WorldWideScience

Sample records for temperature geothermal water

  1. GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    Chrzan, T.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents the role of the geothermal waters mainly for the municipal heating, greenhouses, swimming pools, etc. Presently, two types of geothermal waters are used in the world. Waters of the temperatures higher than 130oC (steam) used mostly to drive turbines in geothermal power plants. Waters of low temperatures (20oC to 100oC) are used as a direct energy carrier for the municipal heating systems. The geothermal waters in Poland are presented in this paper.

  2. Example of low temperature geothermal water valorization by aquaculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisset, P.

    1985-06-01

    A new technique is described for the intensive culturing of Artemia in a continuously renewed medium. Extrapolated to a 1 m/sup 3/ tank, 20 kg live weight Artemia could be produced over a culture period of two weeks on a dried micronized and defatted rice bran using the salt enriched effluent of an abandoned geothermal well as a culture medium.

  3. Investigation of Neutron Detector Response to Varying Temperature and Water Content for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Hatice [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear logging techniques have been used for oil well logging applications for decades. The basic principle is to use a neutron and/or photon source and neutron and photon detectors for characterization purposes. Although the technology has matured, it is not directly applicable to geothermal logging due to even more challenging environmental conditions, both in terms of temperature and pressure. For geothermal logging, the operating temperature can go up to 376 C for depths up to 10,000 km. In this paper, the preliminary computational results for thermal neutron detector response for varying temperature and water content for geothermal applications are presented. In this summary, preliminary results for neutron detector response for varying formation temperature and water content are presented. The analysis is performed for a steady state source (AmBe) and time dependent source (PNG) in pulsed mode. The computational results show significant sensitivity to water content as well as temperature changes for both steady state and time dependent measurements. As expected, the most significant change is due to the temperature change for S({alpha}, {beta}) nuclear data instead of individual isotope cross sections for the formation. Clearly, this is partially because of the fact that strong absorbers (i.e., chlorine) are not taken into account for the analysis at this time. The computational analysis was performed using the temperature dependent data in the ENDF/B-VII libraries, supplied with MCNP. Currently, the data for intermediate temperatures are being generated using NJOY and validated. A series of measurements are planned to validate the computational results. Further measurements are planned to determine the neutron and photon detector response as a function of temperature. The tests will be performed for temperatures up to 400 C.

  4. Water Desalination using geothermal energy

    KAUST Repository

    Goosen, M.

    2010-08-03

    The paper provides a critical overview of water desalination using geothermal resources. Specific case studies are presented, as well as an assessment of environmental risks and market potential and barriers to growth. The availability and suitability of low and high temperature geothermal energy in comparison to other renewable energy resources for desalination is also discussed. Analysis will show, for example, that the use of geothermal energy for thermal desalination can be justified only in the presence of cheap geothermal reservoirs or in decentralized applications focusing on small-scale water supplies in coastal regions, provided that society is able and willing to pay for desalting. 2010 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  5. Water Desalination Using Geothermal Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreddine Ghaffour

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a critical overview of water desalination using geothermal resources. Specific case studies are presented, as well as an assessment of environmental risks and market potential and barriers to growth. The availability and suitability of low and high temperature geothermal energy in comparison to other renewable energy resources for desalination is also discussed. Analysis will show, for example, that the use of geothermal energy for thermal desalination can be justified only in the presence of cheap geothermal reservoirs or in decentralized applications focusing on small-scale water supplies in coastal regions, provided that society is able and willing to pay for desalting.

  6. Water Resource Assessment of Geothermal Resources and Water Use in Geopressured Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harto, C. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Troppe, W. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This technical report from Argonne National Laboratory presents an assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation and an analysis of fresh water use in low-temperature geopressured geothermal power generation systems.

  7. Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, R.E.

    1994-07-01

    The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

  8. The Socorro Geothermal System: A Low Temperature Geothermal Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, M. A.; Owens, L. B.

    2009-12-01

    The State of New Mexico is endowed with relatively high background heat flow and permeable, fractured crystalline and sedimentary rocks. This combination has given rise to numerous low temperature geothermal systems throughout the state. In many instances, hot springs associated with these systems are located within gaps in regional confining units (a.k.a. hydrologic windows) caused either by fault block rotation or the emplacement of volcanic dikes. The Socorro Geothermal Area (SGA) is a prime example of this type of a forced convection geothermal system. The Socorro geothermal area (SGA) lies 2 miles to the west of the NM Tech Campus near the base of the Socorro Mountain Block and will be assessed for production by drilling a 1500ft test well in September 2009. Published shallow temperature gradient measurements in fractured, permeable (3000 Darcy) granites indicate peak heat flow values as high as 490 mW/m^2 but decreases to 25 mW/m^2 about 10 km to the west within the La Jencia Basin near the foothills of the Magdalena Mountains. Silica and Cation based geothermometers suggest that deep geothermal reservoir reaches temperatures of 80 to 112 deg. C. Carbon14 age dating of shallow groundwater within the discharge area are about 20,000 years old. Hydrothermal models we constructed indicates that Mountain front recharge penetrates to depths of 4.5 km below the La Jencia Basin sedimentary pile into fractured, crystalline rocks. Discharge occurs through a hydrologic window to the east within a breached playa deposit at the western edge of the Socorro Basin. The hydrologic window was caused by fault block rotation. Warm springs which produce several hundred gpm of 32 deg. C water at the surface several miles to the south of the proposed drilling area also attest to the presence of a significant hydrothermal system. This low temperature resource could potentially heat the Campus of NM Tech.

  9. Water Intensity of Electricity from Geothermal Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, G. S.; Glassley, W. E.

    2010-12-01

    BACKGROUND Electricity from geothermal resources could play a significant role in the United States over the next few decades; a 2006 study by MIT expects a capacity of 100GWe by 2050 as feasible; approximately 10% of total electricity generating capacity up from less than 1% today. However, there is limited research on the water requirements and impacts of generating electricity from geothermal resources - conventional as well as enhanced. To the best of our knowledge, there is no baseline exists for water requirements of geothermal electricity. Water is primarily required for cooling and dissipation of waste heat in the power plants, and to account for fluid losses during heat mining of enhanced geothermal resources. MODEL DESCRIPTION We have developed a model to assess and characterize water requirements of electricity from hydrothermal resources and enhanced geothermal resources (EGS). Our model also considers a host of factors that influence cooling water requirements ; these include the temperature and chemical composition of geothermal resource; installed power generation technology - flash, organic rankine cycle and the various configurations of these technologies; cooling technologies including air cooled condensers, wet recirculating cooling, and hybrid cooling; and finally water treatment and recycling installations. We expect to identify critical factors and technologies. Requirements for freshwater, degraded water and geothermal fluid are separately estimated. METHODOLOGY We have adopted a lifecycle analysis perspective that estimates water consumption at the goethermal field and power plant, and accounts for transmission and distribution losses before reaching the end user. Our model depends upon an extensive literature review to determine various relationships necessary to determine water usage - for example relationship between thermal efficiency and temperature of a binary power plant, or differences in efficiency between various ORC configurations

  10. 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

  11. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, J.E. [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources; Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  12. The Use of Geothermal Waters in Podhale in Terms of Tourism and Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Michał Bugajski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been observed an increased interest of various industrial and economy branches in geothermal waters. In Poland, one of the more famous geothermal systems is the Podhale Basin, which forms an important reservoir of geothermal waters with relatively low mineralization and high temperatures. More and more often geothermal water is used not only for balneological or recreational purposes, but also as a heat source for heating. New areas of application of geothermal waters are also appearing, eg. use of cooled geothermal water as a raw material to produce fresh water. Another example of the application of geothermal waters is the cosmetic industry. For instance, a cream based on geothermal water from Podhale was introduced to the cosmetics market in 2013. This paper presents the possibilities of using the geothermal waters of Podhale, with particular emphasis on geothermal waters from Banska PGP-1, Banska IG-1 and Banska PGP-3 boreholes.

  13. The Use of Geothermal Waters in Podhale in Terms of Tourism and Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Michał Bugajski; Elwira Nowobilska–Majewska; Aleksandra Nowobilska–Luberda; Tomasz Bergel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been observed an increased interest of various industrial and economy branches in geothermal waters. In Poland, one of the more famous geothermal systems is the Podhale Basin, which forms an important reservoir of geothermal waters with relatively low mineralization and high temperatures. More and more often geothermal water is used not only for balneological or recreational purposes, but also as a heat source for heating. New areas of application of geothermal wat...

  14. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian

    2015-06-30

    Full realization of the potential of what might be considered “low-grade” geothermal resources will require that we examine many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source we will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects. The objectives of this project were: 1) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the integration and utilization potential of low-temperature geothermal sources. Innovative uses of low-enthalpy geothermal water were designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. 2) To perform process optimizations and economic analyses of processes that can utilize low-temperature geothermal fluids. These processes included electricity generation using biomass and district heating systems. 3) To scale up and generalize the results of three case study locations to develop a regionalized model of the utilization of low-temperature geothermal resources. A national-level, GIS-based, low-temperature geothermal resource supply model was developed and used to develop a series of national supply curves. We performed an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. The final products of this study include 17 publications, an updated version of the cost estimation software GEOPHIRES, and direct-use supply curves for low-temperature utilization of geothermal resources. The supply curves for direct use geothermal include utilization from known hydrothermal, undiscovered hydrothermal, and near-hydrothermal EGS resources and presented these results at the Stanford

  15. Realizing the geothermal electricity potential—water use and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar Mishra, Gouri; Glassley, William E.; Yeh, Sonia

    2011-07-01

    Electricity from geothermal resources has the potential to supply a significant portion of US baseload electricity. We estimate the water requirements of geothermal electricity and the impact of potential scaling up of such electricity on water demand in various western states with rich geothermal resources but stressed water resources. Freshwater, degraded water, and geothermal fluid requirements are estimated explicitly. In general, geothermal electricity has higher water intensity (l kWh - 1) than thermoelectric or solar thermal electricity. Water intensity decreases with increase in resource enthalpy, and freshwater gets substituted by degraded water at higher resource temperatures. Electricity from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) could displace 8-100% of thermoelectricity generated in most western states. Such displacement would increase stress on water resources if re-circulating evaporative cooling, the dominant cooling system in the thermoelectric sector, is adopted. Adoption of dry cooling, which accounts for 78% of geothermal capacity today, will limit changes in state-wide freshwater abstraction, but increase degraded water requirements. We suggest a research and development focus to develop advanced energy conversion and cooling technologies that reduce water use without imposing energy and consequent financial penalties. Policies should incentivize the development of higher enthalpy resources, and support identification of non-traditional degraded water sources and optimized siting of geothermal plants.

  16. Direct use of low temperature geothermal water by Aquafarms International, Inc. for freshwater aquaculture (prawns and associated species). An operations and maintenance manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broughton, R.; Price, M.; Price, V.; Grajcer, D.

    1984-04-01

    In connection with an ongoing commercial aquaculture project in the Coachella Valley, California; a twelve month prawn growout demonstration project was conducted. This project began in August, 1979 and involved the use of low temperature (85/sup 0/F) geothermal waters to raise freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (deMan), in earthen ponds. The following publication is an operations and maintenance guide which may by useful for those interested in conducting similar enterprises.

  17. Low temperature geothermal systems in carbonate-evaporitic rocks: Mineral equilibria assumptions and geothermometrical calculations. Insights from the Arnedillo thermal waters (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Mónica; Gimeno, María J; Auqué, Luis F

    2018-02-15

    Geothermometrical calculations in low-medium temperature geothermal systems hosted in carbonate-evaporitic rocks are complicated because 1) some of the classical chemical geothermometers are, usually, inadequate (since they were developed for higher temperature systems with different mineral-water equilibria at depth) and 2) the chemical geothermometers calibrated for these systems (based on the Ca and Mg or SO4 and F contents) are not free of problems either. The case study of the Arnedillo thermal system, a carbonate-evaporitic system of low temperature, will be used to deal with these problems through the combination of several geothermometrical techniques (chemical and isotopic geothermometers and geochemical modelling). The reservoir temperature of the Arnedillo geothermal system has been established to be in the range of 87±13°C being the waters in equilibrium with respect to calcite, dolomite, anhydrite, quartz, albite, K-feldspar and other aluminosilicates. Anhydrite and quartz equilibria are highly reliable to stablish the reservoir temperature. Additionally, the anhydrite equilibrium explains the coherent results obtained with the δ18O anhydrite - water geothermometer. The equilibrium with respect to feldspars and other aluminosilicates is unusual in carbonate-evaporitic systems and it is probably related to the presence of detrital material in the aquifer. The identification of the expected equilibria with calcite and dolomite presents an interesting problem associated to dolomite. Variable order degrees of dolomite can be found in natural systems and this fact affects the associated equilibrium temperature in the geothermometrical modelling and also the results from the Ca-Mg geothermometer. To avoid this uncertainty, the order degree of the dolomite present in the Arnedillo reservoir has been determined and the results indicate 18.4% of ordered dolomite and 81.6% of disordered dolomite. Overall, the results suggest that this multi-technique approach

  18. Temperature-induced impacts on groundwater quality and arsenic mobility in anoxic aquifer sediments used for both drinking water and shallow geothermal energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, Matthijs; van Breukelen, Boris M; Stuyfzand, Pieter J

    2013-09-15

    Aquifers used for the production of drinking water are increasingly being used for the generation of shallow geothermal energy. This causes temperature perturbations far beyond the natural variations in aquifers and the effects of these temperature variations on groundwater quality, in particular trace elements, have not been investigated. Here, we report the results of column experiments to assess the impacts of temperature variations (5°C, 11°C, 25°C and 60°C) on groundwater quality in anoxic reactive unconsolidated sandy sediments derived from an aquifer system widely used for drinking water production in the Netherlands. Our results showed that at 5 °C no effects on water quality were observed compared to the reference of 11°C (in situ temperature). At 25°C, As concentrations were significantly increased and at 60 °C, significant increases were observed pH and DOC, P, K, Si, As, Mo, V, B, and F concentrations. These elements should therefore be considered for water quality monitoring programs of shallow geothermal energy projects. No consistent temperature effects were observed on Na, Ca, Mg, Sr, Fe, Mn, Al, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Eu, Ho, Sb, Sc, Yb, Ga, La, and Th concentrations, all of which were present in the sediment. The temperature-induced chemical effects were probably caused by (incongruent) dissolution of silicate minerals (K and Si), desorption from, and potentially reductive dissolution of, iron oxides (As, B, Mo, V, and possibly P and DOC), and mineralisation of sedimentary organic matter (DOC and P). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mattson, Earl D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McLing, Travis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Center for Advanced Energy Studies; Palmer, Carl D. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Robert W. [Univ. of Idaho and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wood, Thomas R. [Univ. of Idaho and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Podgorney, Robert K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL) and Center for Advanced Energy Studies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  20. Silica extraction from geothermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, William L; Bruton, Carol J

    2014-09-23

    A method of producing silica from geothermal fluid containing low concentration of the silica of less than 275 ppm includes the steps of treating the geothermal fluid containing the silica by reverse osmosis treatment thereby producing a concentrated fluid containing the silica, seasoning the concentrated fluid thereby producing a slurry having precipitated colloids containing the silica, and separating the silica from the slurry.

  1. Defluoridation study for Boise geothermal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigdon, L.

    1980-06-03

    Methods of removing fluorides from water are reviewed and recommendations are made for treating geothermal water used by the Boise Geothermal Project, Boise, Idaho. The Boise geothermal water except for its high fluoride content would be high quality, suitable for primary drinking water. Fluoride ranges from about 15 to 25 mg/l in water from various wells in the Boise region where the Project plans to obtain hot water. Four techniques for removing fluorides from water have been studied extensively during the past 15 years or so. Electrodialysis and reverse osmosis are useful in reducing total dissolved solids from brackish water, but are nonspecific and are too expensive for treatment of the Boise geothermal water. Selective precipitation is a widely used technique for treating water, but would also prove expensive for the Boise geothermal water because of the relatively high solubility of fluoride salts and consequently high concentration (and cost) of precipitants required to reduce the fluorides to an acceptable level. Ion-exchange separation using activated alumina as the exchange medium appears to be the most promising technique and we recommend that some laboratory and pilot studies be conducted to establish suitability and operating boundaries.

  2. High Temperature Perforating System for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, Moises E. [Schlumberger Technology Corporation, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2017-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop a perforating system consisting of all the explosive components and hardware, capable of reliable performance in high temperatures geothermal wells (>200 ºC). In this light we will focused on engineering development of these components, characterization of the explosive raw powder and developing the internal infrastructure to increase the production of the explosive from laboratory scale to industrial scale.

  3. Transported Low-Temperature Geothermal Energy for Thermal End Uses Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhiyao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, Jan-Mou [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The use of geothermal energy is an emerging area for improving the nation’s energy resiliency. Conventionally, geothermal energy applications have focused on power generation using high temperature hydrothermal resources or enhanced geothermal systems. However, many low temperature (below 150°C/300°F) geothermal resources are also available but have not been fully utilized. For example, it is estimated that 25 billion barrels of geothermal fluid (mostly water and some dissolved solids) at 176°F to 302°F (80°C to 150°C) is coproduced annually at oil and gas wells in the United States (DOE 2015). The heat contained in coproduced geothermal fluid (also referred as “coproduced water”) is typically wasted because the fluid is reinjected back into the ground without extracting the heat.

  4. Auburn low-temperature geothermal well. Volume 6. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, R.S.; Castor, T.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Auburn well was drilled to explore for low temperature geothermal resources in central New York State. The Auburn site was selected based on: its proximity to the Cayuga County anomaly (30/sup 0/C/km), its favorable local geological conditions and the potential to provide hot water and space heating to two educational facilities. The well was drilled to a total depth of 5250 feet and into the Pre-Cambrian Basement. The well was extensively logged, flow and stress tested, hydraulically stimulated, and pump (pressure transient analysis) tested. The low-temperature geothermal potential was assessed in terms of: geological environment; hydrological conditions; reservoir characteristics; and recoverable hydrothermal reserves. The average geothermal gradient was measured to be as high as 26.7/sup 0/C/km with a bottom-hole temperature of 126/sup 0/ +- 1/sup 0/F. The proved volumetric resources were estimated to be 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ stock tank barrels (STB) with a maximum initial deliverability of approx.11,600 STB/D and a continuous deliverability of approx.3400 STB/D. The proved hydrothermal reserves were estimated to be 21.58 x 10/sup 10/ Btu based on a volumetric component (4.13 x 10/sup 10/ Btu), and a reinjection component (17.45 x 10/sup 10/ Btu). The conclusion was made that the Auburn low-temperature reservoir could be utilized to provide hot water and space heating to the Auburn School District.

  5. Model of geothermal water deironing on the basis of a triangulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosok-Bazan, Iwona; Olszewski, Robert

    2017-10-01

    The main of this research was to recognize the efficiency of geothermal water deironing processes. To this, studies on a laboratory scale were conducted. In the paper the modeling of geothermal water deironing processes using new tool basis on triangulation has been used. Carrying out the analysis of potential possibilities of using geothermal water and taking economic aspects of water deironing processes into account, the authors of this article conducted research into the geothermal water deironing processes by adjusting existing knowledge on the removal of iron from cold groundwater. The conducted research confirmed the possibility of adjusting such processes to the treatment of geothermal water, but their effectiveness differs depending on the temperature and salinity of water, but this relation is not linear. The analyzes indicated that the best deironing effect was obtained for water whose salinity does not exceed 10 g/L and the temperature 30°C.

  6. An Estimate of Shallow, Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullane, Michelle; Gleason, Michael; McCabe, Kevin; Mooney, Meghan; Reber, Timothy; Young, Katherine R.

    2016-10-01

    Low-temperature geothermal resources in the United States potentially hold an enormous quantity of thermal energy, useful for direct use in residential, commercial and industrial applications such as space and water heating, greenhouse warming, pool heating, aquaculture, and low-temperature manufacturing processes. Several studies published over the past 40 years have provided assessments of the resource potential for multiple types of low-temperature geothermal systems (e.g. hydrothermal convection, hydrothermal conduction, and enhanced geothermal systems) with varying temperature ranges and depths. This paper provides a summary and additional analysis of these assessments of shallow (= 3 km), low-temperature (30-150 degrees C) geothermal resources in the United States, suitable for use in direct-use applications. This analysis considers six types of geothermal systems, spanning both hydrothermal and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). We outline the primary data sources and quantitative parameters used to describe resources in each of these categories, and present summary statistics of the total resources available. In sum, we find that low-temperature hydrothermal resources and EGS resources contain approximately 8 million and 800 million TWh of heat-in-place, respectively. In future work, these resource potential estimates will be used for modeling of the technical and market potential for direct-use geothermal applications for the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Vision Study.

  7. An Estimate of Shallow, Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullane, Michelle; Gleason, Michael; Reber, Tim; McCabe, Kevin; Mooney, Meghan; Young, Katherine R.

    2017-05-01

    Low-temperature geothermal resources in the United States potentially hold an enormous quantity of thermal energy, useful for direct use in residential, commercial and industrial applications such as space and water heating, greenhouse warming, pool heating, aquaculture, and low-temperature manufacturing processes. Several studies published over the past 40 years have provided assessments of the resource potential for multiple types of low-temperature geothermal systems (e.g. hydrothermal convection, hydrothermal conduction, and enhanced geothermal systems) with varying temperature ranges and depths. This paper provides a summary and additional analysis of these assessments of shallow (= 3 km), low-temperature (30-150 degrees C) geothermal resources in the United States, suitable for use in direct-use applications. This analysis considers six types of geothermal systems, spanning both hydrothermal and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). We outline the primary data sources and quantitative parameters used to describe resources in each of these categories, and present summary statistics of the total resources available. In sum, we find that low-temperature hydrothermal resources and EGS resources contain approximately 8 million and 800 million TWh of heat-in-place, respectively. In future work, these resource potential estimates will be used for modeling of the technical and market potential for direct-use geothermal applications for the U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Vision Study.

  8. Feasibility study and energy efficiency estimation of geothermal power station based on medium enthalpy water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsukiewicz-Gozdur Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work presented are the results of investigations regarding the effectiveness of operation of power plant fed by geothermal water with the flow rate of 100, 150, and 200 m3/h and temperatures of 70, 80, and 90 °C, i. e. geothermal water with the parameters available in some towns of West Pomeranian region as well as in Stargard Szczecinski (86.4 °C, Poland. The results of calculations regard the system of geothermal power plant with possibility of utilization of heat for technological purposes. Analyzed are possibilities of application of different working fluids with respect to the most efficient utilization of geothermal energy. .

  9. Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment for Membrane Distillation Desalination in the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akar, Sertac; Turchi, Craig

    2016-10-01

    Substantial drought and declines in potable groundwater in the United States over the last decade has increased the demand for fresh water. Desalination of saline water such as brackish surface or groundwater, seawater, brines co-produced from oil and gas operations, industrial wastewater, blow-down water from power plant cooling towers, and agriculture drainage water can reduce the volume of water that requires disposal while providing a source of high-quality fresh water for industrial or commercial use. Membrane distillation (MD) is a developing technology that uses low-temperature thermal energy for desalination. Geothermal heat can be an ideal thermal-energy source for MD desalination technology, with a target range of $1/m3 to $2/m3 for desalinated water depending on the cost of heat. Three different cases were analyzed to estimate levelized cost of heat (LCOH) for integration of MD desalination technology with low-grade geothermal heat: (1) residual heat from injection brine at a geothermal power plant, (2) heat from existing underutilized low-temperature wells, and (3) drilling new wells for low-temperature resources. The Central and Western United States have important low-temperature (<90 degrees C) geothermal resource potential with wide geographic distribution, but these resources are highly underutilized because they are inefficient for power production. According to the USGS, there are 1,075 identified low temperature hydrothermal systems, 55 low temperature sedimentary systems and 248 identified medium to high temperature geothermal systems in the United States. The estimated total beneficial heat potential from identified low temperature hydrothermal geothermal systems and residual beneficial heat from medium to high temperature systems is estimated as 36,300 MWth, which could theoretically produce 1.4 to 7 million m3/day of potable water, depending on desalination efficiency.

  10. Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment for Membrane Distillation Desalination in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akar, Sertac; Turchi, Craig

    2017-05-01

    Substantial drought and declines in potable groundwater in the United States over the last decade has increased the demand for fresh water. Desalination of saline water such as brackish surface or groundwater, seawater, brines co-produced from oil and gas operations, industrial wastewater, blow-down water from power plant cooling towers, and agriculture drainage water can reduce the volume of water that requires disposal while providing a source of high-quality fresh water for industrial or commercial use. Membrane distillation (MD) is a developing technology that uses low-temperature thermal energy for desalination. Geothermal heat can be an ideal thermal-energy source for MD desalination technology, with a target range of $1/m3 to $2/m3 for desalinated water depending on the cost of heat. Three different cases were analyzed to estimate levelized cost of heat (LCOH) for integration of MD desalination technology with low-grade geothermal heat: (1) residual heat from injection brine at a geothermal power plant, (2) heat from existing underutilized low-temperature wells, and (3) drilling new wells for low-temperature resources. The Central and Western United States have important low-temperature (<90 degrees C) geothermal resource potential with wide geographic distribution, but these resources are highly underutilized because they are inefficient for power production. According to the USGS, there are 1,075 identified low temperature hydrothermal systems, 55 low temperature sedimentary systems and 248 identified medium to high temperature geothermal systems in the United States. The estimated total beneficial heat potential from identified low temperature hydrothermal geothermal systems and residual beneficial heat from medium to high temperature systems is estimated as 36,300 MWth, which could theoretically produce 1.4 to 7 million m3/day of potable water, depending on desalination efficiency.

  11. Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Four appendices are included. The first covers applications of low-temperature geothermal energy including industrial processes, agricultural and related processes, district heating and cooling, and miscellaneous. The second discusses hydrogeologic factors affecting the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells: water quality, withdrawal rate, water depth, water temperature, basic well designs, and hydrogeologic provinces. In the third appendix, properties of metallic and nonmetallic materials are described, including: specific gravity, mechanical strength properties, resistance to physical and biological attack, thermal properties of nonmetallics, fluid flow characteristics, corrosion resistance, scaling resistance, weathering resistance of nonmetallics, and hydrolysis resistance of nonmetallics. Finally, special considerations in the design and construction of low-temperature geothermal wells using nonmetallics materials are covered. These include; drilling methods, joining methods, methods of casing and screen installation, well cementing, and well development. (MHR)

  12. Geothermal potential of northern Bavaria: Analysis of geothermal resources by evaluation of geophysical temperature logs in drinking water wells and deep wells; Geothermisches Potential Nordbayerns - Untersuchungen der geothermischen Verhaeltnisse durch Auswertung geophysikalischer Temperaturmessungen in Trinkwasser- und Tiefbohrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.; Udluft, P. [Lehr- und Forschungsbereich Hydrogeologie und Umwelt, Inst. fuer Geologie, Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The geothermal potential of northern Bavaria was investigated. Thermal water in the lower heat range may be used, e.g., for space heating, bath heating and agricultural purposes. Geophysical data were obtained from a number of drinking water wells with a depth of less than 150 m and a few deep wells of more than 150 m. The data are to serve as a decision aid for potential users of geothermal energy and reduce the exploration risk. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zielsetzung des Forschungsvorhabens ist die Bewertung des geothermischen Potentials Nordbayerns im Hinblick auf die Nutzung von Tiefenwasser zur Gewinnung von hydrothermaler Energie. Niedrigthermale Tiefenwaesser bieten sich z.B. als Energietraeger fuer Raumwaerme, Baederheizung and landwirtschaftliche Nutzung an. Die geothermischen Daten liegen in Form von geophysikalischen Temperaturmessungen aus zahlreichen Trinkwasserbohrungen mit weniger als 150 m Bohrtiefe und einigen Tiefbohrungen mit mehr als 150 m Bohrtiefe vor. Die Bewertung des geothermischen Potentials Nordbayerns soll als Planungsgrundlage fuer potentialle Erdwaermenutzer dienen und zu einer Minimierung des Explorationsrisikos beitragen. (orig.)

  13. Hybrid Cooling Systems for Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, A.; Bharathan, D.

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes the identification and evaluation of methods by which the net power output of an air-cooled geothermal power plant can be enhanced during hot ambient conditions with a minimal amount of water use.

  14. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanashyam Neupane; Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; Carl D. Palmer; Robert W. Smith; Thomas R. Wood

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Geological survey has estimated that there are up to 4,900 MWe of undiscovered geothermal resources and 92,000 MWe of enhanced geothermal potential within the state of Idaho. Of particular interest are the resources of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) which was formed by volcanic activity associated with the relative movement of the Yellowstone Hot Spot across the state of Idaho. This region is characterized by a high geothermal gradient and thermal springs occurring along the margins of the ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ESRP is a regionally extensive and productive cold-water aquifer. We have undertaken a study to infer the temperature of the geothermal system hidden beneath the cold-water aquifer of the ESRP. Our approach is to estimate reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. In the initial stages of this study, we apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from a limited number of wells and thermal springs to estimate the regionally extensive geothermal system in the ESRP.

  15. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L.; Lohse, R.L.

    1983-04-01

    Sixty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled on the Mesilla Valley East Mesa (east of Interstate Highways 10 and 25), stretching from US Highway 70 north of Las Cruces to NM Highway 404 adjacent to Anthony, New Mexico. Using these data as part of the site selection process, Chaffee Geothermal, Ltd. of Denver, Colorado, drilled two low-temperature geothermal production wells to the immediate north and south of Tortugas Mountain and encountered a significant low-temperature reservoir, with a temperature of about 150{sup 0}F and flow rates of 750 to 1500 gallons per minute at depths from 650 to 1250 feet. These joint exploration activities resulted in the discovery and confirmation of a 30-square-mile low-temperature geothermal anomaly just a few miles to the east of Las Cruces that has been newly named as the Las Cruces east Mesa Geothermal Field. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest that the thermal anomaly is fault controlled and extends southward to the Texas border covering a 100-square-mile area. With the exception of some localized perturbations, the anomaly appears to decrease in temperature from the north to the south. Deeper drilling is required in the southern part of the anomaly to confirm the existence of commercially-exploitable geothermal waters.

  16. Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

    1980-11-10

    Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

  17. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  18. Microbial and Chemical Characterization of Geothermal Ground Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Kennedy, John

    Subsurface geothermal sites are commonly colonized by chemolithotrophic bacteria which use rock minerals and CO_2 as sole nutrients. This type of ``life cradle'' may not only be common on Earth but may also be a likely scenario on many other planets. Three geothermal sites in southern New Mexico have been chosen to characterize geothermal waters for microbial diversity and chemical content. All sites of this on-going study are located on or near the Rio Grande Rift and are tapped into fractured reservoir systems of Paleozoic carbonate rocks, Tertiary volcanic rocks or consolidated basin-fill sediments. Geothermal fluids were analyzed for major cations and anions, selected trace elements, TOC, phosphate, fluoride and dissolved gases. The microbial analysis included phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and DNA sequencing. Geothermal ground water was high in dissolved solids, had high concentrations of carbon dioxide and was more acidic than adjacent ground water not affected by geothermal activity. Geothermal ground-water samples contained very low amounts of biomass composed of relatively simple microbial communities. Several species of Archaebacteria were detected in some of the ground water that was derived from wells tapping into deep fractured systems. The analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) images indicated distinct differences of the types of microbes present in geothermal water compared to an adjacent deep non-thermal flow system.

  19. Investigation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources in the Sonoma Valley Area, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, Leslie G.; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Bezore, Stephen P.; Majmundar, Hasu H.

    1983-01-01

    The Sonoma Valley area contains low-temperature geothermal resources (20 C {le} T {le} 90 C) having the potential for useful development. Sonoma Valley residents, local governments and institutions, private developers, and manufacturers may be able to utilize the geothermal resources as an alternate energy source. Historically, there have been at least six geothermal spring areas developed in the Sonoma Valley. Four of these (Boyes Hot Springs, Fetter's Hot Springs, Agua Caliente Springs, and the Sonoma State Hospital warm spring) lie on a linear trend extending northwestward from the City of Sonoma. Detailed geophysical surveys delineated a major fault trace along the east side of the Sonoma Valley in association with the historic geothermal areas. Other fault traces were also delineated revealing a general northwest-trending structural faulting fabric underlying the valley. Water wells located near the ''east side'' fault have relatively high boron concentrations. Geochemical evidence may suggest the ''east side'' fault presents a barrier to lateral fluid migration but is a conduit for ascending fluids. Fifteen of the twenty-nine geothermal wells or springs located from literature research or field surveys are located along or east of this major fault in a 10 km (6.2 miles) long, narrow zone. The highest recorded water temperature in the valley appears to be 62.7 C (145 F) at 137.2 meters (450 feet) in a well at Boyes Hot Springs. This is consistent with the geothermal reservoir temperature range of 52-77 C (126-171 F) indicated by geothermometry calculations performed on data from wells in the area. Interpretation of data indicates a low-temperature geothermal fluid upwelling or ''plume'', along the ''east side'' fault with subsequent migration into permeable aquifers predominantly within volcanic strata. It is quite likely other geothermal fluid &apos

  20. Wine Valley Inn: A mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. Geothermal-energy-system conceptual design and economic feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-26

    The purpose of this study is to determine the engineering and economic feasibility for utilizing geothermal energy for air conditioning and service water heating at the Wine Valley Inn, a mineral water spa in Calistoga, California. The study evaluates heating, ventilating, air conditioning and water heating systems suitable for direct heat geothermal application. Due to the excellent geothermal temperatures available at this site, the mechanics and economics of a geothermally powered chilled water cooling system are evaluated. The Wine Valley Inn has the resource potential to have one of the few totally geothermal powered air conditioning and water heating systems in the world. This total concept is completely developed. A water plan was prepared to determine the quantity of water required for fresh water well development based on the special requirements of the project. An economic evaluation of the system is included to justify the added capital investment needed to build the geothermally powered mineral spa. Energy payback calculations are presented. A thermal cascade system is proposed to direct the geothermal water through the energy system to first power the chiller, then the space heating system, domestic hot water, the two spas and finally to heat the swimming pool. The Energy Management strategy required to automatically control this cascade process using industrial quality micro-processor equipment is described. Energy Management controls are selected to keep equipment sizing at a minimum, pump only the amount of geothermal water needed and be self balancing.

  1. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnquist, Norman [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Qi, Xuele [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Raminosoa, Tsarafidy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Salas, Ken [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Samudrala, Omprakash [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Shah, Manoj [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Van Dam, Jeremy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Yin, Weijun [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    This report summarizes the progress made during the April 01, 2010 – December 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE0002752 for the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems.” The overall objective of this program is to advance the technology for well fluids lifting systems to meet the foreseeable pressure, temperature, and longevity needs of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) industry for the coming ten years. In this program, lifting system requirements for EGS wells were established via consultation with industry experts and site visits. A number of artificial lift technologies were evaluated with regard to their applicability to EGS applications; it was determined that a system based on electric submersible pump (ESP) technology was best suited to EGS. Technical barriers were identified and a component-level technology development program was undertaken to address each barrier, with the most challenging being the development of a power-dense, small diameter motor that can operate reliably in a 300°C environment for up to three years. Some of the targeted individual component technologies include permanent magnet motor construction, high-temperature insulation, dielectrics, bearings, seals, thrust washers, and pump impellers/diffusers. Advances were also made in thermal management of electric motors. In addition to the overall system design for a full-scale EGS application, a subscale prototype was designed and fabricated. Like the full-scale design, the subscale prototype features a novel “flow-through-the-bore” permanent magnet electric motor that combines the use of high temperature materials with an internal cooling scheme that limits peak internal temperatures to <330°C. While the full-scale high-volume multi-stage pump is designed to lift up to 80 kg/s of process water, the subscale prototype is based on a production design that can pump 20 kg/s and has been modified

  2. California low-temperature geothermal resources update: 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy -- Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program to bring the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources up to date and to encourage development of the resources. The Oregon Institute of Technology, Geo-Heat Center (OIT/GHC) and the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) established subcontracts and coordinated the project with the state resource teams from the western states that participated in the program. The California Department of Conservation, Division of Mines and Geology (DMG) entered into contract numbered 1092--023(R) with the OIT/GHC to provide the California data for the program. This report is submitted in fulfillment of that contract.

  3. Temperature distribution in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo B, F.; Bermejo M, F.J.; Domiguez A, B.; Esquer P, C.A.; Navarro O, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    A series of temperature and pressure logs and flow rate measurements was compiled for each of the geothermal wells drilled to different reservoir depths between October 1979 and December 1980. Based on the valuable information obtained, a series of graphs showing the thermal characteristics of the reservoir were prepared. These graphs clearly show the temperature distribution resulting from the movement of fluids from the deep regions toward the higher zones of the reservoir, thus establishing more reliable parameters for locating new wells with better production zones. Updated information based on data from new deep wells drilled in the geothermal field is presented here. This new information does not differ much from earlier estimates and theories. However, the influence of faulting and fracturing on the hydrothermal recharge of the geothermal reservoir is seen more clearly.

  4. Culture of Freshwater Prawns (Macrobrachium Rosenbergii) Using Geothermal Waste Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William C.

    1978-01-01

    The farming of freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) in geothermal-heated water has been demonstrated to be feasible in a non-tropical climate. The husbandry of prawns is being done in two outdoor raceway ponds, 9.1 m by 2.5 m and 29 m by 3.5 m that are 1.2 m deep. The ponds are not shielded from the ambient climate which during the winter months has recorded air temperatures as low as -20oC. A selected brood stock is held in a small spawning building where larvae are hatched in artificial saltwater and reared to the post-larvae stage which makes the facility self-supporting. This project is providing a model for potential investors to utilize the low-temperature geothermal resources in the western United States for warm water aquaculture. Zooplankton, macroscopic crusteans, from a local euthrophic lake are being fed to the post-larvae and adult prawns in addition to prepared commercial dry pelleted foods to keep operational costs at a minimum. Initial measurements of growth and weight gains indicate the production of two crops of prawns per year at seven to the pond is possible. No work on intensive culture has been done. Plans to enlarge the facility and do work on developing intensive culture are being considered.

  5. Advanced Low Temperature Geothermal Power Cycles (The ENTIV Organic Project) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugerwa, Michael [Technip USA, Inc., Claremont, CA (United States)

    2015-11-18

    Feasibility study of advanced low temperature thermal power cycles for the Entiv Organic Project. Study evaluates amonia-water mixed working fluid energy conversion processes developed and licensed under Kalex in comparison with Kalina cycles. Both cycles are developed using low temperature thermal resource from the Lower Klamath Lake Geothermal Area. An economic feasibility evaluation was conducted for a pilot plant which was deemed unfeasible by the Project Sponsor (Entiv).

  6. Trace element hydrochemistry indicating water contamination in and around the Yangbajing geothermal field, Tibet, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin

    2009-10-01

    Thirty-eight water samples were collected at Yangbajing to investigate the water contamination resulting from natural geothermal water discharge and anthropogenic geothermal wastewater drainage. The results indicate that snow or snow melting waters, Yangbajing River waters and cold groundwaters are free from geothermal water-related contamination, whereas Zangbo river waters are contaminated by geothermal wastewaters. Moreover, there may exist geothermal springs under the riverbed of a tributary stream of Zangbo River as shown by its Cd, Li, Mo and Pb concentrations. The efforts made in this study show trace element hydrochemistry can well indicate water quality degradation related to geothermal water exploitation.

  7. Prospects of development of highly mineralized high-temperature resources of the Tarumovskoye geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Alkhasova, D. A.; Ramazanov, A. Sh.; Kasparova, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The promising nature of integrated processing of high-temperature geothermal brines of the Tarumovskoye geothermal field is shown. Thermal energy of a geothermal brine can be converted to the electric power at a binary geothermal power plant (GPP) based on low-boiling working substance. The thermodynamic Rankine cycles are considered which are implemented in the GPP secondary loop at different evaporation temperatures of the working substance―isobutane. Among them, the most efficient cycle from the standpoint of attaining a maximum power is the supercritical one which is close to the so-called triangular cycle with an evaporation pressure of p e = 5.0 MPa. The used low-temperature brine is supplied from the GPP to a chemical plant, where main chemical components (lithium carbonate, burnt magnesia, calcium carbonate, and sodium chloride) are extracted from it according to the developed technology of comprehensive utilization of geothermal brines of chloride-sodium type. The waste water is delivered to the geotechnological complex and other consumers. For producing valuable inorganic materials, the electric power generated at the GPP is used. Owing to this, the total self-sufficiency of production and independence from external conditions is achieved. The advantages of the proposed geotechnological complex are the full utilization of the heat potential and the extraction of main chemical components of multiparameter geothermal resources. In this case, there is no need for reverse pumping, which eliminates the significant capital costs for building injection wells and a pumping station and the operating costs for their service. A characteristic of the modern state of the field and estimated figures of the integrated processing of high-temperature brines of well no. 6 are given, from which it follows that the proposed technology has a high efficiency. The comprehensive development of the field resources will make it possible to improve the economic structure of the

  8. Possibilities for the efficient utilisation of spent geothermal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Barbara; Szczepański, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Waters located at greater depths usually exhibit high mineral content, which necessitates the use of closed systems, i.e. re-injecting them into the formation after recovering the heat. This significantly reduces investment efficiency owing to the need to drill absorption wells and to perform anti-corrosion and anti-clogging procedures. In this paper, possibilities for the efficient utilisation of cooled geothermal waters are considered, particularly with respect to open or mixed geothermal water installations. Where cooled water desalination technologies are used, this allows the water to be demineralised and used to meet local needs (as drinking water and for leisure purposes). The retentate left as a by-product of the process contains valuable ingredients that can be used for balneological and/or leisure purposes. Thus, the technology for desalinating spent geothermal waters with high mineral content allows improved water management on a local scale and makes it possible to minimise the environmental threat resulting from the need to dump these waters into waterways or surface water bodies and/or inject them into the formation. The paper is concerned with Polish geothermal system and provides information about the parameters of Polish geothermal waters.

  9. Cancer mortality and other causes of death in users of geothermal hot water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristbjornsdottir, Adalbjorg; Rafnsson, Vilhjalmur

    2015-01-01

    Residents of geothermal areas have increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast, prostate, and kidney cancers. The aim was to study whether this is also reflected in cancer mortality among the population using geothermal hot water for space heating, washing, and showering. The follow-up was from 1981 to 2009. Personal identifier of those 5-64 years of age was used in record linkage with nationwide death registry. Thus, vital and emigration status was ascertained. The exposed population was defined as inhabitants of communities with district heating generated from geothermal wells since 1972. Reference populations were inhabitants of other areas with different degrees of volcanic/geothermal activity. Hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for age, gender, education, housing, reproductive factors and smoking habits. Among those using geothermal water, the HR for all causes of death was 0.98 (95% CI 0.91-1.05) as compared with cold reference area. The HR for breast cancer was 1.53 (1.04-2.24), prostate cancer 1.74 (1.21-2.52), kidney cancer 1.78 (1.03-3.07), and for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 2.01 (1.05-3.38). HR for influenza was 3.36 (1.32-8.58) and for suicide 1.49 (1.03-2.17). The significant excess mortality risk of breast and prostate cancers, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma confirmed the results of similarly designed studies in Iceland on cancer incidence among populations from high-temperature geothermal areas and users of geothermal hot water. The risk is not confined to cancers with good prognosis, but also concerns fatal cancers. Further studies are needed on the chemical and physical content of the water and the environment emissions in geothermal areas.

  10. Hydrochemical characterization of a mine water geothermal energy resource in NW Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, C; Ordóñez, A; Garcia-Ordiales, E; Álvarez, R; Roqueñi, N; Cienfuegos, P; Peña, A; Burnside, N M

    2017-01-15

    Abandoned and flooded mine networks provide underground reservoirs of mine water that can be used as a renewable geothermal energy source. A complete hydrochemical characterization of mine water is required to optimally design the geothermal installation, understand the hydraulic behavior of the water in the reservoir and prevent undesired effects such as pipe clogging via mineral precipitation. Water pumped from the Barredo-Figaredo mining reservoir (Asturias, NW Spain), which is currently exploited for geothermal use, has been studied and compared to water from a separate, nearby mountain mine and a river that receives mine water discharge and partially infiltrates into the mine workings. Although the hydrochemistry was altered during the flooding process, the deep mine waters are currently near neutral, net alkaline, high metal waters of Na-HCO 3 type. Isotopic values suggest that mine waters are closely related to modern meteoric water, and likely correspond to rapid infiltration. Suspended and dissolved solids, and particularly iron content, of mine water results in some scaling and partial clogging of heat exchangers, but water temperature is stable (22°C) and increases with depth, so, considering the available flow (>100Ls -1 ), the Barredo-Figaredo mining reservoir represents a sustainable, long-term resource for geothermal use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Low-Temperature Geothermal Energy for Desalination in the Western United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, Craig S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Akar, Sertac [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cath, Tzahi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vanneste, Johan [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Geza, Mengistu [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This joint project between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Colorado School of Mines has examined the potential of using low-temperature geothermal resources for desalination. The temperature range in question is not well suited for electricity generation, but can be used for direct heating. Accordingly, the best integration approaches use thermal desalination technologies such as multi-effect distillation (MED) or membrane distillation (MD), rather than electric-driven technologies such as reverse osmosis (RO). The examination of different desalination technologies led to the selection of MD for pairing with geothermal energy. MD operates at near-ambient pressure and temperatures less than 100°C with hydrophobic membranes. The technology is modular like RO, but the equipment costs are lower. The thermal energy demands of MD are higher than MED, but this is offset by an ability to run at lower temperatures and a low capital cost. Consequently, a geothermal-MD system could offer a low capital cost and, if paired with low-cost geothermal energy, a low operating cost. The target product water cost is $1.0 to $1.5 per cubic meter depending on system capacity and the cost of thermal energy.

  12. Geochemical and isotopic evidence on the recharge and circulation of geothermal water in the Tangshan Geothermal System near Nanjing, China: implications for sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lianghua; Pang, Zhonghe; Kong, Yanlong; Guo, Qi; Wang, Yingchun; Xu, Chenghua; Gu, Wen; Zhou, Lingling; Yu, Dandan

    2018-01-01

    Geothermal resources are practical and competitive clean-energy alternatives to fossil fuels, and study on the recharge sources of geothermal water supports its sustainable exploitation. In order to provide evidence on the recharge source of water and circulation dynamics of the Tangshan Geothermal System (TGS) near Nanjing (China), a comprehensive investigation was carried out using multiple chemical and isotopic tracers (δ2H, δ18O, δ34S, 87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, 14C and 3H). The results confirm that a local (rather than regional) recharge source feeds the system from the exposed Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate rocks area on the upper part of Tangshan Mountain. The reservoir temperature up to 87 °C, obtained using empirical as well as theoretical chemical geothermometers, requires a groundwater circulation depth of around 2.5 km. The temperature of the geothermal water is lowered during upwelling as a consequence of mixing with shallow cold water up to a 63% dilution. The corrected 14C age shows that the geothermal water travels at a very slow pace (millennial scale) and has a low circulation rate, allowing sufficient time for the water to become heated in the system. This study has provided key information on the genesis of TGS and the results are instructive to the effective management of the geothermal resources. Further confirmation and even prediction associated with the sustainability of the system could be achieved through continuous monitoring and modeling of the responses of the karstic geothermal reservoir to hot-water mining.

  13. Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-06-01

    There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

  14. Program accomplishments and future prospects for low-temperature geothermal resource assessment in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L.; Ruscetta, C.A. (ed.)

    1982-07-01

    An important component of the State-coupled program has been basic studies in specific regions of New Mexico, including areas adjacent to the cities of Albuquerque, Las Cruces, Socorro, and Truth or Consequences. Considerable geological, hydrological, electrical resistivity, gravity, magnetic, seismic, water analysis, and subsurface temperature data have been compiled and analyzed for these locations. During the four-year research program, a total of 25 tasks have been undertaken. Eleven of these tasks were focused toward collecting and compiling statewide data, six were regional studies covering more than one county, and eight were research projects directed primarily toward data collection near specific cities or known resource areas. Two of these latter studies contributed significantly to the confirmation of the Las Alturas geothermal anomaly east of Las Cruces. A brief summary of the program accomplishments by task is presented. The resource assessment programs in New Mexico have been very successful in (1) delineating low-temperature geothermal resources throughout New Mexico on statewide, regional, and area-specific scales; (2) developing a strong community of in-state geothermal energy research and development professionals and practitioners; and (3) elevating the level of awareness of geothermal energy potential among commerce, industry, and the general public. Future prospects for the state are presented.

  15. Analysis of geothermal temperatures for heat pumps application in Paraná (Brasil)

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Alexandre F.; de Souza Heraldo J. L.; Cantao Mauricio P.; Gaspar Pedro D.

    2016-01-01

    Geothermal heat pumps are broadly used in developed countries but scarcely in Brazil, in part because there is a lack of Brazilian soil temperature data. The aims of this work are: to present soil temperature measurements and to compare geothermal heat pump system performances with conventional air conditioning systems. Geothermal temperature measurement results are shown for ten Paraná State cities, representing different soil and climate conditions. The measurements ...

  16. Methodological approach for a sustainable management of water inflow and geothermal energy in tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Furno

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is quite unusual to consider the exploitation of geothermal resources during at the tunnel design stage. This paper is intended to analyse the nature and the potential of the geothermal resources. These are essentially the hot or cold water inflow and the temperature of the surrounding ground itself. A methodological approach is proposed to face the problem, determine relevant information and estimate the attractiveness of the application. The approach is then applied to the case study of the metro line Dudullu-Bostanci in Istanbul, currently under design, by identifying a possible application of heat exchangers integrated into the tunnel lining and evaluating preliminarily the environmental and economical aspects.

  17. Physicochemical and geochemical characterization of geothermal waters sedimentation tendency at Sijarinska spa and Vranjska spa (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Nebojša Č.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analysis of physicochemical parameters in geothermal waters from the sites in Sijarinska spa (drill hole B-4 and Vranjska spa (drill hole VG-2 in order to investigate their tendency to form deposits in the pipe installation is presented. Drill holes B-4/VG-2 posses utilization capacity of 30/27 L s-1 with water temperatures 75/90 oC. VG-2 water does not show any tendency to (or shows very small sedimentation compared to the B4 water. The behaviour of the geothermal water from the B-4 hole was examined in real condition in Sijarinska spa, by letting it flow through the pipe installation. The results of geochemical analysis of water B-4 show that aragonite is the predominant mineral in the sediment (98 % with lesser amount of calcite, vaterite and anhydrite. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33034

  18. Geothermic analysis of high temperature hydrothermal activities area in Western plateau of Sichuan province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.

    2016-12-01

    There is a high temperature hydrothermal activity area in the western plateau of Sichuan. More than 200 hot springs points have been found in the region, including 11 hot spring water temperature above local boiling point. Most of these distribute along Jinshajjiang fracture, Dege-Xiangcheng fracture, Ganzi-Litang fracture as well as Xianshuihe fracture, and form three high-temperature hydrothermal activity strips in the NW-SE direction. Using gravity, magnetic, seismic and helium isotope data, this paper analyzed the crust-mantle heat flow structure, crustal heat source distribution and water heating system. The results show that the geothermal activity mainly controlled by the "hot" crust. The ratio of crustal heat flow and surface heat flow is higher than 60%. In the high temperature hydrothermal activities area, there is lower S wave velocity zone with VsGeothermal water mainly reserve in the Triassic strata of the containing water good carbonate rocks, and in the intrusive granite which is along the fault zone. The thermal energy of Surface heat thermal activities mainly comes from the high-temperature hot source which is located in the middle and lower crust. Being in the deep crustal fracture, the groundwater infiltrated to the deep crust and absorbed heat, then, quickly got back to the surface and formed high hot springs.

  19. Thermopile probe to measure temperature anomalies in geothermal boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, B.R.; Stephani, E.L.; Todd, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    The standard thermal well logging tools presently employed by oil well logging service companies use a thermistor probe as the temperature measuring device. The thermistor is normally incorporated as one arm of a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The bridge circuit must be staged for limited temperature ranges and is adequate for most well logging operations where only detection of thermal anomalies is of primary concern and the logging speed is not important. The design of a thermopile sensor using conventional thermocouples and a downhole thermally isolated reference junction has greatly improved the temperature logging capability in a deep geothermal wellbore. The much faster response of the thermopile sensor will allow a logging rate of up to 200 ft/min in contrast to the average rate of 50 ft/min using the thermistor probe. The thermopile sensor is a low impedance device whose characteristics are very well known. The development of a high pressure dewar chamber for use in high temperature downhole instrumentation sondes has provided a suitable environment to employ a downhole reference junction permitting the use of thermocouple measurements in the deep geothermal borehole.

  20. Predicting cement distribution in geothermal sandstone reservoirs based on estimates of precipitation temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Whitehouse, Martin; Kristensen, Lars; Hjuler, Morten L.; Mathiesen, Anders; Boyce, Adrian J.; Nielsen, Lars H.

    2016-04-01

    Exploitation of geothermal sandstone reservoirs is challenged by pore-cementing minerals since they reduce the fluid flow through the sandstones. Geothermal exploration aims at finding sandstone bodies located at depths that are adequate for sufficiently warm water to be extracted, but without being too cemented for warm water production. The amount of cement is highly variable in the Danish geothermal reservoirs which mainly comprise the Bunter Sandstone, Skagerrak and Gassum formations. The present study involves bulk and in situ stable isotope analyses of calcite, dolomite, ankerite, siderite and quartz in order to estimate at what depth they were formed and enable prediction of where they can be found. The δ18O values measured in the carbonate minerals and quartz overgrowths are related to depth since they are a result of the temperatures of the pore fluid. Thus the values indicate the precipitation temperatures and they fit the relative diagenetic timing identified by petrographical observations. The sandstones deposited during arid climatic conditions contain calcite and dolomite cement that formed during early diagenesis. These carbonate minerals precipitated as a response to different processes, and precipitation of macro-quartz took over at deeper burial. Siderite was the first carbonate mineral that formed in the sandstones that were deposited in a humid climate. Calcite began precipitating at increased burial depth and ankerite formed during deep burial and replaced some of the other phases. Ankerite and quartz formed in the same temperature interval so constrains on the isotopic composition of the pore fluid can be achieved. Differences in δ13C values exist between the sandstones that were deposited in arid versus humid environments, which suggest that different kinds of processes were active. The estimated precipitation temperatures of the different cement types are used to predict which of them are present in geothermal sandstone reservoirs in

  1. Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature Geothermal Resources of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin F.; Reed, Marshall J.; Mariner, Robert H.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Galanis, S. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of our Nation's geothermal resources. Geothermal power plants are currently operating in six states: Alaska, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. The assessment indicates that the electric power generation potential from identified geothermal systems is 9,057 Megawatts-electric (MWe), distributed over 13 states. The mean estimated power production potential from undiscovered geothermal resources is 30,033 MWe. Additionally, another estimated 517,800 MWe could be generated through implementation of technology for creating geothermal reservoirs in regions characterized by high temperature, but low permeability, rock formations.

  2. The influence of heat sink temperature on the seasonal efficiency of shallow geothermal heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pełka, Grzegorz; Luboń, Wojciech; Sowiżdżał, Anna; Malik, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    Geothermal heat pumps, also known as ground source heat pumps (GSHP), are the most efficient heating and cooling technology utilized nowadays. In the AGH-UST Educational and Research Laboratory of Renewable Energy Sources and Energy Saving in Miękinia, shallow geothermal heat is utilized for heating. In the article, the seasonal efficiency of two geothermal heat pump systems are described during the 2014/2015 heating season, defined as the period between 1st October 2014 and 30th April 2015. The first system has 10.9 kW heating capacity (according to European Standard EN 14511 B0W35) and extracts heat from three vertical geothermal loops at a depth of 80m each. During the heating season, tests warmed up the buffer to 40°C. The second system has a 17.03 kW heating capacity and extracts heat from three vertical geothermal loops at a depth of 100 m each, and the temperature of the buffer was 50°C. During the entire heating season, the water temperatures of the buffers was constant. Seasonal performance factors were calculated, defined as the quotient of heat delivered by a heat pump to the system and the sum of electricity consumed by the compressor, source pump, sink pump and controller of heat pumps. The measurements and calculations give the following results: - The first system was supplied with 13 857 kWh/a of heat and consumed 3 388 kWh/a electricity. The SPF was 4.09 and the average temperature of outlet water from heat pump was 40.8°C, and the average temperature of brine flows into the evaporator was 3.7 °C; - The second system was supplied with 12 545 kWh/a of heat and consumed 3 874 kWh/a electricity. The SPF was 3.24 and the average temperature of outlet water from heat pump was 51.6°C, and the average temperature of brine flows into the evaporator was 5.3°C. To summarize, the data shown above presents the real SPF of the two systems. It will be significant in helping to predict the SPF of objects which will be equipped with ground source heat pumps.

  3. Recovery Act: High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, Matthew [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States); Fabian, Paul [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One of the key renewable resources currently being advanced is geothermal energy. To tap into the large potential offered by generating power from the heat of the earth, and for geothermal energy to be more widely used, it will be necessary to drill deeper wells to reach the hot, dry rock located up to 10 km beneath the earth’s surface. In this instance, water will be introduced into the well to create a geothermal reservoir. A geothermal well produced in this manner is referred to as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS). EGS reservoirs are typically at depths of 3 to 10 km, and the temperatures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the application of existing downhole technologies. These high temperatures are especially problematic for electronic systems such as downhole data-logging tools, which are used to map and characterize the fractures and high-permeability regions in underground formations. Information provided by these tools is assessed so that underground formations capable of providing geothermal energy can be identified, and the subsequent drilling operations can be accurately directed to those locations. The mapping of geothermal resources involves the design and fabrication of sensor packages, including the electronic control modules, to quantify downhole conditions (300°C temperature, high pressure, seismic activity, etc.). Because of the extreme depths at which these measurements are performed, it is most desirable to perform the sensor signal processing downhole and then transmit the information to the surface. This approach necessitates the use of high-temperature electronics that can operate in the downhole environment. Downhole signal processing in EGS wells will require the development and demonstration of circuit boards that can withstand the elevated temperatures found at these

  4. Low-temperature Stirling Engine for Geothermal Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, Greg [Cool Energy, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Weaver, Samuel P. [Cool Energy, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Up to 2700 terawatt-hours per year of geothermal electricity generation capacity has been shown to be available within North America, typically with wells drilled into geologically active regions of the earth's crust where this energy is concentrated (Huttrer, 2001). Of this potential, about half is considered to have temperatures high enough for conventional (steam-based) power production, while the other half requires unconventional power conversion approaches, such as organic Rankine cycle systems or Stirling engines. If captured and converted effectively, geothermal power generation could replace up to 100GW of fossil fuel electric power generation, leading to a significant reduction of US power sector emissions. In addition, with the rapid growth of hydro-fracking in oil and gas production, there are smaller-scale distributed power generation opportunities in heated liquids that are co-produced with the main products. Since 2006, Cool Energy, Inc. (CEI) has designed, fabricated and tested four generations of low-temperature (100°C to 300°C) Stirling engine power conversion equipment. The electric power output of these engines has been demonstrated at over 2kWe and over 16% thermal conversion efficiency for an input temperature of 215°C and a rejection temperature of 15°C. Initial pilot units have been shipped to development partners for further testing and validation, and significantly larger engines (20+ kWe) have been shown to be feasible and conceptually designed. Originally intended for waste heat recovery (WHR) applications, these engines are easily adaptable to geothermal heat sources, as the heat supply temperatures are similar. Both the current and the 20+ kWe designs use novel approaches of self-lubricating, low-wear-rate bearing surfaces, non-metallic regenerators, and high-effectiveness heat exchangers. By extending CEI's current 3 kWe SolarHeart® Engine into the tens of kWe range, many additional applications are possible, as one

  5. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabian, Paul [Composite Technology Development, Inc, Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One key renewable resource being advanced is geothermal energy which offers an environmentally benign, reliable source of energy for the nation. To utilize this resource, water will be introduced into wells 3 to 10 km deep to create a geothermal reservoir. This approach is known as an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). The high temperatures and pressures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the development of this energy source. For example, reliable zonal isolation for high-temperature applications at high differential pressures is needed to conduct mini-fracs and other stress state diagnostics. Zonal isolation is essential for many EGS reservoir development activities. To date, the capability has not been sufficiently demonstrated to isolate sections of the wellbore to: 1) enable stimulation; and 2) seal off unwanted flow regions in unknown EGS completion schemes and high-temperature (>200°C) environments. In addition, packers and other zonal isolation tools are required to eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to producers, and to target individual fractures or fracture networks for testing and validating reservoir models. General-purpose open-hole packers do not exist for geothermal environments, with the primary barrier being the poor stability of elastomeric seals at high temperature above 175°C. Experimental packer systems have been developed for geothermal environments but they currently only operate at low pressure, they are not retrievable, and they are not commercially available. The development of the high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) zonal isolation device would provide the geothermal community with the capability to conduct mini-fracs, eliminate fluid loss, to help identify and mitigate short circuiting of flow from injectors to

  6. Feasibility of penaeid culture in geothermal brackish ground water in southwestern Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNelis, B.

    1986-11-11

    The primary objectives of this research was to determine growth, survival, and feed conversion ratios of Penaeus vannamei grown inland in geothermally warmed brackish ground water. P. vannamei is an important species of marine shrimp (Family: Penaeidae) which is cultured commercially in South America, Central America, and Hawaii. The single source of ground water used for shrimp growout was assayed for mineral content, and its composition was compared to that of other Arizona sources of geothermal ground water and seawater. The culture water was monitored regularly for temperature, oxygen, and ammonia concentrations, and pH. The results of two independent shrimp-growth trials beginning at PL-5 (five-day old post larvae) were used to determine the feasibility of this novel method of cultivating a tropical marine species in an inland temperate location.

  7. Chemical temperature indicators for geothermal applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaven, J.V. Jr.; Bak, C.S.; Jones, V.V.; Grow, B.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this program was the development of a simple, reliable method for temperaure measurement in geotherml wells duing drilling operations. The method of choice involves the use of a series of chemical temperature indicator materials, with sharply defined melting temperatures over the temperature range 80/sup 0/C less than or equal to T less than or equal to 350/sup 0/C. The most promising candidate temperature indicator materials were selected for laboratory experimentation. Differential Scanning Calorimeter measurements were used to determine normal melting point, sharpness of melting point and heat of fusion of the candidate materials. As a result of these experiments, 42 alloys and 9 organic compounds were demonstrated to be acceptable temperature indicators. Since 7 organics had melting temperatures close to corresponding alloys, the useful series of temperature indicators is comprised of 44 materials. Experiments were carried out to develop a configuraion for the indicators compatible with direct addition to drilling muds. Preliminary experimentation was performed on stress resistance and hydrodynamic characteristics of the indicator configuration. The temperature indicators can be made in production quantities at an average of $1.00/each or less. Recommendations are made for testing the indicator configurations at elevated pressures in drilling fluid and for carrying out full scale field testing of the indicators under a variety of geothermal conditions.

  8. Low-temperature geothermal assessment of the Santa Clara and Virgin River Valleys, Washington County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budding, K.E.; Sommer, S.N.

    1986-01-01

    Exploration techniques included the following: (1) a temperature survey of springs, (2) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of water samples collected from selected springs and wells, (3) chemical analyses and calculated geothermometer temperatures of spring and well water samples in the literature, (4) thermal gradients measured in accessible wells, and (5) geology. The highest water temperature recorded in the St. George basin is 42/sup 0/C at Pah Tempe Hot Springs. Additional spring temperatures higher than 20/sup 0/C are at Veyo Hot Spring, Washington hot pot, and Green Spring. The warmest well water in the study area is 40/sup 0/C in Middleton Wash. Additional warm well water (higher than 24.5/sup 0/C) is present north of St. George, north of Washington, southeast of St. George, and in Dameron Valley. The majority of the Na-K-Ca calculated reservoir temperatures range between 30/sup 0/ and 50/sup 0/C. Anomalous geothermometer temperatures were calculated for water from Pah Tempe and a number of locations in St. George and vicinity. In addition to the known thermal areas of Pah Tempe and Veyo Hot Spring, an area north of Washington and St. George is delineated in this study to have possible low-temperature geothermal potential.

  9. Geothermal resources of the Texas Gulf Coast: environmental concerns arising from the production and disposal of geothermal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitler, C.W.; Gustavson, T.C.; Vanston, J.H.; Elmer, D.B.; Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.; Letlow, K.; Lopreato, S.C.; Meriwether, M.; Ramsey, P.; Rogers, K.E.; Williamson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to foresee areas of general environmental concern that will arise during exploration for and development of geopressured-geothermal resources on the Texas Gulf Coast. Disposal of hot saline water and potential subsidence and faulting of the land surface that may result from geothermal-water production are major concerns. The geology of the area is briefly discussed followed by detailed discussions on geothermal fluid disposal; potential subsidence and fault activation; and natural hazards of the geothermal fairways. Geothermal resource production facilities on the Gulf coast of Texas could be subject to hurricane or storm-induced flooding, winds, coastal erosion, or expansive soils. None of these hazards is generated by geothermal resource production, but each has potential for damaging geothermal production and disposal facilities. Production of fluids from geo-pressured geothermal reservoirs will result in reservoir pressure declines and subsequently in compaction of sediments within and adjacent to the reservoir. The magnitudes of environmental impact of subsidence and fault activation varies with current land use; the greatest impact would occur in urban areas, whereas relatively minor impacts occur in rural, undeveloped agricultural areas. (MCW)

  10. Exergy analysis of the performance of low-temperature district heating system with geothermal heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekret, Robert; Nitkiewicz, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Exergy analysis of low temperature geothermal heat plant with compressor and absorption heat pump was carried out. In these two concepts heat pumps are using geothermal water at 19.5 oC with spontaneous outflow 24 m3/h as a heat source. The research compares exergy efficiency and exergy destruction of considered systems and its components as well. For the purpose of analysis, the heating system was divided into five components: geothermal heat exchanger, heat pump, heat distribution, heat exchanger and electricity production and transportation. For considered systems the primary exergy consumption from renewable and non-renewable sources was estimated. The analysis was carried out for heat network temperature at 50/40 oC, and the quality regulation was assumed. The results of exergy analysis of the system with electrical and absorption heat pump show that exergy destruction during the whole heating season is lower for the system with electrical heat pump. The exergy efficiencies of total system are 12.8% and 11.2% for the system with electrical heat pump and absorption heat pump, respectively.

  11. Environmentally Friendly Economical Sequestration of Rare Earth Metals from Geothermal Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, Dean P. [Tusaar Corp., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The purpose of this work was to complete a proof of concept study to apply and validate a novel method developed by Tusaar for the capture and recovery of rare earth elements (known as REEs) and other critical and valuable elements from geothermal waters produced from deep within the earth. Geothermal water provides heat for power production at many geothermal power plants in the western United States. The target elements, the REEs, are vital to modern day electronics, batteries, motors, automobiles and many other consumer favorites and necessities. Currently there are no domestic sources of REEs while domestic and international demand for the products they are used in continues to rise. Many of the REEs are considered “strategically” important. A secure supply of REEs in the USA would benefit consumers and the country at large. A new method to recover these REEs from geothermal waters used at existing geothermal power plants around the country is a high priority and would benefit consumers and the USA. The result of this project was the successful development and demonstration of an integrated process for removal and recovery of the REEs from synthetic geothermal brines on a small laboratory scale. The work included preparation of model geothermal brines to test, selection of the most effective proprietary sorbent media to capture the REEs and testing of the media under a variety of potential operating conditions. Geothermal brines are generally very high in salt content and contain a wide range of elements and anions associated with the rock layers from which they are produced. Processing the geothermal water is difficult because it is corrosive and the dissolved minerals in the water precipitate easily once the temperature and pressure change. No commercial technologies have been shown to be effective or robust enough under these geothermal brine conditions to be commercially viable for removal of REEs. Technologies including ion exchange, traditional

  12. Geothermal and Hydrogeologic Controls on Regional Groundwater Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E. R.; Ingebritsen, S.; Williams, C. F.; Manga, M.

    2015-12-01

    A 1-D analytic solution for combined heat and groundwater flow through an aquifer system accounts for geothermal heating at the base of the aquifer, recharge of cooler water along the groundwater flow path, advection of heat within the aquifer, conduction of heat through the vadose zone, and viscous heating. The 1-D solution, which uses a freely available Python script, can be applied to moderately complex geometries by solving the heat flow equation for piece-wise linear or constant properties and boundary conditions. Analysis of the Eastern Snake River Plain regional aquifer system demonstrates that viscous heating, normally neglected by numerical solutions, is variably important along the groundwater flow path, and that heat conduction to the land surface and cool recharge are the primary thermal perturbations causing deviation from a steady, slow heating along the flow path. Because viscous heating is sometimes important, a general anisotropic form of the viscous heat-generation term has been derived and can be included in more complex 2-D and 3-D numerical solvers of the coupled heat and groundwater flow equations. The 1-D solution allows quick and easy determination of whether this term needs to be included. The rate at which thermal perturbations equilibrate with distance is controlled by the Peclet Number (the ratio of advective to conductive heat transport), which can be used to estimate the distance over which thermal perturbations (e.g., cool recharge or local geothermal hotspots) will be detectable.

  13. Geothermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzella A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology, spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth’s crust.

  14. Geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, A.

    2017-07-01

    Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. Geothermal energy is the thermal energy stored in the underground, including any contained fluid, which is available for extraction and conversion into energy products. Electricity generation, which nowadays produces 73.7 TWh (12.7 GW of capacity) worldwide, usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100 °C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology), spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Produced geothermal heat in the world accounts to 164.6 TWh, with a capacity of 70.9 GW. Geothermal technology, which has focused for decades on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth's crust.

  15. Direct uses of hot water (geothermal) in dairying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmettler, E.R.; Rose, W.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Digital computer simulation was used to investigate the peak, steady energy utilization of a geothermal energy-supported dairy. A digital computer program was also written to assess the lifetime economics of the dairy operation. A dynamic simulation program was written to design water storage tanks under diurnal transient loading. The geothermal site specified is the artesian spring named Hobo Wells near Susanville, California. The dairy configuration studies are unique, but consist of conventional processing equipment. In the dairy, cattle waste would be used to generate methane and carbon dioxide by anaerobic digestion. Some carbon dioxide would be removed from the gas stream with a pressurized water scrubber to raise the heating value. The product gas would be combusted in a spark ignition engine connected to an electric generator. The electrical power produced would be used for operation of fans, pumps, lights and other equipment in the dairy. An absorption chiller using a geothermal water driven generator would provide milk chilling. Space heating would be done with forced air hot water unit heaters.

  16. Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

  17. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

    1981-08-01

    Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

  18. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution in a confined heterogeneous geothermal reservoir due to injection-production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Tan, Lippong; Date, Abhijit; Mohan Kumar, M.S.

    The present study deals with the modeling of transient temperature distribution in a heterogeneous geothermal reservoir in response to the injection-production process. The heterogeneous geothermal aquifer considered here is a confined aquifer with homogeneous layers of finite length and overlain

  19. Mapping temperature and radiant geothermal heat flux anomalies in the Yellowstone geothermal system using ASTER thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to use satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to measure, map, and monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to help meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specifically, the goals were to: 1) address the challenges of remotely characterizing the spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in Yellowstone by using nighttime TIR data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and 2) estimate the temperature, geothermal radiant emittance, and radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone’s thermal areas (both Park wide and for individual thermal areas). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) acquired at night during January and February, 2010, were used to estimate surface temperature, radiant emittance, and radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone’s thermal features, produce thermal anomaly maps, and update field-based maps of thermal areas. A background subtraction technique was used to isolate the geothermal component of TIR radiance from thermal radiance due to insolation. A lower limit for the Yellowstone’s total radiant GHF was established at ~2.0 GW, which is ~30-45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical (Cl-flux) methods. Additionally, about 5 km2 was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. This work provides a framework for future satellite-based thermal monitoring at Yellowstone as well as exploration of other volcanic / geothermal systems on a global scale.

  20. Geothermal water and gas: collected methods for sampling and analysis. Comment issue. [Compilation of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J.G.; Serne, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Woodruff, E.M.

    1976-08-01

    A collection of methods for sampling and analysis of geothermal fluids and gases is presented. Compilations of analytic options for constituents in water and gases are given. Also, a survey of published methods of laboratory water analysis is included. It is stated that no recommendation of the applicability of the methods to geothermal brines should be assumed since the intent of the table is to encourage and solicit comments and discussion leading to recommended analytical procedures for geothermal waters and research. (WHK)

  1. State-coupled low temperature geothermal resource assessment program, fiscal year 1982. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, Larry

    1983-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of low-temperature geothermal energy resource assessment efforts in New Mexico during the period from June 15, 1981 through September 30, 1983, under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contract DE-AS07-78ID01717). The report is divided into four chapters which correspond to the tasks delineated in the contract. Chapter 5 is a brief summary of the tasks performed under this contract during the period October 1, 1978, through June 30, 1983. This work extends the knowledge of low-temperature geothermal reservoirs with the potential for direct heating applications in New Mexico. The research effort focused on compiling basic geothermal data throughout selected areas in New Mexico in a format suitable for direct transfer to the US Geological Survey for inclusion in the GEOTHERM data file and to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for use with New Mexico geothermal resources maps.

  2. Arsenic speciation of geothermal waters in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Gillian; Kim, Nick; Ward, Neil I

    2012-12-01

    Total arsenic and four arsenic species; arsenite (iAs(III)), arsenate (iAs(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and monomethylarsonic acid (MA(V)), are reported in 28 geothermal features from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and Waikato region of New Zealand. Samples were collected for arsenic speciation analysis via a solid phase extraction (SPE) kit allowing the separation, stabilisation and pre-concentration of the species at the time of sample collection in the field. This is the first research to present data for arsenic species collected by this technique in geothermal waters from New Zealand. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ranged from 0.008 to 9.08 mg l⁻¹ As. The highest levels were discovered in three features in Tokaanu (Taumatapuhipuhi, Takarea #5 and #6), with arsenic concentrations of 8.59, 8.70 and 9.08 mg l⁻¹ As, respectively. Inorganic arsenic species were predominant in the geothermal waters, with arsenite contributing to more than 70% of the total arsenic in the majority of samples. Organic species were also determined in all samples, indicating the presence of microbial activity. A potential risk to human health was highlighted due to the high levels of arsenic, mainly as arsenite, in geothermal features linked to bathing pools. Further research is needed into dermal absorption as a potential route of arsenic exposure whilst bathing in these hot pools, as it may contribute to an occurrence of acute arsenic-related health problems.

  3. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  4. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  5. Identified Moderate and High Temperature Geothermal Systems of the Western United States including AK and HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This layer contains the locations of identified moderate (90 - 150° C) and high (> 150° C) temperature geothermal systems and associated reservoir volumes,...

  6. Evaluating geothermal and hydrogeologic controls on regional groundwater temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick R.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-02-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D) analytic solution is developed for heat transport through an aquifer system where the vertical temperature profile in the aquifer is nearly uniform. The general anisotropic form of the viscous heat generation term is developed for use in groundwater flow simulations. The 1-D solution is extended to more complex geometries by solving the equation for piece-wise linear or uniform properties and boundary conditions. A moderately complex example, the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), is analyzed to demonstrate the use of the analytic solution for identifying important physical processes. For example, it is shown that viscous heating is variably important and that heat conduction to the land surface is a primary control on the distribution of aquifer and spring temperatures. Use of published values for all aquifer and thermal properties results in a reasonable match between simulated and measured groundwater temperatures over most of the 300 km length of the ESRP, except for geothermal heat flow into the base of the aquifer within 20 km of the Yellowstone hotspot. Previous basal heat flow measurements (˜110 mW/m2) made beneath the ESRP aquifer were collected at distances of >50 km from the Yellowstone Plateau, but a higher basal heat flow of 150 mW/m2 is required to match groundwater temperatures near the Plateau. The ESRP example demonstrates how the new tool can be used during preliminary analysis of a groundwater system, allowing efficient identification of the important physical processes that must be represented during more-complex 2-D and 3-D simulations of combined groundwater and heat flow.

  7. Evaluating geothermal and hydrogeologic controls on regional groundwater temperature distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Erick R.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1-D) analytic solution is developed for heat transport through an aquifer system where the vertical temperature profile in the aquifer is nearly uniform. The general anisotropic form of the viscous heat generation term is developed for use in groundwater flow simulations. The 1-D solution is extended to more complex geometries by solving the equation for piece-wise linear or uniform properties and boundary conditions. A moderately complex example, the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), is analyzed to demonstrate the use of the analytic solution for identifying important physical processes. For example, it is shown that viscous heating is variably important and that heat conduction to the land surface is a primary control on the distribution of aquifer and spring temperatures. Use of published values for all aquifer and thermal properties results in a reasonable match between simulated and measured groundwater temperatures over most of the 300 km length of the ESRP, except for geothermal heat flow into the base of the aquifer within 20 km of the Yellowstone hotspot. Previous basal heat flow measurements (∼110 mW/m2) made beneath the ESRP aquifer were collected at distances of >50 km from the Yellowstone Plateau, but a higher basal heat flow of 150 mW/m2 is required to match groundwater temperatures near the Plateau. The ESRP example demonstrates how the new tool can be used during preliminary analysis of a groundwater system, allowing efficient identification of the important physical processes that must be represented during more-complex 2-D and 3-D simulations of combined groundwater and heat flow.

  8. Prokaryotic phylogenetic diversity of Hungarian deep subsurface geothermal well waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Andrea; Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Janurik, Endre; Kosáros, Tünde; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    Geothermal wells characterized by thermal waters warmer than 30°C can be found in more than 65% of the area of Hungary. The examined thermal wells located nearby Szarvas are used for heating industrial and agricultural facilities because of their relatively high hydrocarbon content. The aim of this study was to reveal the prokaryotic community structure of the water of SZR18, K87 and SZR21 geothermal wells using molecular cloning methods and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Water samples from the outflow pipes were collected in 2012 and 2013. The phylogenetic distribution of archaeal molecular clones was very similar in each sample, the most abundant groups belonged to the genera Methanosaeta, Methanothermobacter and Thermofilum. In contrast, the distribution of bacterial molecular clones was very diverse. Many of them showed the closest sequence similarities to uncultured clone sequences from similar thermal environments. From the water of the SZR18 well, phylotypes closely related to genera Fictibacillus and Alicyclobacillus (Firmicutes) were only revealed, while the bacterial diversity of the K87 well water was much higher. Here, the members of the phyla Thermodesulfobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospira, Chlorobi, OP1 and OPB7 were also detected besides Firmicutes.

  9. Water Use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS): Geology of U.S. Stimulation Projects, Water Costs, and Alternative Water Source Policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harto, C. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schroeder, J. N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Horner, R. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Patton, T. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Durham, L. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Murphy, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Clark, C. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), geothermal energy generation in the United States is projected to more than triple by 2040 (EIA 2013). This addition, which translates to more than 5 GW of generation capacity, is anticipated because of technological advances and an increase in available sources through the continued development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs) and low-temperature resources (EIA 2013). Studies have shown that air emissions, water consumption, and land use for geothermal electricity generation have less of an impact than traditional fossil fuel–based electricity generation; however, the long-term sustainability of geothermal power plants can be affected by insufficient replacement of aboveground or belowground operational fluid losses resulting from normal operations (Schroeder et al. 2014). Thus, access to water is therefore critical for increased deployment of EGS technologies and, therefore, growth of the geothermal sector. This paper examines water issues relating to EGS development from a variety of perspectives. It starts by exploring the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects. It then examines the relative costs of different potential traditional and alternative water sources for EGS. Finally it summarizes specific state policies relevant to the use of alternative water sources for EGS, and finally explores the relationship between EGS site geology, stimulation protocols, and below ground water loss, which is one of the largest drivers of water consumption for EGS projects.

  10. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES UNDER COMPREHENSIVE UTILIZATION OF GEOTHERMAL SALINE WATER RESOURCES IN THE NORTHERN DAGESTAN

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sh. Ramazanov; M. A. Kasparova; I. V. Saraeva; A. B. Alkhasov; O. M. Ramazanov; M. I. Akhmedov

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study is to develop technologies for processing geothermal brine produced with the extraction of oil as well as to solve environmental problems in the region.Methods. In order to determine the chemical composition and radioactivity of the geothermal water and solid samples, we used atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the technology was made on the basis of experimental studies.Results. In the geothermal water, eight radionuclides we...

  11. Geothermal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzella A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal technologies use renewable energy resources to generate electricity and direct use of heat while producing very low levels of greenhouse-gas (GHG emissions. Geothermal energy is stored in rocks and in fluids circulating in the underground. Electricity generation usually requires geothermal resources temperatures of over 100°C. For heating, geothermal resources spanning a wider range of temperatures can be used in applications such as space and district heating (and cooling, with proper technology, spa and swimming pool heating, greenhouse and soil heating, aquaculture pond heating, industrial process heating and snow melting. Geothermal technology, which has focused so far on extracting naturally heated steam or hot water from natural hydrothermal reservoirs, is developing to more advanced techniques to exploit the heat also where underground fluids are scarce and to use the Earth as a potential energy battery, by storing heat. The success of the research will enable energy recovery and utilization from a much larger fraction of the accessible thermal energy in the Earth’s crust.

  12. State-coupled low-temperature geothermal-resource assessment program, Fiscal Year 1979. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.; Trentman, N. (eds.)

    1980-10-01

    The results of low-temperature geothermal energy resource assessment efforts in New Mexico during the period from 1 October 1978 to 30 June 1980 are summarized. The results of the efforts to extend the inventory of geothermal energy resources in New Mexico to low-temperature geothermal reservoirs with the potential for direct heating applications are given. These efforts focused on compiling basic geothermal data and new hydrology and temperature gradient data throughout New Mexico in a format suitable for direct transfer to the US Geological Survey and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for inclusion in the GEOTHERM data file and for preparation of New Mexico low-temperature geothermal resources maps. The results of geothermal reservoir confirmation studies are presented. (MHR)

  13. Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979 to 1980 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for reservoir assessment and confirmation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

    1980-11-10

    Statewide assessment studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM File for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Site specific assessment studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of High Temperature Geothermal Energy Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Mathilde; Blanc, Isabelle; Marquand, Aline; Beylot, Antoine; Bezelgues-Courtade, Sophie; Traineau, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    International audience; European and French regulations state that 50% of the energy mix in the French Caribbean should be sourced from renewable energies by 2020. Because of the volcanic conditions of the French Caribbean islands, geothermal energy would seem to be a very favorable solution to reach this ambitious objective, as, unlike other renewable sources, it is continuous and weather independent. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), geothermal energy source...

  15. Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in Paso Robles, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campion, L.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Youngs, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    Ninety-eight geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted, and a geologic map and cross sections were compiled. Detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The geological and geophysical work delineated the basement highs and trough-like depressions that can exercise control on the occurrence of the thermal waters. The Rinconada fault was also evident. Cross sections drawn from oil well logs show the sediments conforming against these basement highs and filling the depressions. It is along the locations where the sediments meet the basement highs that three natural warm springs in the area occur. Deep circulation of meteoric waters along faults seems to be a reasonable source for the warm water. The Santa Margarita, Pancho Rico, and Paso Robles Formations would be the first permeable zones that abut the faults through which water would enter. Temperatures and interpretation of well logs indicate the warmest aquifer at the base of the Paso Robles Formation. Warm water may be entering higher up in the section, but mixing with water from cooler zones seems to be evident. Geothermometry indicates reservoir temperatures could be as high as 91/sup 0/C (196/sup 0/F).

  16. Chemical composition of the thermomineral waters of Josanicka Banja spa as an origin indicator, balneological valorization and geothermal potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenić Dejan R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the groundwater is directly dependent on the geological structure, hydrogeological and hydrochemical characteristics and as such it represents an output result of all the factors and processes which take place in the environment within which they were formed. The chemical composition of thermomineral waters often represents a crucial factor in determining the origin, balneological valorization and geothermal potential of the resources. This work presents the analysis of origin, belneological valorization and geothermal potential of Josanicka Banja spa, on the basis of the results gained through making the analyisis of chemical contents of the thermomineral waters which occur in the area. The ratio of concentrations of specific chemical components in the thermomineral waters of Josanicka Banja has served as the basic tool for ascertaining the origin of these waters. On the basis of the analysis of the main anion-cation and gas compositions as well as the contents of specific micro-components, a balneological valorization of these resources has been carried out. Apart from that this work also presents the calculation of the expected temperatures in the primary geothermal reservoir, which was carried out on the basis of the results of chemical analysis of thermomineral waters that occur in the area. Geothermal potential of about 4 MWt and significant contents of balneologically active components of the chemical composition of these waters, open up a possibility for their multi-purpose use, which is also presented in the work. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 33053

  17. Energy and Exergy Analyses of a New Combined Cycle for Producing Electricity and Desalinated Water Using Geothermal Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Akbari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A new combined cogeneration system for producing electrical power and pure water is proposed and analyzed from the viewpoints of thermodynamics and economics. The system uses geothermal energy as a heat source and consists of a Kalina cycle, a LiBr/H2O heat transformer and a water purification system. A parametric study is carried out in order to investigate the effects on system performance of the turbine inlet pressure and the evaporator exit temperature. For the proposed system, the first and second law efficiencies are found to be in the ranges of 16%–18.2% and 61.9%–69.1%, respectively. For a geothermal water stream with a mass flow rate of 89 kg/s and a temperature of 124 °C, the maximum production rate for pure water is found to be 0.367 kg/s.

  18. Hydrologic Windows and the Formation of Low-Temperature Geothermal Anomalies along the Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, J.; Person, M. A.; Kelley, S.; Timmons, S.; Owens, L.; Witcher, J. C.; Phillips, F. M.; Gable, C. W.; Coblentz, D. D.; Campbell, A.

    2013-12-01

    Within the Rio Grande Rift in New Mexico, gaps in Mesozoic and Tertiary confining units are common geologic features. They are created as a result of fault block rotation, erosion, lithological variations and emplacement of magmatic intrusions. These hydrologic windows were first proposed by Witcher (1988, Geothermal resources of southwestern New Mexico and southeastern Arizona: New Mexico Geological Society 39th Field Conference Guidebook, p. 191-197) as a mechanism to permit relatively hot geothermal fluids to discharge at the surface within the Rio Grande Rift. To explore the role of hydrologic windows in these occurrences, we have developed two-dimensional and three-dimensional hydrothermal models of both the Socorro and the Truth or Consequences geothermal resource areas. These finite-element models simulate groundwater flow, heat transfer, solute transport, and residence times. The 2D cross-sectional models help establish the depth of geothermal fluid circulation and crystalline-basement permeability structure required to account for hot-spring temperature conditions near the surface. The three-dimensional models help to assess the effects of water-table configuration and east-west oriented accommodation zones on shallow heat-flow patterns. We utilized carbon-14 groundwater age dating, salinity, and silica concentrations collected from wells and warm springs to calibrate these models. Apparent carbon-14 ages of groundwater samples collected from the 300-meter deep Woods Tunnel geothermal slim hole near Socorro and a 15-meter deep alluvial well from the Riverbend Spa in Truth or Consequences were 20,000 and 6,000 years old, respectively. Maximum geothermal temperatures based on silica concentrations at these two sites are estimated to range from 60 to 87 degrees Celsius. In order to reproduce observed temperature anomalies and groundwater residence times, groundwater circulation must have been within the crystalline basement, two to six kilometers beneath

  19. Preliminary study of the importance of hydrothermal reactions on the temperature history of a hot, dry rock geothermal reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.R.

    1975-07-01

    The conditions under which the heat associated with hydrothermal reactions may be recovered from a dry rock geothermal reservoir were assessed. A theoretical computer model, based upon the finite element method, of a two-dimensional fracture in a hot, dry rock geothermal reservoir was developed and tested. Simulated water circulation through the fracture at constant velocity extracted heat from the wall rock via conduction as well as from chemical processes. Water temperature was assumed equal to the temperature of the wall rock boundary: thus, the combined processes of water circulation and heat transport were simply described by the two-dimensional heat diffusion equation with a time dependent water circulation boundary. The accuracy of the basic finite element approximation was tested by comparing numerical solutions to known analytical solutions for related mathematical models. Hydrothermal reactions occurring between water and a granitic source rock were subdivided into two categories; dissolving reactions and alteration reactions. It was found that the quartz dissolving reaction had little or no direct effect on reservoir temperatures for any combination of flow and fracture parameters. It was shown that hydrothermal alteration reactions could contribute significant chemical energy to a fractured system under conditions of small flow rate and large alteration velocities. Detailed studies of the time dependence of rock and water temperatures with and without alteration were determined.

  20. Community structure and function of high-temperature chlorophototrophic microbial mats inhabiting diverse geothermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klatt, Christian G.; Inskeep, William P.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP) were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across...... the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average 53Mbp/site) were...

  1. South Africa's geothermal energy hotspots inferred from subsurface temperature and geology

    OpenAIRE

    Taufeeq Dhansay; Chiedza Musekiwa; Thakane Ntholi; Luc Chevallier; Doug I.Cole; de Wit, Maarten J.

    2017-01-01

    South Africa intends to mitigate its carbon emissions by developing renewable energy from solar, wind and hydro, and investigating alternative energy sources such as natural gas and nuclear. Low-enthalpy geothermal energy is becoming increasingly popular around the world, largely as a result of technological advances that have enabled energy to be harnessed from relatively low temperature sources. However, geothermal energy does not form part of South Africa’s future renewable energy scenario...

  2. Sustainable energy development and water supply security in Kamojang Geothermal Field: The Energy-Water Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofyan, Y.; Nishijima, J.; Fujimitsu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Kamojang Geothermal Field (KGF) is a typical vapor dominated hydrothermal system in West Java, Indonesia. This geothermal field is the oldest exploited geothermal field in Indonesia. From 1983 to 2005, more than 160 million tons of steam have been exploited from the KGF and more than 30 million tons of water were injected into the reservoir system. The injected water come from condensed water, local river and ground water. Sustainable production in the geothermal energy development is the ability of the production system applied to sustain the stable production level over long times and to manage the mass balance between production, injection and natural recharge in the geothermal reservoir during exploitation. Mass balance in the reservoir system can be monitored by using time lapse gravity monitoring. Mass variation of hydrodynamic in the reservoir of KGF from 1999 to 2005 is about -3.34 Mt/year while is about -3.78 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Another period between 2009 and 2010, mass variation decreased about -8.24 Mt. According to the history of production and injection, natural recharge to the KGF's reservoir is estimated at about 2.77 Mt/year from 1999 to 2005 and 2.75 Mt/year from 1999 to 2008. Between 2009 and 2010, KGF has a bigger mass deficiency rate throughout 200 MWe maintain production. Large amount of fresh water is needed for sustainable geothermal energy production, while the domestic water supply need is also increased. Natural recharge, about 50% of injected water, cooling system, drilling and other production activities in KGF spend large amounts of fresh water. Water consumption for local people around KGF is about 1.46 MT/year. The water volume around KGF of total runoff is the range between dry season 0.07 MT/month and rainy season 4.4 MT/month. The water demands for sustainable geothermal production of KGF and for local people's consumption will increase in the future. Integrated planning between the energy and water sectors in KGF

  3. Geothermal Thermoelectric Generation (G-TEG) with Integrated Temperature Driven Membrane Distillation and Novel Manganese Oxide for Lithium Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renew, Jay [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Hansen, Tim [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Southern Research Institute (Southern) teamed with partners Novus Energy Technologies (Novus), Carus Corporation (Carus), and Applied Membrane Technology, Inc. (AMT) to develop an innovative Geothermal ThermoElectric Generation (G-TEG) system specially designed to both generate electricity and extract high-value lithium (Li) from low-temperature geothermal brines. The process combined five modular technologies including – silica removal, nanofiltration (NF), membrane distillation (MD), Mn-oxide sorbent for Li recovery, and TEG. This project provides a proof of concept for each of these technologies. The first step in the process is silica precipitation through metal addition and pH adjustment to prevent downstream scaling in membrane processes. Next, the geothermal brine is concentrated with the first of a two stage MD system. The first stage MD system is made of a high-temperature material to withstand geothermal brine temperatures up to 150C.° The first stage MD is integrated with a G-TEG module for simultaneous energy generation. The release of energy from the MD permeate drives heat transfer across the TE module, producing electricity. The first stage MD concentrate is then treated utilizing an NF system to remove Ca2+ and Mg2+. The NF concentrate will be disposed in the well by reinjection. The NF permeate undergoes concentration in a second stage of MD (polymeric material) to further concentrate Li in the NF permeate and enhance the efficiency of the downstream Li recovery process utilizing a Mn-oxide sorbent. Permeate from both the stages of the MD can be beneficially utilized as the permeates will contain less contaminants than the feed water. The concentrated geothermal brines are then contacted with the Mn-oxide sorbent. After Li from the geothermal brine is adsorbed on the sorbent, HCl is then utilized to regenerate the sorbent and recover the Li. The research and development project showed that the Si removal goal (>80%) could

  4. An Integrated Model to Compare Net Electricity Generation for Carbon Dioxide- and Water-Based Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vikas

    Utilization of supercritical CO2 as a geothermal fluid instead of water has been proposed by Brown in 2000 and its advantages have been discussed by him and other researchers such as Karsten Pruess and Fouillac. This work assesses the net electricity that could be generated by using supercritical CO2 as a geothermal working fluid and compares it with water under the same temperature and pressure reservoir conditions. This procedure provides a method of direct comparison of water and CO2 as geothermal working fluids, in terms of net electricity generation over time given a constant geothermal fluid flow rate. An integrated three-part model has been developed to determine net electricity generation for CO2- and water-based geothermal reservoirs. This model consists of a wellbore model, reservoir simulation, and surface plant simulation. To determine the bottomhole pressure and temperature of the geothermal fluid (either water or CO2) in the injection well, a wellbore model was developed using fluid-phase, thermodynamic equations of state, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer models. A computer program was developed that solves for the temperature and pressure of the working fluid (either water or CO 2) down the wellbore by simultaneously solving for the fluid thermophysical properties, heat transfer, and frictional losses. For the reservoir simulation, TOUGH2, a general purpose numerical simulator has been used to model the temperature and pressure characteristics of the working fluid in the reservoir. The EOS1 module of TOUGH2 has been used for the water system and the EOS2 module of the TOUGH2 code has been employed for the CO2 case. The surface plant is simulated using CHEMCAD, a chemical process simulator, to determine the net electricity generated. A binary organic (iso-pentane) Rankine cycle is simulated. The calculated net electricity generated for the optimized water and CO2 systems are compared over the working time of the reservoir. Based on the theoretical

  5. Feasibility of direct utilization of selected geothermal water for aquaculture of macrobrachium rosenbergii. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinosa, C.

    1984-05-01

    The feasibility was tested of direct utilization of geothermal water for the aquaculture of Malaysian freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). A problem with using geothermal water for aquaculture is the chemical composition of the water with high flouride levels being a particular problem. Results show that (1) some geothermal water in Idaho can be used directly for the aquaculture of Macrobrachium rosenbergii, (2) high flouride levels cannot be directly correlated with high mortality rates and (3) low flouride levels do not correlate with high growth rates.

  6. ASSESSMENT OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN HYDROTHERMAL CONVECTION SYSTEMS IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1984-01-01

    The amount of thermal energy in high-temperature geothermal systems (>150 degree C) in the United States has been calculated by estimating the temperature, area, and thickness of each identified system. These data, along with a general model for recoverability of geothermal energy and a calculation that takes account of the conversion of thermal energy to electricity, yield a resource estimate of 23,000 MWe for 30 years. The undiscovered component was estimated based on multipliers of the identified resource as either 72,000 or 127,000 MWe for 30 years depending on the model chosen for the distribution of undiscovered energy as a function of temperature.

  7. Potential decline in geothermal energy generation due to rising temperatures under climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, E.; Ortega, S.; Gonzalez-Duque, D.; Ruiz-Carrascal, D.

    2016-12-01

    Geothermal energy production depends on the difference between air temperature and the geothermal fluid temperature. The latter remains approximately constant over time, so the power generation varies according to local atmospheric conditions. Projected changes in near-surface air temperatures in the upper levels of the tropical belt are likely to exceed the projected temperature anomalies across many other latitudes, which implies that geothermal plants located in these regions may be affected, reducing their energy output. This study focuses on a hypothetical geothermal power plant, located in the headwaters of the Claro River watershed, a key high-altitude basin in Los Nevados Natural Park, on the El Ruiz-Tolima volcanic massif, in the Colombian Central Andes, a region with a known geothermal potential. Four different Atmospheric General Circulation Models where used to project temperature anomalies for the 2040-2069 prospective period. Their simulation outputs were merged in a differentially-weighted multi-model ensemble, whose weighting factors were defined according to the capability of individual models to reproduce ground truth data from a set of digital data-loggers installed in the basin since 2008 and from weather stations gathering climatic variables since the early 50s. Projected anomalies were computed for each of the Representative Concentration Pathways defined by the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report in the studied region. These climate change projections indicate that air temperatures will likely reach positive anomalies in the range +1.27 ºC to +3.47 ºC, with a mean value of +2.18 ºC. Under these conditions, the annual energy output declines roughly 1% per each degree of increase in near-surface temperature. These results must be taken into account in geothermal project evaluations in the region.

  8. STATIC_TEMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, E.; Garcia, A.; Espinosa, G.; Hernandez, I.; Santoyo, S.

    2000-03-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC_TEMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC_TEMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliable used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC_TEMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented.

  9. Temperature measurement of geothermal wells by optical fiber sensor; Hikari fiber sensor wo mochiita chinetsusei no ondo bunpu keisoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, N.; Sakaguchi, K. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Experiments of temperature measurement were conducted in high temperature and high pressure geothermal wells using optical fiber sensor. A temperature measurement system using optical fiber sensor was applied to geothermal wells. Working availability was confirmed under the condition up to the depth of 1,750 m and the temperature of 240 centigrade. Observed values agreed well with those observed by the conventional temperature logging. Durability of the optical fiber sensor was also sufficient. The maximum standard deviations of measured values were 1.3 centigrade at the depth of 1,750 m at 195 centigrade for the loop-type sensor, and 3.7 centigrade at the depth of 365 m at about 200 centigrade for the single-end sensor. Although the accuracy was inferior to the conventional measurement using a thermo couple, it was enough to be applied to usual temperature logging. Furthermore, for this system, the temperature profile in the whole well can be monitored, simultaneously. Through the experiments, the detailed successive change of temperature profile accompanied with the water injection can be clearly illustrated. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Natural radioactivity levels of geothermal waters and their influence on soil and agricultural activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat Saç, Müslim; Aydemir, Sercan; Içhedef, Mutlu; Kumru, Mehmet N; Bolca, Mustafa; Ozen, Fulsen

    2014-01-01

    All over the world geothermal sources are used for different purposes. The contents of these waters are important to understand positive/negative effects on human life. In this study, natural radioactivity concentrations of geothermal waters were investigated to evaluate the effect on soils and agricultural activities. Geothermal water samples were collected from the Seferihisar Geothermal Region, and the radon and radium concentrations of these waters were analysed using a collector chamber method. Also soil samples, which are irrigated with geothermal waters, were collected from the surroundings of geothermal areas, and natural radioactivity concentrations of collected samples (U, Th and K) were determined using an NaI(Tl) detector system. The activity concentrations of radon and radium were found to be 0.6-6.0 and 0.1-1.0 Bq l(-1), respectively. Generally, the obtained results are not higher compared with the geothermal waters of the world. The activity concentrations in soils were found to be in the range of 3.3-120.3 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra (eU), 0.3-108.5 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th (eTh), 116.0-850.0 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K (% K).

  11. Comparative investigation of working fluids for an organic Rankine cycle with geothermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Na; Xiao, Song

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the thermodynamic investigation on the use of geothermal water (130 °C as maximum) for power generation through a basic Rankine has been presented together with obtained main results. Six typical organic working fluids (i.e., R245fa, R141b, R290, R600, R152a, and 134a) were studied with modifying the input pressure and temperature to the turbine. The results show that there are no significant changes taking place in the efficiency for these working fluids with overheating the inlet fluid to the turbine, i.e., efficiency is a weak function of temperature. However, with the increasing of pressure ratio in the turbine, the efficiency rises more sharply. The technical viability is shown of implementing this type of process for recovering low temperature heat resource.

  12. DETERMINING UNDISTURBED GROUND TEMPERATURE AS PART OF SHALLOW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Kurevija

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The undisturbed ground temperature is one of the key thermogeological parameters for the assessment and utilization of shallow geothermal resources. Geothermal energy is the type of energy which is stored in the ground where solar radiation has no effect. The depth at which the undisturbed ground temperature occurs, independent of seasonal changes in the surface air temperature, is functionally determined by climate parameters and thermogeological properties. In deeper layers, the increase of ground temperature depends solely on geothermal gradient. Determining accurate values of undisturbed ground temperature and depth of occurrence is crucial for the correct sizing of a borehole heat exchanger as part of the ground-source heat pump system, which is considered the most efficient technology for utilising shallow geothermal resources. The purpose of this paper is to define three specific temperature regions, based on the measured ground temperature data collected from the main meteorological stations in Croatia. The three regions are: Northern Croatia, Adriatic region, and the regions of Lika and Gorski Kotar.

  13. State-coupled low-temperature geothermal-resource-assessment program, Fiscal Year 1980. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L.; Starkey, A.; Trentman, N. (eds.)

    1981-08-01

    Magnetic, gravity, seismic-refraction, and seismic-reflection profiles across the Las Alturas Geothermal Anomaly, New Mexico, are presented. Studies in the Socorro area include the following: seismic measurements of the tertiary fill in the Rio Grande Depression west of Socorro, geothermal data availability for computer simulation in the Socorro Peak KGRA, and ground water circulation in the Socorro Geothermal Area. Regional geothermal exploration in the Truth or Consequences Area includes: geological mapping of the Mud Springs Mountains, hydrogeology of the thermal aquifer, and electrical-resistivity investigation of the geothermal potential. Other studies included are: geothermal exploration with electrical methods near Vado, Chamberino, and Mesquite; a heat-flow study of Dona Ana County; preliminary heat-flow assessment of Southeast Luna County; active fault analysis and radiometric dating of young basalts in southern New Mexico; and evaluation of the geothermal potential of the San Juan Basin in northwestern New Mexico.

  14. Application of a Hybrid Uf-Ro Process to Geothermal Water Desalination. Concentrate Disposal and Cost Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barbara Tomaszewska; Leszek Pająk; Michał Bodzek

    2014-01-01

    M embrane-based water desalination processes and hybrid technologies are often considered as a technologically and economically viable alternative for desalination of geothermal waters. This has been...

  15. Temperature Effects on Biomass and Regeneration of Vegetation in a Geothermal Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishar, Abdul; Bader, Martin K-F; O'Gorman, Eoin J; Deng, Jieyu; Breen, Barbara; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of increasing temperature is central in explaining the effects of climate change on vegetation. Here, we investigate how warming affects vegetation regeneration and root biomass and if there is an interactive effect of warming with other environmental variables. We also examine if geothermal warming effects on vegetation regeneration and root biomass can be used in climate change experiments. Monitoring plots were arranged in a grid across the study area to cover a range of soil temperatures. The plots were cleared of vegetation and root-free ingrowth cores were installed to assess above and below-ground regeneration rates. Temperature sensors were buried in the plots for continued soil temperature monitoring. Soil moisture, pH, and soil chemistry of the plots were also recorded. Data were analyzed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator and linear regression to identify the environmental variable with the greatest influence on vegetation regeneration and root biomass. There was lower root biomass and slower vegetation regeneration in high temperature plots. Soil temperature was positively correlated with soil moisture and negatively correlated with soil pH. Iron and sulfate were present in the soil in the highest quantities compared to other measured soil chemicals and had a strong positive relationship with soil temperature. Our findings suggest that soil temperature had a major impact on root biomass and vegetation regeneration. In geothermal fields, vegetation establishment and growth can be restricted by low soil moisture, low soil pH, and an imbalance in soil chemistry. The correlation between soil moisture, pH, chemistry, and plant regeneration was chiefly driven by soil temperature. Soil temperature was negatively correlated to the distance from the geothermal features. Apart from characterizing plant regeneration on geothermal soils, this study further demonstrates a novel approach to global warming experiments

  16. ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES UNDER COMPREHENSIVE UTILIZATION OF GEOTHERMAL SALINE WATER RESOURCES IN THE NORTHERN DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Ramazanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study is to develop technologies for processing geothermal brine produced with the extraction of oil as well as to solve environmental problems in the region.Methods. In order to determine the chemical composition and radioactivity of the geothermal water and solid samples, we used atomic absorption and gamma spectrometry. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the technology was made on the basis of experimental studies.Results. In the geothermal water, eight radionuclides were recognized and quantified with the activity of 87 ± 5 Bq / dm3. For the processing of this water to produce lithium carbonate and other components we propose a technological scheme, which provides a step of water purification from radio-nuclides. As a result of aeration and alkalinization, we can observe deactivation and purification of the geothermal water from mechanical impurities, iron ions, hydrogen carbonates and organic substances. Water treatment allows recovering lithium carbonate, magnesite caustic powder and salt from geothermal water. The mother liquors produced during manufacturing operations meet the requirements for the water suitable for waterflooding of oil reservoirs and can be injected for maintaining the reservoir pressure of the deposits.Conclusion. The implementation of the proposed processing technology of mineralized geothermal water produced with the extraction of oil in the Northern Dagestan will contribute to extend the life of the oil fields and improve the environmental problems. It will also allow import substitution in Russia for lithium carbonate and edible salt.

  17. Renewable Energy Essentials: Geothermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Geothermal energy is energy available as heat contained in or discharged from the earth's crust that can be used for generating electricity and providing direct heat for numerous applications such as: space and district heating; water heating; aquaculture; horticulture; and industrial processes. In addition, the use of energy extracted from the constant temperatures of the earth at shallow depth by means of ground source heat pumps (GSHP) is also generally referred to as geothermal energy.

  18. Reference book on geothermal direct use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Lund, J.W.; Rafferty, K.; Culver, G.

    1994-08-01

    This report presents the direct uses of geothermal energy in the United States. Topics discussed include: low-temperature geothermal energy resources; energy reserves; geothermal heat pumps; geothermal energy for residential buildings; and geothermal energy for industrial usage.

  19. Light hydrocarbons as redox and temperature indicators in the geothermal field of El Tatio (northern Chile)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassi, F. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Martinez, C. [University Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Earth Science; Vaselli, O. [University of Florence (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, Florence (Italy). National Council of Research; Capaccioni, B. [University of Urbino (Italy). Institute of Volcanology and Geochemistry; Viramonte, J. [National University of Salta (Argentina). Institute GEONORTE and CONICET

    2005-11-15

    El Tatio (northern Chile), one of the largest geothermal fields of South America, is presently undergoing a new program of geothermal exploration, after the failure of the first exploration phase in the early 1970s. The geochemical features of the fluid discharges characterizing this system mainly consist of boiling pools and fumaroles, and represent the result of a complex mixing process involving 3 main components: (i) hydrothermal; (ii) atmospheric; (iii) magmatic. Chemical reactions involving light hydrocarbons equilibrate at higher temperature than those directly measured in the geothermal wells and calculated on the basis of the composition of the inorganic gas species. This suggests that in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system temperatures higher than 300{sup o}C may be achieved. Such results can have a strong impact for the evaluation of the potential resources of this geothermal system. Moreover, the chemical characteristics of the organic gas fraction allow the assessment of the chemical-physical conditions governing the geochemical processes acting on geothermal fluids at depth. (author)

  20. Geomagnetic Survey to Explore High-Temperature Geothermal System in Blawan-Ijen, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Yunus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ijen geothermal area is high-temperature geothermal system located in Bondowoso regency, East Java. It is categorized as caldera-hosted geothermal system which is covered by quaternary andesitic volcanic rocks with steep topography at the surrounding. Several surface thermal manifestations are found, such as altered rocks near Mt. Kukusan and a group of Blawan hotsprings in the northern part of the caldera. Geomagnetic survey was conducted at 72 stations which is distributed inside the caldera to delineate the existence of hydrothermal activity. Magnetic anomaly was obtained by reducing total magnetic measured on the field by IGRF and diurnal variation. Reduction to pole (RTP method was applied with geomagnetic inclination of about -32°. In general, the result shows that high magnetic anomaly is distributed at the boundary of study area, while low magnetic anomaly is observed in the centre. The low anomaly indicates demagnetized rock that probably caused by hydrothermal activity. It has a good correlation with surface alteration observed close to Mt. Kukusan as well as high temperature reservoir drilled in the centre of caldera. Accordingly, the low magnetic anomaly also presents the possibility of geothermal reservoir in Ijen geothermal area.

  1. Geomagnetic Survey to Explore High-Temperature Geothermal System in Blawan-Ijen, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Yunus; Rosid, Syamsu; Fahmi, Fikri; Yunus, Faris Maulana; Muflihendri, Reza

    2018-02-01

    Ijen geothermal area is high-temperature geothermal system located in Bondowoso regency, East Java. It is categorized as caldera-hosted geothermal system which is covered by quaternary andesitic volcanic rocks with steep topography at the surrounding. Several surface thermal manifestations are found, such as altered rocks near Mt. Kukusan and a group of Blawan hotsprings in the northern part of the caldera. Geomagnetic survey was conducted at 72 stations which is distributed inside the caldera to delineate the existence of hydrothermal activity. Magnetic anomaly was obtained by reducing total magnetic measured on the field by IGRF and diurnal variation. Reduction to pole (RTP) method was applied with geomagnetic inclination of about -32°. In general, the result shows that high magnetic anomaly is distributed at the boundary of study area, while low magnetic anomaly is observed in the centre. The low anomaly indicates demagnetized rock that probably caused by hydrothermal activity. It has a good correlation with surface alteration observed close to Mt. Kukusan as well as high temperature reservoir drilled in the centre of caldera. Accordingly, the low magnetic anomaly also presents the possibility of geothermal reservoir in Ijen geothermal area.

  2. Boron sorption from aqueous solution by hydrotalcite and its preliminary application in geothermal water deboronation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qinghai; Zhang, Yin; Cao, Yaowu; Wang, Yanxin; Yan, Weide

    2013-11-01

    Hydrotalcite and its calcination product were used to treat pure water spiked with various concentrations of boron and geothermal water containing boron as a major undesirable element. The kinetics process of boron sorption by uncalcined hydrotalcite is controlled by the diffusion of boron from bulk solution to sorbent-solution boundary film and its exchange with interlayer chloride of hydrotalcite, whereas the removal rate of boron by calcined hydrotalcite rests with the restoration process of its layered structure. The results of isotherm sorption experiments reveal that calcined hydrotalcite generally has much stronger ability to lower solution boron concentration than uncalcined hydrotalcite. The combination of adsorption of boron on the residue of MgO-Al2O3 solid solution and intercalation of boron into the reconstructed hydrotalcite structure due to "structural memory effect" is the basic mechanism based on which the greater boron removal by calcined hydrotalcite was achieved. As 15 geothermal water samples were used to test the deboronation ability of calcined hydrotalcite at 65 °C, much lower boron removal efficiencies were observed. The competitive sorption of the other anions in geothermal water, such as HCO3-, SO4(2-), and F-, is the reason why calcined hydrotalcite could not remove boron from geothermal water as effectively as from pure boron solution. However, boron removal percents ranging from 89.3 to 99.0% could be obtained if 50 times of sorbent were added to the geothermal water samples. Calcined hydrotalcite is a good candidate for deboronation of geothermal water.

  3. Assessment of stream water chemistry and impact of geothermal fluid in the up-Buyuk Menderes Basin, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davraz, Aysen; Aksever, Fatma; Afsin, Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    The discharge of geothermal fluid into the natural water environment may lead to serious damages. In this study, the impact of geothermal waste water on surface water has been investigated in the up-Buyuk Menderes River, Turkey. Thermal return water from district heating and from thermal bath in the Sandıklı region were the most important source of major solutes and trace elements to the up-Buyuk Menderes River and tributaries. The thermal contribution causes a drastic increase in Na, SO4 ions, EC, and temperature of surface waters. The concentrations of As, Al, B, Fe, Cr, Li, S, P, Pb, U, Mn, and Zn are increasing dramatically downstream of thermal water inputs in the Kufi Creek tributary. In addition to natural thermal water inputs, water quality was impacted by anthropogenic trace and major element inputs from surface waters. The increased of some trace elements (Al, As, B, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mn, P, U) in surface water are related to anthropogenic activities such as agricultural activities, sewage effluents, and stockyards in the study area. Additionally, surface water quality of the up-Buyuk Menderes River and tributaries was evaluated according to standards given by the Environmental Protection Agency of both Turkey and USA. Our study demonstrates the influence of thermal water inputs on water quality of surface waters.

  4. The Impact of Changes in Water Availability on Geothermal Power Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassley, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    The conventional geothermal electrical generation capacity potential in the United States is estimated to be as high as 90 GW (USGS, 2008). If Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are included, the estimated capacity soars beyond 800 GW. Current generation capacity in the U.S. is approximately 1,000 GW. With a capacity factor close to 0.9, these numbers suggest that geothermal energy has the potential to be the primary provider of electrical energy in the United States. Realizing that potential is important, since geothermal energy is renewable, has low to no emissions, involves no fuel cycle, has one of the lowest spatial footprints per MW, has one of the lowest levelized costs of energy and the highest energy returned on energy invested values. However, access to water is an important prerequisite for geothermal power generation. It is required in drilling, heat transfer and power production. For EGS applications, water is also needed for stimulation. Much of the water currently utilized in these geothermal applications is groundwater. The impact of climate change on geothermal power generation will be expressed primarily through water availability. The details of potential water change impacts on power generation in existing and future geothermal sites will be presented in three case studies. It will be shown that strategies for mitigating groundwater losses are available, and include: use of degraded water in geothermal systems; use of captured CO2 for heat transfer; expanded use of dry cooling; improved resolution of subsurface permeability mapping; improved efficiencies in power generation; and expanded access to high enthalpy resources. Achieving these benefits will require aggressive research programs. Developing model hybrid technologies that combine geothermal-solar-biomass-wind-small hydro should be part of this research effort. Coupling geothermal resource exploration and mapping with detailed analysis of groundwater resources (recharge sites; climate

  5. Effect of variable frequency electromagnetic field on deposit formation in installations with geothermal water in Sijarinjska spa (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković Dragan T.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have examined the effect of variable frequency electromagnetic field generated with a homemade device on deposit formation in installations with geothermal water from Sijarinjska Spa. The frequency alteration of the electromagnetic field in time was made by means of the sinusoidal and saw-tooth function. In laboratory conditions, with the flow of geothermal water at 0.015 l/s and temperature of 60 °C for 6 hours through a zig-zag glass pipe, a multiple decrease of total deposit has been achieved. By applying the saw-tooth and sinusoidal function, the decrease in contents of calcium and deposit has been achieved by 8 and 6 times, respectively. A device was also used on geothermal water installation in Sijarinjska Spa (Serbia, with the water flow through a 1'' diameter non-magnetic prochrome pipe at 0.15 l/s and temperature of 75 °C in a ten-day period. A significant decrease in total deposit and calcium in the deposit has also been achieved.

  6. Better temperature predictions in geothermal modelling by improved quality of input parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Bording, Thue Sylvester; Balling, N.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal modelling is used to examine the subsurface temperature field and geothermal conditions at various scales (e.g. sedimentary basins, deep crust) and in the framework of different problem settings (e.g. scientific or industrial use). In such models, knowledge of rock thermal properties...

  7. Demonstration of a Variable Phase Turbine Power System for Low Temperature Geothermal Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G

    2014-07-07

    A variable phase turbine assembly will be designed and manufactured having a turbine, operable with transcritical, two-phase or vapor flow, and a generator – on the same shaft supported by process lubricated bearings. The assembly will be hermetically sealed and the generator cooled by the refrigerant. A compact plate-fin heat exchanger or tube and shell heat exchanger will be used to transfer heat from the geothermal fluid to the refrigerant. The demonstration turbine will be operated separately with two-phase flow and with vapor flow to demonstrate performance and applicability to the entire range of low temperature geothermal resources. The vapor leaving the turbine is condensed in a plate-fin refrigerant condenser. The heat exchanger, variable phase turbine assembly and condenser are all mounted on single skids to enable factory assembly and checkout and minimize installation costs. The system will be demonstrated using low temperature (237F) well flow from an existing large geothermal field. The net power generated, 1 megawatt, will be fed into the existing power system at the demonstration site. The system will demonstrate reliable generation of inexpensive power from low temperature resources. The system will be designed for mass manufacturing and factory assembly and should cost less than $1,200/kWe installed, when manufactured in large quantities. The estimated cost of power for 300F resources is predicted to be less than 5 cents/kWh. This should enable a substantial increase in power generated from low temperature geothermal resources.

  8. Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

  9. Potential of low-temperature geothermal resources in northern California. Report No. TR13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannah, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    Economically feasible uses for geothermal heat at temperatures too low for conventional electrical power generation at present are delineated. Several geothermal resource areas in northern California that have development potential are described, and applications of the heat found in each area are suggested. Plates are included of the following field study areas: the east side of the Sierra-Cascade Range north of Bishop, and the northern Coast Range from San Francisco Bay to Clear Lake. The counties included in the study area are Mo doc, Lassen, Sierra, Plumas, Placer, Alpine, Mono, Mendocino, Lake, and Sonoma. (LBS)

  10. Determination of Ground Heat Exchangers Temperature Field in Geothermal Heat Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhurmilova, I.; Shtym, A.

    2017-11-01

    For the heating and cooling supply of buildings and constructions geothermal heat pumps using low-potential ground energy are applied by means of ground exchangers. The process of heat transfer in a system of ground exchangers is a phenomenon of complex heat transfer. The paper presents a mathematical modeling of heat exchange processes, the temperature fields are built which are necessary for the determination of the ground array that ensures an adequate supply of low potential energy excluding the freezing of soil around the pipes in the ground heat exchangers and guaranteeing a reliable operation of geothermal heat pumps.

  11. Isotopic composition of waters from the El Tatio geothermal field, Northern Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giggenbach, W.F.

    1978-07-01

    On the basis of isotopic and chemical analyses of 45 spring, well and meteoric water samples from the El Tatio geothermal field in Northern Chile, four main processes giving rise to the formation of a wide range of thermal discharges can be distinguished. (1) Deep dilution of a predominant, primary high chloride (5500 mg/l, 260/sup 0/) supply water derived from precipitation some 15 km east of El Tatio with local groundwater produces a secondary chloride water. (4750 mg/l, 190/sup 0/) feeding springs over a limited area. (2) Single step steam separation from these two waters leads to isotopic shifts and increases in chloride contents to 8000 and 6000 mg/l respectively. (3) Absorption of this separated steam and carbon dioxide into local ground water and mixing with chloride waters at shallow levels produces a series of intermediate temperature (160/sup 0/), low chloride, high bicarbonate waters. (4) Absorption of steam containing H/sub 2/S into surface waters leads to the formation of zero chloride, high sulfate waters; the isotopic enrichment observed is governed by a kinetic, steady state evaporation process.

  12. Geothermal resources of the Texas Gulf Coast: environmental concerns arising from the production and disposal of geothermal waters. Geological circular 76-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    Disposal and temporary surface storage of spent geothermal fluids and surface subsidence and faulting are the major environmental problems that could arise from geopressured geothermal water production. Geopressured geothermal fluids are moderately to highly saline and may contain significant amounts of boron. Disposal of hot saline geothermal water in subsurface saline aquifers will present the least hazard to the environment. It is not known, however, whether the disposal of as much as 54,000 m/sup 3/ of spent fluids per day into saline aquifers at the production site is technically or economically feasible. If saline aquifers adequate for fluid disposal cannot be found, geothermal fluids may have to be disposed of by open watercourses, canals, and pipelines to coastal bays on the Gulf of Mexico. Overland flow or temporary storage of geothermal fluids may cause negative environmental impacts. As the result of production of large volumes of geothermal fluid, reservoir pressure declines may cause compaction of sediments within and adjacent to the reservoir. The amount of compaction depends on pressure decline, reservoir thickness, and reservoir compressibility. The magnitude of environmental impact of subsidence and fault activation varies with current land use. Geothermal resource production facilities on the Gulf Coast of Texas could be subject to a series of natural hazards: (1) hurricane- or storm-induced flooding, (2) winds from tropical storms, (3) coastal erosion, or (4) expansive soils. None of these hazards is generated by geothermal resource production, but each has potential for damaging geothermal production and disposal facilities that could, in turn, result in leakage of hot saline geothermal fluids.

  13. Economic study of low temperature geothermal energy in Lassen and Modoc Counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-04-01

    The feasibility of using low cost, low temperature geothermal energy in job-producing industries to increase employment and encourage economic development was investigated. The study, encompassing all of Lassen and Modoc Counties, was to be site-specific, referencing candidate geothermal applications to known hot wells and springs as previously determined, or to new wells with specific characteristics as defined in the Scope of Work. The emphasis was to be placed on economically practical and readily achievable applications from known resources. Although both positive and negative findings were found in specific areas of investigation, it is felt that the overall long term prognosis for geothermal energy stimulus to industry in the area is excellent. The applications studied were; greenhouse heating, kiln drying, onion dehydration, feedlots, and aquaculture.

  14. Hydrogeochemical characteristics and genesis of the high-temperature geothermal system in the Tashkorgan basin of the Pamir syntax, western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiman; Pang, Zhonghe; Yang, Fengtian; Yuan, Lijuan; Tang, Pinghui

    2017-11-01

    High-temperature geothermal systems in China, such as those found in Tenchong and Tibet, are common. A similar system without obvious manifestations found in the Tashkorgan basin in the western Xinjiang Autonomous Region, however, was not expected. The results from borehole measurements and predictions with geothermometers, such as quartz, Na-K and Na-K-Mg, indicate that the reservoir temperature is approximately 250-260 °C. Geothermal water is high in Total Dissolved Solids (>2.5 g/L) and SiO2 content (>273 mg/L), and the water type is Cl·SO4-Na, likely resulting from water-rock interactions in the granodiorite reservoirs. Based on isotope analysis, it appears to be recharged by local precipitation and river water. Evidence from the relationships between major ions and the Cl and molar Na/Cl ratio suggests mixing between deep geothermal water and shallow cold groundwater during the upwelling process. Mixing ratios calculated by the relationship between Cl and SiO2 show that the proportion from cold end-members are 96-99% and 40-90% for riparian zone springs and geothermal water from boreholes, respectively. Active regional tectonic and Neo-tectonic movements in the Pamir syntax as well as radioactive elements in the granodiorite reservoir of the Himalayan stage provide basis for the high heat flow background (150-350 mW/m2). NNW trending fault systems intersecting with overlying NE faults provide circulation conduits with high permeability for geothermal water.

  15. Fiber Optic Sensor for Real-Time Sensing of Silica Scale Formation in Geothermal Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Takuya; Orii, Tatsuya; Ueda, Akira; Ozawa, Akiko; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2017-06-13

    We present a novel fiber optic sensor for real-time sensing of silica scale formation in geothermal water. The sensor is fabricated by removing the cladding of a multimode fiber to expose the core to detect the scale-formation-induced refractive index change. A simple experimental setup was constructed to measure the transmittance response using white light as a source and a spectroscopy detector. A field test was performed on geothermal water containing 980 mg/L dissolved silica at 93 °C in Sumikawa Geothermal Power Plant, Japan. The transmittance response of the fiber sensor decreased due to the formation of silica scale on the fiber core from geothermal water. An application of this sensor in the evaluation of scale inhibitors was demonstrated. In geothermal water containing a pH modifier, the change of transmittance response decreased with pH decrease. The effectiveness of a polyelectrolyte inhibitor in prevention of silica scale formation was easily detectable using the fiber sensor in geothermal water.

  16. District space heating potential of low temperature hydrothermal geothermal resources in the southwestern United States. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDevitt, P.K.; Rao, C.R.

    1978-10-01

    A computer simulation model (GIRORA-Nonelectric) is developed to study the economics of district space heating using geothermal energy. GIRORA-Nonelectric is a discounted cashflow investment model which evaluates the financial return on investment for space heating. This model consists of two major submodels: the exploration for and development of a geothermal anomaly by a geothermal producer, and the purchase of geothermal fluid by a district heating unit. The primary output of the model is a calculated rate of return on investment earned by the geothermal producer. The results of the sensitivity analysis of the model subject to changes in physical and economic parameters are given in this report. Using the results of the economic analysis and technological screening criteria, all the low temperature geothermal sites in Southwestern United States are examined for economic viability for space heating application. The methodology adopted and the results are given.

  17. Hydrogeological Modelling of the Geothermal Waters of Alaşehir in the Continental Rift Zone of the Gediz, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ӧzgür, Nevzat; Bostancı, Yesim; Anilır Yürük, Ezgi

    2017-12-01

    In western Anatolia, Turkey, the continental rift zones of the Büyük Menderes, Küçük Menderes and Gediz were formed by extensional tectonic features striking E-W generally and representing a great number of active geothermal systems, epithermal mineralizations and volcanic rocks from Middle Miocene to recent. The geothermal waters are associated with the faults which strike preferentially NW-SE and NE-SW and locate diagonal to general strike of the rift zones of the Menderes Massif. These NW-SE and NE-SW striking faults were probably generated by compressional tectonic regimes which leads to the deformation of uplift between two extensional rift zones in the Menderes Massif. The one of these rift zones is Gediz which is distinguished by a great number of geothermal waters such as Alaşehir, Kurşunlu, Çamurlu, Pamukkale and Urganlı. The geothermal waters of Alaşehir form the biggest potential in the rift zone of Gediz with a capacity of about 100 to 200 MWe. Geologically, the gneisses from the basement rocks in the study area which are overlain by an Paleozoic to Mesozoic intercalation of mica schists, quartzites and marbles, a Miocene intercalation of conglomerates, sandstones and clay stones and Plio-Quaternary intercalation of conglomerates, sandstones and clay stones discordantly. In the study area, Paleozoic to Mesozoic quartzites and marbles form the reservoir rocks hydrogeologically. The geothermal waters anions with Na+K>Ca>Mg dominant cations and HCO3>Cl> dominant anions are of Na-HCO3 type and can be considered as partial equilibrated waters. According to the results of geochemical thermometers, the reservoir temperatures area of about 185°C in accordance with measured reservoir temperatures. Stabile isotopes of δ18O versus δ2H of geothermal waters of Alaşehir deviate from the meteoric water line showing an intensive water-rock interaction under high temperature conditions. These data are well correlated with the results of the

  18. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1994-11-22

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

  19. Chloride waters of Great Britain revisited: from subsea formation waters to onshore geothermal fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Younger, Paul L.; Boyce, Adrian J.; Waring, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that chloride-dominated saline ground waters occur at depth in the UK, not only beneath the sea but also onshore at depths of a few hundred metres. In a few places in northern England, these saline waters discharge naturally at surface in the form of springs. In recent years, however, these saline ground waters have come to be regarded as resources: as potential geothermal fluids intercepted in deep boreholes. Comparisons of the major ions and stable isotopes (δ2H, δ18O...

  20. Temporal variability of secondary processes in alkaline geothermal waters associated to granitic rocks: the Caldes de Boí geothermal system (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asta, M.; Gimeno, M.J.; Auqué, L.F.; Galve, J.P.; Gómez, J.; Acero, P.; Lapuente, P.

    2017-11-01

    The Caldes de Boí geothermal waters show important differences in pH (6.5–9.6) and temperature (15.9ºC–52ºC) despite they have a common origin and a very simple circuit at depth (4km below the recharge area level). Thes differences are the result of secondary processes such as conductive cooling, mixing with colder shallower waters, and input of external CO2, which affect each spring to a different extent in the terminal part of the thermal circuit. In this paper, the secondary processes that control the geochemical evolution of this system have been addressed using a geochemical dataset spanning over 20 years and combining different approaches: classical geochemical calculations and geochemical modelling. Mixing between a cold and a thermal end-member, cooling and CO2 exchange are the processes affecting the spring waters with different intensity over time. These differences in the intensity of the secondary processes could be controlled by the effect of climate and indirectly by the geomorphological and hydrogeological setting of the different springs. Infiltration recharging the shallow aquifer is dominant during the rainy seasons and the extent of the mixing process is greater, at least in some springs.Moreover, significant rainfall can produce a decrease in the ground temperature favouring the conductive cooling. Finally, the geomorphological settings of the springs determine the thickness and the hydraulic properties of the saturated layer below them and, therefore, they affect the extent of the mixing process between the deep thermal waters and the shallower cold waters. The understanding of the compositional changes in the thermal waters and the main factors that could affect them is a key issue to plan the future management of the geothermal resources of the Caldes de Boí system. Here, we propose to use a simple methodology to assess the effect of those factors, which could affect the quality of the thermal waters for balneotherapy at long

  1. Geothermal System Extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnerson, Jon [Boise City Corporation, ID (United States); Pardy, James J. [Boise City Corporation, ID (United States)

    2017-09-30

    This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0000318. The City of Boise operates and maintains the nation’s largest geothermal heating district. Today, 91 buildings are connected, providing space heating to over 5.5 million square feet, domestic water heating, laundry and pool heating, sidewalk snowmelt and other related uses. Approximately 300 million gallons of 177°F geothermal water is pumped annually to buildings and institutions located in downtown Boise. The closed loop system returns all used geothermal water back into the aquifer after heat has been removed via an Injection Well. Water injected back into the aquifer has an average temperature of 115°F. This project expanded the Boise Geothermal Heating District (Geothermal System) to bring geothermal energy to the campus of Boise State University and to the Central Addition Eco-District. In addition, this project also improved the overall system’s reliability and increased the hydraulic capacity.

  2. Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

    1980-12-31

    The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.

  3. Direct utilization of geothermal energy for space and water heating at Marlin, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, M.F.; Green, T.F.; Keeney, R.C.; Ellis, P.F. II; Davis, R.J.; Wallace, R.C.; Blood, F.B.

    1983-05-01

    The Torbett-Hutchings-Smith Memorial Hospital geothermal heating project, which is one of nineteen direct-use geothermal projects funded principally by DOE, is documented. The five-year project encompassed a broad range of technical, institutional, and economic activities including: resource and environmental assessments; well drilling and completion; system design, construction, and monitoring; economic analyses; public awareness programs; materials testing; and environmental monitoring. Some of the project conclusions are that: (1) the 155/sup 0/F Central Texas geothermal resource can support additional geothermal development; (2) private-sector economic incentives currently exist, especially for profit-making organizations, to develop and use this geothermal resource; (3) potential uses for this geothermal resource include water and space heating, poultry dressing, natural cheese making, fruit and vegetable dehydrating, soft-drink bottling, synthetic-rubber manufacturing, and furniture manufacturing; (4) high maintenance costs arising from the geofluid's scaling and corrosion tendencies can be avoided through proper analysis and design; (5) a production system which uses a variable-frequency drive system to control production rate is an attractive means of conserving parasitic pumping power, controlling production rate to match heating demand, conserving the geothermal resource, and minimizing environmental impacts.

  4. Hydrogeological, Hydrogeochemical and Isotope Geochemical Features of the Geothermal Waters in Seferihisar and Environs, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Nevzat; Aras Pala, Ebru; Degirmenci, Saliha

    2017-12-01

    The study area of Seferihisar is located within the Izmir-Ankara suture in the NW of the Menderes Massif in western Anatolia, Turkey. The Paleozoic metamorphic rocks of the Menderes Massif form the basement rocks in the area which are overlain by 760 m thick Izmir-flysch series consisting of metamorphic rocks, limestones and ultrabasic rocks tectonically. The Pliocene Bahçecik formation which consists of an alternation of conglomerates, sandstones, claystones, lignite and limestones and shows a thickness of 300 m overlies the (İzmir) flysch series discordantly. This is overlain by 430 m thick Yeniköy formation composed of conglomerates, sandstones, claystones and clayey limestones discordantly. The Miocene volcanic rocks of Cumaovası overlie the Yeniköy formation concordantly which are overlain by alluvium and travertine deposits. Geothermal waters which are observed in the localities of Tuzla, Cumalı, Doğanbey and Karakoç are associated with NE-SW trending faults in the area. The geothermal waters in the area are considered as Na-Cl or Na-Cl-HCO3 type waters. The geothermal waters of Seferihisar and environs are identified to be Na+K>Ca>Mg dominant cations and Cl>HCO3>SO4 dominant anions. According to the diagram of Na/100-K/100-√Mg, a certainly part of the thermal waters can be considered as equilibrated thermal waters during some waters are of immature waters. According to the results of geochemical thermometers, the reservoir temperatures of thermal waters range from 150 to 240°C. The δ2H values of thermal waters are between -13,3 to -31,9, while δ18O values range from -2,55 to -5,70. The tritium contents of thermal waters are between 13 to 64±10 TU.

  5. Investigation of geothermal resources in Korea (Geothermal Resources Maps)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jeong Ung; Lee, Seung Gu; Yum, Byoung Woo; Kim, Hyoung Chan [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The Korean Peninsula forms a part of the stable foreland of Far East Asia and is a part of Sino-Korean Craton, where, hence, is not associated with high potential geothermal resources. Nevertheless, there are several geothermal springs, of which water temperature ranges from 23 to 76 deg. C. This study was aimed to draw various geothermal base maps in the Korean Peninsula, such as thermal conductivity map, heat flow map, geothermal gradient map, depth contour map of 25 deg. C and various geochemical figures of geothermal waters. In this study, the thermal springs was surveyed for well inventory, the determination of thermal conductivities of rocks, and chemical analyses of geothermal waters. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope values ({delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O) of geothermal waters were also calculated, which would be useful to evaluate the origin of water. Map of geothermal gradient distribution illustrates geothermally anomalous areas - such as Deoksan, Dogo, Onyang and Yusong areas in ChungNam district, Jungwon area in Chungbuk district, Pocheon area in Gyeonggi district, Gosung area in Gwangwon district, Deokgu, Baekam, and Pohang areas in Gyeongbuk district and Busan, Mageumsan and Bugok area in Gyeongnam district. Heat flow map also shows similar features to geothermal anomalies. Most of thermal waters form the Korean Peninsula are alkaline and belongs to Na-HCO{sub 3} type. Their contents are characterized of low total dissolved solids and high contents of fluoride and sodium, of which results are same as those of the researches which was conducted before. (author). 21 refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, III, Edward F.; Boucher, Frederic B.

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  7. Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, T.C.

    1977-06-22

    Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

  8. Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

    1983-12-15

    Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

  9. Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis For The Appalachian Basin: Phase 1 Revised Report November 18, 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Teresa E. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Richards, Maria C. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Horowitz, Franklin G. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Camp, Erin [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Smith, Jared D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Whealton, Calvin A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Stedinger, Jery R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Hornbach, Matthew J. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Frone, Zachary S. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Tester, Jefferson W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Anderson, Brian [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Welcker, Kelydra [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Chickering Pace, Catherine [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); He, Xiaoning [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Magnani, Maria Beatrice [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Bolat, Rahmi [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-11-18

    Pennsylvania, for which the available geological data are insufficient to fully analyze the geological risks but yet the population is high. First, to assess the spatial variation in the depth to which one would need to drill to obtain geothermal temperatures that are useful to a future project, the project used bottom-hole temperature data from Appalachian Basin oil and gas exploration. These bottom hole temperature data are abundant but of low quality. Second, the project examined the potential for sufficient water flow rates through rocks to harvest heat from a geothermal well field, considering only natural reservoirs. This analysis provides a very incomplete picture of spatial variability of natural reservoirs because the oil and gas reservoir data lack key properties and are spatially biased toward those locations with profitable amounts of hydrocarbons in the rock pore spaces. Third, in light of the fact that earthquake activity has been induced in several states by subsurface work related to the oil and gas industry, this project examined the potential for similar activity in the Appalachian Basin. Acknowledging that data for such a task are insufficient, we utilized what was available: records of seismic activity, regional estimates of the orientations of stress in the rocks, and locations and orientations of zones of lateral change in rock properties at depths down to several kilometers below Earth’s surface. With these data, we created a first approximation of spatially variable risks for induced earthquakes. Because no data existed with which to test the reliability of these methods, the results have a high degree of uncertainty. Fourth, we examined the spatial variability of the above-the-ground factors that contribute to the economical viability of projects to tap low-temperature geothermal resources for direct-use. We worked principally with population density as a regionally known variable that would impact the cost of district heating. The resulting maps

  10. Temperature Effects on Biomass and Regeneration of Vegetation in a Geothermal Area

    OpenAIRE

    Nishar, Abdul; Bader, Martin K.-F.; O’Gorman, Eoin J.; Deng, Jieyu; Breen, Barbara; Leuzinger, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of increasing temperature is central in explaining the effects of climate change on vegetation. Here, we investigate how warming affects vegetation regeneration and root biomass and if there is an interactive effect of warming with other environmental variables. We also examine if geothermal warming effects on vegetation regeneration and root biomass can be used in climate change experiments. Monitoring plots were arranged in a grid across the study area to cover a r...

  11. Lithosphere temperature model and resource assessment for deep geothermal exploration in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekesi, Eszter; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Vrijlandt, Mark; Lenkey, Laszlo; Horvath, Ferenc

    2017-04-01

    The demand for deep geothermal energy has increased considerably over the past years. To reveal potential areas for geothermal exploration, it is crucial to have an insight into the subsurface temperature distribution. Hungary is one of the most suitable countries in Europe for geothermal development, as a result of Early and Middle Miocene extension and subsequent thinning of the lithosphere. Hereby we present the results of a new thermal model of Hungary extending from the surface down to the lithosphere-astenosphere boundary (LAB). Subsurface temperatures were calculated through a regular 3D grid with a horizontal resolution of 2.5 km, a vertical resolution of 200 m for the uppermost 7 km, and 3 km down to the depth of the LAB The model solves the heat equation in steady-state, assuming conduction as the main heat transfer mechanism. At the base, it adopts a constant basal temperature or heat flow condition. For the calibration of the model, more than 5000 temperature measurements were collected from the Geothermal Database of Hungary. The model is built up by five sedimentary layers, upper crust, lower crust, and lithospheric mantle, where each layer has its own thermal properties. The prior thermal properties and basal condition of the model is updated through the ensemble smoother with multiple data assimilation technique. The conductive model shows misfits with the observed temperatures, which cannot be explained by neglected transient effects related to lithosphere extension. These anomalies are explained mostly by groundwater flow in Mesozoic carbonates and other porous sedimentary rocks. To account for the effect of heat convection, we use a pseudo-conductive approach by adjusting the thermal conductivity of the layers where fluid flow may occur. After constructing the subsurface temperature model of Hungary, the resource base for EGS (Enhanced Geothermal Systems) is quantified. To this end, we applied a cash-flow model to translate the geological

  12. Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

    1982-06-22

    The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

  13. Assessment of the origin and geothermal potential of the thermal waters by hydro-isotope geochemistry: Eskisehir province, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Galip; Italiano, Francesco; Yasin, Didem; Taskiran, Lutfi; Gulbay, Ahmet Hilmi

    2017-05-01

    The thermal fluids vented over Eskisehir province have been investigated for their origin and to estimate the geothermal potential of the area. Thermal waters as well as bubbling and dissolved gases were collected and analysed for their chemical and isotopic features. Their isotopic composition varies in the range from -11.5 to -7.7 ‰ for δ18O, -84 and -57 ‰ for δ2H, and 0-7.2 TU for tritium. The gases (bubbling and dissolved) are mostly N2-dominated with a significant amount of CO2. The helium isotopic ratios are in the range of 0.2-0.66 R/Rac, indicate remarkable mantle-He contribution ranging between 2 and 10 % in the whole study area. Considering the estimated geothermal gradient about three times higher than the normal gradient, and the reservoir temperatures estimated to be between 50 and 100 °C using quartz and chalcedony geothermometers, a circulation model was built where possible mixing with shallow waters cool down the uprising geothermal fluids.

  14. GIS to support cost-effective decisions on renewable sources applications for low temperature geothermal energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gemelli, Alberto; Diamantini, Claudia; Longhi, Sauro

    2013-01-01

    Through the results of a developed case study of information system for low temperature geothermal energy, GIS to Support Cost-effective Decisions on Renewable Sources addresses the issue of the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in evaluating cost-effectiveness of renewable resource exploitation regional scale. Focusing on the design of a Decision Support System, a process is presented aimed to transform geographic data into knowledge useful for analysis and decision-making on the economic exploitation of geothermal energy. This detailed description includes a literature review and technical issues related to data collection, data mining, decision analysis for the informative system developed for the case study. A multi-disciplinary approach to GIS design is presented which is also an innovative example of fusion of georeferenced data acquired from multiple sources including remote sensing, networks of sensors and socio-economic censuses. GIS to Support Cost-effective Decisions on Renewable Sources ...

  15. High-temperature explosive development for geothermal well stimulation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, E.W.; Mars, J.E.; Wang, C.

    1978-03-31

    A two-component, temperature-resistant liquid explosive called HITEX has been developed which is capable of withstanding 561/sup 0/K (550/sup 0/F) for 24 hours in a geothermal environment. The explosive is intended for the stimulation of nonproducing or marginally producing geothermal (hot dry rock, vapor-dominated or hydrothermal) reservoirs by fracturing the strata in the vicinity of a borehole. The explosive is inherently safe because it is mixed below ground downhole from two nondetonable liquid components. Development and safety tests included differential scanning calorimetry, thermal stability, minerals compatibility, drop-weight sensitivity, adiabatic compression, electrostatic discharge sensitivity, friction sensitivity, detonation arrest capability, cook-off tests, detonability at ambient and elevated pressure, detonation velocity and thin film propagation in a wedge.

  16. Combination of Well-Logging Temperature and Thermal Remote Sensing for Characterization of Geothermal Resources in Hokkaido, Northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingwei Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal resources have become an increasingly important source of renewable energy for electrical power generation worldwide. Combined Three Dimension (3D Subsurface Temperature (SST and Land Surface Temperature (LST measurements are essential for accurate assessment of geothermal resources. In this study, subsurface and surface temperature distributions were combined using a dataset comprised of well logs and Thermal Infrared Remote sensing (TIR images from Hokkaido island, northern Japan. Using 28,476 temperature data points from 433 boreholes sites and a method of Kriging with External Drift or trend (KED, SST distribution model from depths of 100 to 1500 m was produced. Regional LST was estimated from 13 scenes of Landsat 8 images. Resultant SST ranged from around 50 °C to 300 °C at a depth of 1500 m. Most of western and part of the eastern Hokkaido are characterized by high temperature gradients, while low temperatures were found in the central region. Higher temperatures in shallower crust imply the western region and part of the eastern region have high geothermal potential. Moreover, several LST zones considered to have high geothermal potential were identified upon clarification of the underground heat distribution according to 3D SST. LST in these zones showed the anomalies, 3 to 9 °C higher than the surrounding areas. These results demonstrate that our combination of TIR and 3D temperature modeling using well logging and geostatistics is an efficient and promising approach to geothermal resource exploration.

  17. Database on the geothermal resources of Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedaid, Fatima Zohra [Centre de Developpement des Energies Renouvelables, B.P. 62, route de l' Observatoire, Bouzareah, Alger (Algeria)

    2007-06-15

    The paper describes a database on the low-temperature geothermal resources of Algeria that includes information on thermal springs and wells, a description of hot water resources, and thematic maps. (author)

  18. A renewable energy scenario for Aalborg Municipality based on low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Möller, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Aalborg Municipality, Denmark, wishes to investigate the possibilities of becoming independent of fossil fuels. This article describes a scenario for supplying Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through a combination of low-temperature geothermal heat, wind power and biomass. Of particular focus...... in the scenario is how low-temperature geothermal heat may be utilised in district heating (DH) systems. The analyses show that it is possible to cover Aalborg Municipality’s energy needs through the use of locally available sources in combination with significant electricity savings, heat savings, reductions...... in industrial fuel use and savings and fuel-substitutions in the transport sector. With biomass resources being finite, the two marginal energy resources in Aalborg are geothermal heat and wind power. If geothermal heat is utilised more, wind power may be limited and vice versa. The system still relies...

  19. Low-Temperature Projects of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program: Evaluation and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Tom; Snyder, Neil; Gosnold, Will

    2016-10-23

    This paper discusses opportunities and challenges related to the technical and economic feasibility of developing power generation from geothermal resources at temperatures of 150 degrees C and lower. Insights from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office inform these discussions and provide the basis for some lessons learned to help guide decisions by DOE and the industry in further developing this resource. The technical basis for low-temperature geothermal energy is well established and the systems can be economic today in certain situations. However, these applications are far from a 'plug and play' product; successful development today requires a good knowledge of geothermal system design and operation.

  20. Low-Temperature Projects of the Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program: Evaluation and Lessons Learned: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Tom; Snyder, Neil; Gosnold, Will

    2016-12-01

    This paper discusses opportunities and challenges related to the technical and economic feasibility of developing power generation from geothermal resources at temperatures of 150 degrees C and lower. Insights from projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office inform these discussions and provide the basis for some lessons learned to help guide decisions by DOE and the industry in further developing this resource. The technical basis for low-temperature geothermal energy is well established and the systems can be economic today in certain situations. However, these applications are far from a 'plug and play' product; successful development today requires a good knowledge of geothermal system design and operation.

  1. Spatial distribution of temperature in the low-temperature geothermal Euganean field (NE Italy): a simulated annealing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Paolo; Trevisani, Sebastiano [Dipartimento di Geologia, Paleontologia e Geofisica, Universita degli Studi di Padova, via Giotto 1, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    The spatial distribution of groundwater temperatures in the low-temperature (60-86{sup o}C) geothermal Euganean field of northeastern Italy has been studied using a geostatistical approach. The data set consists of 186 temperatures measured in a fractured limestone reservoir, over an area of 8km{sup 2}. Investigation of the spatial continuity by means of variographic analysis revealed the presence of anisotropies that are apparently related to the particular geologic structure of the area. After inference of variogram models, a simulated annealing procedure was used to perform conditional simulations of temperature in the domain being studied. These simulations honor the data values and reproduce the spatial continuity inferred from the data. Post-processing of the simulations permits an assessment of temperature uncertainties. Maps of estimated temperatures, interquartile range, and of the probability of exceeding a prescribed 80{sup o}C threshold were also computed. The methodology described could prove useful when siting new wells in a geothermal area. (author)

  2. Geothermal low-temperature reservoir assessment in northern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, R.L.; Schoenmackers, R.

    1985-07-01

    Fifty-four shallow temperature gradient holes were drilled along Interstate Highway 25 and the Rio Grande, from Las Cruces to Rincon, in northern Dona Ana County, New Mexico. This shallow temperature study (a joint exploration program performed with the cooperation and financial assistance of Trans-Pacific Geothermal, Inc. of Oakland, California) resulted in the discovery and confirmation of new and suspected major low-temperature geothermal resources. Elevated temperature and heat flow data suggest a thermal anomaly which can be generally described as being a nearly continuous linear feature which extends some 25 miles in length in a northwest-southeast direction with the only break being a 5-mile gap near the southern end of the study area. The width of the anomaly is only a few miles but tends to thicken around individual anomalies located within this larger anomaly. There are five main individual anomalies situated within the major anomaly and, listed from north to south, they are the: (1) Rincon Anomaly, (2) San Diego Mountain Anomaly, (3) Radium Springs KGRA, (4) Grande Dome Anomaly, and (5) Goat Mountain Anomaly. The main anomaly is well defined by a 4 HFU contour and the individual anomalies range from about 10 HFU to a high of near 30 HFU, estimated for the Rincon Anomaly. A bottom-hole temperature of 54/sup 0/C at 50 meters was also recorded at Rincon. Deeper drilling is certainly warranted and required in the Rincon Anomaly in order to discover and confirm the true commercially exploitable potential of this geothermal resource. 12 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Oxygen isotope exchange in rocks and minerals from the Cerro Prieto geothermal system: Indicators of temperature distribution and fluid flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.E.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions have been measured in drill cuttings and core samples from more than 40 wells ranging in depth to more than 3.5 km in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. Profiles of isotopic ratios versus sampling depths provide information on the three-dimensional distribution of temperature and fluid flow. These parameters also indicate variations in the history of hydrothermal processes in different areas of the geothermal field.

  4. Economic study of low temperature geothermal energy in Lassen and Modoc counties, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using low cost, low temperature geothermal energy in job-producing industries to increase employment and encourage economic development. The study, encompassing all of Lassen and modoc Counties, was to be site-specific, referencing candidate geothermal applications to known hot wells and springs as previously determined, or to new wells with specific characteristics as defined in the Scope of Work. The emphasis was to be placed on economically practical and readily achievable applications from known resources, thus complimenting the recently completed ERDA-Susanville Study where a designated community was used as a ''laboratory'' in which land-use planning, institutional aspects, geological assessments, technical modeling and socioeconomic impacts were all examined in overview. During the course of the study, monthly progress reports were prepared and reviewed with the Commission so that emphasis on particular features of study could be changed as necessary to reflect updated findings and to redirect efforts into additional areas of potential promise as they became apparent. In this manner, a degree of flexibility was maintained which allowed a more comprehensive study than would have been otherwise possible. Although the report generates both positive and negative findings in specific areas of investigation, it is felt that the overall long term prognosis for geothermal energy stimulus to industry in the area is excellent.

  5. Humboldt's spa: microbial diversity is controlled by temperature in geothermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Christine E; Brady, Allyson L; Sharp, Glen H; Grasby, Stephen E; Stott, Matthew B; Dunfield, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 years ago Alexander von Humboldt (1808) observed that plant and animal diversity peaks at tropical latitudes and decreases toward the poles, a trend he attributed to more favorable temperatures in the tropics. Studies to date suggest that this temperature–diversity gradient is weak or nonexistent for Bacteria and Archaea. To test the impacts of temperature as well as pH on bacterial and archaeal diversity, we performed pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes retrieved from 165 soil, sediment and biomat samples of 36 geothermal areas in Canada and New Zealand, covering a temperature range of 7.5–99 °C and a pH range of 1.8–9.0. This represents the widest ranges of temperature and pH yet examined in a single microbial diversity study. Species richness and diversity indices were strongly correlated to temperature, with R2 values up to 0.62 for neutral–alkaline springs. The distributions were unimodal, with peak diversity at 24 °C and decreasing diversity at higher and lower temperature extremes. There was also a significant pH effect on diversity; however, in contrast to previous studies of soil microbial diversity, pH explained less of the variability (13–20%) than temperature in the geothermal samples. No correlation was observed between diversity values and latitude from the equator, and we therefore infer a direct temperature effect in our data set. These results demonstrate that temperature exerts a strong control on microbial diversity when considered over most of the temperature range within which life is possible. PMID:24430481

  6. Some aspects of steam-water flow simulation in geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulyupin, Alexander N.

    1996-01-24

    Actual aspects of steam-water simulation in geothermal wells are considered: necessary quality of a simulator, flow regimes, mass conservation equation, momentum conservation equation, energy conservation equation and condition equations. Shortcomings of traditional hydraulic approach are noted. Main questions of simulator development by the hydraulic approach are considered. New possibilities of a simulation with the structure approach employment are noted.

  7. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  8. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city...... of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (... and SO4-rich thermal waters (25.3 °C to 62.2 °C) ascending from deep, high permeability Mesozoic limestones. The (equivalent) SO4/Cl (0.01–0.02), Na/Cl (2.82–5.83) and B/Cl ratios (0.02–0.38) of thermal waters differs from the ratios in other geothermal systems from Central Italy, probably implying...

  9. Low temperature geothermal resource evaluation of the Moses Lake-Ritzville-Connell area, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widness, S.

    1983-11-01

    The study area is located in portions of Adams, Grant, Lincoln, and Franklin counties of eastern Washington. The area is representative of a complex stratigraphic and geohydrologic system within the basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Fluid temperature data were collected by three different agencies. The Geological Engineering Section (WSU) at Washington State University, runs a continuous fluid temperature (FT) log as part of a complete suite of geophysical logs. The US Geological Survey (USGS) runs a continuous fluid FT log in conjunction with caliper and natural-gamma logs. Southern Methodist University (SMU) and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DNR), have cooperated in gathering FT data. The DNR-SMU data were collected by taking temperature measurements at 5 m intervals. Bottom-hole temperatures (BHT) and bottom-hole depths (BHD) of selected wells in the study area are given. A technique developed by Biggane (1982) was used to determine the geothermal gradients within the area. A least squares linear regression analysis of the relationship between the BHT and BHD was used to determine the geothermal gradient of a given well data group (WDG).

  10. Aquaculture applications of a thermal effluent and considerations on geothermal water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, W.A.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    Aquaculture may benefit from the use of thermal discharges from power plants or geothermal waters. Fish culture technology applicable to use of heated effluents should also apply generally to geothermal water sources. In the early 1970's the Tennessee Valley Authority and a private cooperator pumped thermal effluent from the discharge canal of the Gallatin Steam Plant near Nashville, TN, through a raceway facility, to evaluate an intensive culture system for catfish. Water tempertures averaged 5/sup 0/C above ambient plant intake water. Results demonstrated the potential of heated water to extend the growing season, enhance growth rates, and increase production. Numerous constraints hindering commercial use of thermal effluents for aquaculture were also identified.

  11. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Gas chemistry and thermometry of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehring, N.L. (US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); D' Amore, F.

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal gases at Cerro Prieto are derived from high temperature reactions within the reservoir or are introduced with recharge water. Gases collected from geothermal wells should, therefore, reflect reservoir conditions. Interpretation of gas compositions of wells indicates reservoir temperatures, controls of oxygen and sulfur fugacities, and recharge source and direction.

  13. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  14. Gravity, magnetic and resistivity investigations of the Okauia Low Temperature Geothermal System in alluvial sediments of the Hauraki Depression, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soengkono, Supri; Reeves, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Gravity, ground magnetics, DC resistivity traversing, and time domain electromagnetic soundings (fixed-loop and in-loop) were conducted to investigate the Okauia Low Temperature Geothermal System near the eastern boundary of the Hauraki Depression in North Island of New Zealand. The gravity study revealed a hidden extension of the Tertiary-age Waiteariki Ignimbrite, underlying plio-Pleistocene alluvium deposits of the Hinuera Formation, which locally host an aquifer of warm geothermal fluids. A 3D magnetic model derived from the ground magnetic measurements helped identify probable paleo-channels within the sedimentary sequence of the Hinuera Formation. These paleo-channels could represent higher permeability at shallow (resistivity surveys suggest that values less than 25 Ωm are indicative of the presence of warm waters at Okauia. Most warm water occurrences at Okauia take place near the Okauia Fault, particularly at 0 m RL (sea level) elevation. The near-surface extent of the Okauia Low Temperature Geothermal System can be approximated from the results of this study.

  15. Geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Quarterly technical progress report, 13 December 1976-12 March 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    During the second three months of this feasibility study to determine the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of heating Mammoth Lakes Village, California using geothermal energy, the following work was accomplished. A saturation survey of the number and types of space and water heaters currently in use in the Village was completed. Electric energy and ambient temperature metering equipment was installed. Peak heating demand for Mammoth Lakes was estimated for the years 1985, 1990 and 2000. Buildings were selected which are considered typical of Mammoth Lakes in terms of their heating systems to be used in estimating the cost of installing hydronic heating systems in Mammoth. Block diagrams and an order of magnitude cost comparison were prepared for high-temperature and low-temperature geothermal district heating systems. Models depicting a geothermal district heating system and a geothermal-electric power plant were designed, built and delivered to ERDA in Washington. Local input to the feasibility study was obtained from representatives of the State of California Departments of Transportation and Fish and Game, US Forest Service, and Mono County Planning Department.

  16. Temperature of ground water at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1979- 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulachok, Gary N.

    1986-01-01

    Anthropogenic heat production has undoubtedly caused increased ground-water temperatures in many parts of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as shown by temperatures of 98 samples and logs of 40 wells measured during 1979-81. Most sample temperatures were higher than 12.6 degrees Celsius (the local mean annual air temperature), and many logs depict cooling trends with depth (anomalous gradients). Heating of surface and shallow-subsurface materials has likely caused the elevated temperatures and anomalous gradients. Solar radiation on widespread concrete and asphalt surfaces, fossil-fuel combustion, and radiant losses from buried pipelines containing steam and process chemicals are believed to be the chief sources of heat. Some heat from these and other sources is transferred to deeper zones, mainly by conduction. Temperatures in densely urbanized areas are commonly highest directly beneath the land surface and decrease progressively with depth. Temperatures in sparsely urbanized areas generally follow the natural geothermal gradient and increase downward at about that same rate.

  17. Geothermal resources in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saibi, Hakim [Laboratory of Geothermics, Department of Earth Resources Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    The geothermal resources in Algeria are of low-enthalpy type. Most of these geothermal resources are located in the northeastern of the country. There are more than 240 thermal springs in Algeria. Three geothermal zones have been delineated according to some geological and thermal considerations: (1) The Tlemcenian dolomites in the northwestern part of Algeria, (2) carbonate formations in the northeastern part of Algeria and (3) the sandstone Albian reservoir in the Sahara (south of Algeria). The northeastern part of Algeria is geothermally very interesting. Two conceptual geothermal models are presented, concerning the northern and southern part of Algeria. Application of gas geothermometry to northeastern Algerian gases suggests that the reservoir temperature is around 198 C. The quartz geothermometer when applied to thermal springs gave reservoir temperature estimates of about 120 C. The thermal waters are currently used in balneology and in a few experimental direct uses (greenhouses and space heating). The total heat discharge from the main springs and existing wells is approximately 642 MW. The total installed capacity from producing wells and thermal springs is around 900 MW. (author)

  18. Development of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the geothermal development promotion survey project. NEDO is taking the lead in investigation and development to reduce risks for private business entities and promote their development. The program is being moved forward by dividing the surveys into three ranks of A, B and C from prospects of geothermal resource availability and the state of data accumulation. The survey A lacks number of data, but covers areas as wide as 100 to 300 km{sup 2}, and studies possible existence of high-temperature geothermal energy. The survey B covers areas of 50 to 70 km{sup 2}, investigates availability of geothermal resources, and assesses environmental impacts. The survey C covers areas of 5 to 10 km{sup 2}, and includes production well drilling and long-term discharge tests, other than those carried out by the surveys A and B. Results derived in each fiscal year are evaluated and judged to establish development plans for the subsequent fiscal year. This paper summarizes development results on 38 areas from among 45 areas surveyed since fiscal 1980. Development promotion surveys were carried out over seven areas in fiscal 1994. Development is in progress not only on utilization of high-temperature steam, but also on binary cycle geothermal power generation utilizing hot waters of 80 to 150{degree}C. Fiscal 1994 has carried out discussions for spread and practical use of the systems (particularly on economic effects), and development of small-to-medium scale binary systems. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. STATIC{sub T}EMP: a useful computer code for calculating static formation temperatures in geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoyo, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Temixco (Mexico); Garcia, A.; Santoyo, S. [Unidad Geotermia, Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico); Espinosa, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Co. Vicentina (Mexico); Hernandez, I. [ITESM, Centro de Sistemas de Manufactura, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The development and application of the computer code STATIC{sub T}EMP, a useful tool for calculating static formation temperatures from actual bottomhole temperature data logged in geothermal wells is described. STATIC{sub T}EMP is based on five analytical methods which are the most frequently used in the geothermal industry. Conductive and convective heat flow models (radial, spherical/radial and cylindrical/radial) were selected. The computer code is a useful tool that can be reliably used in situ to determine static formation temperatures before or during the completion stages of geothermal wells (drilling and cementing). Shut-in time and bottomhole temperature measurements logged during well completion activities are required as input data. Output results can include up to seven computations of the static formation temperature by each wellbore temperature data set analysed. STATIC{sub T}EMP was written in Fortran-77 Microsoft language for MS-DOS environment using structured programming techniques. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The source code and its computational architecture as well as the input and output files are described in detail. Validation and application examples on the use of this computer code with wellbore temperature data (obtained from specialised literature) and with actual bottomhole temperature data (taken from completion operations of some geothermal wells) are also presented. (Author)

  20. Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2010-09-17

    Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology

  1. On calculation of a steam-water flow in a geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulyupin, A. N.; Chermoshentseva, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    Approaches to calculation of a steam-water flow in a geothermal well are considered. For hydraulic applications, a WELL-4 model of a steam-water well is developed. Data obtained using this model are compared with experimental data and also with calculations by similar models including the well-known HOLA model. The capacity of the A-2 well in the Mutnovskoe flash-steam field (Kamchatka half-island, Russia) after planned reconstruction is predicted.

  2. Assessment of water management tools for the geothermal reservoir Waiwera (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael; Altmannsberger, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Water management tools are essential to ensure the conservation of natural resources. The geothermal hot water reservoir below the village of Waiwera, on the Northern Island of New Zealand is used commercially since 1863. The continuous production of 50 °C hot geothermal water, to supply hotels and spas, has a negative impact on the reservoir. Until the year 1969 from all wells drilled the warm water flow was artesian. Due to overproduction the water needs to be pumped up nowadays. Further, within the years 1975 to 1976 the warm water seeps on the beach of Waiwera ran dry. In order to protect the reservoir and the historical and tourist site in the early 1980s a Water Management Plan was deployed. The "Auckland Regional Water Board" today "Auckland Regional Council" established guidelines to enable a sustainable management [1]. The management plan demands that the water level in the official and appropriate observation well of the council is 0.5 m above sea level throughout the year in average. Almost four decades of data (since 1978 until today) are now available [2]. The minimum water level was observed beginning of the 1980s with -1.25 m and the maximum recently with 1.6 m. The higher the production rates from the field, the lower the water level in the observation well. Highest abstraction rates reached almost 1,500 m3/day and lowest were just above 500 m3/day. Several models of varying complexity where used from purely data driven statistical to fully coupled process simulation models. In all cases the available data were used for calibration and the models were then applied for predictive purposes. We used the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency index to quantify their predictive ability. The recommendation for the full implementation of the water management plan is the regular revision of an existing multivariate regression model which is based on the Theis well equation. Further, we suggest improving the underlying geological model of the process simulations to

  3. High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, Matthew; Hazelton, Craig; Kano, Kimi

    2010-12-31

    The development of highly reliable downhole equipment is an essential element in enabling the widespread utilization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The downhole equipment used in these systems will be required to operate at high voltages and temperatures on the order of 200 to 250°C (and eventually to 300°C). These conditions exceed the practical operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating lifetime of tools such as Electric Submersible Pumps (ESPs). In this work, high-temperature insulations based on composite materials were developed and demonstrated. The products of this work were found to exhibit electrical resistivities and dielectric breakdown strengths that PEEK at temperatures above 250C. In addition, sub-scale motor windings were fabricated and tested to validate the performance of this technology

  4. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Lance G. [Energent Corporation, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required

  5. The impact of temperature on microbial diversity and AOA activity in the Tengchong Geothermal Field, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haizhou; Yang, Qunhui; Li, Jian; Gao, Hang; Li, Ping; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2015-11-01

    Using a culture-independent method that combines CARD-FISH, qPCR and 16S rDNA, we investigated the abundance, community structure and diversity of microbes along a steep thermal gradient (50-90 °C) in the Tengchong Geothermal Field. We found that Bacteria and Archaea abundance changed markedly with temperature changes and that the number of cells was lowest at high temperatures (90.8 °C). Under low-temperature conditions (52.3-74.6 °C), the microbial communities were dominated by Bacteria, which accounted for 60-80% of the total number of cells. At 74.6 °C, Archaea were dominant, and at 90.8 °C, they accounted for more than 90% of the total number of cells. Additionally, the microbial communities at high temperatures (74.6-90.8 °C) were substantially simpler than those at the low-temperature sites. Only a few genera (e.g., bacterial Caldisericum, Thermotoga and Thermoanaerobacter, archaeal Vulcanisaeta and Hyperthermus) often dominated in high-temperature environments. Additionally, a positive correlation between Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea (AOA) activity and temperature was detected. AOA activity increased from 17 to 52 pmol of NO2- per cell d-1 with a temperature change from 50 to 70 °C.

  6. Geothermal investigations in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Ravnik

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and the results of geothermal investigations, based on seventy-two boreholes in the territory of the Republic of Slovenia.The data of fundamental geothermal quantities: formation temperature, thermal conductivity, and radiogenic heat production of rocks as well as surface heat flow density are stored in a computerized data base. Their synthesis is given in the map of formation temperatures at 1000 m depth and in the map of surface heat flow density. In both maps the thermal difference between the Pannonian basin in theeastern and the Dinarides in the western part of Slovenia is clearly expressed.However, in the boundary area between these two tectonic units, for a distance of about 100 km in SW-NE direction, elevated horizontal gradients of formation temperature as well as heat flow density are evident. A small positive thermal anomaly in the Ljubljana depression is conspicuous.The low-temperature geothermal resources in Slovenia such as thermalsprings and thermal water from boreholes, are estimated to have a flow rate of 1120 kg/s, corresponding to the ideal total heat production of 144 MWt. In the geothermally promising areas amounting to 3200 km2 the rate of accessible resource base (ARB down to the depth of 3 km has been assessed to about 8.5 x lO 20» J.

  7. World Geothermal Congress WGC-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses materials and results of the World Geothermal Congress that was held in Melbourne (Australia) from April 19 to April 25, 2015. Information on the extent and technological features of utilization of geothermal resources for heat supply and power production, as well as in other economic areas, is given. A stable growth in the capacity and number of geothermal power systems that is determined by ecological cleanliness, economic efficiency, and the highest (among renewable energy sources) indicators of installed capacity utilization is shown. It was noted that combined schemes of geothermal power plants (GPPs), such as turbine units of different type (binary units, units with one or two separation pressures, etc.), have become more frequently used to increase the efficiency of utilization of geothermal heat carrier. Actual data determining room heating systems with the total worldwide capacity of nearly 50000 MW thermal (MWt) as the most currently significant segment of consumption of geothermal waters are given. In addition, geothermal resources are also utilized in soil pumps, balneological and sports basins, greenhouse complexes, and other manufactures. It was noted that geological studies were carried out in more than 40 countries, with the development of methods of simulation of tanks for the existing and new geothermal fields. Trends of development and the role of geothermal power engineering in the energy supply of many countries are shown. It was shown that prospects for the development of geothermal power generation are significantly associated with utilization of low-temperature geothermal sources in binary power generating units, as well as with the increase in installed capacity of operating geothermal power plants (GPPs) without drilling additional wells, i.e., by using waste geothermal heat carrier in binary-cycle or combined-cycle power plants. The article provides data on a pilot binary power unit at Pauzhetka GPP and on a

  8. Modelling water temperature in TOXSWA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Deneer, J.W.; Adriaanse, P.I.

    2010-01-01

    A reasonably accurate estimate of the water temperature is necessary for a good description of the degradation of plant protection products in water which is used in the surface water model TOXSWA. Based on a consideration of basic physical processes that describe the influence of weather on the

  9. The chemistry and isotopic composition of waters in the low-enthalpy geothermal system of Cimino-Vico Volcanic District, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistel, Maria; Hurwitz, Shaul; Evans, William; Barbieri, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Geothermal energy exploration is based in part on interpretation of the chemistry, temperature, and discharge rate of thermal springs. Here we present the major element chemistry and the δD, δ18O, 87Sr/86Sr and δ11B isotopic ratio of groundwater from the low-enthalpy geothermal system near the city of Viterbo in the Cimino-Vico volcanic district of west-Central Italy. The geothermal system hosts many thermal springs and gas vents, but the resource is still unexploited. Water chemistry is controlled by mixing between low salinity,HCO3-rich fresh waters (<24.2°C) flowing in shallow volcanic rocks and SO4-rich thermal waters (25.3°C to 62.2°C) ascending from deep, high permeability Mesozoic limestones. The (equivalent) SO4/Cl (0.01–0.02), Na/Cl (2.82–5.83) and B/Cl ratios (0.02–0.38) of thermal waters differs from the ratios in other geothermal systems from Central Italy, probably implying a lack of hydraulic continuity across the region. The δ18O (−6.6‰ to −5.9‰) and δD (−40.60‰ to −36.30‰) isotopic composition of spring water suggest that the recharge area for the geothermal system is the summit region of Mount Cimino. The strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) of thermal waters (0.70797–0.70805) are consistent with dissolution of the Mesozoic evaporite-carbonate units that constitute the reservoir, and the ratios of cold fresh waters mainly reflect shallow circulation through the volcanic cover and some minor admixture (<10%) of thermal water as well. The boron isotopic composition (δ11B) of fresh waters (−5.00 and 6.12‰) is similar to that of the volcanic cover, but the δ11B of thermal waters (−8.37‰ to −4.12‰) is a mismatch for the Mesozoic reservoir rocks and instead reflects dissolution of secondary boron minerals during fluid ascent through flysch units that overlie the reservoir. A slow and tortuous ascent enhances extraction of boron but also promotes conductive cooling, partially masking the heat present in the

  10. New Zealand geothermal: Wairakei -- 40 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This quarterly bulletin highlights the geothermal developments in New Zealand with the following articles: A brief history of the Wairakei geothermal power project; Geothermal resources in New Zealand -- An overview; Domestic and commercial heating and bathing -- Rotorua area; Kawerau geothermal development: A case study; Timber drying at Kawerau; Geothermal greenhouses at Kawerau; Drying of fibrous crops using geothermal steam and hot water at the Taupo Lucerne Company; Prawn Park -- Taupo, New Zealand; Geothermal orchids; Miranda hot springs; and Geothermal pipeline.

  11. Geothermal resources of Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metesh, J.

    1994-06-01

    The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology has updated its inventory of low and moderate temperature resources for the state and has assisted the Oregon Institute of Technology - GeoHeat Center and the University of Utah Research Institute in prioritizing and collocating important geothermal resource areas. The database compiled for this assessment contains information on location, flow, water chemistry, and estimated reservoir temperatures for 267 geothermal well and springs in Montana. For this assessment, the minimum temperature for low-temperature resource is defined as 10{degree} C above the mean annual air temperature at the surface. The maximum temperature for a moderate-temperature resource is defined as greater than 50{degree} C. Approximately 12% of the wells and springs in the database have temperatures above 50{degree} C, 17% are between 30{degree} and 50{degree} C, 29% are between 20{degree} and 30{degree}C, and 42% are between 10{degree} and 20{degree} C. Low and moderate temperature wells and springs can be found in nearly all areas of Montana, but most are in the western third of the state. Information sources for the current database include the MBMG Ground Water Information Center, the USGS statewide database, the USGS GEOTHERM database, and new information collected as part of this program. Five areas of Montana were identified for consideration in future investigations of geothermal development. The areas identified are those near Bozeman, Ennis, Butte, Boulder, and Camas Prairie. These areas were chosen based on the potential of the resource and its proximity to population centers.

  12. Efficiency of temporary storage of geothermal waters in a lake system: Monitoring the changes of water quality and bacterial community structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Kosáros, Tünde; Janurik, Endre; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2017-12-01

    Disposal of used geothermal waters in Hungary often means temporary storage in reservoir lakes to reduce temperature and improve water quality. In this study, the physical and chemical properties and changes in the bacterial community structure of a reservoir lake system in southeast region of Hungary were monitored and compared through 2 years, respectively. The values of biological oxygen demand, concentrations of ammonium ion, total inorganic nitrogen, total phosphorous, and total phenol decreased, whereas oxygen saturation, total organic nitrogen, pH, and conductivity increased during the storage period. Bacterial community structure of water and sediment samples was compared by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) following the amplification of the 16S rRNA gene. According to the DGGE patterns, greater seasonal than spatial differences of bacterial communities were revealed in both water and sediment of the lakes. Representatives of the genera Arthrospira and Anabaenopsis (cyanobacteria) were identified as permanent and dominant members of the bacterial communities.

  13. Geothermal initiatives in Central America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanold, R.J.; Loose, V.W.; Laughlin, A.W.; Wade, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development is supporting a new project in energy and resources exploitation for Central America. One of the largest components of the project involves exploration and reservoir development investigations directed at enhancing the production of electricity from the region's geothermal resources. An assessment of the geothermal resources of Honduras is in progress, and interesting geothermal regions in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica are being explored. Well-logging activities are in progress in the production wells at the Miravalles geothermal field in Costa Rica, and preparations are being made for logging critical wells at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. A self-contained logging truck, complete with high-temperature logging cable and logging tools designed for geothermal service, is being fabricated and will be made available for dedicated use throughout Central America. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of water samples collected in Panama are being evaluated to select a high-priority geothermal site in that country. Application of low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal fluids for industrial and agricultural processes is being investigated in Guatemala.

  14. Relationship between water chemistry and sediment mineralogy in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field: a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N. (Univ. de Perpignan, France); Thompson, J.M.; Ball, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical compositions of waters collected from the Cerro Prieto geothermal production wells and hydrothermal emanations are different. Compared to the Cerro Prieto well waters, the surficial waters generally contain significantly less potassium, slightly less calcium and chloride, and significantly more magnesium and sulfate. In comparison to the unaltered sediments, the changes in the mineralogy of the altered sediments appear to be controlled by the type of emanation (well, spring, mud pot, geyser, fumarole, or cold pool). However, an increase in quartz and potassium feldspar percentages seems to be characteristic of the majority of the sediments in contact with geothermal fluids. Preliminary attempts to model the chemical processes occurring in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field using chemical equilibrium calculations are reported. For this purpose the chemical compositions of thermal waters (well and surficial emanation) were used as input data to make calculations with SOLMNEQ and WATEQ2 computer programs. Then the theoretical mineral composition of altered sediments was predicted and compared to the mineralogy actually observed in the solid samples.

  15. Assessment of geothermal resources of the United States, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffler, L.J.P. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The geothermal resource assessment presented is a refinement and updating of USGS Circular 726. Nonproprietary information available in June 1978 is used to assess geothermal energy in the ground and, when possible, to evaluate the fraction that might be recovered at the surface. Five categories of geothermal energy are discussed: conduction-dominated regimes, igneous-related geothermal systems, high-temperature (> 150/sup 0/C) and intermediate-temperature (90 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal convection systems, low-temperature (< 90/sup 0/C) geothermal waters, and geopressured-geothermal energy (both thermal energy and energy from dissolved methane). Assessment data are presented on three colored maps prepared in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers on these five categories.

  16. Biological nitrogen fixation in acidic high-temperature geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Lange, Rachel K; Boyd, Eric S; Peters, John W

    2011-08-01

    The near ubiquitous distribution of nifH genes in sediments sampled from 14 high-temperature (48.0-89.0°C) and acidic (pH 1.90-5.02) geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park suggested a role for the biological reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) (e.g. nitrogen fixation or diazotrophy) in these environments. nifH genes from these environments formed three unique phylotypes that were distantly related to acidiphilic, mesophilic diazotrophs. Acetylene reduction assays and (15) N(2) tracer studies in microcosms containing sediments sampled from acidic and high-temperature environments where nifH genes were detected confirmed the potential for biological N(2) reduction in these environments. Rates of acetylene reduction by sediment-associated populations were positively correlated with the concentration of NH(4)(+), suggesting a potential relationship between NH(4)(+) consumption and N(2) fixation activity. Amendment of microcosms with NH(4)(+) resulted in increased lag times in acetylene reduction assays. Manipulation of incubation temperature and pH in acetylene reduction assays indicated that diazotrophic populations are specifically adapted to local conditions. Incubation of sediments in the presence of a N(2) headspace yielded a highly enriched culture containing a single nifH phylotype. This phylotype was detected in all 14 geothermal spring sediments examined and its abundance ranged from ≈ 780 to ≈ 6800 copies (g dry weight sediment)(-1), suggesting that this organism may contribute N to the ecosystems. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrate thermoacidiphilic N(2) fixation in the natural environment and extend the upper temperature for biological N(2) fixation in terrestrial systems. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. THE OPERATION OF POWER EQUIPMENT DURING THE DISPOSAL OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES ASSOCIATED WITH GEOTHERMAL WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ya. Akhmedov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to assess the appropriateness of utilising combustible gases associated with geothermal water with  low gas factor and the possibility of its practical implementation with  the provision of power equipment operation of geothermal systems  with a nonscaling mode.Methods. The investigations were carried out by analysing the content of associated combustible gases in the underground  thermomineral waters of the Cis-Caucasian deposits on the basis of  an assessment of the feasibility of their utilisation for heating and  hot water supply.Results. A review of practically existing heat and power schemes  utilising geothermal water sources is carried out. Based on the  studies conducted, it is found that methane (70-90% is prevalent in the water under consideration; meanwhile, the content of heavy hydrocarbons does not exceed 10%. The concentration of carbon  dioxide is 3 ÷ 6%, nitrogen 1 ÷ 4%. Depending on the depth of the  aquifer, gas factors range from 1 to 5 m3/ m3. As a result of the  analysis of the operation of typical thermal distribution stations, it is  established that a violation of the carbon dioxide equilibrium in water leads to the formation of a solid phase of calcium carbonate on the  heat exchange surface. A technique for estimating the relationship between the partial pressure of methane and carbon dioxide with the total pressure in a solution of geothermal water is proposed. A  scheme for the efficient operation of thermal distribution stations  with the prevention of carbonate deposits formation by using the  combustion products of the used gas combined with the injection of waste water back into the aquifer is presented.Conclusion. As a result of the conducted studies, the possibility of  using associated combustible gases in geothermal wells is  established using differences in their solubility and that of carbon  dioxide. In this case, the protection of

  18. Numerical investigation of the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: a case study of the Daming geothermal field in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuyang; Song, Hongqing; Killough, John; Du, Li; Sun, Pengguang

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of geothermal energy is clean and has great potential worldwide, and it is important to utilize geothermal energy in a sustainable manner. Mathematical modeling studies of geothermal reservoirs are important as they evaluate and quantify the complex multi-physical effects in geothermal reservoirs. However, previous modeling efforts lack the study focusing on the emission reduction efficiency and the deformation at geothermal wellbores caused by geothermal water extraction/circulation. Emission efficiency is rather relevant in geothermal projects introduced in areas characterized by elevated air pollution where the utilization of geothermal energy is as an alternative to burning fossil fuels. Deformation at geothermal wellbores is also relevant as significant deformation caused by water extraction can lead to geothermal wellbore instability and can consequently decrease the effectiveness of the heat extraction process in geothermal wells. In this study, the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir in Daming County, China, are numerically investigated based on a coupled multi-physical model. Relationships between the efficiency of emission reduction and heat extraction, deformation at geothermal well locations, and geothermal field parameters including well spacing, heat production rate, re-injection temperature, rock stiffness, and geothermal well placement patterns are analyzed. Results show that, although large heat production rates and low re-injection temperatures can lead to decreased heat production in the last 8 years of heat extraction, they still improve the overall heat production capacity and emission reduction capacity. Also, the emission reduction capacity is positively correlated with the heat production capacity. Deformation at geothermal wellbore locations is alleviated by smaller well spacing, lower heat production rates, and smaller numbers of injectors in the well pattern, and by

  19. Protection of hotwater line of geothermal water from wells GTD-1,2,3 in Ďurkov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wittenberger

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal energy nowadays belongs to the most interesting, renewable, progressive and ecologically pure energies. Its utilization began long ago, but because the development and exploration show that fossil fuels are depletable in 40 – 50 years, it is needed to pay a greater attention to perspective and economically advantageous energies, among which the geothermal energy indisputably belongs. Since the development continually advances also in the drilling technique and technology, it is necessary to conform to this trend and to develop such technologies, procedures and devices, which would, unlike to those currently used, save time, machinery, environment and would be economically more acceptable.On the basis of results of injection pump tests and physical -chemical analyses it was found out that geothermal water is strongly mineralized. Depending on the manipulation method and exploitation water tends to form incrusts and also is significantly corrosive. To prevent this undesirable formation of the corrosion and incrustation, some geothermal water inhibitors were tested.

  20. Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: development of computer model and acquisition of field temperature data. Part I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooley, G.R.

    1980-03-01

    A downhole thermal simulator has been developed to improve understanding of the high downhole temperatures that affect many design factors in geothermal wells. This development is documented and field temperature data presented for flowing and shut-in conditions.

  1. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Hawthorne, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-04

    Site characteristics pertinent to the geothermal development are described, including: physiography, demography, economy, and goals and objectives of the citizens as they relate to geothermal development. The geothermal reservoir is characterized on the basis of available information. The probable drilling depth to the reservoir, anticipated water production rates, water quality, and resource temperature are indicated. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the near future at Hawthorne are described. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development are discussed, including the financial, environmental, and legal and regulatory aspects. The various steps that are necessary to accomplish the construction of the geothermal district heating system are described.

  2. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Gabbs, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-09

    Characteristics of the site significant to the prospect for geothermal development are described, including: physiography, demography, economy, and the goals and objectives of the citizens as they relate to geothermal development. The geothermal resource evaluation is described, including the depth to reservoir, production rates of existing water wells, water quality, and the resource temperature. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the foreseeable future at Gabbs are described. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development are discussed, including the financial, environmental, legal, and regulatory requirements. The main resource, engineering and institutional considerations involved in a geothermal district heating system for Gabbs are summarized.

  3. Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Corrie E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harto, Christopher B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schroeder, Jenna N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Martino, Louis E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Horner, Robert M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2

  4. Review and problem definition of water/rock reactions associated with injection of spent geothermal fluids from a geothermal plant into aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elders, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Among the technical problems faced by the burgeoning geothermal industry is the disposal of spent fluids from power plants. Except in unusual circumstances the normal practice, especially in the USA, is to pump these spent fluids into injection wells to prevent contamination of surface waters, and possibly in some cases, to reduce pressure drawdown in the producing aquifers. This report is a survey of experience in geothermal injection, emphasizing geochemical problems, and a discussion of approaches to their possible mitigation. The extraction of enthalpy from geothermal fluid in power plants may cause solutions to be strongly supersaturated in various dissolved components such as silica, carbonates, sulfates, and sulfides. Injection of such supersaturated solutions into disposal wells has the potential to cause scaling in the well bores and plugging of the aquifers, leading to loss of injectivity. Various aspects of the geochemistry of geothermal brines and their potential for mineral formation are discussed, drawing upon a literature survey. Experience of brine treatment and handling, and the economics of mineral extraction are also addressed in this report. Finally suggestions are made on future needs for possible experimental, field and theoretical studies to avoid or control mineral scaling.

  5. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  6. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif; Estudio geoquimico de los procesos de interaccion agua-roca sobre sistemas goetermales de aguas alcalinas en granitoides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buil gutierrez, B.; Garcia Sanz, S.; Lago San Jose, M.; Arranz Uague, E.; Auque Sanz, L. [Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  7. In situ evaporation of geothermal water; In situ-Verdampfung von geothermischen Waessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, W.

    2002-07-01

    A method and two technical solutions are presented for converting hot, pressurised geothermal water into water vapour in the deep well and the neighbouring rock by means of pressure reduction. The hot steam generated is led to the surface to drive turbogenerators. [German] Es werden eine Methode und zwei technische Loesungsansaetze vorgestellt, mit denen ausreichend heisse und unter hohem Druck stehende geothermische Waesser im tiefen Bohrloch und im angrenzenden Gesteinsraum durch Druckverringerung in Wasserdampf umgewandelt werden koennen. Der erzeugte Heissdampf stroemt durch Bohrungen zur Erdoberflaeche und treibt dort Turbogeneratoren an. (orig.)

  8. Community Structure and Function of High-temperature Chlorophototrophic Microbial Mats Inhabiting Diverse Geothermal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Inskeep

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average~ 53 Mbp/site were subjected to multiple taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional analyses. All methods, including G+C content distribution, MEGAN analyses and oligonucleotide frequency-based clustering, provided strong support for the dominant community members present in each site. Cyanobacteria were only observed in non-sulfidic sites; de novo assemblies were obtained for Synechococcus-like populations at Chocolate Pots (CP_7 and Fischerella-like populations at White Creek (WC_6. Chloroflexi-like sequences (esp. Roseiflexus and/or Chloroflexus spp. were observed in all six samples and contained genes involved in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and the 3-hydroxypropionate carbon fixation pathway. Other major sequence assemblies were obtained for a Chlorobiales population from CP_7 (proposed family Thermochlorobacteriaceae, and an anoxygenic, sulfur-oxidizing Thermochromatium-like (Gamma-proteobacteria population from Bath Lake Vista Annex (BLVA_20. Additional sequence coverage is necessary to establish more complete assemblies of other novel bacteria in these sites (e.g., Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes; however, current assemblies suggested that several of these organisms play important roles in heterotrophic and fermentative metabolisms. Definitive linkages were established between several of the dominant phylotypes present in these habitats and important functional

  9. Community Structure and Function of High-Temperature Chlorophototrophic Microbial Mats Inhabiting Diverse Geothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Christian G.; Inskeep, William P.; Herrgard, Markus J.; Jay, Zackary J.; Rusch, Douglas B.;  Tringe, Susannah G.; Niki Parenteau, M.; Ward, David M.; Boomer, Sarah M.; Bryant, Donald A.;  Miller, Scott R.

    2013-01-01

    Six phototrophic microbial mat communities from different geothermal springs (YNP) were studied using metagenome sequencing and geochemical analyses. The primary goals of this work were to determine differences in community composition of high-temperature phototrophic mats distributed across the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem, and to identify metabolic attributes of predominant organisms present in these communities that may correlate with environmental attributes important in niche differentiation. Random shotgun metagenome sequences from six phototrophic communities (average ∼53 Mbp/site) were subjected to multiple taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional analyses. All methods, including G + C content distribution, MEGAN analyses, and oligonucleotide frequency-based clustering, provided strong support for the dominant community members present in each site. Cyanobacteria were only observed in non-sulfidic sites; de novo assemblies were obtained for Synechococcus-like populations at Chocolate Pots (CP_7) and Fischerella-like populations at White Creek (WC_6). Chloroflexi-like sequences (esp. Roseiflexus and/or Chloroflexus spp.) were observed in all six samples and contained genes involved in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis and the 3-hydroxypropionate carbon fixation pathway. Other major sequence assemblies were obtained for a Chlorobiales population from CP_7 (proposed family Thermochlorobacteriaceae), and an anoxygenic, sulfur-oxidizing Thermochromatium-like (Gamma-proteobacteria) population from Bath Lake Vista Annex (BLVA_20). Additional sequence coverage is necessary to establish more complete assemblies of other novel bacteria in these sites (e.g., Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes); however, current assemblies suggested that several of these organisms play important roles in heterotrophic and fermentative metabolisms. Definitive linkages were established between several of the dominant phylotypes present in these habitats and important functional

  10. One-pot synthesis of ternary Ag₂CO₃/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst in natural geothermal water with enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaxi; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2014-09-15

    Geothermal water is a clean, cheap and renewable resource and it is widely distributed all over the world. In this work, ternary Ag2CO3/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst has been successfully synthesized via a one-pot precipitation method in natural geothermal water at room temperature, wherein the geothermal water serves as the source of chlorine and carbonate. The results suggest that the Ag/AgCl nanoparticles are anchored on the surface of Ag2CO3 and Ag2CO3/Ag/AgCl composite shows strong absorption ability in the visible light region. The evaluation of the photocatalytic activity indicates that the as-synthesized Ag2CO3/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst exhibits higher photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution under visible light irradiation than one-component (Ag2CO3), two-component (Ag/AgCl, Ag2CO3/AgCl) and the mechanical mixture of Ag2CO3 and Ag/AgCl. The trapping experiments confirmed that holes (h(+)) and (•)O2(-) were the two main active species in the photocatalytic process. Finally, a possible Z-scheme photocatalytic mechanism of the charge transfer was proposed for the enhanced photocatalytic performance. This work may open up new insights into the application of cheap geothermal water resources in the word and provide new opportunities for facile fabrication of Ag/AgCl-based photocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Using TOUGH2/ECO2H for modeling high-pressure and high-temperature CO2-enhanced geothermal energy extraction from saline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, A.; Pruess, K.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional geothermal energy uses water as the fluid to transport heat to the surface. This has a number of drawbacks principally related to strong water-rock chemical reactions, but also in terms of environmental impacts through overdraft of shallow aquifers with valuable water resources. Various authors have proposed the use of CO2 instead of water to transfer heat because such use may result in better rate of heat extraction, less fluid-rock reactivity, and less demand for scarce ground or surface water resources. TOUGH2/ECO2H was developed to study the behavior of high-pressure high-temperature H2O-CO2-NaCl geothermal systems. To demonstrate and test the code, we have modeled an idealized fractured geothermal system. Based on a five-spot well pattern and its inherent symmetry, we use a model grid of 1/8 of a square with sides of 1 km. In the model, CO2 is injected at the four corner-wells at 20 °C and constant pressure of 2.1*10^7 Pa into a variable salinity reservoir which is initially at 200 °C. The center well produces fluid at a constant pressure of 1.9*10^7 Pa. Initially, H2O + NaCl are produced, followed by a mixture of H2O + CO2 + NaCl and, finally only CO2. As soon as the injected CO2 reaches the production well, usually less than 2 months after injection begins, there is a drastic drop in heat production. This decrease occurs because of a reduced flow rate induced by reduction in effective permeability associated with two-phase flow (liquid + gas) in the reservoir. As the liquid phase dries out, the CO2 flow rate increases slowly over about 2-3 years and the heat production reaches a maximum rate that is about 40% larger than the initial rate of production with just water. Our modeling suggests that this same behavior occurs for highly saline geothermal reservoirs, even though the absolute rate of heat production is about 30% lower than the non-saline models. The decrease in production for saline systems is due to a marked reduction in permeability

  12. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ15NNO2− and δ18ONO2−, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus.” The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ18O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ18O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ18ONO2− in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. IMPORTANCE Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying

  13. Tapping the main stream of geothermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    The development of geothermal energy resources in the United States is discussed. The distribution of underground water resources at temperatures above 90 C and depths up to 3 km in the continental U.S. is examined, and it is pointed out that whereas geothermal resources have been detected under 24 states, only 220 quadrillion Btu of energy recoverable as 24 GW of electricity for 30 years has been conclusively located, all of it in the western states. Direct-flash technology, which generates electricity from hydrothermal fluid at a temperature above 210 C with an efficiency of 15% is presented, and the binary cycle technology required to generate electricity from lower-temperature fluids such as those in the 180 C reservoir of low-salinity brine at Heber in southern California is examined in detail. Questions of minerals and heat control in a geothermal turbine system and the environmental emissions from geothermal plants are addressed. The geothermal resources of the United States are classified as petrothermal, geopressurized and hydrothermal, and methods for extracting heat from these dry rocks, pressurized water and natural gas deposits and systems of steam and hot water are indicated. It is concluded that as fossil fuel energy costs rise, the trend favors geothermal energy, particularly that which can be developed from known hydrothermal resources

  14. Supercritical Geothermal Systems - A Review of Past Studies and Ongoing Research Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Dobson, Patrick; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Huenges, Ernst; Poletto, Flavio; Reinsch, Thomas; Sanjuan, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Supercritical geothermal systems are very high temperature geothermal systems that are located at depths near or below the brittle-ductile transition zone in the crust where the reservoir fluid is assumed to be in the supercritical state, e.g., for pure water temperature and pressure are respectively in excess of 374°C and 221 bar. These systems have garnered attention in recent years as a possible type of unconventional geothermal resource that could yield much higher...

  15. Removal of silica in geothermal water by addition of adsorbents; Kyuchakuzai tenka ni yoru jinetsu suichu no silica no jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umetsu, Y.; Narita, E.; Nakazawa, H.; Shimizu, K. [Iwate Univ., Morioka (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1997-06-01

    In the scales generated from geothermal wells, there are silica scale, the other carbonates and sulfates of calcium, composite scales containing the sulfides of metals or oxides and so forth, however, in case of Kakkonda geothermal well, the numerous scales contain silica as a major component. As for the measures to prevent the silica scaling, it is summarized to prevent the scale precipitation or to remove silica component previously. In this study, the removal of silicic acid from the geothermal water has been attempted to prevent the silica-scaling by addition of various iron-contained adsorbents to the water at 40degC. The mixing ratio of Fe in adsorbent to Si in geothermal water was 0.5 (mol/mol). The mixture was stirred at 200 rpm for 5 to 60 min. When allophane clay, tuff-mudstone or iron hydroxide sludge was used as adsorbents, residual silica concentration in the geothermal water was reduced to 300, 150 and 130 mg/l after 10-min. stirring, respectively. Consequently, iron hydroxide sludge and tuff-mudstone re estimated as a useful adsorbent. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Optimization of Wellhead Piping Design for Production Wells at Development of Steam-Water Geothermal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Shulyupin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, the exploitation of geothermal resources develops in a fair competition with other types of energy resources. This leads to actuality of questions which associated with the more efficient use of existing wells, because cost of their drilling is a significant share of geothermal projects. In domestic practice of development of geothermal resources the steam-water wells have greatest energy potential. One way to improve the performance of these wells is a providing of smooth change of direction of motion of steam-water mixture from the vertical, in the well, to the horizontal, in steam gathering system. Typical wellhead piping of domestic steam-water wells involves the removal of the mixture through a cross bar at a right angle. Cross bar can generate considerable pressure loss that increases the operating pressure at the mouth of the well and reduces flow rate. It seems reasonable to substitute the typical cross bar by smooth pipe bend. This reduces wellhead resistance coefficient by more than on 2. Increase of curvature radius of pipe bend reduces the pressure loss to a local resistance but increases the friction pressure loss. There is an optimal curvature radius of pipe bend for minimum pressure loss in view of a local resistance and friction in the pipe bend. Calculations have shown that the optimum value for the radius of curvature is found in the range from 1.4 to 4.5 tube internal diameters. However, for technological reasons it is recommended to choose the radius of curvature from 1.4 to 2.4 diameters. Mounting of smooth pipe bend on the wellhead can provide significant economic benefits. For Mutnovka field (Kamchatka, this effect is estimated at 17.5 million rubles in year.

  17. Development of geothermal field following the 2000 eruption of Usu volcano as revealed by ground temperature, resistivity and self-potential variations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. Mogi; N. Matsushima; S. Takakura; Y. Nishida; M. Saba

    2007-01-01

    .... We made repeated measurements of ground temperature, Self-Potential (SP) and electrical resistivity, in order to clarify the mechanism of development of the newly formed geothermal field on the fault zone...

  18. TEMLOPI: a thermal simulator for estimation of drilling mud and formation temperatures during drilling of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Hernandez, I.; Espinosa, G.; Santoyo, E.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the development and application of the numerical code TEMLOPI v1.0, a useful tool for estimating the temperature distribution of the fluids employed for drilling geothermal wells. The simulator also allows estimation of the thermal disturbance of the surrounding rock caused by fluid circulation and well shut-in. TEMLOPI v1.0 is based on a mathematical model which considers the main heat transfer mechanisms and the heat exchange between the circulating fluid and the surrounding rock formation that occur during drilling of geothermal wells. The simulator was written in Fortran 77 using modular (block) programming. It runs on most IBM compatible personal computers and can be used in-situ. Input data includes the well geometry, the fluid and flow characteristics and the initial (undisturbed) formation temperature. Output files contain the transient temperature distribution (temperature vs depth) in the fluid flowing down the drill pipe and the annulus, the well inner face and the radial distribution in the surrounding rock. The software code model, architecture, input and output files and the solution algorithm are described in detail. Results obtained were validated by comparison with data published in the specialized literature and with data from well Az-29 from the Los Azufres Mexican geothermal field.

  19. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  20. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaguchi, J.L.

    1979-03-19

    The fundamental objective of the water resources analysis was to assess the availability of surface and ground water for potential use as power plant make-up water in the major geothermal areas of California. The analysis was concentrated on identifying the major sources of surface and ground water, potential limitations on the usage of this water, and the resulting constraints on potentially developable electrical power in each geothermal resource area. Analyses were completed for 11 major geothermal areas in California: four in the Imperial Valley, Coso, Mono-Long Valley, Geysers-Calistoga, Surprise Valley, Glass Mountain, Wendel Amedee, and Lassen. One area in Hawaii, the Puna district, was also included in the analysis. The water requirements for representative types of energy conversion processes were developed using a case study approach. Cooling water requirements for each type of energy conversion process were estimated based upon a specific existing or proposed type of geothermal power plant. The make-up water requirements for each type of conversion process at each resource location were then estimated as a basis for analyzing any constraints on the megawatts which potentially could be developed.

  1. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  2. Fiscal 1996 development of geothermal water use power generation plant, etc. Development of the binary cycle power generation plant (development of 10MW class plant); 1996 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu. 10MW kyu plant no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of effectively utilizing medium and high temperature geothermal water type geothermal resource as unused resource, the paper described the development of the binary cycle power generation which generates electric power by heat-exchanging thermal energy of geothermal water with secondary medium using heat exchanger. The development was commenced at the same time as the fiscal 1974 Sunshine Project started, succeeding in constructing/operating a 1000kW class 2-system pilot plant by up to fiscal 1978. After that, the element research for the development of a 10MW demonstrative plant was commenced in fiscal 1979. For the purpose of effectively using geothermal water sleeping as unused resource which is weak in spontaneous welling, the development of the well submersible motor driven downhole pump was also commenced in fiscal 1983, and the development of the pump of demonstrative size (200t/h, 380m, 400kW, 200degC) was finished in fiscal 1992. In the Houhi Sugawara area, a typical medium/high temperature geothermal resource area, reservoirs were assessed starting fiscal 1985 to confirm the amount of geothermal resource by drilling test wells and by production/injection tests. In fiscal 1996, in addition to the environmental survey, conducted were manufacture/design, production/injection piping basic construction, etc. of the testing equipment of geothermal systems. 78 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Modelling global fresh surface water temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, L.P.H. van; Eikelboom, T.; Vliet, M.T.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2011-01-01

    Temperature directly determines a range of water physical properties including vapour pressure, surface tension, density and viscosity, and the solubility of oxygen and other gases. Indirectly water temperature acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing sediment

  4. Aerated drilling cutting transport analysis in geothermal well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakhyudin, Aris; Setiawan, Deni; Dwi Marjuan, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Aeratad drilling widely used for geothermal drilling especially when drilled into predicted production zone. Aerated drilling give better performance on preventing lost circulation problem, improving rate of penetration, and avoiding drilling fluid invasion to productive zone. While well is drilled, cutting is produced and should be carried to surface by drilling fluid. Hole problem, especially pipe sticking will occur while the cutting is not lifted properly to surface. The problem will effect on drilling schedule; non-productive time finally result more cost to be spent. Geothermal formation has different characteristic comparing oil and gas formation. Geothermal mainly has igneous rock while oil and gas mostly sedimentary rock. In same depth, formation pressure in geothermal well commonly lower than oil and gas well while formation temperature geothermal well is higher. While aerated drilling is applied in geothermal well, Igneous rock density has higher density than sedimentary rock and aerated drilling fluid is lighter than water based mud hence minimum velocity requirement to transport cutting is larger than in oil/gas well drilling. Temperature and pressure also has impact on drilling fluid (aerated) density. High temperature in geothermal well decrease drilling fluid density hence the effect of pressure and temperature also considered. In this paper, Aerated drilling cutting transport performance on geothermal well will be analysed due to different rock and drilling fluid density. Additionally, temperature and pressure effect on drilling fluid density also presented to merge.

  5. Application of geothermal energy for heating and fresh water production in a brackish water greenhouse desalination unit. A case study from Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Hacene [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, P.O. Box 151 (Algeria); Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Spahis, Nawel [Faculty of Sciences and Engineering Sciences, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef (Algeria); Goosen, Mattheus F. [Office of Research and Graduate Studies, Alfaisal University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Ghaffour, Noreddine [Middle East Desalination Research Center, P.O. Box 21, P.C. 133, Muscat (Oman); Drouiche, Nadjib [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 2 Bd Frantz Fanon BP399, Algiers (Algeria); Ouagued, Abdellah [Laboratory of Water and Environment, Hassiba Ben Bouali University, Chlef, P.O. Box 151 (Algeria)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this paper was to outline a proposed a new brackish water greenhouse desalination unit powered by geothermal energy for the development of arid and relatively cold regions, using Algeria as a case study. Countries which have abundant sea/brackish water resources and good geothermal conditions are ideal candidates for producing fresh water from sea/brackish water. The establishment of human habitats in these arid areas strongly depends on availability of fresh water. The main advantage of using geothermal energy to power brackish water greenhouse desalination units is that this renewable energy source can provide power 24 h a day. This resource is generally invariant with less intermittence problems compared to other renewable resources such as solar or wind energy. Geothermal resources can both be used to heat the greenhouses and to provide fresh water needed for irrigation of the crops cultivated inside the greenhouses. A review of the geothermal potential in the case study country is also outlined. (author)

  6. Reaction modeling in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Natural volcanic geothermal systems are open systems in term of matter and energy. Such systems are complex to model in terms of fluid chemistry, fluid flow and energy budget. Reaction modeling may be used to gain insight and possibly quantify chemical processes occurring within a system, for example fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction. Methods have been developed within the WATCH (Bjarnason, 1994; Arnórsson et al., 2007) and PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) programs to simulate reactions of multicomponent and multiphase systems to 300°C. The models include boiling and phase segregation (open system boiling), fluid-fluid mixing and fluid-rock interaction (gas-water-rock interaction). The models have been applied to quantify processes within the Hellisheidi geothermal system, Iceland. Open system boiling and fluid-rock interaction were simulated as a function of temperature, initial fluid composition and extent of reaction (T-X-ξ). In addition the interactions of magmatic gases with geothermal fluids and rocks were modeled. In this way various component behavior has been traced within the geothermal system and compared with observations of fluid composition and mineralogy. In addition, the reaction models have been used to evaluate the geochemical feasibility and best conditions of gas (CO2 and H2S) and waste water injection into geothermal system.

  7. Regional geothermal 3D modelling in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, S. E.; Balling, N.; Bording, T. S.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    In the pursuit of sustainable and low carbon emission energy sources, increased global attention has been given to the exploration and exploitation of geothermal resources within recent decades. In 2009 a national multi-disciplinary geothermal research project was established. As a significant part of this project, 3D temperature modelling is to be carried out, with special emphasis on temperatures of potential geothermal reservoirs in the Danish area. The Danish subsurface encompasses low enthalpy geothermal reservoirs of mainly Triassic and Jurassic age. Geothermal plants at Amager (Copenhagen) and Thisted (Northern Jutland) have the capacity of supplying the district heating network with up to 14 MW and 7 MW, respectively, by withdrawing warm pore water from the Gassum (Lower Jurassic/Upper Triassic) and Bunter (Lower Triassic) sandstone reservoirs, respectively. Explorative studies of the subsurface temperature regime typically are based on a combination of observations and modelling. In this study, the open-source groundwater modelling code MODFLOW is modified to simulate the subsurface temperature distribution in three dimensions by taking advantage of the mathematical similarity between saturated groundwater flow (Darcy flow) and heat conduction. A numerical model of the subsurface geology in Denmark is built and parameterized from lithological information derived from joint interpretation of seismic surveys and borehole information. Boundary conditions are constructed from knowledge about the heat flow from the Earth's interior and the shallow ground temperature. Matrix thermal conductivities have been estimated from analysis of high-resolution temperature logs measured in deep wells and porosity-depth relations are included using interpreted main lithologies. The model takes into account the dependency of temperature and pressure on thermal conductivity. Moreover, a transient model based correction of the paleoclimatic thermal disturbance caused by the

  8. Distribution of high-temperature (>150 °C) geothermal resources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, John H.; Priest, Susan S.

    2002-01-01

    California contains, by far, the greatest geothermal generating capacity in the United States, and with the possible exception of Alaska, the greatest potential for the development of additional resources. California has nearly 2/3 of the US geothermal electrical installed capacity of over 3,000 MW. Depending on assumptions regarding reservoir characteristics and future market conditions, additional resources of between 2,000 and 10,000 MWe might be developed (see e.g., Muffler, 1979).

  9. Geothermal Today - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-05-01

    U.S. Department of Energy 1999 Geothermal Energy Program Highlights The Hot Facts Getting into Hot Water Turning Waste water into Clean Energy Producing Even Cleaner Power Drilling Faster and Cheaper Program in Review 1999: The Year in Review JanuaryCal Energy announced sale of Coso geothermal power plants at China Lake, California, to Caithness Energy, for $277 million. U.S. Export-Import Bank completed a $50 million refinancing of the Leyte Geothermal Optimization Project in the Philippines. F

  10. Study of the geothermal production potential in the Williston Basin, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Min H.

    1991-09-10

    Preliminary studies of geothermal production potential for the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin have been carried out. Reservoir data such as formation depth, subsurface temperatures, and water quality were reviewed for geothermal brine production predictions. This study, in addition, provides important information about net pay thickness, porosity, volume of geothermal water available, and productivity index for future geothermal direct-use development. Preliminary results show that the Inyan Kara Formation of the Dakota Group is the most favorable geothermal resource in terms of water quality and productivity. The Madison, Duperow, and Red River Formations are deeper formations but because of their low permeability and great depth, the potential flow rates from these three formations are considerably less than those of the Inyan Kara Formation. Also, poor water quality and low porosity will make those formations less favorable for geothermal direct-use development.

  11. Development of hot water utilizing power plants in fiscal 1999. Development of technology to collect geothermal resources in great depths (Development of technology to produce geothermal resources in great depths); 1999 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Shinbu chinetsu shigen saishu gijutsu no kaihatsu / shinbu chinetsu shigen seisan gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    With an objective to develop geothermal resources, research and development has been performed on the production technologies for the deep-seated geothermal resources, such as pressure, temperature, flow speed and density (PTSD) logging technologies. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1999. In the actual well test on the developed D-probe, it was verified that the probe operates normally under high temperature environment (342 degrees C) which exceeds the measurement limit of conductive cables (315 degrees C). In developing the PTC monitoring technology, the downhole sampler was improved, and a test was performed in the actual hole in the Hijiori area in Yamagata Prefecture. As a result, collection of hot water of about 900 mL has become possible. In developing the high-temperature tracer monitoring technology, simulation was performed keeping in mind charging the tracer into the Hijiori geothermal area, whereas specifications for charging and collecting the tracer were determined. In developing the scale monitoring technology, experiments were carried out on the fluid systems under deep geothermal conditions by using scale forming devices, by which it was indicated that silica is the important scale constituent. (NEDO)

  12. Final Technical Report - 300°C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System For Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng-Po; Shaddock, David; Sandvik, Peter; Saia, Rich; Amita Patil, Alexey Vert; Zhang, Tan

    2012-11-30

    A silicon carbide (SiC) based electronic temperature sensor prototype has been demonstrated to operate at 300°C. We showed continuous operation of 1,000 hours with SiC operational amplifier and surface mounted discreet resistors and capacitors on a ceramic circuit board. This feasibility demonstration is a major milestone in the development of high temperature electronics in general and high temperature geothermal exploration and well management tools in particular. SiC technology offers technical advantages that are not found in competing technologies such as silicon-on-insulator (SOI) at high temperatures of 200°C to 300°C and beyond. The SiC integrated circuits and packaging methods can be used in new product introduction by GE Oil and Gas for high temperature down-hole tools. The existing SiC fabrication facility at GE is sufficient to support the quantities currently demanded by the marketplace, and there are other entities in the United States and other countries capable of ramping up SiC technology manufacturing. The ceramic circuit boards are different from traditional organic-based electronics circuit boards, but the fabrication process is compatible with existing ceramic substrate manufacturing. This project has brought high temperature electronics forward, and brings us closer to commercializing tools that will enable and reduce the cost of enhanced geothermal technology to benefit the public in terms of providing clean renewable energy at lower costs.

  13. Geothermal energy for greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacky Friedman

    2009-01-01

    Geothermal energy is heat (thermal) derived from the earth (geo). The heat flows along a geothermal gradient from the center of the earth to the surface. Most of the heat arrives at the surface of the earth at temperatures too low for much use. However, plate tectonics ensure that some of the heat is concentrated at temperatures and depths favorable for its commercial...

  14. Low temperature geothermal energy applications in the Albuquerque area. Final report, July 1, 1978-August 18, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the engineering and economic feasibility of hot water geothermal energy applications in the Albuquerque area. A generalized system design was developed and used as the basis for a series of economic case studies. Reservoir and user siting considerations were studied in light of the economic findings. Several specific potential applications were identified, including university campuses, industrial and commercial facilities, and residential buildings. Specific key technical problems relating to Albuquerque area applications were studied. These included environmental impacts, corrosion, scaling, heat losses in wells and transmission lines, heat exchangers, control systems, and system utilization and reliability. It is concluded that geothermal energy could be competitive with other energy sources for space heating and limited industrial use for moderate to large (10 million Btu/hr or more) energy using systems.

  15. Application of a Hybrid Uf-Ro Process to Geothermal Water Desalination. Concentrate Disposal and Cost Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewska Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available M embrane-based water desalination processes and hybrid technologies are often considered as a technologically and economically viable alternative for desalination of geothermal waters. This has been confirmed by the results of pilot studies concerning the UF-RO desalination of geothermal waters extracted from various geological structures in Poland. The assessment of the feasibility of implementing the water desalination process analysed on an industrial scale is largely dependent on the method and possibility of disposing or utilising the concentrate. The analyses conducted in this respect have demonstrated that it is possible to use the solution obtained as a balneological product owing to its elevated metasilicic acid, fluorides and iodides ions content. Due to environmental considerations, injecting the concentrate back into the formation is the preferable solution. The energy efficiency and economic analysis conducted demonstrated that the cost effectiveness of implementing the UF-RO process in a geothermal system on an industrial scale largely depends on the factors related to its operation, including without limitation the amount of geothermal water extracted, water salinity, the absorption parameters of the wells used to inject water back into the formation, the scale of problems related to the disposal of cooled water, local demand for drinking and household water, etc. The decrease in the pressure required to inject water into the formation as well as the reduction in the stream of the water injected are among the key cost-effectiveness factors. Ensuring favourable desalinated water sale terms (price/quantity is also a very important consideration owing to the electrical power required to conduct the UF-RO process.

  16. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  17. Geothermal Power Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagud, Maria E. Mondejar; Chamorro, C.R.

    2017-01-01

    Although geothermal energy has been widely deployed for direct use in locations with especial geologic manifestations, its potential for power generation has been traditionally underestimated. Recent technology developments in drilling techniques and power conversion technologies from low......-temperature heat resources are bringing geothermal energy to the spotlight as a renewable baseload energy option for a sustainable energy mix. Although the environmental impact and economic viability of geothermal exploitation must be carefully evaluated for each case, the use of deep low-temperature geothermal...

  18. Silicon isotope fractionation during silica precipitation from hot-spring waters: Evidence from the Geysir geothermal field, Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geilert, S.; Vroon, P.Z.; Keller, N.S.; Gudbrandsson, S.; Stefánsson, A.; van Bergen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the extent and controls of silicon isotope fractionation in hot spring systems of the Geysir geothermal area (Iceland), a setting where sinter deposits are actively formed. The δ30Si values of dissolved silica measured in the spring water and sampling sites along

  19. Silicon isotope fractionation during silica precipitation from hot-spring waters : Evidence from the Geysir geothermal field, Iceland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geilert, Sonja; Vroon, Pieter Z.; Keller, Nicole S.; Gudbrandsson, Snorri; Stefánsson, Andri; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the extent and controls of silicon isotope fractionation in hot spring systems of the Geysir geothermal area (Iceland), a setting where sinter deposits are actively formed. The δ30Si values of dissolved silica measured in the spring water and sampling sites along

  20. Hydrogeological features and environmental impacts of geothermal waters in the Yıldız River Basin (Sivas, Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Tülay Ekemen; Kaçaroğlu, Fikret

    2015-02-01

    The study area, located in the Yıldız River Basin (Sivas), has eight geothermal waters, which are used for balneotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the natural and/or anthropogenic water pollution in terms of drinking and irrigation water in the Sıcak Çermik, Uyuz Çermiği, and Hamzaşeyh Çermiği geothermal areas. Na+, Cl-, SO4(-2), B, Mn, Fe, As, and Se concentrations of the geothermal waters generally exceed the upper limits stated in the Turkish Standards for Water Intended for Human Consumption and World Health Organization regulations. Based on the irrigation water classification by the U.S. Salinity Laboratory Diagram, it is concluded that these waters may have hazardous levels of salinity and sodium when used as irrigation water. Wastewater from these health and tourism centers is discharged into the Yıldız River and to agricultural land. This procedure causes increase in the concentrations of major and minor elements and negatively affects the river water quality.

  1. Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or engineered within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

  2. Physisorbed Water on Silica at Mars Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Sriwatanapongse, W.; Quinn, R.; Klug, C.; Zent, A.

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in probing water interactions on silica at Mars temperatures is discussed. Results indicate that two types of water occur with silica at Mars temperatures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Geothermal reservoir management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

    1978-02-01

    The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

  4. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Moerman, A.; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; van der Hoek, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According to the Dutch Drinking Water Act the drinking water temperature may not exceed the 25 °C threshold at point-of-use level. This paper provides a mathematical approach to model the heating of drinking...

  5. Monitoring the hydrologic system for potential effects of geothermal and ground-water development in the Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, C.D.; Lyster, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    In the early 1980's, renewed interest in the geothermal potential of the Long Valley caldera, California, highlighted the need to balance the benefits of energy development with the established recreational activities of the area. The Long Valley Hydrologic Advisory Committee, formed in 1987, instituted a monitoring program to collect data during the early stages of resource utilization to evaluate potential effects on the hydrologic system. Early data show declines in streamflow, spring flow, and ground-water levels caused by 6 years of below-average precipitation. Springs in the Hot Creek State Fish Hatchery area discharge water that is a mixture of nonthermal and hydrothermal components. Possible sources of nonthermal water have been identified by comparing deuterium concentrations in streams and springs. The equivalent amount of undiluted thermal water discharged from the springs was calculated on the basis of boron and chloride concentrations. Quantifying the thermal and nonthermal fractions of the total flow may allow researchers to assess changes in flow volume or temperature of the springs caused by groundwater or geothermal development.

  6. Characterizations of geothermal springs along the Moxi deep fault in the western Sichuan plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jihong; Xu, Mo; An, Chengjiao; Wu, Mingliang; Zhang, Yunhui; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Qiang; Lu, Guoping

    2017-02-01

    Abundant geothermal springs occur along the Moxi fault located in western Sichuan Province (the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet plateau), highlighted by geothermal water outflow with an unusually high temperature of 218 °C at 21.5 MPa from a 2010-m borehole in Laoyulin, Kangding. Earthquake activity occurs relatively more frequently in the region and is considered to be related to the strong hydrothermal activity. Geothermal waters hosted by a deep fault may provide evidence regarding the deep underground; their aqueous chemistry and isotopic information can indicate the mechanism of thermal springs. Cyclical variations of geothermal water outflows are thought to work under the effect of solid earth tides and can contribute to understanding conditions and processes in underground geo-environments. This paper studies the origin and variations of the geothermal spring group controlled by the Moxi fault and discusses conditions in the deep ground. Flow variation monitoring of a series of parameters was performed to study the geothermal responses to solid tides. Geothermal reservoir temperatures are evaluated with Na-K-Mg data. The abundant sulfite content, dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) data are discussed to study the oxidation-reduction states. Strontium isotopes are used to trace the water source. The results demonstrate that geothermal water could flow quickly through the Moxi fault the depth of the geothermal reservoir influences the thermal reservoir temperature, where supercritical hot water is mixed with circulating groundwater and can reach 380 °C. To the southward along the fault, the circulation of geothermal waters becomes shallower, and the waters may have reacted with metamorphic rock to some extent. Our results provide a conceptual deep heat source model for geothermal flow and the reservoir characteristics of the Moxi fault and indicate that the faulting may well connect the deep heat source to shallower depths. The

  7. Participation in the 2001 IAEA interlaboratory comparison on geothermal water chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Kih Soo; Choi, Kwang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Suh, Moo Yul; Jeon, Young Shin; Choi, Ke Chun; Pyo, Hyung Yul; Kim, Yong Bok; Kim, Jong Gu; Kim, Won Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute Analytical laboratory participated in the 2001 IAEA Interlaboratory Comparison on chemical analysis of Geothermal Water containing high salinity organized by IAEA Hydrology Laboratory(INT/0/060). 14 items such as pH, electroconductivity, HCO{sub 3}, Cl, F, SO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}, B, Li, Na, K, Ca, Mg were analyzed. The result of this program showed that Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute laboratory was ranked within 15% range from top level. Major analytical methods were applied for this activity such as ICP-AES, AAS, IC, pH meter, conductometer and acid titration. 8 refs., 48 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  8. Summary of the 2010 assessment on medium- to low-temperature geothermal resources in Mexico; Resumen de la evaluacion 2010 de los recursos geotermicos mexicanos de temperatura intermedia a baja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Torres, Rodolfo J.; Martinez Estrella, J. Ignacio; Reyes Picasso, Neftali [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: iglesias@iie.org.mx

    2011-07-15

    In 2003 we published our first assessment of the medium- to low-temperature (T {<=} 200 degrees Celsius) Mexican geothermal resources. The assessment was based on a database of 1,358 geothermal manifestations (surface manifestations, e.g. springs, fumaroles, water wells, etc.) identified at that time. Due to a lack of information on one or more relevant parameters, such as geographical coordinates, reservoir or surface temperatures, types of fluid, etc., that assessment included only about 30% of the geothermal manifestations in the database. Since then our group has increased significantly the amount of information in the database, using field work and data compilation from different sources. We have developed a database linked with a Geographical Information System (GIS). This work presents an updated assessment of the medium- to low-temperature Mexican geothermal resources based on our current database, which includes 2,361 geothermal manifestations. As before, we have relied on the volume method and Montecarlo simulations to estimate geothermal resources and their uncertainties for each identified geothermal system. These geothermal systems very often include more than one geothermal manifestation, generally increasing the reliability of the individual estimations. In all, we estimated the geothermal resources of 918 individual geothermal systems which included 1,797 geothermal manifestations (as before, a significant fraction of the identified manifestations lack relevant information) located in 26 of the 32 Mexican States. In most cases these resources would be classified as inferred resources, according to the Australian Geothermal Code. We then added the inferred thermal-energy statistical distributions of the 918 geothermal systems by Montecarlo simulation, obtaining the total estimated geothermal resources of the 26 Mexican States and its uncertainty. With the resulting statistical distribution, we estimated the total-thermal energy stored in the 918

  9. Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, D.R.

    1980-09-30

    A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.

  10. Low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada: area specific studies, Pumpernickel Valley, Carlin and Moana. Final report June 1, 1981-July 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trexler, D.T.; Flynn, T.; Koenig, B.A.; Bell, E.J.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical surveys were used in conjunction with temperature gradient hole drilling to assess the geothermal resources in Pumpernickel Valley and Carlin, Nevada. This program is based on a statewide assessment of geothermal resources that was completed in 1979. The exploration techniques are based on previous federally-funded assessment programs that were completed in six other areas in Nevada and include: literature search and compilation of existing data, geologic reconnaissance, chemical sampling of thermal and non-thermal fluids, interpretation of satellite imagery, interpretation of low-sun angle aerial photographs, two-meter depth temperature probe survey, gravity survey, seismic survey, soil-mercury survey, and temperature gradient drilling.

  11. Geothermal Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    An introduction to geothermal energy is provided in this discussion of: (1) how a geothermal reservoir works; (2) how to find geothermal energy; (3) where it is located; (4) electric power generation using geothermal energy; (5) use of geothermal energy as a direct source of heat; (6) geopressured reservoirs; (7) environmental effects; (8)…

  12. Development of a High-Temperature Two-Component Explosive for Geothermal Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    Describes the status of a process that manufactures explosives downhole for injecting into formations. Shows results for oil and gas tests, where flow improvements ranged from 160% to 1300%. At this stage, the project consisted of laboratory tests of a number of explosives for possible use in geothermal dry steam or liquid dominated wells. Report has many pictures and tables. (DJE 2005)

  13. Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature | Dallas | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature was examined in 6 upland sites in the Western Cape, South Africa. Hourly water temperature data converted to daily data showed that greatest differences were apparent in daily maximum temperatures between shallow- and deep-water biotopes during the warmest period of ...

  14. Produced Water Treatment Using Geothermal Energy from Oil and Gas Wells: An Appropriateness of Decommissioned Wells Index (ADWI) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiaghadi, A.; Rifai, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of harnessing geothermal energy from retrofitted oil and gas decommissioned wells to power desalination units and overcome the produced water treatment energy barrier. Previous studies using heat transfer models have indicated that well depth, geothermal gradient, formation heat conductivity, and produced water salt levels were the most important constraints that affect the achievable volume of treated water. Thus, the challenge of identifying which wells would be best suited for retrofit as geothermal wells was addressed by defining an Appropriateness of Decommissioned Wells Index (ADWI) using a 25 km x 25 km grid over Texas. Heat transfer modeling combined with fuzzy logic methodology were used to estimate the ADWI at each grid cell using the scale of Very Poor, Poor, Average, Good and Excellent. Values for each of the four constraints were extracted from existing databases and were used to select 20 representative values that covered the full range of the data. A heat transfer model was run for all the 160,000 possible combination scenarios and the results were regressed to estimate weighting coefficients that indicate the relative effect of well depth, geothermal gradient, heat conductivity, and produced water salt levels on the volume of treated water in Texas. The results indicated that wells located in cells with ADWI of "Average", "Good" or "Excellent" can potentially deliver 35,000, 106,000, or 240,000 L/day of treated water, respectively. Almost 98% of the cells in the Granite Wash, 97% in Eagle Ford Shale, 90% in Haynesville Shale, 79% in Permian Basin, and 78% in Barnett Shale were identified as better than "Average" locations; whereas, south of the Eagle Ford, southwestern Permian Basin, and the center of Granite Wash were "Excellent". Importantly, most of the locations with better than "Average" ADWI are within drought prone agricultural regions that would benefit from this resilient source of clean water.

  15. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  16. The Tianjin geothermal field (north-eastern China): Water chemistry and possible reservoir permeability reduction phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minissale, Angelo; Montegrossi, Giordano; Orlando, Andrea [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Borrini, Daniele; Tassi, Franco [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Vaselli, Orlando [Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources, National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Department of Earth Sciences, University of Florence, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Huertas, Antonio Delgado [Estacion Experimental de Zaidin (CSIC), Prof. Albareda 1, 18008 Granada (Spain); Yang, Jincheng; Cheng, Wanquing [Aode Renewable Energy Research Institute, 90 Weijin South Road, Nankai District, 300381 Tianjin (China); Tedesco, Dario [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi 43, Caserta 81100 (Italy); Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo Engineering (CNR), Piazzale A. Moro 5, Roma 00100 (Italy); Poreda, Robert [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, 227 Hutchison Hall, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Injection of spent (cooled) thermal fluids began in the Tianjin geothermal district, north-eastern China, at the end of the 1990s. Well injectivities declined after 3-4 years because of self-sealing processes that reduced reservoir permeability. The study focuses on the factors that may have caused the observed decrease in permeability, using chemical and isotopic data on fluids (water and gas) and mineral phases collected from production and injection wells. The results of data processing and interpretation indicate that (1) it is very unlikely that calcite and silica precipitation is taking place in the reservoir; (2) the Fe- and Zn-rich mineral phases (e.g. sulfides, hydroxides and silicates) show positive saturation indexes; (3) SEM and XRD analyses of filtered material reveal that the latter mineral phases are common; (4) visual observation of casings and surface installations, and of corrosion products, suggests that a poor quality steel was used in their manufacture; (5) significant quantities of solids (e.g. quartz and feldspar crystals) are carried by the geothermal fluid; (6) seasonal changes in fluid composition lead to a reduction in casing corrosion during the summer. It was concluded that the decrease in injectivity in the Tianjin wells is caused only in part by the oxidation of casings, downhole pumps, and surface installations, triggered by free oxygen in the injected fluids; the utilization of better quality steels should drastically reduce this type of corrosion. Self-sealing of pores and fractures by reservoir formation solids and by the Fe-corrosion products suspended in the injected fluids seems to be a more important phenomenon, whose effect could be greatly reduced by installing filtering devices at all sites. (author)

  17. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, A.; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; Van der Hoek, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According

  18. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar Márquez, José Manuel; Martínez Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel; Gómez Melgar, Sergio

    2016-02-29

    This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE) systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain). Experimental results validate the proposed approach.

  19. Detailed conceptual design of a high temperature glass pH electrode for geothermal applications. Final report. Task II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.M.; Phelan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The performance of a pH sensor for use in hot geothermal brine was determined by laboratory tests simulating the expected conditions of use. Tests were conducted at temperatures from 21/sup 0/C to 260/sup 0/C and pressures from atmospheric to 5000 psi. Probes were constructed according to the design recommended. Deficiencies were found in the areas of seal, stem glass integrity and glass stability in hot simulated brine. Modifications of the design were made and tested, the improved versions overcoming the seal and stem glass cracking problems. A different pH glass formulation was used which improved sensor performance. Test results of the final design show that the sensor survived hot brine exposure at temperatures up to and including 200/sup 0/C, retaining its low temperature pH measuring capability. Exposure to 250/sup 0/C brine resulted in irreversible probe changes which caused sensor deterioration and failure. Comparative results are shown.

  20. Ground Thermal Diffusivity Calculation by Direct Soil Temperature Measurement. Application to very Low Enthalpy Geothermal Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Andújar Márquez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology and instrumentation system for the indirect measurement of the thermal diffusivity of a soil at a given depth from measuring its temperature at that depth. The development has been carried out considering its application to the design and sizing of very low enthalpy geothermal energy (VLEGE systems, but it can has many other applications, for example in construction, agriculture or biology. The methodology is simple and inexpensive because it can take advantage of the prescriptive geotechnical drilling prior to the construction of a house or building, to take at the same time temperature measurements that will allow get the actual temperature and ground thermal diffusivity to the depth of interest. The methodology and developed system have been tested and used in the design of a VLEGE facility for a chalet with basement at the outskirts of Huelva (a city in the southwest of Spain. Experimental results validate the proposed approach.

  1. Deep geothermal processes acting on faults and solid tides in coastal Xinzhou geothermal field, Guangdong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guoping; Wang, Xiao; Li, Fusi; Xu, Fangyiming; Wang, Yanxin; Qi, Shihua; Yuen, David

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigated the deep fault thermal flow processes in the Xinzhou geothermal field in the Yangjiang region of Guangdong Province. Deep faults channel geothermal energy to the shallow ground, which makes it difficult to study due to the hidden nature. We conducted numerical experiments in order to investigate the physical states of the geothermal water inside the fault zone. We view the deep fault as a fast flow path for the thermal water from the deep crust driven up by the buoyancy. Temperature measurements at the springs or wells constrain the upper boundary, and the temperature inferred from the Currie temperature interface bounds the bottom. The deepened boundary allows the thermal reservoir to revolve rather than to be at a fixed temperature. The results detail the concept of a thermal reservoir in terms of its formation and heat distribution. The concept also reconciles the discrepancy in reservoir temperatures predicted from both quartz and Na-K-Mg. The downward displacement of the crust increases the pressure at the deep ground and leads to an elevated temperature and a lighter water density. Ultimately, our results are a first step in implementing numerical studies of deep faults through geothermal water flows; future works need to extend to cases of supercritical states. This approach is applicable to general deep-fault thermal flows and dissipation paths for the seismic energy from the deep crust.

  2. Geohydrology, geochemistry, geothermal potency of Rianiate Toba Lake North Sumatera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainggolan, Juliper; Sitepu, Cristin; Pardede, Sanggam; Diantoro, Markus

    2017-09-01

    This research was performed to determine the potency of Rianiate’s geothermal an alternative of energy source and determine the types of geothermal that was begun with the position’s measurement by using GPS (Global Position System), and then the direct observation of chemical and physical properties such as pH, surface’s temperature, color etc. The following steps were taking sample in four different springs indicated by spring 1, spring 2, spring 3, and spring 4. The chemical nature was measured by titrimetry method by using AAS, XRD, and gas Chromathology. The calculating of temperature of subsurface has done by using geothermometer and sequentially followed by geothermal potency’s calculation. The position of four springs are located about N: 02° 31,852’ and E: 098° 44. 021’ where were average height from sea’s level is 958 m. The highest surface’s temperature is 80 °C and the temperature under soil is about 130.5 °C described the average of geothermal. The calculation of content of chloride, sulfate, bicarbonations revealed that the water can be categorized as chloride type. The trilateral diagram Na/1000 - K/100 - √Mg of hot water is in the regime of immature water. From the calculation of Indonesia’s Standardized Geotherm, it was obtained that the estimated reservoir potency of Rianiate geotherm is 2,68 MWe.

  3. Draft environmental impact report. California Department of Water Resources, Bottle Rock geothermal power plant, Lake County, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) proposes to construct the Bottle Rock power plant, a 55 MW geothermal power plant, at The Geysers Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). The plant is projected to begin operation in April of 1983, and will be located in Lake County near the Sonoma County line on approximately 7.2 acres of the Francisco leasehold. The steam to operate the power plant, approximately 1,000,000 pounds/h, will be provided by McCulloch Geothermal Corporation. The power plant's appearance and operation will be basically the same as the units in operation or under construction in the KGRA. The power plant and related facilities will consist of a 55 MW turbine generator, a 1.1 mile (1.81 km) long transmission line, a condensing system, cooling tower, electrical switchyard, gas storage facility, cistern, and an atmospheric emission control system. DWR plans to abate hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions through the use of the Stretford Process which scrubs the H/sub 2/S from the condenser vent gas stream and catalytically oxides the gas to elemental sulfur. If the Stretford Process does not meet emission limitations, a secondary H/sub 2/S abatement system using hydrogen peroxide/iron catalyst is proposed. The Bottle Rock project and other existing and future geothermal projects in the KGRA may result in cumulative impacts to soils, biological resources, water quality, geothermal steam resources, air quality, public health, land use, recreation, cultural resources, and aesthetics.

  4. Characterization of the microbial diversity in production waters of mesothermic and geothermic Tunisian oilfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnif, Sami; Bru-Adan, Valérie; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Sayadi, Sami; Chamkha, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The microbial diversity of production waters of five Tunisian oilfields was investigated using Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) technique followed by cloning-sequencing. Dynamics of bacterial populations in production waters collected from four wellheads were also evaluated. For all production water samples collected, DNA from Archaea and Eucarya was not sufficiently abundant to permit detection rRNA genes from these groups by PCR-SSCP. In contrast, the bacterial rRNA genes were detected in all samples, except for samples from DOULEB12 and RAMOURA wells. SSCP profiles attested that two of the studied geothermic wells (ASHTART47 and ASHTART48) had shown a clear change over time, whereas a stable diversity was found with the mesophilic DOULEB well (DL3). PCR amplification of rRNA genes was unsuccessful with samples from DOULEB (DL12) at all three sampling time. The bacterial diversity present in production waters collected from pipelines of SERCINA and LITAYEM oilfields was high, while production waters collected from wellheads (ASHTART and DOULEB) exhibited lower diversity. The partial study of the biodiversity showed a dominance of uncultured bacteria and Pseudomonas genus (class of the Gammaproteobacteria) in three of the studied oilfields (ASHTART47, ASHTART48 and DOULEB3). However, for LITAYEM oilfield, a significant dominance of 5 phyla (Proteobacteria, Thermotogae, Firmicutes, Synergistetes, Bacteroidetes) was shown. Our study gives a real picture of the microbiology of some Tunisian oilfield production waters and shows that some of the sequenced bacterial clones have a great similarity to previous sequenced clones described from other oilfields all over the world, indicating that these ecosystems harbour specific microbial communities. These findings can be considered as an indirect indication of the indigenous origin of these clones. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Radiation protection in the geothermal energy facility of the German genetic research center (GFZ) Potsdam in Gross Schoenebeck (Brandenburg); Strahlenschutz in der Geothermieanlage des Deutschen Geoforschungszentrums (GFZ) Potsdam in Gross Schoenebeck (Brandenburg)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilling, Joerg; Doering, Joachim; Ebert, Monika; Mielcarek, Juergen [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Berlin (Germany); Regenspurg, Simona [Helmholtz-Zentrum Potsdam Deutsches Geoforschungszentrum, Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    About 70% of the geothermal energy originates from radioactive decay. For the utilization of geothermal energy water is used as working fluid. The efficiency of a geothermal energy facility is correlated to the water temperature. In the geothermal energy facility of Gross Schoenebeck the thermal water has a temperature of 150 C. The salty water (265 g/l) contains a complex mixture of dissolved components that might precipitate during cooling (scale formation). The deposits can include radioactive materials (isotopes from the uranium and thorium decay series and K-40). The thermal water from the production bore holes is filtered on the surface.

  6. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    EGS has been highlightened as a most promising method of geothermal development recently because of applicability to sites which have been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties to establish universal design/development methodology, and occurrence of large induced seismicity. Future geothermal target is supercritical and superheated geothermal fluids in and around ductile rock bodies under high temperatures. Ductile regime which is estimated beyond brittle zone is target region for future geothermal development due to high enthalpy fluids and relatively weak water-rock interaction. It is very difficult to determine exact depth of Brittle-Ductile boundary due to strong dependence of temperature (geotherm) and strain rate, however, ductile zone is considered to be developed above 400C and below 3 km in geothermal fields in Tohoku District. Hydrothermal experiments associated with additional advanced technology will be conducting to understand ';Beyond brittle World' and to develop deeper and hotter geothermal reservoir. We propose a new concept of the engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement, expecting the following advantages: (a)simpler design and control the reservoir, (b)nearly full recovery of injected water, (c)sustainable production, (d)cost reduction by development of relatively shallower ductile zone in compression tectonic zones, (e)large quantity of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f)establishment of universal and conceptual design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. In ductile regime, Mesh-like fracture cloud has great potential for heat extraction between injection and production wells in spite of single and simple mega-fracture. Based on field observation and high performance hydrothermal

  7. Modeling of thermodynamic and chemical changes in low-temperature geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, A.L.

    1986-12-01

    A method was developed to incorporate the transport of several chemical components into a model of the transport of fluid mass and heat within a geothermal system. It was demonstrated that the use of coupled hydrological, thermal and chemical data allows for the determination of field porosities, amounts and regions of cool recharge into the system as well as field permeabilities and the hot reservoir volume. With the additional information a reliable prediction of the long-term cooling rate can be made.

  8. Survey of Naegleria fowleri in geothermal recreational waters of Guadeloupe (French West Indies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Moussa

    Full Text Available In 2008 a fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri, occurred in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, after a child swam in a bath fed with geothermal water. In order to improve the knowledge on free-living amoebae in this tropical part of France, we investigated on a monthly basis, the presence of Naegleria spp. in the recreational baths, and stream waters which feed them. A total of 73 water samples, 48 sediments and 54 swabs samples were collected from 6 sampling points between June 2011 and July 2012. The water samples were filtered and the filters transferred to non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a heat-killed suspension of Escherichia coli while sediment and swab samples were placed directly on these plates. The plates were incubated at 44°C for the selective isolation of thermophilic Naegleria. To identify the Naegleria isolates the internal transcribed spacers, including the 5.8S rDNA, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the sequence of the PCR products was determined. Thermophilic amoebae were present at nearly all collection sites. The pathogenic N. fowleri was the most frequently encountered thermophilic species followed by N. lovaniensis. The concentration of N. fowleri was rather low in most water samples, ranging from 0 to 22 per liter. Sequencing revealed that all N. fowleri isolates belonged to a common Euro-American genotype, the same as detected in the human case in Guadeloupe. These investigations need to be continued in order to counsel the health authorities about prevention measures, because these recreational thermal baths are used daily by local people and tourists.

  9. Survey of Naegleria fowleri in geothermal recreational waters of Guadeloupe (French West Indies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Mirna; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Guerlotté, Jérôme; Richard, Vincent; Bastaraud, Alexandra; Romana, Marc; Talarmin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 a fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri, occurred in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, after a child swam in a bath fed with geothermal water. In order to improve the knowledge on free-living amoebae in this tropical part of France, we investigated on a monthly basis, the presence of Naegleria spp. in the recreational baths, and stream waters which feed them. A total of 73 water samples, 48 sediments and 54 swabs samples were collected from 6 sampling points between June 2011 and July 2012. The water samples were filtered and the filters transferred to non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a heat-killed suspension of Escherichia coli while sediment and swab samples were placed directly on these plates. The plates were incubated at 44°C for the selective isolation of thermophilic Naegleria. To identify the Naegleria isolates the internal transcribed spacers, including the 5.8S rDNA, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the sequence of the PCR products was determined. Thermophilic amoebae were present at nearly all collection sites. The pathogenic N. fowleri was the most frequently encountered thermophilic species followed by N. lovaniensis. The concentration of N. fowleri was rather low in most water samples, ranging from 0 to 22 per liter. Sequencing revealed that all N. fowleri isolates belonged to a common Euro-American genotype, the same as detected in the human case in Guadeloupe. These investigations need to be continued in order to counsel the health authorities about prevention measures, because these recreational thermal baths are used daily by local people and tourists.

  10. Structural controls on fluid circulation at the Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex (CCVC) geothermal area (Chile-Argentina), revealed by soil CO2 and temperature, self-potential, and helium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Bravo, Francisco; Pinti, Daniele L.; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Pizarro, Marcela; Tardani, Daniele; Muñoz, Carlos; Sanchez, Juan; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; de la Cal, Federico; Esteban, Carlos; Morata, Diego

    2017-07-01

    Natural geothermal systems are limited areas characterized by anomalously high heat flow caused by recent tectonic or magmatic activity. The heat source at depth is the result of the emplacement of magma bodies, controlled by the regional volcano-tectonic setting. In contrast, at a local scale a well-developed fault-fracture network favors the development of hydrothermal cells, and promotes the vertical advection of fluids and heat. The Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), straddling Chile and Argentina, has an important, yet unexplored and undeveloped geothermal potential. Studies on the lithological and tectonic controls of the hydrothermal circulation are therefore important for a correct assessment of the geothermal potential of the region. Here, new and dense self-potential (SP), soil CO2 and temperature (T) measurements, and helium isotope data measured in fumaroles and thermal springs from the geothermal area located in the north-eastern flank of the Copahue volcanic edifice, within the Caviahue Caldera (the Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex - CCVC) are presented. Our results allowed to the constraint of the structural origin of the active thermal areas and the understanding of the evolution of the geothermal system. NE-striking faults in the area, characterized by a combination of SP, CO2, and T maxima and high 3He/4He ratios (up to 8.16 ± 0.21Ra, whereas atmospheric Ra is 1.382 × 10- 6), promote the formation of vertical permeability preferential pathways for fluid circulation. WNW-striking faults represent low-permeability pathways for hydrothermal fluid ascent, but promote infiltration of meteoric water at shallow depths, which dilute the hydrothermal input. The region is scattered with SP, CO2, and T minima, representing self-sealed zones characterized by impermeable altered rocks at depth, which create local barriers for fluid ascent. The NE-striking faults seem to be associated with the upflowing zones of the geothermal system, where the boiling process

  11. THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE OPTIMIZATION IN THE GEOTHERMAL ENERGY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Golub

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of geothermal energy production process means the minimization of all energy losses from the reservoir conditions to the user. As the available energy is being utilized mostly in the wellbore and in the surface equipment, process optimization requires scientific access including the extraction technology parameters.Specific energy on the geothermal wellhead is calculated for two possible cases. The first embraces only geothermal water production, while the other takes into account the saturated steam production as well. Each of these working conditions defines unambiguously designed pressure on the wellhead.The steam and water energy ratio, in function of predicted sink temperature for reinjection of geothermal water, points out the possibilities for commercialization of reservoir Velika Ciglena.

  12. Methods for collection and analysis of geopressured geothermal and oil field waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lico, M.S.; Kharaka, Y.K.; Carothers, W.W.; Wright, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Present methods are described for the collection, preservation, and chemical analysis of waters produced from geopressured geothermal and petroleum wells. Detailed procedures for collection include precautions and equipment necessary to ensure that the sample is representative of the water produced. Procedures for sample preservation include filtration, acidification, dilution for silica, methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) extraction of aluminum, addition of potassium permanganate to preserve mercury, and precipitation of carbonate species as strontium carbonate for stable carbon isotopes and total dissolved carbonate analysis. Characteristics determined at the well site are sulfide, pH, ammonia, and conductivity. Laboratory procedures are given for the analysis of lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, iron, manganese, zinc, lead, aluminum, and mercury by atomic absorption and flame emission spectroscopy. Chloride is determined by silver nitrate titration and fluoride by ion-specific electrode. Bromide and iodide concentrations are determined by the hypochlorite oxidation method. Sulfate is analyzed by titration using barium chloride with thorin indicator after pretreatment with alumina. Boron and silica are determined colorimetrically by the carmine and molybdate-blue methods, respectively. Aliphatic acid anions (C/sub 2/ through C/sub 5/) are determined by gas chromatography after separation and concentration in a chloroform-butanol mixture.

  13. A Numerical Study on the Effects of Initial Water Saturation of a Geothermal Reservoir on Well Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Khasani; Itoi, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Michihiro

    2004-01-01

    The effects of initial water saturation on well characteristics in two-phase geothermal reservoirs were evaluated. A vertical wellbore model of uniform diameter coupled with a radial horizontal flow in a reservoir of uniform thickness was employed. The momentum equation for two-phase flow in a wellbore was numerically evaluated with a method introduced by Orkiszewski. The energy equation in the wellbore was assumed to be isenthalpic. Mass flow rate and pressure at a feed zone of the well were...

  14. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, G.

    2013-05-01

    Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinjection boreholes. A simple and efficient method of tracer test interpretation, assuming specific flow channels connecting reinjection and production boreholes, is available. It simulates tracer return profiles and estimates properties of the flow channels, which are consequently used for predicting the production borehole cooling. Numerous examples are available worldwide on the successful application of tracer tests in geothermal management, many involving the application of this interpretation technique. Tracer tests are also used for general subsurface hydrological studies in geothermal systems and for flow rate measurements in two-phase geothermal pipelines. The tracers most commonly used in geothermal applications are fluorescent dyes, chemical substances and radioactive isotopes. New temperature-resistant tracers have also been introduced and high-tech tracers are being considered.

  15. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelsson G.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinjection boreholes. A simple and efficient method of tracer test interpretation, assuming specific flow channels connecting reinjection and production boreholes, is available. It simulates tracer return profiles and estimates properties of the flow channels, which are consequently used for predicting the production borehole cooling. Numerous examples are available worldwide on the successful application of tracer tests in geothermal management, many involving the application of this interpretation technique. Tracer tests are also used for general subsurface hydrological studies in geothermal systems and for flow rate measurements in two-phase geothermal pipelines. The tracers most commonly used in geothermal applications are fluorescent dyes, chemical substances and radioactive isotopes. New temperature-resistant tracers have also been introduced and high-tech tracers are being considered.

  16. Effect of neglecting geothermal gradient on calculated oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Majid; Sedighi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Reduced recovery rate with time is a common challenge for most of the oil producing reservoirs. Water flooding is one of the most common methods used for enhanced oil recovery. Simulating water-flooding process is sometimes carried out without considering the effect of geothermal gradient, and an average temperature is assumed for all the grid blocks. However, the gradient plays a significant role on the reservoir fluid properties. So neglecting its effect might result in a large error in the calculated oil recovery results, especially for the thick reservoirs, which in theory can show significant variations in temperature with depth. In this paper, first, advancing the waterfront during injection into a geothermal oil reservoir is discussed. Then, the performance of considering either an average temperature or gradient temperature, are considered and compared with each other. The results suggest that assuming a fixed average reservoir temperature with no geothermal gradient, can lead to a pronounced error for calculated oil recovery.

  17. Multi variate regression model of the water level and production rate time series of the geothermal reservoir Waiwera (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael; Schöne, Tim

    2017-04-01

    Water management tools are essential to ensure the conservation of natural resources. The geothermal hot water reservoir below the village of Waiwera, on the Northern Island of New Zealand is used commercially since 1863. The continuous production of 50 °C hot geothermal water, to supply hotels and spas, has a negative impact on the reservoir. Until the year 1969 from all wells drilled the warm water flow was artesian. Due to overproduction the water needs to be pumped up nowadays. Further, within the years 1975 to 1976 the warm water seeps on the beach of Waiwera ran dry. In order to protect the reservoir and the historical and tourist site in the early 1980s a water management plan was deployed. The "Auckland Council" established guidelines to enable a sustainable management of the resource [1]. The management plan demands that the water level in the official and appropriate observation well of the council is 0.5 m above sea level throughout the year in average. Almost four decades of data (since 1978 until today) are now available [2]. For a sustainable water management, it is necessary to be able to forecast the water level as a function of the production rates in the production wells. The best predictions are provided by a multivariate regression model of the water level and production rate time series, which takes into account the production rates of individual wells. It is based on the inversely proportional relationship between the independent variable (production rate) and the dependent variable (measured water level). In production scenarios, a maximum total production rate of approx. 1,100 m3 / day is determined in order to comply with the guidelines of the "Auckland Council". [1] Kühn M., Stöfen H. (2005) A reactive flow model of the geothermal reservoir Waiwera, New Zealand. Hydrogeology Journal 13, 606-626, doi: 10.1007/s10040-004-0377-6 [2] Kühn M., Altmannsberger C. (2016) Assessment of data driven and process based water management tools for

  18. Geothermal energy program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The mission of the Geothermal Energy Program is to develop the science and technology necessary for tapping our nation's tremendous heat energy sources contained within the Earth. Geothermal energy is a domestic energy source that can produce clean, reliable, cost-effective heat and electricity for our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy - the heat of the Earth - is one of our nation's most abundant energy resources. In fact, geothermal energy represents nearly 40 percent of the total U.S. energy resource base and already provides an important contribution to our nation's energy needs. Geothermal energy systems can provide clean, reliable, cost-effective energy for our nation's industries, businesses, and homes in the form of heat and electricity. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Energy Program sponsors research aimed at developing the science and technology necessary for utilizing this resource more fully. Geothermal energy originates from the Earth's interior. The hottest fluids and rocks at accessible depths are associated with recent volcanic activity in the western states. In some places, heat comes to the surface as natural hot water or steam, which have been used since prehistoric times for cooking and bathing. Today, wells convey the heat from deep in the Earth to electric generators, factories, farms, and homes. The competitiveness of power generation with lower quality hydrothermal fluids, geopressured brines, hot dry rock, and magma (the four types of geothermal energy), still depends on the technical advancements sought by DOE's Geothermal Energy Program.

  19. Models of Geothermal Brine Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy Moller Weare; John H. Weare

    2002-03-29

    Many significant expenses encountered by the geothermal energy industry are related to chemical effects. When the composition, temperature of pressure of the fluids in the geological formation are changed, during reservoir evolution, well production, energy extraction or injection processes, the fluids that were originally at equilibrium with the formation minerals come to a new equilibrium composition, temperature and pressure. As a result, solid material can be precipitated, dissolved gases released and/or heat lost. Most geothermal energy operations experience these phenomena. For some resources, they create only minor problems. For others, they can have serious results, such as major scaling or corrosion of wells and plant equipment, reservoir permeability losses and toxic gas emission, that can significantly increase the costs of energy production and sometimes lead to site abandonment. In future operations that exploit deep heat sources and low permeability reservoirs, new chemical problems involving very high T, P rock/water interactions and unknown injection effects will arise.

  20. Assessment of the Appalachian Basin Geothermal Field: Combining Risk Factors to Inform Development of Low Temperature Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. D.; Whealton, C.; Camp, E. R.; Horowitz, F.; Frone, Z. S.; Jordan, T. E.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration methods for deep geothermal energy projects must primarily consider whether or not a location has favorable thermal resources. Even where the thermal field is favorable, other factors may impede project development and success. A combined analysis of these factors and their uncertainty is a strategy for moving geothermal energy proposals forward from the exploration phase at the scale of a basin to the scale of a project, and further to design of geothermal systems. For a Department of Energy Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis we assessed quality metrics, which we call risk factors, in the Appalachian Basin of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. These included 1) thermal field variability, 2) productivity of natural reservoirs from which to extract heat, 3) potential for induced seismicity, and 4) presence of thermal utilization centers. The thermal field was determined using a 1D heat flow model for 13,400 bottomhole temperatures (BHT) from oil and gas wells. Steps included the development of i) a set of corrections to BHT data and ii) depth models of conductivity stratigraphy at each borehole based on generalized stratigraphy that was verified for a select set of wells. Wells are control points in a spatial statistical analysis that resulted in maps of the predicted mean thermal field properties and of the standard error of the predicted mean. Seismic risk was analyzed by comparing earthquakes and stress orientations in the basin to gravity and magnetic potential field edges at depth. Major edges in the potential fields served as interpolation boundaries for the thermal maps (Figure 1). Natural reservoirs were identified from published studies, and productivity was determined based on the expected permeability and dimensions of each reservoir. Visualizing the natural reservoirs and population centers on a map of the thermal field communicates options for viable pilot sites and project designs (Figure 1). Furthermore, combining the four risk

  1. Geothermal energy: an important resource

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dowling, Carolyn B; Neumann, Klaus; Florea, Lee J

    2016-01-01

    .... Contributions include studies on the feasibility of integrating geological modeling with system design, extraction of low-temperature geothermal energy in underground coal mines, ground-source heat...

  2. Multielement geochemistry of solid materials in geothermal systems and its applications. Part 1. Hot-water system at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-02-01

    Geochemical studies of the geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, have led to development of chemical criteria for recognition of major features of the system and to a three-dimensional model for chemical zoning in the system. Based on this improved level of understanding several new or modified geochemical exploration and assessment techniques have been defined and are probably broadly applicable to evaluation of hot-water geothermal systems. The main purpose of this work was the development or adaptation of solids geochemical exploration techniques for use in the geothermal environment. (MHR)

  3. Colado geothermal resource assessment: shallow-hole temperature survey; intermediate-depth holes IGH No. 1 and No. 2; depth test hole 44X-10. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, N.O.

    1982-09-01

    The Getty Oil Company began the field work on a government cost-sharing venture to assess the geothermal potential in the Colado area of Pershing County, Nevada. Eighteen shallow (500-foot) temperature gradient holes, two intermediate (1500-foot) temperature gradient holes and one deep (8000-foot) exploratory well were drilled. All field work was completed in May 1981. Maximum temperature achieved was 282/sup 0/F at 7064 feet. No fluid reservoir was encountered with this hole.

  4. Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. C. Maurer

    2000-05-01

    Approximately 50% of the cost of a new geothermal power plant is in the wells that must be drilled. Compared to the majority of oil and gas wells, geothermal wells are more difficult and costly to drill for several reasons. First, most U.S. geothermal resources consist of hot, hard crystalline rock formations which drill much slower than the relatively soft sedimentary formations associated with most oil and gas production. Second, high downhole temperatures can greatly shorten equipment life or preclude the use of some technologies altogether. Third, producing viable levels of electricity from geothermal fields requires the use of large diameter bores and a high degree of fluid communication, both of which increase drilling and completion costs. Optimizing fluid communication often requires creation of a directional well to intersect the best and largest number of fracture capable of producing hot geothermal fluids. Moineau motor stators made with elastomers cannot operate at geothermal temperatures, so they are limited to the upper portion of the hole. To overcome these limitations, Maurer Engineering Inc. (MEI) has developed a turbodrill that does not use elastomers and therefore can operate at geothermal temperatures. This new turbodrill uses a special gear assembly to reduce the output speed, thus allowing a larger range of bit types, especially tri-cone roller bits, which are the bits of choice for drilling hard crystalline formations. The Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) represents a significant improvement for drilling geothermal wells and has the potential to significantly reduce drilling costs while increasing production, thereby making geothermal energy less expensive and better able to compete with fossil fuels. The final field test of the AGT will prepare the tool for successful commercialization.

  5. Prospects for Assessing Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS Basement Rock Flow Stimulation by Wellbore Temperature Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Leary

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We use Matlab 3D finite element fluid flow/transport modelling to simulate localized wellbore temperature events of order 0.05–0.1 °C logged in Fennoscandia basement rock at ~1.5 km depths. The temperature events are approximated as steady-state heat transport due to fluid draining from the crust into the wellbore via naturally occurring fracture-connectivity structures. Flow simulation is based on the empirics of spatially-correlated fracture-connectivity fluid flow widely attested by well-log, well-core, and well-production data. Matching model wellbore-centric radial temperature profiles to a 2D analytic expression for steady-state radial heat transport with Peclet number Pe ≡ r0φv0/D (r0 = wellbore radius, v0 = Darcy velocity at r0, φ = ambient porosity, D = rock-water thermal diffusivity, gives Pe ~ 10–15 for fracture-connectivity flow intersecting the well, and Pe ~ 0 for ambient crust. Darcy flow for model Pe ~ 10 at radius ~10 m from the wellbore gives permeability estimate κ ~ 0.02 Darcy for flow driven by differential fluid pressure between least principal crustal stress pore pressure and hydrostatic wellbore pressure. Model temperature event flow permeability κm ~ 0.02 Darcy is related to well-core ambient permeability κ ~ 1 µDarcy by empirical poroperm relation κm ~ κ exp(αmφ for φ ~ 0.01 and αm ~ 1000. Our modelling of OTN1 wellbore temperature events helps assess the prospect of reactivating fossilized fracture-connectivity flow for EGS permeability stimulation of basement rock.

  6. Low-Temperature Enhanced Geothermal System using Carbon Dioxide as the Heat-Transfer Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Alan D. [GreenFire Energy, Emeryville, CA (United States)

    2014-07-24

    This report describes work toward a supercritical CO2-based EGS system at the St. Johns Dome in Eastern Arizona, including a comprehensive literature search on CO2-based geothermal technologies, background seismic study, geological information, and a study of the possible use of metal oxide heat carriers to enhance the heat capacity of sCO2. It also includes cost estimates for the project, and the reasons why the project would probably not be cost effective at the proposed location.

  7. Occurrence of Naegleria species in therapeutic geothermal water sources, Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Ali Reza; Niyyati, Maryam; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Haghighi, Ali; Tabaei, Seyyed Javad Seyyed; Lasjerdi, Zohreh; Azargashb, Eznolah

    2017-03-01

    Potentially pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae include members belonging to Naegleria genus. The species N. fowleri is known worldwide as the causative agent of the lethal Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM). Only one clinical case of N. fowleri has been reported in Iran. Several species of Naegleria have been reported to be natural carriers of other potentially pathogenic microbial agents. The thermotolerance properties of this genus facilitates their presence in geothermal water sources including hot springs and spas. In the current study water samples were collected from 22 therapeutic hot springs, Northern Iran and investigated for the presence of Naegleria spp. using morphological keys and PCR/DNA sequencing based methods. Incubation of collected samples were done at both 30°C and 45°C in order to detect Naegleria spp. and N. fowleri, respectively. Thermotolerance assay and flagellation tests were also performed. The obtained results revealed that 54% of the investigated water samples were positive for Naegleria spp. including N. australiensis, N. americana, N. dobsoni, N. pagei, N. polaris and N. fultoni. The pathogenic N. fowleri was not detected. The most detected Naegleria was belonged to N. australiensis. This is the first report on the Naegleria spp. occurrence in hot springs in Northern Iran showing that most of the surveyed hot spring sources were contaminated with non-pathogenic Naegleria spp. However, due to the recent report of PAM in the country, further studies to investigate the presence of pathogenic N. fowleri in the environment and clinical samples is needed in the region and worldwide.

  8. Phylogenetic Structure and Metabolic Properties of Microbial Communities in Arsenic-Rich Waters of Geothermal Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Crognale

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is a toxic element released in aquatic environments by geogenic processes or anthropic activities. To counteract its toxicity, several microorganisms have developed mechanisms to tolerate and utilize it for respiratory metabolism. However, still little is known about identity and physiological properties of microorganisms exposed to natural high levels of As and the role they play in As transformation and mobilization processes. This work aims to explore the phylogenetic composition and functional properties of aquatic microbial communities in As-rich freshwater environments of geothermal origin and to elucidate the key microbial functional groups that directly or indirectly may influence As-transformations across a natural range of geogenic arsenic contamination. Distinct bacterial communities in terms of composition and metabolisms were found. Members of Proteobacteria, affiliated to Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria were mainly retrieved in groundwaters and surface waters, whereas Gammaproteobacteria were the main component in thermal waters. Most of the OTUs from thermal waters were only distantly related to 16S rRNA gene sequences of known taxa, indicating the occurrence of bacterial biodiversity so far unexplored. Nitrate and sulfate reduction and heterotrophic As(III-oxidization were found as main metabolic traits of the microbial cultivable fraction in such environments. No growth of autotrophic As(III-oxidizers, autotrophic and heterotrophic As(V-reducers, Fe-reducers and oxidizers, Mn-reducers and sulfide oxidizers was observed. The ars genes, involved in As(V detoxifying reduction, were found in all samples whereas aioA [As(III oxidase] and arrA genes [As(V respiratory reductase] were not found. Overall, we found that As detoxification processes prevailed over As metabolic processes, concomitantly with the intriguing occurrence of novel thermophiles able to tolerate high levels of As.

  9. Feasibility of geothermal space/water heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California. Final report, September 1976--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.V.; Racine, W.C.

    1977-12-01

    Results of a study to determine the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of geothermal district heating for Mammoth Lakes Village, California are reported. The geothermal district heating system selected is technically feasible and will use existing technology in its design and operation. District heating can provide space and water heating energy for typical customers at lower cost than alternative sources of energy. If the district heating system is investor owned, lower costs are realized after five to six years of operation, and if owned by a nonprofit organization, after zero to three years. District heating offers lower costs than alternatives much sooner in time if co-generation and/or DOE participation in system construction are included in the analysis. During a preliminary environmental assessment, no potential adverse environmental impacts could be identified of sufficient consequence to preclude the construction and operation of the proposed district heating system. A follow-on program aimed at implementing district heating in Mammoth is outlined.

  10. One-pot synthesis of ternary Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst in natural geothermal water with enhanced photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xiaxi; Liu, Xiaoheng, E-mail: xhliu@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl composite was synthesized in geothermal water by a one-pot method. • Geothermal water served as the source of chlorine and carbonate. • Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl exhibited the enhanced photocatalytic activity and stability. • The efficient charge carrier separation is attributed to the Z-scheme construction. - Abstract: Geothermal water is a clean, cheap and renewable resource and it is widely distributed all over the world. In this work, ternary Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst has been successfully synthesized via a one-pot precipitation method in natural geothermal water at room temperature, wherein the geothermal water serves as the source of chlorine and carbonate. The results suggest that the Ag/AgCl nanoparticles are anchored on the surface of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl composite shows strong absorption ability in the visible light region. The evaluation of the photocatalytic activity indicates that the as-synthesized Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag/AgCl photocatalyst exhibits higher photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution under visible light irradiation than one-component (Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), two-component (Ag/AgCl, Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/AgCl) and the mechanical mixture of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Ag/AgCl. The trapping experiments confirmed that holes (h{sup +}) and {sup •} O{sub 2}{sup −} were the two main active species in the photocatalytic process. Finally, a possible Z-scheme photocatalytic mechanism of the charge transfer was proposed for the enhanced photocatalytic performance. This work may open up new insights into the application of cheap geothermal water resources in the word and provide new opportunities for facile fabrication of Ag/AgCl-based photocatalysts.

  11. Thermoeconomic Analysis of Hybrid Power Plant Concepts for Geothermal Combined Heat and Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heberle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a thermo-economic analysis for a low-temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC in a combined heat and power generation (CHP case. For the hybrid power plant, thermal energy input is provided by a geothermal resource coupled with the exhaust gases of a biogas engine. A comparison to alternative geothermal CHP concepts is performed by considering variable parameters like ORC working fluid, supply temperature of the heating network or geothermal water temperature. Second law efficiency as well as economic parameters show that hybrid power plants are more efficient compared to conventional CHP concepts or separate use of the energy sources.

  12. Advanced turbodrills for geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, W.C.; Rowley, J.C.; Carwile, C.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a new high-temperature, 350/sup 0/C advanced turbodrill for use in drilling geothermal wells is underway. Existing downhole drilling motors are temperature limited because of elastomeric degradation at elevated temperature. The new turbodrill contains high-torque turbine blades and improved seals which allow higher bit pressure drops. This new geothermal turbodrill which is designed for improved directional drilling offers economic alternatives for completing geothermal wells. The advanced turbodrill will be tested in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's hot dry rock geothermal wells.

  13. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasler, H. P.; Buelow, K. L.

    1985-05-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120 F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin.

  14. Use of Geothermal Energy for Aquaculture Purposes - Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.C.; Smith, K.C.

    1981-09-01

    This project, financed by the Pacific Northwest Regional Commission (PNRC), was designed to provide information to evaluate the best methods to use for intensive aquaculture of freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, using geothermal energy. The freshwater prawn is a tropical organism and is native to southeast Asia. Earlier projects at Oregon Institute of Technology have shown the feasibility of culturing this aquatic animal in geothermal water. This phase of the project was designed to investigate intensive culture of this animal as well as the advantages of growing rainbow trout, ornamental tropical fin fish, and mosquito fish, Gambusia affnis, for vector control using geothermal energy. The research data collected on the prawns was obtained from the stocking and sampling of two 0.2- ha (half-acre) ponds constructed as a part of the project. The ponds are equipped with recording monitors for temperature and flow. The geothermal energy used is the geothermal effluent from the Oregon Institute of Technology heating system. This water is of potable quality and ranges in temperature from 50 to 70oC. The geothermal water used in the ponds is controlled at 27oC, ± 2oC, by using thermostats and solenoid valves. A small building next to the ponds contains facilities for hatching larvae prawns and tanks for growing post-larvae prawns. The hatchery facility makes the project self-sustaining. The hatchery was obtained as part of an earlier PNRC project.

  15. Estimation of the sustainable geothermal potential of Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissen, Carolin; Benz, Susanne A.; Keck, Christiane A.; Bayer, Peter; Blum, Philipp

    2017-04-01

    Regarding the limited availability of fossil fuels and the absolute necessity to reduce CO2 emissions in order to mitigate the worldwide climate change, renewable resources and new energy systems are required to provide sustainable energy for the future. Shallow geothermal energy holds a huge untapped potential especially for heating and hot water, which represent up to 50% of the global energy demand. Previous studies quantified the capacity of shallow geothermal energy for closed and open systems in cities such as Vienna, London (Westminster) and Ludwigsburg in Germany. In the present study, these approaches are combined and also include the anthropogenic heat input by the urban heat island (UHI) effect. The objective of the present study is therefore to estimate the sustainable geothermal potential of Vienna. Furthermore, the amount of energy demand for heating and hot water that can be supplied by open and closed geothermal systems will be determined. The UHI effect in Vienna is reflected in higher ground water temperatures within the city centre (14 ˚ C to 18 ˚ C) in comparison to lower ones in rural areas (10 ˚ C to 13 ˚ C). A preliminary estimation of the anthropogenic heat flow into the ground water caused by elevated basement temperatures and land surface temperatures is 3,5 × 108 kWh/a. This additional heat flow leads to a total geothermal potential which is 2.5 times larger than the estimated annual energy demand for heating and hot water in Vienna.

  16. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  17. Geologic setting and geochemistry of thermal water and geothermal assessment, Trans-Pecos Texas. Final report, June 1, 1976-May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    Hot springs and wells in West Texas and adjacent Mexico are manifestations of active convective geothermal systems, concentrated in a zone along the Rio Grande between the Quitman Mountains and Big Bend National Park. Maximum temperatures are 47/sup 0/ and 72/sup 0/C for hot springs and wells in Texas and 90/sup 0/C for hot springs in Mexico within 5 km of the border. Existing information is summarized and the results of a 1-year intensive study of the area are presented. The study includes several overlapping phases: (1) compilation of existing geologic information, both regional studies of geology, structure and geophysics, and more detailed local studies of individual hot spring areas; (2) detailed geologic mapping of hot spring areas to understand the origin and geologic controls of hot springs; (3) field measurement and sampling of hot spring or well waters for geochemical analysis; and (4) synthesis and interpretation of the data.

  18. CO2 flux geothermometer for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Chiodini, G.; Rissmann, C. F.; Bloomberg, S.; Fridriksson, T.; Oladottir, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A new geothermometer (TCO2 Flux) is proposed based on soil diffuse CO2 flux and shallow temperature measurements made on areas of steam heated, thermally altered ground above active geothermal systems. This CO2 flux geothermometer is based on a previously reported CO2 geothermometer that was designed for use with fumarole analysis. The new geothermometer provides a valuable additional exploration tool for estimating subsurface temperatures in high-temperature geothermal systems. Mean TCO2 Flux estimates fall within the range of deep drill hole temperatures at Wairakei (New Zealand), Tauhara (New Zealand), Rotokawa (New Zealand), Ohaaki (New Zealand), Reykjanes (Iceland) and Copahue (Argentina). The spatial distribution of geothermometry estimates is consistent with the location of major upflow zones previously reported at the Wairakei and Rotokawa geothermal systems. TCO2 Flux was also evaluated at White Island (New Zealand) and Reporoa (New Zealand), where limited sub-surface data exists. Mode TCO2 Flux at White Island is high (320 °C), the highest of the systems considered in this study. However, the geothermometer relies on mineral-water equilibrium in neutral pH reservoir fluids, and would not be reliable in such an active and acidic environment. Mean TCO2 Flux at Reporoa (310 °C) is high, which indicates Reporoa has a separate upflow from the nearby Waiotapu geothermal system; an outflow from Waiotapu would not be expected to have such high temperature.

  19. Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

    1978-03-01

    Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

  20. Flows and Heat Exchange in a Geothermal Bed in the Process of Extraction of a Vapor-Water Mixture from It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanov, M. M.; Alkhasova, D. A.; Abasov, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    With the use of the finite-difference method, a nonstationary nonlinear problem on the heat and mass transfer in a geothermal bed in the process of extraction of a vapor-water mixture from it was solved numerically with regard for the heat exchange between the bed and the surrounding rocks. The results obtained were analyzed and compared with the results of earlier investigations. It was established that the heat exchange between the bed and its roof and bottom influences the heat and mass transfer in the neighborhood of a producing well in it. It is shown that this heat exchange increases somewhat the pressure (temperature) of the phase transition of the heat-transfer medium and changes its saturation with water. At the stage of stationary heat and mass transfer in the bed, this change leads to a decrease in the water saturation of the heat-transfer medium, i.e., to an additional evaporation of water from it. However, at the stage of substantially nonstationary heat and mass transfer in the bed, the pattern is more complex: within certain time intervals, the heat exchange in separate regions of the bed decreases the content of vapor in the heat-transfer medium (increases its saturation with water). Moreover, in both the cases of absence and presence of heat exchange between the bed and the surrounding rocks, the distributions of the water saturation of the heat-transfer medium in the bed executes damped oscillations and, in so doing, approaches the stationary state.

  1. Geothermal energy - Ready for use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskell, J. T.

    1980-11-01

    The use of geothermal energy in the United States for heating applications is discussed. The three major forms of geothermal energy, hydrothermal, pertrothermal and geopressured, are briefly reviewed, with attention given to the types of energy available from each. Federally supported projects demonstrating the use of geothermal hot water to heat homes in Boise, Idaho, and hot dry rocks in Fenton Hill, New Mexico to produce electricity are presented. Data available from existing geothermal energy applications are presented which show that geothermal is cost competitive with conventional energy sources using existing technology, and government economic incentives to the producers and users of geothermal energy are indicated. Finally, advanced equipment currently under development for the generation of electricity from geothermal resources at reduced costs is presented.

  2. Computer code of two-phase flow in geothermal wells producing water and/or water-carbon dioxide mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanka, Shouichi; Nishi, Kosuke

    1988-01-01

    Mathematical well models are developed for pure water and for water-carbon dioxide mixtures. For the slug flow regime, three correlations (Orkiszewski’s, Nicklin’s and modified Nicklin’s) are compared. An equation-of-state package for water-carbon dioxide mixtures is proposed as a function of pressure and temperature. The predicted values are compared with sixteen field cases, in which the maximum carbon dioxide content is 2.8 %.

  3. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Water Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have water temperature data. *These services are for testing and evaluation...

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in High-Temperature Acidic Geothermal Springs and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux M. Meslé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, superoxide (O2•-, and hydroxyl radicals (OH• are produced in natural waters via ultraviolet (UV light-induced reactions between dissolved oxygen (O2 and organic carbon, and further reaction of H2O2 and Fe(II (i.e., Fenton chemistry. The temporal and spatial dynamics of H2O2 and other dissolved compounds [Fe(II, Fe(III, H2S, O2] were measured during a diel cycle (dark/light in surface waters of three acidic geothermal springs (Beowulf Spring, One Hundred Springs Plain, and Echinus Geyser Spring; pH = 3–3.5, T = 68–80°C in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park. In situ analyses showed that H2O2 concentrations were lowest (ca. 1 μM in geothermal source waters containing high dissolved sulfide (and where oxygen was below detection and increased by 2-fold (ca. 2–3 μM in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III-oxide mat formation down the water channel. Small increases in dissolved oxygen and H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux, but not consistently across all springs sampled. Iron-oxide microbial mats were sampled for molecular analysis of ROS gene expression in two primary autotrophs of acidic Fe(III-oxide mat ecosystems: Metallosphaera yellowstonensis (Archaea and Hydrogenobaculum sp. (Bacteria. Expression (RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response genes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, peroxidases of the primary autotrophs were used to evaluate possible changes in transcription across temporal, spatial, and/or seasonal samples. Data presented here documented the presence of H2O2 and general correlation with dissolved oxygen. Moreover, two dominant microbial populations expressed ROS response genes throughout the day, but showed less expression of key genes during peak sunlight. Oxidative stress response genes (especially external peroxidases were highly-expressed in microorganisms within Fe(III-oxide mat communities, suggesting a significant role for these proteins during survival and growth in

  5. Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, B.C.; Harman, G.; Pitsenbarger, J. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    Geothermal Energy Technology (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production.

  6. Choosing a Geothermal as an HVAC System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensenbigler, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the process of selecting and installing geothermal water source heat pumps for new residence halls at Johnson Bible College in Knoxville, Tennessee, including choosing the type of geothermal design, contractors, and interior equipment, and cost and payback. (EV)

  7. The geochemistry of lithium-bearing geothermal water, Taupo Volcanic Zone, and shallow fluid processes in a very active silicic volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, A. S.; Hoskin, P. W.; Rudnick, R. L.; Liu, X.; Boseley, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Li abundances and isotopic systematics of Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) geothermal fluids preserves a record of processes occurring within shallow portions of geothermal reservoirs as well as deeper portions of the arc crust. Understanding Li cycling and isotopic fractionation in TVZ geothermal systems contributes to a more refined understanding of physicochemical processes affecting New Zealand's geothermal resources. A comprehensive dataset of 73 samples was compiled, with samples collected from geothermal surface features (springs, spouters, geysers, etc.) and electric-power industry production wells, collectively representing18 geothermal fields across the breadth and width the TVZ. No comparable dataset of fluid analyses exists. Ion chromatography, AAS, and quadrupole ICP-MS analyses were done for Li, Cl-, SiO2, SO42- K, Na, Ca, Mg, B, Sr and Pb concentrations. Lithium abundance in geothermal fluids from the TVZ have a dataset-wide average of 5.9 mg/L and range 4 μg/L to 29 mg/L. The Li abundance and Li/Cl ratios for geothermal water and steam condensates vary systematically as a result of boiling, mixing, and water/rock reaction. Lithium abundance and Li/Cl ratios are, therefore, indicators of shallow (above 2.5 km) and locally variable reservoir processes. δ7Li analysis of 63 samples was performed at the University of Maryland, College Park. Data quality was controlled by measurement of L-SVEC as a calibration standard and by multiple analysis of selected samples. The average δ7Li value for TVZ geothermal fluids is -0.8%. Most δ7Li values for geothermal water fall within a small range of about -3% to+2% indicating similar processes are causing similar isotopic fractionation throughout the region. Considered together, Li aundances and δ7Li values, in combination with numerical models, indicate possible evolution pathways and water/rock reactions in TVZ geothermal systems. Models based on rocks and surface water analysis indicate that Li cycles and

  8. Geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, C.

    1978-01-01

    Several tasks of JPL related to geothermal energy are discussed. The major task is the procurement and test and evaluation of a helical screw drive (wellhead unit). A general review of geothermal energy systems is given. The presentation focuses attention on geothermal reservoirs in California, with graphs and charts to support the discussion. Included are discussions on cost analysis, systems maintenance, and a comparison of geothermal and conventional heating and cooling systems.

  9. The Hydrogeochemistry of Qingshui Geothermal Field, Northeastern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wen, Chen; Cheng-Kuo, Lin; Wayne, Lin; Yu-Te, Chang; Pei-Shan, Hsieh

    2015-04-01

    The Qingshui geothermal field is located at the upstream valley of Lanyang Creek, northeastern Taiwan. It is renowned as a geothermal field. The previous studies demonstrated a higher geothermal gradient, 100oC/km warmer than a normal geotherm. However, Qingshui geothermal field has not been well developed due to the higher mining costs. In the recent years, the Taiwan government has been focusing on developing alternative and renewable energy and initiated a 10 year project, Nation Energy Program. This study is part of this project In general, it is very difficult to collect deep downhole samples without considerable change of hydro- and gas- chemistry of water under high temperature and pressure. A new sampling tool, GTF Sampler, was designed by the research team, Green Energy and Environment Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute. This tool can simultaneously collect high quality geothermal water and gas sample and moreover, the sampling depth can reach up to 800 meters. Accordingly, a more accurate measurements can be conducted in the laboratory. In this study, 10 geothermal samples were collected and measured. The results demonstrate that geothermal water samples are characterized with Na(K)-HCO3 water type and located at the mature water area in Giggenbach Na-K-Mg diagram. Several geothermometers, including silica and cation geothermometry, were used to estimate potential temperature in the geothermal reservoir systems. In general, the geothermoters of Na-K and Na-K-Ca obtain reservoir temperatures between 120-190oC and 130-210oC, respectively, but the silica geothermometer indicates a lower reservoir temperature between 90 and 170oC. There is no big difference among them. It is worth to note that all calculated temperatures are lower than those of in-situ downhole measurements; therefore, more detailed and advanced researches would be needed for the inconsistency. To examine the argument about igneous heat source in the previous studies, rare

  10. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Geothermal applications on the Madison (Pahasapa) aquifer system in South Dakota. Final report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gries, J.P.

    1977-09-01

    Pertinent geologic, hydrologic, and chemical data for the Madison Formation underlying western South Dakota are presented in text and in graphic form. A temperature anomaly in west central South Dakota makes 130 to 160/sup 0/F water available at depths of less than 3500 ft. A central geothermal space heating system designed for Midland, South Dakota indicates that by 1980 geothermal heat will be competitive with existing energy sources. Preliminary tests indicate the superiority of 304 or 316 stainless steel for fabrication of equipment to utilize the warm, corrosive Madison water. South Dakota has no statutes governing geothermal resources; under existing water law, geothermal water would be classified as a top priority domestic use. Suggestions are made for state legislation pertaining to the development of geothermal energy.

  12. Idaho Geothermal Commercialization Program. Idaho geothermal handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, G.D.; Esposito, L.; Montgomery, M.

    1980-03-01

    The following topics are covered: geothermal resources in Idaho, market assessment, community needs assessment, geothermal leasing procedures for private lands, Idaho state geothermal leasing procedures - state lands, federal geothermal leasing procedures - federal lands, environmental and regulatory processes, local government regulations, geothermal exploration, geothermal drilling, government funding, private funding, state and federal government assistance programs, and geothermal legislation. (MHR)

  13. Synergy potential for oil and geothermal energy exploitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziabakhsh-Ganji, Zaman; Nick, Hamidreza M.; Donselaar, Marinus E.

    2018-01-01

    A new solution for harvesting energy simultaneously from two different sources of energy by combining geothermal energy production and thermal enhanced heavy oil recovery is introduced. Numerical simulations are employed to evaluate the feasibility of generating energy from geothermal resources......, both for thermally enhanced oil recovery from a heavy oil reservoir and for direct heating purposes. A single phase non-isothermal fluid flow modeling for geothermal doublet system and a two-phase non-isothermal fluid flow modelling for water flooding in an oil reservoir are utilised. Sensitivity...... and feasibility analyses of the synergy potential of thermally-enhanced oil recovery and geothermal energy production are performed. A series of simulations are carried out to examine the effects of reservoir properties on energy consumption and oil recovery for different injection rates and injection temperature...

  14. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  15. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01

    , -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the

  16. Effects of geothermal energy utilization on stream biota and water quality at The Geysers, California. Final report. [Big Sulphur, Little Sulphur, Squaw, and Pieta Creeks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeGore, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    The discussion is presented under the following section headings: biological studies, including fish, insects, and microbiology; stream hydrology; stream water quality, including methods and results; the contribution of tributaries to Big Sulphur Creek, including methods, results, and tributary characterization; standing water at wellheads; steam condensate quality; accidental discharges; trout spawning bed quality; major conclusions; list of references; and appendices. It is concluded that present operational practices at Geysers geothermal field do not harm the biological resources in adjacent streams. The only effects of geothermal development observed during the study were related to operational accidents. (JGB)

  17. Geothermal progress monitor: Report No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    DOE is particularly concerned with reducing the costs of geothermal power generation, especially with the abundant moderate to low-temperature resources in the US. This concern is reflected in DOE`s support of a number of energy conversion projects. Projects which focus on the costs and performance of binary cycle technology include a commercial demonstration of supersaturated turbine expansions, which earlier studies have indicated could increase the power produced per pound of fluid. Other binary cycle projects include evaluations of the performance of various working fluid mixtures and the development and testing of advanced heat rejection systems which are desperately needed in water-short geothermal areas. DOE is also investigating the applicability of flash steam technology to low-temperature resources, as an economic alternative to binary cycle systems. A low-cost, low-pressure steam turbine, selected for a grant, will be constructed to utilize fluid discharged from a flash steam plant in Nevada. Another project addresses the efficiency of high-temperature flash plants with a demonstration of the performance of the Biphase turbine which may increase the power output of such installations with no increase in fluid flow. Perhaps the most noteworthy feature of this issue of the GPM, the 17th since its inception in 1980, is the high degree of industry participation in federally-sponsored geothermal research and development. This report describes geothermal development activities.

  18. Enhancement of existing geothermal resource utilization by cascading to intensive aquaculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachritz, W.H. II; Polka, R.; Schoenmackers, R.

    1995-12-04

    Aquaculture, the farming and husbandry of freshwater and marine organisms, is the newest and fastest growing US agricultural sector. In New Mexico, low winter temperatures and limited freshwater sources narrow culture production possibilities; however, it has long been recognized that the state has abundant supplies of both saline and geothermal ground waters. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the achievable energy savings and value enhancement of the byproduct geothermal energy by cascading fluids for the production of commercial aquaculture species. Specifically the project involved evaluating the heating systems performance in terms of heating budget for the geothermal assist, determine the total quantity of water used for culture and heating, amount of geothermal byproduct heat extracted, and ability of the system to maintain culture water temperatures during critical heating periods of the year. In addition, an analysis was conducted to determine the compatibility of this new system with existing greenhouse heating requirements.

  19. Fiscal 1997 development of the geothermal water use power plant, etc. Development of the binary cycle power plant (10MW class plant); 1997 nendo nessui riyo hatsuden plant nado kaihatsu. Binary cycle hatsuden plant no kaihatsu (10MW kyu plant no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    A R and D was conducted with the aim of using medium-/high-temperature hot water type geothermal resources. In fiscal 1997, fabrication of geothermal water system testing equipment and geothermal water production/reduction piping installation work were conducted, and an environmental effect survey and ground water variation observation were carried out. Moreover, pumps to pump up geothermal water were fabricated. In the fabrication of a pump for No. 3 demonstration plant, the following improvements were made. Concerning the inlet undersea bearing, the shapes related to it were so reformed that external water feeding in the initial run can be done. Relating to the protection of the thrust bearing half load side friction face, a spring was added to the face so that it was structured to give preload. As a method to install a casing covering board, adopted was a band installation method which is easy in handling. The number of instrumentation cables was reduced. As to cables for downhole pumps, studied were methods of connection, etc. of connection portions of the motor connector and instrumentation cable. Moreover, purifying/regeneration facilities of the downhole pump bearing oil were fabricated and tested. 85 figs., 57 tabs.

  20. Research status of geothermal resources in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lincheng; Li, Guang

    2017-08-01

    As the representative of the new green energy, geothermal resources are characterized by large reserve, wide distribution, cleanness and environmental protection, good stability, high utilization factor and other advantages. According to the characteristics of exploitation and utilization, they can be divided into high-temperature, medium-temperature and low-temperature geothermal resources. The abundant and widely distributed geothermal resources in China have a broad prospect for development. The medium and low temperature geothermal resources are broadly distributed in the continental crustal uplift and subsidence areas inside the plate, represented by the geothermal belt on the southeast coast, while the high temperature geothermal resources concentrate on Southern Tibet-Western Sichuan-Western Yunnan Geothermal Belt and Taiwan Geothermal Belt. Currently, the geothermal resources in China are mainly used for bathing, recuperation, heating and power generation. It is a country that directly makes maximum use of geothermal energy in the world. However, China’s geothermal power generation, including installed generating capacity and power generation capacity, are far behind those of Western European countries and the USA. Studies on exploitation and development of geothermal resources are still weak.

  1. Assessment of subsurface salt water disposal experience on the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast for applications to disposal of salt water from geopressured geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, C.K.; Boardman, C.R.

    1978-08-04

    A representative cross section of the literature on the disposal of geothermal brine was perused and some of the general information and concepts is summarized. The following sections are included: disposal statistics--Texas Railroad Commission; disposal statistics--Louisiana Office of Conservation; policies for administering salt water disposal operations; salt water disposal experience of Gulf Coast operators; and Federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program's brine disposal operations. The literature cited is listed in the appended list of references. Additional literature is listed in the bibliography. (MHR)

  2. Geothermal Energy Program Summary Document, FY 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Geothermal energy is derived from the internal heat of the earth. Much of it is recoverable with current or near current technology. Geothermal energy can be used for electric power production, residential and commercial space heating and cooling, industrial process heat, and agricultural applications. Three principal types of geothermal resources are exploitable through the year 2000. In order of technology readiness, these resources are: hydrothermal; geopressured (including dissolved natural gas); and hot dry rock. In hydrothermal systems, natural water circulation moves heat from deep internal sources toward the earth's surface. Geothermal fluids (water and steam) tapped by drilling can be used to generate electricity or provide direct heat. Geopressured resources, located primarily in sedimentary basins along the Gulf Coast of Texas and of Louisiana, consist of water and dissolved methane at high pressure and at moderately high temperature. In addition to recoverable methane, geopressured resources provide thermal energy and mechanical energy derived from high fluid pressures, although methane offers the greatest immediate value. Commercial development of geopressured energy may begin in the mid-1980s. Economic feasibility depends on the amount of methane that a given well can produce, a highly uncertain factor at present.

  3. New insight from noble gas and stable isotopes of geothermal/hydrothermal fluids at Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex: Boiling steam separation and water-rock interaction at shallow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulleau, Emilie; Tardani, Daniele; Sano, Yuji; Takahata, Naoto; Vinet, Nicolas; Bravo, Francisco; Muñoz, Carlos; Sanchez, Juan

    2016-12-01

    We measured noble gas and stable isotopes of the geothermal and hydrothermal fluids of the Caviahue-Copahue Volcanic Complex (CCVC), one of the most important geothermal systems in Argentina/Chile, in order to provide new insights into fluid circulation and origin. With the exception of Anfiteatro and Chancho-co geothermal systems, mantle-derived helium dominates in the CCVC fluids, with measured 3He/4He ratios up to 7.86Ra in 2015. Their positive δ15N is an evidence for subducted sediment-derived nitrogen, which is commonly observed in subduction settings. Both He-N2-Ar composition and positive correlation between δD-H2O and δ18O-H2O suggest that the fluids from Anfiteatro and Chancho-co (and partly from Pucon-Mahuida as well, on the southern flank of Copahue volcano) represent a meteoric water composition with a minor magmatic contribution. The Ne, Kr and Xe isotopic compositions are entirely of atmospheric origin, but processes of boiling and steam separation have led to fractionation of their elemental abundances. We modeled the CCVC fluid evolution using Rayleigh distillation curves, considering an initial air saturated geothermal water (ASGW) end-member at 250 and 300 °C, followed by boiling and steam separation at lower temperatures (from 200 °C to 150 °C). Between 2014 and 2015, the CCVC hydrogen and oxygen isotopes shifted from local meteoric water-dominated to andesitic water-dominated signature. This shift is associated with an increase of δ13C values and Stotal, HCl and He contents. These characteristics are consistent with a change in the gas ascent pathway between 2014 and 2015, which in turn induced higher magmatic-hydrothermal contribution in the fluid signature. The composition of the magmatic source of the CCVC fluids is: 3He/4He = 7.7Ra, δ15N = + 6‰, and δ13C = - 6.5‰. Mixing models between air-corrected He and N suggest the involvement of 0.5% to 5% of subducted sediments in the magmatic source. The magmatic sulfur isotopic

  4. Energy and Exergy Analysis of Kalina Cycle for the Utilization of Waste Heat in Brine Water for Indonesian Geothermal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasruddin Nasruddin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of waste heat in a power plant system—which would otherwise be released back to the environment—in order to produce additional power increases the efficiency of the system itself. The purpose of this study is to present an energy and exergy analysis of Kalina Cycle System (KCS 11, which is proposed to be utilized to generate additional electric power from the waste heat contained in geothermal brine water available in the Lahendong Geothermal power plant site in North Sulawesi, Indonesia. A modeling application on energy and exergy system is used to study the design of thermal system which uses KCS 11. To obtain the maximum power output and maximum efficiency, the system is optimized based on the mass fraction of working fluid (ammonia-water, as well as based on the turbine exhaust pressure. The result of the simulation is the optimum theoretical performance of KCS 11, which has the highest possible power output and efficiency. The energy flow diagram and exergy diagram (Grassman diagram was also presented for KCS 11 optimum system to give quantitative information regarding energy flow from the heat source to system components and the proportion of the exergy input dissipated in the various system components.

  5. Modern geothermal power: GeoPP with geothermal steam turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The first part of the review presents information on the scale and specific features of geothermal energy development in various countries. The classification of geothermal power plant (GeoPP) process flow diagrams by a phase state of the primary heat source (a geothermal fluid), thermodynamic cycle, and applicable turbines is proposed. Features of geothermal plants using methods of flashing and steam separation in the process loop and a flowsheet and thermodynamic process of a geothermal fluid heat-to-power conversion in a GeoPP of the most widespread type using a double-flash separation are considered. It is shown that, for combined cycle power units, the specific power-to-consumption geothermal fluid ratio is 20-25% higher than that for traditional single-loop GeoPP. Information about basic chemical components and their concentration range for geothermal fluids of various formations around the world is presented. Three historic stages of improving geothermal energy technologies are determined, such as development of high-temperature geothermal resources (dry, superheated steam) and application of a two-phase wet-steam geothermal fluid in GeoPP power units with one or two expansion pressures and development of binary cycle GeoPPs. A current trend of more active use of binary power plants in GeoPP technological processes is noted. Design features of GeoPP's steam turbines and steam separating devices, determined by the use of low-potential geothermal saturated steam as a working medium, which is characterized by corrosion aggressiveness and a tendency to form deposits, are considered. Most promising Russian geothermal energy projects are determined. A list of today's most advanced geothermal turbine performance technologies is presented. By an example of a 25 MW steam turbine design, made by JSC Kaluga Turbine Works, advantages of the internal moisture separation with a special turbine-separator stage are shown.

  6. Effect of Curing Temperature on the Durability of Concrete under Highly Geothermal Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang Tang; Hui Su; Shun Huang; Chunlai Qu; Jiaqi Yang

    2017-01-01

      To determine the durability of concrete in the actual temperature and humidity of the tunnel environment, this study investigates the mechanical properties, permeability of chloride ion, relative...

  7. Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, H.W.; Mitchell, J.C.

    1973-05-01

    At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a greater number were thought to be related to faulting. Measured water temperatures at the 124 wells and springs inventoried ranged from 12/sup 0/ to 93/sup 0/C (degrees Celsius) and averaged 50/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures, calculated using the silica and the sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, range from 5/sup 0/ to 370/sup 0/C and averaged 110/sup 0/C. Estimated aquifer temperatures in excess of 140/sup 0/C were found at 42 sites. No areal patterns to the distribution of temperatures either at the surface or subsurface were found. Generally, the quality of the waters sampled was good. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 14 to 13,700 mg/l (milligrams per liter) and averaged 812 mg/l, with higher values occurring in the southeastern part of the State. Twenty-five areas were selected for future study. Of these areas, 23 were selected on the basis of estimated aquifer temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher and two on the basis of geologic considerations.

  8. Dynamic water vapor and temperature calibration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, F W; Primiano, F P; Saidel, G M

    1984-06-01

    The objective evaluation of thermal and humidification processes in the pulmonary system requires accurate dynamic measurements of temperature and water vapor concentration of a flowing gas mixture. The adequacy of instruments used for such measurements can only be determined by dynamic calibration techniques. We have developed a method of producing step changes in temperature and water vapor content of a gas mixture undergoing controlled steady flow. The system consists of two reservoirs and a slide valve that switches a test section between them. The inlet (usually a probe or catheter tip) of the device to be calibrated is positioned in the test section. The flow rate through the test section is minimally changed during the transition between gas from one reservoir to that of the other. The system has been used to analyze the response of a thermistor and a respiratory mass spectrometer to changes in gas temperature and water vapor.

  9. The mineralogical consequences and behavior of descending acid-sulfate waters: An example from the Karaha - Telaga Bodas geothermal system, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.N.; Christenson, B.W.; Allis, R.G.; Browne, P.R.L.; Lutz, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Acidic steam condensates in volcanic systems or shallow, oxygenated geothermal environments are typically enriched in SO4 and poor in Cl. These fluids produce distinctive alteration-induced assemblages as they descend. At Karaha - Telaga Bodas, located on the flank of Galunggung Volcano, Indonesia, neutralization of descending acid waters has resulted in the successive appearance of 1) advanced argillic alteration characterized by alunite, clay minerals and pyrite, 2) anhydrite, pyrite and interlayered sheet silicates, and 3) carbonates. Minor tourmaline, fluorite and native sulfur also are present locally, reflecting interactions with discharging magmatic gases. Water rock interactions were modeled at temperatures up to 250??C using the composition of acidic lake water from Telaga Bodas and that of a typical andesite as reactants. The simulations predict mineral distributions consistent with the observed assemblages and a decrease in the freezing-point depression of the fluid with increasing temperature. Fluids trapped in anhydrite, calcite and fluorite display a similar decrease in their freezing-point depressions, from 2.8?? to 1.5??C, as homogenization temperatures increase from 160?? to 205??C. The simulations indicate that the progressive change in fluid composition is due mainly to the incorporation of SO4 into the newly formed hydrothermal minerals. The salinities of fluid inclusions containing Cl-deficient steam condensates are better expressed in terms of H2SO4 equivalents than the commonly used NaCl equivalents. At solute concentrations >1.5 molal, freezing-point depressions represented as NaCl equivalents overestimate the salinity of Cl-poor waters. At lower concentrations, differences between apparent salinities calculated as NaCl and H2SO 4 equivalents are negligible.

  10. TEMLOPI/V.2: a computer program for estimation of fully transient temperatures in geothermal wells during circulation and shut-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Garcia, A.; Santoyo, E.; Hernandez, I.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the development, validation and application of the TEMLOPI/V.2 computer program. This program is a useful tool for estimating in-situ the transient temperature distribution of the fluids employed for drilling geothermal wells. TEMLOPI/V.2 is based on a mathematical model which is developed to consider two-dimensional transient heat transfer during drilling and shut-in conditions in and around a geothermal well. The solution of the partial differential equations is based on the finite-difference technique with an implicit scheme. This scheme serves to demonstrate the numerical solution procedure. Each radial grid node is placed in a different thermal region: flow inside the pipe, metal pipe wall, flow inside annulus, and the surrounding formation. The program was written in FORTRAN 77 using modular programming and runs on most IBM compatible personal computers. The software code, its architecture, input and output files, the solution algorithm, flow diagrams and source programs are described in detail. From validation tests, computed temperatures differ by less than 5°C from analytically obtained temperatures. Comparison of results from the fully transient TEMLOPI/V.2 simulator and the pseudo-transient version, TEMLOPI/V.1, with measured data shows that the fully transient model provides better results. Application of TEMLOPI/V.2 is demonstrated in a practical application study of well EAZ-2 from Los Azufres Mexican geothermal field.

  11. Ground Source Geothermal District Heating and Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, James William [Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States)

    2016-10-21

    Ball State University converted its campus from a coal-fired steam boiler district heating system to a ground source heat pump geothermal district system that produces simultaneously hot water for heating and chilled water for cooling. This system will include the installation of 3,600 four hundred feet deep vertical closed loop boreholes making it the largest ground source geothermal district system in the country. The boreholes will act as heat exchangers and transfer heat by virtue of the earth’s ability to maintain an average temperature of 55 degree Fahrenheit. With growing international concern for global warming and the need to reduce worldwide carbon dioxide loading of the atmosphere geothermal is poised to provide the means to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The shift from burning coal to utilizing ground source geothermal will increase electrical consumption but an overall decrease in energy use and reduction in carbon dioxide output will be achieved. This achievement is a result of coupling the ground source geothermal boreholes with large heat pump chiller technology. The system provides the thermodynamic means to move large amounts of energy with limited energy input. Ball State University: http://cms.bsu.edu/About/Geothermal.aspx

  12. An example of geothermal systems: Hidirlar Geothermal Field, Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateş, Özkan; Zeki Tutkun, Salih; Baba, Alper; Woith, Heiko; Özden, Süha

    2010-05-01

    Biga Peninsula located at northwestern Anatolia on southern segment on the dextral North Anatolian Fault and has many important geothermal potential areas. There are known 14 geothermal system namely Tuzla, Kestanbol, Hıdırlar, Kırkgeçit, Kocabaşlar, Bardakçılar, Palamutoba, Akçakeçili, Küçükçetmi, Külcüler, Tepeköy, Çan, Topaklar and Etili. Among them, an important field is the Hıdırlar geothermal field, situated at the southeast of the Biga Peninsula. This field is in a tectonosedimentary basin and controlled by different trending faults. It has a potential usage about 87,7°C surface discharge temperature. Three thermal springs sampled in the Hıdırlar geothermal field. They have named as Spring, Drill and Uyuz. Their surface temperatures are Spring=77,5°C, Drill=57,7°C and Uyuz=53,6°C. According to the result of hydro-geochemical analysis and diagrams, thermal waters are generally Na-SO4 and Na-SO4-HCO3 water types. Assessments of chemical geothermometers applied to the thermal waters, suggest that reservoir temperatures are 90°C-163°C for Spring, 81°C-149°C for Drill and 83°C-161°C for Uyuz. Around Hıdırlar geothermal field, have been determined five different geological units. Lower-Middle Triassic aged Nilüfer Unit of Karakaya Complex is the basement unit. Late Oligocene aged Çakıroba granodiorite and Çan volcanic rocks overlie the basement metamorphic rocks with an unconformity. Neogene aged Örencik Formation, Quaternary aged slope washes and alluvium cover all older units with angular unconformity. Main structural trends have ENE-trending normal faults and they have been cutting by youngest NE-trending normal faults with a dextral strike-slip component. All thermal water springs are arranged on the NE-trending youngest faults. Both fault-slip data and joint measurements, mainly in granodiorites, show an active local extensional tectonic regime on southern segment of North Anatolian Fault. This local tectonic regime

  13. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  14. Effect of Curing Temperature on the Durability of Concrete under Highly Geothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the durability of concrete in the actual temperature and humidity of the tunnel environment, this study investigates the mechanical properties, permeability of chloride ion, relative dynamic elastic modulus, and mass loss ratio of concrete specimens cured in the temperature which varied from normal, 40, 60, 75, and 90°C, and the humidity was kept at 90% continuously. Experimental results reveal that the hot temperature curing environment may benefit early stage strength development but reduce the long-term strength. It is proved that 60°C is a critical point. At above 60°C, the strength of the concrete material and its resistance to chloride ion permeability showed a decreasing trend; however, in the appropriate temperature range, the frost resistance properties of the concrete are improved with increasing temperature.

  15. Modelling of temperature in deep boreholes and evaluation of geothermal heat flow at Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, Jan; Back, Paer-Erik; Laendell, Maerta; Sundberg, Anders (GEO INNOVA AB, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    This report presents modelling of temperature and temperature gradients in boreholes in Laxemar and Forsmark and fitting to measured temperature data. The modelling is performed with an analytical expression including thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, heat flow, internal heat generation and climate events in the past. As a result of the fitting procedure it is also possible to evaluate local heat flow values for the two sites. However, since there is no independent evaluation of the heat flow, uncertainties in for example thermal conductivity, diffusivity and the palaeoclimate temperature curve are transferred into uncertainties in the heat flow. Both for Forsmark and Laxemar, reasonably good fits were achieved between models and data on borehole temperatures. However, none of the general models achieved a fit within the 95% confidence intervals of the measurements. This was achieved in some cases for the additional optimised models. Several of the model parameters are uncertain. A good model fit does not automatically imply that 'correct' values have been used for these parameters. Similar model fits can be expected with different sets of parameter values. The palaeoclimatically corrected surface mean heat flow at Forsmark and Laxemar is suggested to be 61 and 56 mW/m2 respectively. If all uncertainties are combined, including data uncertainties, the total uncertainty in the heat flow determination is judged to be within +12% to -14% for both sites. The corrections for palaeoclimate are quite large and verify the need of site-specific climate descriptions. Estimations of the current ground surface temperature have been made by extrapolations from measured temperature logging. The mean extrapolated ground surface temperature in Forsmark and Laxemar is estimated to 6.5 deg and 7.3 deg C respectively. This is approximately 1.7 deg C higher for Forsmark, and 1.6 deg C higher for Laxemar compared to data in the report SKB-TR-06-23. Comparison with

  16. First geothermal pilot power plant in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Anikó

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hungarian petroleum industry has always participated in the utilization of favourable geothermal conditions in the country. Most of the Hungarian geothermal wells were drilled by the MOL Ltd. as CH prospect holes. Accordingly, the field of geothermics belonged to the petroleum engineering, although marginally. It was therefore a surprise to hear of the decision of MOL Ltd. to build a geothermal power plant of about 2-5 MW. The tender was published in 2004.The site selected for the geothermal project is near the western border of an Hungarian oilfield, close to the Slovenian border. The location of the planned geothermal power plant was chosen after an analysis of suitable wells owned by the MOL Rt. The decision was made on the bases of different reservoir data. The existence of a reservoir of the necessary size, temperature, permeability, productivity and the water chemistry data was proved. The wells provide an enough information to understand the character of the reservoir and will be the production wells used by the planned power plant.The depth of the wells is about 2930 - 3200 m. The Triassic formation is reached at around 2851 m. The production and the reinjection wells are planned. The primary objective of the evaluation is to further learn the nature of the geothermal system. First a one-day discharge test is carried out. If this short-term test is successful, a six-months long-term discharge test will follow. The first period of the test is a transient phenomenon. Within the well test, the wellhead pressure, the flow rate, the outflowing water temperature, the dynamic fluid level, and the chemical components will be measured. The heat transfer around the bore-hole is influenced by the flow rate and the time. For the right appreciation of the measured data, it is very important to analyse the heat transfer processes around the bore-hole. The obtained data from the experiments must be also fitted into the framework of a mathematical

  17. Geothermal energy for the increased recovery of copper by flotation enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The possible use of geothermal energy (a) to speed the recovery of copper from ore flotation and/or leaching of flotation tailings and (b) to utilize geothermal brines to replace valuable fresh water in copper flotation operations was evaluated. Geothermal energy could be used to enhance copper and molybdenum recovery in mineral flotation by increasing the kinetics of the flotation process. In another approach, geothermal energy could be used to heat the leaching solution which might permit greater copper recovery using the same residence time in a tailings leach facility. Since there is no restriction on the temperature of the leaching fluid, revenues generated from the additional copper recovered would be greater for tailings leach operations than for other types of leach operations (for example, dump leaching operation) for which temperature restrictions exist. The estimated increase in total revenues resulting from two percent increase copper recovery in a 50,000 tons ore/day plant was estimated to be over $2,000,000 annually. It would require an estimated geothermal investment of about $2,130,000 for a geothermal well and pumping system. Thus, the capital investment would be paid out in about one year. Furthermore, considerable savings of fresh waters and process equipment are possible if the geothermal waters can be used directly in the mine-mill operations, which is believed to be practical.

  18. Design of serially connected ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pumps for district heating with the utilisation of a geothermal heat source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2016-01-01

    to supply 7.2 MW heat at 85 °C utilizing a geothermal heat source at 73 °C. Both the heat source and heat sink experience a large temperature change over the heat transfer process, of which a significant part may be achieved by direct heat exchange. First a generic study with a simple representation...

  19. Geothermal energy recovery from underground mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Andrew; Shang, Helen [School of Engineering, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Scott, John Ashley [School of Engineering, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-02-15

    Underground mines are extremely capital intensive, but despite this investment the traditional view has been that they have little useful value after closure. There are, however, potential positive uses of closed mines, in particular the generation of renewable geothermal energy. After closure, many mines flood and the relatively stable temperature of this water can be exploited by the use of geothermal recovery loops coupled to heat pumps. A review of the current situation, despite increasing pressures to identify sources of renewable energy, reveals that there are still only a limited number of existing and proposed installations. Nevertheless, a survey of those that do exist demonstrates the potential value of this approach. In particular, during the winter heat can be extracted from mine water and supplied for space heating, and in the summer the process can be reversed and the heat transferred back to the water to provide cooling. (author)

  20. Canadian Geothermal Data Collection: Deep permafrost temperatures and thickness of permafrost, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision temperature measurements have been made in some 150 deep wells and holes drilled in the course of natural resource exploration in the permafrost regions of...

  1. Regional geothermal exploration in north central New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L. (ed.)

    1984-02-01

    A broad-based geothermal resource reconnaissance study covering Bernalillo, Los Alamos, Rio Arriba, San Miguel, Sandoval, Santa Fe, Taos, Torrance, and Valencia counties in north central New Mexico was conducted from June 15, 1981, through September 30, 1983. Specific activities included the compilation of actual temperature, bottom-hole temperature gradient, and geotemperature data; tabulation of water chemistry data; field collection of temperature-depth data from existing wells; and drilling of temperature gradient holes in the Ojo Caliente, San Ysidro, Rio Puerco, and Polvadera areas. The data collected were used to perform: (1) a regional analysis of the geothermal energy potential of north central New Mexico; (2) two site-specific studies of the potential relationship between groundwater constrictions and geothermal resources; (3) an evaluation of the geothermal energy potential at Santa Ana Pueblo; (4) a general analysis of the geothermal energy resources of the Rio Grande Rift, including specific data on the Valles Caldera; and (5) an evaluation of the use of geothermometers on New Mexico groundwaters. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual chapters.

  2. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  3. Geothermal development plan: northern Arizona counties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Northern Counties Area Development Plan evaluated the regional market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. This study identified five potential geothermal resource areas, four of which have low temperature (<90{sup 0}C, 194{sup 0}F) potential and one possible igneous system. The average population growth rate in the Northern Counties is expected to be five percent per year over the next 40 years, with Mohave and Yavapai Counties growing the fastest. Rapid growth is anticipated in all major employment sectors, including trade, service, manufacturing, mining and utilities. A regional energy use analysis is included, containing information on current energy use patterns for all user classes. Water supplies are expected to be adequate for expected growth generally, though Yavapai and Gila Counties will experience water deficiencies. A preliminary district heating analysis is included for the towns of Alpine and Springerville. Both communities are believed located on geothermal resource sites. The study also contains a section identifying potential geothermal resource users in northern Arizona.

  4. Energetic and economical evaluation of the geothermal water desalination by distillation; Evaluation energeco-economique du procede de dessalement de l'eau geothermale par distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasfi, N.; Hajji, N.; Benali, S.; Jeday, M.R. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Gabes, Lab. d' Energetique et d' Ingenierie, Gabes (Tunisia)

    2001-07-01

    This study is devoted to the energetic and economical performance of desalination units by geothermal water distillation, without and with vapor mechanical compression. The process and its block diagram are described. The obtained results allow the evaluation of the more economical process. (A.L.B.)

  5. Geothermal engineering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    This book explains the engineering required to bring geothermal resources into use. The book covers specifically engineering aspects that are unique to geothermal engineering, such as measurements in wells and their interpretation, transport of near-boiling water through long pipelines, turbines driven by fluids other than steam, and project economics. The explanations are reinforced by drawing comparisons with other energy industries.

  6. Computer simulation of two-phase flow in geothermal well producing water and/or water-carbon dioxide mixtures; Mizu aruiwa mizu-tansan gas kongobutsu wo sanshutsusuru chinetsusei ni okeru kieki niso ryudo no simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nishi, K. [Japan Oil Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-10-25

    Mathematical programs to simulate two-phase flow in wellbores have been developed for water and/or water-carbon dioxide mixtures. `Bubble rise velocities` in the slug flow regime are estimated using three methods: Orkiszewski (1967), Nicklin et al. (1962) and a modified Nicklin method. The modified Nicklin method uses {Lambda} = 0.1 instead of {Lambda} = 0.2 as in the Nicklin method. A package has been developed to estimate the phase behaviors of the water-carbon dioxide system. The three methods are evaluated by comparing calculated results with measured data from a Japanese geothermal field. Good results are obtained at moderate to large production rates, however there are some differences between the predicted and actual data at low rates. The average absolute deviation of percentage errors between predicted pressure losses and the field data is 6.21, with standard deviation of 5.72, excluding the low rate cases. The simulation program can estimate the following variables: pressure, temperature, specific enthalpy, flashing point, flow regime, carbon dioxide solubility in water, and can give phase diagrams of the water-carbon dioxide system, which includes the carbon dioxide content of the water and gas phases, and the quality of the gas phase. 12 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Geothermal data of the United States, including many original determinations of underground temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, Nelson Horatio

    1920-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present all available published data bearing on the rate of increase of underground temperature with increasing depth in the United States, together with several hundred original observations by myself and my associates. A canvass of the governmental, State, and serial publications has yielded many records of temperature of flowing wells and also a few observations made with thermometers in borings and deep mines. Additional data on temperature of flows have been given by correspondents. Some of the data, especially those relating to flows from wells, may not be reliable, and as a rule these could not be discriminated. Many records are omitted because no facts are available as to the source of flow.

  8. Geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.E.

    1965-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed: areas of ''normal'' geothermal gradient, large areas of higher-than-''normal'' geothermal gradient, hot spring areas, hydrothermal systems of composite type, general problems of utilization, and domestic and world resources of geothermal energy. Almost all estimates and measurements of total heat flow published through 1962 for hot spring areas of the world are tabulated. (MHR)

  9. Prospects for Assessing Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Basement Rock Flow Stimulation by Wellbore Temperature Data

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Leary; Peter Malin; Tero Saarno; Ilmo Kukkonen

    2017-01-01

    We use Matlab 3D finite element fluid flow/transport modelling to simulate localized wellbore temperature events of order 0.05–0.1 °C logged in Fennoscandia basement rock at ~1.5 km depths. The temperature events are approximated as steady-state heat transport due to fluid draining from the crust into the wellbore via naturally occurring fracture-connectivity structures. Flow simulation is based on the empirics of spatially-correlated fracture-connectivity fluid flow widely attested by well-l...

  10. Mesozoic-Cenozoic course of temperatures on the earth's surface and geothermal regime of the Jurassic oil source deposits (southern paleoclimatic zone of West Siberia)

    OpenAIRE

    Isaev, V.I.; Iskorkina, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a review the state of studies of the influence of the secular course of temperatures on the earth's surface on the thermal history of deep oil source deposits is characterized as a state of scientific research. The aim of research is generalization of the known data about Mesozoic-Cenozoic climate of southeastern part of West Siberia and the assessment of impact of the secular course of temperature of the earth's surface on the geothermal regime, the degree of realization of generation pot...

  11. Fieldwide reservoir engineering analysis of the Pilgrim Springs, Alaska, geothermal reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Economides, M.J. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks); Economides, C.A.E.; Kunze, J.F.; Lofgren, B.

    1982-01-01

    The wells drilled in the region of the geothermal anomaly near Pilgrim Springs provide considerable insight into the general characteristics of the geothermal system. Previous work, including resistivity studies and geothermometry are corroborated by the temperature profiles observed in the six wells. The existence of a hot water zone of about 150/sup 0/C and at a depth of around 5000 ft is now virtually certain.

  12. Outstanding issues for new geothermal resource assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.F.; Reed, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A critical question for the future energy policy of the United States is the extent to which geothermal resources can contribute to an ever-increasing demand for electricity. Electric power production from geothermal sources exceeds that from wind and solar combined, yet the installed capacity falls far short of the geothermal resource base characterized in past assessments, even though the estimated size of the resource in six assessments completed in the past 35 years varies by thousands of Megawatts-electrical (MWe). The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working closely with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Research Program and other geothermal organizations on a three-year effort to produce an updated assessment of available geothermal resources. The new assessment will introduce significant changes in the models for geothermal energy recovery factors, estimates of reservoir permeability, limits to temperatures and depths for electric power production, and include the potential impact of evolving Enhanced (or Engineered) Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology.

  13. Geothermic Characters Of The Most Promising Geothermal Filed For Power Generation In Republic Of Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Kubati M.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents geothermal exploration and their geothermometric characteristics in the western part of Yemen. Geologically this volcanic province totals areas approximately 45000 km2. Tectonically the study area is considered one of the most active in the Arabian Plate boundaries that affected by the opening of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden as well as by the African rift valley. Extensive field work had been carried out to evaluate the geothermal characteristics of this area. Water and gas samples were collected from hundreds of thermal springs and shallow domestic wells and geochemically analyzed and reported. Temperatures and PH values range from 35 to 96.3 C and from 4.5 to 8.5 respectively. Deep geothermal gradient indicates that the geothermal gradients in the western part of the province Red Sea coast are relatively high up to 182 C at the depth of 3290 m. Volcanic units are affected by hydrothermal processes and became intensively altered. By applying geothermometric methods four geothermal fields have been primarily identified they are Al-Lisi and Isbil Dhamar province Al-Qafr Ibb province Damt Dhala province and the Red Sea coast geothermal fields and three water types were recognized which are Na-HCO3-Cl-S and Ca-Na-Cl and Na HCO3.Results from Al-Lisi and Isbil geothermal area are considered the most promising field. Geothermal detail studies have been achieves and location of the first geothermal exploration well is located in Al-Lisi and Isbil field.By applyig geophisical methods Iso- Resistivity contour mapsthese maps reflected high resistivity areas and low.Clearly shows the low resistivity values incentral and Western part of the study area about 11amp937mWhile up Resistivity values to the area in the eastern 600amp937m.Also through the use ofthe different current electrode spacing AB2 700 1000 1500 and 2000m.We find the low- Resistivity areas becoming more widespread and concentrated in the center of the study area and

  14. High geothermal heat flux in close proximity to the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rysgaard, Soren; Bendtsen, Jorgen; Mortensen, John

    2018-01-01

    or geothermal heat sources. Recently it was suggested that there may be a hidden heat source beneath GIS caused by a higher than expected geothermal heat flux (GHF) from the Earth's interior. Here we present the first direct measurements of GHF from beneath a deep fjord basin in Northeast Greenland. Temperature...... and salinity time series (2005-2015) in the deep stagnant basin water are used to quantify a GHF of 93 +/- 21 mW m(-2) which confirm previous indirect estimated values below GIS. A compilation of heat flux recordings from Greenland show the existence of geothermal heat sources beneath GIS and could explain...

  15. A case study of radial jetting technology for enhancing geothermal energy systems at Klaipeda geothermal demonstration plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Peters, E.; Sliaupa, S.; Valickas, R.; Petrauskas, S.

    2017-01-01

    In 1996 a geothermal energy project was initiated at Klaipėda, Lithuania, to demonstrate the feasibility of using low enthalpy geothermal water as a renewable energy resource in district heating systems. The Klaipėda geothermal plant is situated within the West Lithuanian geothermal anomaly with a

  16. Geothermal Potential Analysis Using Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 (Case Study: Mount Ijen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukojo, B. M.; Mardiana, R.

    2017-12-01

    Geothermal energy is also a heat energy contained in the earth’s internal. Indonesia has a total geothermal potential of around 27 GWe. The government is eager for the development of geothermal in Indonesia can run well so that geothermal can act as one of the pillars of national energy. However, the geothermal potential has not been fully utilized. One of the geothermal potention is Mount Ijen. Mount Ijen is a strato volcano that has a crater lake with a depth of about 190 m and has a very high degree of acidity and the volume of lake water is very large. With the abundance of potential geothermal potential in Indonesia, it is necessary to have an activity in the form of integrated geoscience studies to be able to maximize the potential content that exists in a geothermal area. One of the studies conducted is to do potential mapping. This research performs image data processing of Landsat 8, Sentinel 2, RBI Map, and preliminary survey data. This research carried out the Vegetation Index, surface temperature and altitude. The equipment used in this research includes image processing software, number processing software, GPS Handheld and Laptop. Surface Temperatures in the Mount Ijen have anomalies with large temperatures ranging between 18° C to 38° C. The best correlation value of altitude and ground surface temperature is -0.89 ie the correlation of January surface temperature. While the correlation value of Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 vegetation index was 0.81. The land cover confidence matrix scored 80%. Land cover in the research area is dominated by forests by 35% of the research area. There is a potential area of geothermal potential is very high on Mount Ijen with an area of 39.43 hectares located in Wongsorejo District and adjacent to District Sempol.

  17. National Geothermal Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A. F.; Cuyler, D.; Snyder, W. S.; Allison, M. L.; Blackwell, D. D.; Williams, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Geothermal Data System is to design, build, implement, deploy and populate a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of data and service (application) providers. These providers will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermal-relevant data that operates as an integral component of NGDS. As a result the geothermal industry, the public, and policy makers will have access to consistent and reliable data, which in turn, reduces the amount of staff time devoted to finding, retrieving, integrating, and verifying information. With easier access to information, the high cost and risk of geothermal power projects (especially exploration drilling) is reduced. Five separate NGDS projects provide the data support, acquisition, and access to cyber infrastructure necessary to reduce cost and risk of the nation's geothermal energy strategy and US DOE program goals focused on the production and utilization of geothermal energy. The U.S DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Geothermal Technologies Program is developing the knowledge and data foundation necessary for discovery and development of large-scale energy production while the Buildings Technology Program is focused on other practical applications such as direct use and residential/commercial ground source heat pumps. The NGDS provides expanded reference and resource data for research and development activities (a subset of the US DOE goals) and includes data from across all fifty states and the nation's leading academic geothermal centers. Thus, the project incorporates not only high-temperature potential but also moderate and low-temperature locations incorporating US DOE's goal of adding more geothermal electricity to the grid. The program, through its development of data integration cyberinfrastructure, will help lead to innovative exploration technologies through increased data availability on geothermal energy capacity. Finally

  18. Initial temperature distribution in Los Humeros, Mexico, geothermal field; Distribucion de temperatura inicial en el campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Puebla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A; Arellano, V; Aragon, A; Barragan, R.M; Izquierdo, G [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Pizano, A [Comision federal de Electricidad, Los Humeros, Puebla (Mexico)

    2000-12-01

    The initial formation temperatures surrounding 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field are presented. These temperatures were estimated using the Horner and the sphere methods. A brief discussion on the applicability of each method is presented and previous applications are detailed. Then the more likely reservoir temperature of each well versus elevation is plotted based on the estimations about the main feed zone and the temperature of each well. The boiling with depth curve for pure water is also included. Two longitudinal and one traverse geological sections are presented to illustrate the field initial temperature distribution, the lithology and layers thickness, the basement topography and the wells traversed along each sections. Also, the main feed zones of the wells are indicated. Finally, the last series of measured temperature logs in well H-26 are produced by numerical simulation. This considers the well circulation losses and an assumed initial temperature profile. This profile iteratively modified until the computed profiles match the measured temperature profiles. The last assumed temperature profile is then considered as the best approximation to the undisturbed formation temperature around well H-26 and it is then compared with the stabilized temperatures obtained via the Horner and Sphere methods. [Spanish] Se presentan las temperaturas iniciales o estabilizadas de la formacion circundante a 40 pozos del campo geotermico Los Humeros, las cuales se estimaron mediante los metodos de Horner y el metodo de la esfera. Se presenta una discusion sobre la aplicacion de cada metodo y se detallan las aplicaciones previas del metodo de la esfera. Posteriormente y con base en las estimaciones de las principales zonas de aporte de cada pozo y sus correspondientes temperaturas se grafican las temperaturas mas probables de yacimiento para cada pozo contra la elevacion y se incluye en la misma grafica la curva de ebullicion del agua contra la elevacion. Se

  19. Environmental Assessment Lakeview Geothermal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treis, Tania [Southern Oregon Economic Development Department, Medford, OR (United States)

    2012-04-30

    The Town of Lakeview is proposing to construct and operate a geothermal direct use district heating system in Lakeview, Oregon. The proposed project would be in Lake County, Oregon, within the Lakeview Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA). The proposed project includes the following elements: Drilling, testing, and completion of a new production well and geothermal water injection well; construction and operation of a geothermal production fluid pipeline from the well pad to various Town buildings (i.e., local schools, hospital, and Lake County Industrial Park) and back to a geothermal water injection well. This EA describes the proposed project, the alternatives considered, and presents the environmental analysis pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act. The project would not result in adverse effects to the environment with the implementation of environmental protection measures.

  20. Geology of Platanares geothermal area, Copan, Honduras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Duffield, W.; Wohletz, K.; Priest, S.; Ramos, N.; Flores, W.; Eppler, D.; Ritchie, A.; Escobar, C.

    1987-05-01

    The Platanares, Copan (Honduras) geothermal area is located in a highly faulted terrain of Paleozoic(.) metamorphic rocks, Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks, and Tertiary volcanic rocks. All thermal manifestations are located along faults. The volcanic rocks are probably too old to represent the surface expression of an active crustal magma body. Thus, the thermal water is interpreted to be heated during deep circulation in a regime of elevated heat flow. The water chemistry suggests that the geothermal reservoir originates within the Cretaceous sedimentary sequence and that the reservoir temperature may be as high as 240/sup 0/ C. Two exploration coreholes penetrated the volcanic sequence and bottomed within Cretaceous redbeds. Well PLTG-1 is 650 m deep and flows at 3 Mw thermal from a 160/sup 0/ C permeable zone. Well PLTG-2 is 401 m deep and has a thermal gradient of 139/sup 0/ C/km. Exploration drilling is continuing, with a third corehole to be drilled in May, 1987.

  1. Geothermal direct applications hardware systems development and testing. 1979 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Activities performed during calendar year 1979 for the hardware system development and testing task are presented. The fluidized bed technology was applied to the drying of potato by-products and to the exchange of heat to air in the space heating experiment. Geothermal water was flashed to steam and also used as the prime energy source in the steam distillation of peppermint oil. Geothermal water temperatures as low as 112.8/sup 0/C were utilized to distill alcohol from sugar beet juice, and lower temperature water provided air conditioning through an absorption air conditioning system. These experiments are discussed.

  2. The Preston Geothermal Resources; Renewed Interest in a Known Geothermal Resource Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Thomas R. [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Worthing, Wade [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cannon, Cody [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Carl [Univ. of Idaho, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McLing, Travis L [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Mattson, Earl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Dobson, Patric [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Conrad, Mark [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    2015-01-01

    The Preston Geothermal prospect is located in northern Cache Valley approximately 8 kilometers north of the city of Preston, in southeast Idaho. The Cache Valley is a structural graben of the northern portion of the Basin and Range Province, just south of the border with the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). This is a known geothermal resource area (KGRA) that was evaluated in the 1970's by the State of Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) and by exploratory wells drilled by Sunedco Energy Development. The resource is poorly defined but current interpretations suggest that it is associated with the Cache Valley structural graben. Thermal waters moving upward along steeply dipping northwest trending basin and range faults emanate in numerous hot springs in the area. Springs reach temperatures as hot as 84° C. Traditional geothermometry models estimated reservoir temperatures of approximately 125° C in the 1970’s study. In January of 2014, interest was renewed in the areas when a water well drilled to 79 m (260 ft) yielded a bottom hole temperature of 104° C (217° F). The well was sampled in June of 2014 to investigate the chemical composition of the water for modeling geothermometry reservoir temperature. Traditional magnesium corrected Na-K-Ca geothermometry estimates this new well to be tapping water from a thermal reservoir of 227° C (440° F). Even without the application of improved predictive methods, the results indicate much higher temperatures present at much shallower depths than previously thought. This new data provides strong support for further investigation and sampling of wells and springs in the Northern Cache Valley, proposed for the summer of 2015. The results of the water will be analyzed utilizing a new multicomponent equilibrium geothermometry (MEG) tool called Reservoir Temperature Estimate (RTEst) to obtain an improved estimate of the reservoir temperature. The new data suggest that other KGRAs and overlooked areas may need

  3. Geothermal Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Marilyn; Page, Deborah

    This curriculum unit describes geothermal energy in the context of the world's energy needs. It addresses renewable and nonrenewable energy sources with an in-depth study of geothermal energy--its geology, its history, and its many uses. Included are integrated activities involving science, as well as math, social studies, and language arts.…

  4. Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, B.C.; Pichiarella, L.S. [eds.; Kane, L.S.; Henline, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Geothermal Energy (GET) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide information available on the technologies required for economic recovery of geothermal energy and its use as direct heat or for electric power production. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database during the past two months.

  5. A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

    2006-10-12

    Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities

  6. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  7. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

  8. Low-cost low-enthalpy geothermal heat for freshwater production: Innovative applications using thermal desalination processes

    KAUST Repository

    Bundschuh, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    The study is dedicated to exploring different types of low-cost low-enthalpy geothermal and their potential integration with conventional thermal-based water desalination and treatment technologies to deliver energy efficient, environmentally friendly solutions for water desalination and treatment, addressing global water crises. Our in-depth investigation through reviews of various low-enthalpy geothermal and conventional thermal-based technologies suggest that the geothermal option is superior to the solar option if low-cost geothermal heat is available because it provides a constant heat source in contrast to solar. Importantly, the stable heat source further allows up-scaling (> 1000 m3/day), which is not currently possible with solar. Solar-geothermal hybrid constellations may also be suitable in areas where both sources are available. The review also discovers that the innovative Membrane distillation (MD) process is very promising as it can be used for many different water compositions, salinity and temperature ranges. Either the geothermal water itself can be desalinated/treated or the geothermal heat can be used to heat feed water from other sources using heat exchangers. However, there are only few economic analyses for large-scale MD units and these are based on theoretical models using often uncertain assumptions resulting in a large variety of results.

  9. Geothermal resources of California sedimentary basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C.F.; Grubb, F.V.; Galanis, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    The 2004 Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Plan for geothermal energy calls for expanding the geothermal resource base of the United States to 40,000 MW of electric power generating potential. This will require advances in technologies for exploiting unconventional geothermal resources, including Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) and geopressured geothermal. An investigation of thermal conditions in California sedimentary basins through new temperature and heat flow measurements reveals significant geothermal potential in some areas. In many of the basins, the combined cooling effects of recent tectonic and sedimentary processes result in relatively low (geothermal gradients. For example, temperatures in the upper 3 km of San Joaquin, Sacramento and Ventura basins are typically less than 125??C and do not reach 200??c by 5 km. By contrast, in the Cuyama, Santa Maria and western Los Angeles basins, heat flow exceeds 80 mW/m2 and temperatures near or above 200??C occur at 4 to 5 km depth, which represents thermal conditions equivalent to or hotter than those encountered at the Soultz EGS geothermal site in Europe. Although the extractable geothermal energy contained in these basins is not large relative to the major California producing geothermal fields at The Geysers or Salton Sea, the collocation in the Los Angeles basin of a substantial petroleum extraction infrastructure and a major metropolitan area may make it attractive for eventual geothermal development as EGS technology matures.

  10. Development of geothermal-well-completion systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a three year study concerning the completion of geothermal wells, specifically cementing, are reported. The research involved some specific tasks: (1) determination of properties an adequate geothermal well cement must possess; (2) thorough evaluation of current high temperature oilwell cementing technology in a geothermal context; (3) basic research concerning the chemical and physical behavior of cements in a geothermal environment; (4) recommendation of specific cement systems suitable for use in a geothermal well.

  11. Modelling highly variable daily maximum water temperatures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hourly water temperatures were used to calculate daily maximum water temperatures for nine sites within the Sabie-Sand River system, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. A suite of statistical models for simulating daily maximum water temperatures, of differing complexity and using inputs of air temperature, flow rates, ...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5560 - Temperature regulated water mattress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temperature regulated water mattress. 880.5560... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5560 Temperature regulated water mattress. (a) Identification. A temperature... heating and water circulating components, and an optional cooling component. The temperature control may...

  13. Initial distribution of pressure and temperature in the geothermal field of Los Humeros, Puebla; Distribucion inicial de presion y temperatura del campo geotermico de Los Humeros, Puebla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano Gomez, Victor M.; Garcia Gutierrez, Alfonso; Barragan Reyes, Rosa Maria; Aragon Aguilar, Alfonso; Pizano, Arturo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In order to infer the distributions of non disturbed pressure and temperature of the reservoir fluid, a considerable amount of information originating from several disciplines was analyzed, corresponding to 42 wells of the geothermal field of Los Humeros. On the base of the analyzed data models were developed, in one and two dimensions, of the reservoir in an initial state. The models reveal the existence of at least two reservoirs. The first one and most superficial is located between 1600 and 1025 m.a.s.l. and it is a reservoir of dominant liquid. The pressure profile of this reservoir corresponds to a boiling water column approximately between 300 and 339 Celsius degrees. The second reservoir is located underneath the 850 m.a.s.l. and as far as the collected data, it can be said that it extends at least until the 100 m.a.s.l and it is estimated that it is a reservoir of low liquid saturation. For the wells that are fed from this zone of the field temperatures between 300 and 400 Celsius degrees were estimated. A table of the geology of the subsoil of the region of the Los Humeros is shown and a table where the chemical composition of the separated water is indicated and the enthalpy of some of the wells of Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico. [Spanish] Para inferir las distribuciones de presion y temperatura no perturbadas del fluido del yacimiento, se analizo una considerable cantidad de informacion proveniente de varias disciplinas, correspondiente a 42 pozos del campo geotermico de Los Humeros. Sobre la base de los datos analizados se desarrollaron modelos, en una y dos dimensiones, del yacimiento en un estado inicial. Los modelos revelan la existencia de cuando menos dos yacimientos. El primero y mas superficial se encuentra localizado entre 1600 y 1025 m.s.n.m. y es un yacimiento de liquido dominante. El perfil de presion de este yacimiento corresponde a una columna de agua en ebullicion aproximadamente entre 300 y 339 grados centigrados. El segundo yacimiento se

  14. Geomicrobiological analysis of highly mineralized geothermal waters as a contribution to the optimum use of geothermal energy; Geomikrobiologische Forschungsarbeiten an hochmineralisierten Tiefenwaessern als Beitrag zur optimalen Nutzung geothermischer Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, M.; Voelsgen, F.; Hofmann, K.; Bochning, S. [URST Umwelt- und Rohstoff-Technologie, Greifswald (Germany); Keller, T. [Geothermie Neubrandenburg GmbH (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    In the context of a BMBF-funded project for Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, `Geomicrobiological analysis of geothermal waters used for energy generation`, the authors continued the series of microbiological analyses of the thermal water of the geothermal heating station at Neustadt-Glewe beyond full commissioning of the plant in April 1995. Their activities also included performance of model experiments for examination of the conditions causing massive development of microorganisms in the aquifer or in the thermal water loops of the heating station. The experimental results show that compliance with the findings and recommended operational measures will guarantee long-term operating stability of the heating station. However, in-service microbiological monitoring routines are required in order to early detect and prevent unwanted processes in the thermal water system. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des vom BMBF gefoerderten Projektes `Geomikrobiologische Untersuchungen an geothermisch genutzten Tiefenwaessern Nordostdeutschlands` (Mecklenburg-Vorpommern) haben wir uns auch nach voller Inbetriebnahme des Erdwaerme-Heizwerkes Neustadt-Glewe (April 1995) auf die mikrobiologische Analyse des Thermalwassers konzentriert. Darueber hinaus wurde in Modellversuchen geprueft, unter welchen Bedingungen eine Massenentwicklung von Mikroorganismen im Aquifer bzw. Thermalwasserkreislauf moeglich ist. Die Versuche haben gezeigt, dass unter Beachtung der erzielten Befunde bei sachgemaesser Betriebsfuehrung die Langzeitstabilitaet der Anlage gewaehrleistet ist. Jedoch sind mikrobiologische Betriebskontrollen unerlaesslich, um unerwuenschte Prozesse im Thermalwassersystem rechtzeitig erkenn en und verhindern zu koennen. (orig.)

  15. water quality assessment of underground and surface water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    temperature was expected to be lower compared to surface water without any geothermal energy in the area. The level of protection of the ground water sampling sites 5 and 6 was very minimal and methodological constraints of ground water sampling might have resulted in a slight increase of temperature in ground water ...

  16. Hydrogeological and geochemical studies of the Efteni and Derdin geothermal areas, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakus, Huseyin; Simsek, Sakir [Hacettepe University, Engineering Faculty, Geological (Hydrogeological) Engineering Department, Beytepe Campus, 06532 Beytepe (Turkey)

    2008-10-15

    The Efteni and Derdin geothermal areas are located in northwestern Turkey. Relatively low-temperature springs emerge from the Duzce Fault, a normal-component-dominated fault segment of the North Anatolian Fault System. The thermal waters of the Efteni and Derdin Springs show distinct geochemical and isotopic characteristics since they originate from different geothermal reservoirs and reflect the effects of different water-rock interaction processes. Geothermometry revealed higher reservoir temperatures for the Efteni system, however a strong {delta}{sup 18}O shift, interpreted as being the result of isotopic exchange at high temperatures, was observed in the Derdin system. Hydrogeological and geochemical techniques are applied to identify recharge mechanisms, water-rock interaction processes and to construct conceptual models of these geothermal systems. (author)

  17. The effects of colloidal SiO2 and inhibitor on the solid deposit formation in geothermal water of low hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Novica J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low solubility of SiO2 and its occurrence in geothermal waters in the form of ionic, colloidal and suspended state are the main cause of the solid deposit occurrence. Certain chemical types of silica, under the influence of Fe2+, Al3+, F−, OH- ions and other micro-constituents, and due to significantly decreased solubility of SiO2, stimulate nucleation, particle growth and solid deposit formation. The aim of this paper is to inhibit the process of nucleation and solid deposit formation by adding originally designed inhibitor in the form of an emulsion, when the total concentration of the present and added colloidal SiO2 is beyond the solubility limit (120 mg/dm3. By turbidimetric, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis, the processes of solid deposit formation were investigated in Vranjska Banja (Serbia spa geothermal water source (water hardness of 4ºdH, and theoretical and practical conclusions were made.

  18. Naturally occurring arsenic in terrestrial geothermal systems of western Anatolia, Turkey: potential role in contamination of freshwater resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Jochen; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Nath, Bibhash; Baba, Alper; Gunduz, Orhan; Kulp, Thomas R; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Kar, Sandeep; Yang, Huai-Jen; Tseng, Yu-Jung; Bhattacharya, Prosun; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination in terrestrial geothermal systems has been identified in many countries worldwide. Concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/L are detrimental to human health. We examined potential consequences for As contamination of freshwater resources based on hydrogeochemical investigations of geothermal waters in deep wells and hot springs collected from western Anatolia, Turkey. We analyzed samples for major ions and trace element concentrations. Temperature of geothermal waters in deep wells showed extreme ranges (40 and 230 °C), while, temperature of hot spring fluids was up to 90 °C. The Piper plot illustrated two dominant water types: Na-HCO3(-) type for geothermal waters in deep wells and Ca-HCO3(-) type for hot spring fluids. Arsenic concentration ranged from 0.03 to 1.5mg/L. Dominance of reduced As species, i.e., As(III), was observed in our samples. The Eh value ranged between -250 and 119 mV, which suggests diverse geochemical conditions. Some of the measured trace elements were found above the World Health Organization guidelines and Turkish national safe drinking water limits. The variation in pH (range: 6.4-9.3) and As in geothermal waters suggest mixing with groundwater. Mixing of geothermal waters is primarily responsible for contamination of freshwater resources and making them unsuitable for drinking or irrigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of potential geothermal reservoirs in central and western New York State. Volume 3. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    Computer processed geophysical well logs from central and western New York State were analysed to evaluate the potential of subsurface formations as a source for low-temperature geothermal water. The analysis indicated that porous sandstone sections at the top of the Ordovician Theresa Formation and at the base of the Cambrian Potsdam Formation have the required depth, porosity, and permeability to act as a source for geothermal fluids over a relatively large area in the central part of the state. The fluid potential plus an advantageous geothermal gradient and the results of the test well drilled in the city of Auburn in Cayuga County suggest that low temperature geothermal energy may ba a viable alternative to other more conventional forms of energy that not indigenous to New York State.

  20. Geothermal aquaculture project: Real Property Systems Inc. , Harney Basin, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-14

    Real Property Systems Inc., (RPS) owns two parcels in the vicinity of Harney Lake, Oregon. One parcel is 120 acres in size, the other is 200 acres. A study concludes that the 200 acre parcel has the greater potential for geothermal development. RPS is interested in an aquaculture operation that produces fresh water prawns, (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) for the market. To supply the heat necessary to maintain the ideal temperature of 82/sup 0/F desired for these prawns, a geothermal resource having a 150/sup 0/F temperature or higher, is needed. The best estimate is that 150/sup 0/F water can be found from a minimum 1090 feet depth to 2625 feet, with no absolute assurances that sufficient quantities of geothermal waters exist without drilling for the same. This study undertakes the preliminary determination of project economics so that a decision can be made whether or not to proceed with exploratory drilling. The study is based on 10 acres of ponds, with a peak requirement of 2500 gpm of 150/sup 0/F geothermal water.

  1. Geothermal Progress Monitor: Report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This issue of the Geothermal Progress Monitor, the 14th since its inception in 1980, highlights the anticipated rapid growth in the use of geothermal heat pumps and documents the continued growth in the use of geothermal energy for power generation, both in this country and abroad. In countries with a relatively large demand for new generation capacity, geothermal, if available, is being called on as a preferable alternative to the use of domestic or imported oil. On the other hand, in this country where current demand for new capacity is less, geothermal energy is commonly being put to use in small power generation units operating on the hot water resource.

  2. Geothermal heat potential - the source for heating greenhouses in Southestern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbancl Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents economically evaluated solutions for heating greenhouses with geothermal potential, if the same greenhouse is placed in two different locations in Southeastern Europe, one in Slovenia and the other in Serbia. The direct geothermal water exploitation using heat exchangers is presented and the remaining heat potential of already used geothermal water is exploited using high temperature heat pumps. Energy demands for heating greenhouses are calculated considering climatic parameters of both locations. Furthermore, different constructions materials are taken into account, and energy demands are evaluated if the same greenhouse is made of 4 mm toughened single glass, double insulated glass or polycarbonate plates. The results show that the geothermal energy usage is economically feasible in both locations, because payback periods are in range from two to almost eight years for different scenarios.

  3. Deposits and possibilities of using thermal waters in Debrc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajić Mirjana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal waters in Debrc are in karstified Triassic limestone and dolomite. Maximal measured temperature is 58°C on the depth of 1000 m. By using geothermal energy from thermal waters of Debrc, is possible intensive agri and aqva culture production, especially organic food according to world ecologic standards, as well as toplification of Debrc.

  4. Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P.F. II, Smith, C.C.; Keeney, R.C.; Kirk, D.K.; Conover, M.F.

    1983-03-01

    Geothermal downhole conditions that may affect the performance and reliability of selected materials and components used in the drilling, completion, logging, and production of geothermal wells are reviewed. The results of specific research and development efforts aimed at improvement of materials and components for downhole contact with the hostile physicochemical conditions of the geothermal reservoir are discussed. Materials and components covered are tubular goods, stainless steels and non-ferrous metals for high-temperature downhole service, cements for high-temperature geothermal wells, high-temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downhole pumps. (MHR)

  5. Geothermal Energy Production from Oil/Gas Wells and Application for Building Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Honggang [Rutgers University; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    One significant source of low-temperature geothermal energy is the coproduced hot water from oil/gas field production. In the United States, daily oil production has reached above 8 million barrels in recent years. Considering various conditions of wells, 5-10 times or more water can be coproduced in the range of temperature 120 F to 300 F. Like other geothermal resources, such energy source from oil/gas wells is under-utilized for its typical long distance from consumption sites. Many oil/gas fields, however, are relatively close (less than 10 miles) to consumers around cities. For instance, some petroleum fields in Pennsylvania are only a few miles away from the towns in Pittsburg area and some fields in Texas are quite close to Houston. In this paper, we evaluate geothermal potential from oil/gas wells by conducting numerical simulation and analysis of a fractured oil well in Hastings West field, Texas. The results suggest that hot water can be continuously coproduced from oil wells at a sufficient rate (about 4000 gallons/day from one well) for more than 100 years. Viable use of such geothermal source requires economical transportation of energy to consumers. The recently proposed two-step geothermal absorption (TSGA) system provides a promising energy transport technology that allows large-scale use of geothermal energy from thousands of oil/gas wells.

  6. Relationshipe Between Self-potential Anomalies and Hydraulic Flow In A Geothermal System: Application To Cerro-prieto, Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, G.; Revil, A.; Pessel, M.

    The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is located in the alluvial plain of the Mexicali Valley, northern Baja California, Mexico, at about 35 km southeast of the city of Mexicali. The Cerro Prieto geothermal field is one of several high temperature water-dominated geothermal fields within the Salton Trough. We analyze here the self-potential distri- bution at the ground surface in order to determine the pattern of fluid flow in te sub- surface of this geothermal field. Various methods of analysis of self-potential anoma- lies are employed to reach this purpose. We use density probability tomography of monopolar and dipolar electrical sources and an Euler-type analysis. The hydraulic flow pattern found in this geothermal field is in agreement with that detemined from the heat flux inside the structure.

  7. Final report on Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermally-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luchini, Chris B. [Universal GeoPower LLC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The initial geothermal brine flow rate and temperature from the re-worked well were insufficient, after 2.5 days of flow testing, to justify advancing past Phase I of this project. The flow test was terminated less than 4 hours from the Phase I deadline for activity, and as such, additional flow tests of 2+ months may be undertaken in the future, without government support.

  8. Alternative energy sources II; Proceedings of the Second Miami International Conference, Miami Beach, Fla., December 10-13, 1979. Volume 5 - Geothermal power/energy program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    This volume examines the geothermal resource and geothermal energy utilization, and surveys regional energy programs worldwide. The particular papers presented on geothermal energy include those on the temperature indicators for geothermal use, geothermal drilling research in the United States, and geothermal energy and biofuel production in agriculture. Energy programs from India, Egypt, Turkey, Greece and Puerto Rico are reviewed.

  9. Apacheta, a new geothermal prospect in Northern Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urzua, Luis; Powell, Tom; Cumming, William B.; Dobson, Patrick

    2002-05-24

    The discovery of two high-temperature fumaroles, with gas geochemistry compatible with an economic geothermal system, established Apacheta as one of the most attractive geothermal exploration prospects in northern Chile. These remote fumaroles at 5,150 m elevation were first sampled in 1999 by ENAP and its partners, following up on the reports of a CODELCO water exploration well that flowed small amounts of dry steam at 4,540 m elevation in the valley 4.5 km east of the fumaroles. The prospect is associated with a Plio-Pleistocene volcanic complex located within a NW-trending graben along the axis of the high Andes. The regional water table is 4,200 masl. There are no hot springs, just the 88 degrees C steam well and the 109 degrees and 118 degrees C fumaroles with gas compositions that indicate reservoir temperatures of greater than or equal to 250 degrees C, using a variety of gas geothermometers. An MT-TDEM survey was completed in 2001-2002 by Geotermica del Norte (SDN), an ENAP-C ODELCO partnership, to explore the Apacheta geothermal concession. The survey results indicated that base of the low resistivity clay cap has a structural apex just west of the fumaroles, a pattern typically associated with shallow permeability within a high temperature geothermal resource. SGN plans to drill at least one exploration well in 2002-03 to characterize a possible economic resource at Apacheta.

  10. Geothermal Small Business Workbook [Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2003-05-01

    Small businesses are the cornerstone of the American economy. Over 22 million small businesses account for approximately 99% of employers, employ about half of the private sector workforce, and are responsible for about two-thirds of net new jobs. Many small businesses fared better than the Fortune 500 in 2001. Non-farm proprietors income rose 2.4% in 2001 while corporate profits declined 7.2%. Yet not all is rosy for small businesses, particularly new ones. One-third close within two years of opening. From 1989 to 1992, almost half closed within four years; only 39.5% were still open after six years. Why do some new businesses thrive and some fail? What helps a new business succeed? Industry knowledge, business and financial planning, and good management. Small geothermal businesses are no different. Low- and medium-temperature geothermal resources exist throughout the western United States, the majority not yet tapped. A recent survey of ten western states identified more than 9,000 thermal wells and springs, over 900 low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource areas, and hundreds of direct-use sites. Many opportunities exist for geothermal entrepreneurs to develop many of these sites into thriving small businesses. The ''Geothermal Small Business Workbook'' (''Workbook'') was written to give geothermal entrepreneurs, small businesses, and developers the tools they need to understand geothermal applications--both direct use and small-scale power generation--and to write a business and financing plan. The Workbook will: Provide background, market, and regulatory data for direct use and small-scale (< 1 megawatt) power generation geothermal projects; Refer you to several sources of useful information including owners of existing geothermal businesses, trade associations, and other organizations; Break down the complicated and sometimes tedious process of writing a business plan into five easy steps; Lead you

  11. Chemical composition of the thermomineral waters of Jošanička Banja spa as an origin indicator, balneological valorization and geothermal potential

    OpenAIRE

    Milenić Dejan R.; Milanković Đuro D.; Vranješ Ana M.; Savić Nevena R.; Doroslovac Nenad M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of the groundwater is directly dependent on the geological structure, hydrogeological and hydrochemical characteristics and as such it represents an output result of all the factors and processes which take place in the environment within which they were formed. The chemical composition of thermomineral waters often represents a crucial factor in determining the origin, balneological valorization and geothermal potential of the reso...

  12. Overview of Resources for Geothermal Absorption Cooling for Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gluesenkamp, Kyle R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a literature review in three areas: available low-temperature/coproduced geothermal resources in the United States, energy use for space conditioning in commercial buildings, and state of the art of geothermal absorption cooling.

  13. Results from Geothermal Logging, Air and Core-Water Chemistry Sampling, Air Injection Testing and Tracer Testing in the Northern Ghost Dance Fault, YUCCA Mountain, Nevada, November 1996 to August 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecain, G.D.; Anna, L.O.; Fahy, M.F.

    1998-08-01

    Geothermal logging, air and core-water chemistry sampling, air-injection testing, and tracer testing were done in the northern Ghost Dance Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from November 1996 to August 1998. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fault-testing drill room and test boreholes were located in the crystal-poor, middle nonlithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a tuff deposit of Miocene age. The drill room is located off the Yucca Mountain underground Exploratory Studies Facility at about 230 meters below ground surface. Borehole geothermal logging identified a temperature decrease of 0.1 degree Celsius near the Ghost Dance Fault. The temperature decrease could indicate movement of cooler air or water, or both, down the fault, or it may be due to drilling-induced evaporative or adiabatic cooling. In-situ pneumatic pressure monitoring indicated that barometric pressure changes were transmitted from the ground surface to depth through the Ghost Dance Fault. Values of carbon dioxide and delta carbon-13 from gas samples indicated that air from the underground drill room had penetrated the tuff, supporting the concept of a well-developed fracture system. Uncorrected carbon-14-age estimates from gas samples ranged from 2,400 to 4,500 years. Tritium levels in borehole core water indicated that the fault may have been a conduit for the transport of water from the ground surface to depth during the last 100 years.

  14. Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngquist, W.

    1980-01-01

    A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

  15. Assessment of the geothermal energy potential of the 'Canton de Vaud', Switzerland; Evaluation du potentiel geothermique du canton de Vaud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, J. [Jules Wilhelm, Pully (Switzerland); Bianchetti, G. [ALPGEO, Sierre (Switzerland); Vuataz, F.-D. [University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2003-07-01

    This report presents an assessment of the geothermal energy potential in the provincial state of Vaud in western Switzerland. According to the authors the prospect for the three current main technologies: low-temperature surface water, deep hot water springs and advanced geothermal systems, is good. In about 10 years it would be possible to extract some 3.6x10{sup 6} MJ per year from low-temperature surface water while the energy production from deep hot springs could be near to 2x10{sup 4} MJ. Finally, in the forthcoming 20 years the construction of 3 advanced geothermal power plants ('Deep Heat Mining', i.e. the extraction of deep-rock thermal energy by water circulation) could produce about 30 MW electricity in a cogeneration operation mode. Recommendations are given regarding measures needed at the political level to promote geothermal power plants.

  16. Exploration for geothermal resources in the Capital District of New York. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Water chemistry, gas analyses, and geophysical methods including gravity and magnetic surveys, microseismic monitoring, and temperature gradient measurements were used in the Capital District area to evaluate the potential for a hydrothermal geothermal system. Water and gas chemistries provided indirect indicators, and temperature gradients provided direct indications of a geothermal system. Gravity results were supportive of gradient and chemistry data, but seismic and magnetic work have thus far provided little information on the potential system. Gradients throughout the area ranged from an average background value of about 10/sup 0/C/km to a high of roughly 44/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradient values, the most unusual water chemistries and largest carbon dioxide exhalations occur along the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, and indicate a good potential for a usable hydrothermal geothermal system at depth.

  17. Exploration for geothermal resources in the Capital District of New York. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sneeringer, M.R.; Dunn, J.R.

    1981-11-01

    Water chemistry, gas analyses, and geophysical methods including gravity and magnetic surveys, microseismic monitoring, and temperature gradient measurements were used in the Capital District area to evaluate the potential for a hydrothermal geothermal system. Water and gas chemistries provided indirect indicators, and temperature gradients provided direct indications of a geothermal system. Gravity results were supportive of gradient and chemistry data, but seismic and magnetic work have thus far provided little information on the potential system. Gradients throughout the area ranged from an average background value of about 10/sup 0/C/km to a high of roughly 44/sup 0/C/km. The highest gradient values, the most unusual water chemistries and largest carbon dioxide exhalations occur along the Saratoga and McGregor faults between Saratoga Springs and Schenectady, and indicate a good potential for a usable hydrothermal geothermal system at depth.

  18. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort Peck Reservation in Northeast Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Garry J. [Gradient Geophysics Inc., Missoula, MT (United States); Birkby, Jeff [Birkby Consulting LLC, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Tribal lands owned by Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, located in Northeastern Montana, overlie large volumes of deep, hot, saline water. Our study area included all the Fort Peck Reservation occupying roughly 1,456 sq miles. The geothermal water present in the Fort Peck Reservation is located in the western part of the Williston Basin in the Madison Group complex ranging in depths of 5500 to 7500 feet. Although no surface hot springs exist on the Reservation, water temperatures within oil wells that intercept these geothermal resources in the Madison Formation range from 150 to 278 degrees F.

  19. Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

  20. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well

  1. Geothermal heat exchanger with coaxial flow of fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejić Dragan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a heat exchanger with coaxial flow. Two coaxial pipes of the secondary part were placed directly into a geothermal boring in such a way that geothermal water flows around the outer pipe. Starting from the energy balance of the exchanger formed in this way and the assumption of a study-state operating regime, a mathematical model was formulated. On the basis of the model, the secondary circle output temperature was determined as a function of the exchanger geometry, the coefficient of heat passing through the heat exchange areas, the average mass isobaric specific heats of fluid and mass flows. The input temperature of the exchanger secondary circle and the temperature of the geothermal water at the exit of the boring were taken as known values. Also, an analysis of changes in certain factors influencing the secondary water temperature was carried out. The parameters (flow temperature of the deep boring B-4 in Sijarinska Spa, Serbia were used. The theoretical results obtained indicate the great potential of this boring and the possible application of such an exchanger.

  2. Geothermal Well Stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J.

    1981-03-01

    The stimulation of geothermal wells presents some new and challenging problems. Formation temperatures in the 300-600 F range can be expected. The behavior of stimulation fluids, frac proppants, and equipment at these temperatures in a hostile brine environment must be carefully evaluated before performance expectations can be determined. In order to avoid possible damage to the producing horizon of the formation, high temperature chemical compatibility between the in situ materials and the stimulation materials must be verified. Perhaps most significant of all, in geothermal wells the required techniques must be capable of bringing about the production of very large amounts of fluid. This necessity for high flow rates represents a significant departure from conventional petroleum well stimulation and demands the creation of very high near-wellbore permeability and/or fractures with very high flow conductivity.

  3. A reverse method to estimate initial temperatures in geothermal reservoirs; Un metodo inverso para estimacion de la temperatura inicial de yacimientos geotermicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Gutierrez, Alfonso [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail: aggarcia@iie.org.mx; Ramos Alcantara, Jose R. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Arellano Gomez, Victor M. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Gerencia de Geotermia, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2010-01-15

    A method is presented for estimating the initial temperature in geothermal-reservoir formations. The method is based on control theory where the measured temperatures or temperature logs are compared with corresponding simulated temperatures for different times with the well closed. The comparison is made using a control algorithm that makes changes to the originally assumed reservoir temperatures and performs iterations until the best fit between the temperature logs and the simulated temperatures is obtained. The simulation of fluid transport and heat in the well includes the processes of circulation and stop in the presence of circulation losses, modeled on macroscopic balances of momentum and energy. The transport processes in the formation regard the reservoir as an isotropic porous medium and fluid flow is described by Darcy's law. This model generates the fields of temperatures, pressures and speeds as a function of time and space. The method was tested with data from well LV-3 in Las Tres Virgenes geothermal field, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The estimated temperatures of the undisturbed formation-or initial temperatures-are compared within {+-}15 degrees Celsius with the measured temperatures, which is an acceptable outcome from an engineering point of view. [Spanish] Se presenta un metodo para la estimacion de la temperatura inicial en las formaciones de yacimientos geotermicos. El metodo se basa en la teoria de control donde las temperaturas medidas o registros de temperatura se comparan con las correspondientes temperaturas simuladas a diferentes tiempos con el pozo cerrado. La comparacion se hace usando un algoritmo de control el cual hace cambios a las temperaturas de yacimiento originalmente supuestas y realiza iteraciones hasta que se obtiene el mejor ajuste entre los registros de temperatura y las temperaturas simuladas. La simulacion del transporte de fluidos y calor en el pozo incluye los procesos de circulacion y paro en presencia de

  4. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  5. A public domain model for 1D temperature and rheology construction in basement-sedimentary geothermal exploration: an application to the Spanish Central System and adjacent basins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limberger, J.; Bonte, D.; Vicente, G. de; Beekman, F.; Cloetingh, S.; Wees, J.D. van

    2017-01-01

    Brittle basement and sedimentary rocks, in particular if these are underlain by radiogenic crust, are considered a prime target for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). They are marked by high geothermal gradients, caused by radiogenic heat production, and are well suited to be used for geothermal

  6. Stanford Geothermal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Horn

    1999-06-30

    Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

  7. Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

    1998-06-01

    The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

  8. Enthalpy restoration in geothermal energy processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1983-01-01

    A geothermal deep well energy extraction system is provided of the general type in which solute-bearing hot water is pumped to the earth's surface from a relatively low temperature geothermal source by transferring thermal energy from the hot water to a working fluid for driving a primary turbine-motor and a primary electrical generator at the earth's surface. The superheated expanded exhaust from the primary turbine motor is conducted to a bubble tank where it bubbles through a layer of sub-cooled working fluid that has been condensed. The superheat and latent heat from the expanded exhaust of the turbine transfers thermal energy to the sub-cooled condensate. The desuperheated exhaust is then conducted to the condenser where it is condensed and sub-cooled, whereupon it is conducted back to the bubble tank via a barometric storage tank. The novel condensing process of this invention makes it possible to exploit geothermal sources which might otherwise be non-exploitable.

  9. Development of technologies for utilizing geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    In verifying the effectiveness of the deep geothermal resource exploration technology, development is being carried out on a fracture-type reservoir exploration method. The seismic exploration method investigates detailed structures of underground fracture systems by using seismic waves generated on the ground surface. Verification experiments for fiscal 1994 were carried out by selecting the Kakkonda area in which small fracture networks form reservoir beds. Geothermal resources in deep sections (deeper than 2000 m with temperatures higher than 350{degree}C) are promising in terms of amount of the resources, but anticipated with difficulty in exploration and impediments in drilling. To avoid these risks, studies are being progressed on the availability of resources in deep sections, their utilization possibility, and technologies of effective exploration and drilling. This paper summarizes the results of deep resource investigations during fiscal 1994. It also describes such technological development as hot water utilizing power generation. Development is performed on a binary cycle power generation plant which pumps and utilizes hot water of 150 to 200{degree}C by using a downhole pump. The paper also reports development on element technologies for hot rock power generation systems. It also dwells on development of safe and effective drilling and production technologies for deep geothermal resources.

  10. EXPLORATION BY MEANS OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS OF GEOTHERMAL FIELDS AND CASE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Züheyr KAMACI

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal energy which is one of the reuseable energy resources, can save as much as 77 million barrels of petroleum equivalent annually when used in the production of electricity and heating-environment. Geophysical exploration methods plays in important role in the fields of geothermal exploration, development and observational studies. Thermal and geoelectrical methods are the most effective methods which shows the temperature variation anomalies and mechanical drilling places. But, when the other methods of gravity, magnetic, radiometric, well geophysics and well logs can be used in conjunction with seismic tomography, apart from the mentioned geophysical exploration method, better results could be obtained. From the above mentioned facts various case history reports are given from our country and worldwide to determine geothermal energy resources by using geophysical exploration technique application. From these results of studies a 55 °C hot water artessian aquifer is found in the Uşak-Banaz geothermal field by applying geoelectrical methods.

  11. Geothermal energy sources and possibilities of their exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Rybár

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The geothermal energy is everywhere beneath the surface of the earth. The earth’s interior is enormous thermal reservoir of energy, which can be utilized if favorable geological conditions exist.The electricity generation in 1942 at Larderello was a commercial success. The installed geothermoelectric capacity had reached 127 650 kWe. Several countries were soon to follow the example set by Italy. In 1919, first geothermal wells were drilled at Beppu in Japan, followed in 1921 by wells drilled at The Geysers, California, USA. In 1958 a small geothermal power plant began operating in New Zealand; in 1959 another one in Mexico, in 1960 in the USA, followed by many other countries in the years to come.The heat source can be either a very high temperature (> 600 °C magmatic intrusion reaching relatively shallow depths (5-10 km or, as in certain low-temperature systems at the Earth's normal temperature, which increases with depth. The reservoir is a volume of hot permeable rocks from which circulating fluids extract the heat. The reservoir is generally overlain by a cover of impermeable rocks and connected to a superficial recharge area through which the meteoric waters can replace or partly replace the fluids that escape from the reservoir through springs or are extracted by boreholes. The geothermal fluid is water, in majority of cases the meteoric water, in the liquid or vapour phase, depending on its temperature and pressure. This water often carries chemicals and gases such as CO2, H2S, etc.Another source of underground heat is so called the hot dry rock. The mater is to extract heat by creating a subsurface fracture system to which water can be added through injection wells. A creation of enhanced, or engineered, geothermal system requires improving the natural permeability of rock. Rocks are permeable due to minute fractures and pore spaces between mineral grains. The injected water is heated by a contact with the rock and returns to the

  12. Hydrogeochemistry of the Simav geothermal field, western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemici, Ünsal; Tarcan, Gültekin

    2002-08-01

    Thermal waters hosted by Menderes metamorphic rocks emerge along fault lineaments in the Simav geothermal area. Thermal springs and drilled wells are located in the Eynal, Çitgöl and Naşa locations, which are part of the Simav geothermal field. Studies were carried out to obtain the main chemical and physical characteristics of thermal waters. These waters are used for heating of residences and greenhouses and for balneological purposes. Bottom temperatures of the drilled wells reach 163°C with total dissolved solids around 2225 mg/kg. Surface temperatures of thermal springs vary between 51°C and 90°C. All the thermal waters belong to Na-HCO 3-SO 4 facies. The cold groundwaters are Ca-Mg-HCO 3 type. Dissolution of host rock and ion-exchange reactions in the reservoir of the geothermal system shift the Ca-Mg-HCO 3 type cold groundwaters to the Na-HCO 3-SO 4 type thermal waters. Thermal waters are oversaturated at discharge temperatures for aragonite, calcite, quartz, chalcedony, magnesite and dolomite minerals giving rise to a carbonate-rich scale. Gypsum and anhydrite minerals are undersaturated with all of the thermal waters. Boiling during ascent of the thermal fluids produces steam and liquid waters resulting in an increase of the concentrations of the constituents in discharge waters. Steam fraction, y, of the thermal waters of which temperatures are above 100°C is between 0.075 and 0.119. Reservoir pH is much lower than pH measured in the liquid phase separated at atmospheric conditions, since the latter experienced heavy loss of acid gases, mainly CO 2. Assessment of the various empirical chemical geothermometers and geochemical modelling suggest that reservoir temperatures vary between 175°C and 200°C.

  13. Study deep geothermal energy; Studie dypgeotermisk energi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havellen, Vidar; Eri, Lars Sigurd; Andersen, Andreas; Tuttle, Kevin J.; Ruden, Dorottya Bartucz; Ruden, Fridtjof; Rigler, Balazs; Pascal, Christophe; Larsen, Bjoern Tore

    2012-07-01

    The study aims to analyze the potential energy with current technology, challenges, issues and opportunities for deep geothermal energy using quantitative analysis. It should especially be made to identify and investigate critical connections between geothermal potential, the size of the heating requirements and technical solutions. Examples of critical relationships may be acceptable cost of technology in relation to heating, local geothermal gradient / drilling depth / temperature levels and profitability. (eb)

  14. 1978 annual report, INEL geothermal environmental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.; Stanley, N.E.

    1979-04-01

    The objective of the Raft River Geothermal Environmental Program, in its fifth year, is to characterize the beneficial and detrimental impacts resulting from the development of moderate-temperature geothermal resources in the valley. This report summarizes the monitoring and research efforts conducted as part of this program in 1978. The results of these monitoring programs will be used to determine the mitigation efforts required to reduce long-term impacts resulting from geothermal development.

  15. Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

    2012-09-26

    The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165°F exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250 of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the center of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165°F or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

  16. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  17. Sustainable renewable energy seawater desalination using combined-cycle solar and geothermal heat sources

    KAUST Repository

    Missimer, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Key goals in the improvement of desalination technology are to reduce overall energy consumption, make the process "greener," and reduce the cost of the delivered water. Adsorption desalination (AD) is a promising new technology that has great potential to reduce the need for conventional power, to use solely renewable energy sources, and to reduce the overall cost of water treatment. This technology can desalt seawater or water of even higher salinity using waste heat, solar heat, or geothermal heat. An AD system can operate effectively at temperatures ranging from 55 to 80 °C with perhaps an optimal temperature of 80 °C. The generally low temperature requirement for the feedwater allows the system to operate quite efficiently using an alternative energy source, such as solar power. Solar power, particularly in warm dry regions, can generate a consistent water temperature of about 90 °C. Although this temperature is more than adequate to run the system, solar energy collection only can occur during daylight hours, thereby necessitating the use of heat storage during nighttime or very cloudy days. With increasing capacity, the need for extensive thermal storage may be problematic and could add substantial cost to the development of an AD system. However, in many parts of the world, there are subsurface geothermal energy sources that have not been extensively used. Combining a low to moderate geothermal energy recovery system to an AD system would provide a solution to the thermal storage issue. However, geothermal energy development from particularly Hot Dry Rock is limited by the magnitude of the heat flow required for the process and the thermal conductivity of the rock material forming the heat reservoir. Combining solar and geothermal energy using an alternating 12-h cycle would reduce the probability of depleting the heat source within the geothermal reservoir and provide the most effective use of renewable energy. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  18. Volatile element isotope systematics of volcanic geothermal fluids, Krafla Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, A.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Keller, N. S.; Ono, S.; Barnes, J.

    2015-12-01

    Among the major goals of geothermal geochemistry is to identify the source of the geothermal fluids and the processes influencing their chemical composition. Such can be difficult given that geothermal systems are characterized by many phases (vapor, liquid and solid) and components. Here we report data on volatile element stable isotope systematics (H2O, CO2, Cl, H2S and SO4) in volcanic geothermal fluids at Krafla, NE Iceland. Fluid temperatures ranged from 192 to 437°C. The sources and reactions of these volatile elements is commonly based on identifying the variable end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios, or alternatively, comparing temperature dependence of isotope fractionation of given reactions with the measured isotope systematics. Isotopes of a given element fractionates upon reactions with key reactions in geothermal systems being aqueous speciation, vapor-water partitioning and water-rock interactions, these depending on solution composition, temperature and pressure. In order to study the effects of various reactions and processes affecting isotope systematics of geothermal fluids and to reconstruct reservoir isotope systematics, isotope geochemical models were developed by combining aqueous speciation, gas-water partitioning and water-rock modelling together with isotope fractionation and isotope mass action equations. Based on these models and data collected at Krafla it is concluded that the key factors controlling, reactive volatile element isotope systematics (S and C) are two, the isotope composition of the source material and isotope fractionation associated with aqueous and vapor speciation and how these changes as a function of processes occurring in the system including boiling and fluid-rock interaction, whereas the non-reactive element isotope systematics (Cl) is controlled their various end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios. Based on these data and models, the reservoir C, S

  19. Detailed conceptual design of a high-temperature CO/sub 2/ sensor for geothermal applications. Final report, Task I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelan, D.M.; Taylor, R.M.; Baxter, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    The work performed on the development of a pCO/sub 2/ probe is documented. The recommended probe includes a solid state device which senses the pH of the internal electrolyte, a gas-permeable membrane that allows diffusion of CO/sub 2/ into the electrolyte, and a getter to inhibit incursion of H/sub 2/S. The results of the feasibility study indicate that such a probe holds promise of meeting all the operational and environmental requirements for in situ and down-hole measurement of carbon dioxide in geothermal fluids.

  20. Pollution Control Guidance for Geothermal Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, Robert P.

    1978-06-01

    This report summarizes the EPA regulatory approach toward geothermal energy development. The state of knowledge is described with respect to the constituents of geothermal effluents and emissions, including water, air, solid wastes, and noise. Pollutant effects are discussed. Pollution control technologies that may be applicable are described along with preliminary cost estimates for their application. Finally discharge and emission limitations are suggested that may serve as interim guidance for pollution control during early geothermal development.

  1. Moisture Absorption Model of Composites Considering Water Temperature Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUI Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of water temperature on composite moisture absorption parameters was investigated in temperature-controlled water bath. Experiments of carbon fiber/bismaleimide resin composites immersed in water of 60℃, 70℃and 80℃ were developed respectively. According to the moisture content-time curves obtained from the experimental results, the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content of the composites immersed in different water temperature could be calculated. What's more, the effect of water temperature on the diffusion coefficient and the balanced moisture content were discussed too. According to the Arrhenius equation and the law of Fick, a moisture absorption model was proposed to simulate the hygroscopic behaviour of the composite laminates immersed in different water temperature which can predict the absorption rate of water of the composites immersed in distilled water of 95℃ at any time precisely and can calculate how long it will take to reach the specific absorption rate.

  2. Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains, Hidalgo County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, W.E.; Deal, E.G.; Logsdon, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated with the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.

  3. Effects of Temperature and Growing Seasons on Crop Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: Water savings can be improved through reducing agricultural water consumption. The crop water requirement (CWR) depends on several factors including temperature and growing seasons. This study investigated the effects of temperature and growing seasons on CWR in Saudi Arabia. Increase in ...

  4. Chemical Analyses of Ground Water in the Carson Desert near Stillwater, Churchill County, Nevada, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosbury, DeEtta; Walker, Mark; Stillings, Lisa M.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the chemical analyses of ground-water samples collected in 2005 from domestic wells located in the Stillwater area of the Carson Desert (fig. 1). These data were evaluated for evidence of mixing with nearby geothermal waters (Fosbury, 2007). That study used several methods to identify mixing zones of ground and geothermal waters using trace elements, chemical equilibria, water temperature, geothermometer estimates, and statistical techniques. In some regions, geothermal sources influence the chemical quality of ground water used for drinking water supplies. Typical geothermal contaminants include arsenic, mercury, antimony, selenium, thallium, boron, lithium, and fluoride (Webster and Nordstrom, 2003). The Environmental Protection Agency has established primary drinking water standards for these, with the exception of boron and lithium. Concentrations of some trace metals in geothermal water may exceed drinking water standards by several orders of magnitude. Geothermal influences on water quality are likely to be localized, depending on directions of ground water flow, the relative volumes of geothermal sources and ground water originating from other sources, and depth below the surface from which water is withdrawn. It is important to understand the areal extent of shallow mixing of geothermal water because it may have adverse chemical and aesthetic effects on domestic drinking water. It would be useful to understand the areal extent of these effects.

  5. Challenges in Implementing a Multi-Partnership Geothermal Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosnold, Will; Mann, Michael [Universit of North Dakota; Salehfar, Hossein

    2017-03-02

    The UND-CLR binary geothermal power plant project is a piggyback operation on a secondary-recovery water-flood project in the Cedar Hills oil field in the Williston Basin. Two open-hole horizontal wells at 2,300 m and 2,400 m depths with lateral lengths of 1,290 m and 860 m produce water at a combined flow of 51 l s -1 from the Lodgepole formation (Miss.) for injection into the Red River formation (Ordovician). The hydrostatic head for the Lodgepole is at ground surface and the pumps, which are set at 650 m depth, have run continuously since 2009. Water temperature at the wellhead is 103 °C and CLR passes the water through two large air-cooled heat exchangers prior to injection. In all aspects, the CLR water flood project is ideal for demonstration of electrical power production from a low-temperature geothermal resource. However, implementation of the project from concept to power production was analogous to breaking trail in deep snow in an old growth forest. There were many hidden bumps, detours, and in some instances immoveable barriers. Problems with investors, cost share, contracts with CLR, resistance from local industry, cost of installation, delays by the ORC supplier, and the North Dakota climate all caused delays and setbacks. Determination and problem solving by the UND team eventually overcame most setbacks, and in April 2016, the site began generating power. Figure 1: Schematic of the water supply well at the UND CLR binary geothermal power plant REFERENCES Williams, Snyder, and Gosnold, 2016, Low Temperature Projects Evaluation and Lesson Learned, GRC Transactions, Vol. 40, 203-210 Gosnold, LeFever, Klenner, Mann, Salehfar, and Johnson, 2010, Geothermal Power from Coproduced Fluids in the Williston Basin, GRC Transactions, Vol. 34, 557-560

  6. Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1995--September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.

    1995-12-01

    The report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-95. It describes 80 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment and resources. Research activities are summarized on low-temperature resource assessment, geothermal energy cost evaluation and marketing strategy for geothermal district heating. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.

  7. Engineered Geothermal System Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, Susan

    2014-06-19

    In June 2009, AltaRock Energy began field work on a project supported by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “Use of Multiple Stimulations to Improve Economics of Engineered Geothermal Systems in Shallow High Temperature Intrusives.” The goal of the project was to develop an Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) in the portion of The Geysers geothermal field operated by the Northern California Power Agency (NCPA). The project encountered several problems while deepening Well E-7 which culminated in the suspension of field activities in September 2009. Some of the problems encountered are particular to The Geysers area, while others might be encountered in any geothermal field, and they might be avoided in future operations.

  8. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  9. Low-enthalpy geothermal resources for electricity production: A demand-side management study for intelligent communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xydis, George A.; Nanaki, Evanthia A.; Koroneos, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The geological conditions in Greece contributed to the creation of important low-enthalpy geothermal energy resources (LEGERs). The resources are divided into low, medium and high enthalpy, or temperature, based on criteria that are generally based on the energy content of the fluid. LEGERs...... are those sources of the hot water whose temperature is between 25 and 100°C, which are used for heating residences and in the agricultural or industrial sector. The investigation for the exploitation of low-enthalpy geothermal fluids, which began around 1980, intensified in the last two decades. The low......-enthalpy geothermal potential in Greece is rather significant as most of the geothermal fields have been found in regions with favourable developmental conditions, and it seems that they do not present serious environmental or technical exploitation problems. LEGER areas are abundant in Greece, mainly in the eastern...

  10. SPI Conformance Gel Applications in Geothermal Zonal Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle [Clean Tech Innovations, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Zonal isolation in geothermal injection and producing wells is important while drilling the wells when highly fractured geothermal zones are encountered and there is a need to keep the fluids from interfering with the drilling operation. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) objectives are to advance technologies to make it more cost effective to develop, produce, and monitor geothermal reservoirs and produce geothermal energy. Thus, zonal isolation is critical to well cost, reservoir evaluation and operations. Traditional cementing off of the lost circulation or thief zones during drilling is often done to stem the drilling mud losses. This is an expensive and generally unsuccessful technique losing the potential of the remaining fracture system. Selective placement of strong SPI gels into only the offending fractures can maintain and even improve operational efficiency and resource life. The SPI gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a promising solution to thief zones and conformance problems with water and CO2 floods and potentially geothermal operations. This gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an initiator (either internal such as an additive or external such as CO2) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current mechanical methods of using packers, plugs, liners and cementing technologies that often severely damage the highly fractured area that is isolated. In the SPI gels, the initiator sets up the fluid into a water-like (not a precipitate) gel and when the isolated zone needs to be reopened, the SPI gel may be removed with an alkaline solution without formation damage occurring. In addition, the SPI gel in commercial quantities is expected to be less expensive than competing mechanical systems and has unique deep placement possibilities. This project seeks to improve upon the SPI gel integrity by modifying the various components to impart temperature stability for use in

  11. Geothermal Power Generation Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya [Oregon Inst. of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR (United States). Geo-Heat Center

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196°F resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  12. Small geothermic heat and power station with power plants on organic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, W.; Wos, M. [Szczecin Univ. of Tech. (Poland). Chair of Heat Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The results of the calculations of heat-flow heats and power stations were introduced in the work geothermic with one circulation, with two circulations and with three circulations. They are reinforced network water heated up in the geothermic heat exchanger to temperatures 100 C and stream. In this solution the temperature of water force to the geothermic hest exchanger changes and amount out suitably 39,35 C (one circulation), 49,83 C (two circulations), 58,91 C (three circulations). He results that the solution of heat and power station is the most profitable variant with three circulations from the analysis of the received results of calculations. He keeps the highest power of the circulation C.R. from three considered variants. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of deep permeable strata in the permian basin for future geothermal energy reserves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.; Swift, Douglas B.

    1999-09-23

    This project will investigate a previously unidentified geothermal energy resource, opening broad new frontiers to geothermal development. Data collected by industry during oil and gas development demonstrate deep permeable strata with temperatures {ge} 150 C, within the optimum window for binary power plant operation. The project will delineate Deep Permeable Strata Geothermal Energy (DPSGE) assets in the Permian Basin of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico. Presently, geothermal electrical power generation is limited to proximity to shallow, high-temperature igneous heat sources. This geographically restricts geothermal development. Delineation of a new, less geographically constrained geothermal energy source will stimulate geothermal development, increasing available clean, renewable world energy reserves. This proposal will stimulate geothermal reservoir exploration by identifying untapped and unrealized reservoirs of geothermal energy. DPSGE is present in many regions of the United States not presently considered as geothermally prospective. Development of this new energy source will promote geothermal use throughout the nation.

  14. An Active-Distributed Temperature Sensing method to quantify groundwater - surface water exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nataline; Bour, Olivier; Lavenant, Nicolas; Faucheux, Mickaël; Fovet, Ophélie; Longuevergne, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Understanding and quantifying groundwater and surface water interactions are key elements for the management of water quality and quantity, but also for the preservation of groundwater dependent ecosystems and riparian habitat. We developed a methodology to quantify groundwater and surface water interactions, by setting up an active heat tracer experiment using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS). The experimental setup consists in heating an armoured fiber-optic cable that has been previously deployed along the streambed within the sediments. Then, the increase in temperature along the heated cable is a function of the thermal properties of the sediments and of the fluid flow velocity within the sediments. The cable is heated electrically through the steel armouring of the cable while the elevations in temperature are continuously monitored. We tested this methodology on the Kerbernez catchment, located in south-western Brittany (France) and which is part of the AgrHys hydrological observatory. We deploy the cable in a first-order stream within this small agricultural catchment (0.12 km2). Temperature was monitored along 60 meters of stream with a spatial and temporal resolution respectively equal to 29 cm and 30 s. To interpret the data, we used an analytical solution developed for geothermal energy that considers advection and conduction of temperature in porous media. To validate the use of the analytical solution and to define the limits of the method, a 2D numerical model has been developed. This model simulates heat transport and conduction with steady state fluid flow using the Conjugate Heat Transfer module of COMSOL Multiphysics ®. During heating and cooling, the measured temperature was particularly variable along the section with temperature increases that range between 16 to 36°C. This variability can directly be associated with local variations of water fluxes by applying the appropriate analytical solution. Henceforth, it is

  15. Orthogonal Test Analysis on Conditions Affecting Electricity Generation Performance of an Enhanced Geothermal System at Yangbajing Geothermal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchao Zeng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main conditions affecting electricity generation performance of an enhanced geothermal system (EGS include reservoir porosity, reservoir permeability, rock heat conductivity, water production rate and injection temperature. Presently there is lack of systematic research the relative importance of the five aforementioned conditions. The orthogonal test method is a statistical approach to analyze multi-factor and multi-level influence on system performance. In this work, based on the geological data at Yangbajing geothermal field, we analyzed the five conditions affecting the electricity generation performance of EGS, and ranked the relative importance of the five factors. The results show that the order of the relative importance of the conditions on electric power is water production rate > injection temperature > reservoir porosity > rock heat conductivity > reservoir permeability; the order of the relative importance of the conditions on reservoir impedance is reservoir permeability > injection temperature > water production rate > reservoir porosity > rock heat conductivity; the order of the relative importance of the conditions on pump power is water production rate > reservoir permeability > injection temperature > reservoir porosity > rock heat conductivity, and; the order of the relative importance of the conditions on energy efficiency is water production rate > reservoir permeability > reservoir porosity > injection temperature > rock heat conductivity. The construction of an EGS reservoir should be located at a formation with higher reservoir porosity or rock heat conductivity, while the determination of reservoir permeability, water production rate and injection temperature should be based on the comprehensive target.

  16. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing of the Yellowstone Geothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Yellowstone National Park (YNP) geothermal system is one of the largest in the world, with thousands of individual thermal features ranging in size from a few centimeters to tens of meters across, (e.g., fumaroles, geysers, mud pots and hot spring pools). Together, large concentrations of these thermal features make up dozens of distinct thermal areas, characterized by sparse vegetation, hydrothermally altered rocks, and usually either sinter, travertine, or acid sulfate alteration. The temperature of these thermal features generally ranges from ~30 to ~93 oC, which is the boiling temperature of water at the elevation of Yellowstone. In-situ temperature measurements of various thermal features are sparse in both space and time, but they show a dynamic time-temperature relationship. For example, as geysers erupt and send pulses of warm water down slope, the warm water cools rapidly and is then followed by another pulse of warm water, on time scales of minutes. The total heat flux from the Park’s thermal features has been indirectly estimated from chemical analysis of Cl- flux in water flowing from Yellowstone’s rivers. We are working to provide a more direct measurement, as well as estimates of time variability, of the total heat flux using satellite multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data. Over the last 10 years, NASA’s orbiting ASTER and MODIS instruments have acquired hundreds and thousands of multispectral TIR images, respectively, over the YNP area. Compared with some volcanoes, Yellowstone is a relatively low-temperature geothermal system, with low thermal contrast to the non-geothermal surrounding areas; therefore we are refining existing techniques to extract surface temperature and thermal flux information. This task is complicated by issues such as, during the day, solar heated surfaces may be warmer than nearby geothermal features; and there is some topographic (elevation) influence on surface temperatures, even at night. Still

  17. Semiannual progress report for the Idaho Geothermal Program, April 1 to September 30, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihrig, R.R. (ed.)

    1981-03-01

    The completion of the 5-MW Pilot Power Plant at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site, modification of the similar, binary cycle Prototype Power Plant, and the water treatment program that studies environmentally safe ways to inhibit corrosion and scaling in geothermal power plants and investigates corrosion resistant materials are summarized. Studies of binary geothermal cycles using mixed hydrocarbon working fluids are described as part of the continuing search for ways to produce low-cost electricity from moderate-temperature geothermal fluids. Progress is reported on studies of direct contact heat exchanger concepts, heat rejection systems, and primary heat exchangers with augmentation. As part of the now-ended series of aquaculture experiments, an unsuccessful attempt to incubate common carp embryos in geothermal waters is reported. An experiment in revegetating disturbed land at Raft River is mentioned and progress on DOE's new User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program is described. An estimate is presented of the amount of hydrothermal energy that could be produced by the year 2000, with and without Federal assistance, for electric generation and direct applications such as industrial process heat. Progress is reported on the Marketing Assistance Program, through which technical information and assistance is provided potential users and developers of geothermal resources. Also reported is progress in DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) Program demonstration projects and Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) Program study projects.

  18. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Gabbs, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-09

    The results of the analyses as well as a plan for geothermal development are described. The major findings and specific barriers to development that would have to be addressed are identified. Characteristics of the site significant to the prospect for geothermal development are described. These characteristics include physiography, demography, economy, and the goals and objectives of the citizens as they would relate to geothermal development. The geothermal resource evaluation is described. Based on available information, the reservoir is generally described, defining the depth to the reservoir, production rates of the existing water wells, water quality, and the resource temperature. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the foreseeable future at Gabbs are described. The amounts and types of energy currently consumed, by end-user, are estimated. From this information, a conceptual engineering design and cost estimates are presented. Finally, the results of a life cycle analysis of the economic feasibility are discussed. A time-line chart shows the tasks, the time estimated to be required for each and the interrelatioships among the activities. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development are discussed. These include the financial, environmental, legal and regulatory requirements. The main resource, engineering, and institutional considerations involved in a geothermal district heating system for Gabbs are summarized.

  19. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Hawthorne, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-04

    The results of the analyses as well as a plan for the development of the geothermal resource are described. Site characteristics pertinent to the geothermal development are described. These characteristics include physiography, demography, economy, and goals and ojectives of the citizens as they would relate to geothermal development. The geothermal resource is described. The reservoir is characterized on the basis of available information. The probable drilling depth to the reservoir, anticipated water production rates, water quality, and resource temperatures ae indicated. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the near future at Hawthorne are described. The amounts and types of energy currently consumed by end users are estimated. Using this data base, conceptual engineering designs and cost estimates for three alternative district heating systems are presented. In addition, the results of a life cycle cost analysis for these alternatives are discussed. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development, including the financial, environmental, and legal and regulatory aspects are discussed. The various steps that are necessary to accomplish the construction of the geothermal district heating system at Hawthorne are described. A time-line chart shows the tasks, the time estimated to be required for each, and the interrelationships among the activities.

  20. Geothermal studies at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, L.; Grant, B.

    1981-05-01

    New Mexico has geologic characteristics favorble for geothermal energy utilization. Local heat flow and geochemical studies indicate a normal subsurface temperature regime. The alluvial deposits, however, extend to great depths where hot fluids, heated by the normal geothermal gradient, could be encountered. Two potential models for tapping geothermal energy are presented: the basin model and the fault model.

  1. Standard Practice for Installation, Inspection, and Maintenance of Valve-body Pressure-relief Methods for Geothermal and Other High-Temperature Liquid Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers installation, inspection, and maintenance of valve body cavity pressure relief methods for valves used in geothermal and other high-temperature liquid service. The valve type covered by this practice is a design with an isolated body cavity such that when the valve is in either the open or closed position pressure is trapped in the isolated cavity, and there is no provision to relieve the excess pressure internally. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Geothermal Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are the origin and nature of geothermal energy. Included is the history of its development as an energy source, technological considerations affecting its development as an energy source, its environmental effects, economic considerations, and future prospects of development in this field. Basic system diagrams of the operation of a…

  3. Estimate of radon exposure in geothermal spas in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Katarzyna; Olszewski, Jerzy; Zmyślony, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Geothermal waters may contain soluble, radioactive radon gas. Spa facilities that use geothermal water may be a source of an increased radiation dose to people who stay there. It has been necessary to assess the exposure to radon among people: workers and visitors of spa centers that use geothermal waters. In 2013, workers of the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine measured concentrations of radon over the geothermal water surfaces in 9 selected Polish spa centers which use geothermal water for recreational and medicinal purposes. The measurements were performed by active dosimetry using Lucas scintillation cells. According to our research, the doses received by the personnel in Polish geothermal spas are geothermal spas, neither the workers nor the visitors are at risk of receiving doses that exceed the safe limits. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. The effect of pavement-watering on subsurface pavement temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Hendel, Martin; Royon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Pavement-watering is currently viewed as a potential climate change adaptation and urban heat island mitigation technique. The effects of pavement-watering on pavement temperature measured 5 cm deep are presented and discussed. Subsurface temperature measurements could not be used to improve or optimize pavement-watering methods as was seen in previous work on surface temperatures or subsurface pavement heat flux measurements.

  5. Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L. (Energy Associates International, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Caicedo, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1991-08-01

    A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Thermal infrared remote sensing of water temperature in riverine landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Gillespie, Alan R.; Klement, Tockner; Faux, Russell N.; Tan, Jing; Carbonneau, Patrice E.; Piégay, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    Water temperature in riverine landscapes is an important regional indicator of water quality that is influenced by both ground- and surface-water inputs, and indirectly by land use in the surrounding watershed (Brown and Krygier, 1970; Beschta et al., 1987; Chen et al., 1998; Poole and Berman, 2001).Coldwater fishes such as salmon and trout are sensitive to elevated water temperature; therefore, water temperature must meet management guidelines and quality standards, which aim to create a healthy environment for endangered populations (McCullough et al., 2009). For example, in the USA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established water quality standards to identify specific temperature criteria to protect coldwater fishes (Environmental Protection Agency, 2003). Trout and salmon can survive in cool-water refugia even when temperatures at other measurement locations are at or above the recommended maximums (Ebersole et al., 2001; Baird and Krueger, 2003; High et al., 2006). Spatially extensive measurements of water temperature are necessary to locate these refugia, to identify the location of ground- and surface-water inputs to the river channel, and to identify thermal pollution sources. Regional assessment of water temperature in streams and rivers has been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time. Water temperature has typically been measured using a network of widely distributed instream gages, which record the temporal change of the bulk, or kinetic, temperature of the water (Tk) at specific locations. For example, the State of Washington (USA) recorded water quality conditions at 76 stations within the Puget Lowlands eco region, which contains 12,721 km of streams and rivers (Washington Department of Ecology, 1998). Such gages are sparsely distributed, are typically located only in larger streams and rivers, and give limited information about the spatial distribution of water temperature.

  7. Resource assessment for geothermal direct use applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, C.; Hederman, W.F. Jr.; Dolenc, M.R.; Allman, D.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report discusses the topic geothermal resource assessment and its importance to laymen and investors for finding geothermal resources for direct-use applications. These are applications where the heat from lower-temperature geothermal fluids, 120 to 200/sup 0/F, are used directly rather than for generating electricity. The temperatures required for various applications are listed and the various types of geothermal resources are described. Sources of existing resource data are indicated, and the types and suitability of tests to develop more data are described. Potential development problems are indicated and guidance is given on how to decrease technical and financial risk and how to use technical consultants effectively. The objectives of this report are to provide: (1) an introduction low-temperature geothermal resource assessment; (2) experience from a series of recent direct-use projects; and (3) references to additional information.

  8. Geothermal investigations in Idaho, Part 2, An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho - with a section on a reconnaissance audio-magnetotelluric survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, Donald B.; Tippens, C.L.

    1974-01-01

    The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression (possibly a graben) in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. They are transected by a prominent system of northwest-trending faults. For discussion purposes, the aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-metres underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/l) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/l. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/l. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5 to 83.0 degrees C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0 to 83.0 degrees C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35 degrees C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150 degrees C. However, a mixed-water geochemical thermometer indicates that temperatures at depth may exceed 180 degrees C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers. The thermal waters

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide Sequestration and Storage in Geothermal System: New Mitigation Strategy to Reduce H2S from the Atmosphere and Detect its Mineralization with Multiple Sulfur Isotopic Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marieni, C.; Stefansson, A.; Gudbrandsson, S.; Gunnarsson, I.; Aradottir, E. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of the major components in geothermal fluids and is commonly emitted into the atmosphere from geothermal power plants causing potential environmental problems. Among several mitigation methods proposed to reduce the H2S emissions, is H2S sequestration into geothermal systems. Reykjavík Energy is undertaking a pilot project at Hellisheidi geothermal system (SW Iceland) called Sulfix project where H2S is being injected into the geothermal reservoir for permanent sequestration into pyrite. The SulFix project started its operation in June 2014: the soluble geothermal gases are dissolved in geothermal waste water, and injected at 8 bars into the high temperature reservoir (>200˚C) at 750 m below the wellhead. The reactions involving sulfur in the geothermal reservoir may be traced using sulfur fluid chemistry and multiple sulfur isotope systematics (32S, 33S, 34S and 36S), including mixing between the reservoir geothermal fluid and the injection fluid, sulfide mineralization and oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. In this study we investigated the multiple sulfur isotope systematics upon sulfide mineralization under geothermal conditions. High temperature flow through experiments were carried out in basaltic glass at 200-250°C and ~5 mmol/kg H2S to study the fluid-rock interaction. The results indicate that the sulfide mineralization occurs rapidly under geothermal conditions, highlighting the leaching rate of iron from the basaltic glass as the mineralization rate determining factor. Moreover, the formation of sulfide may be traced using the δ34S-Δ33S relationship in the fluids and pyrite formation - for example to determine if non-reactive mixing between the injection fluids and reservoir fluids occurs at Hellisheidi. The experimental results have been further supported by geochemical modeling involving multiple sulfur isotope fractionation between aqueous sulfide species and rocks upon basalt dissolution and secondary pyrite formation.

  10. Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

    1981-01-01

    Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

  11. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  12. Groundwater and geothermal: urban district heating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mounts, R.; Frazier, A.; Wood, E.; Pyles, O.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes how several cities use groundwater and geothermal energy in district heating systems. It begins with groundwater, introducing the basic technology and techniques of development, and describing two case studies of cities with groundwater-based district heating systems. The second half of the report consists of three case studies of cities with district heating systems using higher temperature geothermal resources.

  13. Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    The drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel is reported. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area.

  14. Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-06-01

    Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

  15. Geothermal tomorrow 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Contributors from the Geothermal Technologies Program and the geothermal community highlight the current status and activities of the Program and the development of the global resource of geothermal energy.

  16. Utilization of U. S. geothermal resources. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitzel, J.

    1976-12-01

    This study is concerned with U.S. geothermal resources, their potential for commercial utilization by electric utilities between now and the year 2000, and their impact on the utility industry. USGS estimates of the resources in identified hydrothermal systems were extrapolated to the undiscovered resources marked by hot springs, and further to the blind resources between hot spring areas within the tectonic belts. The resulting estimate of the total hydrothermal resource to a depth of 10,000 ft. is about 100,000 MWe for 30 years with about one-half in undiscovered blind resources, one-fourth in undiscovered hot spring resources, and one-fourth in identified systems. Water rates and direct capital costs for geothermal power plants were evaluated as functions of resource temperature, together with costs and expected flowrates for geothermal wells. Combining these results with the temperature distribution of identified hydrothermal systems, a current supply curve for geothermal energy wa s made. This shows an estimated 20,000 MWe for 30 years potentially producible with current technology from identified resources for direct capital costs of $800/KW or less. The projected supply curve shows an estimated 30,000 to 60,000 MWe for 30 years potentially available at $800/KW or less, in 1976 dollars, taking account of estimated undiscovered resources and probable technical advances.

  17. Assimilation of water temperature and discharge data for ensemble water temperature forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet-Proulx, Sébastien; Chimi Chiadjeu, Olivier; Boucher, Marie-Amélie; St-Hilaire, André

    2017-11-01

    Recent work demonstrated the value of water temperature forecasts to improve water resources allocation and highlighted the importance of quantifying their uncertainty adequately. In this study, we perform a multisite cascading ensemble assimilation of discharge and water temperature on the Nechako River (Canada) using particle filters. Hydrological and thermal initial conditions were provided to a rainfall-runoff model, coupled to a thermal module, using ensemble meteorological forecasts as inputs to produce 5 day ensemble thermal forecasts. Results show good performances of the particle filters with improvements of the accuracy of initial conditions by more than 65% compared to simulations without data assimilation for both the hydrological and the thermal component. All thermal forecasts returned continuous ranked probability scores under 0.8 °C when using a set of 40 initial conditions and meteorological forecasts comprising 20 members. A greater contribution of the initial conditions to the total uncertainty of the system for 1-dayforecasts is observed (mean ensemble spread = 1.1 °C) compared to meteorological forcings (mean ensemble spread = 0.6 °C). The inclusion of meteorological uncertainty is critical to maintain reliable forecasts and proper ensemble spread for lead times of 2 days and more. This work demonstrates the ability of the particle filters to properly update the initial conditions of a coupled hydrological and thermal model and offers insights regarding the contribution of two major sources of uncertainty to the overall uncertainty in thermal forecasts.

  18. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  19. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  20. Evidence for tectonic, lithologic, and thermal controls on fracture system geometries in an andesitic high-temperature geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massiot, Cécile; Nicol, Andrew; McNamara, David D.; Townend, John

    2017-08-01

    Analysis of fracture orientation, spacing, and thickness from acoustic borehole televiewer (BHTV) logs and cores in the andesite-hosted Rotokawa geothermal reservoir (New Zealand) highlights potential controls on the geometry of the fracture system. Cluster analysis of fracture orientations indicates four fracture sets. Probability distributions of fracture spacing and thickness measured on BHTV logs are estimated for each fracture set, using maximum likelihood estimations applied to truncated size distributions to account for sampling bias. Fracture spacing is dominantly lognormal, though two subordinate fracture sets have a power law spacing. This difference in spacing distributions may reflect the influence of the andesitic sequence stratification (lognormal) and tectonic faults (power law). Fracture thicknesses of 9-30 mm observed in BHTV logs, and 1-3 mm in cores, are interpreted to follow a power law. Fractures in thin sections (˜5 μm thick) do not fit this power law distribution, which, together with their orientation, reflect a change of controls on fracture thickness from uniform (such as thermal) controls at thin section scale to anisotropic (tectonic) at core and BHTV scales of observation. However, the ˜5% volumetric percentage of fractures within the rock at all three scales suggests a self-similar behavior in 3-D. Power law thickness distributions potentially associated with power law fluid flow rates, and increased connectivity where fracture sets intersect, may cause the large permeability variations that occur at hundred meter scales in the reservoir. The described fracture geometries can be incorporated into fracture and flow models to explore the roles of fracture connectivity, stress, and mineral precipitation/dissolution on permeability in such andesite-hosted geothermal systems.

  1. Geothermal hydrology of Warner Valley, Oregon: a reconnaissance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammel, E.A.; Craig, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Warner Valley and its southern extension, Coleman Valley, are two of several high-desert valleys in the Basin and Range province of south-central Oregon that contain thermal waters. At least 20 thermal springs, defined as having temperatures of 20/sup 0/C or more, issue from Tertiary basaltic flows and tuffs in and near the valleys. Many shallow wells also produce thermal waters. The highest measured temperature is 127/sup 0/C, reported from a well known as Crump geyser, at a depth of 200 meters. The hottest spring, located near Crump geyser, has a surface temperature of 78/sup 0/C. The occurrence of these thermal waters is closely related to faults and fault intersections in the graben and horst structure of the valleys. Chemical analyses show that the thermal waters are of two types: sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate waters. Chemical indicators show that the geothermal system is a hot-water rather than a vapor-dominated system. Conductive heat flow in areas of the valley unaffected by hydrothermal convection is probably about 75 milliwatts per square meter. The normal thermal gradient in valley-fill dpeosits in these areas may be about 40/sup 0/C per kilometer. Geothermometers and mixing models indicate that temperatures of equilibration are at least 170/sup 0/C for the thermal components of the hotter waters. The size and location of geothermal reservoirs are unknown.

  2. Recent exploration and development of geothermal energy resources in the Escalante desert region, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Robert E.; Ross, Howard P.

    1994-01-01

    Development of geothermal resources in southwest Utah's Sevier thermal area continued in the early 1990s with expansion of existing power-generation facilities. Completion of the Bud L. Bonnett geothermal power plant at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area brought total power generation capacity of the facility to 13.5 MWe (gross). At Cove Fort-Sulphurdate, recent declines in steam pressures within the shallow, vapor-dominated part of the resource prompted field developers to complete additional geothermal supply wells into the deeper, liquid-dominated portion of the resource. At Roosevelt Hot Springs near Milford, Intermountain Geothermal Company completed an additional supply well for Utah Power and Light Company's single-flash, Blundell plant. with the increased geothermal fluid supply from the new well, the Blundell plant now produces about 26 MWe (gross). The authors conducted several geothermal resource studies in undeveloped thermal areas in southwest Utah. Previous studies at Newcastle revealed a well-defined, self-potential minimum coincident with the intersection of major faults and the center of the heatflow anomaly. A detailed self-potential survey at Wood's Ranch, an area in northwest Iron County where thermal water was encountered in shallow wells, revealed a large (5,900 ?? 2,950 feet [1,800 ?? 900 m]) northeast-oriented self-potential anomaly which possibly results from the flow of shallow thermal fluid. Chemical geothermometry applied to Wood's Ranch water samples suggest reservoir temperatures between 230 and 248??F (110 and 120??C). At the Thermo Hot Springs geothermal area near Minersville, detailed self-potential surveys have also revealed an interesting 100 mV negative anomaly possibly related to the upward flow of hydrothermal fluid.

  3. Methods for regional assessment of geothermal resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffler, P.; Cataldi, R.

    1978-01-01

    future. In a manner similar to mineral and fuel assessment, this recoverability is expressed as a "recovery factor". For an ideally permeable hot-water system, the recovery factor may be as much as 50% and seems to be independent of temperature. It must decrease as effective porosity (??e) decreases, but the relation between the two is little more than a guess. On the other hand, for favorable systems like Larderello that produce steam by a mechanism of intergranular vaporization, the recovery factor is probably around 15-20%, decreasing to zero at an effective porosity of zero. According to the anlysis of Bodvarsson (1974), it increases with decreasing reservoir temperature, and as pointed out by Nathenson (1975a) is limited at low temperatures by the need to have sufficient reservoir pressure for extraction and use. The extent to which a geothermal reservoir can be resupplied with heat during "industrial" times of 10-100 yr can be evaluated using simple analytical models. The results, combined with gravity and levelling data of Hunt (1977) for Wairakei and Isherwood (1977) for The Geysers, confirm earlier conclusions by Ramey (1970) and Nathenson (1975a) that resupply to reservoirs producing only steam can be neglected, and the conclusion of Nathenson (1975a) that it may be significant for hot-water systems of high natural discharge. Major subjects that demand continuing investigation include: 1. 1. Determination of recovery factors as functions of temperature and effective porosity, particularly for hot-water systems. 2. 2. Evaluation of fluid recharge and heat resupply by repetitive gravity, levelling and underground temperature surveys in producing geothermal fields. 3. 3. Analysis of the extent to which a recovery factor can be enhanced by stimulation and by use of confined circulation loops. ?? 1979.

  4. Hydrogeological Modelling of Some Geothermal Waters of Ivrindi, Havran and Gönen in the Province Capital of Balikesir, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Nevzat; Ugurlu, Zehra; Memis, Ümit; Aydemir, Eda

    2017-12-01

    Miocene to Pliocene Yürekli formation consists of dacites and rhyodacites. Upper Miocene to Pliocene Soma formation is composed of clayey limestone, marl, siltstone, intercalations of sandstone, agglomerate and andesitic gravels and blocks cemented by tuffs. Quaternary alluvium is the youngest formation. The samples of geothermal waters in the area of Havran can be considered as Na-Ca-(SO4)-HCO3, Na-(SO4)-HCO3 and Na-SO4 type waters. In comparison, the geothermal waters in Gönen are of Na-(SO4)-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 type waters. The geothermal waters of Ivrindi are considered as Na-Ca-HCO3 type waters. In the area, a groundwater sample is of Ca-Mg-HCO3 type water. The geothermal waters belong to the cations of Na+K>Ca>Mg in Havran, Gönen and Ivrindi and to the anions of SO4>HCO3>Cl in Havran, HCO3>SO4>Cl in Gönen and SO4>HCO3>Cl in Ivrindi. In the diagram of Na-K-Mg1/2, the geothermal waters in Havran, Gönen and Ivrindi of the province capital of Balıkesir can be classified as immature waters.

  5. Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.)

    1980-08-01

    Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

  6. Geothermal Cogeneration: Iceland's Nesjavellir Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Energy use in Iceland (population 283,000) is higher per capita than in any other country in the world. Some 53.2% of the energy is geothermal, which supplies electricity as well as heated water to swimming pools, fish farms, snow melting, greenhouses, and space heating. The Nesjavellir Power Plant is a major geothermal facility, supplying both…

  7. UWC geothermal resource exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    A program was developed to explore the strength of the geothermal and hot dry rock (HDR) resource at the Montezuma Hot Springs at the United World College (UWC). The purpose of the UWC {number_sign}1 well is to obtain hydrologic, geologic, and temperature information for ongoing geothermal evaluation of the Montezuma Hot Springs area. If sufficient fluids are encountered, the hole will be cased with a 4 1/2 inch production casing and re-permitted as a geothermal low-temperature well. If no fluid is encountered, the well will be abandoned per Oil Conservation Division regulation. The objectives of the exploration are to evaluate the resource potential to provide space heating for the entire campus of the United World College, determine the effect of a well on the Hot Springs outflow, accurately measure the UWC heating loads versus time, evaluate the potential to support local thermal industry development, assess the feasibility of HDR development, and create an educational program from the collection of data derived from the research effort.

  8. Recommendations for a US geothermal research plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, J.B.; Bloomster, C.H.; Cohn, P.D.; Eliason, J.R.; Peterson, P.L.; Rohrmann, C.A.; Sandness, G.A.; Stewart, D.H.; Wallace, R.W.

    1975-12-01

    A multidisciplinary study team developed a comprehensive research program. Five- and ten-year program plans emphasize critical five-year milestones. Recommended plans are presented here under constraint of three different five-year budgets: $100, $300 and $500 million, respectively. Plans are detailed in six resource subprograms: high temperature water, moderate temperature water, hot dry rock, brine, geopressured, and dry steam. Also presented are plans for five subprograms common to all geothermal resources: exploration, assessment, drilling technology, environmental-social, and institutional. (MHR)

  9. Geothermal absorption refrigeration for food processing industries. Final report, December 13, 1976--November 13, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.L.; Olson, G.K.; Mah, C.S.; Bujalski, J.H.

    1977-11-01

    The first step in the economic analysis of the integration of geothermally powered absorption refrigeration into a food processing plant was an evaluation of the potential geothermal sites in the Western United States. The evaluation covered availability of raw materials, transportation, adequate geothermal source, labor, and other requirements for food processing plants. Several attractive geothermal sites were identified--Raft River, Idaho; Sespe Hot Springs, California; Vale Hot Springs, Oregon; Weisler-Crane Creek, Idaho; Cosco Hot Springs, California; and the Imperial Valley, California. The most economically attractive food processing industry was then matched to the site based on its particular energy, raw material, and transportation requirements. The more promising food processors identified were for frozen potato or vegetable products, freeze-dried products, and meat processing. For the refrigeration temperature range of +32/sup 0/F to -40/sup 0/F and geothermal temperature range of 212/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F, an absorption refrigeration system had to be identified, designed, and evaluated. Both the conventional ammonia/water and an organic absorption refrigeration system using monochlorodifluoromethane (R-22) as the refrigerant and dimethyl formamide (DMF) as the absorbent were studied. In general, only a 60/sup 0/F to 100/sup 0/F temperature drop would be effectively used for refrigeration leaving the remainder of the allowable temperature drop available for other use. The economic evaluation of the geothermal system installed in a food processing plant required the comparison of several principal alternatives. These alternatives were evaluated for three different food processing plants located at their optimum geothermal site: a forzen potato product processing plant located at Raft River, Idaho; a freeze-dried product plant located at Sespe Hot Springs, California; a beef slaughter operation located in the Imperial Valley of California. (JGB)

  10. Optimizing Sustainable Geothermal Heat Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Iti; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Buscheck, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal heat, though renewable, can be depleted over time if the rate of heat extraction exceeds the natural rate of renewal. As such, the sustainability of a geothermal resource is typically viewed as preserving the energy of the reservoir by weighing heat extraction against renewability. But heat that is extracted from a geothermal reservoir is used to provide a service to society and an economic gain to the provider of that service. For heat extraction used for market commodities, sustainability entails balancing the rate at which the reservoir temperature renews with the rate at which heat is extracted and converted into economic profit. We present a model for managing geothermal resources that combines simulations of geothermal reservoir performance with natural resource economics in order to develop optimal heat mining strategies. Similar optimal control approaches have been developed for managing other renewable resources, like fisheries and forests. We used the Non-isothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) model to simulate the performance of a sedimentary geothermal reservoir under a variety of geologic and operational situations. The results of NUFT are integrated into the optimization model to determine the extraction path over time that maximizes the net present profit given the performance of the geothermal resource. Results suggest that the discount rate that is used to calculate the net present value of economic gain is a major determinant of the optimal extraction path, particularly for shallower and cooler reservoirs, where the regeneration of energy due to the natural geothermal heat flux is a smaller percentage of the amount of energy that is extracted from the reservoir.

  11. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Doug [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Leggett, Jim [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  12. Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, James C.

    1989-03-21

    The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.

  13. Deep Geothermal Energy for Lower Saxony (North Germany) – Combined Investigations of Geothermal Reservoir Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Hahne, Barbara; Thomas, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    For the economic success of a geothermal project the hydraulic properties and temperature of the geothermal reservoir are crucial. New methodologies in seismics, geoelectrics and reservoir geology are tested within the frame of the collaborative research programme “Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling” (gebo). Within nine geoscientific projects, tools were developed that help in the evaluation and interpretation of acquired data. Special emphasis is placed on the investigation of r...

  14. Geothermal resources of the northern gulf of Mexico basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P.H.

    1970-01-01

    Published geothermal gradient maps for the northern Gulf of Mexico basin indicate little or no potential for the development of geothermal resources. Results of deep drilling, from 4000 to 7000 meters or more, during the past decade however, define very sharp increases in geothermal gradient which are associated with the occurrence of abnormally high interstitial fluid pressure (geopressure). Bounded by regional growth faults along the landward margin of the Gulf Basin, the geopressured zone extends some 1300 km from the Rio Grande (at the boundary between the United States and Mexico) to the mouth of the Mississippi river. Gulfward, it extends to an unknown distance across the Continental Shelf. Within geopressured deposits, geothermal gradients range upwards to 100 ??C/km, being greatest within and immediately below the depth interval in which the maximum pressure gradient change occurs. The 120 ??C isogeotherm ranges from about 2500 to 5000 m below sea level, and conforms in a general way with depth of occurrence of the top of the geopressured zone. Measured geostatic ratios range upward to 0.97; the maximum observed temperature is 273 ??C, at a depth of 5859 m. Dehydration of montmorillonite, which comprises 60 to 80 percent of clay deposited in the northern Gulf Basin during the Neogene, occurs at depths where temperature exceeds about 80 ??C, and is generally complete at depths where temperature exceeds 120 ??C. This process converts intracrystalline and bound water to free pore water, the volume produced being roughly equivalent to half the volume of montmorillonite so altered. Produced water is fresh, and has low viscosity and density. Sand-bed aquifers of deltaic, longshore, or marine origin form excellent avenues for drainage of geopressured deposits by wells, each of which may yield 10,000 m3 or more of superheated water per day from reservoirs having pressures up to 1000 bars at depths greater than 5000 m. ?? 1971.

  15. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling