.

  10. Foundations of modelling of nonequilibrium low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Bogaerts, A.; Guerra, V.; Turner, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    This work explains the need for plasma models, introduces arguments for choosing the type of model that better fits the purpose of each study, and presents the basics of the most common nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma models and the information available from each one, along with an extensive list of references for complementary in-depth reading. The paper presents the following models, organised according to the level of multi-dimensional description of the plasma: kinetic models, based on either a statistical particle-in-cell/Monte-Carlo approach or the solution to the Boltzmann equation (in the latter case, special focus is given to the description of the electron kinetics); multi-fluid models, based on the solution to the hydrodynamic equations; global (spatially-average) models, based on the solution to the particle and energy rate-balance equations for the main plasma species, usually including a very complete reaction chemistry; mesoscopic models for plasma-surface interaction, adopting either a deterministic approach or a stochastic dynamical Monte-Carlo approach. For each plasma model, the paper puts forward the physics context, introduces the fundamental equations, presents advantages and limitations, also from a numerical perspective, and illustrates its application with some examples. Whenever pertinent, the interconnection between models is also discussed, in view of multi-scale hybrid approaches.

  11. High performance liquid chromatographic determination of glucosamine in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh-Habashi, Ali; Sattari, Saeed; Pasutto, Franco; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2002-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of glucosamine (GlcN) in rat plasma. Internal standard, galactosamine, was added to 100 micro L of plasma containing GlcN followed by precipitation of plasma proteins with acetonitrile. Evaporation of the decanted supernatant solution was accelerated by the addition of methanol. GlcN was derivatized by addition of a solution containing 1-naphthyl isothiocyanate. Sample cleanup included passage through an anion exchange cartridge. Analysis was accomplished by injection of 0.1 mL of the sample solution into an isocratic HPLC system consisting of a C18 column, a mobile phase of acetonitrile: water: acetic acid: triethylamine (4.5: 95.5:0.1:0.05), a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min, and a UV detector set at 254 nm. Galactosamine and GlcN appeared 26 and 29 min post-injection, respectively. The assay was linear over the range of 1.25-400 micro g/mL (CV<10%) with a detection limit of 0.63 microg/mL and a limit of quantification of 1.25 microg/mL. The method was applied to the determination of GlcN in rat plasma after oral administration of 350 mg/kg of GlcN hydrochloride. The present assay is specific, sensitive, precise, and accurate and is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies.

  12. Surface modification of chromatography adsorbents by low temperature low pressure plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Winther-Jensen, Bjørn; Theodosiou, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we show how low temperature glow discharge plasma can be used to prepare bi-layered chromatography adsorbents with non-adsorptive exteriors. The commercial strong anion exchange expanded bed chromatography matrix, Q HyperZ, was treated with plasmas in one of two general ways. Using ...

  13. Surface temperature: A key parameter to control the propanethiol plasma polymer chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiry, Damien, E-mail: damien.thiry@umons.ac.be; Aparicio, Francisco J. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Laha, Priya; Terryn, Herman [Research Group Electrochemical and Surface Engineering (SURF), Department of Materials and Chemistry (MACH), Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons, Belgium and Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the influence of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the chemical composition of propanethiol plasma polymers was investigated for a given set of plasma conditions. In a first study, a decrease in the atomic sulfur content (at. %S) with the deposition time (t{sub d}) was observed. This behavior is explained by the heating of the growing film during deposition process, limiting the incorporation of stable sulfur-based molecules produced in the plasma. Experiments carried out by controlling the substrate temperature support this hypothesis. On the other hand, an empirical law relating the T{sub s} and the at. %S was established. This allows for the formation of gradient layer presenting a heterogeneous chemical composition along the thickness, as determined by depth profile analysis combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and C{sub 60} ion gun sputtering. The experimental data fit with the one predicted from our empiric description. The whole set of our results provide new insights in the relationship between the substrate temperature and the sulfur content in sulfur-based plasma polymers, essential for future developments.

  14. Quantitation of Metformin in Human Plasma and Urine by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography and Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Flemming; Hougaard Christensen, Mette Marie; Brøsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    : We describe an analytical method for the quantification of the widely used antihyperglycemic agent, metformin, in human plasma and urine. The separation was performed using isocratic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography on a Luna hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column (125...

  15. Liquid-phase microextraction for simultaneous chromatographic analysis of three antidepressant drugs in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Dobrovolskni Porto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method using Liquid Phase Microextraction for simultaneous detection of citalopram (CIT, paroxetine (PAR and fluoxetine (FLU, using venlafaxine as internal standard, in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was developed. The linearity was evaluated between 5.0 and 500 ng mL-1 (r > 0.99 and the limit of quantification was 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 ng mL-1 for CIT, PAR and FLU, respectively. Therefore, it can be applied to therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacokinetics or bioavailability studies and its advantages are that it necessary relatively inexpensive equipment and sample preparation techniques.

  16. Temperature and Nitric Oxide Generation in a Pulsed Arc Discharge Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namihira, T.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, M.; Wang, D.; Kiyan, T.; Akiyama, H.; Okamoto, K.; Toda, K.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is increasingly being used in medical treatments of high blood pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and other illnesses related to the lungs. Currently a NO inhalation system consists of a gas cylinder of N 2 mixed with a high concentration of NO. This arrangement is potentially risky due to the possibility of an accidental leak of NO from the cylinder. The presence of NO in the air leads to the formation of nitric dioxide (NO 2 ), which is toxic to the lungs. Therefore, an on-site generator of NO would be highly desirable for medical doctors to use with patients with lung disease. To develop the NO inhalation system without a gas cylinder, which would include a high concentration of NO, NAMIHIRA et al have recently reported on the production of NO from room air using a pulsed arc discharge. In the present work, the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma used to generate NO was measured to optimize the discharge condition. The results of the temperature measurements showed the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma reached about 10,000 K immediately after discharge initiation and gradually decreased over tens of microseconds. In addition, it was found that NO was formed in a discharge plasma having temperatures higher than 9,000 K and a smaller input energy into the discharge plasma generates NO more efficiently than a larger one

  17. A technique for temperature mapping in fluorocarbon plasmas using planar laser-induced fluorescence of CF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Kristen L.; Sobolewski, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of CF A 2 Σ + -X 2 Π(1,0) were used to determine two-dimensional maps of rotational temperature in CF 4 plasmas. Measured rotational temperatures are expected to be in equilibrium with the gas temperature due to the long chemical lifetime of CF relative to the collision rate. Experiments were performed in the capacitively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference rf reference cell at pressures from 26.7 Pa (200 mTorr) to 107 Pa (800 mTorr) and powers of 10 to 30 W deposited in the plasma. Temperatures, which ranged from 273±15 K to 480±15 K, were fairly axially symmetric and increased with pressure and power. All plasmas were coolest near the electrodes, which provided a substantial sink for heat in the plasma. Highest temperatures were found at a radial position near the edge of the electrodes. The strong temperature gradients observed in the plasmas can have serious effects on density measurements that probe a single rotational level, as well as on reaction rate constants and interpretation of density gradients. The effects of water-cooling the electrodes and the presence of a silicon wafer on temperature were also measured

  18. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature plasma (LTP) treatment of biological tissue is a promising path toward sterilization of bacteria due to its versatility and ability to operate under well-controlled and relatively mild conditions. The present collaborative research of an interdisciplinary team of investigators at University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), and University of California, Berkeley (UCB) focused on establishing our knowledge based with regard to low temperature plasma-induced chemical modifications in biomolecules that result in inactivation due to various plasma species, including ions, reactive radicals, and UV/VUV photons. The overall goals of the project were to identify and quantify the mechanisms by which low and atmospheric pressure plasma deactivates endotoxic biomolecules. Additionally, we wanted to understand the mechanism by which atmospheric pressure plasmas (APP) modify surfaces and how these modifications depend on the interaction of APP with the environment. Various low pressure plasma sources, a vacuum beam system and several atmospheric pressure plasma sources were used to accomplish this. In our work we elucidated for the first time the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in biological deactivation of representative biomolecules, both in a UHV beam system and an inductively coupled, low pressure plasma system, and established the associated atomistic biomolecule changes. While we showed that both ions and VUV photons can be very efficient in deactivation of biomolecules, significant etching and/or deep modification (~200 nm) accompanied these biological effects. One of the most important findings in this work is the significant radical-induced deactivation and surface modification can occur with minimal etching. However, if radical fluxes and corresponding etch rates are relatively high, for example at atmospheric pressure, endotoxic biomolecule film inactivation may require near-complete removal of the film. These findings motivated further work at

  19. Liquid–liquid extraction of Pu(IV), U(VI) and Am(III) using malonamide in room temperature ionic liquid as diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, Alok; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Extraction of actinides using malonamide in room temperature ionic liquid. ► High distribution ratios of actinides in room temperature ionic liquid. ► Ion exchange mechanism. ► Stoichiometry of extraction. ► High separation factors of U(VI) and Pu(IV) over Am(III) and fission products. - Abstract: The extraction behavior of U(VI), Pu(IV) and Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of N,N-dimethyl-N,N-dioctyl-2-(2-hexyloxyethyl)malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in the room temperature ionic liquid, 1–butyl–3–methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (C 4 mimNTf 2 ), was studied. The distribution ratio of these actinides in DMDOHEMA/C 4 mimNTf 2 was measured as a function of various parameters such as the concentration of nitric acid, DMDOHEMA, NTf 2 − , alkyl chain length of ionic liquid. The extraction of actinides in the absence of DMDOHEMA was insignificant and the distribution ratio achieved in conjunction with C 4 mimNTf 2 , was remarkable. The separation factor of U(VI) and Pu(IV) achieved with the use of DMDOHEMA, ionic liquid was compared with Am(III) and other fission products. The stoichiometry of the metal-solvate was determined to be 1:2 for U(VI) and Pu(IV) and 1:3 for Am(III).

  20. Ion emission from laser-produced plasmas with two electron temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickens, L.M.; Allen, J.E.; Rumsby, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    An analytic theory for the expansion of a laser-produced plasma with two electron temperatures is presented. It is shown that from the ion-emission velocity spectrum such relevant parameters as the hot- to -cold-electron density ratio, the absolute hot- and cold-electron temperatures, and a sensitive measure of hot- and cold-electron temperature ratio can be deduced. A comparison with experimental results is presented

  1. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission of laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Haslinger, M.J.; Hinterreiter, A.; Kolmhofer, P.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Heitz, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the influence of sample temperature on the dynamics and optical emission of laser induced plasma for various solid materials. Bulk aluminum alloy, silicon wafer, and metallurgical slag samples are heated to temperature T{sub S} ≤ 500 °C and ablated in air by Nd:YAG laser pulses (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration approx. 7 ns). The plasma dynamics is investigated by fast time-resolved photography. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the optical emission of plasma is measured by Echelle spectrometers in combination with intensified CCD cameras. For all sample materials the temporal evolution of plume size and broadband plasma emission vary systematically with T{sub S}. The size and brightness of expanding plumes increase at higher T{sub S} while the mean intensity remains independent of temperature. The intensity of emission lines increases with temperature for all samples. Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with T{sub S}. We apply the calibration-free LIBS method to determine the concentration of major oxides in slag and find good agreement to reference data up to T{sub S} = 450 °C. The LIBS analysis of multi-component materials at high temperature is of interest for technical applications, e.g. in industrial production processes. - Highlights: • Size and emission of laser-induced plasma increase with sample temperature Ts. • Mean optical intensity of plasma is independent of Ts. • Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with Ts. • Major oxides in steel slag are quantified up to Ts = 450 °C. • Industrial steel slags are analyzed by calibration-free LIBS method.

  2. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaw, W.L.; Mamat, C.R.; Triwahyono, S.; Jalil, A.A.; Bidin, N.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen. • Enhanced

  3. Effect of temperature on the morphology and electro-optical properties of liquid crystal physical gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaw, W.L. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Mamat, C.R., E-mail: che@kimia.fs.utm.my [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Triwahyono, S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Jalil, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Energy Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Centre of Hydrogen Energy, Institute of Future Energy, Univerisiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Bidin, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid crystal physical gels were (thermally) prepared with cholesteryl stearate as a gelator in nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical performance of liquid crystal physical gels is almost entirely dependent on the gels' inherent morphology. This study involved an empirical investigation of the relationships among all of the gelation temperature, morphology, and electro-optical properties. Besides continuous cooling at room temperature, isothermal cooling was also performed at both 18 and 0 °C, corresponding to near-solid and solid phases of 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl respectively. Nevertheless, the liquid crystal physical gel was also isothermally rapidly cooled using liquid nitrogen. Polarizing optical microscopy showed that the gel structure became thinner when isothermal cooling was carried out. These thinner gel aggregates then interconnected to form larger liquid crystal domains. Moreover, it was also revealed that the gel networks were randomized. Electron spin resonance results showed that the liquid crystal director orientation was severely randomized in the presence of gel networks. Conversely, isothermal cooling using liquid nitrogen generated a higher liquid crystal director orientation order. The 6.0 wt% cholesteryl stearate/4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl physical gel that was isothermally cooled using liquid nitrogen showed the lowest response time in a twisted nematic mode optical cell. - Graphical abstract: Liquid crystal physical gel was prepared using nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl and cholesteryl stearate as gelator. Isothermal cooling at lower temperature produced thinner gel network and larger liquid crystal domain. - Highlights: • 5CB nematic liquid crystal was successfully gelled by cholesteryl stearate gelator. • The morphology of gel network was controlled by different cooling conditions. • Thinner gel network was formed by the rapid cooling using liquid nitrogen.

  4. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter l